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Magis IN THE MAKING

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2013 PRESIDENT’S REPORT


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INSIDE

2013 President’s Report

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Magis ON CAMPUS IN THE LABORATORY• • • • • 4 Physics professor Patrick Garrity receives a grant from NASA for his research related to a new invention that translates heat into energy.

IN THE CLASSROOM• • • • • • • 6 Loyola faculty train to infuse their classroom teaching with Jesuit ideals.

IN COMPETITION• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 8 Loyola public relations students win their eighth national Bateman competition.

ON THE COURT• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 10

The NAIA awards the Wolf Pack its Five-Star Champions of Character distinction for the fifth year in a row. :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Magis IN THE WORLD RECORDING TRADITIONS• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •14 Music industry studies major Dimitri Staszewski travels to Mongolia to document the changing musical traditions of nomadic sheep herders.

DESIRE TO DO MORE• • • •16 Loyola alumna Morgan Paige Martin ’08 builds a dance studio in Kocani, Macedonia with the help of a grant from USAID.

CLIMB FOR OTHERS• • • • • •18 Student Douglas Alexander climbed Mount Kilimanjaro to raise funds for local schools.

CREATING REFUGE• • • • • • •20

Dear colleagues, Loyola University New Orleans defines itself as a Catholic, Jesuit university by adhering to ideals set forth by St. Ignatius of Loyola more than 400 years ago. One of these ideals is the magis, which in Latin literally means “the more.” For St. Ignatius, this applied to decision-making and discernment, in choosing a path that leads to the greater good. We strive to create a culture at Loyola that encourages students to act according to the magis. In this report we highlight achievements from the past year that illustrate what results when our students, faculty, and alumni ask what more they can do and how they can do it better. This dynamic is not only for individuals but applies to institutions, as well. We, as Loyola, strive to always ask ourselves how we can improve. In 2013, Loyola concluded the year-long celebration of its centennial. At present, we continue the work of providing our students a Jesuit education that frees the individual person and allows him or her to examine the world critically. In doing so, we evoke the magis and employ it as a guide as we continuously strive to improve ourselves and the world in which we live. With prayers and best wishes,

Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J., Ph.D. President

A Loyola alumna creates a safe space for women seeking asylum in the United States. ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

AT A GLANCE• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 22 LOOKING BACK• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 24

ON THE COVER Ignacio volunteer Mayleen Cabral-Ramirez with Mayan children in Belize.


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Magis IN THE MAKING

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The students, faculty, and alumni of Loyola University New Orleans enact the magis in their daily lives and in their work, spending time and energy in pursuits that result in the improvement of themselves, their communities, and the world. This report illustrates the magis in action—our community of men and women who act in ways that serve the more universal good and make the widest impact. Each story provides evidence of the value of a Loyola education—our students’ dedication to excellence and the community; our faculty’s innovation in teaching and research; and the fulfilling lives of service our alumni lead, prepared with a Catholic, Jesuit liberal arts education from Loyola.

Ignacio volunteer Brian Reaney (’15) with Mayan children from the village of San Jose in Belize.


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Magis ON CAMPUS

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The pursuit of magis among the Loyola community takes place, in large part, on our New Orleans campuses— in the work of our students, faculty, and ministry in the classrooms, laboratories, athletic fields, and common grounds that collectively serve as an incubator for Jesuit education. Although our work extends far beyond our campus borders, much of the good that comes from Loyola begins on university grounds.

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Our faculty conducts important research that

pushes the boundaries of science and the human imagination.

Patrick Garrity, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics, received in 2013 a $74,523

grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for his research related to a new invention that translates heat into energy. This sustainable energy technology can be put to immediate use powering rocket sensors that use the heat generated by liftoff, and Garrity hopes it can be translated to everyday use, as well, using body heat to power smartphones in one’s pocket, for instance.

“Body heat is a source of electricity, and we all produce heat,” Garrity said. “You could integrate that into clothing to charge personal devices. If you can take a power plant offline, that’s a big deal.” Garrity worked with a team of Loyola undergraduate students to parse the complex physics involved in his invention, which he will test next summer at the John C. Stennis Space Center in southern Mississippi.

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The ideals of Jesuit education implore our faculty to go beyond the standard demands of university classroom instruction to nourish each student’s mind, body, and spirit. •••

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Each faculty member at Loyola assumes a personal responsibility to sustain the Jesuit tradition at Loyola for the benefit of our students. A new fellowship program, Ignatian Faculty Fellows, enhances our faculty’s understanding of Ignatian pedagogy and their capacity to apply it. The first class

of Ignatian Faculty Fellows graduated in 2013. Each of the participating professors is currently teaching a course revised according to the fellowship’s training, which includes study of the early history of the Jesuits, Ignatian spirituality, the characteristics of Jesuit education, and the recent emphasis in Jesuit higher education on social justice. The program is spearheaded by Associate Professor of English John Sebastian, Ph.D., and is based on Sebastian’s own experience in the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities’ Ignatian Colleagues Program. The program, which has been enthusiastically received, will expand each year and increasingly instill in our faculty a higher ability to enact Loyola’s Jesuit mission. 2014 Ignatian Faculty Fellows 7• • •

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Loyola public relations students have won more

national Bateman competitions than any other school in the country, serving our community while training to be communications leaders of tomorrow.

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The mentorship of Cathy Rogers, the Shawn M. Donnelley professor of nonprofit communications, has been instrumental to Loyola’s unsurpassed excellence in national Bateman competitions.

The magis encourages us to always strive to improve. While Loyola public relations students have won more Public Relations Student Society of America’s Bateman Case Study Competitions than any other school in the country, each year’s team works diligently to improve upon their predecessors’ work.

Under the direction of Cathy Rogers, Ph.D.,

In 2013, the Loyola Bateman team won the national title for its “Step Up, Reach Out” anti-bullying campaign. This was the

“We all have experienced bullying,” Loyola student Vannia Zelaya ’13 said. “Being able to work with students and help the bullying situation in the city was the most rewarding part for me and my teammates.”

eighth national title Loyola has won.

the Shawn M. Donnelley professor of nonprofit communications, Loyola students

implemented a campaign with partners in the New Orleans public school system, where they witnessed real results as students altered their perspectives on bullying.

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The emphasis on magis at Loyola has created a culture in which an

elevated standard of performance is the norm.

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For our Wolf Pack Athletics teams, this means striving for excellence not only on the court but in the classroom and in the community, as well. In 2013, the National Association of

perfectly with Loyola University’s mission of educating the whole person,” said Dr. Michael Giorlando, director of Loyola University New Orleans Athletics and Wellness.

Intercollegiate Athletics awarded the Wolf Pack its Five-Star Champions of Character distinction for the fifth year in a row,

Wolf Pack Athletics unveiled a new logo for the 2012-13 season. The wolf as our mascot

recognizing Loyola athletes’ integrity, respect, responsibility, sportsmanship, and servant leadership. “Reinforcing the five core values of character on a daily basis with our student athletes fits

symbolizes Loyola’s Jesuit values—wolves eating from a cauldron appear in the seal of St. Ignatius of Loyola—as well as strength in numbers and pride in teamwork. This bold new look proudly demonstrates our Pack pride and spirit.

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Ignacio volunteers Allison Rogers ’15 and Akeem Biggs ’16 with Mayan children from the village of Santa Cruz for the Belize Christmas Camp

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Magis IN THE WORLD

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The pursuit of a path that leads toward the greater good cannot be confined to any college campus. Loyola’s deep engagement with the city of New Orleans and the global scope of the university experience we offer students allow them to enact magis in real-world settings. ​ This results in meaningful learning experiences and real benefits for the world we live in. At the same time, many Loyola alumni, prepared with an outstanding liberal arts education and commitment to service, go forth to lead lives dedicated to the service of others, guided by Jesuit ideals.

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Just as Loyola encourages students on campus to

go beyond classroom requirements in their pursuit and discovery of new knowledge, our study abroad programs often place students in situations in which they can enact magis.

In 2013, the Institute of International Education ranked Loyola among the top 40 master’s institutions in the nation for undergraduate participation in study abroad programs. Thirty-five percent of our

“I wanted to document and help preserve music performed by herders and former herders because that is the cultural context from which all of the country’s traditional music originated,” Staszewski said.

undergraduates study abroad.

One of these students is Dimitri Staszewski, a music industry studies major who traveled to Mongolia last spring to document the changing musical traditions of nomadic sheep herders. The aspiring filmmaker spent four months traveling between Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar, and the countryside filming and experiencing firsthand the culture he’d previously only read about.

Back at Loyola, Staszewski is currently editing the footage to create an interactive book that will combine ethnographic essays with footage of actual performances and stories about his experiences. He recently applied for a Fulbright Scholarship to return to Mongolia for another 10 months after graduation.

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Morgan Paige Martin ’08 channeled her passion for dance and her desire to

do more by building a dance studio in Macedonia.

Morgan Paige Martin, center, and her students perform in Macedonia.

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Loyola alumna Morgan Paige Martin ’08 arrived in Kocani, Macedonia, in 2012 to teach English for the Peace Corps. There, she channeled her passion for dance and her desire to do more into building a dance studio in the school where she worked with a grant from USAID (U.S. Agency for International Development). Martin’s Macedonian teenage students had never had access to a formal dance class before. Her five-day dance camp was met with great enthusiasm. “It is no exaggeration that half of the city came to the recital, and the reviews of the show were beyond phenomenal,” Martin said. This summer, Martin, who currently teaches high school in Nashville, Tennessee, will return to Kocani to teach the intensive dance camp again. Her students have not missed a beat—in the interim, they have organized weekly Zumba classes and have appeared on local TV for their new hip-hop choreography and performances.

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Ten New Orleans public schools received equipment to conduct physics demonstrations thanks to the generosity and climbing aptitude of Loyola student Douglas Alexander, who turned his dream of climbing Mount

Kilimanjaro into a fundraiser to inspire students.

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Douglas Alexander made his Mount Kilimanjaro climb a fundraiser, asking for donations contingent on his reaching the summit. He raised more than $5,200,

which he used to purchase instruments that make physics come alive for students, such as force tables used to visualize force vectors and resonance tubes that help visualize the concept of sound waves. The physics major said he nearly abandoned the field of study in high school but was encouraged to keep going by a teacher and, soon after, he grasped the concepts. “Struggling with physics is something I can relate to,” Alexander said. “If it’s something we can relate to, we’re even better at helping.” He hopes his gift results in other students becoming passionate about physics.

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Women forced from their countries by war and persecution are thrust into the most vulnerable situations imaginable. Some seek refuge in the United States, but cast adrift in a strange land, they cannot survive alone. 20 • • •

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Women asylum seekers march on International Women’s Day in London. Photo by Aliya Mirza

Asylee Women Enterprise has been a

crucial companion and safe space for such women since Loyola alumna Molly Corbett ’90 founded it in 2011. The Catholicbased center in Baltimore provides housing, services, and community to these women, acting as a support system and way station as they begin new lives in the United States. Corbett’s career in serving others has spanned her entire adult life, and it began at Loyola.

“My four years at Loyola taught me the true meaning of social justice,” she said, “not only in a secular sense but what we are called to do as Catholics for social justice. My Jesuit education opened my ‘personal lens’ to a world far beyond myself or my community—a world in which ‘seeking God in all things’ involves serving our sisters and brothers, bringing us closer to God.”

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Loyola University New Orleans

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AT A GLANCE

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CLASS OF 2017 PROFILE 654 ENROLLED STUDENTS 3.54 AVERAGE GPA 56.3% ABOVE 3.5 83.3% ABOVE 3.0 583 AVERAGE CRITICAL READING SAT SCORE 563 AVERAGE MATH SAT SCORE 25.17 AVERAGE ACT SCORE 61% FEMALE 39% MALE 548 SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS (58.7% OF CLASS) 42.8% ETHNIC MINORITIES 18.0% AFRICAN-AMERICAN 17.6% HISPANIC 3.7% ASIAN 3.5% OTHER OUR STUDENTS COME FROM: 42 STATES/TERRITORIES 15 COUNTRIES 64% OUT OF STATE 27% FROM NEW ORLEANS METRO 9% FROM LOUISIANA (NON-METRO)

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ACCOLADES CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF TEACHING Community Engagement Classification (only 311 academic institutions nationwide have received this classification since 2006)

U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT A Top 10 Regional University of the South – 23 consecutive years Top 25 nationwide – Service Learning Top 10 regional – Great Schools, Great Prices Top 10 nationwide – Online Doctor of Nursing Practice program

PRINCETON REVIEW Best 378 Colleges Top 10 nationwide – Lots of race/class interaction Top 10 nationwide – Best relations with our city Top 20 nationwide – Best quality of life Top 20 nationwide – Best college library College of Business – Best 295 Business Schools College of Law – One of the nation’s most outstanding law schools School of Nursing – One of the best graduate nursing programs in the country

INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION Top 40 nationwide (master’s institutions) – Undergraduate study abroad participation

COLLEGES OF DISTINCTION The only college or university in Louisiana selected in 2013

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Champions of Character Five-Star Institution – Five consecutive years

WASHINGTON MONTHLY No. 15 nationwide (master’s institutions) – Alumni who receive doctoral degrees No. 35 nationwide (master’s institutions) – Alumni who join the Peace Corps


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2012 – 2013 REVENUES AND EXPENSES REVENUES Tuition and fees, net of aid......................... $82,663,511 Gifts, grants, and contracts........................ $4,495,596 Investment income........................................$8,763,000 Auxiliary enterprises......................................$11,614,894 Other sources......................................................$484,429 TOTAL........................................................... $108,021,430

EXPENSES Instructional..................................................$46,600,807 Research................................................................$433,584 Public service.................................................... $1,847,474 Academic support.........................................$14,751,084 Student services............................................. $9,805,859 Institutional support................................... $27,086,898 Auxiliary enterprises..................................... $7,084,302 TOTAL............................................................$107,610,008

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UNIVERSITY CABINET MEMBERS THE REV. KEVIN WM. WILDES, S.J., PH.D. President MARC MANGANARO, PH.D. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs JAY CALAMIA Vice President for Finance and Administration THE REV. TED DZIAK, S.J. Vice President for Mission and Ministry and Director of the Jesuit Center BILL BISHOP Vice President for Institutional Advancement ROBERTA E. KASKEL Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management M.L. “CISSY” PETTY, PH.D. Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost TOMMY SCREEN Assistant to the President/ Governmental Relations GITA BOLT General Counsel

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In 2013, Loyola University marked its

100th year of educating students in the Jesuit tradition.

Loyola does more than nurture students—it also engages the New Orleans community by acting as a center for cultural and intellectual exchange. Loyola celebrated its centennial in part by hosting the Presidential Centennial Guest Series, which featured public lectures and performances by esteemed speakers and musicians for the community. Offering a variety of renowned presenters, events included forums by the Archbishop of New Orleans; presidents of Catholic universities; Grammy-winning musicians such as Wynton Marsalis; and public figures such as political analyst Cokie Roberts, who spoke shortly after returning from Rome, where she covered the election of the new Jesuit pope. 24 • • •

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The centennial series overlapped with Loyola’s annual Montage Series, which each year invites artists and musicians from around the world and from a variety of genres and disciplines—from graphic design to ballet, opera, and theatre—to present to the New Orleans public. Loyola is one of the most important venues for public cultural events in New Orleans, offering more than 100 public events each year, dramatically adding to the city’s rich cultural tapestry.


OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 6363 ST. CHARLES AVENUE NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 70118 WWW.LOYNO.EDU

Loyola University New Orleans 2013 President's Report  

We strive to create a culture at Loyola that encourages students to act according to the magis. In this report we highlight achievements fro...