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May 2011

Official Newsletter of the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center

Vol. 3, Iss. 5

Customer-focused care at Fisher Clinic keeps forces ready Branch Clinic on Naval Station Great Lakes brings medical, dental & occupational health to thousands

HN Matt Torres, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Corpsman at the Fisher Clinic, takes the vital signs of HN Joshua Soutulla. In an average year, the clinic’s staff will provide medical care to approximately 16,000 beneficiaries. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

Mike Eiermann, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Industrial Hygienist at the Fisher Clinic, prepares a linoleum sample for asbestos analysis. In a year, occupational and preventative medicine sees more than 8,850 unique visitors. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

By Jonathan Friedman Lovell FHCC Public Affairs

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or the men and women of the Fisher Clinic, the readiness mission of the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center could not be more in-focus. Specializing in medical, dental and occupational health, the clinic‟s 232 professionals provide a variety of

services in support of the FHCC‟s mission. “As a specialized service, we foster readiness of the active duty forces and serve to prevent employee, student and recruit illness related to potential risks at the workplace,” said Mark Lesko, Lovell FHCC Occupational Health Medicine Department

HM2 Alico Jervier, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Dental Laboratory Technician at Fisher Clinic, displays a partial dental mold. In an average year, the clinic produces 380 dental prosthetic devices. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

Head at Fisher Clinic (Bldg. 237). “I believe our staff has a sense of accomplishment each day they have reduced the risk of harm and improved the health of our patients, staff and other customers.” Lesko noted that the 59-member staff in occupational health medicine at Fisher Clinic provides occupational health,

industrial hygiene and preventive medicine services with a 12-state region to all U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps service members, and the Lovell FHCC. As the only Branch Medical Clinic on Naval Station Great Lakes‟ main base, the clinic has an ongoing flow of patients and customers. (Continued on page 3)

In This Issue... First Lovell FHCC Quarterly Award Winners

Lovell FHCC Presented Meritorious Unit Commendation

Lovell FHCC Veterans share wisdom with students

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Leadership Commentary Change in season brings opportunities to sharpen processes

Five points of self-evaluation: set high standards, advocate change, communicate, listen and solve problems winter slumber.

This is our challenge in spring. As you‟re shaking off winter, look at these five areas that will help you and us to succeed:

For me, this reference goes much further than Mother Nature. Much more than end-of-the-year resolutions, I believe spring is the perfect time to rouse your senses and evaluate the status quo. Spring is the time to dust off your routine and consider if there are more efficient and effective ways to accomplish your mission.

By Patrick L. Sullivan Lovell FHCC Director lthough the Northern Illinois weather can make it difficult to believe, we are actually in spring. Many people reference blooming flowers and budding trees this time of year because it is an awakening from

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Set high standards. When you become the example, those around you are encouraged to do the same. Instead of telling about them, show others your high standards. Be an advocate for change. When you have a better idea or technique, share it. Champion others to look at challenges and problems in this light.

Last October, we dove into the realities of integration. For many of us, the fall-winter blur has been extraordinarily busy and there has been little room to honestly evaluate how far we‟ve come.

Encourage face-to-face communication. Email has a wonderful specific purpose, but there is nothing like human interaction. Instead of replying via email or text, get out from behind your desk and see what is happening.

Together, we have accomplished a tremendous amount in standing up the new facility. We should all take great pride in what we have done and what we do every day in caring for our patients.

Lovell FHCC Quarterly Award Winners Junior (E4-E5), Senior (E6) and BlueJacket (E1-E3) Sailors of the Quarter

Junior Sailor of the Quarter ET2 Dave Dietzler

Senior Sailor of the Quarter

BlueJacket of the Quarter

IT1 Josh Pedrazoli

HN Chris Fite

Listen more than talk. This is entirely about communication. By listening to others, you will have a greater understanding of their perspective. Empathize with others and it may spark your collective creativity and innovation. Fix the problem. No matter how hard we try, things will go wrong sometimes. This is not the end of the world, but the problem won’t take care of itself. Don’t come up with an alibi or an excuse. Learn from the error and fix it right away. With the transformation of spring come the promises of warmer weather and change. At work, please remember that the change must begin with you. Don‟t be afraid to speak up on behalf of our patients. They are the reason we are here and the reason we keep our promise of Readying Warriors and Caring for Heroes.

The Apollo The Apollo is the official newsletter of the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center. It is published monthly for staff members, Veterans, military family members and volunteers. The newsletter is designed and published at the Lovell FHCC in the Communications Department. 3001 Green Bay Rd. North Chicago, Illinois 60064 224-610-3714 www.lovell.fhcc.va.gov

www.facebook.com/lovellfhcc

www.youtube.com/lovellfhcc

issuu.com/lovellfhcc Director, Capt. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Patrick L. Sullivan, FACHE Deputy Director, Capt. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Capt. David Beardsley, MC, USN

Title: Lovell FHCC Information Resources Management Work Center Supervisor

Title: Lovell FHCC Information Resources Management Leading Petty Officer

Title: Lovell FHCC Primary Care Assistant Leading Petty Officer at Fisher Clinic

Hometown: Addison, Ill. Years in the Navy: 9 years

Hometown: La Crosse, Wis. Years in the Navy: 8 years

Hometown: Jenison, Mich. Years in the Navy: 2 years

Best part of serving in the Navy? “I really think there‟s no other career that let‟s you to see the world, get an education and serve the public.”

Best part of serving in the Navy? “The opportunities to meet people and be trusted with a phenomenal amount of responsibilities.”

Best part of serving in the Navy? “Hands down, serving with the Marines in Afghanistan. There is nowhere else I could do the job that I did there.”

How do you keep our promise of “Readying Warriors and Caring for Heroes?” “While I don‟t specifically interact with patients, I keep the computer systems operational so providers can maintain exceptional care.”

How do you keep our promise of “Readying Warriors and Caring for Heroes?” “By keeping information systems running smoothly and efficiently, I enable our FHCC team to keep a patientcentered focus.”

How do you keep our promise of “Readying Warriors and Caring for Heroes?” “By ensuring students are medically ready, I send them from training to the operational fleet.” 2

Lovell FHCC Communications Department Head Mary Schindler Public Affairs Officer Jonathan E. Friedman Submissions to the publication can be emailed to lovellfhcc.media@va.gov Factual Accuracy and Disclaimer: Accuracy is very important to us and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been published, please bring it to our attention by sending an email to lovellfhcc.media@va.gov. Use of any social media product does not imply endorsement on the part of the Department of Defense or the Department of Veterans Affairs, and may not be available from all government servers. Content on these sites are not edited for accuracy and may not necessarily reflect the views of the federal government.


Fisher Clinic keeps fleet ready (cont.) are an opportunity to refine their patient-centered approach. “Any time you integrate an operation of this magnitude, there are always challenges. With the recent and ongoing renovations to dental spaces, my staff has truly approached this as an opportunity to focus on the patient and improve their service and quality Jennifer Leblanc, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Health Technician at the Fisher Clinic, performs a near-visual acuity test. (Photo by Jonathan of life.” Friedman)

(From left) U.S. Navy Capt. Cornelius Lynch and Patrice Walters, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Prosthodontist and Dental Assistant at the Fisher Clinic, prepare a patient for a procedure. In a year, the Fisher Dental Clinic averages more than 118,000 dental procedures. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman) (Continued from page 1)

With more than 27,800 patient visits last year, the dental portion of the Fisher Clinic refines its mission into a single statement: Send dental-ready Sailors into the fleet. “We‟re caring for a large number of military personnel assigned to Naval Station Great Lakes and the surrounding area,” said Cmdr. Brenda Hamilton, Lovell FHCC Dental Department Head at Fisher Clinic (Bldg. 237). Hamilton explained that Bldg. 237 is scheduled for structural replacement in a 2018 military construction project. Nonetheless, she noted that the tight spaces

In addition to dental and occupational health medicine services, Fisher Clinic provides medical care to approximately 16,000 beneficiaries each year. Led by Cmdr. Steve Elgin, Lovell FHCC Medical Department Head at Fisher Clinic (Bldg. 237), the 75-member medical staff focus on keeping U.S. Navy students healthy and focused on their learning. “I‟m lucky enough to work with an incredible staff that ensures U.S. Navy students are medically cared for so they can focus on their studies,” said Elgin. “These students are the future of the fleet, so it‟s vital that they have every opportunity to excel in their studies.” Elgin noted that each day brings unique challenges and opportunities. From overseas and medical deployment screenings to caring for the common cold, no two days are ever identical. This flexibility, he explained, is why the Fisher Clinic staff excel in their mission. “I have phenomenal civilians and Sailors working tirelessly to medically prepare students. Through their collective experience, they truly know the importance of our mission and literally don‟t stop until the mission is complete. This type of dedication is priceless. And why I know it sounds cliché, this is truly why I love serving in the Navy.” Although the three areas of specialty at the Fisher Clinic are unique, each are part of the larger FHCC mission and each are dedicated to the promise of Ready Warriors and Caring for Heroes.

HM3 James Lynch, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Immunization Specialist at the Fisher Clinic, prepares a syringe prior to immunizing a patient. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

“Many staff are indeed „warriors and heroes,‟” said Lesko. “The active duty staff who deploy from our department are sought for their public health and preventive medicine skills. The civilians on staff, many who are Veterans and Reservists, have a deep sense of loyalty to the mission and the customers of the FHCC. This ties our mission and promise together. In the end, I am proud to stand among a supremely competent team of professionals.”

(From right) Wayne Wrobleski, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Health Technician Supervisor at the Fisher Clinic, instructs HN LaKevin Lester on a hearing test as part of the Occupational Medicine Division of the Occupational Health Medicine Department. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman) 3

HN Mike Baker, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Dental Technician at the Fisher Clinic, reviews a dental x-ray. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

Jim Shores, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Industrial Hygienist at the Fisher Clinic, prepares a slide prior to looking for asbestos filters. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)


“MUC” presented Students interview Veterans for school New Trier Township High School project connects class with community to Lovell FHCC Meritorious Unit Commendation By Jonathan Friedman Lovell FHCC Public Affairs

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he former Naval Health Clinic Great Lakes (now Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center) was recently awarded its first Meritorious Unit Commendation from the Chief of Naval Operations for efforts leading up to the Oct. 1, 2010, integration. The commendation was presented to the facility by Rear Adm. Alton Stocks, Commander, Navy Medicine East and Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Mar. 17 during a Town Hall and Admiral‟s Call in North Chicago, Ill. “This commendation is not easily achieved,” said U.S. Navy Capt. David Beardsley, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Deputy Director. “It is truly a representation of the extraordinary effort made by Naval Health Clinic Great Lakes‟ staff to arrive where we are today.” The award was earned for meritorious service from 2006 to 2010 and for the exceptional care provided to 225,800 recruits, students and eligible beneficiaries at the former Naval Health Clinic Great Lakes. Since the clinic‟s integration with the former North Chicago VA Medical Center in October of last year, those same beneficiaries are now cared for at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center. “As the citation notes in the commendation, we‟re serving as a model for future partnerships of this kind,” said Beardsley. “This is why I couldn‟t be more proud of this accomplishment and the dedication it took to attain it.” As part of the award, military members at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center are authorized to wear the associated ribbon and the Meritorious Unit Commendation pendent will be flown.

Veteran Robert Howard (center), of North Chicago, Ill., speaks with New Trier Township High School Sophomores Garrett Bazil (left) and John Lee (right) at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Mar. 23

as part of a class project to identify with their community. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

By Jonathan Friedman Lovell FHCC Public Affairs

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igh school students from New Trier Township High School paired off with military Veterans from the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Mar. 23 to conduct interviews and discuss experiences as part of their Service Learning Project. The sophomore students arrived at the federal health care center prepared with questions and a desire to learn first-hand accounts of life in the military, explained New Trier Township High School teachers Ariell Bachman and Trisha Randall. “The Veterans are talking about stories from their past that we‟ve never had a chance to experience,” said Sophomore John Lee of Wilmette, Ill. “It‟s so cool to hear the details and to experience their passion for our country.”

Bazil about his experiences being deployed to the middle east. “It‟s so important that we share all aspects of life in the military and life as a Veteran,” said Howard of his service. “I really feel that service to the country is a genuine reflection of the country itself.” Randall explained that the project was to highlight how society shapes a person and the experiences and labels that come with that shaping. “For our students, this is a great opportunity to connect with their community and identify how to deal with the labels placed on one another.” Bachman echoed many of the same sentiments, and noted that meeting Veterans was a great way to broaden her student‟s horizons while speaking with people they otherwise may not meet. For students like Lee, this was exactly the point. “For me, I now understand that being a Veteran means much more than I ever imagined,” said Lee.

Veteran Robert Howard, of North Chicago, Ill., spoke with Lee and fellow 10th grader Garrett

Snapshot: Month in review from Facebook.com/LovellFHCC

Cynthia Wolff, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Supply Processing and Distribution, stops for a photo Mar. 17 during an Environment of Care visit with Veterans Integrated Service Network 12 Director Dr. Jeffrey Murawsky. (Courtesy Photo)

Hundreds took part in the Lovell FHCC's Annual Job Fair Apr. 7. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

(From left) U.S. Navy Capt. John Malfitano, Commanding Officer, Naval Station Great Lakes, presents the 2010 Captains Cup to U.S. Navy Capt. David Beardsley, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Deputy Director, at the Lovell FHCC Mar. 22. The Captains Cup is a series of sporting events held throughout the year on Naval Station Great Lakes. Last year, teams from the former Naval Health Clinic Great Lakes captured the coveted award. (Photo by Jonathan Friedman)

HM1 Benjamin Stewart, a Lovell FHCC Sailor and Cardiovascular Tech aboard USNS Comfort, stops for a photo before departing with Operation Continuing Promise 2011. (Courtesy Photo ) 4

U.S. Navy Cmdr. (Dr.) Robert Lipsitz, Lovell FHCC Preventive Medicine Officer, was recently awarded the Rear Adm. Charles S. Stephenson Award at the Armed Forces Public Health Conference in Hampton, Va., for excellence in Navy Occupational Health, Preventive Medicine and/or Health Promotions. (U.S. Navy Photo)

The Apollo Newsletter (May 2011)  

The Apollo is the official monthly newsletter of the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago, Illinois.