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APRIL 11, 2017 VOL. 91 NO. 27 FREE

LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM @THECARDINALNEWS

SHELBY BROWN @BROSHEA91

U of L confirmed over 700 employees’ information was possibly hacked and used to file fake tax returns. Although university police first received a report of a hacker-filed employee tax return March 1, U of L didn’t know the breach was widespread until last week. “The majority of the reports of fraudulent activity have come in the past week,” U of L spokesperson John Karman said in an April 7 email. As the investigation into hacked U of L tax forms continues, the number of potentially compromised tax returns remains at 750. Hackers stole tax info from more than 70 to file bogus tax returns. The university announced April 5 that 750 employees had “suspicious activity” surrounding their online TALX Tax Express accounts when someone tried to reset PIN numbers. The hackers victimized employees by trying to file fraudulent tax returns.

That’s when U of L officials discovered the breach and notified the tax document company. Local FBI would not confirm an investigation. “The university did not have enough reports to establish a pattern until last week,” said Karman. “We don’t believe we’ve ever had a significant breach related to tax forms.” Computer information systems professor Andrew Wright said since users want easy access to their accounts, security suffers. Two-factor authentication, used on sites like Apple and Outlook, was not used with the TALX accounts. “It’s valuable information - we ought to have a stronger method for accessing it,” Wright said.

Wright said employees were not notified their PINs were reset. “We always want to notify a user when a change like that has been made,” he said. Karman says the situation is not unique, as the IRS sees a 400 percent increase in identity theft attempts during tax season. In an email, Associate Vice President of Human Resources Jeanell Hughes said investigations were underway. “We do not believe this issue will prevent any employees from being able to receive tax refunds,” Hughes said in the email. Officials believe they caught the data breach in time. Karman said the full extent of the problem may be unknown until after tax filing season.

Equifax, which owns TALX Tax Express, reports an unknown user reset at least 75 personal identification numbers to gain access to the accounts. “The unauthorized user was able to successfully answer personal questions about the affected individuals in order to reset the individuals’ PINs,” TALX said in an email to those with compromised accounts. TALX said it began working immediately to aid those whose information was hacked. The corporation says it will safeguard against further security breaches. Investigators are investigating if someone from Equifax or U of L hacked the accounts. “We understand the frustration and hardship this incident may cause you and members of our campus community,” Hughes said. “Information security is a top priority of our university, and we take your data security and privacy protection seriously.” TALX has processed W-2s for U of L since 2003.


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You can now find all of our issues on our website by clicking the “ISSUES” button on our homepage.

April 1 Location: 703 Rockery Way, Building 9B (Province Apartments) Incident: Theft of a firearm Disposition: Report – open case Comments: A university student reported stolen property.

April 3 Location: Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium Parking Lot Incident: Wanton endangerment I/ stalking/harassing communications Disposition: Report – closed, initiation of prosecution Comments: A university student reported being stalked.

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Hacked: Professors speak out about tax breach SHELBY BROWN @BROSHEA91

U of L now reports 83 employees were victimized by cyber thieves who stole tax information and filed bogus returns. Professor Greg Leichty and Communication Department Chair Al Futrell make 85. The professors were not contacted by the university or tax processor Equifax about the hack.

The thieves were filing returns minutes after they stole the information ... They could have been doing other nefarious activities as well. -Al Futrell

Leichty tried to file his taxes in March but the IRS rejected it. They sent him a letter saying his taxes had already been filed through TurboTax. Leichty thinks someone tried to file with the IRS for a refund. “They (U of L) didn’t know about me,� Leichty said. “Who knows how large it (the breach) is?� Like his colleague, Futrell received a letter from the IRS requesting more information about his tax return. “[The] problem was that I had not filed a tax return,� Futrell said. U of L has not contacted Futrell about possible tax problems. U of L says 750 university employees have “suspicious activity� surrounding their online TALX Tax Express accounts. Futrell believes employees should have been notified earlier than April 4. “The thieves were filing returns minutes after they stole the information,� he said. “They could have been doing other nefarious activities as well.� Both professors agree that the breach resulted from lax security. “Apparently, the security measures

Left to right: Professor Greg Leichty and Communication Department Chair Al Futrell.

aren’t very good; otherwise, this breach would not have happened,� Futrell said. Leichty called the university’s response to the hack “spotty� and “minimal.� He thinks the number of hacked employees could grow as not all may have filed taxes yet. U of L Director of Media Relations

John Karman said earlier this week the full extent of the problem may not be known until after tax filing season. “U of L and Equifax will continue to monitor the situation and respond to employees’ concerns about suspicious activity on their accounts,� Karman said in an email April 7.

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U of L joins dozens hacked in 2017 KYELAND JACKSON @KYELANDJ

U of L wasn’t the only school hacked this year. Sixty-one schools and colleges have dealt with hacked tax information in 2017, according to Identity Theft Resource Center data. Hackers obtained U of L employees’ personal information, filing fake tax returns for over 80 employees. Hackers even stole Communication Department Chair Al Futrell’s information. It’s unclear how hackers obtained the information, but phishing - false emails requesting personal information - or malware could be blamed. ITRC Director of Research and Publications Karen Barney said U of L’s breach is small. But, the hacking is unprecedented for the university. “This year there are a lot of spearphishing breaches going on, and they do seem to be hitting the education sector,” Barney said. “(Tax fraud) really became more rampant when people were able to file their returns online.” The theft represents seasonal increases in hacking attempts. During 2016’s tax season, the Internal Revenue Service reported a 400 percent surge in phishing and malware incidents. Hackers accessed U of L employee accounts through TALX, an electronic

This year there are a lot of spear-phishing breaches going on, and they do seem to be hitting the education sector. -Karen Barney

W-2 system owned by Equifax. Equifax, which earned $495 million in 2016, responded with more security - adding another step to access accounts and security questions to reset passwords. “Based on the investigation to date, Equifax has no reason to believe that its systems were compromised or that it was the source of the information used to gain access to the online portal,” Public Relations Senior Director Pamela Stevens said. “Equifax takes the security of consumer information very seriously and understands that this unauthorized access can pose a problem for the affected individuals.” Before, TALX used one-step authentication to secure its website. Asked why two-step authentication was not used before the breach, Equifax refused to comment further.

Other schools were also late to increase their TALX security. Among the 61 schools hacked this year, six used TALX’s W-2 system. Hackers used phishing to breach all those schools except the University of Georgia and possibly U of L: 1. Bowling Green State University 2. Adam’s Elementary (Arkansas City, KS) 3. Jefferson Elementary School (Arkansas City, KS) 4. University of Georgia 5. Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center 6. University of Louisville Though phishing scammers accessed nearly 6,000 employees using Equifax’s W-2 systems, Barney said the company’s security measures aren’t necessarily to

Equifax takes the security of consumer information very seriously... -Pamela Stevens

blame. “When it comes to spear-phishing, things that need to be in place are training of employees on what to be on the lookout for,” Barney said. Phishing advice and training are advertised in U of L’s daily newsletter, but it’s unclear whether training is proactively offered to schools and departments. The university was notified of a hack March 1, learned of a pattern March 30 and notified the public April 4. University spokesperson John Karman said the university waited to gather information, clarifying it would be “irresponsible” to notify employees without ensuring a breach pattern existed. Barney said U of L’s timed response may align with Kentucky’s data breach notification law, which mandates employers notify employees immediately when their information is compromised. “I always appreciate the entities that do breach notifications even though it wasn’t triggered by a law because it’s the right thing to do for consumers,” she said. U of L estimates 750 employees’ tax returns may be compromised; that number may increase by the tax season’s end. IRS Media Relations spokesperson Cecilia Barreda said compromised employees will receive their tax returns. The university may implement more security measures according to costs.

Housing works to uncomplicate housing OLIVIA KRAUTH @OLIVIAKRAUTH

U of L Housing knows processing its properties is confusing. Now, they’re working to simplify the process. In two changes taking place this summer, housing will control 4,000 more beds of students’ living options, streamlining the application, management and payment processes for students and parents. In July, U of L Housing will begin managing Bettie Johnson Hall, Billy Minardi Hall, Community Park and Kurz Hall. In mid-August, they will also begin a one-year lease of Cardinal Towne and University Pointe from American Campus Communities. “We want to make the system less complicated for students,” U of L Housing Director Julie Weber said. “It’s gotten very complicated, trying to figure out which type of building is which, who can live there, what type of meal plan ap-

We want to make the system less complicated for students. -Julie Weber

plies.” Currently, there are multiple ways a housing option can be tied to U of L affiliation, third-party management and crosses between the two - outside of university-owned halls. While those ways will still exist, the changes make more of the options fall under housing’s direct management, making housing seem easier to understand. “As far as the student interacts with the housing system, there are only two choices now,” Weber said.

ACC, Cardinal Towne and University Pointe’s owner, will be responsible for physical upkeep, including maintenance requests and landscaping. ACC will also continue to run the retail spaces in Cardinal Towne. Anything that directly touches students is housing’s responsibility, including parking and leasing. The change will simplify the application and leasing processes, as all properties will be listed on the main U of L housing application. Weber said many rent prices - especially in one-bedroom and studio apartments - dropped because there is no longer a need for leasing executives or managers, only the application. “It allows us to allow way more nine month leases,” Weber said. “You’re going to study abroad? You don’t have to find a subleaser, you can just break your lease and we’ll find someone to take the space.” Cardinal Towne and University Pointe will continue to be predominantly upperclassmen, with about 20 percent of

UP being available to groups of freshmen. Both properties will have RAs. “It’s not that the rules are different they’re apartments, you have a lot more privacy in there. It really is about safety and responding to incidents and providing services to students,” Weber said of the RA’s role. “They don’t have to write everybody up for everything.” Weber said housing released “a whole lot of information” to students and parents about the streamlining and updated the housing website with details. “We basically tried to show that it’s what you’re used to in dealing with us,” Weber said. “We tried to just show it’s a continuation of your life on campus.” The increase in beds gives housing wiggle room for potential future changes, including closing Miller, Threkheld and Unitas Halls temporarily or permanently. Weber said there aren’t any specific plans for the future of those buildings.


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Survivors and allies ‘take back the night’ SHELBY BROWN @BROSHEA91

Students, faculty and staff filled the Red Barn to capacity for Take Back the Night April 4. Take Back the Night aims to protest sexual and domestic violence by sharing survivor stories. “[This is] a march to symbolize the taking back. The taking back of our lives, of the streets,” PEACC director Sally Evans said. “We have a right to be free from violence no matter who we are or where we are.” Hosted by the Prevention, Education and Advocacy on Campus and Community, the event started on campus in 2001. This year’s theme was “Surviving Together.”

We have a right to be free from violence no matter who we are or where we are. -Sally Evans “One of the values of Take Back the Night is that it does bring all different kinds of people together. It’s not just for survivors, though that’s a main focus,” Evans said. “I love that it brings together

a lot of different folks.” “As you go and march, support and love on one another,” U of L professor Kaila Story. “We’re all we’ve got.” Survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence shared their stories. “The place from which I speak this evening is as a survivor,” keynote speaker Isabel Abbott said. Organizations like U of L’s Counseling Center, the Women’s Center, Kent School of Social Work, LGBTQ Center, Planned Parenthood, Cards Speak and the Center for Women and Families presented information beforehand. SGA’s table showed their sponsorship for It’s On Us, another campaign combating sexual assault on college campuses.

Dozens of students marched through campus with signs when the program concluded. Some students said it was their first time at a Take Back the Night, including Bree Perry. “Families typically don’t talk about this,” Perry said. “Not because they don’t want to but some families just don’t have the language to. In high school we’re not learning what a healthy relationship looks like either. Many of us are on our own for the first time, having never heard of interpersonal power based violence.”

PHOTOS BY SHELBY BROWN / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

Take Back the Night banner carried at the front of the march.

Marchers pass Gheens Planetarium chanting with signs.

Marchers use megaphones to shout phrases.

PEACC made signs for participants to carry during the walk.

The crowd awaits the program to begin.

Deputy Attorney General J. Michael Brown discusses Voices of Justice campaign.

PEACC and other campus groups table outside Red Barn for a resource fair.

Kaila Story encourages audience to be there for one another.


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Students gather for “Cards against catcalling” JANET DRAKE

@THECARDINALNEWS

Ninety-nine percent of women admit to experiencing it: a suggestive whistle in your direction, being leered at as you walk in the room, a “hey baby, you got a man?” This is commonly known as catcalling. But these actions (which are 94 percent of the time perpetrated by men against women and/or LGBTQ people) are street harassment, which is illegal in Kentucky. This was the focus of “Cards Against Catcalling,” an event by the Women 4 Women student board at U of L April 6. Lead by student Hadley Hendrick, this

event featured Title IX coordinator for the CASE project, Megan Willman. Four U of L students spoke candidly about their personal experiences with catcalling. “It’s my thing because I have been publically objectified since I was nine,” Hendrick said. “I realized that this is something that I’m experiencing, and I know so many other people are experiencing, and yet no one’s really talking about it.” Megan Willman - who works to educate students about their Title IX rights, and to provide legal resources to people who have experienced harassment posed questions to the audience. “How old were you when you first experienced

some kind of street harassment?” Hands shot up. Answers ranged from nine to 16. Several of these people shared very personal stories. These ranged from being sexually objectified while walking their dog as a 9-year-old, to being told “you should kill yourself” based on their religion. U of L student Maria Martinez spoke about her experience as a Latina woman with street harassment. Martinez, from Colombia, is familiar with the machismo culture that heavily objectifies women in many Latin countries. “We [the United States] view ourselves as such a progressive country, but it’s really not so different. We still have the same problems,”

Martinez said. Speaking alongside Martinez, Elizabeth Peña added, “Street harassment has no racial or ethnic boundaries.” Men made up roughly one-third of the attendees at “Cards Against Catcalling.” Throughout the event, several guys voiced their personal stories with experiencing or witnessing street harassment. “Men don’t really experience it [street harassment], and they’re not usually around when it happens to women, so it’s hard for them to understand that it actually occurs,” junior Thomas Lawrence said.

Students walk for suicide awareness DUSTIN MASSENGILL @THECARDINALNEWS

Students raised over $10,400 for suicide awareness April 9 in the second annual Out of Darkness walk.

Over 210 people participated, up from 150 walkers last year. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention will take a national cut which will go to help pay for large-scale needs like websites and educational pieces and

event. The rest of the money raised will go to local chapters to help fund prevention in Kentucky and the Louisville area. Sara Williams, one of the founders, arranged the walk as a project for one of her social work classes.

Williams and Meyer both would like to see more RSO and team involvement, saying the University of Kentucky’s Greek life team who raised a little under half of their total raised.

1. A group gathers for a photo during the Out of Darkness walk, which raised money for suicide awareness. 2. Students apply temporary tattoos during the walk. PHOTOS BY DUSTIN MASSENGILL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

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READ MORE ONLINE Check out more photos from the Panic! At The Disco concert online at Louisvillecardinal.com

BWILLIAMS@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

APRIL 11, 2017 | PAGE EIGHT

Panic! At The Disco panics KFC Yum! Center in best way OLIVIA KRAUTH @OLIVIAKRAUTH

I’ll be the first to admit my middle school musical tastes could be categorized as “pop punk” at the very least. With their slick emo-kid hair, eyeliner and slightly-angsty-and-unnecessary exclamation point, Panic! At The Disco was a staple band in my neon blue iPod shuffle. However, as I grew up, Panic! fell off of my radar. What was once a top-played artist turned into the band one of my coworkers plays every time we work together (and I mean every single time). But Panic’s April 9 concert at the KFC Yum! Center solidified my growing notion that as I matured, so did Panic! - well, kind of. As the crowd slowly filled in for Louisville’s part of the “Death of a Bachelor” tour, I realized that, while I’ve grown up, Panic’s target audience hadn’t. Teenagers donning band tees, all-black clothing and brightly dyed hair made up about 70 percent of the audience. Two girls behind me were making fun of someone for “stealing all of her quotes from Tumblr.” The available merchandise, mainly black, gave similar vibes. After strong opening acts by Saint Motel and Misterwives, the band hit the stage around 9 p.m. to two massive bursts of gold confetti, ready to knock out a 20song set list. The majority of the first songs were fresh off the “Death of a Bachelor” album, a Frank Sinatrathemed album. Lead singer Brendon Urie proved he was the perfect crooner-pop punk combination, and

made sure everyone knew it by the end of the show. Throughout the show, Urie hit notes my coworkers and I could only dream of hitting in our post-close Panic! jam sessions. And when he did, the crowd, for lack of a better term, panicked. His stamina and vocal dominance were truly incredible. For example, in the middle of the show, he sang half a song, did a backflip, finished the song, came back out on a piano, took a shot and sang two of the more vocally challenging songs of the night - “This is Gospel” and “Death of a Bachelor.” I know he does this for a living, but I was still impressed. Urie’s vocal range seemed to carry the squad. I’m not dissing the band, but if Urie offered to make the tour an a cappella act, I think everyone would still have gone. Later songs in the set, like a cover of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” were just as strong, but reminded me of a basketball team dunking when they’re up by 20 in the final two minutes. We get it - you’re talented. But the second I started to become salty, Urie provided one of the most genuine thank you’s I’ve ever seen at a concert, and suddenly my salt was gone. The band ended the concert with the past and the present, with “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” representing the scene-kid days and “Victorious” representing the now. While the crowd and merch hasn’t matured, their sound has. The pop punk sound remains, but has been toned down, allowing Urie’s voice to appear stronger and brighter.

PHOTOS BY BRIANA WILLIAMS / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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Father John Misty examines absurd world on “Pure Comedy” AARON HARTLEY

@THECARDINALNEWS

These are absurd times we are living in and there is probably no one more aware of it than Joshua Tillman, also known as Father John Misty. Since going solo from folk group Fleet Foxes (in which he was drummer), Tillman has put out a handful of records showcasing his witty and sardonic persona. His second album, “I Love You, Honeybear” was an immensely charming, sharply written meditation on personal relationships, and one of the best records of 2015. Tillman’s latest, “Pure Comedy,” is easily his most ambitious record yet. The biting commentary effervescent in “Honeybear” is blown up to massive scale. Tillman tackles everything from media, politics, life’s meaning (or lack thereof) and the absurdity of human existence. At 74 minutes, “Pure Comedy” is a dense, challenging, and at times, exhausting album. At times, Tillman’s vision feels too sweeping in its scope, and his songwriting and a lot less subtle than his previous efforts. Those who were swept away by “Honeybear’s” razor-edged reflections on love may be turned away by the long, almost rambling waterfalls of insight that make up “Pure Comedy.” It can be argued that “Honeybear” is indeed the better record, as it is certainly the more refined. “Pure Comedy” could benefit from some consolidation, and more

instrumental variety. After so many piano and guitar ballads with only the occasional horn or string section, they begin to blend together. “Pure Comedy” is much more difficult to listen to in portions as well. It works much better with straightthrough listens rather than picking out individual tracks. That being said, the entirety of “Pure Comedy” is a very strong record. Tillman’s insight is scattered and overwhelming, but this seems to fit the album’s theme: our crushingly overbearing modern culture. Knowing Tillman, he probably made the album very specifically for this reason. The album covers a range of emotional engagements, from the goofy and quippy “Total Entertainment Forever,” to the lovely, drawn out ballad “Leaving L.A.” and the angry, impassioned title track. Where “Pure Comedy” falls short in refinement and musical variety, it makes up for in pure emotional engagement and sincerity. This is an album that will draw you in and demand your attention. While Tillman is famous for his occasionally obnoxious ironic view of the world, it feels like the man really seems to care about what he’s saying here. The album’s absolutely beautiful closer, “In Twenty Years or So,” Tillman argues, despite treading for over an hour on despair and absurdity, that “It’s a miracle to be alive/ There’s nothing to fear.” An “everything will be alright in the end” finish is rarely more cathartic.

People may be put off by the Father John Misty persona, and that’s understandable, but they’d be missing out on the work of a very talented, one-of-a-kind modern songwriter. “Pure Comedy” has flaws and can be a bit of work to get into, but with a few listens and some effort, it is a very rewarding and insightful listen.

How to: Decorate with a low budget MADISON THOMPSON @THECARDINALNEWS

Furnishing an apartment or a dorm room can be daunting. If the place is unfurnished, it can be challenging to buy furniture and afford a college education at the same time. There are still ways to decorate and furnish a dorm room without breaking the bank. Habitat for Humanity: Habitat for Humanity is a place where large pieces of furniture are donated to be resold. There are couches, tables, bedside tables and lamps available as well as a variety of light fixtures and wall art. One of the best features about Habitat for Humanity is that every 30 days the original price is reduced up to 75 percent off. There are several locations near U of L, including directly across from Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. Craigslist: Though it may seem like a scary place, Craigslist can be a vital tool given the proper guidance and awareness. Artwork, furniture and technology are available all at the click of a button. Simply take the proper precautions and bring a friend to pick it up if you deem it necessary. Keepsakes: Sometimes the best thing to do is bring things from home. Chairs and coffee tables are some of the easier belongings to move. Items like couches may be harder to transport, but it could save money if you have the ability. Do-it-yourself: If you want a more personalized and DIY feel to your dorm or apartment, try some of these DIYs. Clothing hanger necklace holder: Take a wooden

hanger and screw hooks into the frame. Now you can hang your necklaces in a space-sensible location. Vintage book planter: You will need a book, white glue, ruler, small succulent, x-acto knife, quart-size ziptop bag, scissors and a pen. Glue all of the pages together from the side. Measure and cut out an area in the book where you want to place your succulent without cutting all the way to the bottom. After this, line the base with the zip-top bag. Add your succulent and trim the lining. Metallic rope basket: You will need heavy, natural rope, tacky glue and some kind of metallic glitter ribbon. Start by wrapping the rope in a circular motion. The smaller the hole, the less likely what is put in there will fall out. After wrapping the rope around to the desired size to make the base, begin wrapping the rope around the sides. Wrap some metallic ribbon around the rope once you have wrapped the rope around a few times. Continue this process of wrapping the rope and wrapping the ribbon around the rope until the desired height is achieved. Ruler picture frames: These are cute, customized picture frames that are easily homemade. You need heavy-duty scissors, hot glue gun or glue, miter saw and rulers or a yardstick. Cut the yardstick or the rulers to your desired length. Glue the sides together, making sure the angles line up.

Lava lamp: Though the lava lamp has a very retro feel, it is a fun decoration that will not break the bank and can spruce up a room. You will need cooking oil, water, an empty water bottle, food coloring, glue for the lid and Alka-Seltzer tablets. First fill the bottle two thirds of the way with oil and fill the rest with water. Be sure to leave at least an inch at the top. Then add several drops of food coloring. Next, break an AlkaSeltzer tablet into three or four pieces and drop them into the bottle. The contents will begin to fizz and bubble. Wait until the bubbling calms down before screwing on the lid.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

‘Life’ movie is 2017’s thrilling, frustrating version of ‘Alien’ BRIANA WILLIAMS @THECARDINALNEWS

There are few films that truly change the landscape of the movie industry. However, when “Alien� was released in 1979, it did just that. The science fiction realm of movies was impacted so heavily that it created a boom of science fiction films. Today, the genre is one of the most popular, usually generating the highest budget and box office numbers. Of course, not every science fiction film is a winner. The recent release of “Life� proves that. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Ryan Reynolds and Rebecca Ferguson, “Life� features a plot almost identical to “Alien.� Astronauts are stranded in space and after a series of events occur, an alien life form renders them trapped on their ship. With an already predictable plot, “Life� had little going for it from the start. But the unique aspects of the alien itself were what helped the movie tremendously. Not only did it simply look different, but it grew as the movie progressed. Unlike “Alien,� audiences actually saw how the creature became what it was and understood early on what its weaknesses were. The alien was also treated more like a virus that needed to be eradicated than an alien itself. This provided an interesting dynamic between it and the astronauts. There were also some plot twists here and there, but nothing that would completely shock someone in the audience. The characters in “Life� were perhaps the most frustrating. Reynolds’ character, Roy Adams, was a charac-

ter that Reynolds has played before in several movies. While that character works perfectly for some of his other movies, it just felt flat in this one. Ferguson was the leading female of the film and was in charge of emergency protocols in the event of a major accident. Inevitably, the major accident happened, yet she seemed incredibly useless throughout. Honestly, it felt like filmmakers put her in there just so they could include a woman on the ship. Despite her high ranking, it still felt like she was a background character. Gyllenhaal’s character was the most interesting in the film. His quiet, mysterious and humble nature made him stand out among the other characters. He also had a certain love for space that seemed to be the only thing that he was passionate about. Hints of his backstory were told through dialogue, but he wasn’t explored enough. As one of the main characters, audiences should be able to understand him more as a person than we do, but there just isn’t enough said about him. If the characters weren’t disappointing enough, their actions were worse. As astronauts, doctors and aeronautic engineers all too familiar with the risks of going out into space, throughout the entire movie, it felt like all they’d forgotten everything they learned through training. They tried to save people who obviously couldn’t be saved, they were unbelievably emotional despite knowing the rules for emergencies and they frequently put the entire ship in danger in order to save one person. “Life� had some decent moments, but most of the time, it seemed like watching a recycled, inferior re-

make to “Alien.� It certainly moved faster and the plot unfolded in a smoother manner than “Alien,� and it was definitely suspenseful. The film’s score and special effects were also beautifully done in those areas. However, “Life� fell incredibly short everywhere else. TLC Rating: 5/10

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SPORTS APRIL 11, 2017 | PAGE 11

READ MORE ONLINE Follow @thecardsports on Twitter for live game updates for spring sports.

SPORTS@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Where will the Cards land? Breaking down NFL mock drafts MICAH BROWN

@DROPTHEMICAH

Seven football players - Devonte Fields, Josh Harvey-Clemons, Cole Hikutini, Jamari Staples, James Quick, Keith Kelsey and Colin Holba - were invited to the NFL combine in February. Only Fields, HarveyClemons, Hikutini and DeAngelo Brown are projected to be drafted. Here’s a look at where multiple media outlets predict where each Card will be selected in the 2017 NFL draft (player rankings based on CBSSports.com):

Devonte Fields, outside linebacker

The 6-foot-4, 245 lbs. linebacker is ranked as the 166th overall player in the draft and the 13th overall in his position. Tallying 165 tackles and 26.5 sacks in his career, Fields is projected to be drafted in the fifth round.

Josh Harvey-Clemons, safety

The 187th overall player and the eighth overall strong safety is projected to be taken in the fifth or sixth round. HarveyClemons wrapped up his career with 225 tackles, with 126 being solo.

Cole Hikutini, tight end

As the favorite target for Lamar Jackson, Hikutini finished his senior season with 60 catches for 668 yards and eight touchdowns. The tight end has been projected to be drafted as early as the fourth round, but other outlets have him going as low as the seventh.

DeAngelo Brown, defensive tackle

After finishing the season with 23 tackles, Brown did not receive an invitation to the NFL combine. Experts still expect Brown to be a sixth-round pick, finishing his career with 22 tackles for loss. Devonte Fields finished his career with 26.5 sacks. FILE PHOTO / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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2017

SUMMER SESSIONS

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Visit uofl.me/17summer for details. TERM 1 begins May 8

TERM 2 begins May 30

TEN-WEEK SUMMER TERM begins May 30 TERM 3 begins July 5


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Cardinals take on spring ball

Quarterback Lamar Jackson (left) hands the ball of the running back Dae Williams.

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Corner back Jaire Alexander earned second team All-ACC honors in 2016 and led the team with five interceptions. PHOTOS BY NANCY HANNER / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Caitlin Ferguson embracing the role she is thrown into DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

Before the season started, softball coach Sandy Pearsall said one of the players that stood out to her during the offseason was freshman Caitlin Ferguson. Pointing to her athletism and work ethic, Pearsall said she expected Ferguson to see the field, but she wasn’t sure how much. Now halfway through the season, Ferguson has started 24 games of her 28 games played. Growing up in Versailles, Kentucky, the Woodford County graduate fell in love with the campus and facilities at U of L. Aiming for a school that she could succeed and compete at, Ferguson chose to attend Louisville. Growing up 13 miles away from Lexington, Ferguson caught flack from friends and family back home. “I definitely got some (backlash). Where I’m from it’s die hard UK,” Ferguson said. “A lot of people came to my signing and they’re really supportive. They just like to give me a hard time.” During the fall, Ferguson felt the challenge of being student-athlete in college, but the field is where she gained comfort. “In the beginning, I was really homesick,” Ferguson said. “Softball has been a consistent part for me. I was always comfortable going to practice and it was the only thing really familiar to me.” Breezing into her second semester, those days are long gone. “Now I’ve got the hang of things and I loaded up my schedule a little more, I like it a lot,” Ferguson said. “I’m more comfortable with the area. I don’t have to use a GPS to get around anymore. The team is great and we’ve really bonded.” Latching on to an upperclassman is crucial for any incoming freshman to have a sense of guidance. For Ferguson, that person is Jenna Jordan. While Fer-

guson admits it wasn’t who she said expected to click with, two are always seen together now. Recording a lot of playing time as a true freshman can be difficult. Not everyone experiences it, so not everyone can offer up the right advice. Senior captain Maryssa Becker has nearly 200 career games and started 47 in her freshman year. Along with Jordan, Becker has taken Ferguson under her wing. “I look up to (Becker), she is so good. She knows the mental part of softball and that’s what I sometimes freak out about,” Ferguson said. “She always tells me, ‘You’re fine, we all have confidence in you.’ She tells me to keep it simple and it really helps.” Ferguson said the big stage that is Louisville softball threw her off her game at the beginning of the season. “Our first home tournament, I was freaking out. I couldn’t field (the ball) and I don’t know what was going on,” Ferguson said. “I looked up into the stands and I’ve never played in front of that many people before. That and the expectations just got to me.” It hasn’t all been challenging for Ferguson, though. In the same tournament, Ferguson hit a walk-off two-RBI single against Green Bay. While it may have been a run rule walk-off, the moment is one of Ferguson’s favorites of the year. For Ferguson, the adjustment to the college game and higher level athletes is coming easier than expected. The freshman is batting .346 with 17 RBIs, placing her fourth in average and third in RBI on the team. She is tied for first on the team with seven doubles and hit her first home run against Notre Dame on April 1. Ferguson said that she takes critiques from Pearsall very well and the only time she is worried is when Pearsall says nothing. At the plate, Pearsall is changing Ferguson into a different player.

PHOTO BY LAUREL SLAUGHTER / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

“When I came here, I had the mentality of ‘You’re small, you can’t hit it far.’ So I was trying to overcompensate by hitting it hard every time,” Ferguson said. “Because of coach, I’ve focused on base hits. Getting ground balls and being aggressive, that’s really helped me.” Defense comes naturally to Ferguson, but at the plate, she is still adjusting. Starting so many games this season is something Ferguson anticipated, but caught her a little off-guard when it happened so quickly. “When I came here, I had the mindset of, ‘I’m going to beat someone out and earn a spot.’ It just so happened that (Sydney) Melton got hurt and I was given this

opportunity,” Ferguson said. “Over the past four weekends, I’ve really embraced it and been playing to win.” Away from softball, Ferguson spends most of her time with teammates. Between going to five-dollar Tuesday movies, Dairy Kastle or Cherokee Park to hike, Ferguson enjoys staying active. Entering college, the shortstop thought she was going to a dual-sport athlete. Playing varsity basketball since seventh grade, Ferguson is a part of the 1,000-point club at her high school. While fans won’t be seeing her at the KFC Yum! Center, they can catch her at Ulmer Stadium making a big impact for years to come.

PHOTOS BY DALTON RAY / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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Kade McClure bypasses the numbers, spotlights the details DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

Baseball’s Kade McClure spent his sophomore season mainly throwing on weekdays behind Louisville’s first three starters of Drew Harrington, Kyle Funkhouser and Brendan McKay. With three future MLB players ahead of McClure, it’s easy to see how he got lost in the shuffle. McClure gained recognition midway through the year as his undefeated record continued. By the end of 2016, McClure held a 12-0 record with a 2.54 ERA and 77 strikeouts. Last season, the 6-foot-7 Ohio-native may have been the best fourth pitcher in the nation and easily would be a weekend starter at any other school. During the season, McClure didn’t look at the numbers. “I just wanted to give my defense the best ability to win games and with the number of first rounders and top 100 picks around me, I knew it would be easier to let them make plays,” McClure said. “The only time I thought about being undefeated was when I was 9-0 going for my 10th (win). After I hit that benchmark, it was normal again.” Because of the talent and coaching staff around McClure,

Kade McClure has 165 career strikeouts and a 16-2 record as a Cardinal. PHOTOS BY NANCY HANNER / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

he knew he was capable of performing at that level. Coming off a 12-0 year, McClure’s confidence was high, but playing college baseball wasn’t always on his radar. “I didn’t even think about playing college baseball going

up. I wanted to play basketball or football,” McClure said. “With my dad playing the in the NFL, I really wanted to play football. Then I turned out being 6-foot-7, so I thought I was going to play in the NBA but obviously, that wasn’t the case.”

Shifting to the team, McClure heard the noise around the program saying the team would be a rebuilding year. “We had a lot of guys (this year) that didn’t have as much exposure last year and they’re stepping into roles and filling

spots. A lot of pieces are coming into place very well. If we keep playing like this, I think the season will turn out just fine,” McClure said. Many people didn’t expect the team to start a programbest 19-0 after losing so many key players from the 2016 team. McClure said being a part of history is an honor. “I didn’t even know we broke the record until someone told me after the game,” McClure said. “In this program, we take it game-by-game instead of looking ahead to the weekend series. Before we knew it, we were 13-0, 14-0 and kept going. I don’t think anyone inside or out thought we would start off that hot but we just rolled with it.” McClure understands to make a deep postseason run, the Cardinals will need their bullpen. McClure said that with the players in the infield and the coaches in the dugout, he feels like anyone could step in and have a 10win season. So far in 2017, McClure is 3-1 and the team is 7-1 when he starts. With a 3.3 ERA, McClure is second on the team with 51 strikeouts. With the second half of the season approaching, McClure has two words for his team and fans: Be ready.

Men’s soccer remains competitive despite influx of youth JORDAN SHIM

@JORDANSHIM228

After the men’s soccer team’s 1-1 draw with Xavier, they preserved their undefeated record this preseason. Despite the loss of key players to graduation, the team looks set to have another successful fall campaign. Here are a few things to forward to this upcoming season.

Youth potential

One of the issues at the end of last season was the loss of players through the center of the pitch. Stefan Cleveland, Romilio Hernandez and Michael DeGraffenreidt all left the team, leaving a void in the middle. The team, however, have

not skipped a beat with Cody Cochran, Liam Bennett and Jake Gelnovatch stepping into the starting eleven. Restocking the squad with youth will build a strong core to move the team forward. “What has to happen sometimes is you have to cut down the big trees,” coach Ken Lolla said. “The big trees have to leave so the saplings can grow. Guys like Stef, Mike and Romilio leave so all these guys with massive ability can develop, and that’s what this spring is all about. There’s only one way to do it, and that is to put them in those situations. They’re receiving a lot of light right now.” The squad still has experienced players who can pro-

vide leadership for the youth stepping into the starting XI. “Tim (Kubel) is already the leader for us,” Lolla said. “Tate (Schmitt) has a strong presence on the field and so does Mo. Cody, who is now playing as a center back, is having more voice. Our keepers are growing into that as well.”

Consistency up front

The only loss on the attacking end was Daniel Johnson, who was drafted by the Chicago Fire in the MLS SuperDraft. His dribbling and speed are a big loss, but the team has depth in that position with Grant Hollkamp and Cherif Dieye. Schmitt also has experience playing wide.

FILE PHOTO / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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Men’s basketball appearances in AP’s top 100 all-time programs CONNER FARRELL @THECARDSPORTS

Last week, the Associated Press released an article ranking their top 100 college basketball programs of all time. The men’s basketball program was ranked number seven overall, totaling 627 points. U of L has been ranked in the AP poll 54.41 percent of the time since its conception in 1949. Louisville’s first appearance in the polls came on Jan. 17, 1950. The university’s best decade in terms of being ranked in the poll was in the 1970s, where they appeared 75.6 percent of the time. Howev-

er, the program is currently on pace to beat that mark with their play in the 2010s. The Cards have the lowest number of number one appearances with teams in the top 10. The program has been ranked at number one twice, once in 2009 and again in 2013. Louisville holds the record for the most appearances in the poll without being ranked number one, which was a drought that lasted 520 polls until the program found their way to number one. To determine the all-time top 100, AP gave one point for each week a program appeared in the AP poll and two points for each time a

program was ranked number one. The rest of the top ten features teams that the program is quite familiar with. Some of the teams included instate rival Kentucky, current ACC foes North Carolina, Duke and Syracuse, as well as Cincinnati. Here is the top 10: 1. Kentucky (1,111 points) 2. North Carolina (1,098 points) 3. Duke (1,032 points) 4. UCLA (957 points) 5. Kansas (857 points) 6. Indiana (662 points) 7. Louisville (627 points) 8. Arizona (594 points) 9. Syracuse (581 points) 10. Cincinnati (500 points)

FILE PHOTO / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

North Carolina’s scorching second half burns women’s lacrosse

Madison Hoover (left) is tied for a team-high 16 assists this season and Meghan Siverson is second on the team with 47 goals. DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

Hosting second-ranked North Carolina, No. 20 women’s lacrosse couldn’t handle the hot second-half shooting, falling 15-11. Louisville opened the game leading 7-3, but UNC ended the game on

a 12-4 scoring run. Sophomore Meghan Siverson ended with three goals and three more Cardinals added two goals each. Coach Kellie Young said she knew the opportunity her team had in the first half. “We had a 7-3 lead at one point. They

We need to get to the point where we know we can play with anyone in the country.

-Coach Kellie Young

Hannah Koloski (left) and McKayla Conti totaled three goals against UNC. PHOTOS BY ISAAC SANCHEZ / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

had one player that scored seven goals, we had a plan for that and we didn’t follow that,” Young said. “I’m proud of the effort we put on the field, in terms of physically and continuing to attack. We need to get to the point where we know we can play with anyone in the country.” In the opening minutes, both teams exchanged goals to make it 1-1 with 26 minutes to play. Louisville scored three unanswered goals before North Carolina connected on their second goal. Goalkeeper Brittany Read made two big-time saves in the opening 10 minutes to preserve the lead. Senior Hannah Koloski, the nation’s leading goal-scorer, pushed the Louisville lead to 5-2 after slipping through defenders for her 54th goal of the year. Junior Madison Hoover wrapped around the goal to find sophomore McKayla Conti for the goal. After the Siverson’s second goal, the Cards led 7-3 with

six minutes to play. Despite trailing, North Carolina remained calm and waited for their opportunity. Their patience paid off as they ended the half scoring three straight goals. After the halftime horn, Young had an extended discussion with the officials and UNC assistant coach Phil Barnes about coaches’ influence on officiating. Siverson’s third goal of the match made the score 8-7 Louisville, but the Heels didn’t wait long to tie the game at eight. Once North Carolina knotted the game, the fifth-highest scoring offense began to flex their muscles. UNC scored five unanswered to make the game 13-8. Juniors Jillian Balog and Taylor Webster scored their second goals of the game to give Louisville a late sign of life. North Carolina kept their distance, adding two goals to finish the match.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

17

Who would go on U of L’s basketball Mt. Rushmore?

Left to right: Terrance Williams, Francisco Garcia, Russ Smith, Reece Gaines. GRAPHIC BY MITCHELL HOWES / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

The University of Louisville has one of the nation’s most historic basketball programs. Similar to the football Mt. Rushmore, it’s difficult to pick four of the most impactful players in program history. To make things easier, we’ve only included players who played from 2000 to present. Reece Gaines, guard (1999-2002) Gaines played under both coach Denny Crum and coach Rick Pitino but is remembered as Pitino’s first star player. Gaines averaged 21 points a game as a junior with 3.9 rebounds a game. During his senior season, Gaines led Louisville to the second round of the NCAA tournament. The second round showing was the first since the 1996-1997 season and first NCAA tournament under the Pitino era. Former Marquette star and NBA All-Star Dwayne Wade said Gaines was the best player he played in college. Gaines dropped his points per game average in his final season to 17.9 but upped his assist average to a career-high five a game. A first round selection in the 2003 NBA draft, Gaines should be recognized as a player who laid the foundation for Cardinals today. Now pursuing a coaching career, Gaines is fourth all-time in scoring, third in made 3-pointers and

seventh in assists. Francisco Garcia, guard/forward (2002-2004) Garcia took the reigns from Gaines and averaged double-digits his entire career. Garcia led U of L to their second straight tournament appearance his sophomore season averaging 16.4 points and 4.7 assists. While his stats may have taken a slight hit in his junior season, Garcia made U of L history in the 20032004 season. Alongside Larry O’Bannon, Garcia led the Cardinals to their first Final Four in 19 years. Garcia is the only player on this list that didn’t stay all four years. He was on track to crack top 10 in career points, free throws made and assists before forgoing his senior year. Garcia is tied for eighth in program history for made 3-pointers and holds the record for most assists in a game with 15. Garica will be remembered for leading the Cardinals back to the promise land and made a clear impact on the program. Terrence Williams, forward (2005-2008) For anyone under the age of 25, Williams was the first showtime player to put on a Louisville uniform. Easily one of the most athletic players in program history, Williams was a fan favorite during his time as a Cardinal. Known for his high-

flying dunks and flashy play, Williams ended his career wit a 103-38 record and played in two Elite Eights. Williams was one of the most lethal Cardinals on a fast break, never shying away from a windmill dunk to entertain the crowd. A member of the 1,000-point club, Williams averaged double-digits his final three years. Williams and Earl Clark led the 2008-2009 team to a 31-6 record, a Big East Championship and a one-seed in the NCAA tournament. The Seattle native is third all-time in assists and seventh in both rebounds and steals. Williams is still one of the most recognizable Cardinals in program history and few players had a more successful four years as a Cardinal. Russ Smith, guard (2010-2013) One of the few players that could challenge Williams’ career success is Smith. Nicknamed “Russdiculous” by Pitino, Smith walked away with a 121-31 record, two Final Four appearances, a national championship and three conference championships. Like Williams, fans fell in love with Smith’s big smile and unorthodox style of play. Like the three players listed before him, Smith was an All-American. As a senior, Smith was tabbed a first-team All-American by the Associated Press, CBS Sports, NBC Sports and multiple others.

Smith led Louisville in scoring during his final two seasons and is arguably the most explosive offensive player in the Pitino era. Smith is behind Gaines on the all-time scoring list with 1,908 career points. Known for getting to the free throw line, Smith is second all-time in free throws made. In addition to his top-notch offense, Smith’s defense ability wasn’t far off. Harassing opposing guards for his entire career, Smith is Louisville’s all-time lead in steals. Honorable mentions: Taqwa Pinero, formerly known as Taquan Dean, guard (2002-2005) Earl Clark, forward (2006-2008) Peyton Siva, guard (2009-2012) Gorgui Dieng, center (2010-2012) Objections: By Conner Farrell-Siva should replace Gaines on the Mt. Rushmore. Gaines is undoubtedly one of the most talented scorers that has played at U of L. Siva, on the other hand, was a true leader for the team whenever he was on the court. Manning the point guard position, Siva was the engine that made the team go. He was a two-time MVP in the Big East Tourney, one of only two players to have that honor. Siva’s success in the Final Four and national championship gives him the slight nod.


18

SPORTS

APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

IGNITING INSPIRATION. BETTERING THE WORLD. 2017 GRAWEMEYER AWARDS LECTURE SERIES APRIL 6 The Grawemeyer Awards program at the University of Louisville pays tribute to the power of creative ideas, emphasizing the impact a single idea can have on the world. Prizes are awarded annually to inspire, honor and nurture achievements in music composition, education, ideas improving world order, religion and psychology. The winners visit Louisville each spring to discuss their awardwinning ideas.

3:00 P.M., SCHOOL OF MUSIC, BIRD RECITAL HALL

PLAY Andrew Norman, Music Composition Award recipient

APRIL 18 1:00 P.M., EKSTROM LIBRARY, CHAO AUDITORIUM

SCHOOLS FOR CONFLICT OR FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN Dana Burde, Ideas Improving World Order Award recipient 7:00 P.M., LOUISVILLE PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, CALDWELL CHAPEL

BREAKING WHITE SUPREMACY: THE BLACK SOCIAL GOSPEL AS NEW ABOLITIONISM Gary Dorrien, Religion Award recipient

APRIL 19 5:00 P.M., EKSTROM LIBRARY, CHAO AUDITORIUM

THE POLITICAL CLASSROOM: EVIDENCE AND ETHICS IN DEMOCRATIC EDUCATION Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy, Education Award recipients The lectures are free and open to the public. For additional details, visit grawemeyer.org.

APRIL 20 12:00 P.M., STRICKLER HALL, MIDDLETON AUDITORIUM

DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY: WHERE WE ARE, WHERE WE WERE AND WHERE WE’RE GOING Marsha Linehan, Psychology Award recipient


OPINION APRIL 11, 2017 | PAGE 19

The Cardinal is looking for an opinion editor. Interested? Send your resume to editor@ louisvillecardinal.com

EDITOR@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

University chose reputation over constituents KYELAND JACKSON @KYELANDJ

On April 6, U of L revealed employee information was hacked by scammers filing fake tax returns. But the university first received news of a hack March 1, established a pattern March 30 and issued a public statement a week later. The university implemented more security measures, notified Equifax and gathered a planned response to the situation. By then, the university reiterated it values reputation above faculty. Waiting to ensure the university looked good handling the situation only further endangered the nearly 750 fac-

ulty members whose information was compromised. Whether it be a month or a week spent prepping a response, that’s more time criminals could access social security numbers and W-2 information without employees knowing. It’s not the first time saving face trumped constituents at the university. When the Cardinal broke the story of racial tensions within Threlkeld Hall, the university treated the incident as common practice, another day hushing students and keeping hints of controversy out the ears of concerned parents. Regardless of how bad it looks, the university should own up to bad information when it’s obvious there are peo-

ple at risk. The university has handled troubling information well before, but has a track record of hiding as much as it discloses. Perhaps I’m mistaken and simply don’t understand the process or motivations behind U of L’s decision. Regardless, the situation reeks of posturing. Worse, I doubt university administrators would have disclosed the breach if they didn’t realize the situation was out of their control. Even without the law it should be common practice to warn employees of a breach. Identity Theft Resource Center Director of Research and Publications Karen Barney looked at U of L’s response

and said it may have been timely, but she values entities who notify those affected with or without a law because “it’s the right thing to do for consumers.” If the university wants to demonstrate it cares about its constituents, it needs to re-evaluate priorities. It will look bad revealing condemning information like hacked servers without a plan yet in place. But it’s the right thing to do. Otherwise, the university continues to be a disillusioned entity thinking it knows what’s best for the university without consulting those within it. Otherwise, it becomes another James Ramsey.

Open-carry gun demonstration boils down to fear NICK AMON @NICKYLUZZ

Armed with handguns and assault rifles, over 20 demonstrators - some students - walked around U of L in an advocacy march, hoping to stir the conversation on concealed carry. “I’m not advocating to carry an AR15 into a classroom,” student organizer Aaron Spalding said during the march. “It’s to advocate licensed concealed carry holders to be able to protect themselves on campus.” But protect themselves from what? Students are more likely to be run over at the crosswalk in front of the Ville Grill than be gunned down in the middle of class. Some of the demonstrators may feel safer bringing their guns on campus, given off-campus crime, lack of ULPD officers and unreliable emergency systems. However, how safe would this make oth-

ers on campus? According to research at John Hopkins University, increased gun presence on campus could make common acts more deadly and therefore have a “deleterious” impact on students, faculty and staff. Drinking and acts of petty theft happen on college campuses across the country. What makes me think more firearms on campus will add to this mix and have a positive outcome? Although it seems this is pretty clear-cut, there’s still a growing advocacy for firearm presence on campuses. Eight states allow concealed carry at colleges, 18 states prohibit concealed carry and 23 states leave the decision to the school. Kentucky falls under the last category, and U of L prohibits concealed carry. Maybe instead of putting all of your energy into fighting for concealed carry

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Call backs for interviews will be early August 201%.

on campus, you channel this same energy into fighting for what needs to be fixed on campus first. Does ULPD need more manpower? Of course. Do the emergency systems across campus need revitalization? Of course. Does SGA need to fight for more student safety initiatives? Of course. U of L could provide a safer environment for its students, but ignoring that the current safety measures need to be revamped just because you feel like bringing your gun to class doesn’t solve anything. You’re not helping the problem; you’re making it worse. If we’re focused on the ideology that students with guns promote a safer learning environment, then maybe the Sandy Hook Elementary School victims should’ve been keeping handguns in their cubbies. Sounds absurd right? The notion that more guns lead to more student safety is equally absurd.

I vaguely understand where these demonstrators are coming from. I’m a strong believer in the second amendment and I think responsible gun ownership is a cornerstone to any good democracy. However, just because someone has their concealed carry license doesn’t mean they’re a responsible gun owner. I’m also not willing to take the chance of putting my life in jeopardy because of someone’s fear of the unknown. I guess that’s what this boils down to – fear. Once you look beyond the pistol toting and self-defense rhetoric, the only thing left that these demonstrators are armed with is an immense amount of fear. A fear of not only feeling the need to defend themselves at all times, but a fear to actually take on the problem of campus safety in a serious manner that addresses it for the complex situation that it is.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Here’s a math problem:

What do you get when you add a shorter semester to a lower tuition rate?

You get: SMARTER! This summer the Communication Department has a plan to get you a degree faster at a lower rate. Take more than one Communication class in the summer and save 25% on all additional classes. You save more than $200 per class. Take 5 classes and that’s a savings of almost $1000! comm.louisville.edu/summer

Who said Comm majors can’t do math?


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

ON CAMPUS THIS WEEK: TUES 4/11 Celebration of Student Leadership & Service 2:30 P.m. - 4:00 p.m.

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You can now find all of our issues on our website by clicking the “ISSUES” button on our homepage.

April 1 Location: 703 Rockery Way, Building 9B (Province Apartments) Incident: Theft of a firearm Disposition: Report – open case Comments: A university student reported stolen property.

April 3 Location: Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium Parking Lot Incident: Wanton endangerment I/ stalking/harassing communications Disposition: Report – closed, initiation of prosecution Comments: A university student reported being stalked.

April 4 Location: The Arch Apartments Incident: Criminal mischief III Disposition: Report – closed, warrant advised Comments: A non-affiliate reported damage to property.

April 6 Location: 302 Eastern Pkwy. Incident: Criminal trespass III Disposition: Report – closed, summoned/cited Comments: A university police officer reported an investigation, further reported arresting subject via citation on above charges.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

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Hacked: Professors speak out about tax breach SHELBY BROWN @BROSHEA91

U of L now reports 83 employees were victimized by cyber thieves who stole tax information and filed bogus returns. Professor Greg Leichty and Communication Department Chair Al Futrell make 85. The professors were not contacted by the university or tax processor Equifax about the hack.

The thieves were filing returns minutes after they stole the information ... They could have been doing other nefarious activities as well. -Al Futrell

Leichty tried to file his taxes in March but the IRS rejected it. They sent him a letter saying his taxes had already been filed through TurboTax. Leichty thinks someone tried to file with the IRS for a refund. “They (U of L) didn’t know about me,� Leichty said. “Who knows how large it (the breach) is?� Like his colleague, Futrell received a letter from the IRS requesting more information about his tax return. “[The] problem was that I had not filed a tax return,� Futrell said. U of L has not contacted Futrell about possible tax problems. U of L says 750 university employees have “suspicious activity� surrounding their online TALX Tax Express accounts. Futrell believes employees should have been notified earlier than April 4. “The thieves were filing returns minutes after they stole the information,� he said. “They could have been doing other nefarious activities as well.� Both professors agree that the breach resulted from lax security. “Apparently, the security measures

Left to right: Professor Greg Leichty and Communication Department Chair Al Futrell.

aren’t very good; otherwise, this breach would not have happened,� Futrell said. Leichty called the university’s response to the hack “spotty� and “minimal.� He thinks the number of hacked employees could grow as not all may have filed taxes yet. U of L Director of Media Relations

John Karman said earlier this week the full extent of the problem may not be known until after tax filing season. “U of L and Equifax will continue to monitor the situation and respond to employees’ concerns about suspicious activity on their accounts,� Karman said in an email April 7.

Checking that pays you every month! t'SFFBUBDDPVOUPQFOJOH t"1:NPOUIMZEJWJEFOET t"5.GFFSFGVOET  t/PNJOJNVNCBMBODF t/PNPOUIMZGFF ti0PQTw/4'GFFGPSHJWFOFTT

1SPVEMZTFSWJOH6PG-4UVEFOUTTJODF *2.0% Annual Percentage Yield paid monthly on balances up to $5,000. Balances over $5,000 will earn the higher tier Share 1 dividend rate when requirements are met, or the lower tier Share 1 rate if requirements are not met,. Rates & terms as of August 1, 2015 and are subject to change. Must qualify for checking account. Personal accounts only. All requirements must be met before month-end processing on last business day of month. Transactions posted after that time will count toward the following month’s requirements. Only one Student Honors Checking account per member. ATM fee refunds up to $12.50 per month when requirements are met. Does not apply to ATMs outside the US. “One “Oops!â€? refund per year upon request. Ages 16 to 24 only. Account converts to Honors Checking at age 25.

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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

U of L joins dozens hacked in 2017 KYELAND JACKSON @KYELANDJ

U of L wasn’t the only school hacked this year. Sixty-one schools and colleges have dealt with hacked tax information in 2017, according to Identity Theft Resource Center data. Hackers obtained U of L employees’ personal information, filing fake tax returns for over 80 employees. Hackers even stole Communication Department Chair Al Futrell’s information. It’s unclear how hackers obtained the information, but phishing - false emails requesting personal information - or malware could be blamed. ITRC Director of Research and Publications Karen Barney said U of L’s breach is small. But, the hacking is unprecedented for the university. “This year there are a lot of spearphishing breaches going on, and they do seem to be hitting the education sector,” Barney said. “(Tax fraud) really became more rampant when people were able to file their returns online.” The theft represents seasonal increases in hacking attempts. During 2016’s tax season, the Internal Revenue Service reported a 400 percent surge in phishing and malware incidents. Hackers accessed U of L employee accounts through TALX, an electronic

This year there are a lot of spear-phishing breaches going on, and they do seem to be hitting the education sector. -Karen Barney

W-2 system owned by Equifax. Equifax, which earned $495 million in 2016, responded with more security - adding another step to access accounts and security questions to reset passwords. “Based on the investigation to date, Equifax has no reason to believe that its systems were compromised or that it was the source of the information used to gain access to the online portal,” Public Relations Senior Director Pamela Stevens said. “Equifax takes the security of consumer information very seriously and understands that this unauthorized access can pose a problem for the affected individuals.” Before, TALX used one-step authentication to secure its website. Asked why two-step authentication was not used before the breach, Equifax refused to comment further.

Other schools were also late to increase their TALX security. Among the 61 schools hacked this year, six used TALX’s W-2 system. Hackers used phishing to breach all those schools except the University of Georgia and possibly U of L: 1. Bowling Green State University 2. Adam’s Elementary (Arkansas City, KS) 3. Jefferson Elementary School (Arkansas City, KS) 4. University of Georgia 5. Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center 6. University of Louisville Though phishing scammers accessed nearly 6,000 employees using Equifax’s W-2 systems, Barney said the company’s security measures aren’t necessarily to

Equifax takes the security of consumer information very seriously... -Pamela Stevens

blame. “When it comes to spear-phishing, things that need to be in place are training of employees on what to be on the lookout for,” Barney said. Phishing advice and training are advertised in U of L’s daily newsletter, but it’s unclear whether training is proactively offered to schools and departments. The university was notified of a hack March 1, learned of a pattern March 30 and notified the public April 4. University spokesperson John Karman said the university waited to gather information, clarifying it would be “irresponsible” to notify employees without ensuring a breach pattern existed. Barney said U of L’s timed response may align with Kentucky’s data breach notification law, which mandates employers notify employees immediately when their information is compromised. “I always appreciate the entities that do breach notifications even though it wasn’t triggered by a law because it’s the right thing to do for consumers,” she said. U of L estimates 750 employees’ tax returns may be compromised; that number may increase by the tax season’s end. IRS Media Relations spokesperson Cecilia Barreda said compromised employees will receive their tax returns. The university may implement more security measures according to costs.

Housing works to uncomplicate housing OLIVIA KRAUTH @OLIVIAKRAUTH

U of L Housing knows processing its properties is confusing. Now, they’re working to simplify the process. In two changes taking place this summer, housing will control 4,000 more beds of students’ living options, streamlining the application, management and payment processes for students and parents. In July, U of L Housing will begin managing Bettie Johnson Hall, Billy Minardi Hall, Community Park and Kurz Hall. In mid-August, they will also begin a one-year lease of Cardinal Towne and University Pointe from American Campus Communities. “We want to make the system less complicated for students,” U of L Housing Director Julie Weber said. “It’s gotten very complicated, trying to figure out which type of building is which, who can live there, what type of meal plan ap-

We want to make the system less complicated for students. -Julie Weber

plies.” Currently, there are multiple ways a housing option can be tied to U of L affiliation, third-party management and crosses between the two - outside of university-owned halls. While those ways will still exist, the changes make more of the options fall under housing’s direct management, making housing seem easier to understand. “As far as the student interacts with the housing system, there are only two choices now,” Weber said.

ACC, Cardinal Towne and University Pointe’s owner, will be responsible for physical upkeep, including maintenance requests and landscaping. ACC will also continue to run the retail spaces in Cardinal Towne. Anything that directly touches students is housing’s responsibility, including parking and leasing. The change will simplify the application and leasing processes, as all properties will be listed on the main U of L housing application. Weber said many rent prices - especially in one-bedroom and studio apartments - dropped because there is no longer a need for leasing executives or managers, only the application. “It allows us to allow way more nine month leases,” Weber said. “You’re going to study abroad? You don’t have to find a subleaser, you can just break your lease and we’ll find someone to take the space.” Cardinal Towne and University Pointe will continue to be predominantly upperclassmen, with about 20 percent of

UP being available to groups of freshmen. Both properties will have RAs. “It’s not that the rules are different they’re apartments, you have a lot more privacy in there. It really is about safety and responding to incidents and providing services to students,” Weber said of the RA’s role. “They don’t have to write everybody up for everything.” Weber said housing released “a whole lot of information” to students and parents about the streamlining and updated the housing website with details. “We basically tried to show that it’s what you’re used to in dealing with us,” Weber said. “We tried to just show it’s a continuation of your life on campus.” The increase in beds gives housing wiggle room for potential future changes, including closing Miller, Threkheld and Unitas Halls temporarily or permanently. Weber said there aren’t any specific plans for the future of those buildings.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

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Survivors and allies ‘take back the night’ SHELBY BROWN @BROSHEA91

Students, faculty and staff filled the Red Barn to capacity for Take Back the Night April 4. Take Back the Night aims to protest sexual and domestic violence by sharing survivor stories. “[This is] a march to symbolize the taking back. The taking back of our lives, of the streets,” PEACC director Sally Evans said. “We have a right to be free from violence no matter who we are or where we are.” Hosted by the Prevention, Education and Advocacy on Campus and Community, the event started on campus in 2001. This year’s theme was “Surviving Together.”

We have a right to be free from violence no matter who we are or where we are. -Sally Evans “One of the values of Take Back the Night is that it does bring all different kinds of people together. It’s not just for survivors, though that’s a main focus,” Evans said. “I love that it brings together

a lot of different folks.” “As you go and march, support and love on one another,” U of L professor Kaila Story. “We’re all we’ve got.” Survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence shared their stories. “The place from which I speak this evening is as a survivor,” keynote speaker Isabel Abbott said. Organizations like U of L’s Counseling Center, the Women’s Center, Kent School of Social Work, LGBTQ Center, Planned Parenthood, Cards Speak and the Center for Women and Families presented information beforehand. SGA’s table showed their sponsorship for It’s On Us, another campaign combating sexual assault on college campuses.

Dozens of students marched through campus with signs when the program concluded. Some students said it was their first time at a Take Back the Night, including Bree Perry. “Families typically don’t talk about this,” Perry said. “Not because they don’t want to but some families just don’t have the language to. In high school we’re not learning what a healthy relationship looks like either. Many of us are on our own for the first time, having never heard of interpersonal power based violence.”

PHOTOS BY SHELBY BROWN / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

Take Back the Night banner carried at the front of the march.

Marchers pass Gheens Planetarium chanting with signs.

Marchers use megaphones to shout phrases.

PEACC made signs for participants to carry during the walk.

The crowd awaits the program to begin.

Deputy Attorney General J. Michael Brown discusses Voices of Justice campaign.

PEACC and other campus groups table outside Red Barn for a resource fair.

Kaila Story encourages audience to be there for one another.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Students gather for “Cards against catcalling” JANET DRAKE

@THECARDINALNEWS

Ninety-nine percent of women admit to experiencing it: a suggestive whistle in your direction, being leered at as you walk in the room, a “hey baby, you got a man?” This is commonly known as catcalling. But these actions (which are 94 percent of the time perpetrated by men against women and/or LGBTQ people) are street harassment, which is illegal in Kentucky. This was the focus of “Cards Against Catcalling,” an event by the Women 4 Women student board at U of L April 6. Lead by student Hadley Hendrick, this

event featured Title IX coordinator for the CASE project, Megan Willman. Four U of L students spoke candidly about their personal experiences with catcalling. “It’s my thing because I have been publically objectified since I was nine,” Hendrick said. “I realized that this is something that I’m experiencing, and I know so many other people are experiencing, and yet no one’s really talking about it.” Megan Willman - who works to educate students about their Title IX rights, and to provide legal resources to people who have experienced harassment posed questions to the audience. “How old were you when you first experienced

some kind of street harassment?” Hands shot up. Answers ranged from nine to 16. Several of these people shared very personal stories. These ranged from being sexually objectified while walking their dog as a 9-year-old, to being told “you should kill yourself” based on their religion. U of L student Maria Martinez spoke about her experience as a Latina woman with street harassment. Martinez, from Colombia, is familiar with the machismo culture that heavily objectifies women in many Latin countries. “We [the United States] view ourselves as such a progressive country, but it’s really not so different. We still have the same problems,”

Martinez said. Speaking alongside Martinez, Elizabeth Peña added, “Street harassment has no racial or ethnic boundaries.” Men made up roughly one-third of the attendees at “Cards Against Catcalling.” Throughout the event, several guys voiced their personal stories with experiencing or witnessing street harassment. “Men don’t really experience it [street harassment], and they’re not usually around when it happens to women, so it’s hard for them to understand that it actually occurs,” junior Thomas Lawrence said.

Students walk for suicide awareness DUSTIN MASSENGILL @THECARDINALNEWS

Students raised over $10,400 for suicide awareness April 9 in the second annual Out of Darkness walk.

Over 210 people participated, up from 150 walkers last year. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention will take a national cut which will go to help pay for large-scale needs like websites and educational pieces and

event. The rest of the money raised will go to local chapters to help fund prevention in Kentucky and the Louisville area. Sara Williams, one of the founders, arranged the walk as a project for one of her social work classes.

Williams and Meyer both would like to see more RSO and team involvement, saying the University of Kentucky’s Greek life team who raised a little under half of their total raised.

1. A group gathers for a photo during the Out of Darkness walk, which raised money for suicide awareness. 2. Students apply temporary tattoos during the walk. PHOTOS BY DUSTIN MASSENGILL / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

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7


FEATURES

READ MORE ONLINE Check out more photos from the Panic! At The Disco concert online at Louisvillecardinal.com

BWILLIAMS@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

APRIL 11, 2017 | PAGE EIGHT

Panic! At The Disco panics KFC Yum! Center in best way OLIVIA KRAUTH @OLIVIAKRAUTH

I’ll be the first to admit my middle school musical tastes could be categorized as “pop punk” at the very least. With their slick emo-kid hair, eyeliner and slightly-angsty-and-unnecessary exclamation point, Panic! At The Disco was a staple band in my neon blue iPod shuffle. However, as I grew up, Panic! fell off of my radar. What was once a top-played artist turned into the band one of my coworkers plays every time we work together (and I mean every single time). But Panic’s April 9 concert at the KFC Yum! Center solidified my growing notion that as I matured, so did Panic! - well, kind of. As the crowd slowly filled in for Louisville’s part of the “Death of a Bachelor” tour, I realized that, while I’ve grown up, Panic’s target audience hadn’t. Teenagers donning band tees, all-black clothing and brightly dyed hair made up about 70 percent of the audience. Two girls behind me were making fun of someone for “stealing all of her quotes from Tumblr.” The available merchandise, mainly black, gave similar vibes. After strong opening acts by Saint Motel and Misterwives, the band hit the stage around 9 p.m. to two massive bursts of gold confetti, ready to knock out a 20song set list. The majority of the first songs were fresh off the “Death of a Bachelor” album, a Frank Sinatrathemed album. Lead singer Brendon Urie proved he was the perfect crooner-pop punk combination, and

made sure everyone knew it by the end of the show. Throughout the show, Urie hit notes my coworkers and I could only dream of hitting in our post-close Panic! jam sessions. And when he did, the crowd, for lack of a better term, panicked. His stamina and vocal dominance were truly incredible. For example, in the middle of the show, he sang half a song, did a backflip, finished the song, came back out on a piano, took a shot and sang two of the more vocally challenging songs of the night - “This is Gospel” and “Death of a Bachelor.” I know he does this for a living, but I was still impressed. Urie’s vocal range seemed to carry the squad. I’m not dissing the band, but if Urie offered to make the tour an a cappella act, I think everyone would still have gone. Later songs in the set, like a cover of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” were just as strong, but reminded me of a basketball team dunking when they’re up by 20 in the final two minutes. We get it - you’re talented. But the second I started to become salty, Urie provided one of the most genuine thank you’s I’ve ever seen at a concert, and suddenly my salt was gone. The band ended the concert with the past and the present, with “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” representing the scene-kid days and “Victorious” representing the now. While the crowd and merch hasn’t matured, their sound has. The pop punk sound remains, but has been toned down, allowing Urie’s voice to appear stronger and brighter.

PHOTOS BY BRIANA WILLIAMS / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


FEATURES

APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

9

Father John Misty examines absurd world on “Pure Comedy” AARON HARTLEY

@THECARDINALNEWS

These are absurd times we are living in and there is probably no one more aware of it than Joshua Tillman, also known as Father John Misty. Since going solo from folk group Fleet Foxes (in which he was drummer), Tillman has put out a handful of records showcasing his witty and sardonic persona. His second album, “I Love You, Honeybear” was an immensely charming, sharply written meditation on personal relationships, and one of the best records of 2015. Tillman’s latest, “Pure Comedy,” is easily his most ambitious record yet. The biting commentary effervescent in “Honeybear” is blown up to massive scale. Tillman tackles everything from media, politics, life’s meaning (or lack thereof) and the absurdity of human existence. At 74 minutes, “Pure Comedy” is a dense, challenging, and at times, exhausting album. At times, Tillman’s vision feels too sweeping in its scope, and his songwriting and a lot less subtle than his previous efforts. Those who were swept away by “Honeybear’s” razor-edged reflections on love may be turned away by the long, almost rambling waterfalls of insight that make up “Pure Comedy.” It can be argued that “Honeybear” is indeed the better record, as it is certainly the more refined. “Pure Comedy” could benefit from some consolidation, and more

instrumental variety. After so many piano and guitar ballads with only the occasional horn or string section, they begin to blend together. “Pure Comedy” is much more difficult to listen to in portions as well. It works much better with straightthrough listens rather than picking out individual tracks. That being said, the entirety of “Pure Comedy” is a very strong record. Tillman’s insight is scattered and overwhelming, but this seems to fit the album’s theme: our crushingly overbearing modern culture. Knowing Tillman, he probably made the album very specifically for this reason. The album covers a range of emotional engagements, from the goofy and quippy “Total Entertainment Forever,” to the lovely, drawn out ballad “Leaving L.A.” and the angry, impassioned title track. Where “Pure Comedy” falls short in refinement and musical variety, it makes up for in pure emotional engagement and sincerity. This is an album that will draw you in and demand your attention. While Tillman is famous for his occasionally obnoxious ironic view of the world, it feels like the man really seems to care about what he’s saying here. The album’s absolutely beautiful closer, “In Twenty Years or So,” Tillman argues, despite treading for over an hour on despair and absurdity, that “It’s a miracle to be alive/ There’s nothing to fear.” An “everything will be alright in the end” finish is rarely more cathartic.

People may be put off by the Father John Misty persona, and that’s understandable, but they’d be missing out on the work of a very talented, one-of-a-kind modern songwriter. “Pure Comedy” has flaws and can be a bit of work to get into, but with a few listens and some effort, it is a very rewarding and insightful listen.

How to: Decorate with a low budget MADISON THOMPSON @THECARDINALNEWS

Furnishing an apartment or a dorm room can be daunting. If the place is unfurnished, it can be challenging to buy furniture and afford a college education at the same time. There are still ways to decorate and furnish a dorm room without breaking the bank. Habitat for Humanity: Habitat for Humanity is a place where large pieces of furniture are donated to be resold. There are couches, tables, bedside tables and lamps available as well as a variety of light fixtures and wall art. One of the best features about Habitat for Humanity is that every 30 days the original price is reduced up to 75 percent off. There are several locations near U of L, including directly across from Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. Craigslist: Though it may seem like a scary place, Craigslist can be a vital tool given the proper guidance and awareness. Artwork, furniture and technology are available all at the click of a button. Simply take the proper precautions and bring a friend to pick it up if you deem it necessary. Keepsakes: Sometimes the best thing to do is bring things from home. Chairs and coffee tables are some of the easier belongings to move. Items like couches may be harder to transport, but it could save money if you have the ability. Do-it-yourself: If you want a more personalized and DIY feel to your dorm or apartment, try some of these DIYs. Clothing hanger necklace holder: Take a wooden

hanger and screw hooks into the frame. Now you can hang your necklaces in a space-sensible location. Vintage book planter: You will need a book, white glue, ruler, small succulent, x-acto knife, quart-size ziptop bag, scissors and a pen. Glue all of the pages together from the side. Measure and cut out an area in the book where you want to place your succulent without cutting all the way to the bottom. After this, line the base with the zip-top bag. Add your succulent and trim the lining. Metallic rope basket: You will need heavy, natural rope, tacky glue and some kind of metallic glitter ribbon. Start by wrapping the rope in a circular motion. The smaller the hole, the less likely what is put in there will fall out. After wrapping the rope around to the desired size to make the base, begin wrapping the rope around the sides. Wrap some metallic ribbon around the rope once you have wrapped the rope around a few times. Continue this process of wrapping the rope and wrapping the ribbon around the rope until the desired height is achieved. Ruler picture frames: These are cute, customized picture frames that are easily homemade. You need heavy-duty scissors, hot glue gun or glue, miter saw and rulers or a yardstick. Cut the yardstick or the rulers to your desired length. Glue the sides together, making sure the angles line up.

Lava lamp: Though the lava lamp has a very retro feel, it is a fun decoration that will not break the bank and can spruce up a room. You will need cooking oil, water, an empty water bottle, food coloring, glue for the lid and Alka-Seltzer tablets. First fill the bottle two thirds of the way with oil and fill the rest with water. Be sure to leave at least an inch at the top. Then add several drops of food coloring. Next, break an AlkaSeltzer tablet into three or four pieces and drop them into the bottle. The contents will begin to fizz and bubble. Wait until the bubbling calms down before screwing on the lid.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

‘Life’ movie is 2017’s thrilling, frustrating version of ‘Alien’ BRIANA WILLIAMS @THECARDINALNEWS

There are few films that truly change the landscape of the movie industry. However, when “Alien� was released in 1979, it did just that. The science fiction realm of movies was impacted so heavily that it created a boom of science fiction films. Today, the genre is one of the most popular, usually generating the highest budget and box office numbers. Of course, not every science fiction film is a winner. The recent release of “Life� proves that. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Ryan Reynolds and Rebecca Ferguson, “Life� features a plot almost identical to “Alien.� Astronauts are stranded in space and after a series of events occur, an alien life form renders them trapped on their ship. With an already predictable plot, “Life� had little going for it from the start. But the unique aspects of the alien itself were what helped the movie tremendously. Not only did it simply look different, but it grew as the movie progressed. Unlike “Alien,� audiences actually saw how the creature became what it was and understood early on what its weaknesses were. The alien was also treated more like a virus that needed to be eradicated than an alien itself. This provided an interesting dynamic between it and the astronauts. There were also some plot twists here and there, but nothing that would completely shock someone in the audience. The characters in “Life� were perhaps the most frustrating. Reynolds’ character, Roy Adams, was a charac-

ter that Reynolds has played before in several movies. While that character works perfectly for some of his other movies, it just felt flat in this one. Ferguson was the leading female of the film and was in charge of emergency protocols in the event of a major accident. Inevitably, the major accident happened, yet she seemed incredibly useless throughout. Honestly, it felt like filmmakers put her in there just so they could include a woman on the ship. Despite her high ranking, it still felt like she was a background character. Gyllenhaal’s character was the most interesting in the film. His quiet, mysterious and humble nature made him stand out among the other characters. He also had a certain love for space that seemed to be the only thing that he was passionate about. Hints of his backstory were told through dialogue, but he wasn’t explored enough. As one of the main characters, audiences should be able to understand him more as a person than we do, but there just isn’t enough said about him. If the characters weren’t disappointing enough, their actions were worse. As astronauts, doctors and aeronautic engineers all too familiar with the risks of going out into space, throughout the entire movie, it felt like all they’d forgotten everything they learned through training. They tried to save people who obviously couldn’t be saved, they were unbelievably emotional despite knowing the rules for emergencies and they frequently put the entire ship in danger in order to save one person. “Life� had some decent moments, but most of the time, it seemed like watching a recycled, inferior re-

make to “Alien.� It certainly moved faster and the plot unfolded in a smoother manner than “Alien,� and it was definitely suspenseful. The film’s score and special effects were also beautifully done in those areas. However, “Life� fell incredibly short everywhere else. TLC Rating: 5/10

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SPORTS APRIL 11, 2017 | PAGE 11

READ MORE ONLINE Follow @thecardsports on Twitter for live game updates for spring sports.

SPORTS@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Where will the Cards land? Breaking down NFL mock drafts MICAH BROWN

@DROPTHEMICAH

Seven football players - Devonte Fields, Josh Harvey-Clemons, Cole Hikutini, Jamari Staples, James Quick, Keith Kelsey and Colin Holba - were invited to the NFL combine in February. Only Fields, HarveyClemons, Hikutini and DeAngelo Brown are projected to be drafted. Here’s a look at where multiple media outlets predict where each Card will be selected in the 2017 NFL draft (player rankings based on CBSSports.com):

Devonte Fields, outside linebacker

The 6-foot-4, 245 lbs. linebacker is ranked as the 166th overall player in the draft and the 13th overall in his position. Tallying 165 tackles and 26.5 sacks in his career, Fields is projected to be drafted in the fifth round.

Josh Harvey-Clemons, safety

The 187th overall player and the eighth overall strong safety is projected to be taken in the fifth or sixth round. HarveyClemons wrapped up his career with 225 tackles, with 126 being solo.

Cole Hikutini, tight end

As the favorite target for Lamar Jackson, Hikutini finished his senior season with 60 catches for 668 yards and eight touchdowns. The tight end has been projected to be drafted as early as the fourth round, but other outlets have him going as low as the seventh.

DeAngelo Brown, defensive tackle

After finishing the season with 23 tackles, Brown did not receive an invitation to the NFL combine. Experts still expect Brown to be a sixth-round pick, finishing his career with 22 tackles for loss. Devonte Fields finished his career with 26.5 sacks. FILE PHOTO / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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2017

SUMMER SESSIONS

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Visit uofl.me/17summer for details. TERM 1 begins May 8

TERM 2 begins May 30

TEN-WEEK SUMMER TERM begins May 30 TERM 3 begins July 5


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Cardinals take on spring ball

Quarterback Lamar Jackson (left) hands the ball of the running back Dae Williams.

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Corner back Jaire Alexander earned second team All-ACC honors in 2016 and led the team with five interceptions. PHOTOS BY NANCY HANNER / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Caitlin Ferguson embracing the role she is thrown into DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

Before the season started, softball coach Sandy Pearsall said one of the players that stood out to her during the offseason was freshman Caitlin Ferguson. Pointing to her athletism and work ethic, Pearsall said she expected Ferguson to see the field, but she wasn’t sure how much. Now halfway through the season, Ferguson has started 24 games of her 28 games played. Growing up in Versailles, Kentucky, the Woodford County graduate fell in love with the campus and facilities at U of L. Aiming for a school that she could succeed and compete at, Ferguson chose to attend Louisville. Growing up 13 miles away from Lexington, Ferguson caught flack from friends and family back home. “I definitely got some (backlash). Where I’m from it’s die hard UK,” Ferguson said. “A lot of people came to my signing and they’re really supportive. They just like to give me a hard time.” During the fall, Ferguson felt the challenge of being student-athlete in college, but the field is where she gained comfort. “In the beginning, I was really homesick,” Ferguson said. “Softball has been a consistent part for me. I was always comfortable going to practice and it was the only thing really familiar to me.” Breezing into her second semester, those days are long gone. “Now I’ve got the hang of things and I loaded up my schedule a little more, I like it a lot,” Ferguson said. “I’m more comfortable with the area. I don’t have to use a GPS to get around anymore. The team is great and we’ve really bonded.” Latching on to an upperclassman is crucial for any incoming freshman to have a sense of guidance. For Ferguson, that person is Jenna Jordan. While Fer-

guson admits it wasn’t who she said expected to click with, two are always seen together now. Recording a lot of playing time as a true freshman can be difficult. Not everyone experiences it, so not everyone can offer up the right advice. Senior captain Maryssa Becker has nearly 200 career games and started 47 in her freshman year. Along with Jordan, Becker has taken Ferguson under her wing. “I look up to (Becker), she is so good. She knows the mental part of softball and that’s what I sometimes freak out about,” Ferguson said. “She always tells me, ‘You’re fine, we all have confidence in you.’ She tells me to keep it simple and it really helps.” Ferguson said the big stage that is Louisville softball threw her off her game at the beginning of the season. “Our first home tournament, I was freaking out. I couldn’t field (the ball) and I don’t know what was going on,” Ferguson said. “I looked up into the stands and I’ve never played in front of that many people before. That and the expectations just got to me.” It hasn’t all been challenging for Ferguson, though. In the same tournament, Ferguson hit a walk-off two-RBI single against Green Bay. While it may have been a run rule walk-off, the moment is one of Ferguson’s favorites of the year. For Ferguson, the adjustment to the college game and higher level athletes is coming easier than expected. The freshman is batting .346 with 17 RBIs, placing her fourth in average and third in RBI on the team. She is tied for first on the team with seven doubles and hit her first home run against Notre Dame on April 1. Ferguson said that she takes critiques from Pearsall very well and the only time she is worried is when Pearsall says nothing. At the plate, Pearsall is changing Ferguson into a different player.

PHOTO BY LAUREL SLAUGHTER / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

“When I came here, I had the mentality of ‘You’re small, you can’t hit it far.’ So I was trying to overcompensate by hitting it hard every time,” Ferguson said. “Because of coach, I’ve focused on base hits. Getting ground balls and being aggressive, that’s really helped me.” Defense comes naturally to Ferguson, but at the plate, she is still adjusting. Starting so many games this season is something Ferguson anticipated, but caught her a little off-guard when it happened so quickly. “When I came here, I had the mindset of, ‘I’m going to beat someone out and earn a spot.’ It just so happened that (Sydney) Melton got hurt and I was given this

opportunity,” Ferguson said. “Over the past four weekends, I’ve really embraced it and been playing to win.” Away from softball, Ferguson spends most of her time with teammates. Between going to five-dollar Tuesday movies, Dairy Kastle or Cherokee Park to hike, Ferguson enjoys staying active. Entering college, the shortstop thought she was going to a dual-sport athlete. Playing varsity basketball since seventh grade, Ferguson is a part of the 1,000-point club at her high school. While fans won’t be seeing her at the KFC Yum! Center, they can catch her at Ulmer Stadium making a big impact for years to come.

PHOTOS BY DALTON RAY / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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Kade McClure bypasses the numbers, spotlights the details DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

Baseball’s Kade McClure spent his sophomore season mainly throwing on weekdays behind Louisville’s first three starters of Drew Harrington, Kyle Funkhouser and Brendan McKay. With three future MLB players ahead of McClure, it’s easy to see how he got lost in the shuffle. McClure gained recognition midway through the year as his undefeated record continued. By the end of 2016, McClure held a 12-0 record with a 2.54 ERA and 77 strikeouts. Last season, the 6-foot-7 Ohio-native may have been the best fourth pitcher in the nation and easily would be a weekend starter at any other school. During the season, McClure didn’t look at the numbers. “I just wanted to give my defense the best ability to win games and with the number of first rounders and top 100 picks around me, I knew it would be easier to let them make plays,” McClure said. “The only time I thought about being undefeated was when I was 9-0 going for my 10th (win). After I hit that benchmark, it was normal again.” Because of the talent and coaching staff around McClure,

Kade McClure has 165 career strikeouts and a 16-2 record as a Cardinal. PHOTOS BY NANCY HANNER / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

he knew he was capable of performing at that level. Coming off a 12-0 year, McClure’s confidence was high, but playing college baseball wasn’t always on his radar. “I didn’t even think about playing college baseball going

up. I wanted to play basketball or football,” McClure said. “With my dad playing the in the NFL, I really wanted to play football. Then I turned out being 6-foot-7, so I thought I was going to play in the NBA but obviously, that wasn’t the case.”

Shifting to the team, McClure heard the noise around the program saying the team would be a rebuilding year. “We had a lot of guys (this year) that didn’t have as much exposure last year and they’re stepping into roles and filling

spots. A lot of pieces are coming into place very well. If we keep playing like this, I think the season will turn out just fine,” McClure said. Many people didn’t expect the team to start a programbest 19-0 after losing so many key players from the 2016 team. McClure said being a part of history is an honor. “I didn’t even know we broke the record until someone told me after the game,” McClure said. “In this program, we take it game-by-game instead of looking ahead to the weekend series. Before we knew it, we were 13-0, 14-0 and kept going. I don’t think anyone inside or out thought we would start off that hot but we just rolled with it.” McClure understands to make a deep postseason run, the Cardinals will need their bullpen. McClure said that with the players in the infield and the coaches in the dugout, he feels like anyone could step in and have a 10win season. So far in 2017, McClure is 3-1 and the team is 7-1 when he starts. With a 3.3 ERA, McClure is second on the team with 51 strikeouts. With the second half of the season approaching, McClure has two words for his team and fans: Be ready.

Men’s soccer remains competitive despite influx of youth JORDAN SHIM

@JORDANSHIM228

After the men’s soccer team’s 1-1 draw with Xavier, they preserved their undefeated record this preseason. Despite the loss of key players to graduation, the team looks set to have another successful fall campaign. Here are a few things to forward to this upcoming season.

Youth potential

One of the issues at the end of last season was the loss of players through the center of the pitch. Stefan Cleveland, Romilio Hernandez and Michael DeGraffenreidt all left the team, leaving a void in the middle. The team, however, have

not skipped a beat with Cody Cochran, Liam Bennett and Jake Gelnovatch stepping into the starting eleven. Restocking the squad with youth will build a strong core to move the team forward. “What has to happen sometimes is you have to cut down the big trees,” coach Ken Lolla said. “The big trees have to leave so the saplings can grow. Guys like Stef, Mike and Romilio leave so all these guys with massive ability can develop, and that’s what this spring is all about. There’s only one way to do it, and that is to put them in those situations. They’re receiving a lot of light right now.” The squad still has experienced players who can pro-

vide leadership for the youth stepping into the starting XI. “Tim (Kubel) is already the leader for us,” Lolla said. “Tate (Schmitt) has a strong presence on the field and so does Mo. Cody, who is now playing as a center back, is having more voice. Our keepers are growing into that as well.”

Consistency up front

The only loss on the attacking end was Daniel Johnson, who was drafted by the Chicago Fire in the MLS SuperDraft. His dribbling and speed are a big loss, but the team has depth in that position with Grant Hollkamp and Cherif Dieye. Schmitt also has experience playing wide.

FILE PHOTO / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL


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Men’s basketball appearances in AP’s top 100 all-time programs CONNER FARRELL @THECARDSPORTS

Last week, the Associated Press released an article ranking their top 100 college basketball programs of all time. The men’s basketball program was ranked number seven overall, totaling 627 points. U of L has been ranked in the AP poll 54.41 percent of the time since its conception in 1949. Louisville’s first appearance in the polls came on Jan. 17, 1950. The university’s best decade in terms of being ranked in the poll was in the 1970s, where they appeared 75.6 percent of the time. Howev-

er, the program is currently on pace to beat that mark with their play in the 2010s. The Cards have the lowest number of number one appearances with teams in the top 10. The program has been ranked at number one twice, once in 2009 and again in 2013. Louisville holds the record for the most appearances in the poll without being ranked number one, which was a drought that lasted 520 polls until the program found their way to number one. To determine the all-time top 100, AP gave one point for each week a program appeared in the AP poll and two points for each time a

program was ranked number one. The rest of the top ten features teams that the program is quite familiar with. Some of the teams included instate rival Kentucky, current ACC foes North Carolina, Duke and Syracuse, as well as Cincinnati. Here is the top 10: 1. Kentucky (1,111 points) 2. North Carolina (1,098 points) 3. Duke (1,032 points) 4. UCLA (957 points) 5. Kansas (857 points) 6. Indiana (662 points) 7. Louisville (627 points) 8. Arizona (594 points) 9. Syracuse (581 points) 10. Cincinnati (500 points)

FILE PHOTO / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

North Carolina’s scorching second half burns women’s lacrosse

Madison Hoover (left) is tied for a team-high 16 assists this season and Meghan Siverson is second on the team with 47 goals. DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

Hosting second-ranked North Carolina, No. 20 women’s lacrosse couldn’t handle the hot second-half shooting, falling 15-11. Louisville opened the game leading 7-3, but UNC ended the game on

a 12-4 scoring run. Sophomore Meghan Siverson ended with three goals and three more Cardinals added two goals each. Coach Kellie Young said she knew the opportunity her team had in the first half. “We had a 7-3 lead at one point. They

We need to get to the point where we know we can play with anyone in the country.

-Coach Kellie Young

Hannah Koloski (left) and McKayla Conti totaled three goals against UNC. PHOTOS BY ISAAC SANCHEZ / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

had one player that scored seven goals, we had a plan for that and we didn’t follow that,” Young said. “I’m proud of the effort we put on the field, in terms of physically and continuing to attack. We need to get to the point where we know we can play with anyone in the country.” In the opening minutes, both teams exchanged goals to make it 1-1 with 26 minutes to play. Louisville scored three unanswered goals before North Carolina connected on their second goal. Goalkeeper Brittany Read made two big-time saves in the opening 10 minutes to preserve the lead. Senior Hannah Koloski, the nation’s leading goal-scorer, pushed the Louisville lead to 5-2 after slipping through defenders for her 54th goal of the year. Junior Madison Hoover wrapped around the goal to find sophomore McKayla Conti for the goal. After the Siverson’s second goal, the Cards led 7-3 with

six minutes to play. Despite trailing, North Carolina remained calm and waited for their opportunity. Their patience paid off as they ended the half scoring three straight goals. After the halftime horn, Young had an extended discussion with the officials and UNC assistant coach Phil Barnes about coaches’ influence on officiating. Siverson’s third goal of the match made the score 8-7 Louisville, but the Heels didn’t wait long to tie the game at eight. Once North Carolina knotted the game, the fifth-highest scoring offense began to flex their muscles. UNC scored five unanswered to make the game 13-8. Juniors Jillian Balog and Taylor Webster scored their second goals of the game to give Louisville a late sign of life. North Carolina kept their distance, adding two goals to finish the match.


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APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

17

Who would go on U of L’s basketball Mt. Rushmore?

Left to right: Terrance Williams, Francisco Garcia, Russ Smith, Reece Gaines. GRAPHIC BY MITCHELL HOWES / THE LOUISVILLE CARDINAL

DALTON RAY @DRAY5477

The University of Louisville has one of the nation’s most historic basketball programs. Similar to the football Mt. Rushmore, it’s difficult to pick four of the most impactful players in program history. To make things easier, we’ve only included players who played from 2000 to present. Reece Gaines, guard (1999-2002) Gaines played under both coach Denny Crum and coach Rick Pitino but is remembered as Pitino’s first star player. Gaines averaged 21 points a game as a junior with 3.9 rebounds a game. During his senior season, Gaines led Louisville to the second round of the NCAA tournament. The second round showing was the first since the 1996-1997 season and first NCAA tournament under the Pitino era. Former Marquette star and NBA All-Star Dwayne Wade said Gaines was the best player he played in college. Gaines dropped his points per game average in his final season to 17.9 but upped his assist average to a career-high five a game. A first round selection in the 2003 NBA draft, Gaines should be recognized as a player who laid the foundation for Cardinals today. Now pursuing a coaching career, Gaines is fourth all-time in scoring, third in made 3-pointers and

seventh in assists. Francisco Garcia, guard/forward (2002-2004) Garcia took the reigns from Gaines and averaged double-digits his entire career. Garcia led U of L to their second straight tournament appearance his sophomore season averaging 16.4 points and 4.7 assists. While his stats may have taken a slight hit in his junior season, Garcia made U of L history in the 20032004 season. Alongside Larry O’Bannon, Garcia led the Cardinals to their first Final Four in 19 years. Garcia is the only player on this list that didn’t stay all four years. He was on track to crack top 10 in career points, free throws made and assists before forgoing his senior year. Garcia is tied for eighth in program history for made 3-pointers and holds the record for most assists in a game with 15. Garica will be remembered for leading the Cardinals back to the promise land and made a clear impact on the program. Terrence Williams, forward (2005-2008) For anyone under the age of 25, Williams was the first showtime player to put on a Louisville uniform. Easily one of the most athletic players in program history, Williams was a fan favorite during his time as a Cardinal. Known for his high-

flying dunks and flashy play, Williams ended his career wit a 103-38 record and played in two Elite Eights. Williams was one of the most lethal Cardinals on a fast break, never shying away from a windmill dunk to entertain the crowd. A member of the 1,000-point club, Williams averaged double-digits his final three years. Williams and Earl Clark led the 2008-2009 team to a 31-6 record, a Big East Championship and a one-seed in the NCAA tournament. The Seattle native is third all-time in assists and seventh in both rebounds and steals. Williams is still one of the most recognizable Cardinals in program history and few players had a more successful four years as a Cardinal. Russ Smith, guard (2010-2013) One of the few players that could challenge Williams’ career success is Smith. Nicknamed “Russdiculous” by Pitino, Smith walked away with a 121-31 record, two Final Four appearances, a national championship and three conference championships. Like Williams, fans fell in love with Smith’s big smile and unorthodox style of play. Like the three players listed before him, Smith was an All-American. As a senior, Smith was tabbed a first-team All-American by the Associated Press, CBS Sports, NBC Sports and multiple others.

Smith led Louisville in scoring during his final two seasons and is arguably the most explosive offensive player in the Pitino era. Smith is behind Gaines on the all-time scoring list with 1,908 career points. Known for getting to the free throw line, Smith is second all-time in free throws made. In addition to his top-notch offense, Smith’s defense ability wasn’t far off. Harassing opposing guards for his entire career, Smith is Louisville’s all-time lead in steals. Honorable mentions: Taqwa Pinero, formerly known as Taquan Dean, guard (2002-2005) Earl Clark, forward (2006-2008) Peyton Siva, guard (2009-2012) Gorgui Dieng, center (2010-2012) Objections: By Conner Farrell-Siva should replace Gaines on the Mt. Rushmore. Gaines is undoubtedly one of the most talented scorers that has played at U of L. Siva, on the other hand, was a true leader for the team whenever he was on the court. Manning the point guard position, Siva was the engine that made the team go. He was a two-time MVP in the Big East Tourney, one of only two players to have that honor. Siva’s success in the Final Four and national championship gives him the slight nod.


18

SPORTS

APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

IGNITING INSPIRATION. BETTERING THE WORLD. 2017 GRAWEMEYER AWARDS LECTURE SERIES APRIL 6 The Grawemeyer Awards program at the University of Louisville pays tribute to the power of creative ideas, emphasizing the impact a single idea can have on the world. Prizes are awarded annually to inspire, honor and nurture achievements in music composition, education, ideas improving world order, religion and psychology. The winners visit Louisville each spring to discuss their awardwinning ideas.

3:00 P.M., SCHOOL OF MUSIC, BIRD RECITAL HALL

PLAY Andrew Norman, Music Composition Award recipient

APRIL 18 1:00 P.M., EKSTROM LIBRARY, CHAO AUDITORIUM

SCHOOLS FOR CONFLICT OR FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN Dana Burde, Ideas Improving World Order Award recipient 7:00 P.M., LOUISVILLE PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, CALDWELL CHAPEL

BREAKING WHITE SUPREMACY: THE BLACK SOCIAL GOSPEL AS NEW ABOLITIONISM Gary Dorrien, Religion Award recipient

APRIL 19 5:00 P.M., EKSTROM LIBRARY, CHAO AUDITORIUM

THE POLITICAL CLASSROOM: EVIDENCE AND ETHICS IN DEMOCRATIC EDUCATION Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy, Education Award recipients The lectures are free and open to the public. For additional details, visit grawemeyer.org.

APRIL 20 12:00 P.M., STRICKLER HALL, MIDDLETON AUDITORIUM

DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY: WHERE WE ARE, WHERE WE WERE AND WHERE WE’RE GOING Marsha Linehan, Psychology Award recipient


OPINION APRIL 11, 2017 | PAGE 19

The Cardinal is looking for an opinion editor. Interested? Send your resume to editor@ louisvillecardinal.com

EDITOR@LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

University chose reputation over constituents KYELAND JACKSON @KYELANDJ

On April 6, U of L revealed employee information was hacked by scammers filing fake tax returns. But the university first received news of a hack March 1, established a pattern March 30 and issued a public statement a week later. The university implemented more security measures, notified Equifax and gathered a planned response to the situation. By then, the university reiterated it values reputation above faculty. Waiting to ensure the university looked good handling the situation only further endangered the nearly 750 fac-

ulty members whose information was compromised. Whether it be a month or a week spent prepping a response, that’s more time criminals could access social security numbers and W-2 information without employees knowing. It’s not the first time saving face trumped constituents at the university. When the Cardinal broke the story of racial tensions within Threlkeld Hall, the university treated the incident as common practice, another day hushing students and keeping hints of controversy out the ears of concerned parents. Regardless of how bad it looks, the university should own up to bad information when it’s obvious there are peo-

ple at risk. The university has handled troubling information well before, but has a track record of hiding as much as it discloses. Perhaps I’m mistaken and simply don’t understand the process or motivations behind U of L’s decision. Regardless, the situation reeks of posturing. Worse, I doubt university administrators would have disclosed the breach if they didn’t realize the situation was out of their control. Even without the law it should be common practice to warn employees of a breach. Identity Theft Resource Center Director of Research and Publications Karen Barney looked at U of L’s response

and said it may have been timely, but she values entities who notify those affected with or without a law because “it’s the right thing to do for consumers.” If the university wants to demonstrate it cares about its constituents, it needs to re-evaluate priorities. It will look bad revealing condemning information like hacked servers without a plan yet in place. But it’s the right thing to do. Otherwise, the university continues to be a disillusioned entity thinking it knows what’s best for the university without consulting those within it. Otherwise, it becomes another James Ramsey.

Open-carry gun demonstration boils down to fear NICK AMON @NICKYLUZZ

Armed with handguns and assault rifles, over 20 demonstrators - some students - walked around U of L in an advocacy march, hoping to stir the conversation on concealed carry. “I’m not advocating to carry an AR15 into a classroom,” student organizer Aaron Spalding said during the march. “It’s to advocate licensed concealed carry holders to be able to protect themselves on campus.” But protect themselves from what? Students are more likely to be run over at the crosswalk in front of the Ville Grill than be gunned down in the middle of class. Some of the demonstrators may feel safer bringing their guns on campus, given off-campus crime, lack of ULPD officers and unreliable emergency systems. However, how safe would this make oth-

ers on campus? According to research at John Hopkins University, increased gun presence on campus could make common acts more deadly and therefore have a “deleterious” impact on students, faculty and staff. Drinking and acts of petty theft happen on college campuses across the country. What makes me think more firearms on campus will add to this mix and have a positive outcome? Although it seems this is pretty clear-cut, there’s still a growing advocacy for firearm presence on campuses. Eight states allow concealed carry at colleges, 18 states prohibit concealed carry and 23 states leave the decision to the school. Kentucky falls under the last category, and U of L prohibits concealed carry. Maybe instead of putting all of your energy into fighting for concealed carry

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Call backs for interviews will be early August 201%.

on campus, you channel this same energy into fighting for what needs to be fixed on campus first. Does ULPD need more manpower? Of course. Do the emergency systems across campus need revitalization? Of course. Does SGA need to fight for more student safety initiatives? Of course. U of L could provide a safer environment for its students, but ignoring that the current safety measures need to be revamped just because you feel like bringing your gun to class doesn’t solve anything. You’re not helping the problem; you’re making it worse. If we’re focused on the ideology that students with guns promote a safer learning environment, then maybe the Sandy Hook Elementary School victims should’ve been keeping handguns in their cubbies. Sounds absurd right? The notion that more guns lead to more student safety is equally absurd.

I vaguely understand where these demonstrators are coming from. I’m a strong believer in the second amendment and I think responsible gun ownership is a cornerstone to any good democracy. However, just because someone has their concealed carry license doesn’t mean they’re a responsible gun owner. I’m also not willing to take the chance of putting my life in jeopardy because of someone’s fear of the unknown. I guess that’s what this boils down to – fear. Once you look beyond the pistol toting and self-defense rhetoric, the only thing left that these demonstrators are armed with is an immense amount of fear. A fear of not only feeling the need to defend themselves at all times, but a fear to actually take on the problem of campus safety in a serious manner that addresses it for the complex situation that it is.


20

APRIL 11, 2017 LOUISVILLECARDINAL.COM

Here’s a math problem:

What do you get when you add a shorter semester to a lower tuition rate?

You get: SMARTER! This summer the Communication Department has a plan to get you a degree faster at a lower rate. Take more than one Communication class in the summer and save 25% on all additional classes. You save more than $200 per class. Take 5 classes and that’s a savings of almost $1000! comm.louisville.edu/summer

Who said Comm majors can’t do math?

April 11, 2017; Vol. 92, No. 27  
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