Lowcountry Dog Magazine- December 2020

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Publisher Brian Foster brian@lowcountrydog.com Chief Canine Officer Peanut Copy Editor Chelsea Salerno Social Media and Web Coordinator Alyssa Helms alyssa@lowcountrydog.com Editorial Columnist & Rescue Coordinator Alicia Williams alicia@lowcountrydog.com Staff Writers Julie Murray Kelly Sekulovski Hali Selert Fern Wooden Staff Photographer Southern Vintage Photography Guest Photographer Jeanne Taylor Photography Web and Design Consultant Laura Olsen Contributing Writers Amelia Palmer Laurren Zimmerman For advertising and media inquiries please email contact@lowcountrydog.com

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Above and cover photo by Guest Photographer, Jeanne Taylor Photography. Cover dog is Cricket currently available for adoption from Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary

We believe that our dogs are our best friends, and that’s why we need a reliable source to turn to for information on all things “dog” in our community. Our mission is to be the number one Charleston area resource for dog owners regarding regional dog-centric and dog-welcoming events, health & wellness information, dog training, trends, and local news. We also strive to be a mouthpiece to the public for various Lowcountry-based pet nonprofits, and we promote pet adoption and other responsible pet care practices. Founded in Charleston, South Carolina in 2005 as a print magazine, we re-launched in 2015 as “Charleston’s Digital Dog Magazine.” We continue our mission to be the best dog friendly resource in the Lowcountry.

In this issue

6 10 14 16 22 HAVE A HALLIE JOLLY CHRISTMAS 32 34 38 42

SIT, STAY... BEHAVE: 10 Mind Boosting Ideas for Relieving Anxiety HEALTH & WELLNESS: 4 Strategies to Overcome the Pet Obesity Epidemic PEACE, LOVE & REAL TALK: with Alicia Rose Willliams

FEATURE STORY: New Improved Shelters Coming to the Lowcountry!

IN THE NEWS

THINK OUTSIDE THE SHELTER: How I Started Volunteering

GO GREEN: Adopt A Recycled Dog! LOCAL DOG EVENTS


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Peanut ’s

But t er a n d P u m p k i n Do g Trea t s

Peanut 's P O I N T

• • • • • •

O F

V I E W

2 ½ cups whole wheat flour 2 eggs ½ cup canned pumpkin 2 tablespoons peanut butter ½ teaspoon salt ½teaspoon ground cinnamon

Step 1 Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) Step 2 Whisk together the flour, eggs, pumpkin, peanut butter, salt, and cinnamon in a bowl. Add water as needed to help make the dough workable, but the dough should be dry and stiff. Roll the dough into a 1/2-inchthick roll. Cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Step 3 Bake in preheated oven until hard, about 40 minutes.

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10 Mind Boosting Ideas for Relieving Anxiety WRIT TEN BY: AMELIA PALMER of MDRN CBD CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Animals experience anxiety and stress in much the same way humans do. It often comes out in a physical manifestation of the emotional and mental concern. It’s completely natural for a pet to experience anxiety, even in a home they love. All you have to do is watch for the signs and help your pet before their anxiety escalates. Signs Your Pet is Distressed Anxiety in pets is usually caused by a change in routine or the setup at home, fear from sudden loud noises or moving objects, or aging. It’s important to find out what’s causing the anxiety to treat it to the best of your ability. When looking for the signs, you’ll usually see one or several of the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Pacing and a general inability to settle down Panting Barking or crying Weeing in the house Over washing or excessive licking Destructive behavior

How to Deal with the Stress 1. Lots of Physical Contact Domesticated pets love a good cuddle and feeling their owner close to them should calm their anxiety. If you know something in particular such as fireworks are about to cause distress, or there has been a sudden loud noise, pick your pet up or get into their bed with them. A feeling of closeness can be very therapeutic.

Pet anxiety can be a huge problem, but it’s not one without solutions. Find out how you can curb your pet’s stress and help them feel better. 2. Plenty of Exercise Exercise is good for anxiety because it releases endorphins to boost your pet’s mood and it can tire them out too. A good walk can do wonders, as can a quick run or splash in the pool. Exercise is also a great bonding time that will help ease separation anxiety. 3. Mental Exercises Mental stimulation in the form of obstacle/agility courses or a puzzle toy are brilliant distractions from situations that cause anxiety. If they’re focusing on something else, they can’t sit and dwell on their stress. You can break a negative focus by shifting their attention to something they enjoy. 4. Music or Sound Therapy Never underestimate the power of music to calm a pet. It’s been proven that if you leave music playing or the radio or television on while you’re out, your pet is more likely to be calm. It’s a source of comfort because it sounds like humans are around and it provides a distraction from other noises that could cause stress. 5. Massage Therapy A good massage can physically relax your pet and help them let go of tension carried in their muscles. You can also break the cycle of shivers or nervous shakes while having a good bonding session. 6. Calming Wraps If you aren’t able to give your pet a cuddle or a hug constantly, look into buying them a specially designed wrap or top. These garments apply a mild, constant pressure to the body and


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T R A I N I N G

can be just as reassuring as a hug from you. They’re particularly good for dogs who don’t like thunderstorms. 7. Giving Them a Time Out Anxious behavior isn’t naughty or bad, but isolating your pet or speaking to them authoritatively can break the cycle of the behavior. Just be sure to do so with care and calming tones rather than angry shouts or commands. If you put them in a room on their own, try turning down the lights and playing calming music. A break from the real world might be all they need. 8. Counter-conditioning If your pet has developed bad habits because of their anxiety, it’s important to try to retrain them. Start with telling them to stop as soon as they start pacing, panting or over washing. Be firm but gentle. You may need help from a professional trainer if the habits are too ingrained. 9. Aromatherapy and Diffusers Animals are big on scents. In the same way that some scents can alleviate human stress, there are those that can work with your pets too. You can use a normal aromatherapy diffuser in your home along with the right oils for your pet. Just be sure to check that the oils are pet-friendly. Alternatively, invest in a diffuser tailored for anxious animals that releases just the right pheromones. 10. Calming Supplements There are various supplements—both natural and prescription—designed to help your pet cope with anxiety. CBD oil is a popular option for dogs, as are supplements that contain thiamin, melatonin, L-tryptophan or L-Theanine. However, before dosing your pet with any medication, it’s always best to chat to your vet. An anxious pet can be heartbreaking but by following this advice you can help them stay calm and break any bad habits they’ve developed. It may take time and patience, but your furry friend will feel all the better for it and so will you! ■

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4 Strategies to Overcome the Pet Obesity Epidemic WRITTEN BY: LAURREN ZIMMERMAN

Research over the past 10 years reveals that one in three dogs in the U.S. are overweight or obese. Dogs can become obese and develop health issues due to access body fat, just like humans. According to Banfield Pet Hospital, the prevalence of overweight dogs has increased by 158% during this time period. The quality of life for our pets is consistently threatened by diseases associated with obesity. As a Certified Canine Athlete Specialist and multi-time dog agility national finalist and winner across multiple organizations, I have found that there are important steps that pet parents can take to help their dog safely lose weight. By providing a fresh outlook and healthier future for our favorite furry friends, we can come together as a community to help our pets live longer, happier lives. Underlying Health Issues Start by consulting your veterinarian and rule out any underlying health issues that may be causing your dog’s unwarranted weight gain. Obesity in dogs can be ultimately caused by serious underlying health issues in contrast to lack of exercise or a poor diet. Weight gain can be related to uncontrolled hormone imbalances; this can cause an unnatural increase in their overall appetite.

Regular Cardiovascular Exercise Regular, high and low impact cardiovascular exercise is essential in order to maintain muscle strength and promote a dog’s overall well-being. Running, jumping and general playtime is helpful to keep dogs fit. Start slowly, adding more time with low-intensity walks and gradually work towards jogging and running up to several miles. If your dog is overweight because he is older and suffering from arthritis or persistent pain, physical therapy may be helpful in diagnosing specific mobility issues. Hydrotherapy is also a wonderful way to keep your arthritic dog moving, in a non-weight bearing environment, focusing on increasing their overall cardiovascular health and range of motion. Strength Training with Flexibility Work In addition to regular cardiovascular exercise, just like humans, dogs need strength training and flexibility work to keep their body moving properly. As a health care professional, I see dogs daily that do not have a proper range of motion in the front or rear limbs; also, their core muscles are extremely weak due to inactivity. I encourage my clients to partake in proactive


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and integrative health measures to boost their aging or overweight dog’s strength and mobility issues, addressing the disparaging muscle loss issues in the process. Strength training & flexibility work can be done using a variety of techniques incorporating basic behaviors such as sits, downs, and stands to achieve better overall body composition and movement. Seeking out a ‘’doggie personal trainer’’ to help get you started in achieving these movements safely could drastically increase their overall quality of life. A Clean Diet & Superior Supplementation A clean diet and good supplementation is critical to proactively promoting the muscle health, strength, and joint health of your dog. In order to ward off unwanted weight gain, which over time leads to obesity, it is especially important to keep an eye on your dog’s diet and manage their caloric intake. A high protein, low carbohydrate diet is highly recommended.

Typically, dogs become overweight over an extended period of time; an extra treat here and there seems harmless, but it all adds up! By focusing on a clean diet, feeding smaller meals throughout the day, you can curb your dog’s need for extra cookies and provide their bodies with the nutrition it ultimately needs. Extra calories and unneeded table scraps can lead to debilitating health issues such as diabetes. So, when feeding your dog its daily meals, be sure to consult with your Veterinarian on what balanced diet would be best for your pet. In addition, as part of proactive measures, supplementation can be extremely helpful in building muscle. One all-natural supplement that I have used with my own canine athletes is Myos Canine Muscle Formula. It derived from fertilized egg yolks (Fortetropin), which has been clinically proven to help build lean muscle. Healthy muscles lead to less instances of joint arthritis and debilitating mobility issues, which can give your older dog the mobility back it desperately needs!■

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Someone Needs Granite In Their Life! EDITORIAL BY: ALICIA ROSE WILLIAMS Founder, Eunoia Rescue

It’s unusual for me to promote a dog for adoption through my editorial – but Granite is worth the exception.


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be difficult to adopt without knowing their history (and having an “aggressive” history is always a possibility). With Granite though, he simply does well with everyone. Other dogs? Granite can coexist with no problem. Cats? Granite completely ignores them. Children? Granite welcomes them. Adults? He loves them, especially if they give him attention. This dude is awesome. The only thing that’s missing for Granite is his forever home. I have thought long and hard about adopting him myself (because our bond is strong) – but I know he will continue to excel without me and can make someone very happy.

Granite is a dog that I am currently fostering. Before he was surrendered to the rescue, he was a typical “back yard dog.” He was given the basic food, water, shelter necessities – but it was clear that he didn’t receive a lot of attention. Granite was originally going to be euthanized by his owners because they thought it was “his time to go.” However, the vet thought otherwise. Upon arrival Granite had bronchitis, irritated skin, and severe inflammation in both ears. Medically Granite wasn’t the worst that we have ever seen, but he definitely deserved better. Even though Granite was lethargic and confused about his new circumstances, he has still always been very sweet.

Granite has been with us for seven months with little to no interest. It truly breaks my heart. It seems as though people bypass all of his amazing qualities and focus on his old age, arthritis, chunky figure, and patchy skin. All of these “ailments” do not hinder his willingness to being a wonderful companion. He is a diamond in the rough and we are trying so hard to find someone to just give him a chance. It’s unusual for me to promote a dog for adoption through my opinion piece – but Granite is worth the exception. If you think you are worthy of adopting Granite, please go to www.eunoiarescue.org to fill out an adoption application. I can’t wait to see this guy prosper. ■

In my eyes, Granite has always had the “perfect demeanor.” Within the rescue world, it can www.lowcountrydog.com

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New Improved Shelters Coming to the Lowcountry!

Sketch of the new Dorchester Paws

WRIT TEN BY: FERN WOODEN, STAFF WRITER

Imagine if we could all donate our spare change to better shelter animals’ lives, providing them a loving space while awaiting adoption. The Lowcountry emcompasses eleven counties, including Charleston County, Dorchester County and Berkeley County. Although 2020 has been a challenging year for all of us, two shelters in Berkeley County and Dorchester County found a glimmer of hope. Both Dorchester Paws and Berkeley Animal Center are upgrading to newer shelters within the next coming year. Saving animals is not an easy task, but the resources required can appear overwhelming to outsiders looking in. Dorchester Paws, built in 1972, is the only shelter in the county and is allotted a mere 15% of the county’s annual budget to cover the necessary costs to run the facility. The 48-year-old building often deals with flooding, which happens frequently in the Lowcountry. Each time the shelter floods or faces a threat of imminent rain, they are forced to relocate scared homeless animals to near-by middle school gyms. Imagine the stress that puts on both the staff and the cats and dogs involved! During inclement weather, staff members begrudgingly resort to emergency mode, focusing on crisis needs and restoring the shelter to placing primary animal care first. The shelter closes which causes animals to lack essential medication, an overwhelmed staff, and homeless animals turned away because they do not have the room. With an annual shelter repair budget of $3000, they often wonder how

they can provide the best care for each animal in a dilapidated building. Over 10 days, Dorchester Paws spent $1,400 on emergent repairs for the shelter this past May. Currently, the facility has 400 animals in their care with many in foster homes as the current building can only hold 181 animals. Executive Director Maddie Moore says the shelter’s state is a bigger problem than the Dorchester Paws itself. “The building’s condition causes a devastating ripple effect. Loving families looking to adopt see a depressing shelter and stray away or turn at the door,” said Moore. The animals are the ones paying the price, experiencing longer stay durations in the shelter. Moore notes it is not uncommon to see an animal in their shelter waiting for their forever homes three months at a time. Dorchester Paws confirmed themselves as a no-kill shelter in 2017 and does not euthanize to save space or money. They strive to provide each animal life-saving remedies such as heartworm treatments and prevention so every animal has a fighting chance to find happiness in their forever home. With two vets, Dr. Sally Price and Dr. Angela Price, two vet technicians and one volunteer working tirelessly in a windowless 15x15 square foot space, it is almost a miracle they can accomplish as much as they do. Is there a solution to these problems? Dorchester Paws is working on a campaign to build a new shelter because Dorchester’s animals deserve better. With the help of the county, the shelter is looking for a tract to provide a larger facility for current and incoming pets and a more


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Sketch of the new Berkeley Animal Center being built in 2021. visible spot for potential adopters. Their new space will incorporate larger individual kennels to meet national care standards, larger play yards to exercise and dedicated walking trails. The new building also provides heartworm and behavioral assessments not offered at other county shelters and a state of the art spay and neuter clinic. Currently, the shelter can only handle 60 spay and neuter appointments a week and those are only available to homeless dogs and is done off campus. The new spay and neuter clinic will double the weekly neuter and spay appointments available to the shelter as well as offer the public an affordable option otherwise not offered in the area. Their campaign is currently raising $3 million for the new shelter, including the $1 million the county gave them to start their journey. April Howard, Director of Shelter operations at Dorchester Paws, reminds people why their volunteers and staff work tirelessly to provide these animals a second chance at life. “You have the highest of highs when you watch your favorite animal walk out the front door with a family after months of being in a kennel. You have the lowest of lows when you hold the paw of an animal you barely know and tell them they are loved as they cross the rainbow bridge,” said Howard. It makes people wonder how they conquer each opposition they face day after day. “You walk by a kennel on your way to another task and you see a face that makes you

stop. And in that split second, the perspective is returned, and the silly frustrations disappear.” Berkeley County shares a similar experience to Dorchester Paws with their shelter, Berkeley Animal Center, aka BAC. Formerly Doc Williams SPCA shelter, the county took the space in 2017. Current manager for the facility Debbie Allen shares a common goal with her staff: a commitment to maintaining a fiscally responsible, healthy, safe and loving environment for rescued, abandoned, abused and neglected animals of Berkeley County. When the county took possession of the shelter in 2017, it was apparent the facility was outdated and rundown, too small to function as adequate space for the massive influx of animals they take in. This year the shelter has housed more than 6,000 animals compared to 2,500 in 2017. With resources spread thin, animals are in different buildings in the facility. The current structure also lacks an onsite spay and neuter clinic, forcing BAC to send these animals to Columbia and other clinics in the Lowcountry. Not having an onsite spay and neuter clinic requires more volunteers to transport these animals to multiple locations, putting more stress on the already limited shelter. By June 2021, Berkeley Animal Center will open its doors to the public with a brand new shelter with 36 intake kennels, 30 adoption kennels, a one of a kind pig and goat pen, two horse stalls, three outdoor play and exercise yards, cat and kitten

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rooms and a sick room for cats to heal. The best part for Allen and her team is the new onsite spay and neuter clinic to promote a TNR program for the county. TNR stands for Trap Neuter and Release, a program that helps stop feral cats’ overpopulation and allows them to live safely outdoors. The program also helps combat the past high rates of euthanasia in Berkeley County due to lack of space in the shelter. Each new feature signifies a sign of hope for Allen and her team, despite a trying year. If you are looking to give back this holiday season, both Berkeley Animal Center and Dorchester Paws accept donations to make their dreams for a better-equipped facility. Berkeley Animal Center is always accepting volunteers, fosters, and monetary donations through their website, Berkeleyanimalcenter.org. BAC also has a running Amazon wish list for cat litter, food and toys. Dorchester Paws accepts donations through their social media pages and you can learn more at their website, Dorchesterpaws.org. Many of these dogs and cats come into the shelter with past trauma, often never knowing a loving touch. November is Adopt a Senior Dog Month because no animal should have to live out the rest of their lives in a shelter. This holiday season, forget buying a puppy and consider giving a shelter dog a chance. Who knows, they might be the family member you were missing! â–

Above: Dorchester Paws faces flooding issues regularly at their current shelter. Below: Berkeley Animal Center has to house many dogs outdoors as does Dorchester. New facilties will bring much better living envirnonments for homeless dogs


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Written by Chelsea Salerno, Copy Editor Photography by Jeanne Taylor Photography www.lowcountrydog.com

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It has always been a lifelong dream of mine, and surely many of our readers, to own a large farm where dogs, cats and other furry friends can live out their lives in freedom and happiness. That is essentially what Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary has done and it is pretty amazing. Founded by Helen Bradham in 1988, Hallie Hill is a 40 acre 501c3 animal sanctuary capable of caring for 200 animals, most of whom are considered “less adoptable� due to age, medical or emotional issues. The sanctuary began to take shape when stray dogs would wander onto the property and remained unclaimed. Helen would build enclosures for them to stay in, provide them with vetting and adopt them out to people she knew. From there, more enclosures were built to accommodate more and more animals, each including an open air run and shelter with heat lamps to ward of the cold in the winter months. There is even a catery that houses over 50 cats! Hallie Hill has grown exponentially over the years and what started as a local philanthropist’s pet project has turned into an operation that requires 5 full and part time staff members, an 11 person Board of Directors and numerous hard working volunteers. The property itself is impressive; everything is well maintained and the dogs have yards to run around in that include pools, shade sails, heat lamps, plumbing and running water. There is even a pond to swim in and a huge field to explore! Along with the 150 dogs and 50 cats that live on the property, there is also a colony of feral cats which have their own area tucked away where they have little interaction with humans but also can remain safe and unbothered. There is a house with a patio attached specifically for small dogs and patients in recovery as well as some other animals such as bunnies and even a rat. The catery in the center of the property has both an inside area for the cats to lounge in and an outside garden for them to bask in the sun or play hide and seek. There is a local vet that comes out once a year to administer all vaccines and they have a small infirmary where they can attend to minor medical issues.

Opposite Page: Smokey, the Staffie Mix is a fun loving guy and about 3 years old. Top: Moultrie, the 5 year old hound just wants a couch to call his own. Bottom: Ben is a senior at 11 years old and is a sweet natured boy needing a forever home. Centerfold: Levi, a 16 year old recent surrender was adopted shortly after the shoot

Hallie Hill is a no-kill shelter and part of what makes this sanctuary so special is their ability to take in www.lowcountrydog.com

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animals who might not get adopted otherwise. Their mission statement says it all- “While we can’t change an animal’s past, our mission is to rewrite their future”. Many of the dogs at Hallie Hill are perfectly nice and adoptable. In fact, there are several dogs who are allowed to roam the property freely at night and at some times during the day. These are not the dogs who stay at Hallie Hill long term. The long term residents are dogs who, because of behavioral or medical issues, are not able to be adopted out as easily. These dogs are who the rescue focuses on. Many medical or behavioral issues can be solved with proper attention but some dogs just don’t like people and prefer the company of other dogs. These are the dogs who stay at Hallie Hill long term because people like Executive Director Jennifer Middleton understand that not all dogs will become pets, usually by no fault of their own, and believe that they still deserve a chance at a happy, fulfilled life. One thing that really stood out about Hallie Hill is the way they let the dogs interact with each other to encourage them to build confidence. There is a select group of dogs known as “helper dogs” that are often pulled from shelters to help some of the shy dogs learn how to interact with people and each other. These are extremely pet friendly dogs that help the most shy, under socialized dogs learn the ropes of being a pet. The shy dogs will watch the helper dogs interact with humans and start to gain the confidence to accept treats and pets. This learned behavior is crucial in the eventual adoption of a dog and who better to teach them than someone of the same species? An operation such as Hallie Hill requires money to continue to expand and though they used to be privately funded, the sanctuary relies mostly on donations and fundraising to ensure longevity. The dog and cat enclosures are funded by sponsorships; it costs $500 to sponsor a house for a year and $5000 to sponsor for life. Though there are also private donors, the rescue also participates in several yearly fundraisers such as Laps for Love, Putting for Paws and Cocktails with a Cause. Due to COVID restrictions, this year they are participating in their first online auction

and have an ongoing Pennies for Pets program that encourages supporters to donate their loose change to the cause. Funds raised for the sanctuary go to the general upkeep and vetting of the animals. The sanctuary is also hoping to break ground on an on-property spay and neuter clinic so donations are more important than ever! Hallie Hill is truly a special place. The freedom given to these dogs and cats is unmatched and you can see the genuine happiness in these animal’s faces. The staff cares for each and individual animal like it is their own and works tirelessly to get to know them so they can be placed in a loving “furever” home. Because of their tireless endeavors, 15-20 animals are adopted out a month which makes room for more animals to come in and begin their journey at the sanctuary. If you are looking for a wonderful cause to donate to this holiday season, look no further than Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary! Visit Halliehill.com for more information and to make a donation.


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Above: Jameson, the mastiff mix, is sweet boy who is on a diet from too many Santa cookies. Below: Maisie, a recent addition has an adoption pending

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Top: The barn at Hallie Hill houses what are dubbed “the barn dogs.� These dogs get the run of the place for a time every day and are the dogs that do well in a pack. They also act as an alarm system should a stranger come. Left: The majority of the dogs at Hallie Hill share a large run with a enclosure with heat, hay and fresh water. Bottom: The cabin acts as the introduction as you enter the sanctuary and is where meetings are held as well as meet and greets until a new area is built just for that,


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Vaccine Clinic Tuesdays 9:30 am -12:30 By Appointment Only

SPAY AND NEUTER Monday - Thursdays Morning Drop-Off By Appointment Only

PET HELPERS SPAY AND NEUTER CLINIC

To Set up an Appointment

Call 843-302-0556 View Full List of Services at

pethelpers.org 1447 Folly Rd, Charleston, SC

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In The News Platinum Selling Artist, Sister Hazel to Headline Woofstock 2021: A Lowcountry Dog Music Festival While everyone is trying to make it through 2020, a year that brought tours, events, and life to a halt due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we look back to March 7th of 2020 and the 2nd Woofstock Music Festival in Charleston, SC. The festival, which raises funds for local rescues and shelters, took place at Hanahan Amphitheater and over 1500 people and dogs came along to enjoy a day of music, food, and fun. One of the highlights of the 2020 festival was Ken Block and Drew Copeland of the Florida band, Sister Hazel, performing an acoustic set that got the crowd on their feet and singing along. We are thrilled to announce that on March 27, 2021, we will be bringing back Woofstock and the full band of Sister Hazel will be our headliners.

LOCAL RESCUE STORY: How Jack Sparrow Survived Being Shot, Saved, and Now Loved, Thanks to a Local Good Samaritan! A Good Samaritan, Savannah McCants found a dog in excruciating pain on the side of the road, noticing bullet wounds all over his body, left there to suffer alone. McCants called Southern Paws Rescue, asking for help to save this vulnerable dog, who put his faith into the same species that hurt him.

Skeletons, Emaciated Dogs and Puppies Found at Georgetown Home Deputies found skeletons of dogs as well as emaciated dogs and puppies at a Georgetown home which led to the arrest of a 24-year-old man.

Click images above to read the full story. For more top stories, visit www.lowcountrydog.com/top-stories


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How I Began Volunteering.

morning dog walking crew - friends that I still have over ten years later - and learned so much about the rescue community.

W R I T T E N B Y : J U L I E M U R R A Y, STAFF WRITER

Eventually I gained enough confidence to start volunteering for events. This led me to places I never would have gone by myself - the Coastal Carolina Fair, the Sea & Sand Festival, and the Farmers Market. I would load up a dog, a table and some flyers, drive out to the event and spend all day talking to people about animal rescue. This was such a change from my weekends, pre-Pet Helpers, when I would hole up in my apartment and watch tv or take my beach chair out to Folly and try to avoid people by finding the most secluded spot on the beach and sticking my nose in a book.

We all know Charleston as a vibrant, historic town with so many different things to do, full of restaurants, parks, museums and much more. But when you are new in town without any friends or family members close by AND blessed with extreme introversion, it can also be a lonely place. Any other time I moved to a new town, I had been in school and making friends was pretty easy. This time, however, I was at a loss. I knew I had to do something - I tried running clubs (turns out “a casual jog” meant something MUCH different to those people), and going to bars (not my scene at all) and book groups (they actually wanted to intensely discuss the book and not drink wine and chat). Finally, my office had a Volunteer Day and I signed up to help at a local shelter. We went to the old Pet Helpers on Folly Road and helped with some cleaning. I loved being around the animals and the people who worked there were so welcoming and truly grateful to have our help. This one day completely changed my life in ways that still benefit me to this day. One of them is currently sleeping on my leg as I type these words. A few months after our work outing to Pet Helpers, I finally built up the courage to sign up for the Volunteer Orientation. I was so nervous to show up by myself and be in a room full of people I had never met but as usual, I was worried over nothing. The volunteer coordinator was amazing and I found out there were so many ways to help. The other volunteers and I already had one thing in common, our love for animals, so it was easy to strike up a conversation. I signed up to come in on Saturday mornings and walk dogs and the first day I was hooked. I would walk as many as I could and even just sat in the kennels for HOURS, especially with my favorite dog at the time - Willie - who looked like a cross between a wizard and a Fraggle. I made friends with the other Saturday

Now that I think about it, I probably wouldn’t even be writing for this magazine if I hadn’t signed up for Volunteer Day at work. I met our publisher, Brian Foster, when we were assigned to work at an adoption event at Petco with Pet Helpers’ newest litter of puppies. That wasn’t the only thing that made it a memorable day - I also had my first experience with discrimination against pitbulltype dogs. A man came up to our table and started saying horrible things about the puppies and the breed in general. I didn’t even know that was a ‘thing’ until that day. Ever since then, I have been advocating for pitbull-type dogs, making sure I tell anyone who will listen how loving, kind, sweet, gassy and snuggly they are. I have now been in Charleston for sixteen years and almost everything that I cherish most in my life today - my amazing friends, dogs I’ve fostered and adopted, memories of all the fun events I’ve been a part of - I have because of overcoming my fears and forcing myself to go to a volunteer orientation at a local animal shelter. I am confident that it could bring many wonderful things into your life, too. If you would like to learn more about how to get involved with animal rescue - volunteering, fostering, donating, and more - goto lowcountrydog.com/thinkoutsidetheshelter and find an organization that is just right for you. ■ photo by Jeanne Taylor Photography


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www.lowcountrydog.com

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T H A N K

Y O U

T O

O U R

R E S C U E

S P O N S O R S

Keep Your Puppies Warm! NATURAL GAS & PROPANE INSTALLS

DAYCARE

BOARDING

GROOMING

1090 Jack Primus Road (Just off Clements Ferry)

843.556.8086 Proud Parents of Eunoia Rescue

Vintage Antique Edwardian Art Deco Victorian Jewelry

Lucee's Treasure Chest

10% of sales donated to local spay & neuter efforts

etsy.com/shop/LuceesTreasureChest


D E C E M B E R

2 0 2 0

Over 35 Years Experience in the Pet Industry.

One stop shop for food, treats, supplements, grooming, and self serve dog wash Certified in pet allergy and nutrition. Corn and wheat free store. Locally Owned

440 Old Trolley Road, Ste A Summerville, SC 29485 843-871-7977

www.lowcountrydog.com

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GO GREEN | ADOPT A RECYCLED DOG

PET HELPERS

HALLIE HILL

THESE ADOPTABLE DOGS ARE SPONSORED BY:

CAROLINA COONHOUND


D E C E M B E R

2 0 2 0

BERKELEY ANIMAL SHELTER

LIBBY AND MACE’S PLACE

SOUTHERN PAWS

THESE ADOPTABLE DOGS ARE SPONSORED BY:

www.lowcountrydog.com

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GO GREEN | ADOPT A RECYCLED DOG

BULLIES TO THE RESCUE

EUNOIA RESCUE

THESE ADOPTABLE DOGS ARE SPONSORED BY:

H.F HELP


D E C E M B E R

2 0 2 0

LAKESIDE ANIMAL RESCUE

SOUTHERN TAILS

WATERS ED GE

THESE ADOPTABLE DOGS ARE SPONSORED BY:

www.lowcountrydog.com

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DORCHESTER PAWS

Events 1 2 /05/2 02 0 Sa n ta Paws a t Rita ’ s! Rit a’s on Folly 1 0 am

1 2 /5/2 02 0 Sa n ta Paws & Ho me fo r the H olidays A dop ti o n Eve n t Pet Sense 1 0 am 1 2 /12 /2 02 0 Sa n ta Paws - A Pe t-a cular Event Su pp o r ti ng Pe t He lp e rs Lowcount r y Harley Dav id son 11 am

1 2 /12 /2 02 0 Lo u d, Me rr y & B rig h t a Tacky S wea te r Fun dra ising N ig h t! Berkeley An imal Cent er 6 :30 p m

2 /2 0/2 02 1 Lowco un tr y Dog’ s 6 th A nnual Ea t, Dri n k & Rescu e Smoky O ak Tap room, 1 t o 5 p m

3 / 2 0/2 02 1 Pe t Fest a n d Lowcoun tr y Dog M ode l Co n test Palmett o Isl and s Count y Park 1 2 - 5 p m

3 / 2 7/2 02 1 WOOFSTOCK 2 02 1: A Lowcountr y Dog Musi c Festi val Hanah an A mph it h eat er 11 - 8 p m woof st ock20 21 .com

5 / 1/2 02 1 May th e Dogs Be Wi th You Festival Deep W at er Vineyard 1 0 - 5 p m

6 / 6 /2 02 1 Lowco un tr y Dog Days of Sum m er Ta tt ooed Moose Joh ns Isl and 3 t o 6 p m

C h eck out our Event s page for even mo re local event s and to ch eck for date cha nges . w ww.lowcountr ydog.com/ events


D E C E M B E R

THE

2 0 2 0

DOG PARK

AT WANNAMAKER COUNTY PARK

C H A R L E S TO N CO U N T Y PA R KS .CO M

Photo courtesy of SeamonWhiteside

www.lowcountrydog.com

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