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LOUIS M. FERNANDEZ ARCHITECTURE


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PROJECTS AT LBBA

HANA TOWER

LIVE | WORK

RESPONSIVE SHOWROOM

ART FOUNDATION

PENN CENTER MASTERPLAN

FRICTION TABLE

FLEX AND RETURN

STUDIES

LSSD

Chamberlain Group Innovation and Design Center

SHOWROOM

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT DECEMBER 8, 2011


ROOSEVELT SQUARE COMMUNITY HUB

PARKSIDE OF OLD TOWN: Bldgs 2, 11, 16

LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS

LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS

To be located on Roosevelt Road in Chicago, IL, Roosevelt Square Community Hub is a 9,000 S.F. precast concrete building. It will serve area residents with a technology center, multipurpose/ community room, classrooms, and outdoor gathering space. The building also houses management offices, supportive services, and conference spaces.

To be located in the Parkside of Old Town development in Chicago, IL, this project will involve 114 residential units across 3 buildings, totaling over 200,000 SF. All three buildings will be of precast concrete construction, two of them standing at 4 stories and the third at 9. This project also includes a major urban planning component.

INVOLVEMENT + ROLE

INVOLVEMENT + ROLE

SD

DD

CDs

BN

CA

Aided in developing and refining program, planning and design, exploring material palette, 3d modeling, presentation drawings, construction drawings, and coordination of building systems

LEGENDS SOUTH C-3 OFFSITE

SD

DD

CDs

BN

CA

Aided in developing and refining program, planning and design, exploring material palette, 3d modeling, presentation drawings, and coordination/development of structural systems.

WEST HUMBOLDT PLACE

LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS

LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS

As a fourteen building component of the Chicago Housing Authority Plan for Transformation, LSC-3 is the development of seventyone rental units, one management office and one commercial space, located on the South Side of Chicago. LBBA is working in conjunction with another Chicago architect and is the Architect of Record for the entire project.

To be located on the West Side of Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood, this mixed-use building will consist of 13 residential units, management offices, and supportive services for the residents. The purpose of the building is to provide housing and services for children, youth, and families confronted by HIV/AIDS and other life-changing health conditions.*

INVOLVEMENT + ROLE

INVOLVEMENT + ROLE

SD

DD

CDs

BN

CA

Aided in developing program, selecting appropriate sites, planning and design, exploring material palette, 3d modeling, presentation drawings, construction drawings, RFI’s, coordination of building systems, permitting, and general project management.

SD

DD

CDs

BN

CA

Aided in developing and refining program, planning and design, physical modeling, presentation drawings, construction drawings, coordination of building systems and permitting *www.childrens-place.org


HAZEL/WINTHROP REHABS

RURAL STUDIO 20K HOUSES

LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS

AUBURN UNIVERSITY/LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS

Located in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood, this project was a moderate rehab of 30 residential units and common spaces across 4 buildings, totaling over 60,000 SF. The project was geared towards preserving the quality of available affordable housing and included envelope/structural repairs, upgrades and repairs to individual units, site improvements, and building efficiency upgrades.

“The 20K House project (is a) Rural Studio research project to address the need for affordable housing in Hale County... The objective ... is to design and build a model home that could be reproduced on a large scale by a contractor and built for $20,000”* LBBA is been involved as the Architect of Record, reviewing and preparing construction drawings for three of the houses.

INVOLVEMENT + ROLE

INVOLVEMENT + ROLE

SD

DD

CDs

BN

CA

Aided in construction observation and administration, including submittals, punchlists, general project management. Weekly site meetings and walkthroughs with contractors and owner.

SD

DD

CDs

BN

CA

Aided in construction drawings, coordination, and preparation of typical details across three different building projects. * http://www.ruralstudio.org/initiatives/20k-house


HANA TOWER

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA CTBUH SCHOLARSHIP STUDIO STUDIO PARTNER PROFESSOR

SPRING 2011 ANDRES LEMUS ANTONY WOOD

Headquartered on the IIT campus, the Center for Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is an organization whose mission is to “Disseminate multi-disciplinary information on tall buildings and sustainable urban environments, (and) to maximize the international interaction of professionals involved in creating the built environment...”* Each year, through an application and interview process, CTBUH awards a travel scholarship which is linked to the design of a highrise building. The investigations vary from year to year, but at the core of each one is the design of a tall building inextricably linked to the culture, condition, or experience of a place. Seoul is a super dense city with the high-rise building typology at the core of its identity. HANA TOWER (translates to “Tower of One”) is an exploration of the roles which a tall building may play in the reunification of North Korea and South Korea. It is a vertical infrastructural framework that supports a number of differing scenarios. The building begins as a shell with floors every twelve meters. It evolves through phases where it is populated with tents and workshops, to refugee housing, and in a calmer time becomes a residential high rise. * http://www.ctbuh.org/AboutCTBUH


defector

During the initial phase of the building, Hana Tower serves a steadily increasing flow of defectors from North Korea. The building serves as an urban counterpart to Hanawon, a center outside of Seoul that exists to help fill the cultural chasm between citizens from North of the border. Hana tower is not only a place for education and acclimation; the building stands as a symbol of Seoul’s commitement to reunification.

RATE OF MIGRATION FROM NK TO SK

ONWARD

2019

2018

2015

2013

2011

refugee The road to reunification will undoubtedly be bumpy. It is likely that economic shortcomings in North Korea, civil unrest, and ultimate crisis will create a rapid and large-scale exodus to Seoul and other urban centers. In this phase, Hana Tower maintains elements of its education and acclimation program, but is also large-scale and flexible housing. It serves as an engine for cultural exchange, fostering interactions between refugees and citizens. The tower is an open and flexible shell, responding to the nature of the complex problem as fit.

legacy

defector

refugee

legacy

As the need for flexiblity diminishes, Hana Tower becomes a rational residential tower. The educational and cultural components remain as a celebration of a united Korea, and the building will continue to stand as a commitment to unity across now peaceful borders.


RATE OF MIGRATION FROM NK TO SK

defector

refugee

legacy ONWARD

2019

2018

2015

2013

2011


precast diagrid node/cast in place members

When the building is in its final (residential) phase, each unit has access to Northern and Southern exposure, double height spaces, and takes advantage of passive cross-ventilation.


fostering community interaction between refugees and citizens

Korean Peninsula history museum

a meeting place for refugees and citizens

the complex serves as a symbol of a united peninsula


LIVE | MAKE CINCINNATI, OH

LIVE|MAKE COMPETITION PARTNER

2012 ANDRES LEMUS

LIVE | MAKE is a proposal for the adaptive reuse of a decrepit late 19th century manufacturing building. The new program is mixed use and includes studio spaces, residential units, and space for different varieties of small-scale manufacturing. The building itself is hardy, rational, and enduring. It is an artifact from when the US was at the forefront of manufacturing, but it is not precious. Through our proposal, we treat the existing building as a piece of stock. It works as a practical tool but lacks the qualities of expression, material, and space to engage the context and greater community. The addition of a tall wooden bar lengthens the squat proportion of the building and creates a dialogue with the hill rising behind it. The entire building is now organized around a courtyard which has been chiseled out of the earth. Careful subtractions expose the truth about its strict nature. A field of rigid columns once cloaked in darkess are now a filter for light and curiosity This building is a place to inspire work. It is an unfolding exploration of material, and is an attempt to elevate the level of space in which one pours their soul into their craft. Our decision to portray it as a series of collaged mixed-media was informed by the building and the nature of our design proposal.


RESPONSIVE SHOWROOM

ELMHURST, IL

Chamberlain Group

SHOWROOM

DESIGN Innovation SPATIAL and Design Center SSDLIMIA SHUNIA ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT DECEMBER 8, 2011

2011 JUNIOR DESIGNER DESIGN, VISUALIZATION GRAPHICS, DOCUMENTATION

Responsive Showroom is part of an adaptive reuse for a corporate campus in Elmhurst, IL, a suburb of Chicago. The space provides a stage on which to showcase products for the home with a high level of built-in flexibility. The design process was driven by collaboration with the product development team and involved future users of the space. The exploration of true flexibility and utility required an rigorous iterative process and many interviews with users ranging from sales staff to executives.Given the small budget and aggressive scheduling, our office enlisted the services of an exhibit house for collaboration on details as well as fabrication/installation. The end solution employs the use of two main fixed elements: the wooden capsule and perforated screen. There are also numerous mobile supporting elements that allow the client to quickly reorganize the space. Flat screen displays inegrated throughout allow the user to leverage larger elements of the showroom for many different uses. investigating the possibilities and effectiveness of a flexible system


N


interior view of wooden capsule

understanding the interactions a user would have with the product


perforated steel screen divides the space

early conceptual perspectives


ART FOUNDATION

INFINITE GRIDDED PLANE ADVANCED STUDIO ROLE PROFESSORS

FALL 2010 PERSONAL PROJECT RONALD KRUECK + TOM JACOBS

The Art Foundation is the product of a space-study architecture studio. It was driven by the iterative rebuilding and refining of largescale study models, with little to no drawing during the first 85% of development. This form of work isolates some of the more intangible qualities of the building and can serve as training to detach experience from other abstract or complicating factors. The project site is an abstract, infinite, gridded plane. The homogeneity of the site leaves the building devoid of any external stimulus, rendering it intensely introspective. Digging into the ground and establishing a strong grain, the project exista as a manipulation of the continuing grid while staying distinct from it. It frames a courtyard and pushes long field walls out of the ground, both rejecting the oppressive sameness of the site and creating the possibility for the user to explore and delight in discovery. The material palette is simple, relying on the golden color of the wood floors in contrast with the white site and grey stone courtyard. The lines between interior and exterior are sometimes thin, often revealed only through a change in texture or color.


PENN CENTER MASTERPLAN ST. HELENA ISLAND, SC ADVANCED STUDIO ROLE PROFESSOR

on the site. The buildings are dispersed, and there is a lack of wayfinding and organizational elements. Our proposed masterplan addresses the issues with two main concepts: to encourage pedes-

FALL 2010 GROUP LEADER trian travel by creating clear foot paths around the campus, and to TIMOTHY BROWN use these paths to organize and group the existing and proposed

“For more than 150 years, the Penn Center, Inc., located on St. Hel- buildings into activity centers. ena Island, SC, has been at the epicenter of African American education, historic preservation and social justice for tens of thousands A great deal of the work and planning revolved around our needto of descendants of formerly enslaved West Africans living in the Sea understand the historic and cultural context surrounding Penn Islands, known as the Gullah Geechee people.� It is a noble organi- Center. As a former school and agricultural education center, it was zation with strong cultural and geographical ties to the Low Country important to continue the legacy of inclusive, positive, and ecoregion in South Carolina.

logically responsible farming. Our position as receptive outsiders allowed us to digest and interpret many of the important and nu-

In recent years, Penn Center has had difficulty maintaining owner- anced qualities of the site. ship of its historic campus. Many of the buildings are in an advanced a state of decay and much of the community-owned land has been In a series of community meetings we were moved to witness the lost to speculating developers. Our involvement as an architecture love and devotion that many St. Helena Island residents have for studio began with our request to use their site for a hypothetical the Penn Center. We searched for a solution that would honor the project. Through research and interviews with locals, it became people and could respond to the history and beauty of the site. Our clear that the administration of Penn Center could benefit from a plan called for a very light touch, stretching sinuous lines from one working plan to rehabilitate and unify the 500-acre site.

end of the site to the other. Winding paths preserve the element of mystery and make it possible to delight in the discovery of new and

The lack of a development plan earlier in the campus history led to a unexpected experiences. host of problems which are largely related to the way people move

* http://penncenter.com/history


a light touch to enhance the inherent character of the site

proposed organization and re districting


pavers help distinguish hierarchy of paths


heritage and flower gardens: reinterpretation of traditional southern archetypes

agricultural education reactivates dormant areas of campus and helps P.C. engage community


FRICTION TABLE FURNITURE DESIGN ROLE PROFESSOR

SPRING 2010 PERSONAL PROJECT PAUL PETTIGREW

This project is a reinterpretation of a traditional tapered-leg dining room table. The profile is very thin and although the table is incredibly light, it is sturdy and strong. The legs and top are cut from of (2) 4’ x 8’ sheets of baltic birch plywood using only a table saw and simple finishing tools. The legs slide together for a friction fit and the top drops in, notched in place and secure without fasteners. The top can be placed upside-down to expose an unfinished surface, suitable as a work table. The table top is finished with water-based polyurethane for durability and all other surfaces are finished with wax. The wax deepens the contrast in the wood and brings to light the nuances of layered endgrain. It is very soft to the touch helps to tame and civilize the plywood. At the end of each leg is a sand-cast aluminum sabot. A mortise is milled into each sabot and accepts a tenon cut into the bottom of each leg. The aluminum sabots are small, but entirely essential. Without them the table is delicate and unstable. Their finish shows the rough imprint of the sand used to shape them and contasts the smooth and touchable feel of the waxed plywood.


FLEX AND RETURN

INSTALLATION IN CROWN HALL, IIT FIRST YEAR STUDIO GROUP PROFESSOR

SPRING 2007 G. MOSEY, S. MORENO, M. SHANNON HOMA SHOJAIE

Flex and Return is is an exploration of structure, modularity, and the limits of material. The project uses four unique components to assemble an interconnected lattice, capable of flexing and reacting to pressure. The interlocking pieces are made of drilled and shaped planks held together and spaced by wooden dowels. Each module is tensioned by a strap of butyl rubber, cut from punctured and discarded bicycle tubes. The fifteen foot long structure undulates and presents the user with the opportunity for many postures. By redistributing one’s weight, it is possible to change the shape of the structure dramatically. Once the weight is removed, the structure springs back to its previous form, ready for the next user. The scale of the project required a great deal of repeated components and fabrication time was short. In order to ensure the necessary uniformity, the fabrication process revolved around creative custom jigs and carefully orchestrated processes.


center-drilled wooden dowel

primary module

tensioned bicycle tube

wooden dowel

deflection varies with size of load


STUDIES WEST HUMBOLDT PLACE MODEL

LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS APRIL 2013


STUDIES PASSAGE MODEL

THIRD YEAR STUDIO ROLE PROFESSOR

FALL 2008 PERSONAL PROJECT ROMINA CANNA


STUDIES PERFORATED SCREEN

THIRD YEAR STUDIO ROLE PROFESSOR

SPRING 2009 PERSONAL PROJECT ANDREW SCHACHMAN


STUDIES SECTION MODEL

THIRD YEAR STUDIO ROLE PROFESSOR

FALL 2008 PERSONAL PROJECT ROMINA CANNA


louismfernandez @gmail.com 738 W. 35th St 2Fl Chicago, IL 60616 915.630.9487

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Louis Fernandez' Architecture Portfolio  

Louis Fernandez' Architecture Portfolio