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CREDITS. FOUNDING EDITOR Chelsea Dixon

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OPERATIONS MANAGER Chris Dixon SENIOR EDITOR Bailey Rufer LIFESTYLE Lindsay Marie EDITOR BLOG MANAGER Jade Owen BRAND Kristin Gallina AWARENESS MNGR SALES AND Elizabeth Adams PARTNERSHIPS STYLE GURU Sierra Holmes CONTRIBUTING Conner Lee Carey WRITERS Daniel Wilkens Ebony Jordan Krissy Mallard Kristin Gallina CONTRIBUTING Daniel Wilkens PHOTOGRAPHERS Marcus Harris Neil Glover DESIGN Chelsea Dixon COVER MODEL PHOTOGRAPHER Kristin Gallina Nikki Gomez

PUBLISHER

Arrogant Dreams, LLC. 1971 W Lumsden Road #215, Brandon, FL 33511 contact@arrogantdreams.com Advertise With Us | ads@loveumag.com Collaborate With Us | partners@loveumag.com © 2017 Love U Magazine. All Rights Reserved. All Trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Products or services mentioned within are referred to under the guidelines of the United States Fair Use Doctrine.   We assume no ownership over third party trademarks. This publication provides authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered.  However, due to the ever-changing pace of the internet and the industry, we give no warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the information given. This publication is to be used for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for ones own due diligence to obtain appropriate legal and/or professional advice. Some of the hyperlinks within this publication are referral links. The publisher may receive affiliate commission on purchases made through referral links.. (Credits Continued on Page 86)

Kristin Gallina | Photography by Nikki Gomez


When most people think of ‘black and white issues,’ they think of topics that are definitive, thoughtprovoking or could be considered controversial. We aim to meet that expectation with our B&W Issue. Yes, you will find beautiful black and white photography featured in this season’s pictorial, but that is just part of the magic surrounding our annual B&W Issue. This is our ‘think-piece’ issue. This is the issue where we are not concerned about being objective, but rather a catalyst for you to think deeply and from the heart. We could easily do a holidaythemed issue each Winter, but where is the fun in being like everyone else? This magazine was created to be a breath of fresh air in a sea of standards. We proudly do things a little differently than everyone else, and celebrating B&W in theme and concept is just one of those ‘things’ we do. In this issue, we are looking at the politics of fashion, diversity in fashion, the culture that glorifies sexual misconduct and more! We’ve got great interviews with model Jodi Pollack, and the founder of Optifit Bra, Sue McDonald. I even get into the game with an article on originality, or better yet, the death of it. Whether you are a long-time reader or new to the magazine, I hope you are able to sink your teeth into this issue. We have an amazing team that works hard to bring your content that you will love, so from our heart to yours... Enjoy!

Chelsea FOUNDING EDITOR

Chelsea Dixon

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WELCOME TO THE HOT ISSUE

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EDITOR’S LETTER.


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CONTENTS.

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BEAUTY IS DIVERSITY THE DIVERSITY PROJECT

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MORE THAN A MARCH FASHION FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

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BEHIND-THE-SCENES OF PR THE WOMEN BEHIND THE M

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BEAUTIFUL, INSIDE & OUT JODI POLLACK INTERVIEW


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ROJECT RED MOVEMENT

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‘UNAPOLOGETICALLY BOLD IN B&W PICTORIAL A CELEBRATION OF B&W

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WILL THE REAL DESIGNERS PLEASE STAND UP? ARE YOU A DESIGNER OR NOT?

THE EDITOR’S LETTER LET’S TALK BLACK & WHITE

OOTD TAKEOVER 06 SIERRA’S WINTER LOOKS YOU’LL LOVE BEAUTY BEAT 08 KRISTIN’S KEEP YOUR LIPS KISSABLE

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THE WOMEN BEHIND THE PERFECT FIT THE STORY BEHIND OPTIFIT

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THE GLORIFICATION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT A CLOSER LOOK AT A VOYEUR

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THE DEATH OF ORIGINALITY ARE YOU GOOD AT BEING YOU OR BEING SOMEONE ELSE?


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Sierra’s WINTER OOTD

Takeover!

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Featuring Commentary by Sierra Holmes & Jade Owen

lay the winter months with this lace blazer to add a sophisticated edge to any outfit. Notice the gold heel paired with the gold foil lettering on the t-shirt, for a subtle matching festive feel. Get this whole look from Lane Bryant. (leftside) Feeling frosty? Throw on a poncho to keep cosy and casual this festive season, find this woollen beauty at Lane Bryant. Leggings and ankle boots are every girls go to during the winter period, this killer combo is from Soma Intimates and Bass and Co. (center) Who says winter only means sparkle and glitter? Make a festive fashion statement in a bold, printed skirt and pair with a solid color to #sleigh the office! You can find the sweater and skirt at Eloquii! (rightside)


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Kristin’s Beauty Beat

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by Kristin Galina

Keep your lips KISSable this winter!

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o you ever wonder why we suffer from chapped lips more often in the Winter? In the Winter, there’s a lack of humidity and moisture in the air, causing us to over lick our lips, resulting in chapped lips. Unlike most parts of your body, your lips do NOT contain oil-producing glands, which is why it’s important to keep them moisturized if you want them to remain soft during the Winer season. Check out my favorite lip products that will keep your lips looking and feeling super moisturized during these winter months.

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Blistex Lip Serum

This serum does exactly what it says. Condition your lips! Just like with regular conditioner for your hair this super moisturizing serum softens and deeply conditions with just one pump. It’s infused with nutrient-rich oils plus Vitamin E, leaving your lips looking and feeling silky!


This treatment is filled with vitamins and antioxidants which will nourish your lips. It also has peptides and emollients which add strength and improve the tone and appearance. Apply this treatment every night before bed and you will absolutely notice a difference in the morning. It works best after prolonged use!

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Neosporin Lip Health: Overnight Therapy

Chapstick Total Hydration Moisture and Tint This is the perfect chapstick to have to add a little pop of color to your lips while repairing them at the same time. It comes in a few different color options and instantly smooths and visibly changes the appearance of your lips. It is infused with natural oils so it nourishes while still keeping your lips looking pretty!


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The B&W Issue • Winter 2017

Rae Nicole Davis | Photography by Michael Antonio


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BOLD IN B&W Pictorial

Throughtout this issue, we are celebraing the beauty of black and white photography. Continued on page 18.

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UNAPOLOGETICALLY


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Beauty Is


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by Samantha De Galicia 13

s Diversity


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The B&W Issue • Winter 2017

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he fame, admiration and beauty of models always seemed appealing to me, and I wanted to experience it for myself. When I was eighteen, I decided I wanted to become a professional model, work with top fashion brands and travel the world. I built my portfolio, reached out to hundreds of modeling agencies, and went to many castings, but at the end of the day, I

still received rejections. I started to question what was wrong with me and why these brands did not want to hire me. I realized who they wanted me to be when I looked through magazines and social media content. I had multiple disadvantages, such as my height, race, age and weight. These disadvantages became my biggest insecurities because I knew I was not good enough if I couldn’t change my looks to fit the industry’s ideal beauty standards. I set my focus


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w w w. Lo ve U M a g a z i n e . c o m Models (left to right): Tiffany Hill, Bridgett Johnson, Kaila Uli, Ashley Alzate, Aneesha Madhok, Samantha De Galicia, Deonna Tillman, Jas Monet, Hannah Christina, Zohra Hussein, Madeleine Shelton Photographer: Nick Ramsay

on losing weight, which consisted of daily cardio and limiting my intake of food. I tried to find ways to grow taller, keep my skin clear and make myself look like the idolized, blue-eyed and blonde-haired girl. My looks became an obsession that consumed my entire life and it made me hate myself for who I am not. Casting directors would exclude me from being booked because I was not a size 0, 5’8” or an “all American” girl. I was always considered too Asian, or not Asian

enough, and put into this category that suppressed other parts of me. People would make remarks about Asians which made me feel like I needed to think, act, and look a certain way to fulfill the stereotypes. ust being Asian in the modeling industry can already be perceived as a disadvantage and I shamefully resented my racial identity. Every ounce of my being was judged by many, and to

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be rejected for things I could not change was discriminating. This leads me to believe I wasn’t beautiful and that I was worthless for not having any desirable features. I based my value off looks and what the industry thought of me, but I should have seen my worth underneath the makeup, clothes and covered-up insecurities. I realized I was not the one who needs to change...the industry itself does. uring that summer, I made it my mission to push for more diversity in the industry. I intended to bring together a strong group of diverse girls that represented what the industry lacks. It took weeks of planning and finding a team that supported the message to finally move forward. The day of the photo shoot was better than I could have imagined, we all gathered on the rooftop of the studio building to shoot the first look. The rooftop look represents female empowerment and highlights the confidence in each of us. The last look was in the studio, where every model revealed beauty in its rawest form by taking their makeup off and stripping down to their bathing suits. There was nothing but love and support from every girl who had dealt with similar rejection or discrimination because of their looks. The purpose was to show that beauty is not defined by one race, body type or skin color, and for every girl to embrace being comfortable in her own skin. Individually, we were forced to conform and achieve

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unrealistic beauty standards within the industry, but coming together we became a catalyst to embrace the power of diversity. Every girl has unique attributes that are considered undesirable in the industry, and we all embraced our differences. It was a celebration of diverse beauty and what it means to be a woman of color. I thought I had to conform to the industry’s standards to be accepted, but what I needed was to learn to love myself. I was chasing after an unattainable, fabricated beauty created by the industry. An industry that favors one race or attribute over others conceals raw beauty. Beauty comes in every size, color, shape and form from all different cultures. Defining your worth based on the industry’s standards is flawed, and only when you truly accept yourself will you see real beauty is in you. Real beauty is diversity.

Models (random order): Tiffany Hill, Bridgett Johnson, Kaila Uli, Ashley Alzate, Aneesha Madhok, Samantha De Galicia, Deonna Tillman, Jas Monet, Hannah Christina, Zohra Hussein, Madeleine Shelton Photographer: Nick Ramsay


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Nikki Ellis | Photography by Chad Feacher


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Rachel Brown | Photography by Tommy Chung


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Sophie Hurley | Photograph by Neil Glover


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JODI POLLACK:

BEAUTIFUL, INSIDE & OUT

PHOTOS AND INTERVIEW BY DANIEL WILKENS


“I’ve always had to accept myself as I am, in my own body.” Being ‘different’ has certainly not stopped her in the least. She does say it bothers her that others are much more inhibited: “I think it’s really sad that a lot of young girls - because of their shape or size - don’t consider themselves beautiful. I’ve never been thin; I don’t know what it’s like to be small, so I’ve always had to accept myself as I am, in my own body.” With a number of friends into photography, it was a natural for Pollack to join in some creative shoots. But it wasn’t until seeing and applying for an online ad that she got some much-needed exposure: “I saw the ad for Montreal Plus Size Fashion Week. I had just worked with Jennifer McCready [owner, operator and chief photographer of Lady Luck Pinups] and [the photo] was really edgy and intense; I really liked it and I used one of those pictures for the head shot. I had another friend of mine take a full-body shot and I used that for the application. I went to the audition and killed it, so that was great. I walked for SexyPlus for Montreal Fashion Week. I got such incredible feedback it gave me such a boost of confidence, it was amazing. I’ve been working with Stephanie Augusteijn ever since.”

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‘I should model’. There’s nothing to stop me from modeling. Just because I’m different doesn’t stop me from being the person I am.”

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hen a passion really takes hold of a person, it becomes all-consuming. This is certainly the case with Jodi Pollack, one of Toronto, Ontario’s brightest, up-and-coming models. Watching her work is seeing someone taken over by the whole process. Pollack says her interest goes way, way back. “When I was younger I used to watch Fashion Television, America’s Next Top Model, the runway shows that whole industry was so appealing to me, I loved the different designs, all of it, but I never thought of myself so much as a model.” However, the seeds were planted, and the budding young model-to-be would soon emerge. “When I was 13 getting my eighthgrade graduation picture taken, the photographer asked me if I was a model. He said I really knew how to pose and look good in front of a camera, while most other kids my age were very awkward getting their pictures taken. That was the first time the thought ever came to me.” Confidence is key and lack of it keeps so many great talents hidden in the shadows. For Pollack, however, she was determined not to let worrying about her body interfere with her mental processes. “When I turned 19 or 20 I realized that I thought of myself as beautiful and I didn’t think of my size as a factor. That’s when I seriously thought


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MODEL JODI POLLACK


good on you the way it does on the hanger, don’t give up. Just because it’s not available in that store doesn’t mean it’s not available for you. Wear With all the changes in the industry what makes you feel great, wear what to this point, it’s anyone’s guess what makes you feel confident. If it’s a the future holds for both plus-size shorter skirt and you’re showing a little fashion and fashion in general. Pollack more leg and you’re having fun, go for feels that there are good things on the it. If you like hats, chokers, whatever, horizon for models and consumers they look different on different people. alike: “I think in five years there’s There’s no right way or wrong way, it’s going to be a lot more in retail for plus individual to each person. If you don’t size consumers. You’re going to see feel your best in what you are wearing, more 1X and 2X, sizes 18 and 20. it shows.” These are small steps but in the right hile modeling isn’t for direction. Retailers are understanding everyone, she does they are not catering to body sizes think that if a person from 0 to 10; there are all different has the desire they types of people out there.” should at least test the waters: She believes things also look bright “Just test it out. You don’t know in the years to come for the models until you try. Reach out to friends who are showing off their curvy and family who are photographers. figures: “I am really looking forward Really think about what you want to to differences on the runway and do; get comfortable in front of the magazines. It would be nice on the camera. Take selfies, start a blog runway to see someone who is a size and know that whatever look you 30. It might shake things up. Some have it’s okay, you are worthy. Even if people might not be able to handle modeling isn’t something you want to it, but if we don’t do it we’ll never get pursue professionally, it will give you out of that box. I think there will be a confidence in yourself.” lot of changes as to how we perceive It seems pretty clear that nothing beauty.” is going to stand in the way of Jodi It’s an old saying that beauty comes Pollack and her modeling ambitions. from within. Anyone who meets Jodi With poise and self-awareness, it’s Pollack can tell that the lovely person a safe bet this up-and-comer will on the outside is matched by the continue her winning ways in the beauty that dwells inside her. It’s no years to come. surprise she likes to share her joy with others who are still finding their way. “If something you like doesn’t look

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“It would be nice on the runway to see someone who is a size 30.”


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Piueti Maka | Photography by Kehau Likio


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Alexandra Wolf | Photography by Denis Michaliov


Kiesha Santos | Photography by Samantha Figueroa

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THE WOMAN

the Perf


fect Fit

by Chelsea Dixon & Daniel Wilkens

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N BEHIND


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he bra we know today was patented by Mary Phelps Jacobs in 1914. However, there are many accounts that date back to ancient times of women who used tied fabrics to bind their breasts. The French embraced corset undergarments in the 1500’s, and in 1869, the corset was split into two different pieces. Countless advancements have been made throughout the centuries to turn ancient fabric bindings into the bra we recognize today, yet one common denominator has existed since the very beginning: bra pain. Most females begin to experience that poking, nagging pain in their mid-late teens. It happens around the time that training and sports bras get replaced by the everbeloved underwire bra, a bra that often leaves indentations under one’s breasts, or breaks and leaves small bruises below one’s underarm. Ill-fitting bras have also been linked to health problems, like headaches, back issues, restrictive breathing and poor posture. When you take into account that 80% of women are wearing the wrong size bra,

it’s no wonder why so many women have bra issues. Luckily, Sue McDonald, Founder and Managing Director of Optifit Bra, decided to tackle this problem from a different angle, thus reinventing the bra as we know it. cDonald began advocating for women’s bra health and proper fit well before her UK-based company was born. She worked as an National Health Services (NHS, UK) bra fitter for 20 years, helping pregnant, nursing, and post-mastectomy patients find bras that fit. She would often cut and stitch the bras to ensure they properly fit her individual patients. Daniel Wilkens of Love U Magazine was able to interview McDonald one-on-one and discover why she felt compelled to rethink the basics of bra design. “When I looked into the origins of where the fitting system originally came from, I was quite surprised to find out that 34 - 36 - 38 - 40 was the chest circumference of a man,” she explains. “It came from standardized chest measurements of males from

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“...The sad part is, often they think there is something wrong their own body...”

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Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS). It was there that she met Atul Khanna, a plastic surgeon and future business partner. Khanna was a key speaker at the event -- he felt there was a need for a better bra design given the problems he was exposed to via his clinical practice. It was clear that this fellow bra-health evangelist was Sue McDonald’s kindred spirit, so they joined forces and launched Optifit Bra. ith bra health being the primary goal of both McDonald and Khanna, they focused on achieving the perfect fit without an underwire. To do this, they needed to reinvent bra construction. Building upon McDonald’s 3-D fitting system, Optifit developed their patented wire-free technology that

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World War I. None of the measurements made sense, none of them were anatomical. That just wasn’t right. I knew I had to design something completely different.” In time, she developed an alternative fitting system and attended the prestigious De Montfort University in Leicester, England, known for corsetry and intimate apparel design. She later undertook post-graduates studies on the origins of the bra grading and fitting formula. She knew that a better, healthier bra was possible and she began to hone her system until she perfected her 3D elevation bra design. fter perfecting her design for over a decade, she previewed the line at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Association of


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takes into account a women’s frame, depth and volume. Their customers are given a special Optimeasure to determine their size. This system allows Optifit to handcraft a custom, wire-free bra for each customer, without sacrificing comfort or lift. While conventional bras take a 2-D approach, measuring only the back size and the cup size. here are 504 possible bra sizes with the Optifit measurement system. As grand as that sounds, it makes perfect sense. Women come in all different shapes and sizes, and they also have unique body types. You can be the same exact dress size as someone else and try on the same size dress, but it might look different on you if you have a different body type. In outerwear this is a no-brainer, but it’s refreshing to see similar logic applied to undergarment design. It’s equally, if not more refreshing, to see health play a major role in the design as well. “What we do is very different from what has gone on in the past. Bras used to change to support what the fashion industry dictated,” Sue says. “A different decade would focus on a different feminine ideal. At

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the turn of the century, we had corsets, very heavily shaped. Ten years later we had flapper girls with no shape - just a tube. Ten years after that, breasts were styled and formed. In the 60’s we had Twiggy, again with no shape. It keeps evolving, that fashion industry mandate to stylize. We know it’s not a good idea to style a breast.” While some undergarments are obviously designed for a certain segment of society (young, old, plus or petite), Sue says that Optifit embraces all. “This is for everyone. Every woman can wear this,” she explains. “A conventional bra will compress to the chest wall. What needs to happen is to hold the breast away from the body in its correct position. Everyone can benefit from that.” t’s no surprise that her concept has been welcomed by so many. “A lot of girls are quite happy with what’s out there and what’s available, and that’s fine. But millions more not happy, they are in pain. The sad part is, often they think there is something wrong their own body! The fact is, if you are wearing something that isn’t designed for your

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Sue McDonald, Founder & Managing Director of Optifit Bra

anatomy, it’s going to impact you in a very negative way.” eeling good means so much, and with Optifit that attention to health and wellness is crucial. Sue loves knowing that she’s helped so many. “It feels fantastic to hear those comments. Particularly when they say things like ‘Oh, I feel taller, I’m standing straighter, I can breathe better.’ It’s very satisfying personally, and this is the only bra in the world that does what it does.” We recently partnered with Optifit Bra on a giveaway promotion for our readers. Upon registration, we asked a simple

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question, “Do you suffer from bra pain?” 96% of the registrants replied ‘yes.;’ Many of them detailed their discomforts and problems with their bras. Women have definitely come a long way from binding their breasts with fabric. Although, it is apparent that bra comfort and health continues to be a challenge even today. Thankfully, Sue McDonald is up for the challenge.


Wilonda Previlo | Photography by Eric Brown

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Nikki Ellis | Photography by Chad Feacher

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THE WORST PART OF FOOS’ STORY IS THE IDEA THAT ANYBODY COULD GET AWAY WITH SEXUAL ASSAULT IF THEY KEEP THEIR MOUTH SHUT FOR LONG ENOUGH.


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by Bailey Rufer

n a time when sexual assault and misconduct allegations are running rampant, it seems eerily fitting that Netflix would release an original documentary titled, Voyeur. It details the ‘peeping-tom’ operation in a hotel owned and operated by Gerald Foos, of Aurora, Colorado, and the sexual gratification he got out of it. This documentary also follows Gay Talese, a widely-heralded American journalist who chooses to not only write an article about Foos’ misconduct for The New Yorker magazine, but he also writes and publishes a book about the ordeal (titled The Voyeur’s Motel.) Foos and Talese collaborated on both projects in an effort to shed light on the mistakes Foos made. The reason Foos stayed quiet all these years appears to be simple -- he wanted the statute of limitations to run out so he couldn’t be charged with his crimes. At the end of the documentary, a reporter from the Washington Post

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THE GLORIFICATION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT IN TODAY’S WORLD


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contacts Talese to let him know that he found discrepancies in Foos’ published story. Talese, the book author, publicly disavows his work, saying that he can’t support or promote his book knowing that some of the information might be false. It is factual that Foos owned the motel, and he did participate in voyeurism, but many of the dates don’t match what Foos recorded and shared with Talese. he interesting thing about Voyeur is how blasé everybody seems to be about the situation, regardless of whether or not it’s all completely true. Gerald Foos is now openly admitting to committing sex crimes years after the damage is done, years after witnessing a murder (and, assumably, other illegal activities) and years after selling the motel and quitting voyeurism altogether. Voyeur is a well-done documentary, but behind the film lies something very creepy and foul-tasting: the idea that the sexual misconduct against unknowing, non-consenting individuals are now being formatted into articles, books and movies. It’s sadly obvious that neither Foos or Talese appear to care about Foos’ incredibly perverted crimes, and they treat this situation as if it’s okay that this happens every day. Foos also staunchly stands by the

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idea that he is not ‘a pervert,’ but instead, his voyeuristic tendencies were all ‘research-based.’ Yeah, okay. hy does this documentary glorify sexual assault and misconduct? Running out on the statute of limitations doesn’t mean that your backstory disappears into thin air. Who thought that profiting on something like this was a good idea, and why wasn’t Gerald Foos treated the same way as any other sexual assailant would be treated? In today’s world, so many men are being ousted as ‘sexual offenders,’ and one-by-one these men are being dethroned. What’s the difference between those men and Gerald Foos? After watching the documentary, it’s evident that Foos’ primary concern was about being punished for what he had done. He doesn’t appear to be sorry about the crimes committed; he only appears to be regretful he’s opening up about it. Similar feelings are echoed in scores of ‘apology posts’ written by offenders and posted on social media. Posts essentially say “well, I grew up in a different decade, and it was okay then!”, or “I’m going to use this statement and opportunity to promote the good I’ve done for women/minorities/LGBT+ individuals.” In my opinion, nobody’s really sorry, they’re just

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sorry they got caught. That’s a problem. Two men have taken a rash of exploitations and turned them into money. Profiting off sexual misconduct, whether it be a financial or reputable profit, is in incredibly poor taste. It’s baffling to see that no one really has any issue with it. I was seriously hoping that this documentary would be about the discovery and takedown of a sexual predator, but instead I was given a story about two men that found ‘a story.’ The New Yorker ran Talese’s article about Foos and his nightmarish hotel after deeply and heavily fact-checking it to ensure that readers were getting the most out of their content. It’s not until after publishing the article that Foos sees how much of a problem he really has on his hands, and Talese steps in to assure him that ‘you have to be villainized before you can be highly-regarded.’ What? ou have to be villainized before people can see the ‘true genius’ behind what you’re up to? Seriously? It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that what Gerald Foos did shouldn’t be held in a high or positive regard. In fact, what Gerald Foos did shouldn’t be glorified at all. Not through articles, not through books, or anything else. Foos was a sleazy man who got his rocks off to people who

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had no idea he was standing above them, and Gay Talese knew about it for decades before coming forward with his knowledge and publishing something he could profit from. n a sea of #MeToo posts and horrifying stories of sexual assault survival, Voyeur stands out as a shining example of how privilege can serve somebody so well. The fact that Gerald Foos is boasting publicly about his twisted past and there’s no sort of justice involved (only public notoriety!) just goes to show that you can get away with anything if you have even an iota of privilege. I am a woman, and there really aren’t a handful of days that go by where I’m afraid that something similar is going to happen to me. I’m afraid to walk through the paved, brightly-lit trail next to my apartment because of the string of sexual attacks that have happened within the last month. I’m afraid that there might be cameras in the showers at my local YMCA. I was taught how to distinguish a twoway mirror from a normal mirror, just in case I ever felt like I was being watched. I worry about these things while Gerald Foos builds and operates his ‘experimental hotel.’ The fact that people even have to argue for or against this issue is beyond me. It’s in such poor taste to broadcast Foos’ sociopathic tendencies to the world, and it’s in

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If you are a victim of sexual assault and you need support, call 800.656. HOPE (4673) to be connected to a sexual assault professional service provider. Alternatively, https://www.rainn.org/ contains information that may help you or a loved one cope with sexual assault or misconduct.

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we can talk about ways we’re able to prevent things like this from happening again. We can research and discover how to protect ourselves, both in unfamiliar spaces and at home, and there are outlets you can go to if you’re a victim of sexual assault or misconduct. If you’re a victim, you shouldn’t be afraid to speak up and get the help that you need. If you’re a perpetrator of sexual misconduct, it would benefit both you and your victim to speak up instead of staying quiet. These things can’t always be prevented, but stirring up a conversation about sexual assault has the potential to make waves and save lives.

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even worse taste to try to present this story as anything more than sex crimes. A filthy, boastful recount of a string of sex crimes. The worst part of Foos’ story is the idea that anybody could get away with sexual assault if they keep their mouth shut for long enough. Voyeur goes against everything the modern justice push is trying to promote. Instead of being a film about the takedown of a ‘peeping-tom,’ it’s about the widespread publication of his story and how successful he was. What about publishing an article about a sexual assault survivor? What about publishing a story discussing why sexual assault is bad, instead of a story that seems interesting in theory but only glorifies some sicko? Journalists (and society, really) should be promoting an open conversation regarding sexual assault and misconduct, not sharing a story about staying quiet and waiting for your ‘criminal timer’ to run out. We should be conducting a free-flowing, positive conversation. t the end of the day, there’s not much you can do about this specific issue. Time can’t be changed, and Gerald Foos has to live with the fact that he’s violated so many lives. However, we can change the dialogue that surrounds both Foos’ story and sexual assault, and


Rae Nicole Davis | Photography by Fleek Designs

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Sandhya Sharma

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by Jade Owen

Models: Tyreece Nash & Marcio Lantia | Photographer: Juelson Lanita | Designer: Lauren Black (Inspired by Black Lives Matter)

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MORE THAN A MARCH


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ne of the main reasons for protest is the changing demands that young people have of their governments, combined with their ability to connect with their fellow citizens as they use social media to expose their voices to the world. Generation Y knows that they are the rising force in today’s industries. If they feel strongly enough about an issue, they use all the resources at their fingertips to confront the problem. Protest demonstrators from this era are mostly young people, and they organize primarily through social networks. The rise in social media brings with it the power to contact those who represent the establishment directly without barriers. This has caused many controversies for brands and celebrities. A large social following enables one’s ability to make a change, to reach out to a large demographic and involve the media around certain issues. Why wouldn’t anyone use this to their advantage? There are some who feel that a group of individuals who gather to make signs and scream at the establishment are wasting time and energy. Access to the resources one needs to create an impact is something not readily available to most people. Taking to the streets, millions of women and men who are armed with signs is only the beginning of the process for change. By taking to the streets, people have been making changes from the inside out. Many aren’t at a march or protest to yell then go back home and do nothing. They are

looking for what to do next. Critics say that marches fizzle out without major impact. But what happens when someone understands that change happens from the inside out. They write letters, donate, research local community groups, and they get petition signatures. For some in Generation Y, who are aware of media presentation, they take each news piece with a pinch of salt. So many stories are twisted by media in some way or another. That is the main reason why many young people do their own research on the issues that matter to them most. They tend not to trust the narrative from companies with ties to a particular political party. Often, terrorist attacks are covered based on where they occur. For example, if the attack occurs in Britain or France, there is wide coverage. But, if the attack occurs in Mosul in Iraq, the coverage is slight to none. Generation Y is more aware of the news that surrounds them, be it the 911 attacks or terrorist attacks in Britain and Paris. Instead of creating fear, these terrorist have fueled a fire under those individuals. Instead of cowering, Generation Y has shown their solidarity with demonstrations, clothing protests and online campaigns. ver the past decade, protests all over the world have dominated the media, but there is one main theme they have in common... freedom for the power and right to act, speak or think as one chooses. 2017 has seen the catwalks of New York graced with a politically-charged agenda.

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Photographer: Lauren Welsh | Designer: Loren King (Inspired by Brexit)


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Fashion is often a reflection of society and global issues. There exist an indisputable connection between politics and fashion. Using fashion to express thoughts and ideas has appeared globally. Some designers in the industry use their career to support their political beliefs. T-shirts have a long history of being political objects for politics and protest. The seventies and eighties saw the rise of the slogan t-shirts by designers like Katharine Hamnett and Vivienne Westwood. These designers saw an opportunity to challenge the establishment rather than support it. Hamnett rose in this era for her activism, her iconic slogan t-shirts ranging from ‘Choose Life’ to ‘Stop war, to Blair out’. The most publicized occasion, Hamnett wore one of her own T-shirts to meet the then prime minister, Margaret Thatcher. The t-shirt that Hamnett chose to wear was the ‘58% don’t want Pershing’. It made an anti-nuclear statement. Using clothing to send a message isn’t a new concept. It has peaked yet again to show a person’s beliefs and cultural values. Fashion as a platform that reaches out to an audience through various mediums. It has a voice that’s interpreted without language barriers and creates a platform for all to see. Walter van Beirendonck’s Autumn/ Winter 2015 Collection used the slogan ‘Stop Terrorizing our World.’ The slogan is fueled by the tragic event when al Qaeda terrorists stormed the Paris offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing ten employees and two police officers. Designers are using their media coverage for something more than profit. They are

showing solidarity. Solidarity is a powerful force in itself. While a garment can’t change what happened to those people on that day, it shows others that people do care and will not stand for the ideology behind the attacks. Fashion is one of the many platforms one can use for protest. While it isn’t the only one, it is timely and current. Since fashion can replicate developments and events in social and political life, designers can give you the power to express your thoughts, even if you can’t attend a certain protest. It only takes one person wearing a garment with a message to spark a conversation. Posting it on social media with the relevant tags can show your support within that community. hange does not happen overnight, many people think that one person can’t make a change. Yet, one person can create change with a small gesture or an idea. Educating people on an issue they didn’t actually understand can carry through to people who need to spark conversation. Change can’t happen unless somebody stands for what they believe in. The majority of Generation Y are grabbing on to this responsibility with both hands. While protests have been successful in the past, unfortunately in 2012 British students lined the streets of London to protest tuition fees and unemployment. The government made no changes to their policies and university fees tripled. Protesting may not always equal change, but it can have a lot of other effects. It creates solidarity among the young, it creates a safe haven for like-

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Models: Tyreece Nash & Marcio Lantia | Photographer: Juelson Lanita | Designer: Lauren Black (Inspired by Black Lives Matter)

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minded individuals and a strong united force. While young protesters do not always achieve their demands, the act of protesting gives them more courage to increase the scale of their future protests. Generation Y is a population that opposes inequality and oppression and we are not afraid to stand up for our beliefs. Democracy goes beyond elections, and these days many young people all over the world are thinking the same thing.


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Ashley VanDyke | Photograph by Marcus Harris

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by Daniel Wilkens

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Project Red

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ould there be a better way for the Canadian plus-size fashion industry to wrap up 2017 than with a Vanity Fair-style photoshoot? Hardly, considering the shoot includes over a dozen of Canada’s favorite high-profile models, as well as some stunning first-timers. Project Red is the brainchild of Daniela Lombardi and her partners in Canadian Curvies. Founded earlier this year, Canadian Curvies (Lombardi, Catherine Field, Sarah De Melo and Yolanda L.) strives to promote representation, visibility and body positivity. Lombardi explains how it all came to be: “We created a group we call Canadian Curvies, the four of us, with all different sizes and different looks. We started this body positivity group. We invite all women and we particularly try to support Canadian plus-size models.” After launching in July with a photo shoot - the results of which were seen internationally - Lombardi wanted an ‘end of the year’ venture that helped tie it all together. That’s when Project Red was born. “I said to the girls that I’d really love to use up-and-coming curvy models from the Toronto area. There were so many of us, but we managed to narrow it down to 14 people, including the four of us. They’ve all agreed to be a part of this. We got Toronto photographer Katiuska Idrovo and we’re trying to recreate the Vanity Fair-look, but with all of us in red dresses.” With a full slate of Canada’s most recognizable models on hand, the results promise to be remarkable. Canadian Curvies member Sarah De Melo says she couldn’t be more stoked about Project Red: “Daniela came to us with the idea of the Vanity Fair-style shoot and we’ve been helping her with her vision. We thought it would be great to have all these curvy models - some who are also models in New York and Los Angeles - to come together for this. It’s super exciting!” Echoing that sentiment is Curvies member Catherine Field: “When we launched we did a ‘red’ shoot with photographer Ronnie Lee, inspired by Ashley Graham. The four of us were all in our red bathing suits. That’s when we established who we were, what we believe in and so on,” Field explains. “Today is essentially leveraging the red theme, but we want to include Canadian models who we feel represent and inspire us. Everyone who is here is a professional and a role model. They all


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have ideas about how they want to be represented in the media, they are healthy and they are all extremely talented.” All members of the Canadian Curvies are excited about the project and the message is one that resonates with them all. “This is what we work for. There’s so much great talent here, so many amazing curvy girls that deserve to be out there and be seen. To have them all come together is a dream come true,” according to member Yolanda L. Among the many high profile models taking part in the project are Meredith Shaw, Karyn Inder, Caterina Moda and Ophilia Alleyne. She believes the project is a great vehicle for showing off Canada’s finest: “The real value of this is diversity. Bringing models together from a size 8 all the way up to 22, we’ve never seen anything like that in Canada. We’ve been compartmentalized in our own spaces but now we’re breaking it down and coming together,” Alleyne says. “Some of these ladies I’ve never even met in person, so it’s great to be here!” Not all the models included in Project Red are experienced runway veterans. For some, it is their first time modeling. Newcomer Rebecca Chalmers says her involvement was unexpected, but welcome: “I’m a makeup artist and esthetician and Catherine is my client. She told me about the project and asked me if I’d like to be either a model or a makeup artist and decided to put myself out there and try something new.” Although new to modeling, Chalmers is definitely on board with the essence of the event. “The message is so great. Just having so many people together with this type of collaboration to inspire others is amazing.” he on-site energy was electric and we were happy to be there to interview the women and catch a few candid moments. It was especially important to spotlight some of the behind-thescenes crew, including the ladies that were adjusting the set, tweaking the lighting, and making everyone look glamorous. We celebrate ALL of the women involved, both in front of and behind the camera. Their work and dedication to voicing the need for representation in the plus market, and in the general fashion industry, will open doors. The shoot was a triumphant success and a true testament to the power and passion of their vision. There’s no doubt this will only be one in a long list of body positive #ProjectRed campaigns put forward by the Canadian Curvies. We congratulate and celebrate them on a job well done. Thanks, ladies, for joining the fight to help create a more inclusive future for all.

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w w w. Lo ve U M a g a z i n e . c o m The Women of Canadian Curvies (from left to right): Catherine Field, Yolanda, Daniela Lombardi, Sarah DeMelo | Photographer: Katiuska (Katie) Idrovo


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WILL THE REAL DESIGNERS PLEASE STAND UP? by Bailey Rufer You are not a designer if you refuse to work with bigger individuals!

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et me repeat myself. You are not a real fashion designer if you openly refuse to work with any group of individuals, including (but certainly not limited to) those who do not fit within the realm of a “normal size range.” You are not a real fashion designer if you decide that your work is meant for a specific group of people. You are not a real fashion designer if you claim that creating garments in larger sizes is “not worth the effort.” That’s garbage, and we all know it. Designing clothing is difficult regardless of the situation. There are countless things that need to be accounted for during any design process, like fit, garment construction, and functionality, and I’d be lying if I said that designing clothing for plus-size people wasn’t any more difficult. The issue isn’t that there are more “rules” to designing for plus-sized individuals (Note: There aren’t “more rules.” There aren’t any rules at all. Fashion isn’t a board game, it’s fluid and ever-changing), but the issue is that there are designers that choose to play it safe and restrict their designs simply because they are scared.


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esigners and fashion houses are terrified of failing to satisfy a new, exponentiallygrowing market, and they’re scared of this same market becoming the “norm.” Plus-sized individuals have spent so long settling for less, and there are more and more plus-sized individuals today that are making their way into the modeling, entertainment and journalism spotlights. These people have no intention of putting on the breaks, which means the demand for plus-size red-carpet wear or couture outfits has skyrocketed, putting designers in the position to created for bigger individuals. But what happens when a designer or fashion house rejects the idea of designing an outfit for a plus-sized person, or even just somebody with a curvier figure? One of the issues that plays into dressing a plus-size celebrity or a consumer for an event is that designers only really create outfits in sample sizes, which are normally sizes 0-2. If given the appropriate amount of time, designers have the ability to create a larger size for a celebrity or consumer, especially if that person is high-profile and they’re able to give that brand a lot of publicity. However, many celebrities or consumers will reach out to fashion houses to propose the idea of dressing them for an event,

and they won’t receive much more than a statement dismissing them and their proposal. Several plus-size celebrities have spoken out about the lack of access to designers who are willing to create an outfit for them for different scenarios. Melissa McCarthy, a plussize actress and comedienne, spoke out in 2014 about how difficult it was for her to find an outfit for a red carpet: “Two Oscars ago, I couldn’t find anybody to do a dress for me. I asked five or six designers — very high-level ones who make lots of dresses for people — and they all said no.” McCarthy went on to create her own fashion line, Seven7, to accommodate for the lack of size diversity seen being produced by designers and fashion houses. Plussize model Barbie Ferreira also noted the negative industry trend, and took to Twitter to share her thoughts:

“Every day I’m reminded of my body. Even if I’m excited about an event finding someone who even wants to help me by styling is impossible… Curvy women are not allowed to be edgy not allowed to be stylish or allowed to explore their looks like everyone else in this industry... and hearing an actress in a huge film having similar struggles .. Girl I feel hopeless. Am I gonna have to wear Sears when I win my Oscar?“


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times are changing at an increasing speed, sentiments that are passed down for years and years within the same brand are not thoughts that are so easily thrown out. It’s easy for somebody to blame a person for their own lifestyle, but their hands are suddenly tied when it comes to compromise. The fact of the matter is if you dismiss the opportunity to create a stunning piece for a plussize consumer, regardless of the situation, you are preventing people from experiencing hand-made, interactive pieces of art. Fashion is not “clothing,” it’s an art form. There are festivals and museums and entire WEEKS devoted to the art behind fashion; there are even movies and coffee table books centered around certain designers or fashion houses that have paved the way for today’s fashion looks. Why is it so difficult for these same designers to include plus-size people in those celebrations? he creation and public display of a designer, plus-size outfit has the potential to make waves throughout the general plus-size community. There are a plethora of bigger individuals that people look up to, and seeing them in a gorgeous gown or a perfectlytailored tux allows other people in the community to see that a bigger body has the same potential to provide an

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eslie Jones, a Saturday Night Live star and one of the main characters in 2016’s Ghostbusters reboot, refused to go down without a fight when many of the designers she reached out to refused to work with her. Jones took to Twitter to publicly (yet anonymously) point out that designers were not cooperating with her and her desire to find a dress for the Ghostbusters premiere. Designer Christian Siriano, who rose to fame by becoming the youngest designer to win Project Runway after taking home the title in season four, reached out to Jones via Twitter to let her know that he would be more than willing to design her outfit. Jones ended up wearing a gorgeous gown created by Siriano to the premiere, and Siriano later tweeted that “It shouldn’t be exceptional to work with brilliant people just because they’re not sample size. Congrats aren’t in order, a change is.” Why would a designer be so hesitant when creating a designer outfit for a celebrity client? Wouldn’t a fashion house want positive exposure on a red carpet? The issue isn’t that designers don’t want positive exposure, they just don’t want any positive exposure coming from a group of people that represents “a negative, unhealthy lifestyle.” Fatphobia runs deep in the fashion industry, and even though


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endless supply of outward beauty and grace. Confidence is key, and seeing your favorite plus-size actress in a beaded masterpiece definitely sparks the idea that you, too, could wear something just as amazing. t the end of the day, the plus size community isn’t going to disappear. They are not going to submit and accept anything less than what they truly deserve because those days are long over. The plussize community is here to stay, and they’re louder and more vocal about their right to fashion than they have ever been. They’ve come together as a community to help other people find their voice and their place in the fashion world, and they have no qualms about throwing some elbows to get there. If it’s so easy for the plus-size community to accept their bodies for what they are, why can’t designers?

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Sheila Lopez | Photography by Tommy Kim The B&W Issue • Winter 2017 72


Erica Campbell | Photography by Brian Tru

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Sheila Lopez & Maria Montelongo | Photography by Tommy Kim

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Valerie Toussaint | Photography by Tommy Chung

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Imelda Bonsu | Photography by Carol Spooner Portraits

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Alessa Chanel | Photography by Eric Brown of Prime Optics

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the death of

originality

by chelsea dixon

“What makes you so special?” A question that we’ve all heard before. Usually delivered in a snarky tone -- intended to rile up emotions and offend.

“What makes you so special?”

Often said to provoke one to anger and to belittle one’s progress, but does it ever make you think… What makes me so special?

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Hmmm, I ponder. hen I decided to start Love U Magazine, opposition struck from almost every direction. There were people all around me who didn’t understand the concept, and others questioned how I would compete with larger, more established brands. Some would point out what other magazines were doing, and even my friends who were trying to be supportive would present laundry lists of evidence to prove that I was fighting an uphill battle. “Magazines are dead!” they would proclaim.


I wanted to build a place where women felt empowered.

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I ponder, then I mourn.

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intellectual in me was thrilled to witness evolution right before my eyes. But, then there was this other part-this, the less evolved and empowered part that was just pissed off. I thought, Are they trying to copy me? ere I was, a lady on a mission. A mission that I anyone. could barely get anyone to believe in, yet I was being mimicked -- how absolutely bizarre For years, and slightly annoying. Granted, I fashion magazines and the industry didn’t spend too much time being sell to women by convincing them that annoyed. Instead, I just brushed it they aren’t good enough, convincing off and kept pushing forward. Yes, women to buy XYZ product for a I was slightly annoyed, but I also chance to be better, prettier, even knew that NO ONE can ‘do me’ like sexier. I wasn’t interested in that. I I can because when it’s all said and also had no interest in creating a done, they aren’t ME. They could picture book of products. I wanted copy an article title or jump on the people to read the magazine and feel ‘positivity’ bandwagon, but they can’t enlightened, inspired or just plain replicate my complete vision because happy. Envisioning a world where my vision belongs to me. It lives all women could be accepted and and resides inside of me. Therefore, embraced, I came up with the slogan, it is impossible to truly replicate it, ‘United Under Fashion.’ Fashion being as I would never be able to replicate the common thread that ties us all them. I know there are some that will together -- regardless of size, shape or say that imitation is the highest form ethnicity. of flattery but is it?! Or, is imitation everal months before releasing simply just ‘imitation?’ the first issue, I began promoting the brand on social media. And then, it happened. I noticed instant copy-cats. People who were targeting only the plus-size market were suddenly ‘inclusive.’ The girl-power

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However, I knew that I wasn’t just creating another magazine. My goal wasn’t to double-down on the skewed fashion standards of the traditional industry, nor was my intention to join the members-only club of the plus-size community. I didn’t want to exclude


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I mourn for our society. A society that celebrates clones and downplays the importance of having an original thought or idea. And, it’s everywhere. How many times do you scroll through Instagram and see 20 different people trying to look exactly like the Kardashians? Have you ever noticed new musicians copying old musicians, hoping that their young fans are simply too young or oblivious to tell the difference? Does Hollywood need to remake every single 80s and 90s movie ever made?

I mourn.

What happened to innovation? When did

it go out of style? How can we bring it back in style?

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hroughout history, great thinkers, artists and creators pull from outside influences and the world around them. However, there is always an invisible, yet clear, line between being inspired by a muse and plagiarism. No dignified artist, inventor or maker would even come close to that line out of fear of being deemed ‘unoriginal.’ What happened to us? When did being unoriginal become okay? When did the masses start believing that ‘maybe they aren’t so special.’


You. There are tons of people who are similar to you, but there is only one YOU. Embrace it, already! No one can ‘do you’ like you can ‘do you.’ And, if you are the one being imitated, keep your head up and remember that they can copy all they want, but a copy is never worth more than an original.

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“What makes you so special?”

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mourn, but not for myself. I mourn for those who lose the ability to think and create on their own. When one denies themselves authenticity, they suffocate their spirit and they deny the world of the things that only they can uniquely provide. Imagine if Michelangelo decided to carve out a bunch of pillars and columns because that’s what was ‘hot’ at the time -- the Statue of David wouldn’t exist. Or if Martin Luther King Jr. opted to plagiarize an existing speech in lieu of delivering his famous ‘I Have A Dream’ speech. People struggle with being their authentic selves every day. Some of them are struggling due to circumstance, while others are willingly and purposely turning themselves into clones of whatever’s trending. Some are clones for so long that only traces of their true identity remain. This isn’t flattery. It’s the death of originality. It’s sad. Instead, if one builds their own brand and speaks in their own voice, they will reach the people who authentically speak their language. That’s when the magic happens.


Le-Vondria Bridges | Photograph by Marcus Harris

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Belle | Neil Glover Photography

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Delicia Garrett | Photograph by Marcus Harris


Delicia Garrett | Photograph by Marcus Harris

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Cover Model: Kristin Gallina, Photographer: Nikki Gomez / pg 7-8. Sierra Holmes / pg 11. Model: Rae Nicole Davis, Photographer: Michael Antonio, Wardrobe: Fashion to Figure / pg 13-17. Models (left to right): Tiffany Hill, Bridgett Johnson, Kaila Uli, Ashley Alzate, Aneesha Madhok, Samantha De Galicia, Deonna Tillman, Jas Monet, Hannah Christina, Zohra Hussein, Madeleine Shelton, Photographer: Nick Ramsay / pg 19. Model: Nikki Ellis, Photographer: Chad Feacher / pg 20. Model: Rachel Brown, Photographer: Tommy Chung, Make-up Artist: Matti Domingue / pg 21. Model: Sophie Hurley, Photographer: Neil Glover / pg 26. Model: Piueti Maka, Photographer: Kehau Likio, Wardobe: Charlotte Russe / pg 27. Model: Alexandra Wolf, Photographer: Denis Michaliov / pg 28-29. Model: Kiesha Santos, Photographer: Samantha Figueroa, Make-up Artist: Prentiss Anais / pg 36. Model: Wilonda Previlo, Photographer: Eric Brown of Prime Optics / pg 37. Model: Nikki Ellis, Photographer: Chad Feacher / pg 44. Model: Rae Nicole Davis, Photographer: Fleek Designs, Wardrobe: (Dress) Audacious & Feral, (Coat) Express / pg 45. Model: Sandyha Sharma / pg 52. Model: Vanessa Franco, Photographer: Adan Martin, Hair & Make-up: Ofelia Baez / pg 53. Model: Ashley VanDyke, Photographer: Marcus Harris / pg 56-57. Behind-the Scenes Photographer: Daniel Wilkens, Models (in random order): Daniela Lombardi, Catherine Field, Sarah DeMelo, Yolanda, Tia Duffy, Meredith Shaw, Sarah Ehsani, Karyn Inder, Bree Ahmed, Ophilia Alleyne, Tierra Sedgemore, Caterina Moda, Michelle Woitowich, Austen Niel, Rebecca Chalmers, Melissa Shannon, Ashley Sharman, Glam Team: Shaquilla M. December (Hair), Beauty Catered (HMUA), Nikkie Selvino (MUA), Sarah B. Awuah (MUA, Shanice Sharpe (MUA, Jessica Haisinger (MUA), Petula Petrie (MUA), Jakki Polyoka (MUA), Theresa Palomino (MUA) / pg 58-63. Photographer: Katiuska Idrovo, Models (in random order): Daniela Lombardi, Catherine Field, Sarah DeMelo, Yolanda, Tia Duffy, Meredith Shaw, Sarah Ehsani, Karyn Inder, Bree Ahmed, Ophilia Alleyne, Tierra Sedgemore, Caterina Moda, Michelle Woitowich, Austen Niel, Rebecca Chalmers, Melissa Shannon, Ashley Sharman, Glam Team: Shaquilla M. December (Hair), Beauty Catered (HMUA), Nikkie Selvino (MUA), Sarah B. Awuah (MUA, Shanice Sharpe (MUA, Jessica Haisinger (MUA), Petula Petrie (MUA), Jakki Polyoka (MUA), Theresa Palomino (MUA) / pg 72. Model: Shelia Lopez, Photographer: Tommy Kim / pg 73. Model: Erica Campbell, Photographer: Brian Tru / pg 74. Models: Sheila Lopez & Maria Montelongo, Photographer: Tommy Kim / pg 75. Model: Valerie Toussaint, Photographer: Tommy Chung, Make-up Artist and Hair: Mattie Domingue / pg 76. Model: Imelda Bonsu, Photographer: Carol Spooner Photography, Makeup Artist: Golden Astella / pg 77. Model: Alessa Chanel, Photographer: Eric Brown of Prime Optics, Wardrobe: Plush Boutique / pg 82. Model: Le-Vondria Bridges, Photographer: Marcus Harris / pg 83. Model: Belle, Photographer: Neil Glover Photography / pg 84-85. Model: Delicia Garrett, Photographer: Marcus Harris / Back Cover Model: Krislynn Mallard, Photographer: Christina Schock


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w w w. Lo ve U M a g a z i n e . c o m Love U Magazine is a quarterly, digital publication. For information on our quarterly publishing cycle, please contact us via http://LoveUMagazine.com. 2017 Black & White Issue--Published December 21, 2017. | © 2017 Arrogant Dreams, LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. EDITORIAL OFFICE Love U Magazine is published by Arrogant Dreams. 1971 W Lumsden Road #215, Brandon, FL 33511 contact@arrogantdreams.com Want to Write for Us? Email submissions@loveumag.com General Inquiries:  contact@loveumag.com  |  Advertising: ads@loveumag.com |  Collaborations: partners@loveumag.com


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VISIT US

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Love U Magazine | The B&W Issue, Winter 2017  

In our annual B&W issue, we feature beautiful B&W photography and explore thought-provoking topics. Think of it as our 'think-piece' issue....

Love U Magazine | The B&W Issue, Winter 2017  

In our annual B&W issue, we feature beautiful B&W photography and explore thought-provoking topics. Think of it as our 'think-piece' issue....