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Negation In order to negate a statement or question, simply insert lo ‡Ï in front of the word you are negating. Note that in Hebrew ‡Ï means both ‘no’ and ‘not’. Are you a professor? No, I am not a professor. atah profésor? lo, ani lo profesor

¯«ÒÙ«¯Ù ‡Ï È‡ ,‡Ï ?¯«ÒÙ«¯Ù ‰˙‡ Exercise 2 Go back to the dialogue: this time the taxi driver greets a different man, approaching a Mr Cohen instead. Imagine you are Mr Cohen and you come from New York. The taxi driver wants to know if you are a journalist but in fact you are a professor. Read the dialogue sentence by sentence, changing the words to fit this new situation. Check your dialogue against the answer section.

Inseparable prepositions You may have noticed that unlike English the prepositions ‘to’ l’ Ï , ‘from’ mi’ Ó and ‘in’ b’ √ are single letters attached to the noun they precede. These are known as ‘inseparable prepositions’. NB An apostrophe will indicate an inseparable preposition in our transliteration. ‘mi’ becomes me’ before silent letters and some gutturals; e.g. me’oxford. You will however often hear Israelis using mi’ in all cases.

Exercise 3 See if you can pick out these prepositions in the dialogue. Read them aloud.

Colloquial hebrew  

Colloquial hebrew: Easy and enjoyable lessons in Hebrew

Colloquial hebrew  

Colloquial hebrew: Easy and enjoyable lessons in Hebrew

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