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Fashion

Fall-Winter Trends 2012-13

The accent is on bright colors By Sumeha Khalid

T

his season it’s all about bright colours. Designers are whipping up superb separates and outfits in raging red, tempting tangerine, becoming blue, gregarious green and other such vivid and happy shades. Black and white, though, will always remain in whatever the definition of style. Wanting to share the latest trends in fashion and style with our readers, we spoke to some top guns in the fashion industry and asked them an identical set of questions to share what’s on their mind and how trends were taking shape for the season 201213. Following are the excerpts.

Top guns of the fashion industry share what’s on their mind, most of them holding forth that bright is the big rage for the coming season

Q: What are the likely trends on the local runways? A: The local runways have become very prêt-savvy. There is less embroidery and more experimenting with cuts and silhouette. Currently one sees a more draped look and not so much structure. Q: What do you predict for year 2013? A: More prints, experimental block and digital printing and not so much embroidery. A more universal look for sure!

MahinKarim 36 I September 23 - 29, 2012

Q: Long shirts or short shirts? A: Both look glamorous if worn with the right trouser and by the right body type. Q: Will volume be a consideration in

the next season? A: Yes, volume adds to a silhouette, it will definitely be there complimenting something structured and sleek. A baggy top with a skinny trouser or a fitted shirt with flared trousers always compliments one another. Q: Best option for lowers – tights, jeggings, churidaars, palazzos, etc... A: Like I said before, it’s not what you wear, its how you are wearing it - they all work well if put together with the right tops. Q: Colours that we will see in abundance… A: A profusion of orange, purple and, of course, lots of multi-floral motifss.


HumaAdnan Q: What are the likely trends on the local runways? A: There is a mix of trends we see at the local end. Presently people are trying to explore different options – long, short, loose, fitted, drapes, etc.

AfreenShiraz Q: What are the likely trends on the local runways? A: Palazzo and bold hues. Q: What do you predict for year 2013? A: A wardrobe comprising bold and bright outfits! Q: Long shirts or short shirts? A: Both, depending on the look you want to carry. Q: Will volume be a consideration in the next season? A: Yes, we will surely see a lot of volume in 2013. Q: Best option for lowers - tights, jeggings, churidaars, palazzos, etc... A: Wide bottom pants and tights. Q: Colours that we will see in abundance… A: Fuchsia, tangerine, cobalt, emerald green, deep violet, etc.

Q: What do you predict for year 2013? A: I’m always looking ahead when it comes to trends. As a brand, FNK Asia has always been very experimental and follows its own unconventional route keeping in mind the trends and forecast. For 2013 we are working on several cuts – sporty and unconventional, yet extremely smart. Q: Long shirts or short shirts? A: We have already been releasing short lengths since the last season. With our philosophy lengths don’t matter, they just have to have the bohemia style along with tropical, tribal influence with comfort and utility its hallmarks. For us, the tent like cuts must be chucked out of wardrobe. Q: This coming season will volume be a consideration? A: Volume with a certain cut is acceptable, but it needs to be streamlined and should be figure flattering. Q: Best option for lowers - tights, jeggings, churidaars, palazzos, etc... A: We, as a brand have a special place for lowers. You will see a further extension of blocks, screen print and tye ‘n’ dye. Basically a lot of surface texturing along with our signature embroidery will be seen. We will be doing a whole lot of shalwars, palazzo pants, skinnys and skinny pants. Q: Colours that we will see in abundance… A: Fuchsia, tangerine, cobalt, emerald green, deep violet, etc.

Aliya Tipu Q: What are the likely trends on the local runways? A: Current fashion rage is flowly outfits. A-line cut is also IN. Q: What do you predict for year 2013? A: The trends for the next year to come will be unique in a way because the stylists will seek inspiration from the fifties, sixties and seventies; these are the trends which are being reinvented and being brought back uniquely. Q: Long shirts or short shirts? A: Personally I prefer long shirts as they always look classy and elegant. Q: Will volume be a consideration in the next season? A: No. Q: Best option for lowers – tights, jeggings, churidaars, palazzos, etc... A: Tights. Q: Colours that we will see in abundance… A: Orange, coral, ink blue and parrot green.

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Munaf with his wife Q: What are the likely trends on the local runways? A: Lot of flowy chiffon/silk with a hint of sparkling embellishments in fusion wear. And angarkhas in traditional attire with long flowy dupattas. Q: What do you predict for year 2013? A: I would say straight, structured shirts will make a comeback. Q: Long shirts or short shirts? A: Short shirts are making a comeback… But long and flowing ensembles will stay on as they suit the Asian body-type. Q: Will volume be a consideration in the next season? A: Yes. Volume lends elegance to an outfit. Q: Best option for lowers – tights, jeggings, churidaars, palazzos, etc... A: Of course, churidaars. They look good regardless of gender. Q: Colours that we will see in abundance… A: Tangy colours will be seen more – dark tones of emerald green, royal blue while pink and purple will also be in circulation. 38 I September 23 - 29, 2012

Sophia Naveed Lari,SNL Q: What are the likely trends on the local runways? A: After colour blocking, that has been a great trend all this year, head-to-toe prints are very much seen on the local runways. Also plain colour block tops with printed palazzo pants are very much in fashion. Dress it up or down with a beautiful necklace and you can be a trendsetter! Q: What do you predict for year 2013? A: Clothing needs to have a style, it needs to be bold and bright and the 2013 fashion trends will follow the same rule – only bigger and bolder because this gives clothes a personality. Fashion trends for the year 2013 are going to be a lot of reinvention of old styles – pencil skirts will be back in fashion! Q: Long shirts or short shirts? A: Both. Short shirts for the cool, casual

look with prints, whereas long shirts will still be in fashion as they make one look smarter. Long shirts paired with wide legged pants look elegant and fashionable! Q: Will volume be a consideration in the next season? A: Volume will only be seen in pretty evening dresses. Day-wear ensembles will be tapered and straight. Q: Best option for lowers - tights, jeggings, churidaars, palazzos, etc... A: Palazzo pants and wide legged trousers. Q: Colours that we will see in abundance… A: Red, saffron, cobalt, orange, gold, pastel, pale – all are in.


Glamstock

Art and Décor By Sumeha Khalid

D

ecorating your premises has never been this easy. With so many options to chose from, when it comes to home interiors, people wishing to decorate their homes are spoilt for choice. One name that stands out among

the plethora is ARTEL by Bina Ali. Artel offers an array of beautiful furniture with intricate hand-painted tile inlay, hand painted artifacts, jewellery, and more. This brand was established in 1995 and has come a

long way since then. The key-word to ARTEL products is that they are hand-made. Bina Ali has strived to give a new meaning to terra cotta. “Our creative team comprise boys and girls with little or no educational back ground and are from the lower class mostly. We present them with training for which we pay them a monthly income and then hire them. The point is to give these youngsters a skill and a respectable means of livelihood,” shares Bina. The wooden products are all designed by Artel. These designs are then executed by handicapped carpenters and the local craftsmen of yesteryears. The idea here is to present traditional handicrafts in a modern way. Bina knows the art of fusion and does a wonderful job. Each product is painstakingly hand crafted to the utmost perfection

w h i c h carries exclusively designed furniture in solid wood and the art work on the tile in lay is quite impressive. T h e pottery art work, too, is detailed with tones and shades that are incredible. Artel now has a sister company by the name of Thumb Print by Bina Ali .Thumb Print is a brand which showcases signature fashion line pieces. Product range available at Artel includes furniture, artifacts, wooden, hand painted w o o d e n v e s s e l s , signature jewellery and customised giveaways. ARTEL

that can be attained. The colors are both vibrant and muted to cater to the varied tastes of her clients. Artel has also initiated a highly exclusive range ‘ARTEL GOLD’

products are available in Karachi, Lahore and Islamabad and internationally via the website at http://www.artel.binaali.com

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P

akistan is a rich land with cultural and historical places scattered all over. Bahawalpur state is one of them which is known for its tourists destinations which are different than what is present all over Pakistan. Bahawalpur State which remained in existence from 1833 to1955 has a unique presence mainly due to its architecture blended with Italian style. Bahawalpur has some of the worlds most remarkable and rare antiquities which are still in good shape and are in the possession of the family members of the last Nawab of Bahawalpur.

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During the reign of Nawab Sir Sadiq Muhammad Khan Abbasi V from 1907-55, the state developed into a beautiful place which some beautiful Italian architectural wonders and plenty of other places including schools, colleges, palaces, mosques, hospitals and a library and university. One visit around Bahawalpur revels the beautiful architectures been developed in that rule. Bahawalpur is also known for its palaces besides other architectural places; amongst them are Darbar Mehal, Gulzar Mehal and Noor Mehal. All these palaces are now under the control of army and require a proper permission by

army to visit them. It was in march when I got the opportunity to visit Bahawalpur and its various palaces. Noor Mahal amongst all the palaces is no doubt is one of the most elegant buildings in Bahawalpur built in the Italian style and as it is not open to public hence not many people know about that. It is unique in its architecture and is splendid with beautiful lawns and driveways. I had heard a lot about that palace and once I saw it from far off, I knew that all what has been said regarding this has been true. A beautiful exotic building in white exudes the charm and the beauty of the palace. There are a lot of anecdotes related to the construction of the palace. One of which is much known is that it was undertaken by Nawab Subah Sadiq the fourth, who was also known as the Shan Jahan of Bahawalpur for his passion of constructing beautiful buildings. Mr. Hennan; an Englishman who was the state engineer designed the building. Foundation of Noor Palace was laid in 1872. The map and coins of the state were buried in its foundation as good omen. Most of the material and furniture was imported from England and Italy and construction of the palace was completed in 1875 at a cost of Rs. 1.2 Million. Noor Palace has a covered area of 44,600 square feet. It has 32 rooms including 14 in basement, 6 Verandas and 5 domes. It is said that Nawab Sadiq Muhammad Khan IV had the palace constructed for his wife however, she was there for one night, only as she happened to see the adjoining graveyard from her balcony, and refused to spend another night there and so it remained unused during his reign. Upon entering the palace


you still get the aroma of Nawab rule and the legacy. The design encompasses features of Corinthian and Islamic styles of architecture with a tinge of sub continental style. Corinthian touch is visible in the columns, balustrade, pediments and the vaulted ceiling of the main Hall known as the darbar hall. The Islamic style is evident in the five domes whereas, the angular elliptical shapes are a stroke of subcontinent style. Nawab Muhammad Behawal Khan the fifth, added a mosque to the palace in 1906 at the cost of Rs. 20,000. The design is based on the mosque of Aitchison College. For years the palace remained unoccupied by any one. After

independence of Pakistan when the Bahawalpur State was merged into Pakistan in 1956, Noor Mehal was taken over by the Auqaf department. The palace was leased to Army in 1971 who later acquired it in 1997 for a sum of 120 million. The building was later declared a “Protected Monument� in September 2001 by the Department of Archeology, Government of Pakistan. It is currently in possession of Army and is used as a mess and for holding different state durbars and meetings with foreign delegations. Due to its non access to the general public, the Mehal has been in perfect shape, the aura and the ambiance can be felt

when once enters into the building. The Victorian furniture that was brought initially can still be found here. Noor Mehal and the surrounding palaces are believed to be fine examples of colonial Architecture in Pakistan. One could find structures similar to these in Imperial France of seventeen and eighteen century. French palaces in Versailles, Paris, and even many structures in Victorian England were inspired by these styles. These, like other British period structures in Pakistan are architecturally hybrid and therefore hard to pin down as Italian, or French, or British for say.

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Recipe

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients: 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup brown sugar, firmly packed 1 cup shortening 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 large eggs 2 1/4 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1 (12 ounce) package chocolate chips

Directions: 1 Preheat oven to 375째. 2 In a mixing bowl, cream together the first five ingredients. 3 After creaming the first five ingredients add the last four and make sure everything is mixed together well. 4 Drop by tablespoonfuls on to cookie sheets and bake for 9-10 minutes. 5 For M&M cookies: Replace chocolate chips with M&M plain baking bits.

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Books

Verse with a difference By Syed Afsar Sajid

The title of the collection would seem to suggest silence, seclusion and self-abnegation as its threedimensional context. On the sensuous level, silence is transformed into speech, seclusion into self-exploration, and self-abnegation into resignation

M

aqsood Wafa made an early mark on the literary world with the publication of his first verse collection titled Dare-Imkan (1994). It was like a fresh gust of wind in a literary milieu permeated with ordinary verse compositions – full of clichés, trite structural patterns and hackneyed images. Literary pundits were taken by surprise over the young poet’s innovative diction, style and ingenuity as a ghazal-go. This was some 18 years ago. Since then much water has flown down the

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meandering streams of the rivers Ravi and Chenab flanking his native Alaheda habit at By Maqsood Wafa Faisalabad. Publisher: Jahangir Books, T h e evolutionary 277-Riwaz Garden, Lahore process of Pages: 157; Price: Rs.300/his creative instinct has smoothly synthesis of contraries in Alaheda. graduated from a coalescence as it were of ‘passion and precision’ Like his previous one, the instant in Dar-e-Imkan to a metaphysical book too does not carry any


laudatory preface or introductory note from a celebrity or connoisseur of literature. Only the author’s own remarks explaining its locus appear on the back of its hard cover. The title of the collection would seem to suggest silence, seclusion and self-abnegation as its three-dimensional context. On the sensuous level, silence is transformed into speech, seclusion into self-exploration, and selfabnegation into resignation. The reader could conceive or partake of

65 compositions in both literary forms i.e. ghazal and nazm. Their common themes are vacuity of personal ambition, separation from the loved one(s), pain of loneliness, lost dreams, a sceptical view of existence, an intuitive perception of reality, and a plaintive apprehension of the varying patterns of life across the ages – from its pristine glorious past to its uncanny doleful present. Here are some instances from his ghazal to illustrate the point: Is ziyarat gah-e-tamanna may/

Magar...!/Dastras say paray is hawa may/Phisalti hui zindagi jo mray ikhtiayar-o-bayan may nahi hai/ Usay apni marzi say kaisay guzarun (‘Narasai say bhari aik Nazm’) Uth Javed Anwar ab uth/Apnay beemaron ki khatir/Jaltay cigarette kay sholay say/Apnay pad pay nuskha likh aur nazm mukammal kar/Un khwabon ka nauha likh/ Jin khwabon ka aakhri hissa…/Tairi qabr ki mitti chaat rahi hai (‘Gum shuda khwabon ka Nauha – Javed

In the self-proclaimed medley of disparate voices, the poet seems to be desperately striving to extricate the ‘silence’ that chooses and pursues its own diction, and is also ‘audible’ to the interested reader who is impelled to share the poet’s phantasmagorical dreams this experience only if he were to don the persona of the poet albeit vicariously. Seemingly conscious of his ‘exclusivity’ at different levels like social, cultural and aesthetic, the poet would love to confide into his audience about his dreams and their ethereal or mundane fulfillment. Ironically in his poetics, self-delusion would appear to lead to self-recognition. The dilemma of the poet is akin to that of the humanity at large viz., the paradigmatic dissociation of the ‘silver lining’ from the ‘black cloud’ vis-à-vis the stark realities of existence. This is not to say that he is pessimistic in his poetic stance. The genre of ghazal, with its textual fluidity, is believed to lend him a broader cushion to depersonalize his distress and desolation in an otherwise unwholesome social environment. The book in view contains some

Hum bhi phirtay hain za’ireen kay saath Yun bhi khasiyyat-e-ash’ya ka pata chalta hai/Rait par chalta hun darya ka pata chalta hai! Sah liya talkhi-e-imroz ko itna kay Wafa/Ab koi wada-e-farda bhi nahi chahiyey hai Thukra na dun yeh manzil-ekashf-o-kamal bhi/Awargi-e-sham koi mashwira hi day Khali khali thi lauh-e-aab-ohawa/Us pay tasveer si bana aaey Yeh jo maey khwab daikhta hun bahut/Yeh koi aur silsila to nahi? Sab yaqeen raaigan gaey mairay/ Tairay baray may jab qiyas kiya In his nazm, however, the poet seems to be more comfortable to adumbrate and philosophize his quasi-metaphysical broodings: Kisi ajnabi khaamshi may/Kisi aur dunya ka darwaza kholun/Jisay soch sakta nahi maey/Usay bhi pukarun/Maey khud ko bikhairun, sanwaarun/Maey jo chahay kar lun/

Anwar kay liye’) Kiya mila khwab-e-raaigan say hamay/Khisht-o-aahan ki is taraqqi say/Apnay madfan ki jar say ugti hui/Har imarat ki shakl aisi hai/ Jaisay veeran ho raha hai jahan/ Jaisay mismar ho rahi hai zameen/ Is shikast-e-hunar ki sil oopar/ Unkay katbay talash kiya keejay/Jin ki qabrain hain gum zamanon may (‘Afreenash’) Thus in the self-proclaimed medley of disparate voices, the poet seems to be desperately striving to extricate the ‘silence’ that chooses and pursues its own diction, and is also ‘audible’ to the interested reader who is impelled to share the poet’s phantasmagorical dreams. The book is sure to make a palpable impact on the current literary scenario for its original but rich content as well as finesse in terms of the art and craft of versification.

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Art

Icons of Art in Pakistan A pretty decent effort in paying tribute to the pioneers of art in Pakistan By Nadeem Alam

T

he Indus Valley Civilization in general has been a safe haven for the human life due to its fertile lands and friendly atmospheric conditions. The boundaries of this great civilization encompassed a new country in 1947 under the name of Pakistan. Right from its birth, this fresh state became a crucible of

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diverse forms of art and expression due to its multifarious acculturation that began with the invasions of the Aryans thousands of years ago. This land is a witness to the starvation led enlightenment of the Buddha at Texila and the absorbent of Roman canons and culture in the North as Alexander discovered its magical beauty and romance. Later, this area


In the colonial era, this land was introduced to the British culture while throughout all the ages, Hindu and Jain cultures were always alive beneath the surface. With this background, we can find the diversity in its culture, ethnicity, values and ways of expressions, from music to literature and from dance to visual arts welcomed Arab-Islamic influences that knocked at its doors from the Arabian Sea in early eighth century AD, and the Persian inspirations entered from the arid and stony Khyber Pass after the tenth century. In the colonial era, this land was introduced to the British culture while

throughout all the ages, Hindu and Jain cultures were always alive beneath the surface. With this background, we can find the diversity in its culture, ethnicity, values and ways of expressions, from music to literature and from dance to visual arts. Considering the painting alone, we can

find so many different genres! The tradition of miniature painting has its roots deep in the unmatched colours of Rajput or Gujarati style while it flourished with the Persian tradition in the Mughal courts. Along with miniature painting, we also can find the unparalleled styles of calligraphy, which later gave birth to a new genre as calligraphic-painting. On the other hand, chiefly under the western influences, realistic painting styles encouraged the large-scale oil painting technique, which optimized the landscape, portrait and figurative painting. Therefore, when Pakistan came into being, the local as well as foreign styles of painting were in fashion and masters like Anna Molka, Allah Bakhsh, Haji Sharif and Zubeda Agha were in practice of developing various art forms and techniques. Art in Pakistan absorbed almost all the tastes that were available in this area. However, the academic art institutions – the Fine Arts Department of the

September 23 - 29, 2012 I 47


and buffalos) and human beings, has always given the feeling of dynamism to the viewer. In this exhibition, a landscape painting of Allah Bakhsh is on display. This painting with two pairs of oxen led ploughs driven by an adult and a kid, is a signature Allah Bakhsh frame with oxen and human figures, composed in an open composition, around the lower horizon line in a way that it seems they are going away from the viewer. The foreground has been painted with watered field that is reflecting the oxen and figures while blue patches of sky along with white clouds have been adorned at the background. Abdur Rahman Chughtai is known the world over for his own style: the inimitable Chughtai Style. He explored a new dimension in the tradition of miniature painting that was more close to the Bengal School of Miniature Art rather than that of the Mughals. A portrait of a Mughal artist is the title of a drawing that on display at the exhibition. It bears Chughtai’s signature and has all the details in the headdress, and on the cloak of the princely looking artist who himself has been shown holding a painting of a girl in his hands. In the background,

All these great painters have contributed to the Pakistani art with their remarkable work that not only represents their skill and effort, but also carries the deep conceptual and creative level that these gifted artists have been blessed with

Photographer: Murtaza Ali

Punjab University and Mayo School of Arts (since rechristened as National College of Arts) – refined these forms up to a very mature level. Ejaz Galleries Lahore put on display an exhibition of paintings in reverence to the masters of Pakistani art who actually are the founders of various styles and techniques. Under the title of “Icons of Art from Pakistan” the Galleries displayed paintings of Allah Bakhsh, Abdur Rahman Chughtai, Colin David, Sadequain, Anwar Jalal Shamza, Saeed Akhtar, Jamil Naqsh, Ahmed Khan, Ismail Gulgee and Askari Mian Irani. All these great painters have contributed to the Pakistani art with their remarkable work that not only represents their skill and effort, but also carries the deep conceptual and creative level that these gifted artists have been blessed with. Allah Baksh could be considered as the father of Pakistani art in at least two styles: landscape and figurative painting. By employing all his selftaught western skills, Allah Bakhsh in his landscapes explored the pastoral life of Punjab with its hazy yet shimmering ambiance. His mastery of creating the effect of movement, in his painted animals (preferably oxen

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the onlooker could find the Japanese style rocks so typical of Persian miniature tradition, and the scattered foliage, filling in the compositional requirements. The free-flowing linear quality of Chughtai is very much obvious in this frame as it reflects the subtle tonalities as well. Colin David could be titled as the first real exponent of figurative art in Pakistan. He dared to paint nudes even in the most asphyxiating environment for this style. He had to face many a tribulation in publicly exhibiting his work; sadly most of his landmark work is consigned to the walls in private collections. Colin indeed is such an unsung hero of Pakistani art whom only his close friends and students who have seen his work can admire. Even in this exhibition at the Ejaz’s, they selected one of his very few landscapes, surprisingly a nonfigurative frame. This painting, with a black-and-white dice composed with twigs in a surrealistic looking green background, could never represent the class, style and genius of Colin. A testament to his great skill is that really is one of his experimental frames that was later adopted and carried on by his wife, Zara David. Saeed Akhtar is another giant in the field of figurative and portraiture art. He has worked a lot in establishing his own style, which is actually divided into two different phases. In the first phase, Saeed Akhtar has painted figures and portraits in a realistic manner, much closer to the

commissioned style in nature. In the recent years, he has developed a stylized approach in both his portraits and figures. He has started to look upon the female figure with an eye of a male, exaggerating its contours and curves to a mild level of exploitation. In his portraits though, he has captured the character of nomadic looking faces with embellished features. One such portrait has been displayed in the exhibition with elongated nose and embossed lips. The earring is painted in a designed manner, and white head-covering enhances the tonal effect of the painting. Sadequain, Gulgee, Ahmed Khan and Shemza adopted calligraphicpainting as their preferred medium. Yet these artists never let their own flair go astray. Gulgee and Sadequain took up this genre as an alternative during Zia’s inglorious regime when sanctions were imposed on figurative art and a narrow and restrictive brand of Islam held sway. Sadequain was effortless in his figurative drawings and paintings with a linear and textured rendering. In the new situation, he assimilated poetry of Iqbal and Ghalib and verses of the Holy Quran with his already established painting style. Gulgee, an engineer by profession, after exploring various styles of painting, settled for his natural and instinctual fashion of calligraphic-painting. Conversely Ahmed Khan over the years has developed a true calligraphic

style that is more traditional in its nature and close to the original art of proper calligraphy rather than calligraphic-painting. Ahmad Jalal Shemza, one of the five dearest students of Shakir Ali and a founder of a unique style in calligraphic painting, has been known more for his design quality in calligraphic-painting. Shemza’s style is more contemporary – much in the mould of his mentor Shakir Ali. In this exhibition, three frames of calligraphic-painting represent these qualities of Ahmad Khan, Gulgee and Shamza, Moreover, a frame in the same genre bears the name of Askari Mian Irani while the piece of Sadequin on display is a pen and ink drawing. It is relatively dichotomous that in this show the Ejaz Galleries did not display any figurative work of Colin David while conspicuous was one such frame by Jamil Naqsh – a nude, painted in detail. This striking anomaly aside, overall this show in its nature could be considered as a pretty decent effort in paying tribute to the pioneers of art in Pakistan.

(Nadeem Alam teaches Art-History at the University College of Art and Design, Lahore. He is a Researcher, Art-Historian and Art-Critic, with a special interest in Western Art, South Asian Art and Art in Pakistan. Email: nadeem.cad@pu.edu.pk)

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Lounge issue no 103