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LOW E R

P O L K

A L L E Y WAY S

D I S T R I C T

VISION PLAN

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

A comprehensive vision & strategy plan for the Lower Polk Alleyways District


LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


ALLEYWAYS FOR OUR NEIGHBORS THE LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS DISTRICT VISION PLAN (LPA•DVP) GUIDELINES FOR THE FUTURE OF OUR NEIGHBORHOOD

This is a comprehensive vision and strategy plan for the Lower Polk Alleyways District that assembles and organizes the present community’s ideas and aspirations for the future of the Lower Polk Neighborhood. The community’s primary goal is to preserve and improve the Alleyways as a public asset for the neighborhood as well as the City of San Francisco. It is a plan supported by, and soon to be implemented by, the Lower Polk Neighbors, the City of San Francisco, and the developers of future change to the neighborhood over the next 5-10 years.

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Lower Polk Neighbors would like to thank the many individuals and organizations that helped make this plan document possible, including the following;

THE RESIDENTS, BUSINESS OWNERS, AND COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS OF THE LOWER POLK NEIGHBORHOOD CITY AGENCIES:

SF Department of Public Works SF Municipal Transportation Agency SF Planning Department

LOWER POLK NEIGHBORS 2016 BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Andrew Chandler Andrew Dunbar Chris Schulman Mohit Sabharwal

LOWER POLK COMMUNITY BENEFIT DISTRICT: Christian Martin

VISION PLAN CONSULTANT: INTERSTICE Architects

SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING & DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS All of the San Francisco Planning Department and the Department of Public Works began the Polk Streetscape Project in 2012, which included a larger region of improvements along Polk Street from McAllister to Union Streets. This project included work on one of the six alleyways in Lower Polk, Fern Alley. We thank SFDPW for their role as a catalyst for future improvements in the Lower Polk neighborhood as the Fern Alley project has made great strides in helping the neighborhood, as well as the City of San Francisco, to reassess how city alleyways can be envisioned.

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

NOTE:

The reader of this document accepts the following conditions: This document may not be used, duplicated, modified, or changed in any manner without the written consent of the Lower Polk Neighbors. Any unauthorized use, duplication, or modification or change will subject the user and its agents to liability for such acts. The Lower Polk Neighbors and Interstice Architects are acknowledged as the authors, retaining all common law, statutory and other reserved rights, including the copyright. All material presented in this document is not intended for construction. Design drawings are intended to be used as diagrammatic suggestions and/or representation of existing conditions for the alleyways.


C O N T E N T S INTRODUCTION WHY DO WE NEED THE LPA DVP? | GUIDING GOALS USE THIS DOCUMENT TO... IMPLEMENTATION & REVISITATION

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICT CONTEXT WHO WE ARE PROJECTS IN PROGRESS

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CONNECTING TO COMMUNITY DATA MAPPING WHAT WE HEARD: WORKSHOPS 1+2 SYNTHESIS + CONNECTION COMMUNITY DESIGN WORKSHOP 3

WHAT MAKES GREAT ALLEYWAYS PRINCIPLES FOR GREAT ALLEYWAYS TOOLBOX

VAN NESS GATEWAY POLK PLACE LARKIN GATEWAY

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER + IDENTITY

PROJECTS + PHASING PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES OTHER RESOURCES LPN DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES

APPENDIX

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41

DISTRICT UNITY

BEYOND THE LPA•DVP

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35

STRATEGIES

MID-BLOCK CHARACTER AUSTIN + FRANK NORRIS ALLEYWAY FERN ALLEYWAY HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY CEDAR ALLEYWAY ALICE B. TOKLAS + MYRTLE ALLEYWAY OLIVE ALLEYWAY

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49

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WORKSHOP NOTES + COMMENTS LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


“… this has to be a vision that reflects the input and priorities of the Lower Polk residents and merchants ... in the hopes of creating a better place for those of us who live, work and visit here now, and for all those who will walk the streets of Lower Polk far into the future.” -LPN Board

This Vision Plan you are holding, is the result of a year-long process of discussions and meetings with neighbors, merchants, business owners and community stakeholders, workshops and community meetings, comments and suggestions - all distilled into a vision that reflects the input and priorities of the Lower Polk neighbors themselves.

INTRODUCTION

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


INTRODUCTION THE CREATION OF THE LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS DISTRICT:

AN URBAN VISION:

Since the LPN was founded in 2003, the LPN membership and its numerous partners in the community have worked to develop and improve the pedestrian experience of this neighborhood. The Alleyways are recognized as a distinct element of the neighborhood, while at the same time the function and use of the Alleyways by pedestrians has long been a concern and point of focus for the LPN. Given the neighborhood’s location in an area of the city with few parks and public open spaces, these smaller and less vehicle-friendly Alleyways represent an untapped opportunity to fulfill the District’s growing need for higher quality, pedestrian-oriented public space. The LPN considers the Alleyways as a crucial component to creating enjoyable civic places that are dedicated to high-quality pedestrian experience within the neighborhood, as well as contributing to a healthier city. The premise that the Alleyways will no longer be “Back Streets” is a significant change in point of view that is broadly supported both by the LPN and the City. The Alleyways now need to take front stage, and therefore, the focus has shifted towards the creation of a “Lower Polk Alleyways District.”

The Lower Polk Alleyways District Vision Plan represents a set of guidelines and planning goals for improvements to a pedestrian-prioritized area of the city that is defined by the Alleyways in order to create a high-quality, people-focused network within the dense urban grid of the City of San Francisco.

TO DEFINE A NEW DISTRICT: The Lower Polk Neighborhood is a distinct and vibrant part of the

The LPN Board has long identified the priorities related to improved public

space, and in 2015 decided that there was a dramatic need to understand the Alleyways, not as singular back-streets, or isolated funding needs, but instead to consider them as a whole – as a District. Thus, the Alleyways have become integral parts of a broader neighborhood initiative. Each alleyway is a unique part of the greater district and should be individually addressed and integrated to form an interconnected, high-functioning amenity for the neighborhood as a whole. The Lower Polk Alleyways District brings neighbors, individual merchants and business owners together to leverage funding made available through several sources including the development of the California Pacific Medical Center’s (CPMC) Van Ness and Geary Campus within the neighborhood, the newly formed Lower Polk Community Benefit District, and other private developers, to actualize long-awaited street improvements and to enhance pedestrian experience. The Vision Plan concentrates and prioritizes projects alleyway by alleyway, in addition to those that are district-wide, and creates the ground for new initiatives and provides support to initiatives already underway. The Plan encourages new public-private partnerships, and advocates for additional corporate and private funding sources.

unique collection of neighborhoods that characterize San Francisco’s celebrated urban heritage. It is a diverse, richly textured mixed-use neighborhood. Street life is busy and activity extends late into the evenings. Street-life and activity is characterized along Polk Street by neighborhoodowned “heritage merchants,” entertainment, and retail experiences. This activity is coupled with and supported by increasingly dense housing which is growing rapidly in this transit-rich area of the city.

The Lower Polk Alleyways District Vision Plan (LPA•DVP) was

Six Alleyways extend from the Polk Street corridor, west to Van Ness

The LPA-DVP was initiated by the residents and merchants of the District and reflects the principles and values set forth by the LPN community, thereby characterized by a single, overarching factor: it is a community-led project.

Avenue, and east to Larkin Street to form the Lower Polk Alleyways District. Each alleyway is composed of an East and West block that converge at Polk Street. The Alleyways District is framed by Pine Street to the North and Ellis Street to the South. This District has a smaller boundary within those defined by the LPN and CBD official boundaries. The Austin and Frank Norris Alleyway blocks are the northernmost in the District, and the alleyways continue within each block to the south until Olive (East and West), the southernmost Alleyway in the Alleyways District. Considered as a “network,” these individual Alleyways offer opportunities to enhance public open space in the neighborhood and to become exemplary Living Alleyways for the greater city.

commissioned by the Lower Polk Neighbors in the Spring of 2015 to embark on a 12-month process to create a new vision for the 12 blocks of alleyways located within the boundaries of its neighborhood. In the summer of 2015, LPN contracted with INTERSTICE Architects to assist and facilitate the community-driven process which has resulted in this community-initiated set of strategies and guidelines for the future of the LPN Alleyways.

The Lower Polk Neighbors (LPN) is a 501c3 non-profit organization that is committed to a safer, cleaner and more beautiful Lower Polk neighborhood, located in the heart of Downtown San Francisco. The Vision Plan you are holding, is the result of a year-long process of discussions and meetings with neighbors, merchants, business owners and community stakeholders, workshops and community meetings, comments and suggestions - all of which are distilled into a vision that reflects the input and priorities of the Lower Polk Neighbors themselves.

INTRODUCTION LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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WHY DO WE NEED THE LPA•DVP?

GUIDING GOALS

The alleyways are a vibrant, dynamic asset to the Lower Polk Neighborhood. Understanding their role in the future as not just a “back door” for service, but instead as viable pedestrian places requires a plan of action to envision the alleys as a unified network in service of the public realm.

• Enhance the unique character of the neighborhood and strengthen its identity as a unified District. • Foster community pride and stewardship. • Prioritize the pedestrian experience - including safety, beauty, healthfulness, and inclusivity.

A GRASS ROOTS INITIATIVE: The LPN has long envisioned an enhanced pedestrian realm for its neighborhood. The need for a comprehensive plan emerged from the recognized need for better alleys to support the growing neighborhood and offered a way to embrace them as the distinguishing feature in achieving this goal. The Lower Polk community had been working over many years on the alleys individually - as hot spots emerged, or problems became more acute. There was a recognized frustration that in reacting to alley-related issues, they often found themselves working repeatedly on many similar – but often separate and dispersed fronts. The residents and merchants wanted a way to organize and consolidate their energies, ideas resources towards creating better, safer, pedestrian oriented streets. The initiative to undertake the creation of a plan emerged from the recognition that all the alleys had similar interconnected needs, and all offered a greater combined potential when viewed together rather than any single one individually. What was needed was a way to focus energies and resources when, and as, they became available - in a more strategic long term method. Alleys are receiving more attention City wide, as the success of the “living Alleys” initiative in San Francisco is widely embraced by City Planning and its associated public agencies. By creating a vison document, the LPN was able to leverage their celebrated history of artistic endeavors often related to the Alleys to merge this creative enegy with the growing enthusiasm for these smaller scale urban “rooms”. A resulting process provided the chance to align, document and organize the voices, resources and initiatives of the entire community. And this process was recognized as critical to the success of achieving their shared aspirations. A vision plan offered a comprehensive and organized approach to consolidate and record the collective wisdom, experience, and desires of those most closely affected. INTRODUCTION

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

• Increase social interaction through cultural and arts activities. The workshops and design charrettes proposed a forum for collaboration and discussion. The Visioning process and facilitated meetings allowed for the history of the LPN’s many initiatives and goals to be documented, storeys told, and experiences shared as individual stakeholders participated in in building something new. Together the local community merchants, residents and business owners could build defining document which could speak as the many voices of the community through one voice.

WHAT THE ALLEYS SHOULD BE: The Lower Polk Alleyways District is one of the largest contiguous networks of alleyways in San Francisco. The pedestrian scaled alleyways are a place for all to occupy and represent nearly a third of the streetscape in this mostly hardscaped part of the city. As smaller scaled, less traveled connective passages, the Alleyways represent an opportunity for neighborhooddriven change. The Vision Plan leverages opportunities to create improved pedestrian activated public open space, in a district that is under-served by this simple amenity. The DVP identifies diverse ways in which the dynamic expression of the neighborhood’s identity can be realized though physical changes to the Alleys themselves. Ultimately, it is meant to create a new stewardship and attitude toward the Alleyways defining them as distinct places that serve the community for them to share and enjoy. Through exploring the under-utilized potential of the present Alleyways network, this plan guides and focuses future development partnerships and funding opportunities to create newly activated, green open spaces that are woven right through the heart of the core of the Lower Polk Street Neighborhood

• Create a well-integrated and interconnected network of alleyways with unique character and distinctionto reinforce the District. • Promote sustainability by integrating planting and storm-water management practices.

LPA•DVP TIMELINE July-September 2015

Existing Conditions Documentation

October 2015 Workshops 1&2: Mapping Areas of Opportunity and Concern November-December 2015 Preliminary Design Concepts, Initial Document Outline March 2016 Workshop 3: Development of Design Guidelines April 2016

Preliminary Document Draft

May 2016

Public Comment Online Complete

Summer 2016 Document Review by Stakeholders and Community Fall 2016 Document Adoption and Distribution to the City of San Francisco Fall 2017

First Annual Review of Document


USE THIS DOCUMENT TO:

STAKEHOLDERS: • • • • • • •

• Understand the issues, assessment and priorities of the community in relation to change in the Alleyways,

Neighborhood groups Community Benefit District LPN Developers Merchants Non-profits City of San Francisco

• Understand the goals and values of the District, • Inform the development of detailed projects for each of the Alleyways,

• Guide coordinated infrastructure improvements that are planned by City Agencies,

• Form partnerships and seek funding and grants for site specific Alleyway projects,|

• Formulate design competitions for Alleyways, • Guide the work of developers in order to create a more vibrant and cohesive public streetscape in the Alleyways.

IMPLEMENTATION & REVISITATION BEYOND THE LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

This plan provides a framework and ideas for the community to follow over the next 10 years, and as such it should be considered a living document to be revisited and revised as the alleyways continue to evolve.

The Lower Polk Alleyways District Vision Plan is both a documentation of a process and a tool for change. It provides guidance and implementation strategies for a wide-range of alleyway improvement projects which support a variety of users over the next 5-10 years. The projects intentionally range in scale and degree of permanence to allow for the flexibility and resilience of future progress within the District. In order to develop this plan beyond paper, the LPA•DVP should be read and engaged by all members of the community, particularly those invested in the future of the Lower Polk Neighborhood. The document is meant to be flexible enough to respond to varying opportunities for partnership, funding sources, and collaborative models. Collaboration between individual residents, building owners, developers, communitybased institutions, academic institutions, the Lower Polk Neighbors, the Lower Polk Community Benefit District, and City Officials and Agencies is critical to the future success of these alleyways as a distinct district within the City of San Francisco.

THE LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS DISTRICT

This plan provides a framework of ideas and strategies for the community to follow over the next 5-10 years. As such, it should be considered a living document to be revisited and revised as the alleyways continue to evolve. The schedule of implementation is not fixed and the document itself is to be reconsidered by the LPN on an annual basis in order to evaluate the progress on projects and the priorities set in this document. INTRODUCTION LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


OUR NEIGHBORHOOD

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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DISTRICT CONTEXT AN ALLEYWAYS DISTRICT FOR SAN FRANCISCO The Lower Polk Neighborhood is uniquely positioned as a convergance point between diverse neighborhoods and four Supervisional Districts in San Francisco.

THREE CORRIDORS DEFINE THE DISTRICT The Lower Polk Alleyways District is situated within the larger Polk Street Neighborhood within Van Ness/Civic Center, and is found within an overlap of the Lower Polk Neighborhood and the Lower Polk Community Benefit District (CBD), and is bounded by Van Ness to the west, Larkin to the east, Pine Street to the north and Ellis Street to the south. The District is located adjacent to the neighborhoods of Nob Hill (to the northeast), the Tenderloin (to the south and east), and Downtown to the east, and is just north of San Francisco’s Civic Center. As a result of these adjacencies and the rather fluid boundaries, the Lower Polk Neighborhood is uniquely positioned as a convergence point between diverse neighborhoods, as well as the intersection of four supervisorial districts in San Francisco. Lower Polk is a dynamic, 24-hour neighborhood with a rich and diverse identity and history that should be maintained and reinforced into the future developments of the neighborhood.

Van Ness Avenue is a major vehicular and public transit corridor for

the city of San Francisco and a section of U.S. Route 101, the longest U.S. route in California (established in 1926). As a result of its rapid and constant vehicular traffic, Van Ness forms a significant barrier to east-west pedestrian movement, safety and well-being. Activity along Van Ness tends to prioritize serving visitors and those traveling by vehicle. However, the many bus stops along Van Ness deliver and pick up large numbers of pedestrians moving to and from the Lower Polk Neighborhood. California Pacific Medical Center began construction of their Van Ness and Geary campus in 2015, which will tend to increase both pedestrian and vehicular traffic along Van Ness. The Campus will bring new visitors to the neighborhood and particularly pedestrians into the Lower Polk Neighborhood. The Campus’s presence will reinforce the importance of this neighborhood to the greater city.

Polk Street is the lively “cultural corridor” for the neighborhood. Polk Street forms a central North-South oriented spine that ties the Alleyways together within the District and connects this neighborhood to Civic Center and the Middle and Upper Polk neighborhoods. It is a major commercial corridor and a relatively flat route that serves as a well-traveled bike corridor for cyclists in the city. Polk Street is a vital path where San Francisco neighborhoods connect with both downtown and those neighborhoods west of Van Ness.

Larkin Street is the “local’s corridor” and forms the eastern terminus of

the Alleyways, whereas the Alleyways do not continue on the east side of Larkin. The Larkin corridor, from a vehicular perspective, is a rapid one-way street that would benefit from traffic calming measures. From a pedestrian perspective, it is used primarily by residents of the neighborhood and connects Nob Hill to Little Saigon and the Tenderloin. Its past and present is defined by primarily residential use with smaller scale commercial and retail establishments located at intersections on both the major streets and Alleyways of Lower Polk.

Access to Public Open Space: The District and the Lower Polk

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

DRAFT 7/15/2016

Neighborhood has conspicuously few significant public open spaces. This situation is further exacerbated by the access barriers such as the vehicular arterial of 101, the surrounding topography, and the physical distance to the open spaces in the surrounding neighborhoods, such as Civic Center Plaza, Jefferson Park, Lafayette Park, and Union Square. Macauley Park is the single small neighborhood park located with the Lower Polk Neighborhood and within the LPA District. It is primarily a play area with plantings at its perimeter and is well-used and well-maintained. The Lower Polk Alleyways District Plan aims to supplement city-provided open space and provide the Alleyways as a viable alternative to more typical park spaces, in the form of a pedestrian-oriented open space network.


PINE ST

NOB HILL

JEFFERSON SQUARE PARK

OLIVE

CEDAR

MYRTLE

OLIVE

LARKIN

ALICE B. TOKLAS

FERN

THE TENDERLOIN

CIVIC CENTER

HEMLOCK

POST ST CEDAR GEARY ST

ET

MYRTLE

OFARRELL ST

RE

T TS

3 6

CEDAR

A.B. TOKLAS

KE

AR

M

CIVIC CENTER PLAZA

5

HEMLOCK

LARKIN ST

UNION SQUARE

SUTTER ST POLK ST

HEMLOCK

POLK STREET

CEDAR

2

FERN

VAN NESS AVE

FERN

FERN FRANK NORRIS

LOCAL’S CORRIDOR

AUSTIN

HEMLOCK

GEARY BLVD

FRANK NORRIS BUSH ST

CULTURAL CORRIDOR

VAN NESS VEHICULAR CORRIDOR:

BARRIER

AUSTIN

OLIVE

OLIVE ELLIS ST

LEGEND

LEGEND

ALLEYS IN ALLEYWAY DISTRICT INITIATIVE PLAN ALLEYS CURRENTLY UNDER REVIEW BY PROJECT SPONSORS

PUBLIC PLAZA GREEN SPACE/PARK

EXISTING PARKLETS EXISTING NEIGHBORHOOD PARK

JEFFERSON SQUARE

CITY CONTEXT

THE LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS DISTRICT: AT THE CONVERGING POINT OF FOUR SUPERVISOR DISTRICTS

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARGARET S. HAYWARD PLAYGROUND

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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WHO WE ARE:

THE LOWER POLK COMMUNITY

The Lower Polk Neighborhood is a distinct and vibrant part of the

unique collection of neighborhoods that characterize San Francisco’s celebrated urban heritage. It is a diverse, richly textured mixed-use neighborhood. Street life is busy and activity extends late into the evenings. Street-life and activity is characterized along Polk Street by neighborhood-owned “heritage merchants,” entertainment, and retail experiences. This activity is coupled with and supported by increasingly dense housing which is growing rapidly in this transit-rich area of the city.

The Lower Polk Alleyways District is home to a diverse, multigenerational community. The neighborhood was along the route

of the first Pride Parade in San Francisco and continues to have strong LGBTQ and transgender community presence in the neighborhood today. Residents range from millennials, new to the neighborhood to families and seniors who have been a part of the community for decades. The neighborhood is ethnically diverse, with amenities and institutions that support a broad range of cultures, such as the prominent Asian and Muslim communities. These distinct backgrounds and cultures are expressed in the many murals and Art-supported events and galleries that characterize the Lower Polk streets. The Lower Polk Community has traditionally maintained a strong voice through visual expression and the Arts. The variety of overlapping and intersecting communities seem endless – and many have institutions, outreach centers, and cultural buildings throughout the six alleyway district which include several mosgues, temples and churches among others. Community centers serving a variety of ethnic communities and age groups are distributed broadly throughout the area, from senior housing to youth programs. The LGBTQ community has maintained a historically strong presence in the area and bars , entertainment venues and artist communities cater to every possible constituency and diverse expression of the greater city of San Francisco whose residents and guests can easily find themselves at home in the Lower Polk ‘mosaic’ of cultures and communities. The Polk Street Oral Histories Project* has been one of example of the many voices that make up this multi-generational neighborhood of merchants, residents, business owners and community professionals.

“All too often [people] think of the street hustlers and runaways who flocked to the street, and about the blight that hit after the AIDS and drug epidemics of the 1980s. They know less about how a new generation of gay businesses thrived in the 1970s, how bar-based activism led to the Tavern Guild, how the face of Polk Street philanthropy became the Imperial Court, where bar owners, patrons and divas raised money to fight AIDS and homelessness.” - Katherine Seligman, SF Gate http://www.sfgate.com/entertainment/article/Oral-histories-tell-Polk-Street-s-story-3220904.php

“People who didn’t have much connection to their biological families, they came to the Tenderloin, then they came here.” -Joey Plaster, Polk Oral Histories* http://www.sfgate.com/entertainment/article/Oral-histories-tell-Polk-Street-s-story-3220904.php

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

DRAFT 7/15/2016

“In the days before you could get a cup of organic coffee, a reflexology massage and cuisine from half a dozen cultures in just a few blocks, Polk Street was home to a collection of souls that considered themselves a family.”

- Katherine Seligman, SF Gate


PROJECTS IN PROGRESS (As of July 2016)

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

POLK STREETSCAPE PROJECT

POLK STREETSCAPE PROJECT DPW // SFMTA // SF PLANNING The Polk Streetscape Project began in 2012 and was guided by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency as well as the Department of Public Works and the Planning Department. The projected was initiated to make infrastructure and street-level improvements along the Polk Street commercial corridor from McAllister to Union Streets.

FERN ALLEY INITIATIVE

FERN ALLEY INITIATIVE DPW // SFMTA The Fern Alley initiative was developed as a part of the greater Polk Streetscape Project. This initiative focused on the unique design of the alley and sparked interest in re-envisioning the alleyways of Lower Polk. CPMC VAN NESS + GEARY CAMPUS CPMC

CPMC VAN NESS + GEARY CAMPUS

The CPMC Van Ness and Geary Campus Development (to open between 2018-2019) includes a dramatic streetscape redesign along Cedar Alley as a result of the Medical office building located on Cedar with a frontage on Geary.

AUSTIN ALLEY INITIATIVE

AUSTIN ALLEY INITIATIVE PACIFIC EAGLE // LPN Streetscape design of Austin Alley brought forth by Trumark Urban and Pacific Eagle’s plans for a new mixed use development with frontages on the alley.

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS DISTRICT PLAN

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN LPN (Lower Polk Neighbhors) Each of these initiatives helped to incentivize the community of Lower Polk to develop a plan for the alleyways of Lower Polk.

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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CONNECTING TO COMMUNITY OUR PROCESS The Lower Polk Alleyways District Vision Plan is founded on the principle that the Plan is community-led. In order to gain continued insight into the needs and desires of the community, a significant outreach was undertaken to invite all community members to participate in the design process at every phase of the development of this document. Following the initial kickoff meeting led by the LPN, the Alleyways were studied by the Consultant Team, detailed physical information was gathered, and an extensive set of existing conditions maps were developed. These maps and drawings were used throughout the process for diagramming of comments, priorities, and future ideas for change. The existing conditions maps, including plans, elevations and sections of each Alleyway, included the physical layout and features of each Alleyway as well as existing land uses and activities. These documents served as critical tools during the first two highly interactive Community Workshops. Significant efforts to reach out to all members of the Lower Polk Neighborhood community were made to alert residents and business owners alike to the two workshops, including email distribution and the circulation of over 8,500 flyers and postcards. The initial workshops, Workshops 1 and Workshop 2, focused on understanding the concerns, needs, desires and aspirations that the Lower Polk Neighbors had for their neighborhood. The synthesis of the information gathered from these workshops became the fundamental basis for the development of design guidelines and strategies for the LPA District. A third Community Workshop focused on Design was held to present the comments and suggestions from the first two workshops, and to provide neighbors and merchants a forum for ideas, physical design proposals, and defining the character and identity of each Alleyway, as well as the means by which the District would be unified visually and experientially. Data gathered from all three Workshops, along with ongoing information gathered by the LPN, the Consultant, and the CBD, was compiled and developed into the design guidelines that comprise the LPA•DVP. The document was reviewed by the LPN members and Board and was published in the fall of 2016.

Beyond the initial publication of the LPA•DVP, the document is

intended to be a manual that is referenced in an on-going manner by the LPN and CBD. The document will be accessible to all community members, merchants, business owners, and developers to use as a reference for the future development of their Alleyways over the next 10 years. The following pages provide greater detail as to how the community engagement process progressed, as well as displaying each of the maps with comments complied from Workshops 1 and 2. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

Documenting the physical existing conditions of the Lower Polk Alleyways

LPN KICKOFF MEETING

Announcement of the alleyways initial vision plan process

DATA MAPPING

Understanding the needs of the community related to their alleys, aspirations and frustrations

OUTREACH

LPN Branding and design & distribution of flyers and blog posts for Workshops 1 & 2

“We wanted to empower the people to define and draw the things they wanted to see happen...” -Chris Schulman, LPN

COMMUNITY WORKSHOP 1


Recording & mapping comments on specific locations in the alleyways, proposing changes and eliciting potential solutions.

COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS 2

SYNTHESIS + CONNECTION

Further understanding the needs of the community related to their alleys, aspirations and frustrations

Community Design workshop to develop strategies and priority areas for the Vision Plan

COMMUNITY WORKSHOP 3

OUTREACH

Design & distribution of flyers and blog posts for Workshop 3

The document is a set of guidelines and prioritization of all projects that is meant to evolve with the Lower Polk Community over the next 10 years

Production of a ten-year Vision Plan Document for the Lower Polk Alleyways District

DESIGN GUIDELINES

DOCUMENTATION

Diagramming and documenting design strategies for each individual alley as well as the district as a whole

A LIVING DOCUMENT

REVIEW

Review of the document with the Lower Polk Neighbors and City officials

The LPA•DPV is a neighborhood-led, resident-empowering, socially conscious document for the future of our alleyways.

-LPN Guiding Principles COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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“…the first step to understanding the alleys was to observe them, to walk them and to be in them - always with an eye towards relating them together to a larger whole […] to record them, to measure them, to draw them and to document what was already there and how they were being inhabited day to day…” -Andrew Dunbar, LPN board member

AUSTIN ALLEYWAY AT POLK ST LOOKING WEST

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

FRANK NORRIS ALLEYWAY AT POLK ST LOOKING EAST

FERN ALLEYWAY AT POLK ST LOOKING WEST

FERN ALLEYWAY AT POLK ST LOOKING EAST

HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY AT POLK ST LOOKING WEST

HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY AT POLK ST LOOKING EAST


DATA MAPPING DOCUMENTING THE EXISTING ALLEYWAYS LEGEND ENTRY/EXIT F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/ EXIT

5+ STORIES

6+ STORIES

5+ STORIES

+/- 4 STORIES

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

• Physical measuring of alley widths, sidewalks, garages, entries, and points of access to dimension and draw plans

THE MONARCH HOTEL

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH)

120

THE MONARCH HOTEL

THE OPAL

POLK ST.

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

G

• Photographing to generate elevations of each block

115

13 0

13 5

12 5

APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

How we studied each alleyway:

THE OPAL

+/- 3 STORIES

ALICE B TOKLAS

G

F

• Observation of activity and use patterns

G

AMC THEATERS

0

8

16

32

• Recording of businesses with alleyway frontages or locations at

64

crtical intersections

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

CURRENT LAND USE

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

• Locating existing planting, street trees, lighting and other postive pedestrian elements

PARK

ALICE B. TOKLAS TYPICAL ALLEYWAY SECTION VAN NESS TO POLK - LOOKING WEST

AMC THEATERS

RESIDENTIAL

+/- 4 STORIES

COMMERCIAL PUBLIC DRIVE/ASPHALT

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

VAN NESS TO POLK - LOOKING WEST

AT POLK LOOKING WEST TO VAN NESS

+/- 3 STORIES 7+ STORIES

VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION

MYRTLE

ALICE B. TOKLAS (VAN NESS TO POLK) Lower Polk Alleys

October 7, 2015

MYRTLE

POLK TO LARKIN - LOOKING EAST

POLK TO LARKIN - LOOKING EAST

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY PLAN

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY SECTION AT POLK LOOKING EAST TO LARKIN

EXISTING PHOTOGRAPHS

OLIVE

VAN NESS TO POLK - LOOKING WEST

VAN NESS TO POLK - LOOKING WEST

OLIVE

TIONS TYPICAL SECTIONS Lower Polk Alleys

r 7, 2015

OLIVE

POLK TO LARKIN - LOOKING EAST

0 SCALE 1/4” = 1’-0”

POLK TO LARKIN - LOOKING EAST

2

4

8

0

16

2

4

8

16

SCALE 1/4” = 1’-0”

October 7, 2015

CEDAR ALLEYWAY AT VAN NESS LOOKING SOUTH TO DEMOLITION FOR FUTURE CPMC OFFICES

CEDAR ALLEYWAY AT LARKIN LOOKING SOUTH AT JANE

ALICE B. TOKLAS ALLEYWAY AT POLK LOOKING WEST TO VAN NESS

MYRTLE AT LARKIN LOOKING SOUTH AT MACAULAY PARK

OLIVE ALLEYWAY AT POLK LOOKING WEST TO VAN NESS

OLIVE ALLEYWAY AT POLK LOOKING EAST TO LARKIN

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

15


COMMUNITY OUTREACH COMMUNITY OUTREACH WAS AN ONGOING PROCESS THROUGHOUT THE FORMATION OF THIS VISION PLAN. The highest priority of the development of this District Vision Plan was to form a document that was driven by individuals of the Lower Polk Community.

“Over 8,500 post cards were distributed to residents and merchants both by hand and by mail. ”

Efforts included, E-mails and blog posts as well as postcards, flyers, door hangers, and cards that were distributed throughout the neighborhood. These outreach efforts encouraged Lower Polk Residents to be involved in the LPN as well as in the opportunity to design the future of the Alleyways District. After each of the workshops, residents were encouraged to post additional thoughts on forums for input on the LPN website.

-Christian Martin, Lower Polk CBD

found your new years resolution? LPN

A C T I V A T E Y O

U

R

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

JOIN L O W E R

P O L K

N E I G H B O R S

w w w. l owe r p o l k . o r g

got polk? LPN

The outreach efforts were about getting people to be excited about the future of their streets and instilling in them the feeling of empowerment through involvement; this was critical to the process. The outreach effort was a comprehensive graphic campaign from bar coasters to posters which were broadly distributed to ensure a widely inclusive process.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

16

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

LOWER POLK NEIGHBORS

JOIN

Y O

U

R

C

O

M

M

U

N

I

T

Y

WHAT CAN A NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZATION DO FOR YOU? n

Connect to what’s going on

n

Meet people who want to be involved

n

Find & support community events

n

Make your voice part of a larger whole

n

Meet your neighbors

n

Chance to engage public process

n

Learn more about your city

n

Empowerment to change public policy

n

Satisfaction of acting locally

n

Be a part of changing the future while respecting the past

n

Stewardship of your environment

n

Be a part of positive change through personal activism

LOWER POLK N E I G H B O R S

w w w. l o w e r p o l k . o r g @lowerpolk facebook.com/lowerpolkneighbors

DOOR HANGER

LPN AWARENESS CARDS

LPN BLOGPOSTS

LPN

ACTIVATE


WHAT WE HEARD: COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS 1 & 2 WHEN:

Wednesday, October 7th & Saturday October 10th, 2015

WORKSHOP GOALS: • • • •

Gather general information about alley use and activities Understand community and individual alley character Locate areas of opportunity and concern within the alleyways Open discussion about long-term goals desired improvements and the needs of local residents

TOOLS:

N

NEIGHBORS,

E

I

G

H

B

O

R

JOIN US

JOIN US

TO DESIGN YOUR ALLEY

OUR ALLEYS!

S,

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN FIND US ONLINe: lowerpolk.org | TWITTER: @lowerpolk

TO DESIGN YOUR ALLEY

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS

D E S I G N WORKSHOP

LOWER POLK NEIGHBORS

W H E N : WED. mar. 23rd, 6 PM WHERE: 1300 POLK ST

lowerpolk.org |

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

@lowerpolk

WORKSHOP 2 POSTCARD + FLYERS

Initial presentation and comments.

DESIGN WORKSHOP WHEN: WHERE:

FEB. 24th, 6 PM 1300 POLK ST

JOIN U S for inpu t

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

L O W E R

low e r p o l k A L L E Y WAYS VISION PLAN COMMUNITY WO R KS H O P

P O L K

NEIGHBORS www.lowerpolk.org @ l o w e r p o l k

W H E N : WED Oct 7th, SAT OCT 10TH, where:

7PM-8:30 pm 11AM-12:30 pm

first congregational church of san francisco

1300 POLK STREET steiner hall (downstairs)

WORKSHOP 1 FLYER

Existing conditions drawings used for comments.

• • • •

Slide presentation and precedent images Existing conditions plans, sections, and elevations of each alleyway Post-It Notes, Comment sheets Photographic elevation of alley street views

OUTCOMES: • Located areas along each of the alleyways to prioritize for design • Understanding of the general identity and role of each of the alleyways in the neighborhood • Recording the aspirations and frustrations of residents, business owners, merchants, and stakeholders • Gain understanding of history and culture of the neighborhood • Identifying “hot spots,” problem areas • Identifying patterns of use & behaviors common to each alleyway • Identifying organizations and buisnesses with entrances or acitivies on the alleyways • Develop broad neighborhood concerns and goals into guidelines for unifying the district

Alley focus stations. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

17


“WHAT WE HEARD” COMMENT EXAMPLES In the course of the workshops and the ongoing comment periods, over one hundred comments and suggestions were received some of which are displayed here as examples.

DISTRICT COMMENTS CONCERNS: The streets are filled with trash and waste.

The lighting in the alleys is often blinding and inconsiderate of aesthetics of the space.

INDIVIDUAL ALLEY COMMENTS OPPORTUNITIES: The streets could be made safer for the pedestrian with paving textures and patterns at crossings.

Lighting in the alley should be increased for safety but should add character and vibrancy to the alley.

We are excited for new development coming to Austin and to connect to events with Miami AD School.

AUSTIN Maye’s and the Regency Ballroom bring nighttime activity. This is the “visitors” side of the alley.

FERN WEST We appreciate the new street tree plantings on our alley. Many dog walkers pass through.

Graffiti is a problem on surfaces in the alleyways

We love the existing murals and want to preserve them.

HEMLOCK WEST We hope the new CPMC campus will be a positive addition to our community.

If we provide seating in the alleyways, it will welcome unwanted activity.

Increasing movable seating near storefronts encourages community interaction.

CEDAR WEST We would love to have a “front door” at the Marque and more differentiation along the AMC facade.

The alleys need more trees and greening.

Macaulay Park is a place for community events and is an asset to the neighborhood.

ALICE B. TOKLAS The Academy of Art car Museum is an opportunity to connect our alley to student-run art.

OLIVE WEST

FRANK NORRIS Accessibility and safety for school children and seniors are a priority for our alley.

FERN EAST Fern East is the “locals” block of the alley and is active near Quetzal Cafe.

HEMLOCK EAST The community youth center backs on our alley and can bring energy and excitment to the alleyway.

CEDAR EAST We love the neighbor-driven murals, green wall, and plantings on our alleyway.

MYRTLE We are excited for RS94109, cafe and record store to open across from our community’s only park, Macaulay.

OLIVE EAST Our alley has many community services and cultural ties to Little Saigon.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

18

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


SYNTHESIS & CONNECTION Overlaying community input and data collection to map the existing conditions of the Lower Polk Alleyways. The following maps are a compilation and synthesis representing the “existing conditions” of the Alleyways as of the date of issuance of this document. They are a result of two important recording and workshop phases that preceded the documentation of this vision plan:

A) Groundwork and Data Mapping, and B) Community Workshop Comments. These maps reflect the conditions, sentiments, issues and identified opportunities that the neighborhood residents, business owners and City agencies have recognized at this time and in this place for each alleyway. The consultant team has made every effort to portray both the positive and negative aspects of each of the Alleyways as well as creating a representation that helps to describe the physical challenges and prospects that may be capitalized upon as changes to the neighborhood are proposed.

“Each alley must be studied individually, and developed as a unique ‘character’ acting within the larger district... Balancing unity and uniqueness.” -LPN Board Member

A. Groundwork and Data Mapping includes the following existing items: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

clear delineation of dominant ground floor land use, location of entry/exits to buildings, vehicular garage entries and curb cuts, institutional and open space uses, building elevations, showing vertical height and features such as murals and windows, 6. vegetation such as trees and in-ground planters, 7. parking spaces and meters, 8. street lights and other public lighting, 9. paving and cross-walk markings, 10. building setbacks and open lots, 11. commercial business names (when known),

B. Community Workshop Comments: The maps also integrate place

specific comments made by observation and input from neighbors – both residents and business owners – that reflect both the problems (indicated with red circles and notations) and the opportunities, or positive attributes, of the Alleyways (indicated in green with notations). These maps bring together and ground-truth various information sources anbd observations about the current attributes of the physical neighborhood, all combined with the many insights and suggestions of the Lower Polk neighborhood assembled by way of the community workshops. These maps now form a comprehensive resource and important backbone to the document for future projects. They are organized on the following pages by Alleyway from North to South, in East and West side pairs, with elevations displayed above and below.

DATA MAPPING ORDER: Working North to South, each alley is studied individually. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

19


F

G

M

ART + MURALS

LEGEND

MUSIC HALLS + EVENTS DINING + BARS

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES

AUSTIN THE VITAMIN SHOPPE

+/- 3 STORIES

+/- 5 STORIES

ENTRY/EXIT

PACIFIC EAGLE DEVELOPMENT

≈4 STORIES

FRONT DOOR GARAGE

CHAI-YO

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/ EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

LEGEND

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH)

175

AREAS OF CONCERN CONCERN COMMENTS

OPPORTUNITY: PACIFIC EAGLE DEVELOPMENT

OPPORTUNITY COMMENTS

THE VITAMIN SHOPPE

G

EXISTING LAND USE

G

G

G

THE POUR HOUSE

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

0

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

15

17

0

EXISTING STREET LIGHT

ART + MUSIC EVENT SPACE

5

MIAMI AD SCHOOL

15

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

0

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT

CHAI-YO

G

16

M

G

AUSTIN

5

GARAGE ENTRY

16

G

G

POLK ST.

FRONT DOOR

G

POLK ST.

F

G

VAN NESS ST.

ENTRY/EXIT

PARK RESIDENTIAL MIAMI AD SCHOOL

VACANT / UNDER CURRENT LAND USE CONSTRUCTION

0

8

16

COMMERCIAL PARK/ RETAIL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & RESIDENTIAL REPAIR (PDR)

SCHOOLS

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

+/- 5 STORIES

THE POUR HOUSE

PRODUCTION,

≈5 STORIES

INSTITUTIONAL

GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIALSCHOOLS USE

GROUND FLOOR DRIVE/ASPHALT COMMERCIAL USE COMMUNITY

20

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

MIAMI AD SCHOOL ≈7 STORIES

DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR DRIVE/ASPHALT

GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE ENGAGEMENT GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

64

THE POUR HOUSE

VACANT / UNDER

INSTITUTIONAL CONSTRUCTION

32

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

AUSTIN (VAN NESS TO POLK) - SYNTHESIS th

≈3 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES


FRANK NORRIS

M

GARAGE

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/ EXIT

PARKING

G

FRONT DOOR

DINING + BARS

F

HOMELESS / LOITERING

ENTRY/EXIT

H20 CAFE

SENIOR FACILITIES + HOUSING

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES

≈5 STORIES +/- 3 STORIES

P

LEGEND SCHOOL YARDS + PLAYGROUNDS

REDDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH)

APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

DOG POOP AREA

STUDENTS CROSSING

G

REDDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YARD

REDDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

POLK ST.

LARKIN ST.

G

G

PLAN TO BUMP OUT SIDEWALK IN ACTION

0

SHATTERED GLASS DAILY

16

H20 CAFE

SMOKERS/ URINE

FRANK NORRIS F

G

VAGRANTS LIVING

G

P

WALGREENS

CHAIN LINK FENCE

URINE + TRASH ACCUMULATION

5

15

0

SENIOR HOUSING/ LOOKSIE OPTOMETRY

G

15

REMOVE TREES SIDEWALK IS TOO NARROW

G

REDDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YARD (ROOF) /

PROSTITUTES EVERY 1-2 WEEKS SO MUCH URINE

0 DPW PROPOSED RAISED CYCLE TRACK

8

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YARD (ROOF) / PARKING

SENIOR HOUSING/ LOOKSIE OPTOMETRY

WALGREENS

CURRENT LAND USE PARK

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

RESIDENTIAL SENIOR HOUSING/ LOOKSIE OPTOMETRY

≈13 STORIES

VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

≈7 STORIES

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR +/- 3 STORIES

INSTITUTIONAL

WALGREENS

SCHOOLS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YARD (ROOF) / PARKING

DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL USE

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

FRANK NORRIS (POLK TO LARKIN) - SYNTHESIS Lower Polk Alleyways

February 24th, 2016

P

ENGAGEMENT

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

21


FERN LEGEND - WEST F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT

ART + MURALS

MUSIC HALLS + EVENTS DINING + BARS

HOTEL

ENTRY/EXIT

ROUTE 101 ≈5 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES

+/- 5 STORIES

MAYE’S OYSTER HOUSE

DRIVEWAY/ CURB CUT APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH)

LEGEND PEOPLE + PARTY

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY AREAS OF CONCERN CONCERN COMMENTS

ST. CLAIRE + ROUTE 101

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

ENTRY/EXIT GARAGE ENTRY

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT

VAULT

EVENTS + MUSIC

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

BLANK WALL

G

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

G

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

THE REGENCY BALLROOM BUS LANE 165

EXISTING STREET LIGHT

14

0

155

EXISTING LAND USE

LUSH LOUNGE 145

G

MURAL

150

FRONT DOOR

160

F

POLK ST.

OPPORTUNITY COMMENTS

MAYE’S OYSTER HOUSE

PARK

THE REGENCY BALLROOM

CURRENT RESIDENTIAL LAND USE

0

8

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

LUSH LOUNGE

VACANT / UNDER PARK CONSTRUCTION RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL / RETAIL VACANT / UNDER PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH) CONSTRUCTION REPAIR (PDR) COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

INSTITUTIONAL SCHOOLS

≈4 STORIES

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR INSTITUTIONAL

DRIVE/ASPHALT

SCHOOLS

GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIALDRIVE/ASPHALT USE GROUND FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND COMMERCIAL USEFLOOR

COMMERCIAL USE

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

22

THE REGENCY BALLROOM

+/- 5 STORIES

FERN WEST (VAN NESS TO POLK) - SYNTHESIS

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

Lower Polk Alleyways

February 24th, 2016

+/- 3 STORIES


ON LOK

ENTRY/EXIT

≈ 4 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES

MUSIC HALLS + EVENTS DINING + BARS SENIOR FACILITIES + HOUSING

≈ 4 STORIES

LEGEND

HOTEL

≈ 4 STORIES

FERN - EAST

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT

BICYCLES

QUETZAL CAFE

DRIVEWAY/ CURB CUT APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH)

BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE 145

PARKLET

LOCAL SITE OF STREET

CYCLISTS ON SIDEWALK: SIGNAGE OPPORTUNITY

ART IN THE ALLEY

QUETZAL CAFE

MUSIC CITY

PLAY ‘N PLAY IN BASEMENT

G

G

ALLIANCE FRANCAISE

G

ON LOK

G

G

G

G INTERNATIONAL BEAUTY COLLEGE

140

0

DPW PROPOSED RAISED CYCLE TRACK

8

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

THE HARCOURT HOTEL

INTERNATIONAL BEAUTY COLLEGE

CURRENT LAND USE PARK RESIDENTIAL

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

THE HARCOURT HOTEL

≈ 4 STORIES

≈ 5 STORIES

≈ 4 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES

INTERNATIONAL BEAUTY COLLEGE

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR INSTITUTIONAL SCHOOLS DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

FERN EAST (POLK TO LARKIN) - SYNTHESIS

Lower Polk Alleyways

February 24th, 2016

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

23


HEMLOCK - WEST F

G

M

CVS/PHaRMaCY +/- 3 STORIES

+/- 5 STORIES

EnTRY/EXIT

ART + MURALS

DINNING + BARS

FITNESS CENTER

RELIGIOUS FACILITY

LEGEnD FROnT DOOR

MaSJID aLTaWHEED MOSQUE

GaRaGE

HEMLOCK TaVERn

MaInTEnanCE EnTRY/ EXIT DRIVEWaY/CURB CUT aPPROX. BUILDInG PROFILE BUILDInG PROFILE EXCEEDS PaGE

LEGEND

ELEVaTIOn (FaCInG nORTH)

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY AREAS OF CONCERN CONCERN COMMENTS OPPORTUNITY COMMENTS

G

GARAGE ENTRY

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT EXISTING STREET LIGHT

G G

G

HEMLOCK TaVERn

GG

HEMLOCK 5

15

G

24 HOUR FITnESS

G

BLUR

0

15

EXISTING LAND USE

5

14

PARK

0 14 CIRCUIT CITY / 24 HOUR FITnESS

RESIDENTIAL

5

12

0

13

5

13

0

8

16

32

64

SCaLE 1/16” = 1’-0”

CURREnT VACANT / UNDER LanD USE CONSTRUCTION

BLUR

PaRK

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL RESIDEnTIaL

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & VaCanT / UnDER REPAIR (PDR) COnSTRUCTIOn

INSTITUTIONAL

COMMERCIaL / RETaIL

SCHOOLS

REFLECTED ELEVaTIOn (FaCInG SOUTH) +/- 5 STORIES

CIRCUIT CITY / 24 HOUR FITnESS

PRODUCTIOn, DISTRIBUTIOn & REPaIR

≈ 5 STORIES

≈ 5 STORIES

DRIVE/ASPHALT InSTITUTIOnaL BLUR

GROUND FLOOR SCHOOLS RESIDENTIAL USE DRIVE/aSPHaLT

GROUND FLOOR GROUnD FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE RESIDEnTIaL USE GROUnD FLOOR

COMMERCIaL USE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

24

TRUE ELEVaTIOn (FaCInG SOUTH)

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

HEMLOCK WEST (Van nESS TO POLK) - SYnTHESIS Lower Polk Alleyways

October 7th, 2015

≈ 3 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES

POLK ST.

FRONT DOOR

NOTABLE MURAL

POLK ST.

F

VAN NESS ST.

ENTRY/EXIT

MaSJID aLTaWHEED MOSQUE

STREET TREES + PAVING

CVS/PHaRMaCY


HEMLOCK - EAST LEGEnD FROnT DOOR

G

GaRaGE

M

MaInTEnanCE EnTRY/ EXIT DRIVEWaY/CURB CUT

PARKING

F

ART + MURALS

DINNING + BARS

PaRKInG

SCHOOL YARDS + PLAYGROUNDS

WInG LUM CaFE

+/- 3 STORIES

EnTRY/EXIT

GOLDEn GaTE JEEP

HaLSTED n. GRaY-CaREW & EnGLISH

P

aPPROX. BUILDInG PROFILE BUILDInG PROFILE EXCEEDS PaGE

ELEVaTIOn (FaCInG nORTH)

VISUAL INVITATION OPPORTUNITY FOR TEMP. BLOCKAGE TO STOP THROUGH TRAFFIC

LIGHTING IMPROVEMENTS WILL MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE

130 HaLSTED n. GRaY-CaREW & EnGLISH GaRaGE

G

G

HOMELESS/ ”CAMPERS”

G

GOLDEn GaTE JEEP

G

OPPORTUNITY FOR VISUAL INVITATION

POLK ST.

LARKIN ST.

G

MR. HOLMES PASTRY SHOP

HOMELESS/ ”CAMPERS”

P

WInG LUM CaFE

UTILIZE SOCIAL MEDIA & ENGAGE BUSINESSES

HEMLOCK

G LE SaLOn

COMMUnITY YOUTH CEnTER

125

HOMELESS/ ”CAMPERS” SEX & DRUG CRIMES

0

DPW PROPOSED RAISED CYCLE TRACK

COMMUnITY YOUTH CEnTER

LE SaLOn

MaY’S LaUnDROMaT

8

16

32

64

SCaLE 1/16” = 1’-0”

MaY’S LaUnDROMaT

CURREnT LanD USE PaRK RESIDEnTIaL

REFLECTED ELEVaTIOn (FaCInG SOUTH)

VaCanT / UnDER COnSTRUCTIOn COMMERCIaL / RETaIL MaY’S LaUnDROMaT LE SaLOn

+/- 3 STORIES

PRODUCTIOn, DISTRIBUTIOn & REPaIR InSTITUTIOnaL

COMMUnITY YOUTH CEnTER

SCHOOLS DRIVE/aSPHaLT GROUnD FLOOR RESIDEnTIaL USE GROUnD FLOOR COMMERCIaL USE COMMUNITY

TRUE ELEVaTIOn (FaCInG SOUTH)

HEMLOCK EaST (POLK TO LaRKIn) - SYnTHESIS Lower Polk Alleyways

October 7th, 2015

P

ENGAGEMENT

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

25


CEDAR - WEST LEGEnD

oCEAn AQUARIUM

+/- 5 SToRIES

EnTRY/EXIT

SHELTER

RELIGIOUS FACILITY

+/- 3 SToRIES

F

FRonT DooR

G

GARAGE

M

MAInTEnAnCE EnTRY/ EXIT

RIGPA SAn FRAnCISCo CEnTER

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT APPRoX. BUILDInG PRoFILE BUILDInG PRoFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

LEGEND

ELEVATIon (FACInG noRTH)

0

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY 15

AREAS OF CONCERN

NEW CEDAR STREETSCAPE TREE ADDITIONS

CONCERN COMMENTS

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

EXISTING LAND USE

G

G

G

CEDAR

FUTURE CPMC oFFICE BUILDInGS (CURREnTLY UnDER ConSTRUCTIon)

HOSPITAL DROP OFF

EXISTING STREET LIGHT

G

NEW CEDAR STREETSCAPE

NEW CEDAR STREETSCAPE HOSPITAL GARAGE

G nEXT DooR SHELTER

125

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT

G

130

M

G

RIGPA SAn FRAnCISCo CEnTER

135

GARAGE ENTRY

140

G

5

FRONT DOOR

14

F

G

oCEAn AQUARIUM

POLK ST.

ENTRY/EXIT

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

OPPORTUNITY COMMENTS

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

“RESTING” /LOITERING

PARK RESIDENTIAL

FUTURE HoSPITAL BUILDInGS

CURREnT LAnD USE VACANT / UNDER

0

8

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

EPISCoPAL CoMMUnITY SERVICES SHELTER

CONSTRUCTION PARK

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL RESIDEnTIAL

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & VACAnT / UnDER REPAIR (PDR) ConSTRUCTIon INSTITUTIONAL CoMMERCIAL / RETAIL SCHOOLS

REFLECTED ELEVATIon (FACInG SoUTH) +/- 5 SToRIES

+/- 3 SToRIES EPISCoPAL CoMMUnITY SERVICES SHELTER

PRoDUCTIon, DISTRIBUTIon & REPAIR

InSTITUTIonAL DRIVE/ASPHALT SCHooLS GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE

DRIVE/ASPHALT

GROUND FLOOR GRoUnD FLooR RESIDEnTIAL COMMERCIAL USE USE

GRoUnD FLooR CoMMERCIAL USE

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

26

TRUE ELEVATIon (FACInG SoUTH)

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

CEDAR WEST (VAn nESS To PoLK) - SYnTHESIS Lower Polk Alleyways

October 7th, 2015

FUTURE HoSPITAL BUILDInGS


CEDAR - EAST

CHInESE GRACE CHURCH

F

FRonT DooR

G

GARAGE

M

MAInTEnAnCE EnTRY/ EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

ART + MURALS

+/- 3 SToRIES

RELIGIOUS FACILITY DINNING + BARS

≈ 5 STORIES

SIGNIFICANT PLANTING

EnTRY/EXIT

PARKING

P

LEGEnD

KEYS & ID’S SMoKE SHoP

APPRoX. BUILDInG PRoFILE BUILDInG PRoFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

ELEVATIon (FACInG noRTH)

RESILIENT & DURABLE IMPROVEMENTS

MOTORCYCLES AND FIRE TRUCKS DOWN STREET

KEYS & ID’S SMoKE SHoP

FIRE STATIon

SF CYCLE

GRAFFITI MAGNET

FUKUDA AUTo SHoP

CHInESE GRACE CHURCH

G

G

POLK ST.

CEDAR

LARKIN ST.

G

PAINT GRAFFITI RESISTANCE TESTING

MURALS BY OWNERS RESPECT

PROFESSIONAL MURAL

G

DPW PROPOSED RAISED CYCLE TRACK

PLANTING BY SHELDON

P

G

G

G

G

G

PROFESSIONAL MURAL

JAnE

110

0

8

“GREEN” WALL PLANTINGS

POSITIVE CAFE BUSINESS

115

12

0

SURFACE PARKInG

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

JAnE

CURREnT LAnD USE PARK RESIDEnTIAL

REFLECTED ELEVATIon (FACInG SoUTH)

VACAnT / UnDER ConSTRUCTIon CoMMERCIAL / RETAIL

+/- 3 SToRIES

≈ 6 STORIES

JAnE

PRoDUCTIon, DISTRIBUTIon & REPAIR

≈ 6 STORIES

InSTITUTIonAL PARKInG

SCHooLS DRIVE/ASPHALT

TRUE ELEVATIon (FACInG SoUTH)

GRoUnD FLooR RESIDEnTIAL USE GRoUnD FLooR COMMUNITY CoMMERCIAL USE

TRUE ELEVATIon - FACInG SoUTH

CEDAR EAST (PoLK To LARKIn) -SYnTHESIS

Lower Polk Alleyways

October 7th, 2015

P

ENGAGEMENT

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

27


ALICE LEGEND B. TOKLAS

≈ 5 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/ EXIT

≈ 6 STORIES

≈ 5 STORIES

+/- 4 STORIES

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

LEGEND

THE MONARCH HOTEL

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH)

12 5

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

THE OPAL

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

POLK ST.

ENTRY/EXIT

G

G

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

THE MONARCH HOTEL

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

OPPORTUNITY COMMENTS

115

CONCERN COMMENTS

13 0

13 5

AREAS OF CONCERN

120

HOTEL

MOVIE THEATER

ENTRY/EXIT

THE OPAL

ALICE B TOKLAS

G

F AMC THEATERS

EXISTING STREET LIGHT

G HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

RESIDENTIAL FRONT DOOR

EXISTING LAND USE PARK

0

8

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

CURRENT LAND USE RESIDENTIAL VACANT / UNDER PARK CONSTRUCTION RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL / RETAIL VACANT / UNDER PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION CONSTRUCTION

REPAIR (PDR)

&

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH) AMC THEATERS

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

INSTITUTIONAL SCHOOLS

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR

+/- 4 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES ≈ 7 STORIES

INSTITUTIONAL

DRIVE/ASPHALT

SCHOOLS

GROUND FLOOR DRIVE/ASPHALT RESIDENTIAL USE

GROUND FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND COMMERCIAL USE FLOOR

COMMERCIAL USE

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

28

ALICE B. TOKLAS (VAN NESS TO POLK) - SYNTHESIS

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

Lower Polk Alleyways

February 24th, 2016


LEGEND

≈ 11 STORIES

≈ 7 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES

SCHOOL YARDS + PLAYGROUNDS

≈ 6 STORIES

DINNING + BARS

ENTRY/EXIT ≈ 6 STORIES

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/ EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

SIGNIFICANT PLANTING

CALIFORNIA PRODUCE

MYRTLE MUSIC HALLS + EVENTS

FLEETWOOD

APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH)

RECORD STORE/ CAFE

11 0

A LOT OF TRASH AND PEOPLE CLUSTERED HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

CALIFORNIA PRODUCE

G

RS94109

POLK ST.

LARKIN ST.

G

G

5

10

MYRTLE M DISCOUNT BEAUTY SUPPLY

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

G

G

PUBLIC RESTROOM

SERGEANT JOHN MACAULAY PARK

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

0

DPW PROPOSED RAISED CYCLE TRACK

8

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

DISCOUNT BEAUTY SUPPLY

SERGEANT JOHN MACAULAY PARK

CURRENT LAND USE PARK RESIDENTIAL

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

DISCOUNT BEAUTY SUPPLY

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR INSTITUTIONAL

+/- 3 STORIES SERGEANT JOHN MACAULAY PARK

SCHOOLS DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

MYRTLE (POLK TO LARKIN) - SYNTHEIS Lower Polk Alleyways

February 24th, 2016

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

29


OLIVE - WEST F

G

M

ENTRY/EXIT

ART + MURALS

HOTEL

SUNLIGHT

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES

LEGEND

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY +/- 4 STORIES

+/- 3 STORIES

FRONT DOOR GARAGE MAINTENANCE ENTRY/ EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

LEGEND

WOODY & SONS’ DETAIL SHOP

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH) 5

12

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY REACH OUT TO LOCAL ARTIST 0 - DATA 12 DRIVEN/ LOCAL ART

CONCERN COMMENTS OPPORTUNITY COMMENTS FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

VACANT LOT

5 11

5

10

WOODY & SONS’ DETAIL SHOP

G

G

POLK ST.

F

ACADEMY PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY -STUDENTS

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

ENTRY/EXIT

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY

FOOD TRUCK OPPORTUNITY (EX: THE “BOX”)

11 0

AREAS OF CONCERN

OLIVE

SPRINT

EXISTING STREET LIGHT

G

G

G

ALEXIS PARK 100

EXISTING LAND USE PARK 0

RESIDENTIAL

CURRENT LAND USE

SPRINT

VACANT / UNDER PARK CONSTRUCTION

8

16

32

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

ALEXIS PARK

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL RESIDENTIAL

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & VACANT / UNDER REPAIR (PDR) CONSTRUCTION

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

INSTITUTIONAL COMMERCIAL / RETAIL SCHOOLS

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR

+/- 3 STORIES

+/- 4 STORIES SPRINT

INSTITUTIONAL DRIVE/ASPHALT SCHOOLS GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE DRIVE/ASPHALT

GROUND FLOOR GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL USE USE

GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

30

ALEXIS PARK

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

OLIVE (VAN NESS TO POLK)

Lower Polk Alleyways

February 24th, 2016


OLIVE - EAST

PACIFIC DENTAL SERVICES

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/ EXIT

BICYCLES

SUNLIGHT

RELIGIOUS FACILITY

ENTRY/EXIT F

HOTEL

6+ STORIES

O’FARRELL THEATRE

+/- 3 STORIES

ART + MURALS

LEGEND

DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT APPROX. BUILDING PROFILE BUILDING PROFILE EXCEEDS PAGE

ELEVATION (FACING NORTH) “POP-UP” GALLERY SPACE - SHORT TERM RENTAL

O’FARRELL THEATRE

LIGHTS TO ACTIVATE MURALS AT NIGHT

FOOD DISTRIBUTION: 530 AM, FRIDAYS MURAL

SOUTHEAST ASIAN COMMUNITY CENTER

OPPORTUNITY: ARTIST DESIGN COLLECTIVE

5

10

G

G

POLK ST.

LARKIN ST.

G

MURAL

PACIFIC DENTAL SERVICES

HOMELESS/ “CAMPERS”

OLIVE G

G

MURAL

G

EXCELLENT DRY CLEANERS

CITY HOPE COMMUNITY CENTER CIVIC CENTER INN

100 DPW PROPOSED RAISED CYCLE TRACK

0

8

16

32

95

64

SCALE 1/16” = 1’-0”

CITY HOPE COMMUNITY CENTER

CIVIC CENTER INN

CURRENT LAND USE EXCELLENT DRY CLEANERS

PARK RESIDENTIAL VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION

REFLECTED ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR

EXCELLENT DRY CLEANERS

CITY HOPE COMMUNITY CENTER

CIVIC CENTER INN

INSTITUTIONAL SCHOOLS DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

TRUE ELEVATION (FACING SOUTH)

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

OLIVE (POLK TO LARKIN) Lower Polk Alleyways

February 24th, 2016

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

31


COMMUNITY DESIGN WORKSHOP 3 WHEN:

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

WORKSHOP GOALS: • • • •

• • • • •

Review comments from workshops 1 & 2 Review synthesis maps for each alleyway Provide a “toolbox” of design elements to community members. Neighbors select and manipulate materials, lighting and amenity elements that are best suited to enhance character and identity of their individual alleyway Neighbors take an active role in designing their alleyways Individuals engage in group discussion about design issues Neighbors use “coloring book” perspectives to draw and illustrate their design ideas and guidelines for their alleyway Neighbors write comments, suggestions and design ideas directly on synthesis maps Graphic recording of design suggestions through narrative facilitation

TOOLS:

• Slide introduction & summary of “What We Heard” from Workshops 1 & 2 • Sythesis Drawings: Existing conditions plans with “mapped” comments of areas of opportunity and concern from Workshops 1 & 2. • Alleyway Design Toolbox Diagram • “Coloring Book” Perspectives • Post-It Notes & Oversized Post-It Pads • Markers

OUTCOMES:

Design guidelines are developed from Design Workshop comments and drawings that reflect and enhance the character and identity of each alleyway. • • • • • • • •

Recorded discussions and video interviews Illustrated alleyway views Annotated synthesis maps with design feedback and comments Facilitation note boards recording breakout group feedback on individual alleyways Alleyway character assignments and potential prevailing themes and uses most compatible with each alleyway Input on entrance and gateways Ideas and suggestions on ways to promote mid-block activities that lend identity to each alleyway Ideas on connecting the alleyways as “network”

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

32

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

WORKSHOP 3


“I’ve never been to anything like that before – it was so unusual […] we were asked to draw on these posters like coloring books … our own alleys - … create views of what we would like to see happening in them...” -Neighborhood Resident

ENVISIONING ALLEYWAYS: WORKSHOP-PRODUCED

“COLORING BOOK” SKETCHES

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

33


34

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


STRATEGIES

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

35


WHAT MAKES GREAT ALLEYWAYS? Great alleyways ARE defined by their success within the communities they serve. A reference for determining keys to this success may be found in the City of San Francisco’s Living Alleys Toolkit.

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS: Accessibility “Living alleys aim to increase pedestrian comfort and safety by giving more space to people and less to cars.” This is an important principle that can be applied globally to the entire network. Street Crossings “To help create a network of living alleys that is safe, visible, and convenient to use, connectivity across what might be challenging crossings is key.” This area of focus is addressed particular at the mid-block crossings. These are identified as nodes in the alleyways network. Hydraulics “Green infrastructure, such as permeable paving and rain gardens, etc., are elegant solutions to stormwater management.” Sustainable design through smart green infrastructure will help vegetate the alleyways themselves while participating in an improved city-wide storm management system. Road Composition and Underground Utilities “Location of underground utility systems may determine design.” It is important that this be researched and incorporated into a systematic design approach that is coordinated with maintenance and larger city infrastructure objectives. Emergency Vehicle Access “Since emergency vehicle access has a high impact on feasibility of alley improvements, projects should be reviewed early by the fire department for any issues that could impact the design.” Ensure that alleyway clearances and dimensions are confirmed with city agencies to standards and safety requirements.

STRATEGIES

36

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

GREAT ALLEYWAYS IN LOWER POLK Great alleyways in the Lower Pollk Alleyways district must reflect two key principles, district unity and individual alleyway character & identity. District Unity guidelines promote the use of the alleyways as an interconnected network of pedestrian corridors. This is focused on engaging the community on a larger block-to-block scale to ensure distribution of uses and activities across a four to six block area of walkable day-to-day use. Alley character and individuality guidelines focus on understanding and enhancing the unique nature and role of each alleyway in the district.

GREAT ALLEYWAYS = DISTRICT UNITY + ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

• • • •

District Unity Guidelines Van Ness Gateways Polk Places Larkin Gateways

• • • •

Mid-Block A: PAVING PATTERN Mid-Block B: CHICANE Mid-Block C: TABLE-TOP Individual Alleyway Guidelines

Over the next two chapters the Vision Plan will define a collection of places (listed above) that form the building blocks of Great Alleyways. These places will become the focal points of future projects.


PRINCIPLES FOR GREAT ALLEYWAYS “The alleyways should be an exemplary pedestrian district in San Francisco.”

1. Alleyways should be attractive,

interesting.

2. Alleyways should be durable,

clean.

safe, walkable and

maintainable, and easy to keep

3. The highest possible quality of materials should be used in the design and construction of the alleyways. 4. Alleyways should invite a range of uses and be inclusive in their appeal to residents, business people, tourists, and those generally passing through the neighborhood. 5.

Pedestrian circulation through the Alleyways should be encouraged and prioritized over other types of

circulation. Bicycles and automobiles are secondary uses that are accommodated and well-integrated. 6. Alleyways should have features that

signify and encourage pedestrian and neighborhood use.

7. Alleyway sidewalks should be comfortable to walk on, wider than minimum width when possible, providing places for people to pause. 8. Alleyways should include uses that reflect the culture of the neighborhood – for example, food, history, art and commerce that is distinct to the Lower Polk District.

9. Future real estate development that shares frontage with the Alleyways should work to provide

entries, activity and commercial storefronts facing the Alleyways.

10. Alleyways should integrate sustainable features in their creation – including planting, storm-water management, and materials efficiency. 11.

Programming for events plays a critical role in the future success of the Alleyways; and should be developed alongside physical improvements.

12.

Temporary closures, removal of parking and other traffic changes should be considered when they significantly improve the pedestrian quality of the Alleyways.

13. Alleyways should preserve

existing trees and include new tree plantings as appropriate as a contributor to the City’s urban forest.

14. Future design and development should encourage

mid-block

activation through design elements and programmed activities that draw pedestrians into the alleyways.

15. Alleyways should be diverse and differentiated in pattern, texture, formal configuration and program as well as provide a wide range of buisinesses, entires, and direct activity that connect

the

private space of adjacent structures to public space of the alleyways.

STRATEGIES LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

37


PEDESTRIAN SAFETY

TOOLBOX:

WAYFINDING

Elements for Great Alleyways

TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING

LIGHT DIRECTIONAL / LINEAR

SIGNAGE POOLS

MUR WALL MOUNTED

TABLE TOP CROSSWALK

PAVING PATTERNS

BANNERS

FESTOON LIGHT

STRIPING BOLLARD

BOLLARD

CHICANE

PEDESTRIAN SCALE

TRAFFIC & TRAFFIC CALMING:

LIGHTING:

• • •

Table-topped crosswalks slow traffic and unify the pedestrian path of travel along the major North-South roads of Van Ness, Polk, and Larkin. Table-top crosswalks at Polk Street should be consistent in design, color and patterning. Bollards are often necessary where table-topped crosswalks occur and form a barrier between cars and pedestrians. Bollards can be decorative or lighted. Paving patterns distinguish alleyways. Patterns can be formed by means of stamped asphalt, colored concrete, concrete scoring, and unit pavers (listed from least to most cost-effective). Cobbled or Textured paving will enhance traffic calming. Striping design & color can highlight pedestrian crosswalks in a unique manner. Chicanes are curb extensions (planters or sidewalk widening) that alternate to slow traffic.

STRATEGIES

38

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

• •

MEDALLIONS

BOLLARD

PA

STREET LIGHT

SIGNAGE:

Lighting is prioritized along the south “night” side of the alleys where parking can create unsafe conditions. • A variety of scales and types of lighting should be used that are appropriate to the condition, needs, and character of each alley. Bollard lights are useful in direct illumination of a walkway or path, while serving as a barrier between pedestrians and vehicles during the day. • Wall Mounted lights are used for illuminating artwork, murals and frontages and should be coordinated with building owners. Festoon Lights are the lights currently above 3 alley intersections along Polk Street. These are delicate and atmospheric.

Descriptive Character Banners placed at the Larkin Gateway connect the alleyways as part of a greater district, but also communicate the inherent character of the alley. Alley Character Medallions centered along the crosswalk at every intersection also serve to identify the Lower Polk Alleyways District, as well as to express the unique identity of each alley.


AESTHETIC + COMFORT

GNAGE

ART + collaborations

MURALS

ECOLOGY

FURNISHING

LIGHTING LEANING RAILS

PLANTING

PLANTING BEDS + STORMWATER

ARCHITECTURAL FACADE TREATMENTS

MEDALLIONS

GREEN WALLS

STREET TREES

TEMPORARY SEATING

PAVING CAFE TABLES

TEMPORARY INSTALLATIONS /PROJECTIONS FOOD TRUCKS/ MARKET STALLS

SITABLE STRUCTURES

PLANTERS & BASKETS

T

ART: • • • • •

Murals should be promoted where possible. Existing murals should be maintained. Temporary installations/Projections should reflect the culture of Lower Polk and are to be curated by local artists. Food Trucks / Market Stalls are temporary elements that can utilize parking spaces during special events. Lighting on the alleyways should not only be functional, but consider the potential to install lighting as a collaboration between the neighborhood and local artists. Architectural Facade Treatments are a more intensive alternative to murals. An architecturally driven facade can change alley frontage perception from being a “back door” to a “front door.”

SCREENS & CANOPIES

PAVING

FURNISHING:

PLANTING:

• •

Temporary Seating Seating that is placed in the alleyways for events and special outdoor activities. Cafe Tables bring life to the alley during the day and can be stored and maintained by shop owners. Sitable Structures can be made from a variety of materials and can be multi-functional serving as art, bollards or architectural elements. This should be designed to prohibit long-term loitering. Leaning Rails are structures that are thin enough to prevent permanent resting, but provide a surface

• • •

March 23rd, 2016

Street Trees should be planted on the northern (south-facing) side of the alley. Planters should have a decomposed granite fill or decorative drainage grate. Planting Beds & Stormwater : Where possible, planting beds should be used for infiltration of stormwater runoff from the sidewalk and adjacent buildings. Paving can be permeable and planted, but is difficult for street cleaning. Screens & Canopies are architectural elements that can shield unsightly areas, increase shade, and can add vertical green to areas that are too small for intensive tree planting. Planters & Baskets serve as decorative features. Planters can be raised to form a structural element as well as a traffic barrier along the sidewalk. They can be permanent or semipermanent. Baskets hang above the sidewalk and should be filled with native, drought-tolerant or seasonal plantings. They can act as signage signaling the entry to an alleyway. Green Walls plant covered walls that require coordination with building owners. Some green walls require limited structure maintenance, while others may require heavy maintenance and architectural design.

STRATEGIES

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

39


40

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


DISTRICT UNITY GUIDELINES

DESIGN STRATEGY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

41


“…its like the idea of ‘campus’… The district needs to have a coherence of certain physical aspects that begin to express the idea of a larger place, that here you are in a special part of the city, that it is our neighborhood and we are proud of it…” - Neighborhood Business Owner

DISTRICT UNITY

42

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


UNIFYING CORRIDORS STITCHING TOGETHER THE DISTRICT

POST

LOCAL’S CORRIDOR

PEDESTRIAN

LINGER

VAN NESS AVENUE THE VISITOR’S CORRIDOR Van Ness is a major transportation corridor for the city. Several bus lines run along Van Ness and as a result, it connects Lower Polk to more distant area’s of the city and has the opportunity to bring visitors to the neighborhood. Van Ness has the capacity to serve as a pedestrian route, although Polk Street has a more active and pleasant pedestrian experience. The alleyways have the opportunity to welcome and entice pedestrians to connect from Van Ness to Polk Street and to continue their journey along the more pedestrian-friendly Polk Street corridor. POLK STREET THE CULTURAL CORRIDOR

PAUSE

LARKIN

SUTTER

POLK

VAN NESS

VISITOR’S CORRIDOR

STROLL

CULTURAL CORRIDOR

The Lower Polk Alleyways run West to East and form intersections at three North-South corridors in the Lower Polk Alleyways District. Each of the three corridors serve a unique purpose in connecting the pedestrian experience within the district itself and to the larger city fabric.

Polk Street is the primary commercial and cultural corridor for the neighborhood. It is a pedestrian corridor that elicits a strong sense of neighborhood identity. Polk Street unites the neighborhood with visitors who come for dining and shopping, as well as commuters who utilize the street’s protected bike lanes. At each alleyway, the

GEARY

LARKIN STREET THE LOCAL’S CORRIDOR PASSAGE OFARRELL

MEANDER

ELLIS

The Larkin Street corridor is utilized by those within the Lower Polk Neighborhood and the adjacent Tenderloin Neighborhood. Along it are many businisess, amenities, and institutions that serve the immediate community, such as Redding Elementary School and Sergeant Macaulay Park. The street is also home to many cultural places and local hang outs such as Gangway and Little Saigon. It is a one-way vehicular thoroughfare connecting the central city to destinations North, but it is relatively pedestrian friendly compared to the vehicular scale of its counterpart, Van Ness Avenue.

PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION CORRIDORS

UNIFYING CORRIDORS DISTRICT UNITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

43


DISTRICT NODES

UNITY THROUGH GATEWAYS + PLACES

GREAT ALLEYWAYS = DISTRICT UNITY + ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY GATEWAYS + PLACES The three corridors of Van Ness Avenue, Polk Street, and Larkin form critical intersections with each of the alleyways. The intersections become opportunities for design guidelines that focus on welcoming pedestrians into the neighborhood or providing places of pause along their journey.

VAN NESS GATEWAYS VISITOR’S ENTRY POINTS

At the intersections between Van Ness and each of the alleyways, the street slopes down toward Polk Street. A pedestrian crossing the intersections at Van Ness has a clear view down to Polk Street. The Van Ness Gateway should have elements that guide visitors walking along Van Ness through the alley and into the heart of the Lower Polk Neighborhood.

“…intersections are orientation points, they are thresholds, and so can act to focus attention. They can be like gates or plazas - these are repeated places where things come together.” - LPN Board Member

POLK PLACES

CULTURAL NODES Polk Street unites the East and West blocks of each alleyway in the district. Intersections at Polk Street are focuses on a slower, meandering journey and provide opportunities to pause. Both locals and visitors alike have the opportunity to meet, to rest, and to enjoy the experience of Polk Street. LARKIN STREET LOCAL’S GATEWAYS Intersections between alleyways and Larkin Street should focus on the familiar. The intersections should be welcoming, while also a means of conveying the identity of each alley and it’s purpose in the neighborhood. Larkin intersections should connect to local amenities and businesses at street corners.

DISTRICT NODES DISTRICT UNITY

44

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


VAN NESS GATEWAYS G

G

G

G

G

G

G

6' TYP.

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

14' TYP.

G

34' -36' TYP.

G

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

G

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY PLAN

THE LOCAL’S GATEWAY LEGEND ENTRY/EXIT GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

PARK RESIDENTIAL VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION COMMERCIAL / RETAIL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR INSTITUTIONAL SCHOOLS

G

G

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS Table-top crosswalk Typical alleyway medallion G

G

“Gateway” tree planting on North and South sides of the alley

LARKIN ST.

POLK ST.

DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

VAN NESS ST.

PROPOSED LAND USE

LARKIN ST.

FRONT DOOR

G

POLK ST.

F

Van Ness Avenue serves as a major transit and vehicular thoroughfare for the City of San Francisco. The alleyways provide an opportunity for pedestrians to escape the congestion of Van Ness and walk down along the Polk Street corridor. At the Van Ness intersections, a table-top crosswalk provides easy crossing along Van Ness at the alleyways while alleyway G G identityG medallions encourage pedestrians to look further into the alley and wander down to Polk Street. The alleys from Van Ness to Polk street are seen as a passage through which pedestrians can find a pleasant walk along Polk Street. Van Ness intersections become the “welcome sign” for G G G G G visitors.

G G G G Increased trees on North side of theGalley

Increased lighting on South side of the alley

DISTRICT UNITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

LARKIN

POLK

G

45


POLK PLACES G

G

G

G

G

G

G

6' TYP.

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

14' TYP.

G

34' -36' TYP.

G

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

G

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY PLAN

THE CULTURAL CORRIDOR

G

G

G

G

G

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

As the core of the Lower Polk Alleyways district, Polk Street is critical to defining the district as a unified network. At the intersection of each of the alleys with Polk Street there is an opportunity for pedestrians to pause along the active commercial corridor. Polk Place is defined by a continuation of the existing overhead lights across Polk Street at each alleyway intersection and paving pattern shifts at each intersection along the Polk Street table-top crosswalks. This paving pattern should be consistent across all alleyways. Alley Identity Medallions describe the unique character of each alley, but remain consistent as they are centered on each alleyway crosswalk along Polk Street.

G

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS Bulb-outs where possible Movable seating Increased planting Overhead Lighting across Polk Street

G

Alleyway Identity Medallion

G

G

G

G

G

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

Table top crosswalk and unified paving treatment at all Polk Intersections.

POLK ST.

Bollards at the East side of the intersection

G

“Gateway” tree planting on North and South sides of the alley Increased trees on North side of the alley Increased lighting on South side of the alley DISTRICT UNITY

46

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

LARKIN

POLK

G


LARKIN GATEWAYS G

G

G

G

G

G

G

6' TYP.

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

14' TYP.

G

34' -36' TYP.

G

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

G

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY PLAN

LEGEND

NEIGHBOR’S GATEWAY

ENTRY/EXIT

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

6' TYP.

PARK

RESIDENTIAL

14' TYP.

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR INSTITUTIONAL SCHOOLS

G

TOOLBOX ELEMENTSG

G

G

G

G

Alleyway character banners on Larkin corner Overhead element across alley, where possible Bulb-outs, where possible Movable seating Increased planting G

G

Table top crosswalk

LARKIN ST.

DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

POLK ST.

G

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

34' -36' TYP.

VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION

LARKIN ST.

G PROPOSED LAND USE

Larkin is the Eastern terminus of the alleyways. It serves as the “locals entry” to each alleyway. At every Larkin intersection, banners denote the name andG character of each alleyway. G These banners can be changed for G special events in the district or on an individual alley. The banners enhance the sense of belonging of each alley to the greater Alleyways District. LARKIN ST.

FRONT DOOR

POLK ST.

F

Typical alley medallion G

G

G

G

G

“Gateway” tree planting on North and South sides of the alley Increased trees on North side of the alley Increased lighting on South side of the alley

DISTRICT UNITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

LARKIN ST

POLK ST.

G

47


48

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


ALLEYWAY CHARACTER + IDENTITY

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

49


THE MID-BLOCK GREAT ALLEYWAYS = DISTRICT UNITY + ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY MID-BLOCKS The Mid-Block is the moment that draws pedestrians into alleyway and is an opportunity for the unique expression of each alleyway. The alleyways are programmed with differentiated mid-block activities and design elements. The mid-block does not have to be centered on the block, but can be an extension of the gateways or Polk places that draws people into the alleyways. On each alleyway, these mid-block project areas become focal points and a potential basis for development along the alley.

MID-BLOCK A: PAVING PATTERN Using paving to define “places for people.”

MID-BLOCK B: CHICANE Forming a “meandering path” through chicanes.

MID-BLOCK C: TABLE-TOP Making continuous places or “pedestrian plazas” between the street and sidewalk through table-tops.

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

50

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

“...every alleyway should be unique; diversity is what the LPN is all about” -Andrew Chandler, LPN Chair


MID-BLOCK A - PAVING PATTERN G

G

G

G

G

G

G

6' TYP.

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

14' TYP.

G

34' -36' TYP.

G

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

G

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY PLAN

PLACES FOR PEOPLE

LEGEND ENTRY/EXIT

G

GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

PROPOSED LAND USE PARK

G

G

G

Paving patterns at the mid-block are a simple, often costeffective ways to calm traffic and at visual interest to any alleyway. Patterns invite pedestrians into the alleyway and G G give the perception of the street as a shared space that appeals to the pedestrian above vehicles. Paving patterns can be acheived through at variety of materials ranging in maintence and cost. G

G

G

G

G

LARKIN ST.

FRONT DOOR

POLK ST.

F

G

RESIDENTIAL VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION COMMERCIAL / RETAIL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR INSTITUTIONAL

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS

T

T

T

T

SCHOOLS

Character-defining paving pattern

G

G

G G Mid-Block commercial frontage

G

Diversity in Land Use G

G

G

G

G

LARKIN ST.

POLK ST.

DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

Parking reduction/ Temporary parking

G

G

Increased trees on North side of the alley Increased lighting on South side of the alley

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

LARKIN S

POLK ST.

G

51


MID-BLOCK B - CHICANE G

G

G

G

G

G

G

6' TYP.

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

14' TYP.

G

34' -36' TYP.

G

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

G

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY PLAN

MEANDERING PATH

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

LARKIN ST.

POLK ST.

Chicanes are extensions of the sidewalk curb that alternate on either side of the road to increase planting and pedestrian area. The overall pedestrain experience is enhanced as larger planted areas and trees soften the alleyway and the increased sidewalk space allows for movable and semipermanent seating in front of cirtical mid-block frontages. Chicanes also force cars to move slowly as the path of travel winds back and forth.

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS Chicanes occur at critical mid-block commercial opportunities Increased planting

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

LARKIN ST.

Movable seating

POLK ST.

Stormwater management planting

G

Increased trees on North side of the alley Increased lighting on South side of the alley

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

52

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

LARKIN S

POLK ST.

G

G


MID-BLOCK C - TABLE TOP G

G

G

G

G

G

G

6' TYP.

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

14' TYP.

G

34' -36' TYP.

G

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

LARKIN ST.

G

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

G

TYPICAL ALLEYWAY PLAN

LEGEND

PEDESTRIAN PLAZA

ENTRY/EXIT GARAGE

M

MAINTENANCE ENTRY/EXIT DRIVEWAY/CURB CUT

G

A mid-block table top allows the sidewalk and street to be level, forming a unified, G plaza-like place that allows the G full width of the alley to be occopied by the pedestrian. Removable bollards can be added to the start of the tabletop for temporary street closures during special events.

PROPOSED LAND USE

G

G

G

G

G

PARK

LARKIN ST.

FRONT DOOR

POLK ST.

F

G

G

RESIDENTIAL VACANT / UNDER CONSTRUCTION

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS

COMMERCIAL / RETAIL

Mid-Block table top creates a destination at the heart of the block

PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION & REPAIR INSTITUTIONAL

DRIVE/ASPHALT GROUND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL USE GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL USE

G Pavement changeG creates a plaza-like space at the mid-block

G

G

G

G

G

The mid-block “plaza” is activated by commercial G G G G G and community oriented frontages on the alley

LARKIN ST.

Removable bollards can be used for temporary closures POLK ST.

SCHOOLS

Increased trees on North side of the alley Increased lighting on South side of the alley

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

LARKIN S

POLK ST

G

53


ALLEYWAY CHARACTER + IDENTITY BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER

INDIVIDUAL ALLEY PROJECTS

GREAT ALLEYWAYS = DISTRICT UNITY + ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY POLK PLACES

+

MID-BLOCKS

INDIVUDAL ALLEY GUIDELINES

Each alley in Lower Polk has a strong sense of existing character. For every alley, a unique set of guidelines were developed to enhance the existing character and develop a defined identity. Distinction can be made through choices in design elements presented on the following spread. The unique selection of design elements along each alley begins to distinguish the individual alleys, while still connecting them to the greater district.

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

54

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

PROJECT A

PROJECT B


ALLEYWAY CHARACTER + IDENTITY

POSITIVE ACTIVITY + PROGRAM

AUSTIN + FRANK NORRIS STORYTELLING, LEARNING, DISCOVERY

CEDAR

HEALTH, GROWING, REFLECTION

FERN

HEMLOCK

CREATING, MAKING, IMAGINING

EXERCISE, MOVEMENT, ASPIRATION

ALICE B. TOKLAS + MYRTLE

OLIVE

HISTORY, PERFORMING, JOURNEYS

GATHERING. CULTURE, EATING

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER ORDER: Working North to South, each alley is studied individually.

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

55


AUSTIN + FRANK NORRIS ALLEYWAYS WHERE WE STARTED...

VIEW AT POLK STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARD AUSTIN

EXISTING CONDITIONS PHOTOGRAPHS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

56

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

FRANK NORRIS LOOKING EAST TOWARD LARKIN

AUSTIN LOOKING EAST TOWARD POLK


AUSTIN + FRANK NORRIS STORYTELLING

LEARNING DISCOVERY

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

57


AUSTIN ALLEYWAY

STORYTELLING • LEARNING • DISCOVERY Austin and Frank Norris alleyways form “Story Alleyway”, the two northernmost alleyways within the District. These alleyways are book-ended on Van Ness and Larkin corners by schools – inspiring the theme of education to guide their future improvements. Austin has the potential for present and future activation by mixed-use, restaurant and commercial activity intermittently along its length. At the Van Ness corner, south side, an excellent opportunity for a media wall or large scale information graphic exists. Likewise on the north corner at Polk a zone has been identified for a projection wall for neighborhood storytelling through educational and artistic films. Along its length additional tree planting and pedestrian lighting increase safe passage & increased evening use. A mid-block improvement including planting and paving is envisioned as part of a mixed-use development underway at 1545 Pine Street, also including a residential entry and a combined office/gallery space entry off of Austin. Future opportunities and collaborations are associated with the restaurants that are already established along this Alleyway – with potential for associated outdoor uses and extended planting areas closer to the Polk Street corridor.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS

• 1545 Pine Street Development + Streetscape Design

TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING

• Educational Institution: Miami AD School

• Extended table top at Polk Street.

• Commercial Frontages at Polk Street Corner

• Distinct gradient pattern using pavers along the sidewalk and cobbled or textured pavers along the extended table top toward Polk Street. Paving pattern along sidewalk is matched where there is street parking to create a pedestrian friendly zone.

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES)

LIGHTING Pedestrian Scale Lighting along the South side of the alley.

• Temporary Art Projections & Films • Outdoor Dining & Cafes

SIGNAGE + ART Story Wall Mural at Miami AD School Projection Wall at Chai-Yo Alley Identity Medallion at Intersections

“We are excited for new development coming to Austin and to connect to events with Miami AD School.”

FURNISHING • Cafe Tables and Chairs at Polk Street Corner and in front of the 1545 Pine Street Development

PLANTING • Stormwater planting beds in front of the 1545 Pine Street Development

-Workshop Participant

• Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

58

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


AUSTIN ALLEYWAY

DESIGN IDEA 1: PROJECTION WALL

The projection wall is set up for evening movie watching and story-telling. On off nights, the wall can be used to communicate upcoming events in the Lower Polk Neighborhood as well as to display work of local artists.

LAND USE

RESIDENTIAL

LAND USE

PROJECT A: 1545 PINE STREET DEVELOPMENT 1545 PINE STREET MIXED-USE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

G

THE VITAMIN SHOPPE

G POLK STREET

VAN NESS AVE

G

CHAI-YO

MIAMI AD SCHOOL

G

SCHOOL

G

G

PDR

G

THE POUR HOUSE

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL

LAND USE

AUSTIN - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN DESIGN IDEA 2: STORY WALL MURAL

KEY PLAN PINE

POST

LARKIN

POST

POLK

AUSTIN

VAN NESS

LAND USE

A mixed-media, changing mural that is curated by the Miami AD Students to communicate upcoming events and initiatives in the neighborhood.

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

59


FRANK NORRIS ALLEYWAY STORYTELLING • LEARNING• DISCOVERY

The west Alleyway’s namesake, Frank Norris, was an American journalist and novelist who made San Francisco his home in the 1890’s. One of his more well-known books, McTeague: A Story of San Francisco (1899), inspired the name of a present neighborhood watering-hole located just south on Polk Street. History and discovery are the themes that resonate with the neighbors and users of this Alleyway. This Alleyway’s multi-generational and regular users include the Senior community located at 81 Frank Norris and the elementary school students attending Redding Elementary School, whose school yard and drop-off occur on the east end of Frank Norris Alleyway. Future improvements to this Alleyway are meant to improve the pedestrian experience and use of the Alleyway for these two particular groups through the addition of traffic calming, new plantings, wider sidewalks and lighting. Two particular projects – the Story Grove & Children’s Mural and the Front Door, each respond to the identified needs and aspirations of this community.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING

• Redding Elementary School

Table-top crosswalks at Polk Street and Van Ness Street

• Redding Elementary School Yard

Mid-Block widened sidewalks (Chicane) to form “Story Grove” (Alternate: Mid-Block table-top and temporary closures for events).

• 81 Frank Norris - Senior Housing; Entry on the alleyway • Existing Mid-Block Crosswalk

Textured or cobbled pavers at the mid-block for visual interest and traffic calming

• Parking Garage

LIGHTING Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES) • Closures for Children’s & School Events • Outdoor Book Readings in “Story Grove”

Festoon Lights over “Story Grove” (Fairy Tale Lighting)

SIGNAGE + ART Children’s Murals for Storytelling and the Art Culture of Lower Polk

• Traffic Calming

Alley Identity Medallion at Intersections.

• Book Sales (Friends of the San Francisco Public Library)

“Accessibility and safety for school children and seniors are a priority for our alley.” -Workshop Participant

Alley Identity Banner at Larkin Corner.

PLANTING Addition of a vine-climbing screen and planting beds for vines along the Redding Elementary school yard at the street level as well as planters on the school yards above the parking garage on the southern side of the alleyway Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and mid-block planting to form “Story Grove.”

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

60

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


DESIGN IDEA 1: STORY GROVE

FRANK NORRIS ALLEYWAY

DESIGN IDEA 2: CHILDREN’S MURAL

Story Grove is formed at the mid-block of Frank Norris and is an opportunity for families of all ages to gather. Events such as book sales and outdoor storytelling are set-up within the alleyway

The large wall opposite Redding elementary has can be seen from the children’s school yard. This wall has the opportunity for a coordinated mural effort involving the children of Redding and local artists as the painters of this mural that should emphasize education and inspire the children who walk past this mural daily.

LAND USE

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL

PROJECT B: STORY GROVE

PROJECT A: SENIOR HOUSING “FRONT DOOR” G

G

G

REDDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

LARKIN ST

POLK STREET

T

G

G

SENIOR HOUSING/ LOOKSIE OPTOMETRY

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YARD (ROOF) / PARKING

SCHOOL

DESIGN IDEA 3: FAIRY TALE LIGHTING

Story Grove transforms at night into a forest of dappled light. Overhead lights hang between the trees, bringing warmth, delight, and traffic calming to the alley.

LAND USE

FRANK NORRIS - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN

DESIGN IDEA 4: GARAGE GREEN SCREEN

The mid-block garage becomes the backdrop for Story Grove. Vines climb and plants cascade from planters in the children’s school yard above the garage.

LAND USE

KEY PLAN PINE

FRANK NORRIS

POST

POLK

RESIDENTIAL

WALGREENS

VAN NESS

F

POST

LARKIN

H20 CAFE

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YARD

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

61


FERN ALLEYWAY WHERE WE STARTED...

VIEW AT POLK STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARD FERN WEST

EXISTING CONDITIONS PHOTOGRAPHS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

62

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

FERN EAST LOOKING EAST TOWARD LARKIN

FERN WEST LOOKING EAST TOWARD POLK ST


FERN CREATIVITY

THE ARTS EXPRESSION

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

63


FERN ALLEYWAY- WEST CREATIVITY • THE ARTS • EXPRESSION

Fern Alleyway West is characterized by lively nighttime activities and use. The Regency Ballroom and Maye’s Oyster House are musical event venues at either end of the Alleyway. Both residents and visitors to these neighborhood venues will benefit from improvements to safety and lighting in the evening and future attractions that may be appreciated during the day. Projects are focused on improvements that extend from the corner intersections and their accompanying activities, creating improved plazalike spaces, through the development of artistic paving patterns, murals and intensified architectural lighting. A temporary art installation program is meant to improve and increase day-time attraction and visitation.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS

• Evening activity & visitors (Mayes Oyster House, McTeague’s, Lush Lounge)

TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Van Ness and Polk.

• Notable mural at Lush Lounge

Bulb-outs at Maye’s Oyster House on Polk to create a chicane and increase the pedestrian space.

• Regency Ballroom events at Van Ness corner

Visual interest through paving pattern designed through collaboration with a local artist.

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES)

LIGHTING Directional and/or artist driven lighting at Maye’s Oyster House and the Regency Ballroom.

• Temporary Art Installations • Performance Art Events

Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley.

• Art Car Exhibits • Outdoor Music Programming (Daytime)

SIGNAGE + ART Artist collaboration on paving pattern.

Maye’s and the Regency Ballroom bring nighttime activity. This is the “visitors” side of the alley. -Workshop Participant

Existing mural on Lush Lounge is made a focal point. Increased murals reflect art and the culture of Lower Polk. Alley Identity Medallion at Intersections.

FURNISHING Movable/Temporary cafe tables and seating for events along Polk Street.

PLANTING Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

64

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


DESIGN IDEA 1: ART INSTALLATIONS

FERN ALLEYWAY-WEST

DESIGN IDEA 2: FEATURE LIGHTING

Temporary art installations can be coordinated on a seasonal basis. These add interest and liveliness to the pedestrian experience at the mid-block and become a memorable neighborhood event and attraction.

Illuminated feature fixtures continue the lighting from Fern Alleyway East, and provide safety and evening interest along Polk Street. Lighting, color, and intensity may be programmable and adjustable for a variety of events.

LAND USE

PDR

PROJECT A: MAYE’S PLAZA

PROJECT B: REGENCY STREETSCAPE ROUTE 101

G

G

G

G

G

G

POLK ST

VAN NESS AVE

G

MAYE’S OYSTER HOUSE

THE REGENCY BALLROOM

G

G LUSH LOUNGE

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL

LAND USE

FERN WEST - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN KEY PLAN

PINE

POST

POST

LARKIN

FERN POLK

LAND

The Regency Ballroom hosts many “bigname” USE artists in the music industry and often has a line of visitors passing through the alley. Columnar, vertical lights illuminate the “Event Preview Wall” where concert attendees wait. The wall, a changing “supergraphic,” displays imagery of upcoming artists at the Regency.

DESIGN IDEA 4: PAVING PATTERN

Paving patterns on Fern highlight moments along the alleyway and create a pedestrianfocused experience. The patterns are collaborative elements designed by local artists and design teams. Pavement materials include stamped colored asphalt, concrete, or unit pavers.

VAN NESS

DESIGN IDEA 3: EVENT PREVIEW WALL

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

65


FERN ALLEYWAY- EAST CREATIVITY • THE ARTS • EXPRESSION

Fern Alleyway East’s design has been developed by City and County of San Francisco Department of Public Works (DPW) and the SF Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) in collaboration with the neighborhood, as part of the Polk Streetscape Project. The design is focused on improved pedestrian use and Art as its main design theme. The LPADVP proposes that the typical gateway features proposed per District Unit objectives be integrated into the streetscape improvements being undertaken by SFDPW/MTA. This plan otherwise supports the designed features of the proposed Fern Alleyway East improvements including widened sidewalks, plantings, lighting, paving patterns and traffic-calming.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES • Music in the City’s “Play n’ Play” events • Quetzal Cafe at Polk Street corner

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Van Ness and Polk.

• On Lok Senior Citizen Center at Larkin Corner

LIGHTING Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley.

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES)

SIGNAGE + ART Alley Identity Medallion at Intersections.

• Lighting/Projection/Art Installations

Alley Identity Banner at Larkin Corner.

• Outdoor Art exhibits & Events • Art Car Exhibits

FURNISHING Movable/Temporary cafe tables and seating for events along Polk Street at Quetzal Cafe.

“Fern East is the “locals” block of the alley and is active near Quetzal Cafe.” -Workshop Participant

PLANTING Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

66

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


FERN ALLEYWAY - EAST

FOLLOW TYPICAL POLK PLACE GUIDELINES

FOLLOW TYPICAL LARKIN GATEWAY GUIDELINES 145

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G G

G

G

6' TYP. 14' TYP.

34' -36' TYP.

GG

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

G

LARKIN ST.

POLK ST.

POLK ST.

G G G ALLEY G G FERN SF PLANNING/DPW PLANS / THE POLK STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS PLAN

G

G G

6' TYP.

G

14' TYP.

G

G

34' -36' TYP.

G

6' TYP. 8' TYP.

G

G

140

KEY PLAN PINE

LARKIN

POST

POLK

VAN NESS

FERN POST

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

G

G

G G

G

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

67

LARKIN

POLK S

POLK S

G


HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY WHERE WE STARTED...

HEMLOCK AND LARKIN CORNER LOOKING SOUTH

EXISTING CONDITIONS PHOTOGRAPHS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

68

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

HEMLOCK AND POLK CORNER LOOKING NORTH

HEMLOCK WEST LOOKING EAST TOWARD POLK ST


HEMLOCK FITNESS

MOVEMENT COMMUNITY

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

69


HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY - WEST FITNESS • MOVEMENT • COMMUNITY

Hemlock West is centrally located north-south within the Alleyway District and as the more sloped block is used by the neighborhood more as a passageway then the easterly block of Hemlock. There are new development sites coming on-line on this block, along with existing residential entries, creating opportunities to expand upon the precedents set on the northwest corner at the newer residential development, including unit pavers and new tree plantings.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS

• Central alley - Movement & Passage

TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING

• Frequent dog walking

Table-top crosswalks at Van Ness Street and Polk Street Extended table top at Polk Street for performances and temporary closures.

The more passive and movement-oriented use of this block supports and validates the implementation of improvements including rhythmic lighting meant to reinforce evening use, street tree plantings, a mural(s) and a dog walking area at the western mid-block area. These simple streetscape improvements have the potential to improve the extent of use and the overall quality of experience for the residents and all neighbors, as well as connecting the west and east blocks of Hemlock.

• Residential entries

Mid-Block Chicane forms a “mini dog park.”

• Notable tree planting

Visual interest through paving pattern.

• 24 Hour Fitness at Van Ness corner relocating

• Mixed use development proposed for Polk Street Corner

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES)

LIGHTING Enhanced atmospheric lighting that varies in scale along the South side of the alley to create a sense of movement through light.

SIGNAGE + ART

• Dog walking area/park

Increased murals promote fitness and the culture of Lower Polk.

• Weekly outdoor fitness classes

Alley Identity Medallion at intersections.

FURNISHING

“...why can’t we have a puppy alley? ...who wouldn’t want that - everyone loves puppies.”

Semi-permanent outdoor fitness structures.

PLANTING Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

-Workshop Participant

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

70

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


DESIGN IDEA 1: DOG PARKLET

HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY - WEST

DESIGN IDEA 2: RHYTHMIC LIGHTING

The neighborhood is in need of a safe and well-maintained location for dog walking and control of dog waste. A chicane creates a “dog parklet” along Hemlock that provides a contained area for dogs and owners to play.

Variation in size, scale, and spacing of lighting along the alley creates a sense of movement through light.

LAND USE

RESIDENTIAL

INSTITUTIONAL

PROJECT B: DOG PARKLET

MASJID ALTAWHEED MOSQUE

CVS/PHARMACY

G

NEW DEVELOPMENT

G POLK ST

VAN NESS AVE

G

PROJECT A: POLK PLACE

NEW DEVELOPMENT

G

G BLUR

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL

LAND USE

HEMLOCK WEST - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN KEY PLAN

HEMLOCK POST

POST

LARKIN

PINE

A mural emphasizing the importance of health and exercise that appears to “move” along the alley.

POLK

DESIGN IDEA 3: “KEEP MOVING” MURAL

VAN NESS

LAND USE

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

71


HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY - EAST FITNESS • MOVEMENT • COMMUNITY

Hemlock East as one of the other centrally located block of the Alleyways District, has the additional opportunity due to its flatter topography to be used in a more engaging way to host outdoor fitness activity in an area of the City that is underserved in terms of recreational outdoor facilities. The active nature of this Alleyway is capitalized on to create a series of outdoor amenities including paving modifications to support fitness class or a sprint track, a fitness court for temporary or semi-permanent equipment, and other signage/parking spaces dedicated for pop-up fitness events. The design elements of this block of Hemlock would, similar to the West end, include lighting to expand evening use and planting of trees on the north side of the street, while the south side is focused on the fitness programming represented by the three projects illustrated: fitness court, mini-sprint track and pop-up space for fitness events.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES •

Central alley - Movement & Passage

Parking garage

Community Youth Center

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES) •

Weekly outdoor fitness classes

Kokoda Fitness Truck events

“Run with your neighborhood” events (Utilize mini sprint track)

Neighborhood “sprints”

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Larkin Street and Polk Street. Paving pattern creates visual calming while defining a “mini sprint track” at the center of the alley.

LIGHTING Enhanced atmospheric lighting that varies in scale along the South side of the alley to create a sense of movement through light.

SIGNAGE + ART

Alley Identity Medallion at intersections. Alley Identity Banner at Larkin Corner.

FURNISHING Semi-permanent outdoor fitness structures

“The community youth center backs on our alley and can bring energy and excitement to the alleyway.”

PLANTING Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

-Workshop Participant

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

72

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


DESIGN IDEA 2: MINI-SPRINT TRACK

DESIGN IDEA 1: FITNESS COURT

Striping of pavement along the alley forms a paving pattern as well as a numbered “mini-sprint track.” Neighbors share the track and can use it for coordinated “Run with your Neighborhood” events.

The National Fitness Campaign has installed several outdoor fitness courts throughout the city. This fitness court is in the form of a semipermanent parklet along the alley. The court can be used by residents throughout the day or for scheduled group classes. A percentage of the costs for the court can be covered through the NFC’s Partnership Program.

HEMLOCK ALLEYWAY - EAST LAND USE

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL

PROJECT A: FITNESS STATION HALSTED N. GRAY-CAREW & ENGLISH GARAGE

20

30

40

50

10

START

FITNESS TRUCK

60

G 70

80

90

100

110

120

130

G

140

160

170

180

G

FINISH

POLK ST

190

G

150

G

GOLDEN GATE JEEP

LARKIN ST

WING LUM CAFE

G COMMUNITY YOUTH CENTER

LE SALON

MAY’S LAUNDROMAT

RESIDENTIAL

LAND USE

HEMLOCK EAST- DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN DESIGN IDEA 3: POP-UP FITNESS EVENTS

LAND USE KEY PLAN

HEMLOCK POST

LARKIN

POST

POLK

PINE

VAN NESS

Temporary closures support outdoor fitness events and potentially weekly classes through programs such as the Kokoda Fitness Truck. Kokoda, who’s motto is “functional fitness anywhere,” currently has only one public location in Crissy Field, far from the Lower Polk Community.

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

73


CEDAR ALLEYWAY WHERE WE STARTED...

CEDAR EAST VIEW AT LARKIN ST LOOKING WEST TOWARD POLK ST

EXISTING CONDITIONS PHOTOGRAPHS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

74

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

CEDAR AND LARKIN ST CORNER LOOKING SOUTH AT JANE

CEDAR AND POLK ST CORNER LOOKING NORTH


CEDAR HEALTH

GROWTH GREENING

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

75


CEDAR ALLEYWAY - WEST HEALTH • GROWTH • GREENING

Cedar West is undergoing a complete streetscape redesign as a result of the CPMC Campus development along Van Ness Avenue and Geary Street, up to Post Street. In relation to the mission of the medical campus and the betterment of the Alleyway District, the Vision Plan emphasizes Cedar as an Alleyway promoting community health through the streetscape improvements. The Medical Office Building planned for the corner of Van Ness and Geary has a main entrance and drop-off along Cedar, proposing increased planting and paving meant to calm traffic. These improvements should be furthered and reinforced by the Van Ness Gateway, Polk Place and extension east to Cedar East through tree plantings and additional traffic calming improvements that are meant to unify the District.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES • CPMC Campus Landscape Improvements (Paving, Increased street trees & greening)

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALM I NG Table-top crosswalks at Van Ness and Polk.

• Episcopal Community Services Next Door Shelter • RIGPA Center

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES)

LIGHTING Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley.

SIGNAGE + ART

• “Growing a Healthy Community” - Community + Health Events

Alley Identity medallion at intersections.

FURNISHING Movable/Temporary cafe tables and seating along Polk Street at Quetzal Cafe.

PLANTING

“We hope the new CPMC campus will be a positive addition to our community.”

Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

-Workshop Participant

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

76

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


CEDAR ALLEY - WEST

FOLLOW TYPICAL VAN NESS GATEWAY GUIDELINES

15

0

FOLLOW TYPICAL POLK PLACE GUIDELINES

G

KEY PLAN

POST CEDAR

POST

LARKIN

PINE

POLK

G

VAN NESS

G G

G

125

G

G

POLK ST.

140

GG

POLK ST.

5

GG G

CPMC VAN NESS AND GEARY CAMPUS PLANS

CEDAR

14

G GGG G G GG

130

GG G

G

135

G

POLK ST.

VAN NESS ST.

VAN NESS ST.

VAN NESS ST.

G

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

POLK ST

POLK S

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

77


CEDAR ALLEYWAY - EAST HEALTH • GROWTH • GREENING

Cedar East is an Alleyway that reinforces the themes of public health and greening. The improvements revolve around opportunities that recognize the efforts made by neighbors and businesses to plant and create green infrastructures and building on that success. The Alleyway receives a significant amount of mid-block sunlight as a result of surface parking lots and low building heights on the south side of the street. This creates optimal conditions to expand planting and create new planting-oriented infrastructures and programming.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITIES

Events surrounding health and greening might include community dedicated community gardening plots, an informal flower market from plants harvested in the alleyway, and community gardening educational events. Wider sidewalks are located to create improved pedestrian environments and allow for broader planting areas. Lighting improvements are deployed and inspired by organic forms and are strategically located intermittently down the street to highlight the “greened” areas. Planting is strategically located as both in-ground and raised planting beds to significantly increase the green in this Alleyway and implement additional storm water treatment. Green walls should be considered, particularly at building corners and strategically sunny locations along the alleyway, such as the northeast corner.

• Notable street art

“We love the neighbor-driven murals, green wall, and plantings on our alleyway.”

• Existing planting by Lower Polk residents • Green wall at Jane on Larkin

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Polk Street and Van Ness Street

• Mid-Alley frontages (Bike shops to be converted to architecture office)

Extended table top at Polk for performances and temporary closures Mid-Block Chicane to slow traffic and increase planting and screening in front of the surface parking lot.

• Large Surface parking lot allows for light into the alley

Visual calming through the paving pattern which is derivative of the pattern present at the CPMC campus on Cedar West.

• Fire Station “back door” • Increased sunlight as a result of the surface parking along the southern side of the alley.

PROGRAM GOALS (EVENTS + ACTIVITIES)

LIGHTING Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley

SIGNAGE + ART

• Community Gardening + Planting

Alley Identity Medallion at Intersections

• “Grower’s Market:” An informal flower market from plants harvested in the alleyway

Alley Identity Banner at Larkin Corner

FURNISHING

• Educational Events on Gardening

Movable/Temporary cafe tables at Jane on the Larkin Corner

• Increased Stormwater Planting

PLANTING A green wall and small planting beds add interest to the southern side of the alley.

-Workshop Participant

Increased planting beds along the south side of the alley at the surface parking lot. Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

78

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


CEDAR ALLEYWAY - EAST

DESIGN IDEA 1: ORGANIC LIGHTING

Lighting in the alley should be organic in form and/or use existing planting infrastructure for hanging and support.

LAND USE

LAND USE

G

PROJECT A: GREEN WALL GATEWAY

PROJECT B: GROWER’S MARKET

FIRE STATION

CHINESE GRACE CHURCH

FUTURE ARCHITECTURE OFFICE

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G G

G

G

G

POLK ST

G

G G

LARKIN ST

KEYS & ID’S SMOKE SHOP

LAND USE

G

G

JANE

PARKING

LAND USE LAND

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL

USE

CEDAR EAST - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN

PINE

POST

LAND USE

POST CEDAR

LARKIN

The “green wall gateways” serve as elements that wrap around the building corners to visually guide and welcome pedestrians into the alley while adding interest to building facades. These gateways can be not only facade treatments but over head vines, trellises, or architectural elements.

KEY PLAN

POLK

Where possible in the alley, both at-grade and raised planting beds should be considered. Planting should be low-maintenance and beds should be cleaned frequently of litter and debris. Flowing plants can be maintained by residents and sold in an informal market.

DESIGN IDEA 3: GREEN WALL GATEWAY VAN NESS

DESIGN IDEA 2: GROWER’S MARKET + PLANTING BEDS

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

79


ALICE B. TOKLAS + MYRTLE ALLEYWAYS WHERE WE STARTED...

MYRTLE VIEW AT LARKIN STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARD POLK ST

EXISTING CONDITIONS PHOTOGRAPHS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

80

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

ALICE B. TOKLAS VIEW AT POLK STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARD VAN NESS

COMMUNITY MURAL ACROSS FROM MACAULAY PARK


ALICE B. TOKLAS + MYRTLE HISTORY

PERFORMANCE DIALOGUE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

81


ALICE B. TOKLAS ALLEYWAY HISTORY • PERFORMANCE • DIALOGUE

Alice B. Toklas Alleyway celebrates the history and culture of the Lower Polk neighborhood as a center of LGBTQ life in San Francisco. Toklas, a San Francisco-born member of the Parisian avant-garde and life partner of writer Gertrude Stein, was born one block away from Myrtle on O’Farrell Street and hence the block was dedicated in her name in 1989. Today the AMC Theater, at the corner of Van Ness, is housed in the Don Lee Building (c. 1921) and is an important landmark and center for activity for the Alleyway. The themes of history and performance are united and result in two proposed significant projects - one at the residential entry of the Marquee (the Front Porch), and the other, the History Walk situated at the corner of Alice B. Toklas and Polk Street. Improvements to include lighting, signage, art and furnishings are opportunities to activate this Alleyway both day and night and reinforce the historical landmarks that define the Alleyway’s unique character.

CRITICAL OPPORTUNITIES • AMC Movie Theater in the Don Lee Building • The Marquee Residential Entry

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Polk Street and Van Ness Street

• Alice B. Toklas, alleyways namesake is a prominent LGBTQ figure.

Extended table top at Polk for performances and temporary closures

• Historic roots of Polk Street and the location of the first San Francisco Pride Parade

Bulb-out/Chicane at the Marquee to form a “front porch.”

POTENTIAL EVENTS + ACTIVITIES

Visual calming through a paving pattern that is coordinated with lighting placement and mimics the spotlight effect of “theatric” lighting.

• Day/Night Murals • Projections on AMC Wall

LIGHTING Wall-mounted, theatric lighting strategically placed to illuminate murals. Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley

SIGNAGE + ART

“We would love to have a ‘front door’ at the Marque and more differentiation along the AMC facade.” -Workshop Participant

Increased murals reflect the history and the culture of Lower Polk Alley Identity Medallion at Intersections

FURNISHING Movable/Temporary cafe tables and seating for events.

PLANTING Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley and “Gateway” planting where possible at intersections.

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

82

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


ALICE B. TOKLAS ALLEYWAY

DESIGN IDEA 1: HISTORY WALK

A timeline of major events, people, and memories are inscribed in the pavement and enhanced at night by projections.

LAND USE

PROJECT A: THE MARQUE “FRONT PORCH” THE OPAL

PROJECT B: HISTORY WALK THE MONARCH HOTEL

G

G

POLK ST

VAN NESS AVE

G

F AMC THEATERS

G

THE MARQUEE LOFTS FRONT DOOR

RESIDENTIAL

LAND USE

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL

ALICE B. TOKLAS - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN KEY PLAN

POST

POST

LARKIN

PINE

POLK

The articulated facade of the AMC building at the corner of Polk Street becomes a “living” mural of the history of Lower Polk. A painted mural tells one story during the day. A night, a projection, overlaid with the mural tells another. The paintings and projections can be changed or repainted seasonally.

VAN NESS

LAND USE

DESIGN IDEA 2: DAY/ NIGHT LIVING HISTORY MURAL

ALICE B. TOKLAS

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

83


MYRTLE ALLEYWAY

HISTORY • PERFORMANCE • DIALOGUE Myrtle Alleyway is home to the Lower Polk Neighborhoods only park, Macaulay Park. This park is the eastern anchor of Myrtle and is a children’s playground with a surround of mature trees. The Vision Plan seeks to make the most of existing corner activities and carry those activities and new program events into the space of the Alleyway, including an expanded seating area at the intersection at Polk and an extended table top (the Deck) that creates both a dog park area adjacent to Macaulay park and a temporary street closure area for musical programming. Continuity of the living history walk on Alice B Toklas Alleyway is proposed to reinforce the connection all the way back to Van Ness. Additional improvements are meant to include lighting to reinforce the event areas and vertical greening combined with lighting elements to produce in-direct illumination of perceived dead spaces. The Myrtle Alleyway vision is one of a lively place that serves multiple generations and performance types in a public venue.

CRITICAL OPPORTUNITIES • Macaulay Park - Children’s Park and Neighborhood Events

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Polk Street

• Historic roots of Polk Street and the first San Francisco Pride Parade

Extended table top at Larkin for performances and temporary closures

• RS94109 Record Store and Cafe

Chicane along the California Produce corner at Polk Street to allow for cafe seating. Visual calming through a paving pattern that is coordinated with lighting placement and mimics the spotlight effect of “theatric” lighting.

POTENTIAL EVENTS + ACTIVITIES • “The Deck:” Extended table-top between Macaulay Park and RS94109. Activated through outdoor concerts and stories of the history of Polk Street.

LIGHTING Wall-mounted lighting strategically placed to illuminate murals

• Opportunity for the Polk Street Oral Histories project contributors to share their narratives on “The Deck.”

Directional lighting placed to illuminate murals and green screens

• Green wall along Discount Beauty Supply facade.

Enhanced theatric, atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley

• History Walk - A living history of Polk Street. Changing installations and art collaborations that share the evolving history of Lower Polk.

SIGNAGE + ART Existing mural opposite Macaulay park is made a focal point.

• Dog Walker’s Meet-Up at Macaulay

“We love that our neighborhood has a park for community events and play structures for children.” -Workshop Participant

Alley Identity Medallion at Intersections Alley Identity Banner at Larkin Corner

FURNISHING

Temporary/movable cafe seating outside of California Produce. Additional seating can be added for performance events on “The Deck.”

PLANTING

A green screen and small planting beds add interest to the southern side of the alley. Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley

LEGEND

ENTRY/EXIT

F

FRONT DOOR

G

GARAGE ENTRY EXISTING STREET LIGHT EXISTING STREET TREE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

84

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


MYRTLE ALLEYWAY

DESIGN IDEA 2: “THE DECK”

DESIGN IDEA 1: CALIFORNIA PRODUCE CAFE

The table-topped area along Macaulay Park across adjacent to RS94109 on Polk Street becomes and outdoor performance space. Movable bollards close this portion of the street during events.

California Produce has an existing parklet seating space on Polk Street. The outdoor seating experience is expanded and turns the corner, welcoming pedestrians into the alley.

LAND USE

COMMERCIAL /RETAIL

PROJECT B: CALIFORNIA PRODUCE CAFE

PROJECT A: THE DECK

CALIFORNIA PRODUCE

RS94109

POLK ST

T

M

T

T

T

G LARKIN ST

G

G

T

G

G

DOG RUN

DISCOUNT BEAUTY SUPPLY

SERGEANT JOHN MACAULAY PARK RESIDENTIAL

PARK

LAND USE

MYRTLE - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN

LAND USE

PINE

POST

POST

LARKIN

Temporary closures at “The Deck” allow park activity flow out into the street. Children’s activities and music events fill the street with positive activity.

KEY PLAN

POLK

The Discount Beauty Supply Facade is accented with vertical screen elements that are illuminated at night.

DEISGN IDEA 4: “MUSIC IN MACAULAY + CHILDREN’S EVENTS

VAN NESS

DESIGN IDEA 3: GREEN SCREEN

MYRTLE

ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

85


OLIVE ALLEYWAY

WHERE WE STARTED...

OLIVE WEST VIEW AT POLK STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARD VAN NESS

EXISTING CONDITIONS PHOTOGRAPHS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

86

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

OLIVE EAST MURAL AND VIEW LOOKING EAST TOWARD LARKIN

OLIVE EAST LOOKING EAST TOWARD LARKIN


OLIVE GATHERING

CULTURE FOOD

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

87


OLIVE ALLEYWAY (WEST) GATHERING • CULTURE • FOOD

Olive Alleyway is the southern-most Alleyway of the District and is a place of community activity and cultural confluence. It is proximate to the Tenderloin and Civic Center neighborhoods as well as Little Saigon, and food and culture create a unique opportunity to define the improvements for both East and West Olive. The Alleyway’s proximity to Civic Center and its walkable gradient create an opportunity for lunchtime visits. The utilization of an open lot at the Polk corner as a food truck lunch venue with temporary seating, is reinforced by creating a pedestrian focused experience throughout the Alleyway with a special paving pattern and mural art that unify the themes of automobile history and the celebration of diversity that is represented by food truck culture.

CRITICAL OPPORTUNITIES • Academy of Art Car Museum • Relatively flat road • Large parking lot on Polk Street corner • Good sunlight

POTENTIAL EVENTS + ACTIVITIES • “The Truck Stop:” Utilize corner parking lot at Polk Street for lunchtime and weekend food truck events • Cooking Events/Demonstrations

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS

TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Van Ness and Polk Bulb-out at Van Ness corner to create a chicane and “place” outside of the Academy of Art Car Museum. Artist-driven, culturally relevant paving pattern that aids in visually calming traffic.

LIGHTING Directional and wall-mounted lighting strategically placed to illuminate murals Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley

SIGNAGE + ART

“The Academy of Art Car Museum is an opportunity fill our alley with student-run art.” -Workshop Participant

Increased murals reflect food and the culture of Lower Polk Artist collaboration on paving pattern Alley Identity Medallion

FURNISHING Movable/Temporary cafe tables and seating for events.

PLANTING Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

88

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


DESIGN IDEA 1: PAVING COLLABORATION

OLIVE ALLEYWAY

DESIGN IDEA 2: “THE TRUCK STOP”

The paving of the street flows or “bulges open” at pivotal moments of activity on the alley. An artist driven collaboration could design a dimensional paving pattern that creates the illusion of the street tearing open along a seam bursting with local food and cultural symbology.

Food Truck events in celebration of cultural diversity. Temporary seating provides the opportunity for neighbors to gather and share a meal.

LAND USE

WOODY & SONS’ DETAIL SHOP

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY

G LARKIN ST

VAN NESS AVE

G

SPRINT

G

G

G

ALEXIS PARK HOTEL

PROJECT A : THE TRUCK STOP

OLIVE WEST - DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN DESIGN IDEA 3: MURAL: FOOD TRUCK EVOLUTION

POST

LARKIN

POST

POLK

PINE

VAN NESS

LAND USE

The wall of the Academy of Art car museum provides an opportunity to educate visitors on the impact of automobiles on the food industry over time. A playful student-design mural could convey this history through the “evolution of the food truck.”

KEY PLAN

OLIVE ELLIS

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

89


OLIVE ALLEYWAY (EAST) GATHERING • CULTURE • FOOD

Olive Alleyway East links directly to Little Saigon and the Asian food culture that it represents. The Vision Plan proposes that a future opportunity is connected to the change of use at the south corner at Pol and that a future strategic widened sidewalk and mixed-use market would reinforce the street life and potential for gathering around food at the western end. The facing street frontage is a tall building face that is an excellent opportunity for food and culture murals. Continuity with Olive West and temporary closures for street-life around a farmer’s market or other “meet and eat” events is a priority – including improvements to provide leaning and short-term perch seating, as well as focal lighting to enhance this use in early evening and during the winter.

CRITICAL OPPORTUNITIES • Proximity to “Little Saigon” District and restaurants • Great American Music Hall

TOOLBOX ELEMENTS

TRAFFIC + TRAFFIC CALMING Table-top crosswalks at Larkin and Polk

• O’Farrell Theater & Larkin corner murals

Chicane to increase pedestrian space front of the new “market center.”

• City Hope Community Center + Vibrant Signage

Visual calming through paving pattern.

• Southeast Asian Community Center food pick-up (5:30 am every Friday)

POTENTIAL EVENTS + ACTIVITIES • “Meet n’ Eat” neighborhood events • Farmer’s Market Days • Organize outdoor concerts with the Great American Music Hall

LIGHTING Directional and wall-mounted lighting strategically placed to illuminate murals Enhanced atmospheric, pedestrian scale lighting along the South side of the alley

SIGNAGE + ART Artist collaboration on street paving Existing murals are made a focal point

“Our alley has many community services as well as cultural ties to Little Saigon.” -Workshop Participant

Additional mural along the Great American Music Hall Alley Identity Medallion at intersections Alley Identity Banner at Larkin corner

FURNISHING Movable/Temporary cafe tables and seating for events. Asses future potential for permanent structures such as hybrid bike racks/leaning rails/table tops.

PLANTING Increased tree planting along the North (South-facing) side of the alley

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY

90

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


DESIGN IDEA 1: MURALS: NIGHT + DAY

New murals span across the Great American Music Hall and the Southeast Asian Community Center adjacent to the existing mural at the O’Farrell Theater. The community center mural can be more focused on food and daytime aesthetic, while the mural along the music hall can bring night time entertainment with unique lighting.

OLIVE ALLEYWAY

LAND USE

PROJECT A: MEET N’ EAT MARKET O’FARRELL THEATRE

SOUTHEAST ASIAN COMMUNITY CENTER

PROJECT B: LITTLE SAIGON GATEWAY

GREAT AMERICAN MUSIC HALL

LITTLE SAIGON

G

G

POLK ST

LARKIN ST

G

G

G

G

CITY HOPE COMMUNITY CENTER

OLIVE EAST- DESIGN STRATEGY PLAN

Long temporary and permanent structures are placed in front of the new “market center” along Polk Street to act as shared “tables.” Visitors have the opportunity to park their bikes and share a meal or a drink with their neighbors.

KEY PLAN PINE

LAND USE POST

ELLIS

POST

LARKIN

DESIGN IDEA 2: MEET N’ EAT

POLK

CIVIC CENTER

VAN NESS

PROPOSED MIXED USE/ “MARKET CENTER”

OLIVE

ALLEYWAY CHARACTER & IDENTITY LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

91


92

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


BEYOND THE LPA-DVP

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

93


BEYOND THE LPA•DVP

94

LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN


PROJECT PRIORITIZATION The Alleyways District Vision Plan is incremental in its approach. It is structured to provide a ground for collaborative change on a broad district wide level over time, but also encourages local influence at a very small collaborative scale with each individual Alleyway block. Alleyways should be prioritized based on several criteria.

The following is a list of principles, conditions or attributes that may be present in any given Alleyway that may elevate a projects’ feasibility – and thus might prioritize a certain Alley for preferred consideration for more immediate attention. • Does the Alleyway serve a senior or youth oriented facility or housing development? • Does the Alleyway have new developments underway or land along its length subject to a project under SF Planning review for a future development? • Is the Alleyway Slated for infrastructural repair or replacement initiative as part of the DPW, MTA or other municipal department? • Is the Alleyway in need of higher safety standards? • Is the Alleyway in need of improved sanitation standards or storm water management infrastructure? • Is the Alleyway in line for private or public funding based on adjacent city projects such as schools or municipal facilities improvement projects?

PROJECT SCALE & PHASING STRATEGIES It is the Intent of this document to suggest gradual and accretive changes over time that are in close communication with the neighborhood and its evolving needs. The various areas and “places” described offer a range of possible projects, many at varying scales and scopes. Through this diversity of project type, it is hoped that the district’s public realm may benefit incrementally over time by taking advantage of multiple sponsorship levels, both public and private. Larger projects which might be more district-oriented may be long-term; while smaller, or more inwardly alley specific projects could be accomplished in the short term. District Unity By tackling the alleyways at a district level, projects can be accomplished in groups or in sections, starting from the connector streets inward. These Connective Projects, such as the Van Ness Gateways (pg 45), Polk Places (pg 46), Larkin Gateways(pg 47), and Mid-Blocks (pg 51) are important for district unification. The projects could be grouped or taken on accretively over time, depending on development opportunities, or by infrastructure funding advantages such as the Polk Street Improvement Project currently underway, or the planned MTA improvements in the future along Van Ness. Alleyway Character Other projects identified within the LPN•DVP are more alleyway specific and involve more inward Mid-Block enhancements. These projects are related more to those principles applied to Alleyway Identity (pg 49 - 91) and should help define its individual character within the Larger District. They are scaled to involve all of or only part of any discrete Alleyway and each midblock project can be assisted by private developers or associated with /midblock parcels that may have institutional or municipal links. Individual stakeholder groups may apply for grants or collaborate directly with existing institutions, commercial venues or larger housing entities. Projects are encouraged to find synergies with ground floor commercial renovations or, at a larger scale, with Municipal Rehabilitation Projects such as the one for the SFSD Redding Elementary School planned for this coming year. Whatever the scale or funding these projects, they should look to work with the local residents, business owners, and Lower Polk Neighbors in keeping with the aspirations of the growing Alleyways District community. At a District Unity level or at the level of the individual the Alleyway Character diversity, the involvement of this vibrant neighborhood is the hallmark of the Lower Polk Alleyways Vision plan.

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PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES The following list is source of potential partnerships:

EDUCATION

• Education Outside (https://www.educationoutside.org/)

• Friends of SFPL (San Francisco Public Library) (http://www.friendssfpl.org/)

• San Francisco Education Fund (http://www.sfedfund.org/)

COMMUNITY BUILDING

• City Hope Community Center (https://www.citychurchsf.org/CH/Our-Mission)

“The guidelines outlined in this document rely on sponsorship and coordination with existing community and city organizations to activate the alleys with positive events.“

• Community Living Campaign

(http://www.sfcommunityliving.org/)

• Invest in Neighborhoods San Francisco (http://investsf.org/)

• Lower Polk Art Walk (http://www.lowerpolkartwalk.com/)

• NEXT Village SF

(http://www.nextvillagesf.org/)

• Polk Gulch Oral Histories Project (http://www.calhum.org/experiences/the-polk-gulch-oral-history-project)

• SOUP SF

(soupsf.org)

• The San Francisco Foundation (http://sff.org/)

• Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corp. (http://www.tndc.org/)

SAFETY

• Safe Routes to School (http://sfsaferoutestoschool.org/)

• Tenderloin Safe Passage

(http://tenderloinsafepassage.org/)

• Tenderloin Housing Clinic (http://www.thclinic.org/)

OUTDOOR ACTIVITY

• National Fitness Campaign (http://nationalfitnesscampaign.com/en)

• Shape Up San Francisco Coalition (http://shapeupsfcoalition.org/)

• Shared School Yards Project • SF Bike Coalition (https://www.sfbike.org/)

• Sunday Streets SF • Roaming Hunger - San Francisco Food Trucks (http://roaminghunger.com/agency/)

• Walk SF

(http://walksf.org/)

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OTHER RESOURCES LIVING ALLEYS TOOLKIT

(http://www.sf-planning.org/ftp/files/plans-and-programs/inyour-neighborhood/market_octavia_living_alley/Market-Octavia-Living-Alleys-Toolkit_FINAL-WEB.pdf)

BETTER STREETS PLAN

(http://www.sf-planning.org/ftp/BetterStreets/)

POLK STREETSCAPE PROJECT

(http://sf-planning.org/polk-streetscape-project)

FERN ALLEY PLAN CPMC VAN NESS & GEARY CAMPUS (http://vng.cpmc2020.org/)

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LPN DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPALS Lower Polk Neighbors (LPN) has a history of supporting new development that is consistent with the character, history, socioensure-economic diversity, and other characteristics of the neighborhood such as building design, scale, architecture, and proportionality. We understand that architecture and development needs to bridge the past and the future and welcome innovative projects. LPN believes that new developments, when not displacing rent-controlled residential units, can be a positive impact to our neighborhood. We do strongly believe however, that several development principles are necessary to ensure that projects improve the neighborhood, not simply add new residents and commercial square footage. Therefore, LPN has created a list of development principles to guide our evaluation of proposed developments within our neighborhood boundaries. LPN expects that project sponsors will engage with the organization early in the project design process. We have been a strong advocate for the Lower Polk neighborhood since 2000 and have consistently taken positions that reflect the values listed above. We will work closely with developers, the Planning Department, Planning Commission, and elected officials to ensure that our principles are included in final plans for developments. These are guidelines, not demands. Our leadership and membership will evaluate all aspects of the project before determining whether to support or oppose.

PEACE OF MIND: SECURITY AND SAFETY

GETTING AROUND: PEDESTRIANS, BIKES AND AUTOMOBILES

Development proposals must demonstrate that the design has placed a high priority on the safety and security of our neighborhood residents and visitors alike. While internal security systems and design within a building obviously need to be effective for its residents, Lower Polk Neighbors expects that any new development within our neighborhood consciously respects the safety and security of those who are outside of the building as well.

PEDESTRIANS LPN prioritizes a positive and vibrant pedestrian experience. All projects should seek to maximize the public and private pedestrian experience, including but not limited to the widening of sidewalks, addional greening, and street furniture.

LPN expects building and street design to promote a healthy and vibrant public life by ensuring that exterior designs encourage healthy and positive behavior. Avoid design features that will encourage illegal, unhealthy and clandestine conduct. We understand that encouraging a positive public street life can also attract exactly the kind of behavior that inhibits an environment’s positive potential. It’s important to design facades and pedestrian zones in such a way that negative and unacceptable public behavior can be managed by neighbors, the City and the Police. Good design directly embraces the reality of such activity and actively seeks creative strategies to minimize it.

Social Justice: Diversity and Affordability Peace of Mind: Security and Safety The Public Realm: Our Streets and Alleys Getting Around: Pedestrians, Bikes and Automobiles Architecture and Design: Excellence for The Lower Polk Neighbors Development Area & Polk Alleyways District 6. A Vibrant Economy: Supporting Neighborhood Commerce 7. Embracing the Spirit of Collaborative Community

SOCIAL JUSTICE: DIVERSITY AND AFFORDABILITY: LPN believes that inclusionary affordable housing should be built on-site. It is a priority for our neighborhood that we remain socially and economically diverse. LPN’s goal is to have the highest number of affordable housing units be built, and welcomes working with developers in how they can locate the affordable units within the sponsor’s project. Under unique circumstances, we may consider alternatives. BEYOND THE LPA•DVP

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AUTOMOBILES AND TRAFFIC Polk Street, Van Ness Avenue and arterial streets are increasingly impacted by severe traffic. Lower Polk Neighbors believes that while parking may be part of a project, due to the transit rich nature of the neighborhood, parking should be minimized or eliminated. LPN strongly encourages reduced parking where allowed by law via variance or CU approval. LPN will apply additional scrutiny to projects which request parking in addition to the minimum. Car share services benefit both residents and businesses within the community and are a key way for developers to contribute to the broader community. Car sharing services are strongly supported and we will generally request the required number of spaces, or more, be applied to a project that triggers car share requirements. LPN may also request car share parking in buildings where it is not required by code.

The Principles we hold important are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Bicycles and non-motorized transportation Lower Polk Neighbors strongly supports at least a 1:1 or higher ratio for bike parking, preferably 2:1 so that all residents, including children and spouses can take advantage of bicycle and non motorized transportation.

THE PUBLIC REALM: OUR STREETS AND ALLEYS Lower Polk Neighbors puts significant emphasis on the public realm plans and alley treatments (when applicable) of projects proposed within our organization boundaries. Developments must interface with the sidewalk, street, and other public realm elements to create a livable street environment which enriches the everyday life of residents and visitors. LPN will closely review how the project integrates with the public realm. Outdoor seating, street trees, other plantings, public art, bulb outs, and other design elements are strongly desired and directly encouraged. The pedestrian experience is key. LPN is committed to the improvement of our Alleys as an essential part of our neighborhood. Our programming, advocacy, and goals for the our alleys are aggressive, ambitious and one of our highest priorities. For properties that face an alley, we expect that developers will put significant emphasis on activating that alley and work directly with us to embrace these public spaces in a way that reflects LPN’s commitment to these forgotten streets. The scale of alley improvements for a project will in general, be relative to the size of the project and total space along an alley that a project fronts. Opportunities for commercial spaces, including art galleries, cafes and other businesses that can activate an alley are expected.

Traffic is a concern for the organization. Large or specialized projects that will likely contribute to additional traffic, are encouraged to work closely with LPN to design traffic concepts and/or flows so as to minimize negative impacts on pedestrians and bicyclists.


ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN: EXCELLENCE FOR THE LOWER POLK NEIGHBORS DEVELOPMENT AREA & POLK ALLEYWAYS DISTRICT

The Lower Polk Neighborhood development area is a distinct and vibrant part of the unique collection of neighborhoods that characterize San Francisco’s rich urban heritage. It is a diverse and richly textured neighborhood with an emphasis on mixed use development. Street life is busy and extends late into the evenings with and a strong pedestrian oriented small scale “heritage merchant” and retail experience. This activity is coupled and supported by increasingly dense housing which is growing rapidly in this transit rich area of the city. ARCHITECTURAL EXPRESSION In its architectural expression and scale, the neighborhood is looking to encourage and support new development that reinforces and engages the distinct character of this neighborhood as differentiated from others while acknowledging the important goals and planning objectives of the San Francisco General Plan. The General Plan is overarching and detailed - it although it is comprehensive and has been evolved over several generations of legislation, there is no specific area plan for the Lower Polk Nieghborhood just to the west of the Van Ness corridor. This area has a unique block structure punctuated by alleys that run East West and offer a smaller scale street that we believe should be part of a larger green space initiative that could provide better shared public space for our diverse constituency if it was better integrated into the mixed use fabric of the neighborhood. THE LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN The LPN members and its numerous partners are working hard to develop our own “Polk Alleyways District” which is at the very heart of our Neighborhood. Through this plan we are defining a vision for a pedestrian prioritized area of the city where people live in a thriving small scale commercial corridor punctuated by a series of regularly interspaced two block long alleys that stem east and west off the central spine of the Lower Polk corridor. The scale of Polk Street is one that we want to capitalize on. New development should maintain and intensify this strong sense of neighborhood while improving safety, livability and an ever enhanced pedestrian domain where people can live, and work, visit and enjoy only a stones throw from civic center, and the major larger scale vehicular and retail corridor of Van Ness, surrounded by the predominantly residential neighborhoods that border it. ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTERISTICS: POROSITY AND TRANSPARENCY In an effort to prioritize the pedestrian it is critical that new development not create a “back of house” condition on street frontages: In this alleys are streets as well and they must not be slighted as “lessor” streets when

they are in fact perhaps best suited to the quieter neighbor to neighbor expression of urban place. We expect new development to avoid and or consolidate vehicular entries to lessen their impact on the available shop frontage. Prioritize glazing and entry ways into buildings – shop fronts and largely open glazing to allow for the “mise-en-scene” of the interior functions and activities of the individual building and the street. Prioritize evening light bleed into the streets from stores and shop fronts to establish a visual connection between interior functions and the life of the street outside the building. Engagement with the street. Alley Activation Characteristics of the architecture that will distinguish this Polk Alleyways District as a place will be those that prioritize the activation of the alleys. This can be achieved with entrances to buildings – pedestrian oriented lobbies that are better placed off the busy main streets and would benefit from the quieter pedestrian scale of these smaller scale streets. Small commercial frontages for “pop-up’ shops and trade-stores or lobbies are encouraged. Rear “patios for garden dinning perhaps associated with street fronting restaurants would also benefit from the quieter and more “cozy’ rear setbacks permitted in this area. Enriched and prioritized ground floor amenity uses associated with larger scale residential buildings are becoming more prevalent in these urban oasis alleys – including second or even third floor “roof” gardens that can maintain a strong visual connection with the alleys and there canopies, lights and pedestrian scale activities. This multilevel connection is encouraged as it affords “eyes on the street” and creates a shared ownership and responsibility attendant with the shared Park- Alley model. SIGNAGE / GROUND FLOOR COMMERCIAL TEXTURE The walking experience is so particular to this part of the city that it is no accident that it works as well as it does – we want development to acknowledge and respect the nuanced architectural character inherent in the successful pedestrian level façade. Recessed entries and variegated quality of openings along the street frontage with a pattern change typically every 25 to 30 ft is characteristic of the scale and texture of successful pedestrian mercantile urban edges. This ground floor complexity of materials and design differentiation results in a visually and experientially enriched zone of interaction, surprise and delight. Operable windows are encouraged and the careful handling of security and screening is key to developing a sensitive and inviting neighborhood round the clock. Differentiation of the pedestrian zone includes sectional complexity along this frontage as well with signage kept closely in scale with shop frontage and not in priority for the attention of vehicular passage. At this first floor store fronts should be tall (15 to 17 feet ceilings) street connected interiors with generous light deep into the retail environment. Clerestory’s are encouraged and shop special treatments are expected to create the more visually corrugated first story that belongs to this pedestrian enhanced domain.

DEVELOP PLACES The Public Realm - Perhaps the single most important component of the Districts sense of place is the relationship between it’s the community (merchants, dwellers and local institutions) and its built environment which so critically frames its streets and shared public realm. Sense of place is strengthened when changes to the built environment re-calibrate and adjust this relationship for the better. “.... The public realm is much more than a utilitarian system of connections to get from here to there. It is where people walk, meet, and where they socialize. It is where they take in the views, where they see what merchants have to offer, and where they come to know their neighborhood and their fellow citizens. The public realm connects us socially and economically. It can even be a place where people play. The public realm is the setting for civic life, and whether it is safe or dangerous, a place to spend time in or to avoid, determines the kind of civic life San Franciscans enjoy” . (SF General Plan, City Design Group) In its Architectural design guidelines the LPN seeks to balance all the functions of a building and its street, to make The Polk Alleyways District public realm a truly gracious pedestrian oriented civic space, and to put people and the quality of this place foremost. We expect developers and new building owners and builders to help us in this important effort of place-making as one of the façade’s primary functions. To this end we expect projects to engage the street beyond the minimum for sidewalks and ADA accessibility. We encourage the implementation of street furnishings, enhanced and enlarged plantings, trees where possible and lights that complement the pedestrian friendly nature of the street at night, including sustainable features in alleyways where this contribution can be made in an adjacency to a development – enhanced storm flow control and absorbs ion and management are all important aspects to a comprehensive strategic project that benefits in each its own part the building of a great public realm. Lower Polk Neighbors has had a history of supporting permitted by-right height and bulk. Generally, LPN will not support height and bulk related Special Use Districts (spot zoning) to exceed height and bulk requirements. Lower Polk Neighbors is inclined to support “routine” variances that are common for all projects unless negative impacts on residents or merchants is possible. Lower Polk Neighbors is generally inclined to support projects up to their permitted height and bulk, although there are unique circumstances where the organization may not support the full permitted height of a building. This includes when a development is significantly out of scale with other buildings, including those properties that are a transition from Van Ness RC to Polk NCD height districts. These situations will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and will take into account all of the residents’ and the developers concerns. Lower Polk Neighbors encourages the effective use of light wells and setbacks to allow new buildings to co-exist with neighboring buildings, many of which are rent controlled and have longterm tenants. BEYOND THE LPA•DVP LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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A VIBRANT COMMERCE

ECONOMY:

SUPPORTING

NEIGHBORHOOD

Lower Polk Neighbors encourages the development of functional commercial spaces that prioritizes locally owned non-formula retail business to either be retained or attracted to our neighborhood. Formula retail businesses are encouraged to locate on Van Ness Avenue. In projects that will displace a local business, Lower Polk Neighbors encourages developers to take steps to assist the business remain in the neighborhood. Any projects that commit to keeping the existing business in the new development or assit the merchant in relocating within the neighborhood will receive beneficial consideration.

EMBRACING THE SPIRIT OF COLLABORATIVE COMMUNITY Lower Polk Neighbors is excited to collaborate with developers and project sponsors on special neighborhood projects. Previous opportunities have included tree plantings, sponsoring Alley events, and applying jointly for grants. Feel free to reach out to us with opportunities to collaborate. Lower Polk Neighbors meeting procedures dictate that a developer or project sponsor will present to membership one month, then return the following month (or later) to respond to follow-up questions and a vote of the membership. Consummate to the scope and scale of individual projects, Lower Polk Neighbors board members may meet with project representatives one or more times before and/or in between general membership meetings. Attending two meetings (or more) also helps a developer create relationships with our neighbors and community. By building a relationship with Lower Polk Neighbors and developing projects that embrace our principles outlined above, the Lower Polk Neighbors Board, following a vote of support from the membership, will commit to attending entitlement hearings, submitting written letters in support, and take other actions to support projects.

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WORKSHOP NOTES & COMMENTS Alleyway Comments from Workshops Dated October 7th & 10th, 2015 and March 23rd, 2016 AUSTIN ALLEY

FRANK NORRIS

• West side tends to be more ‘visitor-friendly’ side of Polk Street – alley program can draw nighttime activity to center of alley with beer gardens or temporary outdoor dining by adjacent bars

• Senior Housing, 81 Frank Norris & The “Leland” Building, are critical communities that use this alley

• The connection to Van Ness feels unsafe with low lighting and negative behavior at mid-block • There is a potential opportunity to connect with art and music events at Miami AD School • There is a need for Noise Mitigation. Potential Solution: Soft surfaces, Trees/ plantings

• Parents of Children that attend Redding Elementary School have a vested interest in this alley • Safety and accessibility for Children especially at mid-block crossing needs to be prioritized • Concern: Desire to limit vehicular traffic during school hours (Students must cross the alley to reach the school yard) • Appreciate traffic reversal as it allows parents to drop children on same side as the school

• Smokers, urine/urination, and dog poop gather near new apartments at North • Concern that there is shattered glass on a daily basis along the road from the school crossing to the end of the parking building

• Option: Block or limit vehicular traffic through the alley (unlikely due to mid- block apartment garage location)

• Desire to enhance planting and stormwater treatment at potential bulbouts. “Fixed Edges”

• There is a desire to eliminate street parking and have two-way traffic from Polk to the apartments and to eliminate through traffic on school side with the exception of buses

• Allow for a senior and/or school bus stop area with bright-colored paving

• Safety Concern: General desire to add additional pedestrian lighting

• Opportunity for a green wall at the parking structure/school play yard. Potential to act as a sound absorption measure as well

• Interest in the addition of murals and green walls, particularly along the large wall across from school

• Plantings along this wall should be vine pockets not large shrubs/bushes.

• Desire limit unwanted behavior outside of school

• Desire for aggressive vine & urban agriculture

• Concern with trash accumulation, prostitutes and urination at Larkin Corner

• Potential to “wrap” green elements (green walls, trees, etc.) around the corner from Polk street into the alley

• Option: Utilize paint to discourage urination habit

• Residents would like to choose plantings that will not block or inhibit the use of the sidewalk

• Street feels narrow to users, especially near 81 Frank Norris where the trees obstruct the sidewalk for elderly • Option: Addition of raised planters

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• Many campers live along the parking lot openings

• Walgreen’s has trash bins that are left out for pick-up on Frank Norris – Trash accumulation is a problem

• Current plan in action to bump out sidewalk at Larkin corner

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• Option: chainlink fence along roof school yard is unattractive and could be masked with shrubs

• Opportunities to slow cars & constrict vehicles: Eliminate use of Frank Norris as a cut-through, use cobbles or heavy textures or “sound” paving to create at “traffic break,” Mid-block chicanes, enhance overhead/tree canopy

• Option: Desire to increase alleyway cleaning

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• Graffiti and trash are seen as both good and bad

• Seating should be keep toward main streets

• Potential for brightly colored bulb-outs adjacent to the mid-block crosswalk used by the school to signal cars to slow • Desire to widen the sidewalk at 81 Frank Norris • Assess potential for diagonal parking on Frank Norris


FERN (WEST)

FERN (EAST)

• West side tends to be more ‘visitor-friendly” side of Polk Street – alley program can draw nighttime activity to center of alley with beer gardens or temporary outdoor dining by adjacent bars. This often includes partying

• Art in the Alley

• Need for better pedestrian protection • Interest in DPW projects and timeline so that this project may take advantage of opportunities • Quoted DPW Mission & Howard Alley Examples • Resident expressed interest in re-establishing monthly or bimonthly art walk • Need utility maps for infrastructure & survey from city to locate existing location of vaults, etc. • Sponsorship opportunities should be explored and cultivated • Create a “Hard-surface temp Park” using borrowed trees(in pots?)and boulders / benches

• Opportunity: Engage Music City “Play n’ Play” events in basement of building • Need for trash bins and bathrooms • Cyclists ride on sidewalk along Larkin corner. OPTION: Potential for cyclist signage at this intersection • To Do: Temporary Closures • Site Impaired Wayfinding and orientation elements / medallions or plaques. • Mid block Alley Example: 88 Broadway Project • Pan-handling occurs more southerly • Need to add public restrooms • Interpretive aspects could be developed – History & Cultural narratives, interpretive signage or sculptural elements – perhaps at “gates”

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WORKSHOP NOTES & COMMENTS Alleyway Comments from Workshops Dated October 7th & 10th, 2015 and March 23rd, 2016 HEMLOCK (WEST)

HEMLOCK (EAST)

• Gateway from Van Ness – desire for visual clues to the alleyways district entry points

• Cyclists ride on sidewalk along Larkin and interfere with pedestrian traffic into alleys – route bike traffic to Polk Street

• Sloped street makes traffic slowing a priority

• Dog waste as much an issue as human waste

• Concentrate functions away from SVN towards mid and lower block

• Resident expressed necessity to keep parking for visitors – does not want elimination of parking to negatively affect businesses.

• Encourage corner transparency at gates in retail to wrap into alleys • Desire for passage controlling speed (diversions - Chicanes) • Storm water opportunities – wind control from taller buildings on Van Ness Blvd. • Need to plant trees that can handle winds • The 24 Hour Fitness is leaving and will be redeveloped. Opportunity: Activation at Van Ness corner with potential ground floor commercial use/” Van Ness Passage” welcoming treatment • Hemlock Tavern & part of the Northern Block will be redeveloped into apartments + mixed use • Opportunity to engage children that attend the Mosque

• Residents and visitors feel unsafe to leave vehicles parked • Opportunities for visual invitations at alley intersections • Identifying creative ways to utilize social media (especially for businesses) • Option: Blockage to stop through traffic • Increased lighting can make a huge difference • Desire to make alley drug free (Currently many sex and drug crimes) • Residents have difficulty believing physical change will change behaviors

• Notable changing mural on the Southern corner at Blur

• Many “areas of concern” toward Larkin where campers sit in window sills

• Opportunity for bike repair station

• Mr. Holmes Bake House brings “eyes” to the alley and positive activity

• Opportunity for Fitness Planning

• Potential to add planters in front of Golden Gate Jeep

• Desire to have festoon lights through the alley

• Opportunity to have a battery recharge station at the workout area to help fuel the light in the alley

• Potential for dog park (west) with fenced in area in place of parking spots, a safe low-light zone, trash receptacles for doggie bags, use of turf as dog park surface

• Issue with “sleeping” in planters. Proposed solution: Place bollards in planters strategically

• Desire for Increased greening, trees, & shrubs

• Potential for vine walls on supports to create “archways.”

• Desire for a puppy alley

• Problem with drivers parking on curbs. Proposed solution: Low bollards put along curb edge to prevent curb parking • Desire to stop drug related activities, public urination, and “hanging out.” Potential Solution: Overhead lights

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CEDAR (WEST)

CEDAR (EAST)

• Many resting “loitering” people along Polk corners due to the RIGPA Center and Next Door Shelter

Increase number of garbage cans

• RIGPA Center is a positive feature in the alley

• Cyclists ride on sidewalk along Larkin and interfere with pedestrian traffic into alleys – route bike traffic to Polk Street

• Areas of concern between sole pair of trees on the Polk corner of the alley

• Polk Street Art Walk can move to flatter and underused southern alleys

• Design plans should be updated to include new hospital drawings (design for alley)

• Many of the murals on this street were commissioned by building owners and painted by local artists. They should be respected.

• Ocean Aquarium frontage on the alley is a positive

• Desire for resilient and durable improvements and potential graffiti resistance testing for paints used in the alley. • Local gardener Sheldon can act as the “greening captain” and has plantings along the existing surface parking lot. • Homeless outreach in most populated southern alleys. • Concern with vehicular traffic: frequent motor cycles and fire trucks moving quickly through the alley. • SF Cycle and Fukuda Auto shop are seen as positive additions that bring commercial frontage to the alley • Edinburgh Castle mural is a positive addition to the alley • Chinese Grace Church is seen as an area of concern as it is a “graffiti” magnet.” • Areas of concern on North and South corners of Cedar at Polk Street • Jane on the corner of Larkin and Cedar brings positive activity • SF Cycle shop is closed and is being purchased by an Architecture Firm. OPPORTUNITY: Mid-block frontage and activation by Architecture Office. • Residents would like to increase planters and potentially add flower boxes along the alley.

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WORKSHOP NOTES & COMMENTS Alleyway Comments from Workshops Dated October 7th & 10th, 2015 and March 23rd, 2016 ALICE B. TOKLAS (WEST)

MYRTLE (EAST)

• Site specificity: Alley was named after Alice B. Toklas who was born in SF and a writer, partner of Gertrude Stein, and member of Parisian avant garde (plaques/ infographs/ narrative artwork, mural). Alice B. Toklas wrote History of Space.

• Vinyl Record Shop RS94109 / soon to be cultural event space, coffee bar – there is currently a kickstarter campaign to help complete their renovations – due to be completed in Jan 2016 – welcoming corner

• Potential partners: Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club

• Sergeant John Macaulay Park – Poor visibility from street lend to nefarious activity. A lot of negative activity, trash on corner

• Inspiration: King Street – Native words of Ohlone tribe

• Inside of the park has positive activity – children only

• Desire to mask the dull wall of the AMC Building that occupies the entire southern block. SOLUTION: Green walls or Day/Night Murals and projections

• Need for sanitation improvement. Myrtle has the only public restroom in Lower Polk. Potential Solution: Increased trash receptacles & public restrooms

• Utilize the empty lobby space at the entry of the AMC Theaters for a “café corner”

• Need for sound mitigation. Potential Solution: Wall/Façade treatments

• Define the Marquee residential entry. Potential Solution: Table-top “plaza” for entry.

• Very creative / artistic oriented people in the area – members of art and design community

• Parking spaces in front of the Marquee entry are “white zone” and are strictly for loading/unloading

• Want to incorporate data- driven art and design installations, reaching out to different art organizations and publications including: SFAQ, The Thing Quarterly, The Seasonal Exhibitions held at O’Farrell and Jones, 3rd Thursday Art Walks. Gathering a round table of art associations, groups and organizations to contribute

• Concern about Noise/Echoing/Acoustics. Potential Solution: Coordination with building owners to enhance facades with noise mitigation features • Planting is on the north-facing side of the street and is suffering. Potential Solution: desire to increase south-facing plantings • Desire to tie the alley to place. Potential Solution: “Living history walk.” & Desire for unique paving patterns • Need for an organized scheme to provide pedestrian friendly, characterenhancing lighting • Traffic on Alice B. Toklas is not bad • The building adjacent to The Opal is set to be demolished and turned into Micro-Units (Stanton Architects). The Opal will become a Marriot Residential Inn • The Monarch Hotel and Polk side of the alley will be a challenge for change- Quite a bit of negative activity at this corner • Potential for Temporary seating across from projection wall/walls • Opportunity for temporary bollards to be used for street closures APPENDIX

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LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

• Liked the idea of pop-up installations, galleries, happenings • Potential for partnership with Urban Solutions whose goal is to fill voids by “strengthening underserved neighborhoods.” • Invest in ground floor land use • More effective communication mechanism to stake holders • Person or group that already has this – Interconnected/com. Channels


OLIVE (WEST)

OLIVE (EAST)

GENERAL ALLEYWAY COMMENTS

• Academy of Art University Car Museum – potential partnership for outdoor space, draw in visitors, create space for people to hang around before/ after viewing museum) (good PR for them)

• Reach out to business owners between the O’Farrell Theater and Pacific Dental Services (two large murals at each end of alley) to invite artists to create a continuous alley of murals

• Concern with the amount of homeless along Larkin corners

• A food truck alley during lunch or late dinner hours would draw people in, look at SOMA Food Truck park – in a Freeway underpass

• Flood lights could be used to create outdoor mural gallery while making it safe to walk at night and look at art, an “art promenade.”

• Inspiration: The Box – chef in bar adjacent “box” at The Tempest is another good example of using food to liven up space

• Potential for a pop-up gallery space, short term rentals

• Need for a more thoughtful lighting plan that enhances the pedestrian experience in a positive way. Lighting is not just for safety, but is experiential. Lighting should be warm and inviting.

• Potential Design Inspiration: “The Little Griddle” at Market and Octavia • Reach out to artists to create site specific/data driven art and architecture throughout the neighborhood • Olive West is mostly commercial/PDR • Opportunity to utilize North corner parking lot at Olive West for food trucks. The lot is used primarily at night for the club

• Southeast Asian Community Center food pick up (5:30 AM every Friday) • Potential to create an artist design collective • Existing murals add vibrancy to the alley • Need to transform the parking lot and sidewalk in front of the Civic Center Inn. Parking is only used hourly by visitors-not by the Inn. Potential Solution: Potential area for food trucks “Open Garage.”

• General need for more public restrooms

• General desire to not only fill the alleys with positive behavior, but to have elements that act as preventative measures as well (i.e. means of prohibiting loitering/drug-related activity). • Safety: Potential for LPN/CBD to provide a list of neighborhood resources • (311 & Next Door App: Allow you to connect with your neighbors) • Suggestion to look at book Tilings and Patterns by Grunbaum and Shepherd. • Green Walls on alleys can potentially have combined funding.

• Opportunity to engage the Academy of Art car museum. Potential connection to food trucks + automobiles

• Existing mural on the north corner at Olive and Larking appears to be a semi-organized art effort, as well as the mural on the back Mitchell Brothers

• Residents are concerned by events that draw in the campers (i.e. soup kitchen, etc.)

• Major concern regarding loitering at entries & openings. Potential Solution: Designed gates/facades to eliminate “niches.”

• Potential to develop an Arts Commission

• Desire to increase street trees (only 1 Tree on all of Olive). Potential Solution: Continue Olives from across Van Ness as the “signature” tree • Utilize traffic to the Great American Music Hall located in the mid-block of Olive East • General desire to “soften” the walls and make the street more inviting. Potential Solution: Murals, Green Walls, Trees, etc.

• Many residents believe that “Polk Gulch” is a sacred name.

• Opportunity to collaborate with SFAC. • Tree guards can be used to protect newly planted trees • Need for a strategy to incentivize occupants • Table-tops should be wider at the top of sloped alleys

• Issue with loitering + drug-related “resting.” Desire for movable seating only. Permanent furnishings could be used negatively • Proximity to Civic Center can bring in crowds for food truck events

APPENDIX LOWER POLK ALLEYWAYS VISION PLAN

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Lower Polk Alleyways Vision Plan  

The Lower Polk Alleyways District Vision Plan (LPA-DVP) was commissioned by the Lower Polk Neighbors (LPN) in the Spring of 2015 to embark o...