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2011 FORMULA1 KOREAN GRAND PRIX

• KOREA, 14TH – 16th OCTOBER 2011 • • Bruno Senna • Vitaly Petrov • Eric Boullier • James Allison • • ‘My Home Race’ with Hyo Won Kim • i-Race heads to Budapest •


Q&A: Bruno Senna

Lotus Renault GP • Race Driver • Car 9

“Like Japan, Korea should suit the R31 well” Hotfoot from the Japanese GP, Bruno looks to make amends for his sobering outing at Suzuka

What can you conclude from the race in Japan? It was a bit of a tough race in Suzuka; I had a difficult start where I was squeezed out at turn two and that lost me a few positions. Ultimately I didn’t feel I had the right car to perform at the level Vitaly was performing. Each time I tried to push a bit harder the car felt very edgy, and I ended up going off the track on several occasions. This put me behind other cars which were running at the same pace or a bit slower which meant I was then stuck behind them and I couldn’t pass. Looking at the data we found that we had a bit of a problem with the downforce as we were losing load throughout the race. On a high speed circuit you do not want that to happen. One of the most pleasing aspects of the weekend was coming back from my shunt in FP3 to qualify with the same lap time as my team-mate - I think we can take a positive note from that. The team did a great job putting the car back together in such a short time after the mistake I made (in free practice 3) and I was happy to deliver a good result for them by getting into Q3. As a team we are working well together and I’m learning a lot from the engineers and mechanics with every race that passes.

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How do you handle the pressure of coming back from something like your FP3 shunt to perform so strongly in qualifying? I helped the team with the rebuild of the car and I even bled my own brakes! And I did a good job as the pedal was firm! In qualifying I had to ‘remove my brain’, as Eric told me: ‘just drive without thinking about it,’ and that’s what I did. I just attacked as I had nothing else to lose at that moment in time. I knew the car was good enough for a top ten position and that’s what I achieved.

Next stop Korea - what are your memories from last year?

My memories of last year’s event are not great; I had suspension failure in practice and then I had a very difficult race with the rain, safety car and then the red flag. It was a very difficult way to learn a new track and certainly an eventful weekend. This year will be like starting afresh.

What’s your impression of the circuit? It is a difficult track, and I think there are many places where you can make mistakes. There are off-camber corners scattered through the track and for a driver that’s not really the most comfortable thing. However, it’s the same for everybody and I’m hoping that we can use Suzuka as a baseline for when we arrive in Korea then take the car out for the first time on Friday. From then we can just chip away at the time and get on target for qualifying and the race.

With a similar downforce level to Suzuka and a number of medium to high speed corners, do you think it will suit the R31?

Yes, I think it should. There are a few big traction requirements in Korea but the type of tarmac is very smooth and the layout of the track mean that all the weaknesses we had in Singapore won’t be as pronounced in Korea. We should be strong again and our car should be in the top 10 all the way to the end of the season.

“The layout of the track means that all the weaknesses we had in Singapore won’t be as pronounced in Korea” L O T US RENAULT GP • KO RE A N GP PRE V I EW • 0 3


Q&A: Vitaly Petrov

Lotus Renault GP • Race Driver • Car 10

“I have momentum and confidence behind me” Having helped the team reinforce its position in the Constructors’ Championship, Vitaly looks to build on his Suzuka performance in Korea How did it feel to be back amongst the points in Japan? It was a good feeling and I am satisfied with how I drove over the course of the three days. I was pleased with my pace in the practice sessions and I managed to secure a respectable position in qualifying, which gave me a strong chance of being on the points board again. Did I capitalise on the grid position I had? Not as much as I would have liked, no. I thought I could have been in the hunt for seventh or eighth, but our strategy played out reasonably in the end. It was evidence again that our car adapts well to the faster circuits.

You pulled out your best tricks near the end of the race, passing the Force India cars along the way… Yes, I enjoyed the last phase of the race because I was able to use the soft tyres well to pass Paul (Di Resta) and Adrian (Sutil) and close in on Sergio (Perez). Throughout the first stages of the race I wasn’t able to make much ground on the cars in front because I had to look after the tyres, but I knew that as I got closer to the chequered flag I would be able to get back in the top 10.

Your result gave the team a bit more breathing space in the battle for fifth place in the Constructors’ Championship – how important were those two points? I think they were crucial. Extending our lead (in fifth place) was target number one last weekend, and we achieved that so we can have no complaints from that perspective.

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Now it’s the Korean Grand Prix – have you got some good momentum behind you to get an even better result there? Yes, I have momentum and confidence behind me, but I’m fully mindful that it will be a different proposition to Suzuka. Some of it is driven at high speed, but there are also a few second gear corners too, which our car won’t be so keen on. It was quite a dirty circuit last year, but I expect that to be less of an issue this time around. We will collectively put our thinking caps on again to see how we can get the most from the weekend.

“I have momentum and confidence behind me, but I’m fully mindful that it will be a different proposition to Suzuka”

LO T US RE NAULT GP • KO RE A N GP PRE V I EW • 0 5


Eric Boullier

Team Principal and Managing Director

“In many ways, 2011 has been a transitional year for us with a whole range of changes”

A wORD WITH THE BOSS Fresh from a strategically challenging race in Suzuka, Eric explains the importance of Korea to the Formula 1 calendar

Would ‘satisfied’ or ‘pleased’ be the best word to describe the team’s exploits in Japan? I would have to say that I was satisfied. We set foot in Japan with high hopes just a fortnight after what can only be explained as a weekend of misery in Singapore. We thought Suzuka would be a circuit that the R31 would take to naturally. In some respects we were right; we were on the pace all weekend long, but unfortunately we didn’t make the headlines as we might have hoped. After a good qualifying performance I was hopeful, even confident, that we would make real inroads in the top 10 and could push for a double points finish but, as it turned out, it was tale of two halves. On one hand, Vitaly drove well on a two-stop strategy and everything seemed to work for him. On the other hand, Bruno had a tricky start and never really recuperated the lost time – even the emergence of the safety car didn’t help. It was one of those days for him.

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You must view Vitaly’s points as important in the team’s quest for fifth place in the Constructors’ Championship… Absolutely, yes. I have to look at the weekend in Japan practically. We are nearing the end of the season and our objectives are narrowing. We know what is within the realms of possibility in the next seven weeks or so, and our sights are set on that fifth place in the championship. The two points in Japan brought us much closer to achieving that, but there will not be an ounce of complacency from the team.

Korea is very new on the F1 scene – how does it rank as a venue? I fully maintain that for Formula 1 to consider itself a global sport it needs to cross borders, and showcase itself in new territories. Korea joined the F1 calendar only last year and I was very pleased to see it put on a good show. Japan may well be well-established in the motorsport world but Korea is not, and the country deserves

the chance to build its own brand in F1, too. I am looking forward to returning and seeing how the venue and organisation has progressed from last year.

With only four races remaining, how much thought are you giving to 2012?

Frankly speaking, a lot of my thoughts have now turned to next year. Whilst the priority remains securing fifth place in the Constructors’ Championship and helping nurture Bruno and Vitaly’s opportunities to score highly at the next four races, an increasing amount of my time is devoted to seeing how we can raise the bar. In many ways, 2011 has been a transitional year for us with a whole range of changes. However, sport throws up many difficulties and it is a test of character as to how one handles them. I like to think we have dealt with things in the right manner and that there will be brighter times ahead. Make no mistake, this team’s number one goal is to bring silverware back to Enstone.

LO T US RENAULT G P • KO RE A N G P PRE V I E W • 0 7


James Allison

Technical Director

“ There is still much to learn about this track” Following on from the team’s exploits in Suzuka, James discusses the broad nature of the Korean International Circuit

Which aspects of the car are crucial for a good performance at the Korean International Circuit? The Korean International Circuit is not a track which favours any particular aspect of the car; it’s one where the entire package has to be maximised. Whilst there are long straights where a low drag package would be beneficial, there are sufficient corners to require higher levels of downforce for a quick lap. Interestingly, the track surface is very smooth and there are no notable bumps. Ally this with no kerbs of any stature and you can run the car very low. This could play to the strengths of our exhaust package as the potentially more constant proximity between car floor and ground should aid and assist hot air flow management.

How different is the set-up from Suzuka?

We run a similar level of downforce to that employed in Japan, however there are subtle yet pertinent differences. For example, DRS should be far more effective in Korea

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thanks to the long straights so we will give this aspect due consideration amidst our musings of wing angles.

How much more understanding do you have of the circuit the team is not heading to Korea for the first time?

Early in the weekend at Suzuka our car did not lend itself to long runs on the soft tyre, where we fared even worse than our rivals. This encouraged us along the path of favouring the medium tyre in the race; a strategy contrary to that employed by those around us. The tyre performance in the race diverged slightly from our predictions, with the soft tyre proving to be faster than expected, meaning that its limitations in durability were allayed. This, and the timing of the safety car were not the most helpful of scenarios for our task, but nevertheless we finished ahead of Force India, which was one of our targets.

Heading to Korea last year was certainly a voyage into the unknown and we certainly arrive in Mokpo with more megabytes of data on our servers than in 2010. That said, for the inaugural event we faced a circuit which was very dirty and a set of very trying weather conditions in the race so there is still much to learn about the track. Track evolution was very pronounced so we will have to see if that was a result of the then recent surfacing or if the local environment is contributory to this.

What was learnt at Suzuka?

The weather had a big impact on the race last year – what range of conditions we could expect this year?

Certainly the weather presented us with an interesting set of challenges last year but the current forecast is for rather pleasant conditions which should be favoured by all those to all taking part in the event.

“The Korean International Circuit is not a track which favours any particular aspect of the car”

LO T US RE NAULT G P • KO RE A N G P PRE V I E W • 0 9


Korea

TECH TALK

RENAULT SPORT F1 The engine

TURN 8

Turn 8 is taken at almost 300 kph before heading to the slower turns 9 and 10.

Korea A set-up guide

Korea is in the middle of the power-driveability ratio. Good driveability through medium to high speed corners is required for sectors two and three, while a good top end power is essential for the three straights in the first part of the track.

TURNs 7 – 13

The sweeping corners of turns 7-13 are quite long, and rely on good downforce and balance from the car; these are quite satisfying turns for the drivers.

TURN 5

Good engine drivability and traction required.

TURN 4

1. ENGINE

Korea is not an all-out power circuit, however there are significant straights at the start of the lap. For the lower speed corners like turns 1, 4, and 6, good traction is essential so smooth power delivery from the engine is an advantage here.

More heavy braking demands after a significant straight, leading into the slowest speed section of the track where both good low speed change of direction and mechanical grip are required.

2. BRAKES

It’s not a circuit with extreme braking demands, however there are three significant areas of speed retardation requirements: turn 1, turn 3 and turn 4; all at the end of long straights.

TURN 3

Over 300 kph with heavy braking into turn 3. Higher speeds could be attained on this long straight, however wing levels required for the corners mean the maximum velocity is constrained by the drag and gearing.

3. SUSPENSION

Car set-up is a compromise between reasonably good change of direction at high speed (necessitating a stiffer set-up) and the slower speed corners like turns 1, 4, 6, which warrant a softer set-up. One of the features of the track is that it is incredibly smooth, and there are no significant kerbs. This means the car can run very low and close to the ground, especially as there are no notable bumps on the surface.

2 3 4

1

TURN 1

High braking demands at the end of turn one, which has the potential to be very difficult at the start of the race with cars at their heaviest and tyres at their coolest.

6 5

4. REAR WING

Downforce levels are similar to Suzuka. Although Korea does have very long straight, the corners are sufficient to allow more wing to be carried than focusing purely on speed when pointing in one direction. It is closer to a Spa or Montreal type of track than a Monaco or Hungary set-up.

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5. TYRES

Pirelli’s soft and super soft tyres are allocated. These should not present any problem with the warm-up, which was an area of focus in the past. The challenge with the super soft will be making it last the whole lap in qualifying – there are a lot of stresses on the tyre from the high speed corners.

6. FRONT WING

A ‘reasonable’ amount of front wing is needed to balance the car for the medium and high speed corners; slightly more than at a slower speed circuit, but not as much as at Silverstone or Suzuka.

TURN 17

Turn 17 involves quite high speeds, heading on to the first straight.

TURNS 14 – 18

Good change of direction required from the car in these sections; the close walls punish any mistake. Turns 14-18 are similar to Valencia.

LO T US RENAULT G P • KO RE A N G P PRE V I EW • 11


KOREAN GRAND PRIX THE REST OF THE NEWS

F1

My Home Race with Hyo Won Kim

Hyo Won Kim, a CFD Aerodynamist for LRGP and former Engineering graduate at the University of Cambridge, arrived in Enstone back in March of last year. Beginning his Enstone career in the same year as the Korean Grand Prix was a case of good timing for both parties and, as the 30 year-old explains, he was only too happy to be a part of the Korean F1 experience…

FOR

REAL

Whilst the Lotus Renault GP race team was in Suzuka, the Hungaroring in Budapest also reverberated to the sounds of an LRGP Formula 1 car as the third event in the 2011 i-Race programme took place. This exciting initiative sees lucky individuals – whether they are sponsors, journalists or hardcore race fans – go through an intensive schedule to get behind the wheel for themselves

LRGP’s Mabel Dautzenberg was on the ground in Budapest to oversee the programme...

A GLIMPSE BEHIND THE SCENES “We had 24 guests each day for the driving experience, which aims to give people a bit of an idea of what it is like to drive an F1 car; it gives them a glimpse behind the scenes and the feeling of what it is like to be an F1 driver. The day is always a long one. We left our hotel in Budapest at 7am in the morning for the circuit where the guests were greeted with the same motorhome as the race team uses at Grands Prix. The first thing they did was to get kitted out; and the overalls, fireproof underwear and helmets are always very similar to those our race drivers wear.

GETTING BEHIND THE WHEEL Next, it was time for several safety briefings before the drivers were taken out for recognition laps so they could begin learning the track. Then, as soon as that was done, they were able to get behind the wheel themselves. We sent out six Formula Renault cars for twenty minute sessions for the drivers to build-up speed. For this first session there were Lotus Evoras to pace them – not bad, eh!

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ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS

TOASTING A GREAT DAY

Following this, an engineer analysed the telemetry to give the guests feedback and show where there was room for improvement. There was then a further briefing, which gave more track information from one of the driving instructors. It was then back out on track for another 20 minutes in the Formula Renault. The drivers met with one of our physiotherapists for a massage followed by a briefing on what happens to the body when put through the forces generated by an F1 car. Then, shortly after this they were able to enjoy lunch. Typically, this takes place in a Grand Prix hospitality unit so the drivers can enjoy some delicious food and also share the experiences of the day with each other.

Once the driving was finished, the drivers were presented with all their telemetry and we toasted everyone with a glass of champagne! The programme is proving very appealing and we’ve had participants from Russia, Brazil, the UK, Australia – all over the world in fact. There’s a range of experience too; from people who have karted or even raced before, to those who have had no experience of anything similar to this before. We’ve even had a former Formula 1 technical director and race car constructor have a go. It really is for everyone.

THE BIG MOMENT ARRIVES After lunch guests had a briefing about the controls of the Formula 1 car, including the buttons on the steering wheel. Shortly after that was the big moment: two laps in a Formula 1 car. After guests drive the F1 car, they are always given a ride in a two-seater Formula 1 car. In Budapest they did this with our Formula 1 third driver Ho-Pin Tung. This is the icing on the cake to round off what is a fantastic day.

Growing up in Korea, did you dream of the day your own country would host a race? I didn’t know a great deal about F1 while I was growing up in Korea. Some of the sport’s milestones were reviewed on sports news but there wasn’t a way of getting to know F1 that well. Before coming to England, I had lived in Sri Lanka which is another country where F1 is an unknown quantity. So, it wasn’t really until after I came to England that I got to know what F1 was all about. In fact, it was in the early 2000s when, funnily enough, I saw former Renault F1 cars proudly carrying logos of Hanjin – a large shipping company from Korea. Since then I have longed to see more Korean involvement in the sport. Little did I know that we will be racing in Korea a decade later!

Were you proud when you heard your home country was going to join the F1 map?

I was extremely proud. I remember reading about it in the press before I joined LRGP. I was a researcher in academia back then, and that was about when I had set my sight on pursuing a career in F1. It was hugely exciting news for me at the time. It was particularly good to see Korea joining the likes of Japan and China in the world of F1. Japan enjoys the

most mature motorsport industry in the whole of Asia, whilst China continues to be a regular fixture on the F1 calendar. So for Korea to host a Grand Prix (and more in the future) – is a sure sign of an emerging nation in the making. I think the country will have a growing presence in F1 and I cannot wait to see the full potential.

Working at the race must have been very special – what was your role?

It was extremely special. My main role was to work closely with Geoff Simmonds, our Race Team Co-ordinator, making sure that the days leading up to and during the race weekend were running as smoothly as possible. It was quite an eye opener to witness how much work goes into a race ‘weekend’ even before the cars are assembled for first practice. There is a long list of things that require meticulous preparation in order to run F1 cars over the weekend. I had to make sure that nothing got lost in translation. Of course, the knowledge of Korean work ethics and mannerisms came in very handy too! This meant my role was stretched beyond the job description – and before I knew it, I was sorting out express laundry of the drivers’ overalls as well as operating their Korean language-only sat nav!

How successful do you think the race was? Very successful. The race was immensely exciting due to the rain and I think it was very well received by the public. F1 has definitely left a lasting impression on the Korean fans. The organisers have done a sterling job in getting the facility race-ready in time, despite delays and much speculation in the process. However, it was apparent that there was room for some improvement with the off-track facilities in the area. Knowing how quickly the Koreans can turn these things around, I’m eager to see how it has evolved since last year.

How important is it for F1 – with its ‘global sport’ tag- to come to countries such as Korea?

F1 is undoubtedly a global sport. Whilst the sport is already massively popular in Europe, there are other corners of the world that are just waking up to F1 or other countries that just can’t get enough of it. I think it’s very important for the sport to reach out to these parts of the world to nurture their growing interest. Not only will it broaden the fan base but it could also attract sponsors and talents – in drivers, engineers, and others – from a wider pool. It can only be good for the sport in the long run.

L O T US RENAULT G P • KO RE A N GP PRE V IE W • 13


KOREAN GRAND PRIX

9

Bruno Senna

Q: 18 P: 12 Q: 6 P: 3 Laps: 57 Laps: 56

Q: 16 P: 12 Q: 9 P: 7 Laps: 56 Laps: 58

Q: NT P: 8 Laps: 65

Q: 16 P: 8 Laps: 77

Q: 9 R: A Laps: 55

Q: 9 P: 10 Laps: 56

10

Vitaly Petrov

Q: 6 P: 3 Laps: 58

Q: 8 R: A Laps: 52

Q: 10 P: 9 Laps: 56

Q: 7 P: 8 Laps: 58

Q: 6 P: 11 Laps: 65

Q: 11 R: A Laps: 67

Q: 10 P: 5 Laps: 70

Q: 11 P: 15 Q: 14 P: 12 Q: 9 P: 10 Laps: 56 Laps: 52 Laps: 59

1

Sebastian Vettel

Q: 1 P: 1 Laps: 58

Q: 1 P: 1 Laps: 56

Q: 1 P: 2 Laps: 56

Q: 1 P: 1 Laps: 58

Q: 2 P: 1 Laps: 66

Q: 1 P: 1 Laps: 78

Q: 1 P: 2 Laps: 70

Q:1 P:1 f’lap Laps: 57

Q: 2 P: 2 Laps: 52

2

Mark Webber

Q: 3 P: 5 Laps: 58

Q: 3 P: 4 f’lap Laps: 56

Q: 18 P: 3 f’lap Laps: 56

Q: 2 P: 2 f’lap Laps: 58

Q: 1 P: 4 Laps: 66

Q: 3 P: 4 f’lap Laps: 78

Q: 4 P: 3 Laps: 70

Q: 2 P: 3 Laps: 57

3

Jenson Button

Q: 4 P: 6 Laps: 58

Q: 4 P: 2 Laps: 56

Q: 2 P: 4 Laps: 56

Q: 6 P: 6 Laps: 58

Q: 5 P: 3 Laps: 66

Q: 2 P: 3 Laps: 78

Q: 7 P: 1 f’lap Laps: 70

4

Lewis Hamilton

Q: 2 P: 2 Laps: 58

Q: 2 P: 8 Laps: 56

Q: 3 P: 1 Laps: 56

Q: 4 P: 4 Laps: 58

Q: 3 P: 2 f’lap Laps: 66

Q: 9 P: 6 Laps: 78

5

Felipe Massa

Q: 8 P: 7 f’lap Laps: 49

Q: 7 P: 5 Laps: 56

Q: 6 P: 6 Laps: 56

Q: 10 P: 11 Q: 8 Laps: 58 R: DNF Laps: 58

6

Fernando Alonso

Q: 5 P: 4 Laps: 58

Q: 5 : 6 Laps: 56

Q: 5 P: 7 Laps: 56

Q: 5 P: 3 Laps: 58

7

Michael Schumacher

Q: 11 R: D Laps: 19

Q: 11 P: 9 Laps: 56

Q: 14 P: 8 Laps: 56

8

Nico Rosberg

Q: 7 R: D Laps: 22

Q: 9 P: 12 Laps: 55

Q: 4 P: 5 Laps: 56

Q: 11 R: A Laps: 9

Q: 14 R: F Laps: 23

Q: 7 P: 13 Laps: 44

Q: 18 P: 17 Q: 10 P: 9 Laps: 59 Laps: 53

Q:3 P: 4 Laps: 60

Q: 1 P: 2 Laps: 70

Q: 1 P: 1 Laps: 44

Q: 1 P: 1 Laps: 53

Q: 1 P: 1 Laps: 61

Q: 1 P: 3 Laps: 53

Q: 1 P: 3 Laps: 52

Q: 1 P: 3 Laps: 60

Q: 6 P: 5 Laps: 70

Q: 3 P: 2 f’lap Laps: 44

Q: 5 R: A Laps: 4

Q: 2 P: 3 Laps: 61

Q: 6 P: 4 Laps: 53

Q: 6 P: 6 Laps: 57

Q: 5 R: Wh Laps: 39

Q: 7 R: H Laps: 35

Q: 3 R: 1 Laps: 70

Q: 13 P: 3 Laps: 44

Q: 3 P: 2 Laps: 53

Q: 3 P: 2 f’lap Laps: 61

Q: 2 P: 1 f’lap Laps: 53

Q: 5 R: A Laps: 7

Q: 3 P: 4 Laps: 57

Q: 10 P: 4 Laps: 52

Q:2 P: 1 f’lap Laps: 60

Q: 2 P: 4 Laps: 70

Q: 2 R: A Laps: 12

Q: 2 P: 4 f’lap Laps: 53

Q: 4 P: 5 Laps: 61

Q: 3 P: 5 Laps: 53

Q: 6 R: A Laps: 32

Q: 3 P: 6 Laps: 70

Q: 5 P: 5 Laps: 57

Q: 4 P: 5 Laps: 52

Q: 5 P: 5 Laps: 60

Q: 4 P: 6 f’lap Laps: 70

Q: 4 P: 8 Laps: 44

Q: 6 P: 6 Laps: 53

Q: 6 P: 9 Laps: 60

Q: 4 P: 7 Laps: 53

Q: 4 P: 5 Laps: 65

Q: 4 P: 2 Laps: 78

Q: 2 R: A Laps: 36

Q: 4 P: 2 Laps: 57

Q: 3 P: 1 f’lap Laps: 52

Q: 4 P: 2 Laps: 60

Q: 5 P: 3 Laps: 70

Q: 8 P: 4 Laps: 44

Q: 4 P: 3 Laps: 53

Q: 5 P: 4 Laps: 61

Q: 5 P: 2 Laps: 53

Q: 8 P: 12 Laps: 58

Q: 10 P: 6 Laps: 65

Q: 5 R: F Laps: 32

Q: 8 P: 4 Laps: 70

Q: 8 P: 17 Laps: 56

Q: 13 P: 9 Laps: 52

Q: 10 P: 8 Laps: 59

Q: 9 R: G Laps: 26

Q: 24 P: 5 Laps: 44

Q: 8 P: 5 Laps: 53

Q: 8 R: A Laps: 28

Q: 8 P: 6 Laps: 53

Q: 3 P: 5 Laps: 58

Q: 7 P: 7 Laps: 65

Q: 7 P: 11 Laps: 76

Q: 6 P: 11 Laps: 70

Q: 7 P: 7 Laps: 57

Q: 9 P:6 Laps: 52

Q: 6 P: 7 Laps: 59

Q: 7 P: 9 Laps: 69

Q: 5 P: 6 Laps: 44

Q: 9 R: A Laps: 0

Q: 7 P: 7 Laps: 60

Q: 23 P: 10 Laps: 52

Q: 15 R: H Laps: 22

Q: 15 P: 13 Q: 11 P: 15 Q: 19 P: 17 Q: 12 P: 9 Laps: 56 Laps: 57 Laps: 64 Laps: 76

Q: 16 P: 9 Laps: 70

Q: 13 P: 12 Q: 15 P: 13 Q: 14 Laps: 56 Laps: 51 R: OL Laps: 16

12

Pastor Maldonado

Q: 15 R: Tr Laps: 9

Q: 18 R: E Laps: 8

Q: 17 P: 18 Q: 14 P: 17 Q: 9 P: 15 Laps: 55 Laps: 57 Laps: 65

Q: 8 R: A Laps: 73

Q: 12 R: Sp Laps: 61

Q: 15 P: 18 Q: 7 P: 14 Laps: 56 Laps: 51

14

Adrian Sutil

Q: 16 P: 9 Laps: 57

Q: 17 P: 11 Q: 11 P: 15 Q: 12 P: 13 Q: 17 P: 13 Q: 15 P: 7 Laps: 55 Laps: 55 laps: 57 Laps: 65 Laps: 77

Q: 14 R: A Laps: 49

Q: 10 P: 9 Laps: 56

15

Paul di Resta

Q: 14 P: 10 Q: 14 P: 10 Q: 8 P: 11 Laps: 57 Laps: 56 Laps: 56

16

Sergio Pérez

Q: 13 P: DQ Q: 16 R: A Laps: 23

Q: 12 P: 17 Q: 15 P: 14 Q: 12 P: 9 Laps: 55 Laps: 57 Laps: 65

17

Kamui Kobayashi

Q: 9 P: DQ Q: 10 P: 7 Laps: 56

Q: 13 P: 10 Q: 24 P: 10 Q: 14 P: 10 Q: 13 P: 5 Laps: 56 Laps: 58 Laps: 65 Laps: 78

18

Sébastien Buemi

Q: 10 P: 8 Laps: 57

17

Jaime Alguersuari

Q: 12 P: 11 Q: 13 P: 14 Q: 7 Laps: 57 Laps: 55 R: Wh Laps: 9

20

Jarno Trulli

(Karun Chandhok)

Q: 20 P: 13 Q: 20 Laps: 56 R: C Laps: 31

21

Heikki Kovalainen

Q: 19 R: WL Laps: 19

Q: 19 P: 15 Q: 19 P: 16 Q: 18 P: 19 Q: 15 Laps: 55 Laps: 55 Laps: 56 R: A Laps: 48

Q: 18 P: 14 Q: 20 Laps: 76 R: Dr Laps: 28

22

Daniel Ricciardo

DNQ

Q: 24 R: H Laps: 14

Q: 24 P: 23 Q: 22 P: 21 Q: 21 Laps: 54 Laps: 55 R: G Laps: 28

DNQ P: 17 Q: 23 P: 17 Q: 24 P:24 Q: 24 P: 19 Q: 22 P: 19 Q: 22 P: 18 Q: 23 Laps: 74 Laps: 69 Laps: 54 Laps: 49 Laps: 57 Laps: 66 R: M Laps: 13

23

Vitantonio Liuzzi

DNQ

Q: 23 R: RW Laps: 46

Q: 23 P: 22 Q: 22 P: 22 Q: 22 P: 21 DNQ P: 16 Q: 21 P: 13 Q: 22 P: 23 Q: 23 P: 18 Q: 23 Laps: 54 Laps: 53 Laps: 61 Laps: 75 Laps: 69 Laps: 54 Laps: 50 R: E Laps: 37

24

Timo Glock

Q: 21 P: NC Q: 21 P: 16 Q: 22 P: 21 Q: 21 Laps: 54 Laps: 54 Laps: 54 P: DNS

25

Jérôme d’Ambrosio

Q: 22 P: 14 Q: 22 Laps: 54 R: A Laps: 42

Q: 13 R: Wh Laps: 44

Q: 16 P: 9 Laps: 58

Q: 16 P: 12 Q: 14 P: 12 Q: 11 Laps: 65 Laps: 76 R: A Laps: 67 Q: 10 DNS

Q: 17 P: 16 Q: 13 P: 16 Q: 20 Laps: 57 Laps: 64 R: A Laps: 66

Q: 12 P: 13 Q: 11 P: 7 Laps: 59 Laps: 69

Q: 15 P: 7 Laps: 44

Q: 17 P: 9 Laps: 59

Q: 18 P: 8 Laps: 70

Q: 18 P: 8 Laps: 56

Q: 9 P: 8 Laps: 60

Q: 11 P: 11 Laps: 53

Q: 10 P: 6 Laps: 61

Q: 12 P: 12 Laps: 53

Q: 15 R: G Laps: 32

Q: 11 P: 10 Q: 17 P: 8 Laps: 60 Laps: 53

Q: 13 P: 11 Q: 12 P: 12 Q: 17 Laps: 69 Laps: 44 R: G Laps: 21

Q: 17 P: 14 Q: 7 P: 13 Laps: 59 Laps: 53

Q: 24 P: 15 Q: 23 P: 8 Laps: 59 Laps: 69

Q: 11 R: A Laps: 11

Q: 18 P: 10 Q: 16 P:12 Q: 16 P: 10 Q: 6 Laps: 52 Laps: 59 Laps: 69 R: A Laps: 0

Q: 19 P: 19 Q: 17 Laps: 55 R: G Laps: 2

Q: 12 R: M Laps: 9

Q: 17 P: 11 Q: 11 P: 8 Laps: 44 Laps: 52

Q: 13 P: 7 Laps: 70

Q: 20 P: 19 Q: 19 P:18 Q: 18 P: 18 Q: 19 P: 13 Q: 19 P: 16 Q: 20 P: 20 Q: 21 Laps: 55 Laps: 57 Laps: 64 Laps: 76 Laps: 69 Laps: 55 R: OL Laps: 10

Q: 20 P: 19 Q: 21 Laps: 63 R: S Laps: 30

Q: 8 P: 14 Laps: 68

Q: 15 P: 11 Q: 10 P: 15 Q: 9 Laps: 59 Laps: 68 R: M Laps: 27

Q: 11 P: 14 Q: 17 P: 10 Q: 15 P: 10 Q: 17 P: 13 Q: 19 Laps: 65 Laps: 77 Laps: 70 Laps: 56 R: A Laps: 25

Brazil

13.11.11

Abu Dhabi

30.10.11

India

16.10.11

27.11.11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Sebastian Vettel Jenson Button Fernando Alonso Mark Webber Lewis Hamilton Felipe Massa Nico Rosberg Michael Schumacher VITALY PETROV

Q: 16 P: 10 Q: 14 P: 12 Q: 15 Laps: 52 Laps: 60 R: Wh Laps: 11 Q: 18 P: 7 Laps: 52

Q: 16 R: A Laps: 56

Q: 16 P: 15 Laps: 53

Q: 20 P: 20 Q: 19 Laps: 56 R: OL Laps: 17

Q: 18 P: 14 Q: 19 P: 14 Q:20 Laps: 43 Laps: 51 R: G Laps: 47

Q: 19 P: 19 Laps: 53

Q: 18 P: 16 Q: 18 Laps: 58 R: WL Laps: 55

Q: 16 P: 15 Q: 20 P: 13 Q: 19 P: 16 Q: 18 P: 18 Laps: 43 Laps: 51 Laps: 59 Laps: 53

Q: 23 P: NC Q: 23 P: 19 Q: 22 P: 22 Laps: 39 Laps: 57 Laps: 51

Q: 21 P: 20 Q: 22 P: 19 Q: 24 Laps: 65 Laps: 43 R: A Laps: 0

Q: 24 P: 20 Q: 24 P: 23 Laps: 57 Laps: 53

Q: 22 P: 15 Q: 21 P: 21 Q: 20 P: 16 Q: 19 P:17 Q: 20 P: 17 Q: 19 P: 18 Q: 21 P: 15 Q: 21 Laps: 69 Laps: 55 Laps: 50 Laps: 57 Laps: 66 Laps: 43 Laps: 51 R: A Laps: 9

Q: 21 P: 20 Q: 23 P: 20 Q: 23 P: 20 Q: 22 P: 15 Q: 24 P: 14 Q: 23 P: 22 Q: 22 P: 17 Q:21 P:18 Q: 24 P: 19 Q: 20 P: 17 Q: 22 Laps: 54 Laps: 56 Laps: 62 Laps: 75 Laps: 69 Laps: 55 Laps: 50 Laps: 57 Laps: 65 Laps: 43 R: G Laps: 1

Q: 21 P: 20 Laps: 51

Q: 22 P: 18 Q: 20 P: 21 Laps: 59 Laps: 51

324 210 202 194 178 90 63 60 36

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Nick Heidfeld Adrian Sutil Kamui Kobayashi Paul di Resta Jaime Alguersuari Sergio Perez Sebastien Buemi Rubens Barrichello BRUNO SENNA Pastor Maldonado

34 28 27 20 16 13 13 4 2 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Red Bull Racing Vodafone McLaren Mercedes Scuderia Ferrari Marlboro Mercedes GP LOTUS RENAULT GP Force India Sauber F1 Team Scuderia Torro Rosso AT&T Williams Team Lotus HRT F1 Marussia Virgin Racing

518 388 292 123 72 48 40 29 5 0 0 0

POINTS SYSTEM 1ST = 25 2ND = 18 3RD = 15 4TH = 12 5TH = 10 6TH = 8 7TH = 6 8TH = 4 9TH = 2 10TH = 1

WHERE CAN YOU FOLLOW US? On our website, to start with:

www.lotusrenaultgp.com

Q: 15 P: 13 Q: 14 P: 16 Q: 13 P: 12 Q: 12 P: 13 Q: 13 P: 17 Laps: 68 Laps: 43 Laps: 52 Laps: 60 Laps: 53

Q: 17 P: 12 Q: 16 P: 11 Q: 12 P: 7 Laps: 70 Laps: 56 Laps: 52

Q: 14 P: 16 Q: 8 Laps: 56 R: OL Laps: 23

Q: 9 P: 16 Laps: 53

Q: 13 P: 14 Q: 17 P: 16 Q: 21 P: 10 Q: 14 P: 11 Q: 13 P: 11 Q: 14 P: 14 Laps: 59 Laps: 68 Laps: 44 Laps: 52 Laps: 60 Laps: 53

Q: 11 P: 11 Q: 8 P: 6 Laps: 52 Laps: 59

Q: 12 P: 14 Q: 6 P: 15 Laps: 56 Laps: 51

Korea

09.10.11

Japan

25.09.11

Q: 7 R: A Laps: 0

Q: 17 R: Tr Laps: 48

(Narain Karthikeyan)

Singapore

Q: 12 P: 12 Q: 10 P: 9 Laps: 69 Laps: 44

Rubens Barrichello

Q: 12 P: 13 Q: 9 P: 14 Laps: 55 Laps: 56

11.09.11

Q:15 P:15 Laps: 59

11

(Pedro de la Rosa)

Italy

28.08.11

Belgium

31.07.11

Q: 10 P: 9 Laps: 52

(Nick Heidfeld)

Q: 16 P: 8 Laps: 52

Hungary

24.07.11

Germany

10.07.11

Great Britain

26.06.11

Europe

12.06.11

Canada

29.05.11

Monaco

22.05.11

Spain

08.05.11

Turkey

17.04.11

China

10.04.11

Malaysia

27.03.11

Australia

THE REST OF THE NEWS

1 15 56 67 315

The number of Grands Prix

The percentage of the lap spent braking

Number of gear changes per lap

In km/h, this is the lowest apex speed at T3

In km/h, this is the top speed approaching T3

This is the highest g-force the drivers experience in the lap at T9 for two seconds

3.5 55 56 275 1100

(English, French, Portuguese, German, Polish and Russian versions) On Twitter: twitter.com/OfficialLRGP On Facebook: facebook.com/LotusRenaultGP On YouTube: youtube.com/LRGPTV Vitaly on Twitter: twitter.com/vitalypetrov10 Bruno on Twitter: twitter.com/BSenna Romain on Twitter: twitter.com/Rgrosjean

Number of laps

The percentage of the lap spent at full throttle In km/h, this is the highest apex speed at T8 In metres, the longest distance on full throttle between T2 and T3

Who’s who at LRGP? • Gerard Lopez Chairman • Eric Boullier Team Principal and Managing Director • Patrick Louis Chief Operating Officer • James Allison Technical Director • Naoki Tokunaga Deputy Technical Director • Martin Tolliday Chief Designer • Dirk de Beer Head of Aerodynamics • John Wickham Team Manager • Alan Permane Trackside Operations Director • Gavin Hudson Chief Mechanic • Stephen Curnow Chief Commercial Officer • Stephane Samson Head of Team Marketing and Communications • Federico Gastaldi Business Development Director • Frederic Garcia Head of Event Marketing TRACKSIDE Hospitality • The girls in our hospitality who will look after our guests are Simona, Adriana and Daniela • Catering: Massimilian, Riccardo and Simoneto

KEY: A accident C clutch D damage DNF did not finish DNQ did not qualify DNS did not start DQ disqualified F fire G gearbox H hyraulics M Mechanical NT no time OL oil leak RW rear wing S suspension Sp spin T transmission WL water leak Wh Wheel

14 • KO REA N G P P R E VIEW • LO T US R E NAULT G P

L O T US RENAULT GP • KO RE A N GP PRE V I EW • 15


Gallery

Scan this QR code to view more images.

16 • KO REA N GP P R E VIE W • L O T US R E NAULT G P

LO T US RENAULT G P • KO RE A N G P PRE V IE W • 17


And Finally…

Media Contacts

Cirebox

Team Principal and Managing Director

Lotus Renault GP Press Office Address Lotus Renault GP Whiteways Technical Centre Enstone Oxfordshire OX7 4EE UK Telephone

+44 (0) 1608 678 000

Facsimile

+44 (0) 1608 678 609

Email pressoffice@lotusrenaultgp.com

Media contacts Stephane Samson, Head of Team Marketing and Communications +44 (0) 7827 307 185 stephane.samson@lotusrenaultgp.com Ben Nichols, Senior Press Officer +44 (0) 7748 920 072 ben.nichols@lotusrenaultgp.com Andy Stobart, Press Officer +44 (0) 7703 366 151 andy.stobart@lotusrenaultgp.com Justine Hoffmann, Press Officer +33 (0) 6 89 66 30 18 justine.hoffmann@lotusrenaultgp.com Website lotusrenaultgp.com Facebook facebook.com/LotusRenaultGP Twitter twitter.com/OfficialLRGP

18 • KO RE A N G P P R E VIE W • LO T US R ENAULT G P


2011 Korean Grand Prix Preview  

Lotus Renault GP prepares for round sixteen of the season in Korea.

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