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NOV. 11, 2014 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Police investigating two campus robberies DAVID CECIL

Editor-in-Chief Simon Isham Asst. Editor-in-Chief Olivia Krauth Managing Editor Sammie Hill Copy Editor Alexandria Ruhs News Editor Jacob Abrahamson Asst. News Editor Lubna Hindi Features Editor Sarah Rohleder Sports Editor Noah Allison Asst. Sports Editor Sam Draut Opinion Editor Tyler Mercer Photo Editor Sasha Perez Faculty Adviser Ralph Merkel

Advertising Manager Natalie Ruark Advertising Clerk Kade Tambo Distribution Manager Kade Tambo Business Manager Lisa Potter

CONTACT US HOUCHENS BUILDING, LL07 UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE LOUISVILLE, KY 40292 EDITORIAL 502.852.6728 ADVERTISING 502.852.0667 FAX 502.852.0700

NEWS@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Lee Street has gotten popular lately, but for all the wrong reasons. LMPD reported on Nov. 6 at approximately 4:30 p.m. an armed robbery attempt on the corner of Third and Lee streets. Not even 24 hours afterwards, another rave alert was issued, involving a strongarmed robbery near Second and Lee. While neither party in the armed robbery case were affiliated with the university, the victim of the strong-armed case was a U of L student. Neither victim sustained any severe injuries, according to police. The suspect involved in the Nov. 6 armed robbery attempt was described as a white male, stand-

ing around 5 feet 10 to 6 feet, wearing a black hoodie and was carrying a handgun. At press time, LMPD was still in pursuit of the perpetrator. Multiple suspects were involved in the Nov. 7 strong-armed robbery, described as three Hispanic males ranging from 17-20 years in age. Suspects were also detailed as wearing a black jacket with ENYCHA in white letters on the back, a green, shortsleeved shirt, and a black and white pinstriped NY baseball cap. LMPD urges individuals to take extra precaution, and to be diligent in the surrounding areas and city in whole, both at night and in the daytime, which was when the robbery attempt occurred. They also implore anyone with further information on the case to contact the LMPD at 852-6111 immediately.

OUR MISSION Our job is to serve the University of Louisville community. We hope to promote public discourse and act as a forum for it. We are dedicated to the pursuit of truth through fair, accurate reporting. Our coverage will represent the university in a way that advocates a culture of inclusivity. Our morals are of utmost importance, and we work hard to earn the public trust that is essential to journalism.

EDITORIAL POLICY The Louisville Cardinal, produced by students since 1926, publishes every Tuesday during the fall and spring semesters. The Editor-in-Chief has final say over the content. The Cardinal enjoys hearing feedback from its readers; please write us letters, comment on our website or communicate with us on social media. Each reader is entitled to one copy of the paper, completely free of charge.


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U of L sets new record in sexual health rankings tion as opposed to Go Ask Alice! (a The University of Arizona, which young adult health program at Co- ranked fourth, takes a different aplumbia University), that might help a proach. Their student newspaper, No glove, no love from U of L stu- little too.” The Daily Wildcat, has been running dents. The university was recently He also suggested that the univer- a weekly column on sexual health for ranked 16th out of 140 schools in a sity centralize its information about 10 years. Students can submit their sexual health education index, a new mens’ and womens’ sexual health into specific questions, and have them anrecord for the university. The Tro- one webpage, so students did not swered by a sexual health expert. jan Sexual Health Report Card, now have to dig for it. For the past four years, U of L has in its ninth year, is the only sexual “In all of the 140 schools we are performed consistently well, always health index of its kind for American looking at, ranking in the colleges and universities. there is more top 40, and usuThe rankings are based on a num- consistency of ally within the 1. Oregon State ber of criteria determined by research excellence. The top 20. This and rankings firm Sperling’s Best competition is year, the uni2. University of Texas Places, who conducted the study on getting tightversity placed 3. University of Maryland better than five behalf of Trojan. Factors considered er, so smaller 4. University of Arizona include hours of operation, contra- things are havof the eight Ivy ceptive availability, STI testing, out- ing a big imLeague schools. 5. Stanford University reach, quality of information and pact,” said SperThe University sexual assault resources. ling. of Kentucky, Bert Sperling, CEO of Sperling’s Sperling said that one of those dif- by contrast, has hovered around 50, Best Places, said that though U of L’s ferences can be the availability of in- ranking 48th this year. ranking was impressive, there are a formation when it is needed most: the “If I were giving you a letter grade, few things that the school could do to University of Oregon, which ranked I would say the University of Louisimprove. just below U of L on this year’s index, ville would get an A-minus, and the “The pros and cons of the differ- recently put out an app. Students can University of Kentucky is getting a ent types of contraception could be enter what sexual activity they want solid B,” said Sperling. “They are not improved a little bit on the website,” to engage in, and the app will give doing as good a job as (U of L) doing he said. “And if it’s original informa- them their safety options. HIV and STI testing, or getting stu-

SIMON ISHAM

EDITOR@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Top Five Schools:

dents engaged.” Katrina Kaufman, senior program coordinator for the Health Promotion office, said that she and her colleagues are very pleased about the improvement in the score. “We definitely feel like this is a big improvement, but we continue to look for the newer, better ideas that get students the resources and information that they need,” she said. One new initiative is Hot Spots, a collection of sexual health materials including female and male condoms, dental dams and lubricant. Hot Spots can be put in any dorm floor of any dorm at the request of any student or RA. Once placed, any student can come by at any hour and take what he or she needs. There are currently 17 around campus. The office has also recently focused on coordinating outreach programs in order to educate students, not only about safer sex, but also sexuality and relationships more broadly. The office employs a full-time sexual health adviser to coordinate these programs.


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SGA Update: Senate looks ahead to spring semester ADELINE WILSON

NEWS@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

SGA student senators discussed the 2015-2016 budget and plans for the remainder of the academic year at Tuesday night’s SGA Senate meeting. SGA President Monali Haldankar announced that the election packet for 2015-2016 Top Four and Senate will likely be available by the next meeting on Nov. 18. Academic Vice President Allie Funk spoke about her work with the Study Abroad office, which is looking at the results of a survey sent to students on Oct. 20. The survey aimed to gather student opinions on study abroad opportunities. In addition, Funk is also working with Dean of Libraries Robert Fox to increase the seats in the 24 hour side of the library. The timeline on this project will depend on the availability of funds. “We will be hopefully having a 57 percent increase of seats in the 24 hour side, so that is going to be from 120 seats to 201,” said Funk. “It is a $137,000 project, so we are going to

IN THE NEWS What you missed while you were in class

figure out where we can get the monMAJOR GIFT TO HELP AREA SCHOOLS ey.” The Mary K. Oxley Foundation has given $5 million to U of L’s Budget will also be a factor for SerCollege of Education and Human Development. This gift, and an vices Vice President Morgan Cooksey additional $2.5 million from the U of L Foundation, will be used to as she works with administration on increase retention, reacher preparedness and professional developthe student safety resolution. Cookment in five Jefferson County Schools. This will be accomplished sey said that the university president through education programs for teachers. and provost agreed with the plans of action in the safety resolution, such McCONNELL HOLDS PRESS CONFERENCE ON CAMPUS as the ‘L-Trail’ and the safety app, After the Republicans gained the majority in the U.S. Senate, but the question of funding will efSen. Mitch McConnell held a press conference on Nov. 5 in the fect when students could see these on Chao Auditorium to discuss his upcoming agenda as the likely campus. “Focusing on safety, we are going Senate Majority Leader. McConnell discussed his relationship to be exploring options for funding. with the president and what issues he hopes to work on in the We presented (the safety resolution) next session of Congress. to the president and provost, and “We’re going to function. We’re going to pass legislation. Some they are completely on board, as they of it (Obama) may not like,” said McConnell. have been. They really liked all of the He spoke about his desire to act on tax reform, trade agreements ideas that we have presented,” said and the Affordable Care Act. He said that although he would Cooksey. like to repeal the “legislative mistake,” he knows the President Finally, the Senate completed still has the veto power. their first reading of the 2015-2016 Reporters also questioned him about possible disagreement budget, which will determine how between him and more conservative Senators, such as Ted Cruz SGA funds will be distributed in the (R-Tex.). He assured the audience that he would be elected maupcoming academic year. They are scheduled to vote on the budget at jority leader this Thursday. their final meeting of the semester, Nov. 18, which will be held on the 1/4 EAT SMART AD Heath Sciences Campus.


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Women’s basketball looks to carry on Walz’ winning ways SAM DRAUT

SDRAUT@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

The Louisville women’s basketball team transitions into a new era in the Atlantic Coast Conference this season with a few returners from a core that experienced the most success in program history. Gone is Shoni Schimmel, the program’s second leading career scorer. Asia Taylor and Tia Gibbs exhausted their eligibility after being a Cardinal for five years. Antonita Slaughter, who hit big shots throughout her career, also graduated. But the cupboard is not bare. Louisville head coach Jeff Walz reloaded after losing four stalwarts, hauling one of the nations’ best recruiting classes. Paired with five spectacular freshmen are five seniors who have been a part of Louisville’s run to the national championship game and return to the Elite Eight last season. “We’re fortunate to have Sara Hammond, Bria Smith, Jude Schimmel ,who were a part of last year’s team on the floor. Now we add Shawnta’ Dyer and Sherrone Vails,” Walz said. “So we have five players that have had a lot of success here. They understand what is expected of them and they understand the amount of work and dedication you have to have. They have done a great job teaching the freshmen what to expect and what they need to do.” Sara Hammond headlines the group of seniors after being selected to the coaches’ and Blue Ribbon Panel’s allACC teams. She started all 38 games last season and averaged 10.4 points and 5.9 rebounds per contest.

“It would not surprise me if Sara Hammond averaged 14 to 18 points a game this year,” Walz said. “She knows it is her team now. It is her senior year. Sara wants to go out on a high note.” A team that will begin the season ranked twelfth returns a backcourt that have each played in over 100 games in their career. Smith and Schimmel both played pivotal roles in Louisville’s run to the National Championship in 2013 and Elite Eight appearance last season. Smith, who has played point guard and shooting guard throughout her career, has averaged 8.8 points and 4.3 rebounds per game in her three seasons at Louisville. With her sister Shoni absent, Jude will play an even bigger role than years past. “She will be more important to us on the offensive end of the floor. In the past years, she has been more of a distributor and has gotten the ball to her teammates,” Walz said. “Now, I am asking her score.” Schimmel averaged 5.6 points per game and dished out 114 assists last season. She had a 1.65 assist to turnover ratio. The senior guards add a stout defensive presence. Smith and Schimmel were first and second on the team last year with 55 and 54 steals, respectively. Louisville hit 221 three pointers last season, but just 36 of those threes return from a year ago. The perimeter-oriented offense will see a drastic change this season. Fifth-year seniors Shawnta’ Dyer and Sheronne Vails add a post

Senior guard Jude Schimmel will see an increase in play time and role as a leader of this team. Schimmel was second on the team in steals with 54.

presence the Cardinals lacked. “In practice now, we are six or seven post players deep. In previous years, we were three or four. We never had any subs, so to have Shawnta and Sherrone back, with their experience,” Hammond said. “Shawnta is our best low block player we have. Every time she gets it

there she scores and then Sherrone’s length and her ability to block shots and create chaos on defense, we are going to need that this year.”

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Senior guard Bria Smith’s 55 steals were key in U of L’s winning record.

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 Vails, a 6-foot-4 center, missed the entire 2013-14 season after undergoing knee surgery in summer 2013. She started 28 games in 2012-13 and averaged four points per game. Dyer appeared in 15 games early last season before a stress fracture in her left hip ended her season. She scored 5.1 points per game in her brief campaign. When healthy, Vails and Dyer add an imposing low post game, allowing Louisville to play inside out instead of relying on a perimeter game. “Jude has shot the ball fairly well from the three-point line, Arica Carter has, Megan Deines has. Are we going to be an outside-in offensive team? No, we’re going to be more inside-out this year. But, we have players that can knock down threes,” Walz said. “So, instead of taking 15 to 18 threes a game, we might be taking eight to ten. But, I’m still expecting us to be 34 or 35 percent or better from three, you just won’t see us taking as

MYISHA HINES-ALLEN

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Head coach Jeff Walz coaches sophomore Emmonnie Henderson. Henderson was the lone freshman on last year’s squad and will see an increased role this year.

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL many of them.” In contrast to the five experienced seniors, Walz has worked to prepare five freshmen to the rigors of college basketball. Two McDonalds-AllAmericans, Myisha HinesAllen and Mariya Moore headlined the 2014 recruiting class. Walz said the two wing players were the most physically ready to play of his five freshmen. Hines-Allen is a versatile, 6-foot-2 forward, who ESPN ranked 34th nationally in the 2014 recruiting class. “She can play the three or four for us. She has really shown us that she has a great knack for rebounding the basketball and finishing around the basket. She has stepped out and shot the three well for us,” Walz said. “She does have the ability to stretch a defense. Her physicality and her ability to withstand contact and embrace it is going to give her the ability to play early.” Moore is a 5-foot-11 guard who averaged 17.8 points, 8.6 rebounds and 7.2 assists per game in her senior year of high school. She played on the 2014 USA Basketball Women’s U-18 National team. Walz worked as an assistant coach for the squad. Sydney Brackemyre was

ranked 37th nationally by ESPN and will provide an outside presence from the forward position. Carter will play behind Smith and Schimmel at the guard position. Walz has been impressed with her ability to defend the ball and get to the rim. She was 77th nationally out of high school and now looks towards the senior guards to show her the ropes. “I have been learning from them and have seen how successful they have been,” Carter said. “I want to be like them, I always ask them questions, I know those are the two I should be watching.” Ariana Freeman is the final freshman on the roster. The 5-foot9 guard was a prolific scorer in high school, but Walz sees defense and rebounding as a way for her to find the floor. The development of the five freshmen will be crucial to Louisville’s adjustment to the ACC. “I feel confident that all five will be able to be a big part of this team,” Walz said. “It’s going to be interesting to see what freshman steps up and takes playing time away from upperclassmen.” Collectively, the Cardinals are a cohesive unit determined to continue the success of the program. Through his seven seasons, Walz has averaged 26 wins per year. “The thing I love about our upperclassmen is there is no division. They don’t walk by us and treat us like freshman, they talk to us, they help us and they lead the way,” Freeman said. Wedged in between the seniors and freshman are three role players who have played meaningful minutes over

the past few years. Junior Cortnee Walton appeared in 37 games and averaged over 12 minutes a game last season. The 6-foot-3 forward pulled in 118 rebounds. Fellow junior Megan Deines provides a scoring threat off the bench. She appeared in 33 games last season. Lone sophomore Emmonie Henderson averaged 5.5 points and 3.1 rebounds in 34 games last season. She added a strong post presence, scoring in double digits seven times and shooting 52 percent from the field. After finishing 33-5 in its lone year in the American Athletic Conference, Louisville will face a much more difficult schedule this season. The returning players may carry the Cardinals early, but the development of the freshmen will determine the success in March.

Scorers like Bria Smith will have to step up as the Cardinals change their offensive identity.


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Influx of freshmen won’t fluster Louisville’s wily veterans NOAH ALLISON

NALLISON@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Louisville basketball is coming off a year in which it dominated its conference. In the one year spent in the American Athletic Conference, U of L went 31-6, with three of those losses coming to a conference opponent. Louisville went 15-3 in the AAC, won games by 10, 20, 30 and even 40 points and obliterated the AAC tournament en route to winning it. U of L defeated the 2014 National Champions and AAC member Connecticut in all three meetings last year by scores of 76-64, 71-61 and even 81-48. The AAC is glad to see Louisville go and the ACC is glad to welcome the Cardinals. Undoubtedly, competition in the Atlantic Coastal Conference is going to be a bit stiffer than last year. There are five ACC teams ranked in the AP’s preseason top 25, four of which are in the top ten. Louisville is ranked eighth. Of the five preseason AllAmericans, three play in the ACC: North Carolina’s junior guard Marcus Paige, Dukes freshman center Jahlil Okafor and Louisville’s junior forward Montrezl Harrell. With all this talent, all these great players and classic programs, Louisville has no room to ease into the ACC. The transition is made easier with a combination of five returning impact players from last year’s team and an influx of young, tall freshmen talent. It starts with Louisville’s two captains, senior forward, 6-foot-5 Wayne Blackshear and junior forward, 6-foot-8 Montrezl Harrell. The two could not provide a more dynamic, yet Ying & Yang like balanced approach to their leadership roles.

Blackshear, was a top 30 nationally ranked high school McDonald’s AllAmerican from Chicago and Harrell, an otherwise unheralded and less highly recruited forward from a small town in North Carolina. Their careers though have been a stark contrast of their hype out of high school. Blackshear has battled injuries and inconsistent play while his easy-going nature somewhat allowed his play to succumb to the attention players like Russ Smith and Luke Hancock demanded in the past. Last year, Blackshear averaged just less than 20 minutes, three rebounds and eight points a game. Meanwhile, Harrell showed flashes of brilliance during his freshman year and last year as a sophomore captain earned the respect of his teammates and the nation with his dominant play. Harrell set the school record with 98 dunks, led the team in rebounds with 311 and was second on the team in scoring with his 519 points and second on the team in blocks with 49. He played the most minutes out of anybody and averaged 29 minutes a game, 14 points and eight rebounds. As a leader and player, the best thing for Blackshear’s game might be to be a senior captain. For the first time in his four-year career, the team is leaning on Blackshear’s play and he spent the offseason working relentlessly so the team can depend on him. He is athletic, can shoot from anywhere on the court and can dictate his own shot and rebound. For the first time, the

CHRIS JONES

#3

Rick Pitino’s Cardinals went 31-6 last year. Much of their winning ways can be attributed to jump in productivity by power forward Montrezl Harrell, above. As a sophomore, he led U of L in rebounds with 311 and broke the program’s single season dunk record with 98.

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL offense will suit his skill set and his quiet, nice guy, lead by example attitude will be reflected by his teammates. While the offense will suit Blackshear, it will go through Harrell. A beast on the boards and dominant in the paint, Harrell will touch the ball most possessions. To add to his low-post presence, Harrell has picked up a jump shot and three-point shot

over the offseason. His energy and communication will be spread out to every Cardinal on the court and on the bench. With a young cast on this squad, Harrell and Blackshear are the only two remaining players that played in the national championship two years ago. Although there are new faces Louisville will again boast one of the best backcourts in the nation. The combination of sophomore guard Terry Rozier and senior guard Chris Jones will have Louisville in good hands.

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 Both were first year players last year, Rozier a freshman and Jones a transfer, but the experience they gained and the chemistry they built was invaluable. Jones averaged 25 minutes per game, 10 points a game and dished out the second most assists on the team with his 96. Rozier averaged 19 minutes a game, seven points a game and had 67 assists on the year. The knowledge and game savvy they learned from the likes of Smith and Hancock will have this backcourt ready to step up. Rozier plays years beyond his youth and the weight Chris Jones lost over the offseason will have him quicker and harder to contain than ever. They can both create their own shot and rebound and they will have no fear in stepping up and making a play. Backing the two guards up will be sophomore Anton Gill who in the preseason has shown his natural ability to score and his improvement on defense. Accompanying Gill will be freshman and Louisville-native Quentin Snider. The two backups will have to continue to improve on defense and get faster in order for Rick Pitino

to start implanting his famous and ferocious press defense that was the key to Louisville’s national champion run in 2013. While rebounding and play at the center position was inconsistent last year Louisville hopes that the center position will be stabilized this year. The projected starter will be redshirt sophomore Mangok Mathiang who led the Cards in blocked shots last year with 51. At 6-foot-10 he averaged just three points and three rebounds a game though last year but played better as the year went on. Mathiang red-shirted the year Louisville won it all. While he didn’t play he joins the team captains in having the experience of being on a championship squad. Backing him up will be freshman center Chinanu Onuaku. At 6-foot10, 230 pounds, Onuaku is the physical presence one would hope for at the center position. Early on, he has showed flashes of brilliance, blocking shots and snagging rebounds, which will be the best way for him to contribute early. Fans will be excited to see Louisville’s two 7-foot centers Anas Mahmoud and Matz Stockman, but more than likely this will be a year for the freshman giants to sit on the bench and learn with few minutes of

NOV. 11, 2014 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

playing time scattered throughout the season. While there are plenty of new faces on this Louisville squad, the talent and experience is there for Pitino to work with. Every year provides

a new challenge but the culture of Louisville basketball is prepare, play and fight. And it’d come as a shock to many if Louisville wasn’t there fighting late into March.

For much of last year, Terry Rozier, Mangok Mathiang and Anton Gill got to enjoy a display of great play. One year older, all of their minutes will significantly increase this year in the ACC.

PHOTO BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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The All-American man just keeps getting better NOAH ALLISON

NALLISON@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

MONTREZL HARRELL #24 Named a pre-season first team All-American, Louisville’s junior power forward Montrezl Harrell is ready to be the leader of this team and superstar of Card Nation. After his sophomore campaign, Harrell could have gone pro but has returned to see just how much his skill set can grow. With Rick Pitino coaching him up, the sky is the limit.

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

When Montrezl Harrell decided to forgo the NBA draft and return for his junior season, the expectations and possibilities for this Louisville team skyrocketed. As a sophomore captain, Harrell averaged 14 points and 8 rebounds a game on the Cards’ way to a 31-6 record and an AAC title. Now, as a junior leading U of L into the ACC, Harrell is a pre-season All-American and ready to show the country who puts the word ‘power’ in power forward. “I know I am going to have to play a huge role in our program and I am fine with that,” Harrell said. “I’m fine with having to be one of the go to players on the team. That doesn’t phase me, that just gives me extra motivation knowing that I have to work harder to better my game. Having that spotlight is really an honor and you just have to use it as motivation to get better.” The decision for Harrell to return for his junior season shocked many, as a sophomore Harrell physically dominated the opposition. The 6-foot-8 power forward had 98 dunks on the season, many of which were ferocious and jawdropping. In a season where consistent play at the big man positions was hard to come by Harrell put the team on his back. As an underclassmen forward, Harrell led the team in rebounding with 311 and was second on the team in blocked shots with 49. His relentless effort on the court is what sets him aside from any other player, and his raw,

super human athletic ability just makes it plain unfair for everyone who has to contest him. The scary thing is, though, this year the pre-season All American will be better than ever before. “I feel like I’ve improved a lot in my game. I added a 15-foot jump shot and also being able to step out behind the three-point line, ball handling. I’ve improved a lot in my game but I just have to get back to the way I played defense last year,” Harrell said. Harrell stepped out and hit multiple three-point shots in Louisville’s first scrimmage of the year. It looked routine for him. If anybody is going to make sure he doesn’t get too trigger happy, it’s going to be Harrell himself. “But that’s not the one thing I am going to rely on. I am not going to take anything away from my game and just be a perimeter player, that’s not my game. I’m known for power and finishing around the rim and that’s what I am going to stick with but its also going to make it tough to guard me if I can step out behind the three point line,” Harrell said. Harrell could easily be the hardest working athlete in the country and that is not too bold a statement. He lives, sleeps, breathes and bleeds basketball. Although he is an athlete, he is not a brute, Harrell understands the mechanics of the game and recognizes Pitino’s ability to teach him all those mechanics. It’s on Harrell to use that coaching, and just practice, practice, practice. “We have a long season ahead of us and the work doesn’t stop. I get better everyday. I wake up every morning and look for something that I can improve my game on to make me better and make the team better. I don’t take a day off or play at half speed, that’s not the way I was brought up in the game,” Harrell said. For all his on court skill and off court preparation, it is the intangibles Harrell brings to this Louisville squad that are so pivotal. As a junior captain, it is Harrell’s role to be a consummate professional and workhorse. He leads a team that has six freshmen and four players with just two year’s experience on the Louisville program. As a freshman on that 2013 national champion squad, Harrell has all the tools and experience to lead these young but talented Cardinals. “Being around people like Peyton (Siva), Gorgui (Dieng), Luke (Hancock), Russ (Smith), I learned a lot of different things from them. With me being back here, being one of the older guys it just gives me an opportunity to teach these young guys how I was taught and I really feel like that’s my job.” Harrell said. “I once was a younger guy but I took everything in from those guys. I was a sponge, because I knew one day they weren’t going to be in this locker room and maybe I was going to be in their position, and here it is. It’s my goal to lead this team as far as we can go.”


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Jude Schimmel and Bria Smith ready for the spotlight SAM DRAUT

SDRAUT@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Two guards from opposite ends of the country converge in Louisville for their final year of college basketball. Bria Smith from Massapequa, New York and Jude Schimmel from Mission, Oregon have been a part of 85 wins, an Elite Eight, and an appearance in the National Championship game during their three years at Louisville. The two have played in 207 games in their careers and logged over 4,500 minutes. They have been catalyst for Jeff Walz’s defensive schemes, stockpiling 261 steals over the past two seasons. Smith has been an explosive guard who came to Louisville ranked as the nation’s eighth best player out of high school by ESPN. The 5-foot-10 guard was named a third team freshman All-American and continued to improve as a sophomore during the run to the National Championship. She was named to the Oklahoma City Regional AllTournament team. Last season, Smith averaged 7.6 points and 4.3 rebounds per game while being named to the All-American Athletic

Conference second team. Smith spent the offseason polishing her game and once again looks to be a critical component of the backcourt. “I have been working on my overall game: my handles, my dribbling got way better, my pull up jumper, my outside shot, everything is looking good right now,” Smith said. “Bria worked extremely hard this offseason, her pull up jump shot is more consistent,” Walz said. “We have been focusing on free throws. Bria gets to the line as good as anyone, the problem is she is about a 58-60 percent free throw shooter.” Walz would like to have Smith shooting around 80 percent from the free throw line. He believes she can average anywhere from 10 to 14 points per game in her final year. During her time at Louisville, Smith has played point guard and shooting guard. Midway through her sophomore year, she began to see more time at point, but will play either position this year. “I’m playing both again. We have me, Jude and Arica now that can play the point so I am going to switch off spots,” Smith said.

Schimmel followed her sister to Louisville and played alongside Shoni whose prolific career culminated last March. Now, Jude will command the Cardinal offense during her senior year. The 5-foot6 guard has been an efficient offensive player with a career assist to turnover ratio of 1.3. In her final season, Walz expects Schimmel to play around 30 minutes a game, a stark increase from her career average of 19.7 minutes per contest. “I gained weight in the off-season, so I feel like my weight and endurance is really good right now. I am actually looking forward to being able to play a couple more minutes,” Schimmel said. “I am going to have a big role, but at the same time I am excited and I’m prepared.” Along with the expanded playing time, Schimmel will be asked to do more than run the offense. She averaged 5.6 points per game last season, but expect that number to increase this year.

BRIA SMITH #21


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JUDE SCHIMMEL #22

“She will be more important to us on the offensive end of the floor. In the past years, she has been more of a distributor and has gotten the ball to her teammates,” Walz said. “Now, I am asking her score. I’m not expecting Jude to take twenty shots a game, but I am expecting her to take on more of a leadership role.” Schimmel spent the offseason working on the offensive side of the ball. Over the past two seasons, she has shot a reliable 34 percent from three, but continued to work on her shot. “If anyone wants to be good shooter, all it takes is practice. I have done my best to try and shoot as much as I could during the offseason,” Schimmel said. “I worked on a quicker shot and my pull up jumper, I feel like it is going to be a good year for me.” Smith and Schimmel are determined to return to the Final Four in their final season, which would cap off a prosperous four years of Louisville basketball.

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Coach Walz’ senior backcourt has big shoes to fill but possesses the experience, skill and work ethic to accept the challenge.

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL “We just need to come together as a team. In the past, we already knew each other and already had that chemistry, so we need to build on our chemistry and work hard like we have been doing,” Smith said. “I feel like people might underestimate us, but with our chemistry and the

growth that we have had, I feel like we will have a good chance,” Schimmel said. “Everyone has strengths and weaknesses. We have to be willing to accept that and use our strengths to the best of our abilities.”


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Terry Rozier: Sophomore guard with veteran presence HALEY O’SHAUGHNESSY

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This year’s Louisville squad is in good hands. The veteran presence, professional approach and one-of-akind talent that guard Terry Rozier has will reverberate positively throughout the team. When you watch him on the court, you wouldn’t guess Rozier to be just a sophomore, but the underclassman is ready to lead. Rozier has an entire team behind him, but he has a confidence all his own. “I wake up. I look myself in the mirror, and I’m true to myself because no matter what anyone else says, I know myself better than anyone,” he said. “Anybody can tell me anything, how good I am or not or whatever, but deep down inside, I know how good I am and how much work I have to do.” Rozier is not the only one who believes in his

As a freshman, Rozier impressed. When he relieved either Russ Smith or Chris Jones from the bench, there was not much to worry about. The freshman guard turned the ball over just 22 times the whole season and defensively had 38 steals. PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL potential. When Rick Pitino talks about Rozier’s “quantum leap,” he is not referring to his hop step or rebounds-even though the off-guard chalked up the fifth most rebounds of the team last season despite only averaging 18.9 minutes a game. No, instead, Pitino is talking about his massive transition from freshman to sophomore. “He’s come a long way, from being a good freshman to being one of the premier backcourt players in the country. It’s a quantum leap,” Pitino said. Rozier fits well in the guard-anchored team because of his maturity as a player and quickness on the court. His 38 steals were tied for third most on the team, and this year, that number is expected to jump as he is now in a leading role. Last season, the pressure to produce and create baskets was where it should have been: in the hands of current Pelicans guard Russ Smith. He was a senior and a leader to Rozier, who was a freshman

with no more pressure to live up to than his recruiting hype. Rozier only averaged seven points a game compared to Smith’s 18.2, but averaged ten fewer minutes per game. Now a sophomore on a freshmenheavy team, Rozier finds himself becoming the Mr. Miyagi. All preseason, Pitino has reiterated the importance of four upperclassman leaders, and he includes Rozier. The sophomore is placed alongside senior and national champion Wayne Blackshear, preseason All-American junior and national champion Montrezl Harrell and senior point guard Chris Jones. In his important minutes as a freshman, Rozier did not panic. The guard who had the ball in his hands kept it in his hands, only turning the ball over 22 times the whole season. His mature play can be attributed to his professional approach. “Since the first day that he arrived, he steps onto the court as if he’s a ten-year NBA veteran,” Pitino said. “He just carries about his business in a workman’s type way and he just looks to get better. He’s really one of the easiest guys to coach I have ever had. He knows he’s very good but he doesn’t show big ego.”

Backcourt partner Chris Jones knows Rozier is ready to step up to copilot the team. “Terry’s a great player... Terry is just a raw talent- he’ll adapt to it pretty well. He only played 19 minutes (a game) because there were upper guys,” he said. “His game will show it, and he’ll have four other guys that will help him, and also lean on him.” Paired up with Jones, Rozier has a chance to shine in his starting role for the Cardinals’ backcourt. “There are a lot of good backcourts in college basketball, I wont say we are the best backcourt but I don’t think I would take anybody over these two guys.” Rozier knows his role, and echoes his coach when he speaks about it. “We are a program that gets better as the year goes on. We have six freshmen, and Coach P talks everyday that we need them to step up. It’s us upperclassmen guys’ role to get them better,” he said. “It’s not going to be easy, we are going to have grind out games just about every game. “It’s tough, but it’s something that we look forward to.”


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Chris

Jones: PIERCE FELTNER

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“Mighty Mouse” is what head coach Rick Pitino calls his 5-foot-10 guard. Senior Chris Jones is going to have play a mighty large role on this Louisville basketball team if they wish to see success in their first year in the ACC. Some say he’s too small to play at such a high level, but Coach Rick Pitino could not agree less. “He’s a tremendous asset, because he is so strong that he can pick you up full court and you can’t lose him. He’s so quick that you can’t lose him,” Pitino said of Jones effort. Jones enters his second season at U of L after transferring from NW Florida Sate College where he was a stand-out junior college player. He returns averaging 10.2 points per game last year where he scored 15 or more points in eight games. His role will need to expand for the team to have success. Coach Pitino has suggested that he will be playing

As a junior, Chris Jones scored at least 15 points eight times. He will have the ball more often than not to start the possession this year.

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

around 34 of the 40 minutes a game. Jones will also need to be a leader on and off the court for this team and he knows that. “I am going to be a coach on the floor a lot this year so its up to me to get these guys to where they want to get to.” After dominating on the junior college level, Jones had to accustom himself to the high level of play at Louisville. And on Pitino’s team there is only one thing that matters: defense. “The thing I had to learn most was the switching of Coach P’s defense and how hard he wants me to play every possession,” Jones said. As a leader this year, Jones got to learn from the best upon his arrival to Louisville. The winning-est senior class in Louisville history who graduated last year, brought Jones along the Cardinal way. “It was very fun last year playing with guys like Russ (Smith), Luke (Hancock), (Stephan) Van Treese and Tim (Henderson). And once guys like that leave, you miss them. The guys who taught you the way, taught you how Coach P wants you to play, so it feels good to know I can teach these young guys what they taught me, “ Jones said. Jones knew with those guys no longer here that it was his responsibility to be the best he could be. Over the offseason, Jones shed some weight and increased his speed and endurance to ready himself for the weight he will carry this season. “I worked hard to lose weight, to get quicker and faster. I know I have to take on a lot more of a scoring role and a passing role, I’ll have the ball in my hand

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Might not stand tall, but plays big probably 90 percent of the time so I just have to be able to balance those two roles out and hopefully win a national championship.” Jones and his running mate, Terry Rozier, are being looked at as possibly one of the most dynamic backcourts in the nation. Coach Pitino even said they are one of the better backcourts he’s ever been around, which is a huge statement with the large amount of talent Pitino has coached over the years. Jones’ teammates and coaches will be looking to him throughout the season for leadership. The fans certainly hope to see him assert himself as the player he truly wants to be for this team. Jones could truly be a dynamic guard and this season will be the last chance for “Mighty Mouse” to show he can.


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Wayne Blackshear ready to make the most of his senior year season it looks like Rick Pitino may finally get the Wayne Blackshear he recruited. It’s been a rollercoaster for the senior “He and I had a long talk. He was upset forward from Chicago since arriving at me for telling him he had to work here on campus in 2011. Coming out harder. I said, ‘Look son, I haven’t enjoyed of high school, Wayne Blackshear was coaching anybody much more, you and the 26th ranked player in the nation Peyton Siva are about as good as it gets by ESPN and named a McDonalds when it comes to coaching a nice person. All-American. He averaged 32.6 points But right now that old adage of nice guys per game his senior season at Chicago finishing last is going to happen to you. basketball factory Morgan Park High Your hourglass of sand is running out School. and you’ve just got to be aggressive. Be Blackshear is a 6-foot-5, athletic, mean and tough, be Chicago tough. It’s forward with a shooting range well your year, your senior year and all I want beyond the three-point line. He can you to do is just be aggressive. However defend and show a knack for getting to it takes,’” Pitino said. the bucket when he needs to. “And he’s shown it, he stayed here the Based on what he accomplished entire summer worked non-stop on his in high school, the feeling was that shot, worked on his ball handling and Blackshear would be able to come in and worked like he should have worked and contribute right away from a scoring he’s getting the fruits for his labor right standpoint. But he was hampered by now because he looks very, very good a shoulder injury that kept him out for out there.” the majority of his freshman year. Once Blackshear took the message to heart he came back, there was a mixed bag of and looked inward. The senior didn’t performances from the talented forward. waste the off-season and found the Blackshear could very well be the motivation to get to work. most polarizing player on the Cardinals’ “I found that in myself. I had to get basketball team. On one hand, fans have back to how I used to be. I use to just stay seen greatness and ability from him, like in the gym everyday and that’s what I did when he scored the first five points of the this whole summer. I didn’t even leave national championship game matching the gym, I stayed in there every single Michigan’s Trey Burke’s efforts, or how day just to work on what I needed to get he poured in 20 on Cornell and 23 on better.” Blackshear said. “I don’t want to Houston last season. leave here and have people wondering There just hasn’t been the consistency. what I can do.” On a number of occasions last year Blackshear, who was named a team Blackshear was held scoreless and did captain this year, will have to step up. not make up for it with effort in the Along with junior forward and fellow rebounding battle. team captain Montrezl Harrell, they are As a junior, Blackshear averaged three the two remaining players from the 2013 rebounds and eight points a game. The National Championship run. He will be McDonald’s All-American that many asked to be more aggressive with the thought could be a one-and-done type ball and take a much bigger role from a After a career hampered by injury and under-performing, forward Wayne of player was heading into his senior leadership standpoint. His personality, Blackshear is ready to step up as a senior captain and leave his mark on year and needed to salvage his college however, will make him more of the the Louisville basketball program. basketball career. Heading into this lead by example type. If scrimmages and preseason games himself and the Louisville fan base. are any indication of what’s to come this “I’m taking it upon myself to be year, Louisville should be excited to see aggressive in practice every day, getting the new, or better said, old, Blackshear. better and better.” He has scored over 20 points in each of Fans will be looking for the more his showings this preseason, holding aggressive Wayne this season, he has true to the promise that there will be a something to prove and the feeling is more aggressive Blackshear, much to the that he will put the critics to rest. delight of Cardinal fans. “I’m taking it upon myself to be The legacy of Wayne Blackshear aggressive in practice every day, getting at Louisville is one that has had its ups better and better,” Blackshear said. and downs, but it just feels like there is “I feel like I have improved, but I don’t something more to be seen from the want to talk about it. I just want to go out young man. His senior season will be the there and show it.” final chapter in what has up to this point PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL been an under performing career for

MARQUIS DRIVER

SPORTS@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM


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Sara Hammond: Her team, her year, her moment to seize honorable mention All-American. Hammond kicked off her final offseason by representing the United States in Russia for the Women’s three on three FIBA World Championship. She brought home the gold medal after defeating Russia in Moscow, her team finished with a perfect 9-0 record. “It was my first experience overseas. I have been to Mexico and Canada, but that is still North America,” Hammond said. “To go over to Russia and experience what the people are like and the environment was awesome. And of course, the basketball was my favorite part, playing against Germany, France and Russia just to see what European

basketball is like. “For professional women’s basketball, A former McDonalds All American people go over there for and Kentucky Miss Basketball, 6-footeight months of the year. 2 forward Sara Hammond is ready To kind of get a glimpse for the spotlight in her final year as a of what it is like after I Cardinal. am done with college She was selected by the coaches’ and was really an eye opener the Blue Ribbon Panel’s all Atlantic for me,” Hammond Coast Conference team. said. “I met wonderful Last year, she started all 38 games people and played with for Louisville, finishing the season wonderful people on the averaging 10.4 points and 5.9 USA team, we have a rebounds a game. friendship now and still In her only season in the American communicate with each Athletic Conference, Hammond other.” received first team all-conference The tremendous recognition and was a WBCA experience also added a continued interest for Hammond to play professionally after her time at Louisville. “It being my senior year, I’m starting to think about that stuff more. What is the next step? PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE What is the next chapter? LOUISVILLE CARDINAL Professional basketball is points per game respectively. a dream of mine ever since I started In years past, Hammond has been playing basketball,” Hammond said. a second or third option offensively “It is definitely a possibility and it is with other perimeter scorers playing definitely something I want to do around her. This year, she can be the whether it is playing in the WNBA or Cardinal’s primary threat. overseas.” “Sara is more confident. She knows “She wants to move on after college it is her team now. It is her senior and I think that is a big part of her year, Sara wants to go out on a high desire and her work ethic,” Louisville note,” Walz said. “Sara wants to make head coach Jeff Walz said. sure when her senior year is finished Focusing on the here and now, she has put it all out there. And what Hammond understands more will she has done in this offseason and in be asked of her this season with the our practices has shown that.” loss of scorers like Shoni Schimmel, After starting on a team that Antonita Slaughter, Asia Taylor and reached the National Championship Tia Gibbs. game in 2013 and last year’s squad that During the offseason, Hammond went to the Elite Eight, Hammond is a worked diligently on her perimeter senior that has been a part of pressure game and ball handling skills, making packed moments. her a more versatile offensive threat. Now, with five freshmen on the “I have worked on my three point roster, Hammond is looked at as a shooting. We lost a lot of our three vocal leader who can be counted on point shooters from last year, so in big spots. coach is trying to look for that three “I just want to be that leader that pointer shooter,” Hammond said. “So everyone can count on,” Hammond we have all been challenged to get said. “All of my teammates tell me into the gym and shoot as much as we that they trust me having the ball can. I took it as a personal goal and in my hands late in a game or in a we are all trying to make 100 threes critical situation. To have that trust a day.” factor from them gives me a lot of Walz believes Hammond can confidence in myself.” average anywhere from fourteen In her final season as a Cardinal, Senior forward Sara Hammond will carry the brunt of the load for the to eighteen points a game this year. Hammond will be ready to continue Cardinals this year. Averaging 10.8 rebounds and 10.4 points per game Over the past two seasons, she has to carry the Louisville success. over the past two years, the team captain will look to branch out averaged 10.8 rebounds and 10.4 offensively and fight to get Louisville back to the Final Four.

SAM DRAUT

SDRAUT@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM


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Walking among the trees, Louisville’s young but tall centers DEREK BRIGHTWELL

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Entering his 14th year at the University of Louisville, Rick Pitino has something that he’s had only once before in his stint with the Cardinals, a seven-footer. In fact, he’s got two of them in freshmen Anas Mahmoud and Matz Stockman. Combined with freshman Chinanu Onuaku and sophomore Mangok Mathiang, the hall of fame coach is sitting on his tallest team at U of L. Last year, Mathiang, the only returning player at the center position for Louisville, was the tallest player on the team. This year, he’s walking amongst the trees. “I tend to blend in right now with the short guys,” the 6-foot-10 Mathiang said. “We got a bunch of big guys, which is fun to me, makes practice more fun. “It’s gonna help us a lot. Even though they’re freshmen, they’re big bodies,” he continued about the size of the freshmen class. “They’ll rebound. With the exception of Anas, it’s not like they’re skinny little twigs like I was when I first came in. They’re coming in huge. They’re coming in ready for battle and to go to war with us.” The Cards will look to Mathiang to continue to grow as a defender. Last year, he led the team with 51 blocked

Freshman center Chinanu Onuaku is the most ready to play of all the freshmen.

PHOTO BY RACHEL ESSA / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

shots, recording at least one swat in 28 games. 6-foot-10, 230-pound Chinanu Onuaku is the team’s most physically imposing player, as well as the youngest, just turning 18 this November. He’s also the freshman most poised to make an impact this year. In the opening scrimmage against Barry University, Onuaku looked good defensively, blocking five shots. While his goal is to start this year, he admits to still having a ways to go. “I’m just trying to find my niche in the team right now,” he said, but offered a thought on what that niche might be. “It’s what I’m doing right now, rebounding and blocking shots.” As for what makes him so dominant down low? “I just like to throw my weight around and get nasty,” he said with a smile. Of the three freshmen centers to join Louisville, Onuaku is sizing up to have the most immediate impact. “Now you look at him and he’s a physical specimen,” Pitino said. “He’s the most ready to play of the freshman, physically.” Junior forward Montrezl Harrell also was impressed with the young big man’s progress in the summer. “I feel like when he first came in, his body was out of shape, used to give up on drills,” Harrell said. “But now he’s competing. He plays hard 100 percent of the time. He’s rebounding the ball well. He wants to learn, he wants to get better. It’s only going to make us better in the long run when we need him to provide minutes for us. “You never know what’s going to happen in a game. Somebody could get in foul trouble and we’ll need him to play more minutes than what’s normal for him,” he went on. “I feel like he’s going to accept the challenge and he’s going to stand out.” “Chinanu is going to be a good basketball player. He’s very smart. He’s physical. He’s ready to play,” Pitino added on the young center’s intelligence. “He’s going to be a good basketball player. He understands the game a little bit like Montrezl understands the game. He has a very good feel for the game of basketball. He’s got to play a lot this year, obviously. When you go against the size of Minnesota and Ohio State and you play the teams we’re playing, he’s going to have to log a lot of minutes. And the good news is, he’s 18.”

Sophomore center Mangok Mathiang led the Cards in blocked shots with 51 last year. PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE CARDINAL Fans looking forward to seeing the see Mahmoud on the floor this year. two seven-footers may have to wait a “If we can get 15 pounds of muscle year before anointing them the twin on Anas, he can play,” he said. “That’s towers. easier said than done. We’ve really “I know these big guys, when you struggled putting weight on him. He’s look at them, I’ve been through it so very skilled.” much in my life. These bigs, they’re just While the center position will be a not ready to play,” Pitino commented work in progress throughout the year, on his young centers. “Guards are returning Mathiang’s shot blocking always ready to play early, bigs are and adding the size and strength of ready late. These guys are going to Onuaku will allow Pitino to go two be ready late. Like one guy doesn’t deep down low at the center position have good skills right now, Matz. The for most of the year. other doesn’t have good strength, Anas. They’re both going to get strength, and he’s (Stockman) going to get skills from all the individual instruction. Nanu gets by because he’s physically ready to play.” Pitino did leave an open door for A fun-loving character who always has a smile on his members of Card face, Mathiang will provide leadership and positive Nation looking to energy to the young corp of centers.


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Fifth-year seniors provide talent and experience down low SAM DRAUT

SDRAUT@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Despite finishing with the program’s second most wins in season, last year’s 33-5 Cardinal team lacked size and depth on the low block. Out of necessity, Sara Hammond and Asia Taylor were forced to bear a large portion of the rebounding and low post responsibility. This season, two fifth year seniors return size, experience and most importantly depth to the Louisville roster. 6-foot-1 forward Shawnta’ Dyer played in 15 games last year before suffering a stress fracture in her left hip that ended her season. 6-foot-4 center Sheronne Vails missed all of last season after undergoing left knee surgery in the summer of 2013. When healthy, Dyer has been a potent presence on the low block. During her freshman year, she averaged 7.3 points and five rebounds a game while shooting 54.9 percent from the field. Dyer’s sophomore year was cut short after she tore her ACL and MCL

Sherrone Vails missed all of last season with a knee injury. Vails has 115 career blocks and is back and healthy for the Cardinals.

in December, but after facing injuries throughout her career, she worked persistently in the summer and appears healthy. “The offseason was frustrating, putting the hours in rehabbing and conditioning, but overall it helped me,” Dyer said. “My body is keeping up with and I’m 100 percent healthy, as far as the conditioning and running up and down the floor that is still something I need to work on.” Louisville head coach Jeff Walz is excited to have her skill set back on the floor, allowing him to play an inside out style as opposed to outside in like in years past. “She is our best low post finisher. We just have to figure out a way to keep her healthy for her fifth year,” Walz said. “The kid has battled so many injuries but she has continued to fight to come back. Now it is just a matter of managing her practices and managing her game minutes.” Walz monitored Tia Gibbs minutes last season, a guard who had struggled with injuries during her career. She was able to stay healthy enough to play throughout the year. Dyer and Vails will see similar monitoring this season. “It is hard for me because I always want to be out there, I don’t want to take a day off of practice, but he (Walz) has to pull me. It’s frustrating, but it’s smart because if I want to play at the end of the season I do have to do that,” Dyer said. Vails enters the year with 64 career starts and was last on the floor during Louisville’s run to the national championship game. In her final year, she is glad to be back and contributing. “It has been great knowing that I am back out there with my team and cheering them on while going through drills,” Vails said. “I feel 100 hundred percent but I still need the conditioning part, but practicing and going up and down the floor throughout the year will help.” Vails adds length and size to the back end of the Cardinal’s defense, she has 115 career blocks and had seven in game in 2010. “Her knees are feeling better. Sherrone is a presence for us, her offensive game has improved and she has always shot the ball well from eight to ten feet, but now she is scoring in the post,” Walz said. “Defensively, she has always been a presence out there for us.” Walz biggest challenge is keeping the Shawnta’ Dyer played in 15 games last season before suffering a stress two healthy throughout the entirety of fracture in her left hip that ended her season. the season.

PHOTOS BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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NOV. 11, 2014 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

NOAH ALLISON

NALLISON@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

#24 Ariana Freeman

#11 Arica Carter

Position: Guard Height: 5-foot-9 Hometown: Manassas, Virginia Athletic accomplishments: Three-start prospect 24th ranked wing player “Arianna Freeman is a strong guard, really if she’ll buy in to coming out and rebounding the ball for us and being one of our better on ball defenders her playing time will be there for her too. Her offensive game is not as far along as the others but like I tell them, not everybody can be a scorer. You have to find players that are willing to buy in, who wants to be our rebounder, who wants to be our screener, who wants to be our best defensive player.” -Jeff Walz

Position: Guard Height: 5-foot-8 Hometown: Long-Beach, California Athletic accomplishments: Four-star prospect ranked 77th nationally “Arica Carter is going to play some point and shooting guard for us. I think she’ll do a really nice job at backing up the point, she defends the ball extremely well, her ability to get to the rim has really impressed me but we are going to have to get her to continue to get in the weight room, continue to eat right and hopefully be able to put on some weight during this freshman season.” –Jeff Walz

#31 Sydney Brackemyre

Position: Forward Height: 6-foot-1 Hometown: Wilmington, Ohio Athletic accomplishments: Five-start prospect ranked 37th nationally “Sydney Brackenmyre has really shown us some promise of being able to shoot the basketball from the outside. She has some really nice post moves and she finishes well. She’s a very smart basketball player and I think you’ll see that during this season. She is not one that’s going to blow by you and make a spectacular offensive play but she is one that’s going to get the ball to the right person in the right place.” -Jeff Walz

#2 Myisha Hines-Allen Position: Forward Height: 6-foot-2 Hometown: Montclair, New Jersey Athletic accomplishments: Five-star prospect 34th ranked nationally McDonald’s All-American “I can score, I can defend, I can rebound pretty well and I can dribble the ball up and down the court. I just want to be able to go in and have a presence for my team. Going in open minded and not being scared of the competition, not playing like a freshman basically.” - Myisha Hines-Allen

#4 Mariya Moore Position: Forward Height: 6-foot Hometown: Hercules, California Athletic accomplishments: Five-star prospect 42nd ranked nationally McDonald’s All-American USA Basketball U-18 National Team “My style is kind of laid back, you wouldn’t really expect me to do some of the things that I do. Like my vertical may not be that high but I get a lot of rebounds or you may not think I am as quick as I am but since I sprint I get to the basket.” -Mariya Moore


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Rule #3: MAKE A DIFFERENT MISTAKE Coach Walz is a great teacher and when he corrects our mistakes he is very specific about how he wants it to be done. So if he tells you how to do it, do not do it your way “because your way doesn’t work,” as Coach likes to say.

Freshmen survival guide for Louisville basketball The transition from high school to college is hard enough, but add on playing Division I basketball for one of the top programs in the country and it becomes ten times harder. Every freshman that comes to Louisville has a hard time with this transition in their first year. Playing at this level is, of course, more difficult physically but what people do not understand is how much more difficult the mental side approach to the game is. I’ve made a survival guide to give you an inside look at what it takes to be successful under Coach Walz’s system.

RULE #4: TALK The game is a lot easier and more fun when we communicate with each other on the court. Being a mute will only make things harder on yourself and in Coach Walz’s words, “unfortunately, you can’t text it to her, so you have to open up your mouth and talk.” Rule #5: WORK HARD If you work hard, it makes up for a lot of mistakes you make. Of course you still want to do as well as you can, but if you go hard, he won’t get as mad about it. Rule #6: LISTEN TO THE MESSAGE, NOT THE DELIVERY Coach Walz is very demanding and can get extremely passionate while coaching. He tends to speak loudly and yell a lot of the time. As a freshman, usually what happens when you’re not used to the intense style of coaching is you get upset and let it affect the way they play. What I have told all of our freshmen is to listen to what he is saying, not how he is saying it because if you focus on how he is saying it, you’ll miss the message and make more mistakes.

Rule #1: PAY ATTENTION We go over a lot in practice and we move at a very fast pace. It is imperative to Coach Walz is arguably one of the most successful and brilliant coaches in be focused and know what is going on at all times. There isn’t anything Coach women’s college basketball and he demands nothing but the best from us. This Walz hates more than when he feels he has to repeat himself. may not seem like a lot because Coach Walz does not have a lot of rules, but it does take a lot of hard work and dedication. Playing for him may be hard at Rule #2: LISTEN EVEN IF HE’S NOT TALKING TO YOU first, but if you follow these guidelines it could make surviving and being sucThis goes along with paying attention. If coach tells someone one thing and cessful in practice a whole lot easier. five minutes later a different player of the same position makes the exact same mistake, it drives him crazy! He feels that you are not listening and this is one of the easiest ways to get yelled at.

Coaches like Jeff Walz can get pretty heated. Cortnee knows the tricks to avoid their wrath.

PHOTO BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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NOV. 11, 2014 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Valuable role players could prove to be pivotal by the end handling and outside shooting, I thought that was where my weaknesses Forgotten between the five were,” Walton said. “I needed to get seniors and five freshmen are three more comfortable with the ball outside contributors who have played of the paint.” “I want to do what my teammates meaningful minutes throughout their need me to,” Walton said. “If they need careers. Juniors Cortnee Walton and Megan me to get ten rebounds a game I will do Deines and sophomore Emmonnie that, if they need me to score 12 points Henderson are experienced role a game I will do that.” Deines, the 6-foot-1 guard, can players who will see expanded provide a perimeter threat for a team responsibilities this season. “All three of them, I am counting on that lost a majority of its outside to be a big part of this team this year,” scorers from a year ago. Deines hit 20 threes during her Louisville head coach Jeff Walz said. Walton and Deines were freshmen freshman campaign and has shown the during Louisville’s trip to National ability to score throughout her career. Championship game, both appearing She scored in double figures eight games as a freshman, including totals in games in the NCAA tournament. As a freshman, Walton appeared in of 17, 19, 15, and 16 points. “Cortnee and Megan have both 33 games, pulling down 84 rebounds worked hard this offseason. I’m and shooting 52.9 percent from the expecting them to do big things for field. She played in 37 games last season us,” Walz said. Henderson was the lone freshman and had at least five rebounds in nine last year, but provided strength and games. Walton prepared in summer for size in areas Louisville desperately her expanded role by opening up her needed help. She played in 34 games, finishing the year with 5.5 points and offensive game. “The offseason, I did a lot of ball 3.1 rebounds per game.

SAM DRAUT

SDRAUT@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Henderson earned American A t h l e t i c Conference All-Freshmen honors and also competed on Louisville’s track and field team in the shot put and discus throw. “Her freshman year was an eyeopener for her. Junior guard Megan Deines can step out and knock You come from down three’s as well as play good defense. high school and PHOTO BY AUSTIN LASSELL / THE CARDINAL you’re bigger and stronger than everyone and you get to college and it understanding what to expect. matters that you are in shape,” Walz “I understand defensively now, said. “She has bought into it. She had honestly, sometimes it went in one a great summer, but she still has room ear and out the other because I was to grow. But her basketball game is so flustered with other things,” where I thought it would be because Henderson said. “I know what he she is able to get up and down the means now when he says go here or floor.” go there.” Henderson did fight through Walz will look to these three players growing pains last year, but said to step up and play key roles in the this season has a different feel to it, Cardinals’ success. partly being in better shape and also

November 11, 2014: Volume 89, No. 11  
November 11, 2014: Volume 89, No. 11  
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