Page 1

2012-2014

SUFFOLK NEW COLLEGE

LEVEL 3 DIPLOMA IN SPORT (DEVELOPMENT, COACHING AND FITNESS)

Course Handbook


1. Welcome Welcome to Suffolk New College and to the Business, Leisure and IT (BLiT) Curriculum Centre. We hope that you will enjoy your time with us and be successful. During the first sessions you will be introduced to your lecturers, the units you will be taught and the responsibilities you have as a student. There will be rules and regulations that you have to follow as with any type of organisation which are mostly due to ensuring your safety and the safety of others. Your new surroundings will become very familiar quite quickly – if you get lost in the beginning just look out for the signs or ask someone – everyone will feel the same! It is very important to look after the building and there will be strict classroom rules such as no eating and the only drink allowed is water. All groups will be asked to nominate a class representative who will have meetings with senior members of staff at our student parliament. Details about this will be given you to by your course tutor during group tutorial times. There will be some training sessions for this role and it will be very useful to be able to show this on your CV when applying to either University or for employment. Every student will have a personal academic review every six weeks with your tutor but if you have anything that you need to discuss that is urgent please do not hesitate to contact them. You will also have a personal tutorial on a regular basis. You must make sure that you check out the policies on the student intranet – it is important that you know where to find out about our procedures such as discipline, equal opportunities, copying other people’s work and what to do if you feel unsafe at any time. Once you have your student ID badge you must keep this somewhere safe – you cannot get into the building without it and if you lose it you will have to pay £5 to get another one. Please keep this handbook for reference during your time here – your lecturers will refer to it from time to time and you need to have this with you. Good luck with your course and remember we are here to help you as much as we can.

Sue Partington Head of BLiT


Contents Section 1: Key dates Section 2: Your Programme of Study Your course team The course structure Your study week Assessment Presentation of written work Classroom guidelines Practical participation policy Personal tutorials Transport for off-site activities and trips Information sheets Information sheet 1 – Submission of work policy Information sheet 2 - Presentation of written work Information sheet 3 - Classroom guidelines


KEY DATES - TERM DATES THURSDAY 13TH SEPTEMBER 2012 17TH SEPTEMBER 2012 29TH OCTOBER 2012 – 2ND NOVEMBER 2012 20TH DECEMBER 7TH JANUARY 2013 18TH FEBRUARY 2013 – 22ND FEBRUARY 2013 1ST APRIL 2013 – 12TH APRIL 2013 27TH MAY 2013– 31ST MAY 2013 26th June 2013 FE 12th July 2013

INDUCTION DATE FULL TIME TEACHING STARTS HALF TERM LAST TEACHING DAY Christmas break TEACHING STARTS HALF TERM EASTER BREAK HALF TERM - SUFFOLK SHOW DAYS AWARDS END OF TERM


Section 1: Your Programme of Study General information about your programme of study can be found in the college handbook including: Induction Learning Agreements Functional Skills Enrichment Programme Attendance and Punctuality Assessment Progression Personal Tutorials 1. Your course team The members of your course team work closely to ensure that you receive the best possible care whilst you are studying at Suffolk New College. 2. Your course structure The BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Sport is a practical, work-related course. It is equivalent to two GCE A levels. The course is made up of thirteen units over the two years. The first year units are: 1. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport 2. The physiology of Fitness 4. Fitness Training and Programming 7. Fitness Testing for Sport and Exercise 8. Practical Team Sports 13. Leadership in Sport 15. Instructing Physical Activity and Exercise The second year units are: 3. Assessing Risk in Sport 5. Sports Coaching 6. Sports Development 9. Individual Practical Sport * 19. Analysis of Sports Performance 21. Sport and Exercise Massage * 26. Work Experience in Sport * Students will either study Sport and Exercise Massage or Outdoor and Adventurous Activities as one of the nine second year units


Work placement: On a vocational course it is essential that you have the opportunity to put the theory learned in the classroom into practice or observe it in the workplace. For this reason there is a two-week period in the second year of the course. During your placement, which should take place in a sport organisation, you will be required to complete any duties, which the placement organisation allocates to you. Coursework related to the placement will be set and handed out prior to the start of your placement period. Students are encouraged to seek out, negotiate and establish their own work placements so that the experience may also prove useful for future career developments or choices. This is an excellent opportunity to establish useful contacts within the industry and to demonstrate your skills to prospective employers. Your tutor will closely monitor your performance at your chosen organisation, as it is an essential part of the course assessment. A member of the course team will visit you during the placement. The aims of the placement are: To provide an experience of the industry and to provide a background of reality for other coursework To further develop and improve, in a structured and monitored way, your key skills and to assist you in the achievement of these. To assist you in making a decision about what you do (and do not) want to do in terms of a job and career. To enhance your employability at the conclusion of the course To complete / achieve the course. 3. Your study week You will be expected to complete 35 hours of study each week (during term time). The study hours will include: Your main study area and Personal Tutorial periods. Your programme contains additional qualifications in year one: CYQ Level 1 Award in fitness and physical activity and Level 2 Award in Sports Leadership and in year two: First Aid, CYQ Level 2 Certificate in Fitness Instructing/Gym-based Exercise and Level 3 Award in Higher Sports Leadership. Study time in the Learning Curve or other Resource Areas, on work placement, or at work, or away from college, completing course work or assignments set by your tutors.


4. Assessment General detail regarding assessment is provided in the College handbook. All units are internally assessed and graded by unit tutors. An overall grade for the qualification is awarded to all learners who successfully complete the qualification. Grades awarded can range from PP to D*D*. Points are awarded for the In each unit you can attain: PASS (similar to an A’ Level grade E) worth 70 points MERIT (similar to A’ Level grade C) worth 80 points or DISTINCTION (similar to A’ Level grade A) worth 90 points To work out your overall grade you add together your points from each unit. Points/grade conversion table

Points

Grade

UCAS

Up to 880

PP

80

880-919

MP

120

920-959

MM

160

960-999

DM

200

1000-1029

DD

240

1030-1059

D*D

260

1060 and above

D*D*

280

Assessment methods: You will be assessed in a variety of ways. Some assessments may take the form of written reports produced individually; others may be oral presentations, displays, practical work displays. You may also be required to organise a trip or a competition. Submission of work: You will be given a date to submit each piece of course work. It is vital that you meet these dates in order to progress with your studies. Failure to submit a piece of course work by the deadline will result in disciplinary action. A detailed submission of work policy is included as ‘information sheet 1’. You should take the time to have a thorough read of this important policy. Plagiarism: Copying work is not allowed. Plagiarism is using work produced by another as your own, for example cutting and pasting chunks of information from the internet into your assessment work; directly copying text from a course book or using work produced by another student and submitting it as yours. It will result in disciplinary action along with disqualification of the work submitted which in turn will impact upon achievement of the qualification.


Moderation of work: The main purpose of moderation is quality control i.e. to check that your unit tutors are assessing accurately and consistently to agreed national standards. Very occasionally grades may be altered if they are found to vary from national standards. Moderation will apply to all types of student work including written work, presentations, practical assessments and other performance evidence. Summative assessment: This is carried out in order to make final judgements about your performance in relation to the grading criteria of each unit. This is the definitive assessment and recording or your achievement that is conducted to the national standard to finalise the unit assessment and grading. It is not expected that you are offered opportunities to revisit assignments at this stage of the process unless time is available and agreed with the tutor. Reporting grades: On completion of assessment, moderation and the assessment board, your unit results will be reported to Edexcel. Reporting takes place in February, to record semester 1 units and June/July to record semester 2 units. The grade reported will be the final one for each unit. 5. Presentation of written work ‘Information sheet 2’ provides guidelines for presenting written assignment work. The document should be used to help you complete work to the required standard. 6. Classroom guidelines ‘Information sheet 3’ contains details regarding the use of classrooms. The guidelines have been produced to ensure that you have a positive learning experience at Suffolk New College and that you get the most out of your sessions. 7. Practical Participation Policy Some BTEC Sport Units include practical elements. Students who are unable to participate in practical sessions for more than one week of any unit should obtain a medical certificate or note from their GP or physiotherapist. Any student who is unable to participate in a practical session should wear sports kit to the session and demonstrate their learning through coaching/officiating. Failure to comply with the above will have a negative impact on your ability to complete the unit. 8. Personal tutorials You will have a named Personal Tutor and you are entitled to have at least six meetings with your Personal Tutor during each year of your course. Your Personal Tutor will help you to keep your Learning Agreement up to date, review your progress on the course and give advice and guidance you may need with your studies. You may meet with your Personal Tutor individually or with small groups of other students, depending on what kind of information, advice or guidance you need. Your Personal Tutor will be either Rob Jessop or Gill Gooding and they may be found in South Cluster staff room or contacted by email.


9. Transport for off-site activities and trips The College will provide appropriate transport for you to travel to off-site activities and for any trips taken during the course. You are advised to use this transport. The current College policy states that students should not take other students in their cars to off-site activities or on trips. If you decide to take your own transport there isn’t any insurance cover by the college for this. If you take your own vehicle for any College event and inappropriate driving occurs you will be subject to the College Disciplinary Policy (details are included in the College handbook). Reckless driving will result in a ban from taking your vehicle to the activity and a written warning.


10. Information sheets Information sheet 1 - Submission of work policy All work should include a title, an introduction, the report from your research and findings, a summary and sources of information. Standards All work must be submitted by the deadline date as indicated on the assessment. It should be your best effort (detailed, in-depth, covering all of your targeted criteria). After marking there will be an opportunity to make minor adjustments to the criteria you have already submitted evidence for (no new criteria can be covered at this stage). The subject tutor will include a date for the resubmission on your work. If you have not achieved the Pass criteria after the second marking the work will be a Referral. This will be discussed at the Assessment Board at the end of the semester. You should work hard in the unit to complete and pass all other assessments. Assessment Board At the end of the semester the tutors meet to discuss individual student achievement. If you have a referral in a unit you will be required to attend the Assessment Board to explain the referral. The Board will then make a decision. Any last attempt to cover the criteria will be completed under supervision in quiet conditions. Grades If, at the end of a unit, you have one criterion that hasn’t been completed for a particular grade and the rest have, you will be given an opportunity to complete the outstanding criteria. Late work If work is not handed in on the due date it will be classed as late (this includes the next morning) and will result in disciplinary action. You will then have to hand in your work on the resubmission date. It will be marked once only. If you are ill and unable to come into college to submit the work you will need to telephone your tutor that day and bring the work to the subject tutor on the first day you return after illness. If the work is referred then an R grade will be recorded and it will go to the Assessment Board (as detailed above) Reporting grades: On completion of assessment, moderation and the assessment board, your unit results will be reported to Edexcel. Reporting takes place in February, to record semester 1 units and June/July to record semester 2 units. The grade reported will be the final one for each unit.


Information sheet 2 – presenting written work Good presentation is an essential feature in the workplace, therefore, as a student on a vocational programme, you will need to follow standard practice in presenting your assignment work, detailed below: Presentation Ideally work should be completed on a computer as one continuous file to include page numbers. Your signed assignment and task sheet must be included Work must be submitted in a clear plastic wallet Structure Front cover: single sheet detailing the unit name, assignment title, your name and unit tutor name. Contents: A list of the main topic headings included in your work. Introduction. A brief outline of what you will be covering in the assignment. Main body. Detailed findings (these should be presented under headings and sub-headings as covered by the unit tutor). Refer to ‘presentation conventions’ below. Conclusion. A summary of your findings / work. Bibliography. A list of all the information sources used and displayed. Appendix. Include any diagrams, photographs, brochures etc. in this section. Number each item and refer to them in the main part of your work. Presentation conventions The main body of your assignment work must be broken-down into headings, sub-headings and paragraphs. The headings and sub-headings must be distinguished by font size and/or bold, underline etc. A clear line space must be left after a heading and before a paragraph. Paragraphs should not be indented and a clear line space must be left between them. Leave two spaces after a full stop.


Information sheet 3 – Classroom guidelines We hope to make your learning at Suffolk New College a positive experience. Tutors and students have drawn up the guidelines outlined below to enable you, your tutor and your peers to get the most out of your sessions. You may drink water during the session to keep you hydrated. Fizzy drinks etc are not permitted – Check guidelines for IT rooms with your tutor. You have regular timetabled breaks when you can go to the atrium to eat. Eating in classrooms is not permitted during a break or in sessions. Your phone and other electrical equipment is not for use in class, it is an unwelcome distraction. Please ensure that they are turned off and put safely away in your bag. You may keep your bag on the floor by your chair or under your desk. Please make sure that the gangways are clear. The classroom is a place of work and should be kept tidy. Please put all of your litter in the bin at the end of each session. Reading newspapers and magazines are a good way to keep in touch with current affairs however they should not be read during sessions and must be put out of sight during the session. Focus your attention on the subject in hand. Please respect the learning environment by allowing others to listen, contribute and learn without being interrupted or distracted unnecessarily. The course that you are studying is a vocational course and is designed to prepare you for work in the industry. The following rules are designed to equip you with the skills you will need in the workplace: When you enter the classroom prepare yourself for work by getting out notes, pens and paper. If late, knock before entering and speak to the tutor at the time or at the end of the session if the tutor prefers. • Be dressed and equipped appropriately for the session. • Be ready to engage with tutor and peers. • No swearing/offensive/abusive language. • No feet on chairs/tables. • At the end of the session check the room is left clean and tidy ready for the next session. • If you are the last person out of the room please make sure the room gets locked.

Thank you for following these guidelines without having to be constantly reminded.


Unit 1:

Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport

Unit code: QCF Level 3:

D/502/4888 BTEC National

Credit value:

5

Guided learning hours: 30 Aim and purpose The aim of this unit is to explore the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems and also to learn the fundamentals of the energy systems.

Unit introduction The human body is made up of many different systems that work together and allow us to take part in a huge variety of sport and exercise activities. An athlete can go from rest to all-out sprinting in a matter of seconds, whereas an endurance athlete can continue exercising for many hours at a time. The skeletal and muscular systems work together to allow our bodies to perform a vast range of different movements. Our cardiovascular and respiratory systems act as a delivery service, working together to supply oxygen and nutrients to the body which in turn is used to produce energy for muscular contraction. In order to appreciate how each of these systems function, learners will study the structure of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The human anatomy of these systems is very different but in terms of operation, each system is implicitly linked. Having an understanding of these body systems is imperative in the sport and active leisure industries in order to begin to appreciate how the body functions and how it copes with the many different stresses of exercise. The unit starts by exploring the structure and function of the skeletal system which includes the different bones of the skeleton and the different types of joints. The muscular system is then studied, including the major muscles of the body, muscle movement, the different types of muscle and muscle fibre types. The structure of the heart and blood vessels is covered, together with the function of the cardiovascular system. The unit goes on to explore the structure of the respiratory system and the function, including the mechanics of breathing. The final part of the unit explores the three different energy systems and the sports in which they are predominantly used.

Learning outcomes On completion of this unit a learner should:

1

Know the structure and function of the skeletal system

2

Know the structure and function of the muscular system

3

Know the structure and function of the cardiovascular system

4

Know the structure and function of the respiratory system

5

Know the different types of energy systems.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport

1


Unit content 1 Know the structure and function of the skeletal system Structure of skeletal system: axial skeleton; appendicular skeleton; types of bone (long bones, short bones, flat bones, irregular bones, sesamoid bones); location of major bones (cranium, clavicle, ribs, sternum, humerus, radius, ulna, scapula, ilium, pubis, ischium, carpals, metacarpals, phalanges, femur, patella, tibia, fibula, tarsals, metatarsals, vertebral column - cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae, sacrum, coccyx) Function of skeletal system: support; protection; attachment for skeletal muscle; source of blood cell production; store of minerals Joints: fixed; slightly moveable; synovial/freely moveable (types, structures, movement at each joint)

2 Know the structure and function of the muscular system Muscular system: major muscles (biceps, triceps, deltoids, pectoralis major, rectus abdominis, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius, semimembranosus, semitendinosus, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis anterior, erector spinae, teres major, trapezius, latissimus dorsi, obliques, gluteus maximus); function; location; types of muscle (cardiac, skeletal, smooth) Function of the muscular system: movement - antagonistic pairs (agonist, antagonist); fixator; synergist; types of contraction (isometric, concentric, eccentric, isokinetic) Fibre types: Type 1; Type 2a; Type 2b; characteristics; types of sports each are associated with

3 Know the structure and function of the cardiovascular system Structure of the cardiovascular system: heart (atria, ventricles, bicuspid valve, tricuspid valve, aortic valve, pulmonary valve, aorta, vena cava - superior and inferior, pulmonary vein, pulmonary artery); blood vessels (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, veins, venuoles) Function of the cardiovascular system: delivery of oxygen and nutrients; removal of waste products; thermoregulation (vasodilation and vasoconstriction of vessels); function of blood (oxygen transport, clotting, fighting infection)

4 Know the structure and function of the respiratory system Structure of the respiratory system: nasal cavity; epiglottis; pharynx; larynx; trachea; bronchus; bronchioles; lungs (lobes, pleural membrane, thoracic cavity, visceral pleura, pleural fluid, alveoli); diaphragm; intercostal muscles (external and internal) Function: gaseous exchange; mechanisms of breathing (inspiration and expiration); lung volumes, eg tidal volume, vital capacity, residual volume; control of breathing (neural and chemical)

5 Know the different types of energy systems Energy systems: phosphocreatine; lactic acid system; aerobic energy system; amount of ATP produced by each system; sports that use these systems to provide energy; recovery time

2

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit. Assessment and grading criteria To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

D1

analyse the function of the muscular system and the different fibre types

D2

analyse the three different energy systems and their use in sport and exercise activities.

P1

describe the structure and function of the skeletal system

P2

describe the different classifications of joints

P3

identify the location of the major muscles in the human body

P4

describe the function of the muscular system and the different fibre types

M1 explain the function of the muscular system and the different fibre types

P5

describe the structure and function of the cardiovascular system

M2 explain the function of the cardiovascular system

P6

describe the structure and function of the respiratory system

M3 explain the function of the respiratory system

P7

describe the three different energy systems and their use in sport and exercise activities. [IE3]

M4 explain the three different energy systems and their use in sport and exercise activities.

PLTS: This summary references where applicable, in the square brackets, the elements of the personal, learning and thinking skills applicable in the pass criteria. It identifies opportunities for learners to demonstrate effective application of the referenced elements of the skills.

Key

IE - independent enquirers

RL - reflective learners

SM - self-managers

CT - creative thinkers

TW - team workers

EP - effective participators

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport

3


Unit 2:

The Physiology of Fitness

Unit code: QCF Level 3:

R/502/5486 BTEC National

Credit value:

5

Guided learning hours: 30 Aim and purpose This unit provides an opportunity for learners to explore the body's response to acute exercise and how the body adapts to long-term exercise participation.

Unit introduction You will have no doubt experienced the effects of exercise on your body; your heart beats faster and your breathing rate increases, but have you ever wondered what else is happening inside your body to allow you to perform physical activity and exercise? The body has a number of systems that work together to allow you to take part in exercise by increasing the oxygen and energy supply to your muscles. In this unit you will learn about how these body systems respond to exercise in both the short and the long term. Many jobs in the sports industry require a good level of understanding of how the body reacts to exercise, for example, personal trainers, football coaches and fitness instructors. This unit provides the underpinning knowledge for progression into these types of careers. This unit explores the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems responses to exercise. All three energy systems that provide energy for exercise participation are also covered together with the energy continuum. Learners will have the chance to investigate the effects of exercise on each of the body systems by taking part in practical activities and conducting physiological tests to help 'see' for themselves how each of the body systems reacts. The unit then goes on to explore how the body adapts to long-term exercise participation to help make a person fitter and more able to cope with the stresses of exercise. Again, there will be a practical investigation into the physiology of exercise participation which will help learners to explore how the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems become more efficient in response to different types of exercise.

Learning outcomes On completion of this unit a learner should:

1

Know the body's response to acute exercise

2

Know the long-term effects of exercise on the body systems

3

Be able to investigate the physiological effects of exercise on the body systems.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit content 1 Know the body's response to acute exercise Musculoskeletal response: increased blood supply; increase in muscle pliability; increased range of movement; muscle fibre micro tears Energy systems: phosphocreatine; lactic acid; aerobic; energy continuum; energy requirements of different sport and exercise activities Cardiovascular response: heart rate anticipatory response; activity response; increased blood pressure; vasoconstriction; vasodilation Respiratory: increase in breathing rate (neural and chemical control); increased tidal volume

2 Know the long-term effects of exercise on the body systems Cardiovascular system: cardiac hypertrophy; increase in stroke volume; increase in cardiac output, decrease in resting heart rate; capillarisation; increase in blood volume; reduction in resting blood pressure; decreased recovery time; increased aerobic fitness Muscular system: hypertrophy; increase in tendon strength; increase in myoglobin stores; increased number of mitochondria; increased storage of glycogen and fat; increased muscle strength; increased tolerance to lactic acid Skeletal system: increase in bone calcium stores; increased stretch in ligaments; increased thickness of hyaline cartilage; increased production of synovial fluid Respiratory system: increased vital capacity; increase in minute ventilation; increased strength of respiratory muscles; increase in oxygen diffusion rate Energy systems: increased aerobic and anaerobic enzymes; increased use of fats as an energy source

3 Be able to investigate the physiological effects of exercise on the body systems Types of exercise: eg aerobic, resistance, circuit, interval Methods of investigation: comparison of pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise physiological readings, eg resting heart rate, exercise heart rate, percent heart rate maximum, percent heart rate reserve maximum, Rating of Perceived Exertion, blood pressure, flexibility tests, spirometry Review: effects of exercise on the body systems (acute and long-term); pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise physiological data; practicality of exercise activities selected; advantages and disadvantages; strengths and areas for improvement

2

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit. Assessment and grading criteria To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to:

P1

M1

describe the musculoskeletal and energy systems response to acute exercise

P2

To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

explain the response of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems to acute exercise

describe the cardiovascular and respiratory systems responses to acute exercise

P3

describe the long-term

M2

effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal system and energy systems P4

explain the long-term effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems

describe the long-term effects of exercise on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems

P5

collect physiological

M3

data to investigate the effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems, with tutor support [IE2, IE4, CT5, CT6, RL3] P6

review physiological data

collect physiological

D1

data to investigate the effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems, with limited tutor support M4

collected, describing the effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems. [RL3, RL5, RL6]

review physiological data collected, explaining the effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems.

independently investigate the physiological effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory andenergysystems

D2

review physiological data collected, analysing the effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems.

PLTS: This summary references where applicable, in the square brackets, the elements of the personal, learning and thinking skills applicable in the pass criteria. It identifies opportunities for learners to demonstrate effective application of the referenced elements of the skills. Key

IE - independent enquirers

RL - reflective learners

SM - self-managers

CT - creative thinkers

TW - team workers

EP - effective participators

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport


Unit 4:

Fitness Training and Programming

Unit code: QCF Level 3:

D/502/5619 BTEC National

Credit value:

10

Guided learning hours: 60 Aim and purpose The aim of this unit is for learners to be able to plan fitness training sessions and design fitness training programmes.

Unit introduction Fitness is vital to achieving success in sport and individuals who are serious about their sports performance will carry out a fitness training programme. Elite athletes develop and maintain high levels of fitness and take fitness training very seriously. Many elite athletes have a designated fitness coach. In addition, a large number of individuals want to improve their fitness in order to participate in community sports activities and competitions. Fitness is also important for active leisure pursuits such as outdoor activities. It is therefore important for individuals working in the sports sector to have an understanding of how to plan fitness training sessions and how to design fitness training programmes. This unit is particularly relevant for those who aspire to working in sports coaching, fitness instructing or elite sport. The first part of the unit involves learners examining different methods of fitness training. These include methods of training to improve flexibility, strength, muscular endurance, power, aerobic endurance and speed. Learners will develop the ability to prescribe appropriate exercise intensities, work/rest ratios, resistance, repetitions, sets, number of exercises, order of exercises, speed of movement and systems of training depending on the nature of the session and client needs. The second part of the unit involves learners planning a fitness training programme for a selected individual. Learners will examine the principles of training and the concept of periodisation. Learners are required to set goals for a fitness training programme and plan the training year. They are also required to monitor and evaluate a fitness training programme. This involves using a training diary and/or feedback and reviews then evaluating the extent to which the programme is achieving goals set.

Learning outcomes On completion of this unit a learner should:

1

Know different methods of fitness training

2

Be able to plan a fitness training session

3

Be able to plan a fitness training programme

4

Be able to review a fitness training programme.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit content 1 Know different methods of fitness training Components of physical fitness: flexibility; strength; muscular endurance; power; aerobic endurance; speed Methods of training: flexibility, eg static stretching, ballistic stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching; strength, eg free weights, resistance machines; muscular endurance, eg circuit training, core stability training, medicine ball training; power, eg plyometrics, anaerobic hill sprints; aerobic endurance, eg continuous training, fartlek training, interval training; speed, eg interval training, sportspecific speed training

2 Be able to plan a fitness training session Plan: frequency; intensity; time; type Individuals: eg elite, trained, untrained, individuals, groups Cardiovascular training: exercise intensities; monitor intensity, eg observation, talk test, Rating of Perceived Exertion, heart rate monitoring - maximum heart rate, heart rate reserve/karvonen formula; anaerobic threshold; work/rest ratios Resistance training: choice of exercises; number of exercises; order of exercises; resistance; repetitions; sets; rest between sets; speed of movement; systems of training Flexibility training: choice of exercises; number of exercises; order of exercises; repetitions; time Speed training: time/distance; repetitions; sets; rest between sets; work/rest ratio

3 Be able to plan a fitness training programme Collect information: goals (short-, medium- and long-term goals); SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound) targets; lifestyle; medical history; physical activity history Principles of training: overload; specificity; progression; individual differences; variation; reversibility; FITT (frequency, intensity, time and type) principles Periodisation: macrocycle; mesocycle; microcycle; individual training sessions Training diary: eg progression, attitude, motivation, links to goals

4 Be able to review a fitness training programme Monitor: training diary, eg date and details of sessions, progression, attitude, motivation, links to goals, competition results; coach/instructor feedback and reviews Review: extent to which programme has achieved goals set; modification of programme to achieve planned goals

2

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit. Assessment and grading criteria To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

P1

describe one method of fitness training for six different components of physical fitness

M1

explain one method of fitness training for six different components of physical fitness

P2

produce training session plans covering cardiovascular training, resistance training, flexibility training and speed training [CT1, CT3]

M2

produce detailed session plans covering cardiovascular training, resistance training, flexibility training and speed training

D1

justify the training session plans covering cardiovascular training, resistance training, flexibility training and speed training

P3

produce a six-week fitness training programme for a selected individual that incorporates the principles of training and periodisation [CT1, CT3]

P4

monitor performance against goals during the six-week training programme

P5

give feedback to an individual following completion of a six-week fitness training programme, describing strengths and areas for improvement. future [RL1, TW6]

M3

give feedback to an individual D2 following completion of a six-week fitness training programme, explaining strengths and areas for improvement. activities.

give feedback to an individual following completion of a six-week fitness training programme, evaluating progress and providing recommendations for

PLTS: This summary references where applicable, in the square brackets, the elements of the personal, learning and thinking skills applicable in the pass criteria. It identifies opportunities for learners to demonstrate effective application of the referenced elements of the skills.

Key

IE - independent enquirers

RL - reflective learners

SM - self-managers

CT - creative thinkers

TW - team workers

EP - effective participators

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit 7:

Fitness Testing for Sport and Exercise

Unit code: QCF Level 3:

A/502/5630 BTEC National

Credit value:

10

Guided learning hours: 60 Aim and purpose The aim of this unit is to enable learners to gain an understanding of fitness testing and the importance of health screening and health monitoring tests.

Unit introduction In today's society, we can easily fall into the trap of developing a sedentary lifestyle; we use the car rather than walk to the local shops, we take the lift rather than the stairs, and our hectic lifestyle doesn't seem to allow us the time to engage in regular physical activity. Establishing and maintaining a desirable level of fitness is more important than ever; it's paramount to the future health of the nation. The overall relationship between fitness and health affects performance in our everyday lives, whether it be sport- or work-related. Fitness is vital to achieving success in sport, and fitness testing plays a valuable role in the development of personal fitness levels. Sports performers regularly participate in fitness tests to determine their baseline measures. Fitness testing results are then used to identify strengths and areas for improvement. Fitness testing results are also used to predict future performance and provide feedback on the effectiveness of a training programme. Fitness testing can be carried out in a health club setting. Health clubs screen clients for contraindications to exercise, and fitness testing enables the instructor to determine baseline measures, using the results as a basis for exercise programme design. This unit is particularly relevant for those who aspire to work in sports coaching, fitness instruction and elite sport. The first part of the unit looks at a range of laboratory and field-based fitness tests. Learners will explore the different tests available and the benefits and drawbacks of laboratory and field-based fitness tests. Learners will also be introduced to the practice of health screening and how to carry out health monitoring tests. The second part of the unit will develop the skills and knowledge to be able to follow fitness test protocol, taking into account test validity and reliability. Learners will develop skills to be able to administer fitness tests in a safe and effective manner, interpreting results against recommended values, providing feedback to an individual regarding how fitness levels can be improved.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009

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Learning outcomes On completion of this unit a learner should:

1

Know a range of laboratory-based and field-based fitness tests

2

Be able to use health screening techniques

3

Be able to administer appropriate fitness tests

4

Be able to interpret the results of fitness tests and provide feedback.

2

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit content 1 Know a range of laboratory-based and field-based fitness tests Fitness tests: flexibility, eg sit and reach; strength, eg 1RM, grip dynamometer; aerobic endurance, eg multi-stage fitness test, step test, maximal treadmill protocol; speed, eg sprint tests; power, eg vertical jump, wingate test; muscular endurance, eg one-minute press up, one-minute sit up; body composition, eg skinfold calipers, bioelectrical impedance analysis, hydrodensitometry Advantages and disadvantages of different tests: eg cost, time, equipment requirement, facility requirements, skill level of person carrying out test, issues with test validity, issues with test reliability

2 Be able to use health screening techniques Health screening procedures: health screening questionnaires; client consultation, eg questioning, listening, non-verbal communication, client confidentiality; informed consent; coronary heart disease risk factors; medical referral Health monitoring tests: eg heart rate, blood pressure, lung function, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index

3 Be able to administer appropriate fitness tests Fitness tests: eg multi-stage fitness test, step test, maximal treadmill protocol, 1RM, grip dynamometer, vertical jump, wingate test, sprint tests, one-minute press up, one-minute sit up, skinfold calipers, bioelectrical impedance analysis, hydrodensitometry; preparation for tests, eg selection of tests, reliability, validity and practicality of tests; purpose, eg identify components of fitness which need to be improved, give a benchmark from which to measure improvement, allow a more specific programme to be written, play a role in educating individuals about health and fitness Administer: pre-test procedures; test sequence; test protocols; health and safety; recording test results; reasons to terminate a fitness test

4 Be able to interpret the results of fitness tests and provide feedback Interpret results against normative data: compare and make judgements against, eg population norms, norms for sports performers, norms for elite athletes, accepted health ranges Feedback: feedback, eg verbal, written; tests carried out; test results; levels of fitness; strengths and areas for improvement; recommendations

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009

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Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit. Assessment and grading criteria To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to:

P1

describe one test for each component of physical fitness, including advantages and disadvantages

M1

explain the advantages and disadvantages of one fitness test for each component of physical fitness

P2

prepare an appropriate health screening questionnaire [IE1, CT1, CT2]

P3

devise and use appropriate health screening procedures for two contrasting individuals [IE1, CT1, CT2]

P4

safely administer and interpret the results of four different health monitoring tests for two contrasting individuals [IE4, IE5, IE6, TW3, TW4, TW5, TW6]

M2

describe the strengths and areas for improvement for two contrasting individuals using information from health screening questionnaires and health monitoring tests

P5

select and safely administer six different fitness tests for a selected individual recording the findings [IE1, IE2]

M3

justify the selection of fitness tests commenting on suitability, reliability, validity and practicality

P6

give feedback to a selected individual, following fitness testing, describing the test results and interpreting their levels of fitness against normative data. [IE4, IE6, TW3, TW4, TW5, RL1]

M4

compare the fitness test results to normative data and identify strengths and areas for improvement.

4

To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

D1

evaluate the health screening questionnaires and health monitoring test results and provide recommendations for lifestyle improvement

D2

analyse the fitness test results and provide recommendations for appropriate future activities or training.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit 8:

Practical Team Sports

Unit code: QCF Level 3:

R/502/5634 BTEC National

Credit value:

10

Guided learning hours: 60 Aim and purpose The aim of this unit is to enable learners to explore the skills, techniques, tactics and rules of team sports through practical participation.

Unit introduction This unit will develop learners' knowledge and understanding of team sports. Learners will be given the opportunity to participate in a variety of team sports as performers and officials in different roles. The desire to participate in sports activities continues to grow. People are more aware of the lifelong benefits of a healthy lifestyle, and the legacy of the successful Olympic bid will provide more opportunities for those wanting to take part in sport. This unit gives learners an opportunity to participate and develop their own knowledge and ability in a selection of team sports. This unit reinforces the knowledge and understanding required to study aspects of coaching and leadership, fitness and training, physiology and health and safety through active participation in team sports. The unit focuses on developing learners' own practical sports performance in team sports, focusing on the application of skills, techniques and tactics. This will be achieved through participation in practical activities, and learners reflecting on their performances and those of other performers in team sports. Learners will have the opportunity to practise and refine their individual skills and techniques. They will be able to investigate and experience different team tactics and formations, and review their own performance in these areas and the performance of other individuals. The rules and regulations of team sports are also investigated, since an awareness of the rules can often lead to an improvement in performance. Throughout the unit, learners will be made aware of safe practice relating to all those participating in the sport. Learners will participate in a variety of team sports offered as part of the centre's curriculum, as well as other sports offered in the wider community. It is expected that learners will provide the evidence for this unit by selecting two sports in which they either excel or have a particular interest.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009

1


Learning outcomes On completion of this unit a learner should:

1

Know the skills, techniques and tactics required in selected team sports

2

Know the rules and regulations of selected team sports

3

Be able to assess own performance in selected team sports

4

Be able to assess the performance of teams in selected team sports.

2

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit content 1 Know the skills, techniques and tactics required in selected team sports Team sports: eg association football, basketball, cricket, hockey, netball, rugby union, rugby league, rounders, volleyball, lacrosse, adapted team sports, wheelchair rugby, wheelchair basketball, goalball Skills and techniques: required to perform effectively, eg passing, throwing, receiving, catching, shooting, movement, turning, intercepting, tackling, footwork, marking, dodging, creating space Tactics: relevant to the selected sport, eg offence/attacking, defence, setplays, team formations, movement, communication, phases of play

2 Know the rules and regulations of selected team sports Rules: rules/laws as produced by governing body for the sport; unwritten rules and/or etiquette specific to sport, eg injured player in football Regulations: eg players, officials, spectators, facilities, equipment, playing surface, scoring system, health and safety, child protection, insurance, administration Situations: eg player in illegal position, player injured, ball out of play, illegal challenge

3 Be able to assess own performance in selected team sports Self-analysis: specific to sport; application of skills; techniques and tactics; achievements; strengths; areas for improvement Assessment methods: eg objective performance data, subjective observations, use of technology (Kandle, Dartfish), SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis, testing, interviews, performance profiling Development: aims and objectives; goals; SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound) targets; opportunities, eg training, courses, qualifications; possible barriers

4 Be able to assess the performance of teams in selected team sports Performance analysis: specific to sport; application of skills; technique and tactics; achievements; strengths; areas for improvement Assessment methods: eg objective performance data, subjective observations, use of technology (Kandle, Dartfish), SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis, testing, interviews, performance profiling Development: aims and objectives; goals; SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound) targets; opportunities, eg training, courses, qualifications; possible barriers

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009

3


Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit. Assessment and grading criteria To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

P1

describe skills, techniques and tactics required in two different team sports

M1

explain skills, techniques and tactics required in two different team sports

P2

describe the rules and regulations of two different team sports, and apply them to three different situations for each sport

M2

explain the application of the rules and regulations, of two different team sports, in three different situations for each sport

P3

demonstrate appropriate skills, techniques and tactics in two different team sports

P4

carry out a self-analysis using two different methods of assessment identifying strengths and areas for improvement in two different team sports [RL1, RL2, RL3, RL5, CT2, IE3, IE4, EP4]

M3

explain identified strengths and areas for improvement in two different team sports, and make suggestions relating to personal development

D1

analyse identified strengths and areas for improvement in two different team sports, and justify suggestions made

P5

carry out a performance M4 analysis using two different methods of assessment, identifying strengths and areas for improvement in the development of a team in a team sport. [RL1, RL5, IE3, IE4, IE6, CT4, TW2, TW4, TW6]

explain identified strengths and areas for improvement in the development of a team in a team sport, and make suggestions relating to development of a team.

D2

analyse identified strengths and areas for improvement in the development of a team in a team sport, and justify suggestions made.

PLTS: This summary references where applicable, in the square brackets, the elements of the personal, learning and thinking skills applicable in the pass criteria. It identifies opportunities for learners to demonstrate effective application of the referenced elements of the skills.

Key

4

IE - independent enquirers

RL - reflective learners

SM - self-managers

CT - creative thinkers

TW - team workers

EP - effective participators

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit 13:

Leadership in Sport

Unit code: QCF Level 3:

K/502/5722 BTEC National

Credit value:

10

Guided learning hours: 60 Aim and purpose The aim of this unit is to examine the characteristics of effective sport or exercise leadership and to give learners the opportunity to demonstrate own planning and delivery of a sport or exercise session.

Unit introduction Every year, more people are taking part in sport and exercise activities. This increased participation has meant that supervision and coaching in sport is no longer the sole domain of qualified professionals such as physical education teachers; more and more individuals are taking up the challenge. Increasing prevalence of leadership courses, and other initiatives, has resulted in a greater supply of effective leaders in sport. Out-of-school hours learning opportunities in primary schools, the development of academies at sports clubs and community activities have created many opportunities for sports leaders. This unit gives learners the knowledge and skills required to plan and lead sport or exercise activities; it also gives learners their first step into sports leadership. The unit looks at the qualities necessary for effective sports leadership. Learners will be able to identify the qualities required by studying real examples of successful leaders, including those they have worked with or those they have observed in the community. Understanding and demonstrating the responsibilities of a sports leader is a very important part of this unit. Learners will examine the health and safety considerations, the legalities of working in different situations, particularly with young children, and their own responsibilities regarding personal behaviour and appearance. There is also an important practical part of the unit which includes the planning involved in sports leadership, where learners are given the opportunity to put theory into practice by organising and delivering an activity session. A sound working knowledge of the local, regional and national structures of sport will provide learners with an understanding of the sporting landscape in which they will be able to offer their leadership skills. On completion of this unit learners will understand the key concepts of effective leadership and will have developed the skills required in the planning, delivery and review of the activity session.

Learning outcomes On completion of this unit a learner should:

1

Know the qualities, characteristics and roles of effective sports leaders

2

Know the importance of psychological factors in leading sports activities

3

Be able to plan a sports activity

4

Be able to lead a sports activity.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit content 1 Know the qualities, characteristics and roles of effective sports leaders Qualities: eg knowledge of sport skills, knowledge of rules and laws, understanding the mental needs of participants, understanding the physical needs of participants Characteristics: eg objectivity, patience, persistence, empathy, approachable, consistent, goal focused, committed, discreet, forgiving, attentive, empowering Roles: eg organiser, motivator, guardian, teacher, instructor, psychologist, trainer, role model

2 Know the importance of psychological factors in leading sports activities Psychological factors: cohesion eg group/team cohesion, size, stability, similarity, membership, Tuckman's stages of group development (forming, storming, norming and performing), development of cohesion in a group/team, social loafing and the Ringelmann effect; personality eg theories, confidence, self concept, Profile of Mood States (POMS); motivation eg extrinsic, intrinsic; stress eg stress management, anxiety and arousal

3 Be able to plan a sports activity Risk assessment: hazard; who might be affected; likelihood of occurrence; severity; risk rating; measures to minimise; considerations eg risks relating to locations, activities, equipment, participants, leaders Activities: eg basic sports coaching, modified activities for special populations (crab football, short tennis, mini basketball), fitness sessions (circuit training, exercise to music, water aerobics) Plan: participants eg age, ability, gender, numbers, specific needs, medical consent; resources eg equipment, time, environment, staff ratio, transport targets; expected outcomes; other considerations eg legal requirements

4 Be able to lead a sports activity Lead: effective; safe and secure environment; communication; skills and techniques eg group control, demonstration of skills, demonstration of techniques, coaching methods, teaching methods Review: participants' performance; own performance; formative and summative; feedback (from participants, supervisor, observers); strengths and areas for improvement; development eg plan, SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound) targets, opportunities, potential barriers

2

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit. Assessment and grading criteria To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

P1

describe four qualities, four characteristics and four roles common to effective sports leaders

M1

explain four qualities, four characteristics and four roles common to effective sports leaders

D1

analyse four qualities, four characteristics and four roles common to effective sports leaders

P2

describe four psychological factors that are important in the leading of sports activities

M2

explain four psychological factors that are important in the leading of sports activities

P3

produce a risk assessment for a selected sports activity

P4

produce a plan for leading a selected sports activity [CT1, CT5, CT6, IE2]

P5

lead a selected sports activity, with tutor support [CT5, CT6, TW4, TW5, TW6, SM3, SM4, EP3, EP5]

M3

independently lead a selected sports activity

P6

review the performance of participants, within activity, identifying strengths and areas for improvement [IE4, RL1, RL2, RL6]

P7

review own performance in the planning and leading of the sports activity, identifying strengths and areas for improvement. [RL1, RL2, RL3, RL4]

M4

review the performance of participants and self, explaining strengths and areas for improvement.

D2

justify suggestions made relating to development of participants.

PLTS: This summary references where applicable, in the square brackets, the elements of the personal, learning and thinking skills applicable in the pass criteria. It identifies opportunities for learners to demonstrate effective application of the referenced elements of the skills.

Key

IE - independent enquirers

RL - reflective learners

SM - self-managers

CT - creative thinkers

TW - team workers

EP - effective participators

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit 15:

Instructing Physical Activity and Exercise

Unit code: QCF Level 3:

F/502/5726 BTEC National

Credit value:

10

Guided learning hours: 60 Aim and purpose The aim of this unit is for learners to be able to design, plan, deliver and review exercise sessions which meet the needs of different client groups.

Unit introduction The number of people attending gyms and exercise sessions has increased significantly over the last decade as people seek to get themselves fit, lose weight, improve their health or reduce the effects of the ageing process. Each client will have different needs and it is the job of the instructor to meet their needs by providing them with safe and effective exercise programmes and sessions. Instructors will require a good understanding of the health-related components of fitness and how the body adapts to training within different client groups. They will require knowledge of health screening methods and risk assessments to ensure the safe and effective delivery of the exercise sessions. Each exercise session will require some form of warm-up and cool down activity and this unit will provide the underpinning knowledge so learners have the opportunity to develop their own ideas in-line with the latest research. Calculating and considering the intensity of exercise will be explored using a variety of methods in order that the goals of each client can be reached without detrimentally affecting their health. Clients will be from a number of different groups with a variety of needs. This unit will investigate those clients' needs and allow learners to adapt sessions and activities to meet them. Planning and delivering single and sequential exercise sessions is important so that clients observe progress towards their goals. The unit requires learners to design a six-week exercise programme for two contrasting clients and then plan and deliver a safe and effective exercise session. Experienced instructors will always review their sessions and obtain feedback from others. The unit will explore different methods for collecting feedback on performance, enabling learners to identify their strengths and areas for improvement. This may include planning for future sessions, making changes to the activities, the intensity of the activity, the goals of the client or their personal style of delivery. The knowledge and skills provided by this unit are an exciting combination of theory and practical aspects to help learners gain an improved understanding of working as an instructor in the fitness industry.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009

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Learning outcomes On completion of this unit a learner should:

1

Know the principles of safe and effective exercise sessions

2

Be able to design an exercise programme

3

Be able to plan and lead an exercise session

4

Be able to review the design of an exercise programme and leading of an exercise session.

2

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


Unit content 1 Know the principles of safe and effective exercise sessions Principles of fitness training: components of fitness (strength, aerobic endurance, muscular endurance, flexibility, body composition); adaptations to training, eg hypertrophy, increased muscle tone, decreased resting heart rate, increased stroke volume; FITT principles (frequency, intensity, time, type) Health and safety: PAR-Q (physical activity readiness questionnaire); contraindications; risk assessments Warm-up: functions; components (raising of the pulse, dynamic stretches); duration; types of warm-up, eg specific (aerobic routines), general (low repetitions on resistance machines) Cool down: functions; components (lowering of the pulse, stretches, eg developmental, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation - PNF)

2 Be able to design an exercise programme Structure: introduction to the session; warm-up; main component (duration, activities, exercise intensity, eg max heart rate, training zones, Karvonen formula, Rating of Perceived Exertion - RPE); cool down Factors to consider: screening, eg PAR-Q, medical history and exercise history; motives; barriers; current physical activity level; goals (short and long term) Clients: eg varied ability, individuals, groups, specific groups (elderly, children, obese); code of ethical practice, eg rights, relationships, personal responsibilities, professional standards Activity selection: eg likes and dislikes, accessibility, culture, commitments (work and family), goals, time

3 Be able to plan and lead an exercise session Plan an exercise session: screening; risk assessment; aim; objectives; structure of the session; venue; marketing; setting-up, checking and maintaining equipment Deliver an exercise session: introduction to the session; instruction delivery (communication, technique correction, correct body alignment, modification of exercises, observation, motivation, rapport with clients); end of the session, eg feedback, checking and setting down equipment

4 Be able to review the design of an exercise programme and leading of an exercise session Review performance: methods, eg peer evaluation, questionnaires, self-evaluation; fit for purpose, eg track progression, adapt session, modify activities, improve own performance, codes of practice, continued professional development; modify, eg FITT progression, changes in exercises to maintain interest and motivation, achievable goals; development needs, eg continue professional development; SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound) targets

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009

3


Assessment and grading criteria In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit. Assessment and grading criteria To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

P1

describe the principles of fitness training

P2

describe the health and safety M1 considerations associated with exercise programmes and sessions

P3

describe the importance of warm-up and cool down in exercise programmes and sessions

P4

design a six-week exercise programme for two selected contrasting clients [IE2, IE3, IE4, CT1, CT3, RL2, SM3]

M2 explain choice of activities for exercise programmes for selected clients

D1

justify choice of activities for exercise programmes for selected clients, suggesting alternative activities

P5

plan a safe and effective exercise session [IE2, IE3, IE4, CT1, CT3, RL2, SM3]

M3 explain choice of activities for D2 the planned exercise session

justify choice of activities for the planned exercise session and suggest alternative activities.

P6

deliver a safe and effective exercise session, with tutor support [CT5, CT6, RL6, TW3, TW4, TW5, TW6, EP4, EP5]

M4

P7

review own performance in the designing of exercise programmes and the planning and delivery of the exercise session, identifying strengths and areas for improvement. [CT4, RL1, RL2, RL3, RL4, RL5, RL6, EP4]

4

explain the health and safety considerations associated with exercise programmes and sessions

independently deliver a safe and effective exercise session.

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Nationals specification in Sport - Issue 1 - January 2010 Š Edexcel Limited 2009


L3 Diploma in Sport Course Handbook  

Infomtain booklet for L3 sports course

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