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ALOHA 2008

Land-of-Sky Regional Council Annual Report


Aloha 2008 In Hawaii, “Aloha” is used as a traditional greeting and farewell. Given the significant changes that Land-of-Sky Regional Council experienced in fiscal year 2007-2008, we chose to use a tropical theme for this year’s Annual Report to highlight our past year’s accomplishments and welcome the challenges of a new year. In December 2007, Land-of-Sky Regional Council opened the doors to a new office complex after occupying the same space for more than twenty years. The new facility provides more than 17,000 square feet, nearly doubling the size of the previous offices. The new complex maximizes energy efficiency, features state-of-the-art electronic and IT capabilities, and offers premium meeting space for our employees and constituents. Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s Executive Director Joe McKinney

We are confident the new facility will further enhance our mission to foster desirable social, economic, cultural, and ecological conditions for our four counties. It enhances our ability to provide a forum for local government officials and community leaders to address challenges we face in our region.

The 2008 Land-of-Sky Regional Council Annual Report features several of our programs that have helped impact the lives of many citizens in Western North Carolina. We trust it will give you better insight into our organization and the spirit of cooperation that exists between our local governments. We offer you this report as an opportunity to review and say “goodbye” to our past accomplishments and celebrate and say “hello” to our future successes. ALOHA 2008! Joe McKinney Executive Director

Council Members

Carol Peterson & Denise Braine, Buncombe County Chuck McGrady & Bill Moyer, Henderson County Eddie Fox & Vernon Ponder, Madison County Jason Chappell & Kelvin Phillips, Transylvania County Terry Bellamy & Robin Cape, City of Asheville George Goosmann & Charles Grimes, Town of Biltmore Forest Carl Bartlett & Mary Leonard White, Town of Black Mountain Jimmy Harris & Joe Albright, City of Brevard Dave Bucher & Jim Wert, Village of Flat Rock Bob Davy & Mark Biberdorf, Town of Fletcher Greg Newman & Jeff Collis, City of Hendersonville Johnny Norton & Kenny Ramsey, Town of Hot Springs Dona Menella & James Ball, Town of Laurel Park Darhyl Boone, John Chandler, & Bob Zink, Town of Mars Hill Steve Garrison, Luther Nix, & Lawrence Ponder, Town of Marshall Letta Jean Taylor & Bill Hollins, Town of Montreat J.C. Chapman & Roger Petit, Town of Rosman Walt Currie & Don Hallingse, City of Weaverville Jerry VeHaun & Jason Young, Town of Woodfin Jack Roberts, Aging Programs Representative Carmella Watkins, Volunteer Services Representative

At-Large Members 1

Rodney Locks, Transylvania County Simone Bouyer, Madison County Janet Bowman, Madison County

Executive Committee (photographed on front cover)

Eddie Fox, Chair Madison County Commissioner Letta Jean Taylor, First Vice-Chair Mayor of the Town of Montreat Chuck McGrady, Second Vice-Chair Henderson County Commissioner Terry Bellamy, Secretary Mayor of the City of Asheville Carol Peterson, Treasurer Buncombe County Commissioner Rodney Locks, At-Large Member Brevard City Councilman Jason Chappell, At-Large Member Transylvania County Commissioner

Economic Development Representatives Mark Burrows, Transylvania County Larry Blair, Henderson County George Morosani, Buncombe County Jerry Plemmons, Madison County


LOSRC Transforms Shopping Center into Regional Center After four years of discussion and planning concerning a possible move, Land-of-Sky Regional Council (LOSRC) relocated to 339 New Leicester Highway in West Asheville in December 2007. The new office is in the revitalized Leicester Crossing shopping center, which previously housed a Bi-Lo supermarket. LOSRC is leasing 17,767 square feet, nearly twice the space of the old offices. The facility has been completely renovated to maximize energy efficiency, convenience, and wellness for its employees. Since its founding in 1966, LOSRC has focused on resource conservation and energy use reduction in Western North Carolina (WNC). In keeping with these efforts, LOSRC’s new office was designed with a variety of “eco-friendly” features. There are five skylights strategically located to maximize the available natural light. The southwest-facing front windows have been tinted to keep the building’s reception area cool in the summer and reduce the need for air conditioning. The HVAC and lighting systems have timers set on energy-conserving schedules and lighting is provided by low-energy, indirect fluorescents. These features, in addition to furniture and other materials made from recycled content, represent a symbolic effort to promote conservation-minded construction in WNC.

Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s Executive Committee Members Eddie Fox, Carol Peterson, Jason Chappell, and State Representative Bruce Goforth participate in the Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony on March 26, 2008.

The new building also has many features designed to maximize the space’s utility and convenience. The large conference room can host groups of up to 150 people. Each department is equipped with a resource room that can double as a temporary office, and there is more room for storage. Electronics and IT capabilities are integrated within the space with a wireless internet network accessible throughout the building. The medium conference room’s SmartBoard® interacts with LOSRC’s server, and the large conference room’s audiovisual system provides convenient audio and video capability. LOSRC hosted an Open House on March 26, 2008. It featured a ribbon-cutting ceremony and was attended by over 150 people who work with LOSRC. Our organization is enthusiastic about what the future holds for our region and how the new facility will aid in the mission to develop sustainable improvements and fresh solutions for the people and governments of WNC.

Large Conference Room

Medium Conference Room Reception Area Land-of-Sky Regional Council at 339 New Leicester Hwy. Executive Director Joe McKinney’s New Office

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Air Quality Work Featured in National Publication In February 2008, the National Association of Development Organizations (NADO) recognized Land-of-Sky Regional Council (LOSRC) for its work on air quality issues in Western North Carolina. A special report titled Tackling Regional Air Quality Issues: A Breath of Fresh Air for North Carolina Residents praised LOSRC’s commitment to clean air and highlighted several clean air initiatives that the organization has undertaken in the last 15 years. One example of the Council’s clean air advocacy highlighted in the report was a public transit service owned by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. LOSRC leveraged its experience and expertise to help the Cherokee economic development office with a grant application to establish a bio-diesel shuttle running from Cherokee to Gatlinburg, TN. As a result, the project was successfully funded by grants from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the shuttle began operation in July 2006. NADO’s Special Issue Tackling Regional Air Quality Issues: A Breath of Fresh Air for North Carolina Residents

LOSRC has also shown its commitment to innovation by promoting recycling as an air quality initiative. The air-pollution reduction effect of solid waste recycling in the region is equivalent to taking 39,000 cars off the road each year. Nearly a decade ago, LOSRC began working to increase the availability of recycling centers. In recent years, the region’s recycling industry has not only meant cleaner air, but also new jobs for the region.

The NADO special report served to highlight what many in the region already know about Land-of-Sky Regional Council. The Board and employees of LOSRC are deeply committed to ensuring that the pristine natural resources of Western North Carolina are protected for generations to come.

Support from Students Fuels Lucas’ Return Gladys Lucas began volunteering 12 years ago in Michigan and transferred to Land-ofSky Regional Council’s Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) in 2001. Gladys gives an average of 30 hours weekly working with “her children” at Mountain Community School in Henderson County. She works with second grade students who are below grade level in reading and writing. Because of Gladys’ dedication, her students have improved their communication, social interaction with their peers, and reading and writing skills. Gladys has become a model volunteer for FGP and has represented the Program in many radio and newspaper interviews. She continues to spread the word about the love and rewards she finds as a Foster Grandparent and has been very effective in recruiting others to join the Program. In 2004, Gladys received the North Carolina Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service and was honored by Governor Mike Easley for her leadership and dedication as a Foster Grandparent volunteer.

Foster Grandparent Gladys Lucas

Teachers and administrators who work with Foster Grandparents have seen a vast improvement in students’ academic performances, social and emotional behaviors, language skills, and other developmental abilities. The Program also benefits the schools financially by providing volunteer instruction valued at $1.3 million annually. Gladys has overcome many challenges in her life, including a battle with breast cancer. In 2007, after ten years of remission, Gladys was told the cancer had returned to her lungs. She underwent aggressive chemotherapy and radiation, but never complained or lost her positive outlook on life. During her treatment, Gladys received cards and notes daily from the children and teachers with whom she works, which fueled her desire to return to volunteering.

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In January 2008, Gladys was able to return to the school for three hours a day, no doubt a result of her positive outlook and love for the children. The challenges that “Granny Gladys” has overcome highlight the unparalleled love, dedication, and joy that she brings to her work with the children at the Mountain Community School.


Buncombe Commissioners Adopt County Aging Plan On April 8, 2008, Buncombe County Commissioners adopted The Buncombe County Aging Plan (2008-2012), which was presented by The “Livable, Aging-Friendly Community” Planning Task Force of the Buncombe County Aging Coordinating Consortium (BCACC). The Plan includes six components – Financial Well-being, Health and Wellness, Safety and Security, Living Environments, Service and Support Coordination, and Social Engagement. These components contain specific recommendations – 116 in total – which will be addressed over the next four years. The Aging Plan is the result of the participation of over 500 people – 60 people comprised the Task Force and Work Teams, and approximately 450 residents and experienced aging-service providers attended community meetings or completed surveys. The effort was guided by Planning Task Force Chair Beth Lazer, Warren Wilson College Social Work Department Chair Dr. Alison Climo, and Area Agency on Aging (AAA) Director Joe Connolly. Buncombe County has contracted with Land-of-Sky Regional Council AAA to guide agencies on implementing the recommendations of the plan, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of existing services to older adults, and to advocate in the community for initiatives to bring about a livable, aging-friendly community.

The Buncombe County Aging Plan (2008-2012)

“Achieving this vision will demand a paradigm shift in our views of aging,” says Beth Lazer. “This plan represents a dramatic departure from ‘business as usual’ in terms of how we think about aging and planning for older adult services. We will need to challenge the perception that aging is a disease, build broad community support for the importance of healthy lifestyles, and promote awareness that planning for one’s later years begins long before age 65. Lastly, we must acknowledge that older adults bring significant economic and civic assets to our community.”

Dickens Rallies Support for Project C.A.R.E. Federal funding for Project C.A.R.E. (Caregiver Alternative to Running on Empty) was set to end in June 2008. Speaker of the North Carolina Senior Tar Heel Legislature and Buncombe County Delegate Charles Dickens led the effort to advocate for the state to sustain the program’s funding. Project C.A.R.E. is a nationally recognized Alzheimer’s Demonstration Program administered through the North Carolina Division of Aging and Adult Services. It serves caregivers of persons with dementia in 14 counties, including Buncombe, Madison, Henderson and Transylvania, by providing funding for consumer-directed respite care and family support.

North Carolina Senior Tar Heel Legislature Speaker and Buncombe County Delegate Charles Dickens

Speaker Dickens worked with the Alzheimer’s Association Western Carolina Chapter and Area Agencies on Aging to develop and deliver a series of regional forums across the state. Older adults, family members, caregivers, community leaders, and media were invited to learn about the benefits of Project C.A.R.E. at these meetings. Program staff, consultants and appreciative clients facilitated these forums.

Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s Family Caregiver Specialist Carol McLimans served on the planning committee for the first public forum held at Haywood Community College in March 2008. Representatives Bruce Goforth, Phil Haire, Ray Rapp, and Senator John Snow attended and expressed their support for Project C.A.R.E. A bill was passed in the 2008-2009 session of the North Carolina General Assembly for $500,000 to sustain Project C.A.R.E. and was signed into law by Governor Mike Easley in July. 4


North Carolina Has Plans for Your Bottles and Cans In response to manufacturing companies’ need for greater supply of recycled materials, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a law requiring establishments holding an Alcohol and Beverage Control permit to recycle beverage containers. The law ensures recyclable materials are recovered and reused by manufacturers, while helping to meet statewide waste diversion goals. As a result, bottles and cans began clinking their way from bars and restaurants across North Carolina to recycling facilities on January 1, 2008. Land-of-Sky Regional Council worked with the NC Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance (DPPEA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Glass Packaging Institute (GPI), and recyclers and waste haulers to develop a public relations campaign to promote awareness of the new law. This “Partnership for Bar and Restaurant Recycling” provides marketing tools such as advertisements and posters. The public relations campaign promotes these recycling efforts to the public, increases public awareness about recycling, and generates employee support for bar and restaurant recycling.

“Partnership for Bar and Restaurant Recycling”

New Program Helps Improve QUality Of Life for Older Adults The Land-of-Sky Regional Council (LOSRC) Area Agency on Aging (AAA) has joined a state-wide initiative to empower older adults who have chronic health concerns. The North Carolina Division of Aging and Adult Services (DAAS) and the Division of Public Health (DPH) have partnered with Area Agencies on Aging to mobilize a statewide campaign to implement and sustain the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP). Developed by researchers at Stanford University and funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging, CDSMP is a skill-building workshop series that helps people with one or more chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, chronic pain, hypertension, cancer, and arthritis) learn to manage their condition and improve their quality of life. The six-week program is research-based and led by volunteer leaders who live with chronic health conditions. The CDSMP’s ultimate goal is to reduce the risk and occurrence of disease and disability among adults 60 and older. CDSMP implementation has begun in seven regions across the state and is expected to expand to 17 regions. LOSRC’s AAA has led the effort by offering training and workshops in each of the four counties. The program’s success is the result of vision and strong leadership, as well as partnerships with the Mountain Area Health Education Center, the Madison County Health Department, Transylvania Community Hospital, the Lakeview Senior Center, Silvermont Opportunity Center, Pardee Health Education Center, and our volunteer program leaders.

WRP Hosts Foreign Environmental Exchange Delegation

Ukrainian delegation

In the summer of 2007, a delegation from the Ukraine visited the Asheville area to study new approaches to environmental management. As part of their tour, the group spent an afternoon with Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s (LOSRC) Waste Reduction Partners (WRP). A presentation by WRP staff and volunteers focused on the concept of utilizing retired engineers and scientists to provide technical assistance on such environmental issues as water and energy efficiency, solid waste disposal, and pollution prevention. The group was also given information about LOSRC’s Regional Brownfields Initiative, followed by a tour of Mica Village lofts, a successfully redeveloped Brownfields site. Through the presentations and the question-and-answer sessions that followed, the delegates were encouraged to initiate similar programs in their respective locations in the Ukraine.

This week-long visit by the Ukrainian delegation was arranged through the Open World Program affiliated with The Library of Congress. The group also visited other facilities and organizations dedicated to improving the environment, including the Metropolitan Sewerage District, Warren Wilson College, and the Blue Ridge Parkway. 5

Through this visit, LOSRC was able to gain an understanding of the considerable environmental challenges faced by regions in the Ukraine. During this information exchange, WRP’s staff and volunteers provided the delegates with new alternatives that could help them address these problems.


Mica Village Lofts – A Brownfields Success Story A $20,000 LOSRC Brownfields grant investment has enabled an Asheville developer to convert an old mica processing plant into ten eco-friendly luxury condos. Mica Village is the first residential Brownfield redevelopment in WNC and is located at 75 Thompson Street. The condos overlook the Swannanoa River and were developed using the 3R concept- Reduce, Recycle and Reuse. The development has been given the stamp of approval by the WNC Green Building Council for meeting benchmarks in the areas of energy efficiency, indoor air quality, water conservation, smart land use, and more. By reusing materials found on the site and working with local artists and suppliers, more than 60% of the materials in the finished building have been recycled and reclaimed. Living spaces are located on the upper levels of the building with open parking on the ground level.

Mica Village Lofts - An Eco Friendly Community located at 75 Thompson Street by the Swannanoa River in Asheville

The Regional Brownfields Initiative (RBI) provided the seed money towards an environmental assessment of the property, assisted the developer with a NC Brownfields Agreement and liability protection, and eased the way for financial assistance to redevelop the property. Chemicals had seeped into the soil from neighboring properties, qualifying it for Brownfields status according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Landscaping solutions, such as pervious pavers in the entrance driveway, allow rainwater to dilute the toxins and heal the soil. “Without the $20,000 assessment investment from Land-of-Sky, the banks wouldn’t even talk to me,” said the developer, Regina Trantham.

Area Agencies Collaborate To Update Special Needs Registry In 2007, Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s (LOSRC) Area Agency on Aging (AAA) helped reinvigorate the Special Needs Registry in Buncombe County. This effort was made possible through the commitment and partnership of the AAA, Buncombe County Emergency Services, Asheville-Mountain Area Chapter of the American Red Cross, Buncombe County Department of Social Services, and United Way’s 2-1-1. The Buncombe County Special Needs Registry is a database that provides vital information on residents who have special medical needs. Participation in the program is voluntary. This Registry assists emergency responders in the event of a 911 call and/or during a widespread disaster, such as a flood, blizzard, or an extended power outage. The information collected may also be used to help determine the need and availability of appropriate supplies and resources for emergency shelters in the county. In the event of an emergency, those on the Special Needs Registry can be contacted, have needs assessed, and given information on how to respond and directions to nearby shelters. Special Needs Registry forms are available through the Buncombe County Emergency Management website and have been disseminated through churches, Meals on Wheels, Mission Hospital, Western Alliance for Independent Living, members of the Mayor’s Task Force for People with Disabilities, and other local agencies. Henderson County has established an award-winning program that is currently in use. LOSRC is committed to supporting similar efforts in Madison and Transylvania Counties. 6


Regional Accomplishments The Family Caregiver Support Program (FCSP) provided a $28,000 contract with the Alzheimer’s Association Western Carolina Chapter for caregiver respite and a $6,000 contract for caregiver case assistance in all Region B counties. 36 caregivers were provided assistance with 20 from Buncombe County, ten from Henderson County and six from Transylvania County. The FCSP also provided $10,000 to the Senior Companion Program for caregiver respite. Ten caregivers were provided assistance with eight from Buncombe County and two from Henderson County. The Volunteer Services Department hosted a Wellness Fair promoting physical and mental fitness for over 300 volunteers on October 18, 2007, at the NC Arboretum. Volunteers participated in health and wellness presentations, free health screenings, blood pressure, and vision checks. Local agencies provided information about services within our community. On May 1, 2008, the Volunteer Services Department hosted a Volunteer Celebration Luncheon in appreciation of volunteers of the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, Waste Reduction Partners, and various advisory boards and committees at LOSRC. Approximately 100 volunteers enjoyed a catered lunch, live music, and also received a gift. Les Mitchell was awarded the 2008 Kathleen Godwin Cole Award. Since retiring in the early 1990s, Mr. Mitchell has contributed his time, talent and expertise to a variety of organizations in Buncombe County. The award was established in early 1990 in memory and honor of Kathleen Godwin Cole, who served for several years on the Advisory Council on Aging and was Chair of its Contractor Relations Committee.  This award is given annually to one volunteer, age 60 or better, who has made a major contribution in programs providing service to other older persons. The Health Adventure provided a five-week Nutrition Challenge workshop for volunteers of the Foster Grandparent and Senior Companion Programs. Volunteers learned how to improve their quality of life through proper nutrition. In FY08, Waste Reduction Partners provided more than 16,714 hours of technical assistance to businesses, industries, and institutions in the WNC region. This assistance, provided primarily by retired professionals, helped 120 organizations save an estimated $2.07 million in annual utility costs while improving their environmental performance. Clients reduced their carbon footprint by an amount equivalent to the emissions of 1,557 automobiles. LOSRC staff worked with the French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and the City of Asheville to complete a local planning process to access two new sources of federal transit funds. The project team conducted a Coordinated Public Transportation and Human Services Transportation planning process for Buncombe, Haywood, and Henderson Counties. A Request for Proposals was released to identify projects for funding through the Job Access Reverse Commute and New Freedom programs. Three projects were selected for funding by 7 the MPO and have been submitted to the Federal Transit Administration for approval.

LOSRC developed and implemented a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) for 2007-2012. Key strategic initiatives in the CEDS are Regional Growth Management Planning; Transportation and Air Quality; Housing; and the Regional Brownfields Initiative. The CEDS Strategy Committee chose “Regional Coordination” as the overarching theme of the 2007-2012 CEDS. The Council obtained two grants from the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center totaling $440,000 for a planning and business development project for clean energy and alternative fuels. The project seeks to help existing businesses in these sectors, to assist local entrepreneurs to create new clean energy businesses, to help local governments plan for a robust energy future, and to recover some of the estimated $377 million spent out-of-region to purchase energy and fuels by switching to locally produced renewable energy and energy efficiency. Local Government Services’ staff authored and received a $95,000 grant award from the US Department of Agriculture entitled “Leading the Way to Sustainability.” Waste Reduction Partners (WRP) and LOSRC staff will use grant funding to help public and private sector organizations achieve their sustainability goals by implementing energy efficiency, waste reduction, and water conservation programs. LOSRC’s Mobile Environmental Learning Center (MELC) visited 12 schools in Buncombe, Madison, Henderson, and Transylvania Counties, educating over 2,500 students on recycling and empowering teachers at each school with new solid waste educational tools. The continued implementation of the NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources Wastewater Discharge Elimination (WaDE) grant resulted in more than $200,000 in grant funds to eliminate failing septic systems and wastewater discharge. LOSRC led an effort to achieve US Department of Energy “Clean Cities” designation for the region. This encourages local governments and private sector fleet managers to explore and implement alternative fuel and clean vehicle technologies. LOSRC’s Voluntary Buffer Partnership received a $139,000 grant from the NC Clean Water Management Trust Fund to place conservation easements on riverside forested areas on two sites in Madison County. An Area Agency on Aging consultant developed a grant application to help initiate an Aging and Disability Resources Connections (ADRC) program in Region B. ADRC is a coordinated service delivery system where older adults and people with disabilities can receive consistent, comprehensive information, assistance and access to longterm support services in their communities. LOSRC’s WNC Stormwater Partnership developed educational tools including television public service announcements, a print ad campaign, brochures, a regional website, training sessions for local officials, and newsletter articles.


Buncombe County Accomplishments Home and Community Care Block Grant provided $1,995,193 in funding for 13 different services that helped support over 1,900 older adults living independently in their homes. Through this funding, 649 older adults were given nutritional meals, 66 participated in Adult Day programs, 186 received in-home health care and home repair services, and 1,034 received transportation services. The Family Caregiver Support Program provided a $14,000 contract with the Council on Aging of Buncombe County, Inc., for caregiver respite and a $5,000 contract for caregiver case assistance. 21 caregivers were provided assistance. WRP engineers worked with over 35 businesses, industries, non-profits, local governments, and schools in Buncombe County, helping them save an estimated $690,000 in utility costs. WRP recommended energy savings of over 72,000 million Btu. Senior Community Service Employment Program provided job-search training and part-time employment worth $88,578 to 30 older adults placed in 19 different organizations. Two participants were placed in unsubsidized employment. The Regional Brownfields Initiative secured a $43,500 grant from the EPA to conduct a demonstration project through a student design competition on a redevelopment site in the River District. Foster Grandparent Program saved Buncombe County more than $1.2 million. 68 Foster Grandparent volunteers served over 64,832 hours to help special needs or at-risk children achieve their short- and long-term goals. Regional Ombudsmen provided 682 hours in response to 137 complainants regarding longterm care, responded to 642 technical assistance calls, and provided 26 education/training sessions. 42 Community Advisory Committee volunteers contributed 602 hours and made 265 visits to longterm care facilities. These volunteers provided a financial value of $6,020 in services to the county.

Area Agency on Aging secured $1,600 in funding from Progress Energy which provided 22 fans and ten air conditioners to older adults in need through the Fan/ Heat Relief Program. These units were distributed by Council on Aging of Buncombe County, Inc. The Regional Brownfields Initiative completed assessment activities for environmental conditions on six sites identified for redevelopment. The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program saved Buncombe County more than $484,000, with 234 volunteers giving over 25,780 hours to local government and non-profit agencies. The Ombudsman Program and AARP presented a Scam Jam at Ardenwoods Retirement Community on October 11, 2007. Scam Jams are seminars where local professionals update and inform the community on current scams affecting NC. Senior Companion Program saved Buncombe County more than $810,000. 43 Senior Companion volunteers served over 41,500 hours to assist older adults with one-on-one care in their homes. Local Government Services staff facilitated the Montreat Landcare Team and worked with the Town Administrator to obtain a $12,800 grant from DENR’s Mobile Source Emission Reduction program to purchase an electric vehicle on behalf of the Town, Montreat College, and the Mountain Retreat Association. Buncombe County contracted with LOSRC to develop a greenways map and preliminary plans for the County. The map and plans were adopted by the County and are included in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. Local Government Services staff designed a recycling advertisement for the City of Asheville which encouraged attendees to recycle during the Bele Chere festival. The ad illustrated the positive environmental outcomes resulting from the 7,000+ tons Asheville citizens recycled in 2007.

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Henderson County Accomplishments Home and Community Care Block Grant provided $890,931 in funding for 14 different services that helped support over 900 older adults living independently in their homes. Through this funding, 488 older adults were given nutritional meals, 17 participated in Adult Day programs, 210 received inhome health care and home repair services, and 189 received transportation services. The Family Caregiver Support Program provided a $12,000 contract with Pardee Pavilion for caregiver respite and a $5,000 contract with Henderson County Council on Aging for caregiver case assistance. 25 caregivers were provided assistance. The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program saved Henderson County more than $500,800, with 265 volunteers giving over 26,680 hours to local government and non-profit agencies. The Senior Companion Program saved Henderson County more than $110,000. Eight Senior Companion volunteers served over 5,600 hours to assist older adults with one-on-one care in their homes. Senior Community Service Employment Program provided job-search training and part-time employment worth $18,520 to four older adults placed in one organization. Regional Ombudsmen provided 177 hours in response to 43 complainants regarding long-term care, responded to 328 technical assistance calls, and provided nine education/training sessions. 29 Community Advisory Committee volunteers contributed 1,254 hours and made 470 visits to longterm care facilities. These volunteers provided a financial value of $12,540 in services to the county. Area Agency on Aging secured $1,329 in funding from Duke Energy and Progress Energy which provided 110 fans to older adults in need through the Fan/ Heat Relief Program. These units were distributed by Henderson County Council on Aging and Western Carolina Community Action – Hendersonville.

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Foster Grandparent Program saved the County more than $126,361. Eight Foster Grandparent volunteers served over 6,476 hours to help special needs or at-risk children achieve their short- and long-term goals. The Ombudsman Program and AARP presented a Scam Jam at Lake Point Landing on June 5, 2008. Scam Jams are seminars where local professionals update and inform the community on current scams affecting NC. WRP engineers assisted 14 businesses, industries, local governments, and non-profit facilities, helping them save more than $361,000 in solid waste reduction and energy efficiency strategies. LOSRC staff assisted the Henderson County engineering department in developing a Recycling Coordinator position and helped train the new staffperson. Local Government Services staff administered a $250,000 Division of Community Assistance Small Cities Housing Development Grant to support Henderson County and the Henderson County Habitat for Humanity in the construction of waterlines and the roadway associated with the Shuey Knolls Housing Development. Local Government Services staff administered a $400,000 NC Housing Finance Agency Single Family Rehabilitation Grant, which helped rehabilitate nine Single Family Housing Units. Local Government Services staff administered a NC Housing Finance Agency Housing Efficiency Loan Program (HELP) provided by Duke Energy that assists in making single-family housing units become more energy efficient. LOSRC’s GIS Planner conducted a training class for Town of Fletcher Planning Staff. The class was a “hands-on” lesson demonstrating day-to-day uses of ESRI’s ArcMap.


Madison County Accomplishments Home and Community Care Block Grant provided $447,310 in funding for eight different services that helped support over 575 older adults living independently in their homes. Through this funding, 316 older adults were given nutritional meals, 29 received in-home health care and home repair services, and 238 received transportation services. Senior Community Service Employment Program provided job-search training and part-time employment worth $22,641 to four older adults placed in four different organizations. One participant was placed in unsubsidized employment. Regional Ombudsmen provided 56 hours in response to 17 complainants regarding long-term care, responded to 73 technical assistance calls, and provided one education/training session. 11 Community Advisory Committee volunteers contributed 100 hours and made 18 visits to long-term care facilities. These volunteers provided a financial value of $1,000 in services to the county. Senior Companion Program saved Madison County more than $185,000. Ten Senior Companion volunteers served over 9,500 hours to assist older adults with oneon-one care in their homes. The Family Caregiver Support Program provided a $10,000 contract with Madison County Department of Community Services for caregiver respite. Five caregivers were provided assistance. Foster Grandparent Program saved Madison County more than $42,434. Four Foster Grandparent volunteers served over 2,175 hours to help special needs or at-risk children achieve their short- and long-term goals. Retired and Senior Volunteer Program saved Madison County more than $22,950 with 20 volunteers giving over 1,220 hours to local government and non-profit agencies. WRP engineers provided energy efficiency assessments for the Madison County and Hot Springs libraries. The recommendations could save $2,500 in annual energy costs at these facilities. Rural Transportation Planning Organization staff conducted intersection and traffic accident analyses on behalf of its Madison County members. Highaccident locations were identified using Transportation Engineering and Accident Analysis Software (TEAAS). Madison County contracted with LOSRC to develop a Comprehensive Plan for the County. Work began in the spring of 2008 and is expected to be completed in the fall of 2009.

LOSRC staff provided coaching services to the Town of Marshall through the Rural Center’s NC Small Town Economic Prosperity Program. The Town completed an Economic Development Strategy and has applied for funds from the Rural Center to implement key projects. Local Government Services staff wrote a successful grant application for Marshall for water and wastewater planning. The $40,000 grant from the NC Rural Center will pay for the majority of the $60,000 project. LOSRC will also administer the grant.  Local Government Services staff completed the implementation phase of the Business Area Redevelopment Plan project, which included National Historic District designation for downtown Marshall, loans to six building owners to rehabilitate their properties, and planning and grant-writing assistance. LOSRC staff successfully applied for a $50,000 NC Rural Center grant and a $10,000 NC DPPEA grant on behalf of the Madison County Solid Waste Department. The grants will allow the County to purchase new equipment that will improve recycling bailing and processing capacity. This improvement in efficiency will also help the county save $50 for every ton of cardboard and paper diverted from disposal. Local Government Services staff administered a $164,500 North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center Hurricane Recovery Economic Revitalization Grant. Project activities include completion of two commercial property rehabilitations, completion of a Comprehensive Plan for the Town of Hot Springs, and the creation of a business area national register nomination. Local Government Services staff administered a $750,000 Division of Community Assistance (DCA) Small Cities CDBG Water System Infrastructure Grant for the Town of Marshall. The project will replace aging waterlines. Local Government Services staff assisted the Town of Marshall in securing a $300,000 Appalachian Regional Commission Grant to contribute to the cost of constructing new wells, new storage tanks, and replacing undersized and/or deteriorated waterlines. Local Government Services staff assisted the Town of Mars Hill in securing a $500,000 NC Rural Economic Development Grant and a $300,000 Appalachian Regional Commission Grant to contribute to the construction of a waterline 10 interconnection with the Town of Weaverville.


Transylvania County Accomplishments Home and Community Care Block Grant provided $332,336 in funding for 11 different services that helped support over 375 older adults living independently in their homes. Through this funding, 135 older adults were given nutritional meals, 40 participated in Adult Day programs, 106 received in-home health care, and home repair services, and 106 received transportation services. The Family Caregiver Support Program provided a $10,000 contract with Transylvania Community Hospital Home Care for caregiver respite. Seven caregivers were provided assistance. Retired and Senior Volunteer Program saved Transylvania County more than $266,800 with 133 volunteers giving over 14,200 hours to local government and non-profit agencies. Foster Grandparent Program saved Transylvania County more than $93,906. Five Foster Grandparent volunteers served over 4,813 hours to help special needs or at-risk children achieve their short- and long-term goals. Regional Ombudsmen provided 71 hours in response to 15 complainants regarding long-term care and responded to 94 technical assistance calls. Ten Community Advisory Committee volunteers contributed 76 hours and made 24 visits to long-term care facilities. These volunteers provided a financial value of $760 in services to the county. Area Agency on Aging secured funding from Duke Energy provided 20 fans to older adults in need through the Fan/Heat Relief Program. These units were distributed by Western Carolina Community Action – Brevard. The Senior Companion Program saved Transylvania County more than $95,000. Five Senior Companion volunteers served over 4,800 hours to assist older adults with one-on-one care in their homes. WRP engineers worked with seven commercial and non-profit facilities in Transylvania County. The technical assistance helped save an estimated $22,000 in energy efficiency and solid waste management costs. Senior Community Service Employment Program provided job-search training and parttime employment worth $5,877 to one 11 older adult placed in an organization.

LOSRC staff successfully administered a $35,000 DCA Small Cities CDBG Hookup Grant. The project will assist the City of Brevard in connecting three single family housing units to the City sewer system and eliminating three failing septic systems. Rural Transportation Planning Organization (RPO) staff conducted intersection and traffic accident analyses on behalf of its Transylvania County members. High-accident locations were identified using Transportation Engineering and Accident Analysis Software (TEAAS). Staff also assisted with deployment of the RPO’s four Nu-Metrics Hi-Star traffic counters in the City of Brevard. Local Government Services staff facilitated Transylvania County Commissioners’ annual planning workshop on April 12, 2008. Local Government Services staff presented a Landcare concept to Transylvania County Community Appearance Initiative Advisory Committee and administered a $1,500 grant to the County to cover expenses for this voluntary approach to junk removal. By request, LOSRC staff met with the Transylvania Community Hospital (TCH) to help plan a recycling program. TCH hopes to showcase corporate sustainability strategies in its waste reduction, energy efficiency, and water conservation programs. The recycling program is planned to begin during the fall of 2008. LOSRC staff assisted Transylvania County with the administration of a $400,000 Department of Commerce Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). The construction of the Blue Ridge Business Incubator (BRBI) is the third phase of the Transylvania County Economic Recovery strategy. The BRBI has been constructed on the existing campus of Blue Ridge Community College. Local Government Services staff assisted the City of Brevard in the administration and implementation of a NC Department of Commerce Division of Community Assistance Small Cities CDBG Revitalization Strategies Grant. This $350,000 grant was the last part of a five-year grant totaling $1.5 million. LOSRC Housing Staff assisted the City of Brevard with development, administration, management, leadership development, and construction and rehabilitation activities management.


Hands-on Approach to Medication Therapy Management On October 1, 2007, Lt. Gov. Beverly Perdue launched ChecKmeds NC, a new Medication Therapy Management (MTM) Program, which provides an advanced level of pharmacy services to Medicare Part D recipients. One purpose of ChecKmeds NC, a program funded by the North Carolina Health and Wellness Trust Fund Commission, is to ensure patients are taking their prescribed and over-the-counter medications appropriately. Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s Senior Companion Program (SCP) and Foster Grandparent Program (FGP), along with the Area Agency on Aging (AAA) and local Kerr Drugs Pharmacy, worked together to bring this service to all SCP and FGP volunteers. Kerr Drug pharmacist Lori Brown collaborated with AAA Health Promotion Specialist Rebecca Chaplin, FGP Manager Stacy Friesland, and SCP Manager Tracy Ash to bring seven pharmacists and pharmacy interns to their May 2008 in-service training. They held one-on-one 20-minute medication reviews with all FGP and SCP volunteers. The service was available regardless of the volunteers’ status as Medicare Part D recipients. In total, the pharmacists offered services to approximately 60 volunteers, which equaled $1,700 of nonreimbursed support from Kerr Drugs and other community pharmacists. The service had a substantial impact on volunteers and is a great example of interagency collaboration across the public/private sectors.

Paige Best Stocks, PharmD, MAHEC Family Health Center, reviewed Foster Grandparent Shirley McIntyre’s medications at the May 2008 InService Training.

Monthly Trainings Bring Foster Grandparents and Senior Companions Together One of the great assets of our new building at 339 New Leicester Highway is the large spacious conference room. The Volunteer Section is especially excited about the large conference room for many reasons. The Foster Grandparent Program and Senior Companion Program managers are required to provide four hours of monthly training for the volunteers. Prior to our move, the trainings had to be done separately by program and, due to lack of space, two sessions were required in one day for each program. In March 2008, we combined the Foster Grandparent Program and Senior Companion Program trainings. The trainings are now held one day a month and the volunteers from both programs attend together. The average number of volunteers that attend is anywhere from 100 to 125. At the first combined training one of the volunteers commented “It’s like a high school reunion.” The Foster Grandparent volunteers enjoy learning about what the Senior Companion volunteers do and the Senior Companions are interested in what the Foster Grandparents do. We have had a variety of speakers, including the Health Adventure, a representative from the Buncombe County Special Needs Registry, CheKmeds NC, and “A Garden for Every Nook and Granny” presented by the NC Cooperative Extension Services. We end each training with an exercise session, which has been a huge success. Foster Grandparents and Senior Companions come together in the large conference room at LOSRC for their monthly In-Service trainings.

For National Volunteer Week this year we were able to have a sit-down Recognition Luncheon in the large conference room for over 100 Land-ofSky Regional Council volunteers. It was huge success and the volunteers enjoyed the luncheon and the accommodations as well.

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Retired Nurse Aids Volunteer Programs Once a nurse, always a nurse. Or at least that’s the way it is with Mary Burgess, a retired RN and a dedicated Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) volunteer at Landof-Sky Regional Council. Mary joined RSVP in September 2006 after seeing an ad in the local newspaper. She began volunteering at the local genealogy society, but her primary interest remained in the medical field. When the need arose for a nurse to give basic physicals to Senior Companion Program (SCP) and Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) volunteers, Mary brushed off her nursing skills and put them to good use. For the past two years she has checked blood pressure, measured height and weight, and helped with medication management for SCP and FGP volunteers. Mary’s contribution not only saves the volunteers money, but also the Mary Burgess checks the blood time it takes for an extra visit to their doctors’ offices. When asked if having Mary come to pressure of Foster Grandparent an In-Service training to give physicals was helpful, Senior Companion volunteer Edna Trulla Davis. Metcalf said, “Absolutely.” Metcalf added, “[She] talked to me about my blood pressure and medications. She made me feel comfortable.” Metcalf said it was nice because, “you don’t have to go to so much effort to go to the doctor’s. You don’t have to sit and wait and wait.” For her volunteer efforts, RSVP Lead Program Coordinator Connie Pegg and RSVP Coordinator Bennie Norman chose to honor Mary by selecting her to be recognized at the 2008 Director of Volunteers in Agencies (DOVIA) luncheon held at Crest Mountain.

WRP Provides Waste Reduction Tips to News Media Early in 2008, the Asheville Citizen-Times invited Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s Waste Reduction Partners (WRP) to provide a bi-weekly waste reduction tip to the Business Section of their newspaper. Each of the WRP teams – energy, water, and solid waste – prepares a series of tips on their particular areas of expertise and submits them to WRP staff for review prior to publication. The tips offer simple, direct suggestions for reducing waste in the business and commercial sectors, and can generally be applied to residential use as well. Some examples include: - Replacing incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent bulbs can reduce lighting costs by up to 75%; - A 50% reduction in flushing water consumption can be achieved by replacing older toilets with more efficient models made after 1994; - Refurbishing old office carpet can cost half as much as new carpet and can double the normal life span of a floor covering; - Commercial electric motor-driven systems consume 63% of all electricity used for industrial purposes, and replacing standard efficiency motors with premium efficiency ones can reduce costs by up to 5%. Additional conservation tips can be found online at www.landofsky.org/wrp.

WRP Waste Reduction Tip as seen in the Asheville Citizen-Times

Madison County Tax Office Benefits from Internet Mapping In 2007, Land-of-Sky Regional Council (LOSRC) began providing Internet Mapping Services to the Madison County Tax Office. This service allows realtors, appraisers, and citizens in Madison County to access maps, geographic data, and property tax records through an interactive website. Previously, all real estate and property tax inquiries required assistance from the Madison County Tax Office. Users of this site can access important property information such as the owner’s name, total acres, sale price, sale date, and property value. They can also view and query many other spatial features such as roads, streams, and 2006 True-Color Aerial Photos. There are many tools built into the system that allow users to search by Property Identification Number (PIN), owner, deed book, or deed page.

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The availability of this web-based tool has eliminated the need for people to travel to the Tax Office to access property information. Records can be accessed by the public at http://www.landofskygis.org/MadisonIMS or by visiting the Madison County webpage. Funding for this project was provided by a National Spatial Data Infrastructure Cooperative Agreement Program grant from the Federal Geographic Data Committee, as well as the North Carolina Department of Transportation and LOSRC.


Organizations Unite to Provide a Unified Voice for Regional Transportation Our roads and transportation systems do not stop at county or municipal boundaries, so planning our transportation infrastructure at a regional level is critically important. Throughout North Carolina, regional organizations dedicated to transportation planning work to ensure that each region’s needs and priorities are met. Transportation planning is accomplished in our region through two organizations, the French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), and the Land-of-Sky Rural Transportation Planning Organization (RPO). Land-of-Sky Regional Council (LOSRC) has been the Lead Planning Agency for the RPO since its chartering in 2003. The RPO provides transportation planning assistance to the rural portions of Buncombe, Haywood, Madison, and Transylvania Counties. The MPO serves the urbanized areas of Buncombe, Haywood, and Henderson Counties. In late 2007, members of the MPO began discussions to transfer the Lead Planning Agency function for the MPO from the City of Asheville to LOSRC. With the support of the Asheville City Council, members of both the MPO and the RPO, and the LOSRC Board, plans have been put in place to complete the transition of Lead Planning Agency function by January 1, 2009. Both the RPO and the MPO provide a forum for public participation in transportation planning, prioritize local transportation needs, and collaborate with local, state, and federal partners on transportation issues. Together, the MPO and RPO can work towards more coordinated transportation planning for the entire five-county region. With a unified voice for regional transportation priorities, our local governments will more effectively meet the transportation needs of our region.

Regional Trails Connect French Broad Communities In 2007, the North Carolina State Trails Program began working with regions across the state to develop regional trail systems that will interconnect in a comprehensive statewide trail network. As part of this program, Land-of-Sky Regional Council developed a regional trail plan for the French Broad watershed. This plan covers the five-county area that includes Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson, Madison, and Transylvania Counties in Western North Carolina. The goal of this plan is to help communities in the region work together on greenways and open space plans to create and maintain connections between communities. The plan maps existing trails, open spaces, bicycle routes and proposed local and regional trails. Workshops were held to solicit input from local planners, experts and the general public. The map shows a network of general trail locations and proposed connections. The plan also identifies several high priority regional connections/trails, which include: • Along the length of the French Broad River, with walking/biking and boating trails – providing connections between cities, towns, Pisgah National Forest, the Appalachian Trail, Blue Ridge Parkway, and the state-sponsored Mountains-to-Sea Trail; • Connections between DuPont State Forest, Hendersonville, Brevard, and Pisgah National Forest; • Along the Swannanoa River, connecting Black Mountain, Swannanoa and Asheville, and extending over to Old Fort in McDowell County; and connections between Canton, Clyde, Waynesville, and Maggie Valley, and to the greenways in these towns. The Preliminary Plan of the North Carolina’s Regional Trails and Open Space Plan

The preliminary plan was released in June 2008 and as a “living-plan” will continue to grow and change as Western North Carolina residents provide additional input. 14


EPA Recognizes Award-Winning Brownfields Program The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded $400,000 each to the Land-of-Sky Regional Council (LOSRC) Regional Brownfields Initiative (RBI) and the City of Asheville. The check presentation ceremony was on Thursday, April 10, 2008. The funds will provide assistance to prospective developers for environmental assessments of Brownfields properties in Region B (Buncombe, Henderson, Madison, and Transylvania Counties) and Asheville’s River Revitalization Area. The national award-winning RBI continues to grow through its partnerships with private and public investors. By encouraging investment in Brownfield sites, the Initiative seeks to protect human health and the environment through site revitalization. With these grants, the RBI has brought $3,250,000 to the region in Brownfields assistance.

Jimmy Palmer, EPA Southeast Regional Administrator, presented Mayor Bellamy the City of Asheville award and Joe McKinney the LOSRC award on April 10, 2008

The RBI has provided financial and technical assistance to seventeen sites throughout Region B since the program began in 2002. The RBI estimates assessment funds to date have leveraged over $250 million in revitalization and burgeoning development. Six of the RBI sites are located in Asheville’s river district. The City’s new grants will expand economic development opportunities for additional sites along the French Broad and Swannanoa Rivers. EPA Brownfields grants are highly competitive. Of the 194 assessment grants awarded nationally for 2008, LOSRC and the City of Asheville were two of six grantees in North Carolina.

LOSRC Staff Gives Back to the Community Land-of-Sky Regional Council (LOSRC) employees are not only involved in their communities through their work at the Council, but through individual volunteerism as well. To promote these individual volunteer efforts, LOSRC grants one hour of leave for every hour an employee takes to volunteer, up to four hours. This benefit enables employees to take one full day per year to participate in volunteer activities. During the past year, several employees spent a day participating in building a home as part of Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build program. Another employee greeted and registered blood donors at the American Red Cross blood drive held for the West Asheville/Enka-Candler community. Some staff spent their time working with youth, including the Communities in Schools and Kids in the Creek programs, The Asheville Tourists Children’s Fund, and 4-H. Other employees have used their time to provide support for LOSRC staff and volunteers, including transportation to doctor appointments, as well as radiation and chemotherapy treatments. While encouraging staff to donate much-needed volunteer hours to the community, this practice has also strengthened LOSRC as an organization by allowing staff members to work outside the office with members of other departments. Participants have also gained a “sense of place” and a better awareness of needs in their communities.

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Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build Program Pictured Above: LOSRC staff Rebecca Chaplin and Danna Harrell-Stansbury along with Women Build Project Managers Pictured Left: LOSRC staff Danna Harrell-Stansbury, Kate O’Hara, Bonnie Smith, and Tracy Wahl along with Women Build Project Manager


Ombudsmen Craft Improved Care Plan Following allegations of misconduct, a 61-year-old resident of an area nursing home received a discharge notice from his facility’s administration. The resident’s family contacted Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s (LOSRC) Ombudsman Office, which is tasked with advocating for residents of long-term care facilities. An investigation began that focused on medical, social, psychological, and pharmacological research in efforts to understand the allegations made against the resident, who dearly loved the facility in which he lived. With the help of medical professionals, extensive research revealed the resident was exhibiting behaviors indicative of his medical diagnosis resulting from a stroke. Also, an experimental dosage of medication had exacerbated his behavior. A review of the resident’s history showed that several approaches typically used to deal with the alleged behaviors were not exercised by the staff.

Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s Ombudsmen from left to right: Lee Ann Smith, Terry Collins, and Barbara Hinshaw

After presenting the evidence to the State Ombudsman Office, it was determined the discharge was inappropriate. In response, the LOSRC’s Ombudsman Office facilitated in-service training for the facility’s staff on behaviors associated with strokes and brain injuries. An agreement was reached between the resident, his family, and the nursing home which allowed him to continue to live in the home under an improved care plan. LOSRC’s Ombudsman played a critical role in this incident which ensured improvement in the quality of life for the resident, the family, the nursing home staff, and community stakeholders.

A Tribute to Kathy Thorpe In February 2008, Land-of-Sky Regional Council lost a valued leader and advocate through the passing of Kathy Thorpe, a North Carolina Cooperative Extension Agent with Transylvania County. Kathy was involved in so many different ways with our work here at Land-of-Sky Regional Council. As chair of the Transylvania County Council on Aging, she served as a key member of the Area Agency on Aging (AAA) Advisory Council. She was the sole Senior Health Insurance Information Program representative in Transylvania County and chaired the Home and Community Care Block Grant Committee. In support of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, sponsored by the AAA, she provided transportation to senior participants. Kathy’s collaboration with Land-of-Sky Regional Council was not limited to the AAA. She was instrumental in developing and implementing a special nutrition class, Out to Lunch, for limited-income volunteers in the Foster Grandparent and Senior Companion programs. Kathy also played an instrumental role in environmental education. She contributed to the development of the Mobile Environmental Learning Center, which teaches recycling to students and members of the public across the Land-of-Sky Region.

Kathy Thorpe (second from right) celebrates Active Aging Week 2007 with committee members.

Despite the magnitude and variety of Kathy’s regional accomplishments, her primary legacy will no doubt be her leadership in the development of the Silvermont Opportunity Center in Brevard. Before the center opened, Transylvania County was one of only a few counties in North Carolina without a senior center. Because of Kathy’s efforts towards the Center’s development, seniors in Transylvania County now have a place to gather and hold meetings. In addition to her regional accomplishments, Kathy was also nationally recognized as Woman of the Year by the American Association of University Women on May 8, 2007. Those who were fortunate enough to have been touched by Kathy’s gentle and loving spirit know that her gifts extended far beyond these professional titles and accreditations. Kathy had a profound impact on the delivery of services in Transylvania County and her wisdom and insights rippled throughout the region. Her memory lives on through those people and places that were graced by her presence.

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Land-of-Sky Regional Council’s Staff

Administrative Services Department: L - R: Brett Satz - Information Systems Specialist, Danna Harrell-Stansbury - Director of Marketing and Administration, Michelle Barber - Clerk to Council / Administration and Marketing Coordinator, Joe McKinney - Executive Director,

Bonnie Smith - Administrative Services Assistant

Area Agency on Aging:

L - R: Margaret Stanley - Aging Program Specialist, Lee Ann Smith - Regional Ombudsman, Barbara Hinshaw - Lead Regional Ombudsman, Terry Collins - Regional Ombudsman,

Christina Giles - Project Assistant / Purchasing Coordinator, Rebecca Chaplin - Aging Program Specialist, Joe Connolly - Director Area Agency on Aging, Carol McLimans - Family Caregiver Resource Specialist, Brenda DelaCruz - SCSEP Job Developer, Jennifer Atkinson - SCSEP Coordinator

Volunteer Services Department:

L - R: Stacy Friesland - Foster Grandparent Program Manager, Joleen Huertas - Project Assistant, Tracy Ash - Senior Companion Program Manager, Patti Cameron - RSVP Coordinator,

Connie Pegg - RSVP Lead Coordinator, LeeAnne Tucker - Director Volunteer Programs

Finance Department:

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L - R: Peggy Barnes - Finance Officer, Sherry Christenson - Accounting Technician, Rose Sabo - Accounting Technician, Wanda Clark - Accounting Assistant

Local Government Services:

Seated L - R: Karen Kiehna - Senior Planner, Housing Jon Beck - GIS Planner, Jim Stokoe - Senior Regional Planner, John Connell - Housing Specialist, Back L - R: Heather Strassberger - Regional Planner,

Kate O’Hara - Regional Planner / Brownfields Project Manager, Bill Eaker - Environmental Services Manager, Carrie Runser-Turner - Regional Planner, Terry Albrecht - Director Waste Reduction Partners, Russ Jordan - Energy Program Manager, WRP Ron Townley - Interim Director of Local Government Services, Linda Giltz - Regional Planner, Holly Bullman - Regional Planner Not Pictured: Don Hollister - WRP Supervisor, Tracy Wahl - Brownfields Project Manager, NC DENR


FY 2008 Budgeted Revenues by Source* $8,467,813

FY 2008 Budgeted Expenditures by Function* $8,467,813

*Does not include Revenue from Other Sources, Capital Leases, or Expenditures Used for Non-Program Purposes, each of the amount $2,250,332. Revenue from Capital Leases were used for acquisition of Office Space and Furniture and Equipment.

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Lending Our Support to the Region’s Communities Serving Buncombe, Henderson, Madison & Transylvania Counties 339 New Leicester Hwy., Suite 140 Asheville, NC 28806 Phone: (828) 251-6622 Fax: (828) 251-6353 www.landofsky.org

MADISON

BUNCOMBE

35° N

HENDERSON

TRANSYLVANIA

82° W Mission Statement Work with local governments, the Region’s leadership, state and federal agencies, service providers, and volunteers to foster desirable social, economic, cultural and ecological conditions in Buncombe, Henderson, Madison and Transylvania Counties.

Land-of-Sky Regional Council 2008 Annual Report  

Land-of-Sky Regional Council is one of 17 regional councils in North Carolina, which bring together programs, issues and solutions that affe...

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