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CULTURE & COMMUNITY

Farmers Market. Photo courtesy of City of San Antonio

Latino art at Centro de Artes. Photo courtesy of City of San Antonio

click on this: CENTRO DE ARTES Getcreativesanantonio.com/ explore-san-antonio/city-exhibits/ centro-de-artes HISTORIC MARKET SQUARE Getcreativesanantonio.com/ explore-san-antonio/Marketsquare LA FAMILIA CORTEZ Lafamiliacortez.com LA MARGARITA RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR Lamargarita.com MI TIERRA CAFE & BAKERY Mitierracafe.com SPANISH GOVERNOR’S PALACE Spanishgovernorspalace.org VIVA VILLA Vivavillatacos.com

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open Mi Tierra. Chinese immigrants settled around the market and opened a Chinese café, which also offered Mexican pan dulce. The El Mercado building was built in 19381939 as a Works Progress Administration project after Giles’ Municipal Market was demolished. During World War II, produce wholesalers moved to Terminal Market at a railroad spur on Zarzamora Street. As a result, the energetic street life around Market Square died down. But some merchants stayed, determined not to give up on the place where their ancestors had thrived. Eventually, they persuaded City Council and the Chamber of Commerce to create the first market committee in the 1960s. Headed by nationally recognized architect Boone Powell, the committee spurred the revitalization of the entire market area. A permanent building for the farmers market was built in Hay Market Plaza. Three city blocks bounded by Dolorosa, Santa Rosa, and West Commerce Streets were turned into pedestrian malls, with stone fountains, ornamental streetlights, trees, and benches. Market Square regained its color and vibrancy by 1976. The Farmer’s Market Plaza now houses unique locally-owned shops and stalls offering a wide variety of products celebrating the cultural, artistic and ethnic influences of the Southwest and Mexico, from clothing to wood carvings to tasty local treats and candies. Directly across the plaza is El Mercado where artists proffer their handiworks from stalls and carts, and

local retailers sell quality Mexican artifacts, clothing, leather goods, and art. The ceiling is festooned with colorful lights and Papel Picado year-round and decorated with murals depicting San Antonio’s Mexican-American heritage; Mi Tierra is open 24/7 with strolling mariachi musicians and a large selection of classic Tex-Mex dishes plus a wide variety of Mexican pastries at the always aromatic bakery. In a charming Old World setting, La Margarita serves fajitas and seafood with great margaritas. Viva Villa Taqueria has a chef-inspired menu of more than 30 tacos along with craft beer and wine, Big Red soft serve, drinks to-go and more. Centro de Artes, a two-story exhibit space in San Antonio’s Zona Cultural, tells the story of the Latino experience with a focus on South Texas regional art, history and culture. “Nuestra Latinidad” with artists Delilah Montoya, Joshua Perez, Jake Prendez and Gabriel Villa ends June 2. The “New York Foundation for the Arts Immigrant Artist Mentorship Program Exhibition,” organized by San Antonio artist Kim Bishop, runs June 27-Sept. 29. Showcasing Latino artists and Latino-themed artworks, Centro de Artes has free admission and is open 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Sundays. WRITER’S BIO Dan R. Goddard is a longtime San Antonio arts writer who thinks sipping a margarita while listening to mariachi and Tejano music at Market Square is quintessentially San Antonio. thesanantonioriverwalk.com

Profile for Traveling Blender

RIO Magazine June 2019  

Official Magazine of the San Antonio River Walk

RIO Magazine June 2019  

Official Magazine of the San Antonio River Walk