Page 2

A Brief History Of The College Bunbury Catholic College opened in February 1973 as a co-educational institution resulting from amalgamation of St Francis Xavier’s College (Rodsted Street) for boys and St Joseph’s College (Wittenoom Street) for girls. The Bunbury Catholic Schools’ Board which had already rationalised Primary Education in Bunbury, was requested to do a similar service for Secondary Education. Previously, St Francis Xavier’s College (Marist Brothers), had classes as far as Year 10, and Catholic boys who wished to go as far as Leaving Certificate had to complete their education at a State High School. Though St Joseph’s College, under the care of the Sisters of Mercy, offered classes as far as Leaving Certificate, enrolments in Years 11 and 12 were low, and the subject choice was limited. So, to offer a wider range of subjects and to utilise available staff to the best advantage, a co-educational Bunbury Catholic College was established. The College’s aim was to develop each student’s potential in a meaningful way for both the individual and the community by stimulating interest, enabling students to develop academically and acquire Christian values.

Crest Philosophy The crest is designed to convey the centrality of Christ and Church to our College in Bunbury. In a very real sense we are the Church in Bunbury and the rising red and green spires reflect the presence of the Church and our own aspiration for the higher good in life. The ‘M’s making the spires remind us of the two great teaching orders involved in the formation of the College, the Sisters of Mercy and the Marist Brothers. Finally, the simplicity of design reflects, we hope, the Gospel call to simplicity and unadorned truth, which should characterise our College.

College Motto Our motto was developed in 2005 and comes from the challenging words of Micah 6:8:

‘This is what Yahweh asks of you: only this, To act justly, to love tenderly, and to walk humbly with your God’. Micah’s readings date back to early 700BC where he would be considered a contemporary of the prophet Isaiah. He was from south-western Judah and was preoccupied with social justice. His verse embraces the essence of faithfulness. Each element is dependent on the other two. When we live justly and love tenderly, we will walk humbly with our God. And as we walk humbly with God we must live with love and justice for all God’s people. Thus, these are not three separate commands. They are unity. A right relationship with God requires justice, love and humility. Or, to sum it up in another way, God expects from us a faith that involves justice tempered with love and humility and nothing else will do. The challenge for the students and staff of Bunbury Catholic College is to make this statement real rather than just something that adorns our letterheads and classroom walls.

Page 2

Bunbury Catholic College

SHOWCASESeniorPP7  

Prayers and Scripture References .......................................................................................Page 4 College Histo...

SHOWCASESeniorPP7  

Prayers and Scripture References .......................................................................................Page 4 College Histo...

Advertisement