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Baseball Day Camp Coming to the East Cape Christine Courtright

Issue No. 68

To Baseball Fans:

Oct/Nov

What we discovered is the kids here love baseball, but equipment is expensive and hard to come by. We also thought that maybe teaching some basic skills would make the game more enjoyable and maybe open doors for their future!

So, Sawyers ‘Camp’ was formed. The camp will be one day – during November 17 – 19 or 24 - 26. The exact date is to be determined….hurricane changed our plans! Time will be 9am – 4pm in Campam ento. We will do some kind I have been of lunch, collecting old hopefully baseball with help equipment from some from my of the mothcoaches, to ers to cook, bring down morning/ to the kids Children playing with the first batch of equipment brought down afternoon who can't snacks. We will also invite the students from Las afford to buy their own. My aunt took baseCuevas and Santa Cruz schools. Ages will be K – ball stuff last year and she told me the kids th 8 grade for this first camp. The focus will be on played everyday. hitting, throwing & catching, fielding and pitchingI think the kids need a baseball camp so that covering the basic skills and rules. This camp is they can learn the rules and have more fun. also an official sanctioned event with the Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez. Sawyer Kenck How can you be involved? — As the above letter says, it started with To make this camp successful we need to get some one kid’s visit. After his visit, we got thinking equipment – namely, mitts, balls and bats in all and started asking some questions. The next sizes…. even one thing helps – used is perfect! We spring we brought down baseball equipment need instructors and assistants – no coaching exand gave it to a friend living in Campamento. perience necessary. Spanish language knowledge Our friend kept the gear at his house near the is nice, but not required. The more helpers we school. He felt that if it stays in one location and the kids get it when they want to play, Continued on page 5 and then returns it, it will stay a complete set Oct/Nov

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My name is Sawyer. I'm 10 years old and baseball is my favorite sport. I have played for 6 years. I want to play pro some day.

longer. Each afternoon the kids would come and get the gear, play until dark and return it. Soon the parents came out and played too!

When I went to Baja to visit my aunt, I brought 2 baseball mitts so I could play catch. The o n l y neighbor boy didn't know how to play baseball.


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Advertising in East Capers Advertising in the East Capers gets the word out about your business AND your ad money supports the 3 week 'Cursos de Verano' summer school, for over 120 local children and provides art supplies for 18 East Cape public schools. In addition to space in the printed version, your color ad appears in the online version at no additional cost. You can download the 2014/15 Advertising K it by visit ing our website at: www.eastcapearts.com.

Tax-deductable Contributions to the Asociación de Artes The Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C., Los Barriles, B.C. Sur, Mexico is a legal non-profit Mexican corporation not affiliated with any other organization, association, club or business. The Asociación is in full compliance with the terms of the NAFTA agreement of January 1, 1994. As such, contributions made to the Asociación de Artes are tax-deductable in the United States, Mexico and Canada. For more information visit: www.eastcapearts.com or the NAFTA Website at: http://www.ustr.gov/trade-agreements/freetrade-agreements/north-american-free-tradeagreement-nafta.

Volunteers Needed! The Asociación de Artes needs volunteers to help support their programs that bring the arts to the local communities and the schools. To learn more about these programs, visit: www.eastcapearts.com. If you would like to volunteer, send an email to: eastcapearts@gmail.com.

Call for Articles East Capers is looking for fiction and true stories about our region and items that affect our residents. If you are interested in submitting articles, recipes, stories or your personal experiences in Baja, email your 1,000-words or less article to: kaojaa@gmail.com.

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East Capers Periódico Publisher Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C., Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico Editor Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr.

Copy Editor Pako Ford

Circulation

The Sierra de La Laguna range is a protected biosphere reserve. Several rangers watch for fires and tend a weather station in the meadow. During your hike, you will enjoy the diversity of flora. At the beginning of the ascent, you will find barrel cactus, thorn shrub and palo verde. As you climb higher, you will encounter new and different species of shrub, trees and wildflowers. At the top, you are surrounded by madrone, oak and piñon.

Brian Cummings

Advertising Kathy Obenshain Denise Linnet

Contributors Jorge Bergin Holly Burgin Jill Borggreve John David Lionel Brooke Christine Courtright Hank Darlington Larry Epstein Bob Farmer Steve Fowler Karen Hursh Graber Gary Graham Sefi Held JoAnn Hyslop Urmas Kaldveer, PhD Tehroma Lask Catherine Matsalla Pablo Ponce Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr.

Big Horn Sheep have been part of Baja California Sur’s landscape for many years. They arrived here after the ice age. They settled in the northern Mexican State of Sonora and the costal fringe of the peninsular mountain ranges of the Baja California Sur. Big Horn Sheep are found as far north as the San Francisco mountain range between Guerrerro Negro and San Ignacio and as far south to an area at the northern fringe of the East Cape near the Bay of La Paz. The sound of their large horns clashing during mating season echoes throughout the canyons and ravines of the rugged mountain ranges. Thanks to the structure of their hooves, Big Horn Sheep have a remarkable capacity for climbing and jumping. The halves of each hoof separate, so the feet can cling firmly to the rocky terrain. The soles are soft and like a cushion, allowing the Big Horn to keep its balance as it moves across uneven or slippery ground. Males have thick spiral horns, measuring up to four feet.

The Beaches of East Cape Generations of local residents have identified the East Cape beaches as the area along the western edge of the Sea of Cortez between Punta Pescadero on the north and Cabo Pulmo on the south. Los Barriles, Buena Vista and La Ribera are located within the East Cape, on the shores of Bahia de Palmas. Visiting East Cape beaches is a seasonal experience.

Printer Imprenta Ciudad Los Niños, La Paz, BCS, Mexico To learn about Ciudad Los Niños, visit their website at: http://ciudadninoslapaz.org/english/home.htm ———————————

The opinions expressed within the articles in East Capers are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C.

Thank You! This publication is possible with the help of the board members of the Asociación de Artes and members of the community.

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Baja. The mountains are southern Baja’s only granitic range. The highest point is about 7,000 feet. The Sierra de la Lagunas receive more rainfall than any other place in Baja and once hosted a series of lakes. The largest drained around 1870 when a rockslide opened a path on the east side for the water to pour down Cañon San Dionisio. This event left a flat, grassy depression near the top of the peak. Two small streams flow through the meadow, one toward the Sea of Cortez and the other toward the Pacific.

Baja California Sur: Land of Big Horn Sheep

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Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr. is an award-winning writer, historian and editor, with over 25 years experience producing many different types of copy. He is the author of over 150 published articles and three books. You can read some of his writing at www. wzaponline.com.

North winds between November and March make the beaches a perfect launching pad for wind surfers. The rest of the year, those who prefer less strenuous activities populate the beaches. Day access to most of the beaches in the East Cape is not restricted. A visit to East Cape beaches would not be complete without a trip to the Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park. One of the largest coral reefs in the world is located off the beach at Pulmo, within an underwater ecological reserve. Fishing, spear fishing and shell collecting are not permitted here. It is also one of the most famous diving locations in the Sea of Cortez.

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East Cape Vignettes By Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr. (With permission of Destino Magazine)

Mexican Retablos: 19 Century Devotional Art As you travel around the East Cape visiting its many quaint shops, you are bound to come across Retablos, which means “Altarpieces” in Spanish. They are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper. Used in home altars to venerate Catholic saints, Retablos are a type of folk art, which is deeply rooted in Spanish history. They represented the very foundations of religious beliefs in the 17, 18 and 19century Mexican culture. These colorful and charming unique art forms are a mixture of century’s-old Catholic iconography and indigenous art. The historical and cultural links between the "old" and the "new" worlds are reflected in this art. With the introduction of inexpensive mediums such as tin, Retablo as an art form flourished, reaching its pinnacle of popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century. With some exceptions, mostly untrained artists worked to produce and reproduce these sacred images. Some artists painted more prolifically than others painted and where known to have duplicated the same image hundreds, if not thousands of times in his career.

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La Ribera “Three Rivers” La Ribera is Spanish for “the shore.” Originally, this little East Cape fishing village was known as Tres Rios (Three Rivers). Although there are no rivers near the town today, it is easy to imagine how the town got its name. Three broad arroyos fan out from the slopes of the nearby La Laguna mountain range and run to the Sea of Cortez on either side of the town. When the canyons high up in the Lagunas absorb more rainfall than they can hold, these arroyos run like shallow rivers. Many years ago, the main village of La Ribera was located on a flat shelf of land touching the beach. Over the years, hurricanes and monsoonal rains flooded the area, devastating the town. As a result, residents were forced to abandon the site and rebuild their homes and businesses on higher ground. The skeletons of two or three crumbling concrete and brick structures remain to mark the site.

Crossing the Sierra de la Lagunas Hiking the Sierra de la Laguna mountain range is a perfect way to enjoy the East Cape and Southern

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The Black Pearls of the East Cape When Hernan Cortez visited Bahia de La Paz at the beginning of the 16th century, he and his soldiers encountered several hundred naked Indians fishing in the clear aquamarine water of the bay. Cortez was not looking for fish though. He had heard about the beautiful black pearls of La Paz from other Spanish adventurers. He was after the riches they would bring. He and his men rounded the tip of a large island on their way to the pearling grounds. He then gave Isla Espiritu Santo its first name - Isla de Perlas. To this day, some still call La Paz by its nickname - La Perla. From the time of their discovery, to the last half of the 19th century, black pearl beds were wide spread along the gulf shores of the Baja peninsula. From present day Los Barriles on the Bahia de Palmas a few miles north of the Tropic of Cancer, to beyond La Paz, pearl oysters were located at depths up to a hundred feet on rocky bottoms in almost any place protected from the violent actions of waves and currents.

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The Intimate and True Adventures of “El Ballenero” Episode 6: Treated to an introduction and to whale song By: Urmas Kaldveer, PhD would like to elaborate on two of my stories from the last episode (#5 – April/May) that were important in the evolution of my greater and greater intimacy with “The Whale People”. Early in that season of 2005 we came across the first mother (I cannot abide using the term “cow” for a mother whale) and calf pair that I had ever encountered. We were about one mile off shore from Punta Pescadero in the southern half of my grid and “the girls” (my interns - they accepted this term as one of endearment) spotted a large humpback moving slowly north. The second blow indicated two whales but one considerably smaller. Seeing that it was an M/C pair we approached carefully and to our surprise and delight, it wasn’t we that were looking for an encounter but the whales. The calf was quite young, most likely a yearling born in Mexican Waters the previous season and due to be weaned the present season. The mother circled the panga with her calf a number of times (I asked Vicente to cut the engine) and then allowed the calf to approach us more closely. The calf not only came close but actually brushed against the side of the panga and blew a fine mist of seawater and “bad breath” on us in the boat (this is often the case when observing grey whales on the Pacific side but very rare with humpbacks and almost unknown with blue whales). We were able to look directly into its eye from only three feet away as it passed and I was struck by the level of awareness, curiosity and intelligence that was manifested in that glance. Not only was I literally looking into the eye of the whale I was in a very real sense “communing” with it. Oct/Nov

Since 2005 I have had numerous “eyeball to eyeball” encounters with humpbacks from the panga, from my kayak and often under the surface with them as we dove together but you know what they say about your “first time”! More than half of those times it has been with a mother and calf pair “seeking” encounters with me out of what I can only describe as curiosity and friendship - more on that later. The other story I wish to relate about that first research year occurred the last day we went out for the season. Lenee (one of my interns) had become increasingly adamant about wanting to swim near a whale. As she was my responsibility I had to tell her no, even though in hindsight it would have been perfectly safe. What made things different that day was that after tracking a humpback for a while and getting a good photo ID the whale swam under the panga and began to “sing”. This was a new experience for me and it was thrilling to not only hear that ancient and intelligent voice but to have the sound vibrate the bottom of the panga so our entire bodies experienced the song. Humpback whale song is far more complex and intricate than most people are aware. This was all too much for Lenee. She threw off her shirt and shorts (we always had suits under our outer gear just in case) and without asking simply dove over the side and threaded water, diving deeper every so often to hear the song better. This was too much for Kristin, so she did the same. It was a delight to see these two young students who had been so “scientifically” involved with the project totally letting go and entering into “whale space”. The whale moved on, the girls climbed out and I realized that they had taught me something about following your heart. I on the other hand was 64 years old, certainly too old to start swimming with whales, no? Returning once again to Ukiah In June after that first season, I

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continued from page 32 Himno de los Percubetas Separamos la basura La volvemos a ocupar Protegemos la natura Respetamos nuestro mar Somos los ninos de Percubetas Tenemos que estar siempre alertas Cuidamos el ambiente Le damos proteccion De reciclage te damos lección East Cape Recycling Baja participated in a special Off-Road Racing program to teach the kids about off -road racing with race sponsor Manolo Nuñoz and our Los Barriles racecar drivers, who attended this event with their amazing racecars. We are very pleased that Sr. Nuñoz made a commitment to ensure that there will be trash barrels available along the spectator areas of the future race routes and to help educate spectators about using them.

East Cape Guild Events By Jill Borggreve he season is about to get busy. The East Cape Guild will hold two of its popular events in November. Monte Carlo Night will be November 22 at Buena Vista Beach Resort (Spa). This is the once a year opportunity to play blackjack, craps and this year we will add a roulette table for your gaming fun. Play and win donated prizes. Dinner is included in the ticket price of $30 or 400 pesos. There will also be a silent auction with many valuable prizes available.

Contact Jill Borggreve at b2jborg@gmail.com for additional information on the East Cape Guild or for information about how to donate to help local students stay in school.

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East Cape Recycling Baja discussed with the kids the importance of the spectators’ cleaning up their trash from the arroyos and beaches upon leaving the race and the responsibility of each of us to help sustain our local economy, which depends and thrives on keeping our beaches and ocean clean. As a reminder to everyone to protect our beaches, East Cape Recycling Baja created a bumper sticker and distributed them at this event. Many were attached to the off-road racecars. The bumper stickers are free. If you would like a bumper sticker, please stop by East Cape Casas and RV Resort and pick one up to attach to your vehicle. The kids were not the only ones to get in on the action…East Cape Recycling Baja sponsored a special 8-hour “Solo para Mujeres” (For Women Only)

On November 29, its time to work off that Thanksgiving meal by playing golf at the Los Barriles Country Club. All golfers invited, even if you have never golfed before you will have fun at this morning event. Hot dogs and drinks, including Bloody Marys, will be available as well. Watch the Baja Pony Express for details.

Anthem of the Percubetas We separate garbage We fulfill the need We protect nature We respect our sea We are the children of 'Percubetas' We must be ever vigilant We take care of the environment We give it protection We give you the recycling lesson environmental workshop over two days. Sofia Gomez with Wild Coast taught the local women how to separate inorganic waste and recycle plastic, metal, cardboard/paper, glass and EPS 6 foam (packaging for appliances). The women made wonderful craft projects from recyclable materials and learned how to compost organic waste to be used to supplement the soil and make their gardens beautiful. The program was a great success and we have had requests and plan to repeat the program with WildCoast in the fall. We are very proud of all that was accomplished this summer. The best news is that change is happening; the messages we are communicating to respect our environment and cherish it's resources are setting; the children and their families are creating a new ethos and embracing a philosophy that will surely have positive and profound effects on our local environment. More than ever, we need volunteers!!! If protecting our environment is important to you, it only takes one hour a month to make a difference. Many hands make light work and we have lots of fun. Please contact us at info@eastcaperecyclingbaja.com.

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Bumper Sticker

All proceeds from these events go to fund scholarships for local students to complete their high school education. If you share a passion to help educate our students or just want to meet others in the community please come to one of our monthly meetings in October (22nd) or November (19th).

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See

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By John David Lionel Brooke

have, the better we can teach and the more fun for the kids it will be. I am also collecting donations so we can have a camp shirt for each child participating. With the recent hard times caused by the hurricane, this camp would be a welcomed diversion for the kids!

Noontime's blue troposphere Visualize mashed potato clouds my dear Wink at twenty trillion stars this night Gaze by mummy moon's silver light

Anyone interested in helping or donating, please contact Chris Courtright at: jonandchris@juno.com.

Glimpse rainbows in imagined views Your color palette is within, dear muse.

Ideas and suggestions are greatly appreciated. Let's get ready to play ball!

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Hear By John David Lionel Brooke Cicadas humming in the afternoon Howling coyotes laughing at the moon Thundering heaven's raindrops weep on you Whispering Morning Doves sweetly coo Nature's music sings lyrically into your ear Melodies only you, my deaf muse, can hear.

The Environmental Beat of the ‘Percubetas’ Resounds with the Community A Report from the Recycling Comradres By Holly Burgin he 80 children participating in East Cape’s Recycling Baja’s environmental music program greeted this summer’s Cursos de Verano (Summer DayCamp) with anticipation and enthusiasm. The kids transformed recycled buckets, tin cans, 5gallon water bottles, individual water bottles, metal bottle caps, and other recyclables into percussion instruments. Then they sent a rousing message to the community to protect our environment with their impeccable synchronized percussion performance. Our wonderful professional drummer and maestro, Pablo Ruiz, from San Jose, designed a music program that inspired and motivated the kids to learn a complicated percussion routine, and a “percubeta call to action” song that Pablo wrote. “Percubetas” are percussion musicians that play drums made from buckets. The performance at the Cursos de Verano closing ceremony was FABULOSO! Watch

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this wonderful performance on YouTube. It will knock your socks off! https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=z3BEs7jQlYY. Every detail of our program was attended and managed to its fabulous culmination, with the help of great volunteers, Renee Lagloire, Janine Barnes Webb, and Erica Martz and others in the community. We thank Sofia Gomez from Wild Coast for introducing us to Pablo, and providing environmental education support for our program. We thank and acknowledge East Cape Casas and RV Resort in hosting our program and the special help of Omar Araiza and Randall in managing the venue details. Cursos de Verano environmental education program would not be complete without the Recycling Contest. This year the kids and their families collected a half-ton of recyclables! The two kids, from each of the four age groups, who collected the most recyclables by weight, won a fishing trip with one of their parents on the Awesome and Too Awesome fishing boats. Special thanks to Captains Luis and Adan and their crews for donating their time, Awesome Sport Fishing for donating the fishing boats, and to Kathy Obenshain for helping make this an unforgettable day for the winners. And there is more!

East Cape Seasonings By John David Lionel Brooke Piquant summer sizzles Seas run hot as desert Waterfalls slow to steam Chubasco saucy tormentas Naked Ocotillos prickle Pitahaya Dulce swell red Skinny vaca gain again Baja California riches Emerge from undercover It is Snow Bird’s time You know it is winter When under a salty sky Peppered colored kites Skitter with half wings Fly over windblown sea Spring clears the skies Keen sports fishers growl Plough wavy water troughs Through the tranquil gulf On chili primavera morns

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continued from page 3 immediately started raising funds for the 2006 season. I had come to realize that it was possible to divide my year in half, teaching part time (summer school and fall semester) at the college and spending my winters in Baja tracking the humpbacks. All of my whale experiences thus far had strongly reinforced my personal opinion - shared by many - that these creatures were far beyond the level of intelligence and sensitivity we gave them credit for. That following 2006 season was another good year but there were fewer whales (or I wasn’t in the right place at the right time) so I only obtained about a dozen good IDs and only one or two of those were “World Class”. During the fall semester of 2006 at the college, one of my students brought in a video made by her friend Bill Kreutzmann, one of the drummers for “The Grateful Dead” rock band. It was called “Ocean Spirit” and it recorded a voyage taken by him and four of his friends into the North Pacific specifically to swim with as many ocean critters as they could find. Watching these men swim with whales, sharks, rays, sea lions etc. I was inspired! Humans, free diving with all manner of critters, fear-

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less, full of respectful loving energy, I was hooked.

Mexican Seafood In Foil Packets:

How can you look into the eye of the whale if you don’t enter its world? I vowed to myself that the next season, 2007, I would swim with the whales.

By Karen Hursh Graber, Senior Food Editor for Mexico Connect Magazine

Mariscos Empapelados

exican seafood in parchment paper is a wonderfully easy, informal dish — great for picnics, barbeques, or grilling on the beach. The seafood packets can be prepared ahead of time, kept in a cooler, and popped onto the grill, or cooked indoors in the oven. Cilantro is present in so many Mexican seafood dishes simply because its flavor compliments fish and shellfish so well. Try using it in place of parsley in making linguine with clam sauce and other nonMexican seafood dishes.

My book – THE OTHERS “The Whale People” A personal Journey of Discovery, Transformation and Healing (Balboa Press) is available online at Amazon.com & Barnes and Noble. Copies are also available locally at Homes and Land Real Estate and by contacting me at ukaldveer@gmail.com - I live in El Cardonal full time.

Ingredients  1/2 lb. each: fish filets, chopped shrimp, shelled, deveined and chopped squid or octopus, cleaned and chopped shucked clams or oysters, chopped  1/2 cup finely chopped white onion  2 roma tomatoes, finely chopped  1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro  2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed  1/4 cup butter, softened  1 teaspoon salsa ingelesa (Worcestershire Sauce)

Amigo a Amigo Hurricane Odile Disaster Relief By Steve Fowler s we start our sixth day of the Rotary Club of Los Barriles Cabo Este relief fund project we have been identified by the national news as one of the organizations working to bring help to the East Cape. See link What You Can Do to Help Rebuild Los Cabos. Our funding goal of $30,000 in thirty days is aggressive but so is the challenge of bringing help. On our 6th day we have now exceeded $9,000 collected. These funds will go to help with the relief programs in the East Cape. Please join us in helping our neighbors by visiting our website Amigo a Amigo Hurricane Odile Disaster Relief and giving to our clubs disaster relief program: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/amigo-aamigo-hurricane-odile-disaster-relief.

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Directions 1. In a large bowl, combine the fish, shrimp, squid or octopus, clams or oysters, onion, tomato and cilantro. 2. Cream the garlic, butter and Worcestershire Sauce together with a wooden spoon and add it to the seafood mixture, using the spoon to combine the ingredients. 3. Cut aluminum foil into a 6" squares; divide the mixture among them and fold each one over, envelope style, double-folding the edges to seal in juices. 4. Place the packets on a grill over hot coals, or in a 375º F oven, until they inflate, about ten minutes. 5. Serve packets directly onto plates and let each diner unwrap his own. Accompany with crusty French bread to soak up the juices. Serves 8.

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The History of Mexican Mural Artists By JoAnn Hyslop talented group of modern artists responded to the revolutionary upheaval of 1910 through the medium of public murals. Lead by Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Jose Clemente Orozco and David Alfaro Siqueiros, a whole new mythology surrounding the revolution could be seen on public buildings throughout the country. Although these artists all differed in their style of painting and their outlook on life, each believed that art was the highest form of human expression and a vital element in social revolution. In 1923, the artists established the “Syndicate of Revolutionary Mexican Painters, Sculptors and Engravers”. The organization’s newspaper, El Machete, proclaimed that “collective art” should replace the “individualist” art of the bourgeois. This was why murals were popular. They were available for everybody to enjoy: not just a few wealthy art collectors. The legacy of Mexican muralism can be traced to the US government-sponsored arts programs of President Roosevelt’s WPA and Farm Security Administration during the 1930. Artists were commissioned to paint murals in Schools and post offices throughout the country. In 1932, The Los Angeles City Council commissioned David Alfaro Siqueiros to paint a large mural on the south wall of the historic Italian Hall overlooking Olvera Street in downtown LA which the artist named, “America Tropical”. The left and right sides of the mural featured rainforests and Mayan pyra-

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mids. Siqueiros left the final center part of the mural unpainted, choosing to come in the middle of the night and finish the final image depicting a brownskinned man crucified under a massive eagle. At the unveiling, the city officials were shocked at the image and ordered it white-washed over. In the 1970s, when the white wash started to fall off, a new City Council voted to restore the mural. A $10 million restoration funded by the City of Los Angeles and the Getty Conservation Institute brought the mural back to life. The mural was finally unveiled for public viewing on October 9, 2012 along with an accompanying Cultural Center which invites visitors to learn more about the mural through exhibits featuring of its past and the techniques used to create it, as well as the conservation process and the artistic legacy of its creator.

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Mexican Proverbs El que adelante no mira, atás se queda (He who doesn’t look ahead stays behind) Mona en seda pero mona queda (A monkey dressed in silk is still a monkey) En la tierra de los ciegos el tuerto es rey (In the land of the blind the one-eyed man is king) Lo mío, mío y lo tuyo de entreambos (What is mine is mine; what’s yours is ours)

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Los Barriles Community Market Community - a feeling of fellowship with others, as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests, and goals.

he aftermath of hurricane Odile will affect all of us in the East Cape, so it seems particularly appropriate to celebrate this idea of community this year. The Los Barriles Community Market begins its 4th year this fall and thanks to local farmers, food vendors, musicians and artists, the market has become a "thing you do" on Saturday morning. You go get a cup of coffee, grab some breakfast, shop for your veggies, listen to music, visit friend and celebrate community.

Historic East Cape Mining Town Hosts Art Festival he town of San Antonio Real, located south of El Triunfo on Highway #1 in the Sierra de La Laguna mountains, will celebrate its 4th annual Art Festival on Sunday, November 16th. Signs will be posted on the west side of the highway directing you to the road which leads to the historic center of town where the festival will be held. Ample parking will be available close by. San Antonio was noted for its mining activities back in the 1700s. Silver ore was first discovered nearby in Santa Ana in 1720 by Ignacio de Rojas, a soldier attached to Padre Jaime Bravo from the Jesuit Mission in La Paz, who was on a quest to find and develop a new mission site.

Local artists from the area will be present to display and sell their pottery, hand made from local clay, along with other original art works produced by BCS artists. Food and music will also be part of the event. San Antonio’s annual festival also give attendees an opportunity to stroll through the Zocalo ( town square) and view the 250 year old historic buildings, some abandoned and others occupied. Across from the church on the south corner, is the San Antonio Cultural Center. Marizonia Diaz, the Director of the Center, has created a welcoming environment for local residents to practice their artistic skills, where they also can sell their art work to visitors. Marizonia is responsible for coordinating the activities at the annual Art Festivals in both San Antonio and El Triunfo.

The Market is starting earlier this year, by request, so you mark Nov 22 on your calendars--Opening day, 9am -1pm at the NEW CITY PARK( same place, same time) and it will run EVERY Saturday until April 4th,2015. The Market has grown over its short life thanks to all you out there but so has the town, so we need more diversity in food products and produce -We encourage any and all of you to participate with what ever your talent m ay be. We look forward to seeing the whole town on Nov 22, 9am -1pm. Bring your support and good spirits. We welcome all comments, suggestions, vendor sign-ups at: losbarrilescommunitymarket@gmail.com

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In the late 1750s San Antonio had become a place of some note in the territory of Baja California Sur after a new silver mine had been opened up. As the village grew, a mining company, established by Manuel de Ocio, the “Pearl King” of La Paz, continued to extract ore and the population increased. As a result, San Antonio Real remains today as the oldest continuously occupied Civil community in all the Californias. After Mexico had won its battle for independence from Spain in 1822, the territory of Baja California Sur became a part of Mexico with Loreto as the site for the capital. In 1828, when Loreto was destroyed by flooding from a hurricane, San Antonio served as the interim capital city until the seat of power was moved to La Paz in 1830. Original art work is highlighted at the San Antonio Art Festival.

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Day 10 P. O. (Post Odile) By Larry Epstein he room is ethereal and bright, with walls that blend into the landscape and a sheer roof that looks to be fabric, but it must be made of sterner stuff, for it stands intact. I proceed inside. People of all shapes and sizes jostle to seat themselves at closely spaced tables. I notice that all of the staff are large well-fed men, ‘though graceful. One man in particular smiles at me, and we exchange greetings in the vernacular “buen dia.” I approach a crystal pitcher in which float small chips of ice and liquid the color of the sun at dawn. Pouring it into a tumbler, I sip tentatively. It is as though the nectar from an entire orange grove has been transported onto my tongue, and I down what remains in my glass, refreshed, before refilling it. To my right are fruits --- papaya, pineapple, grapefruit, watermelon, jicama, peaches and cantaloupe --- sliced and chilling. I mound them onto a plate and settle at a table. Blesséd coffee awaits. Across the table my wife Cheri waits for no one. She has made her own choices and devours them with a lust I realize that I covet and soon readily ape. Next I survey an array of hot foods --- tender sliced beef in a sauce of mild chilies, corn, tomatoes, onion and leaves of forest green cilantro; eggs with a fresh salsa of lime, bright yellow and red peppers and more veggies and spices; bits of chicken with its own mix of vegetables; tortillas dipped in egg, fried and sprinkled with cheese; salsa-simmered chilaquiles; papas fritas; ham and the ubiquitous refried beans. I sample some of each. Then there is a grill attended by Daniel, a large man in traditional white chef’s garb and jaunty black chapeau. He juggles ingredients, blending them into omelets or stuffing them into tortillas. For me Daniel folds mushrooms and cheeses into an omelet, plates the upshot and hands it to me smiling. I can barely wait to return to my table before digging in. It is hot and delicious. Finishing I belch contentedly. Cheri smiles as she savors her third cup of coffee. We are blessed in many ways. Our casa survived the storm unscathed. We had plenty of water. Our car had a full tank, and we could shop daily for victuals. For eight days after the storm, our good friend Donna, and her daughter-in-law Mayte, made sure that we had at least one yummy hot meal at Roadrunner. But eight days without power was enough. We came to Hotel Araiza Palmira in La Paz for A/C and Internet and discovered the hotel’s scrumptious breakfast. The Buddha says that the way to end suffering is to forsake attachment, especially to the physical world. If you have nothing to regret, he reasoned, you will not suffer. He was wise for sure. Perhaps in my next life, I will do a better job of following his teachings. But after 60some years of creature comforts, I gotta admit, the A/C is nice.

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Fishing: The Silent Killer By Jorge Bergin

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over, I go back to my patio slouch mode, Bloody Mary in hand and hardly move again until the next outing.

s I come closer to the big 80 I am forced to change meds, make other changes in my life. I don’t get much exercise at all (I force myself to take a walk now and then) so I know I’m not treating my heart right.

I’m no doctor but I think most of them would call this routine "the widow maker." My version, live or die is doing what I like to do interrupted by what I like to do even more. I don’t need a prescription for this particular regimen.

There’s no gym in my village --- I know some of you will say “You don’t need a gym, there are plenty of exercises you can do to get your heart rate up”. I need a gym. I’m glad we don’t have one or I would have to go there and work out.

~

I don’t just sit and vegetate. I have an exercise program - I fish. Once or twice a month I find a calm day and talk my Mexican pal into a half-day boat ride looking for mean and tasty fish in his small boat. It usually means 6 to 7 hours sitting on the hard bench seats (I use 2 soft cushions) while we troll or mooch or fish the bottom. On a good day there is a break almost every hour when the reel alarms go off and my heart gets a nice 10 to 20 minute workout with the rod and reel. When this great healthy fun is

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rest of my life in Alaska. After a few years of visiting Baja Sur on vacation, I moved to the Los Cabos area permanently. I arrived with the plan of opening a restaurant/coffee shop/bakery in San Jose del Cabo. This provided me with some money and solved the coffee problem for myself and many others.

No More Sanka By Bob Farmer have been a coffee drinker for as long as I can remember. Brewed black coffee, freshly made, no old burnt stuff. When the espresso craze started, I was a natural convert. Not only could I buy a good cup of regular coffee just about anywhere in town for a buck, I could buy a triple shot raspberry latte for only half a day’s pay. (I calculated my latte habit was about $3,500 bucks a year at the height of my addiction.) I was very interested in the source of the beans. The labels on the bags listed countries from all over the world but almost every blend included beans from Mexico. This was very comforting to me because I was planning on visiting Baja California Sur. Naturally I assumed that there would be good coffee. Imagine my shock and dismay when I discovered how flawed that assumption was. On my first trip to Baja Sur, I stayed at the Palmas de Cortez hotel in Los Barriles, right on the beautiful Sea of Cortez. The room was a nice, palapa roofed bungalow, complete with fireplace: no locks, no worries. For 2 weeks I enjoyed great food, nice folks and perfect weather. My only complaint was the coffee! Just about every place in Los Cabos served Sanka. Sanka???? This is Mexico for crying out loud. Starbucks even buys Mexican beans! Being without any Spanish skills, I couldn't even explain my problem. However, bad coffee didn’t keep me from falling under the spell of warm weather and sandy beaches. By the time I left, I knew I wasn’t going to spend the

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Still, the coffee situation in general hadn’t changed. If I drove to La Paz, there were a couple of places with really good coffee but Sanka seemed to be the standard. When returning from La Paz one day, I stopped for a cup at a highway restaurant near Todos Santos. The young man who was helping me offered American coffee in almost flawless English. Out of curiosity, I asked him to describe how it was made. He e xp la i ne d that they put fresh ground coffee in a cloth bag and dipped it in boiling w a t e r . Saweet. High end cowboy coffee! I had a cup and it was absolutely d e l ic io us . We talked for a bit and joked about the Sanka routine. He told me that good coffee was always available but you have to know how to ask for it. I threatened the poor fellow with bodily harm if he didn’t teach me the phrase in Spanish. He said, “You ask for cafe de talega” After I got over feeling like I had just won the lottery; I asked him what the word meant. He grinned and lifted the large wet bag of spent coffee grounds from the pot. “What does that remind you of?” he asked. I had no clue. He continued, “You’ve seen our huge bulls wandering around, no?” Of course, how can you miss them with that big hump on their shoulders and their huge masculinity hanging….. wait. I was slowly getting the picture. So talega means…. that?

Costco Wardrobe By Pablo Ponce ’ve often wondered at what age in a person’s life do they throw caution to the wind and decide that top shelf clothing brand names no longer matter. They have decided, it is time to replace everything in their closet and drawers with an all new wardrobe consisting of clothing that comes solely from stores such as Costco. Just recently I had the opportunity to see this transformation firsthand. Here’s what happened….. It was April 7th, 2012 when I found myself at a cousin’s birthday party. He was splashing around with his kids in his in-laws pool and I was kicking back under the patio shade when my uncle says to my cousin’s father-in-law (FIL), “hey I like that tshirt.” FIL says, “Thanks I got it at Costco. I also got these shorts there.” I was sitting there thinking, I thought Costco sold bulk food? When did they start selling clothes? The volley continued with my uncle saying, “Yeah, I’ve got that shirt and those shorts too. My wife buys all my clothes at Costco.” FIL says, “mine too!” I found myself in the middle of the two old guys as they continued their talk of cargo shorts and coupons, of socks and savings, and it hits me…for a couple’a geezers these guys look pretty hip in their Costco gear. I can’t see myself at age 44 trading in my Nike Cross trainers for a pair of sport shoes that say Kirkland on the side, but maybe when I get to their age, 60, I’ll change my mind. Then this happened… It was early January and I was online searching for a pair of shoes I could wear on my next season-long trip down to Baja. This was no ordinary pair of shoes though. I was looking for what they call a “sport sandal” that I’d specifically use while riding my quad. Last years flip flops were just too flip floppy so this pair had to be rugged yet stylish, not to mention cheap. After a few days of searching I had narrowed it down to about three choices. First though, I must tell you, whoever came up with the design of these sandals must have a screw loose, and the person in charge of color schemes has got to be color blind, because everything I found online was hideous, not to mention expensive. Eventually I chose one but just before Adding to Cart, my mom saw them on the screen and said, “They have the exact same

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thing at Costco for about a third of the cost.” Now I’m not what you would call a Costco fan. Actually I never even realized they sold clothes or shoes until I found myself there with my mom the next day, looking for this sport sandal. I did find them online just like mom said, and they did look just like the other pricey pairs at the outdoor stores, but I wanted to try them on just to feel how weird they were going to feel and then I’d decide if I’d buy them or not. It took a while to discover, no thanks to the brain surgeon behind the counter, that this particular store did not have what I wanted so we took off and ended up finding them at another Costco nearby. I brought them home and tried them on and sure enough they felt and looked strange but I think they just might do the trick. I’ll just have to ride with a bag over my head until they get scuffed up enough that they don’t look so ugly. Since getting the initial sport sandals, I’ve been back to Costco to pick up socks, briefs, cargo shorts, t-shirts, and even a pair of running shoes which are pretty cool. So going back to my question regarding how old a person should be before they switch on over to a full on Costco wardrobe? I guess it’s age 44.

~

Baja Recent History he Mexican-American War (1846-1848) had major repercussions in Baja California. The war began after Mexico refused the United States’ offer to buy California, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming. In the treaty ending the war, Mexico gave in to U.S. demands and ceded the vast territory in exchange for $15 million. The original draft of the treaty included Baja California in the sale, but the United States eventually agreed to omit the peninsula because of its proximity to Sonora, which is located just across the narrow Sea of Cortés. In 1853, an American named William Walker invaded the peninsula with 50 mercenaries, intent on annexing the land for the United States. Although he had no support from the U.S. government, Walker sailed from San Francisco to La Paz, arrested the governor, took possession of the public buildings and raised the flag of a new republic. He even declared himself president and installed cabinet members. Without reinforcements, however, Walker was forced to retreat, first to Cabo San Lucas and eventually back across the border.

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Continued from page 20 “You know, I almost killed myself with addiction by the time I was 38. Now I look back at all the fun I’ve had from then to now, and I’m so thankful that I had friends who stood by me through that period of my life,” Mark concluded. Although the “suits” decided to decline on their company’s option to purchase RBV and were willing to walk away from six decades of history, Mark Walters and his partners, the Hermosillos, went back to basics and breathed new life into the old girl; RBV seems to be thriving once again.

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I carefully stepped across the cattle guard as Walters commented, “We have had many great folks visit Rancho Buena Vista throughout the years; I miss seeing them, and mourn the loss of the ones who are gone forever.” But Rancho Buena Vista endures.

~

continued from page 10 He smiled and said, “Yes. Cafe de talega. If your server is young and especially if they are female, they might giggle but in a few minutes you will have a delicious cup of coffee.” “What a great scam” I thought. “I can't wait to pull this on some of my friends.” But after a few minutes of conversation, I finally believed he was telling me the truth. Ok, I admit to being a bit prudish on occasion, but I wasn’t going to let that stand between me and a good cup of coffee! The opportunity came in a few days. Naturally my waiter was a young female. I could feel my ears reddening as I carefully, with my best pronunciation, asked for “una tasa de café talega, por favor.” And exactly as advertised, she giggled, disappeared for a bit and returned with a delicious cup of freshly brewed coffee.

As we departed, the laughter and shouts echoed in my ears as Mark and I walked past the pool. Then we headed to my road trek, strolling past the famous rock table still sitting in its place of honor on the long porch where hundreds if not thousands of card games had taken place, on past the scales where an equal number of trophy fish had been hung and photographed during the past seven decades.

When I left, she must have wondered why I was grinning from ear to ear and acting like the luckiest guy in town.

actually ordered. The day it arrived, I cautiously unpacked the carton and followed directions, being very careful when I assembled the Quad Copter. That’s probably not an accurate statement since all that was required was that I tighten the self-locking propeller blades and charge the battery before it was ready to fly. But truthfully, I wasn't quite ready! I felt a little bit intimidated by this 24- x 24-inch bundle of technology resting on our coffee table. I studied the instruction manual from cover to cover – all 75 pages – for several days. I devoured the information on the camera, Wi-Fi, GPS, software and cell phone app – all of which needed to be understood before I took on the challenge of flying this machine that had set me back about $1,500. I had not been this nervous about taking control of boats that had cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and yes, a few owned by others that were even more dear than that!

The historical significance of RBV surrounded us like the cool breezes that were blowing across the sea.

Doing the Drone By Gary Graham (Previously published in Western Outdoor News, July 29, 2014) here’s no doubt that 2014 will go down in history as the “Year of the Drone" within the fishing community. Forget the latest and greatest tackle innovations or superduper electronics. Nope, this year the buzz is definitely about drones and who can take the most awe some photos with them. The list of people who have purchased the flying cameras is growing faster than I can keep up! So far, my WON column partner, Jonathan Roldan, and Ali Hussainy, President, BD Outdoors; Erik Landesfeind, and Barry Brightenburg all determined they had to have one. If you search the web, you’ll find plenty of entertaining videos that were shot with drones by crews and anglers on the sportfishing fleet. I, too, couldn't resist; mine arrived in mid-May. By the time it actually got here, I had watched hours of U-Tube videos on quad-copters in general, and had logged in many how-to hours on the DJI Technology Phantom 2 Vision Plus website, the drone that I

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EVER SO CAUTIOUSLY, I moved the left stick forward and watched as it leaped into the air.

Okay, call me crazy, but the only thing I had ever flown was a model airplane tethered by a control line which I flew in a circle … often crashing it before the full circle had even been completed. Early one morning, after days of procrastinating, drone in tow, Yvonne and I walked across the street to the park. Going through the checklist printed on the underbelly of the unit as carefully as a 747 pilot, with great trepidation I turned on the controller, and started the drone. Ever so cautiously, I moved the left stick forward and watched as it leaped into the air. Thank God I knew to let go of the stick so it could spring back to the center! It hovered at 30 feet or so and I began "Doing the Drone" for real.

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Healing Winds Holistic Center By Tehroma Lask he Center is like no other place in Los Barriles. Watch for it as you drive along the delegation road. A wash of sea green lines the curvy parapet, flowing gently over the color of adobe, finally sinking into a wash of deep violet blue. Broken tile line a curved organic cantilevered entrance. Walk into our central courtyard and studios beyond… Recently my dear friend, Camilla asked where I got the idea to create our Center, a place that feels like home away from home, where old and new friends, as well as, family share yoga, art and other interests. In my family, three generations gather here. About seven years ago, immersed in work and raising a family, stressed to a degree, my mom took notice and suggested I try yoga. My reply was less than original: I don’t have time: work, family, etc. Yet, I longed to take better care of myself in the midst of my busy life. I took my first yoga class with Jackie Reeves in the Palapa building south of the Primary School, asking her if I could take the 8am intermediate class as that timeslot fit best into my full schedule. Her answer was yes, as long as I promised to take care of myself in a class full of intermediate students. What a gentle and welcome introduction to yoga. If you have ever taken a class or more with Jackie, you know how easy it is to love the practice of yoga. The following summer, my husband Javier and I were on the water, not a fish in sight. After a few bites of our sandwiches, looking back at our beautiful town, I shared how much I loved yoga and how I felt its practice changing my life. I asked him to help me build a yoga studio. Inspired by a recent trip to Barcelona, I proceeded to design our Center, which includes four studios and a central courtyard that will embrace you with its curves, and draw your eyes upward through its organically shaped opening to the bright blue Baja sky. The overhang sparkles with droplets of light randomly placed along the courtyard’s perimeter. The broken tiles are a tribute to projects designed and built by our company over the years and friendships forged with clients through the creation of their homes. In February of 2009, Jackie inaugurated Sukhasana

Yoga and Pilates Studio leading the first of many classes to be held there since. Under her knowledgeable and efficient leadership, our studio has grown to include a wide range of choices and time-

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slots to fit varying schedules: Yoga, Meditation, Pilates, On The Ball, Strength Training, Zumba, Samba and Salsa. Our group of talented, Certified and CPR trained instructors offer experiences that range from quiet introspective stillness, strength and flexibility, to shake those hips and dance like nobody is watching. After a ten year hiatus from my own art, I began painting again and realized the next addition to our Center would be an art studio. At Camilla’s suggestion, Cheri and I met for iced tea where she shared the concept of art therapy and inspiring copies of her workshop ideas. Shortly thereafter, my dear friend Jo Quinn came to visit, sharing about her current job in an art studio and her plan to move back to Baja. That fall, Jo inaugurated Libelula Art Studio with an art journaling class. Our art studio enjoyed a successful first season under the insightful organization of Cheri Epstein, offering a wide range of classes and workshops (no experience necessary), as well as, drop in times for many to enjoy, immersed in natural light, surrounded by soulful and like minded company. Shortly after attending the Creative Approaches to the Healing Arts conference in Santa Fe with Jo and Cheri, I received an email from Jules Harris inquiring about the use of one of our spaces. She was moving back to Baja, part time, and would like to be part of our team. Yes! Over ten years ago, I met Jules and thought: we could be friends. Jules now manages The Sanctuary, our quietest and most serene space, where Rolfing (structural bodywork and functional movement), Hakomi Bodywork and Personal Counseling are offered under the spectacular care of Trained and Licensed Professionals, like Jules Harris and Susan Ackerman, to name a lovely few.

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Menudo Rojo (Red Menudo)

-ented Camilla Ford for organizing a magical evening where friends, family, community and storytellers gathered in our courtyard under the indigo star sparkled sky for True Stories. One of my personal favorite moments at Healing Winds: my mom sharing her story about Don Chapito and her grandchildren smiling, wide eyed and listening intently nearby.

Ingredients:

Ultimately, the overall vision is to offer a wide variety of classes and treatments in both English and Spanish thus bridging the predominant cultures in the East Cape and offering something for everyone. Next year, we plan to offer yoga classes in Spanish. Join us on Facebook where schedules, updates, inspiring quotes and photos are posted regularly. Schedules are also posted on the BPE. Watch for your favorites, as well as: New Classes, Treatments and Retreats. Healing Winds is mirrored in friendship, family and community. It is as warm and inviting as the East Cape itself. May you feel at home in our Center, finding yourself surrounded by friends, old and new and may your family come together – in multiple generations if possible, to share the gift of time and shared interests. A special shout out with Love and Gratitude to Jackie Reeves, my dear friend, beloved yoga teacher and Healing Winds General Manager --SHAKTI! And to our amazing community: our Center would not exist without all of you. Thank you for your continued support. Questions and feedback are encouraged: Tehroma Lask romalask@prodigy.net.mx, Owner, founder and collaborator. HWHC presented by UVERDE, A.C. “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” Gandhi.

~

3 gallons water, divided 2 1/2 pounds beef tripe, cut into 1-inch pieces 6 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 large white onion, finely chopped 1 1/2 tablespoons salt 1 tablespoon ground black pepper 1 1/2 tablespoons dried oregano 2 tablespoons ground red pepper 5 de arbol chile peppers 6 japones chile peppers, seeds removed 6 cups canned white or yellow hominy, drained 8 es v 1/2 white onion, chopped r Se 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro 2 limes, juiced

Directions: 1. In a large pot, bring 1 gallon water to a boil. Place tripe in the pot, reduce heat, and simmer 2 hours. Periodically skim off fat with a spoon. Drain water, reduce heat, and pour in a fresh gallon of water. Continue to simmer tripe for 2 hours; drain. 2. Pour remaining 1 gallon water into the pot with tripe, and bring to a boil. Stir in garlic and 1 white onion. Season with salt, pepper, oregano, and red pepper. Reduce heat, and simmer 1 hour. 3. Preheat the broiler. 4. Arrange the de arbol chile peppers on a baking sheet, and broil about 2 minutes, just until they begin to scorch. Remove from heat, slit lengthwise, and remove seeds. In a blender or food processor, blend the de arbol chile peppers and japones chile peppers until very finely chopped. Mix into the pot, and continue cooking 2 hours over low heat. 5. Mix the hominy into the pot. Continue cooking 1 hour. Serve with remaining onion, cilantro, and lime juice.

Last winter, we enjoyed our first community event after dark. Thanks to our beautiful, artistic and tal-

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Ironman Triathlon Comes to Baja

my number one fan and emotional support. I needed a boost, badly. Ok I just take it easy and plod along. I am not in the running for a spot to Kona any longer so why kill myself during the run? Next check point. No Randy and I feel like crying. I stay away from thinking about my Dad (who just passed away two weeks earlier and I am dedicating the race to him) because I feel deep pain in my stomach immediately. Not good when you are battling negative thoughts most of the time anyways. I catch up to Brenda (bike superstar) now wearing bright pink compression socks and she is walking. She has stomach cramps. I can relate. I had to walk a few times to try to get rid of mine. I was afraid to eat anything but force myself to drink water. Anything I take makes my stomach angry. I see Randy! I am so relieved, I almost start to cry but have no tears since any hydration has been sweated out. He tells me I am in fifth or sixth position. But I am guessing the others are massively ahead of me so why push myself. Last lap, eight miles to go. When I pass Randy he yells out to me that I am now in forth position and that the woman in fifth is hot on my ass. Brenda, Miss Pink Socks!! She is super close, 50 feet away. I tell Randy that I just don't think I have it in me and he orders me not to let her beat me! He said it with such vengeance that he kick started my determination. This is when I detached from mind from my legs. They are two pieces of wood and one goes in front of the other and I focus my mind on only one thing, that there is no way that woman is going to beat me. I start my mantra: “NO NO NO” and I push as hard as I can passing everyone ahead of me, really worrying that my body will give out at any second. On a turn around, I can see that she is still close by. I push harder to stay ahead but she keeps answering back. The last two miles and now I am on autopilot. This is when my mind shuts down and joins my legs in having no feeling or real function anymore. All the blood feels like it has left my brain and whatever energy is left is solely to move my momentum forward. I round the last corner to the finish chute where the crowd is cheering its loudest. The energy that I was striving to find comes to me from the crowd and I am suddenly lighter on my feet. I skip through the finish line and stop because I don’t believe I have anything left to take another step. I wait expecting to fall over because I gave every last ounce of myself to keep ahead of Brenda. I limp my way into Randy’s arms.

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My Ironman Race Report By Catherine Matsalla Editor's Note: Beginning in 2013, athletes begin with a 2.4-mile swim in the blue waters of the Sea of Cortes. They then biked 112 miles and run 26.2 miles along a 20-mile corridor between Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo. Ironman Los Cabos offered 40 qualifying slots to the Ironman World Championship in Kailua-Kona, HI. San Jose Del Cabo resident Catherine Matsalla participated in both competitions, finishing fourth in her age group both years. Below is Catherine's race report for the March 30, 2014 competition.

Stage One: The Battle Swim... WWIII In the Ocean

When I am able to look up, my friends are telling me that that I beat my time from last year. I don’t believe them. I turn to see the clock and realize that I have! I came through at 11:56 and Brenda is two minutes behind. I find her and we embrace. The only other person in the world who knows our effort in that last eight miles. Through tears, she tells me of her friend she lost only weeks before and I tell her about my father. We are bonded through tragedy and triumph. I thank her for helping me discover what I am truly capable of.

The mass start of 1,300 of us all sprinting into the water at the same time becomes a thick soup of bobbing heads in black slick wetsuits and I was in the thick of it. I was kicked countless times, punched in the mouth, in the goggles twice, swam directly over top of and my ankle grabbed. I picked a bad line in the water which meant that it was the most popular. Last year I took an outside line with clear water to swim in. This year I was surrounded by heathens. I had to stop about six times to let the big guys go because they literally squeezed me out. I thought it was a horrendous swim but my time was 1:06, a personal record.

The Battle with My Bike Right off the start there was an annoying noise coming from somewhere on my bike. Loud enough for everyone to hear, but could not figure it out. After about an hour or so, a flat tire. I pulled up to a truck full of guys. My strategy was that they would jump to

my rescue, but they were all confused about what to do so I barked out instructions and they jumped to attention. Well as you can imagine how that goes in a panicked state because I was pretty sure I was in the running second or third spot at that point and I was super frustrated as I could see competitors zoom by one after another as the clock ticked. I ride like mad to make up time. Then I think, bad plan; I might burn out near the end, but I felt ok so I passed a bunch of people in search of other women with a U on their leg, signifying that they are in my age group. I feel I am making progress then along came FLAT NUMBER 2!! So I pull off to the side once again and yell for help. Thankfully a real mechanic showed up and I rounded up other guys, who held up the bike while I barked orders again. This time I barked a few other words that cannot be mentioned here. They did their best to calm me down and assure me. Now I was out of tubes and cartridges and would be out of the race with another flat. With this thought I stopped at the bike mechanic station to replenish my supplies but they did not have what I needed. A waste of time. I start to push again, but Lord it was a bit hard to get the mind in gear after that and the wind was blowing against me. I ended up playing a cat and mouse game with Brenda, another competitor in my age group. She finally passes me and there is no way I can keep up. So I let her go. I always think that if they can press me and I cannot answer back, then they deserve to beat me. Then the stomach cramps start and they get bad. I have to ease up my efforts and stop eating. Everything I down causes spasms.

The Comeback Kid - on the run In transition I decide not to wear socks in my shoes. Bad idea! I am out of the tent and can’t find Randy,

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With the best moments passed, that run down the chute and the announcer says, “Catherine Matsalla, you are an Ironman!”; I am a little sad, but reflective. I am able to feel the vibrations of the joy of my accomplishment. That feeling will last forever.

For more information about the Ironman Triathlon and the next race in Cabo, visit the official website at: http://www.ironman.com/. Oct/Nov

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continued from page 11 For the next few weeks, I flew at the drop of a hat, taking off from my front yard overlooking the lake. To begin, I flew pretty much straight up and down, and then slowly, as my confidence grew, the flights extended farther. I flew it to the edge of the lake, as well as a block or so in either direction, going higher and higher until I sent it to 250 feet and lost sight of it. There were remarkably few mishaps. I discovered the dreaded death spiral when I descended too quickly causing the drone to drop like a stone! I was in luck! My error was high enough for me to slow the drone’s descent down so instead of a crash, well, we will simply call it a hard landing. No fault, no foul, aside from a nicked up prop or two that a little sandpaper took care of. It was ready to resume training, but the question is, just who was training who?

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Jonathan had two clients who attempted to use theirs from a panga and ended up float-testing them (by the way, they don't float). Both were a total loss; however, one was insured. At this point, almost every flight drew a crowd full of questions. The best description I've come up with is that it’s like an incredibly stable tri-pod in the sky with the difference that the drone will hover in the same place when you release the two joy sticks until you sort out what you want to do, sort of like a “pause” button. "Doing the Drone" has gained momentum within the fishing community. It has added a dimension that has been missing in this serious challenge of fishing. Find a drone overhead and you’ll find grown men once again playing with their toys.

~

Common Spanish Phrases

Then it came time for me to head to Baja. I safely stored it in the trusty Roadtrek for the drive down to East Cape in its own custom case in early June.

English

Spanish

Pronunciation

Good morning.

Buenos días.

Upon my arrival, I flew it often. Mark and Jennifer Rayor's beachfront home; at Rancho Leonero; at East Cape RV and then I headed up to La Paz for WON Panga Slam.

booEHN-os DEEas

Good afternoon.

Buenas tardes.

booEHN-as TARdehs

Good evening. (greeting)

Buenas noches.

booEHN-as NOchehs

Hello, my name is John.

Hola, me llamo Juan.

OH-la meh YAmo Wahn

What is your name?

¿Cómo se llama usted?

KOH-moh seh YA -mah oos-TEHD

How are you?

¿Cómo está usted?

KOH-moh ehs-TA oos-TEHD

Jonathan Roldan, Tailhunter International, my WON column partner, and I flew them together at Muertos and Balandra Bay. Swapping tips we began to grasp the possibilities that the drone offered. Some of our Drone images ended up in the La Paz Panga Slam story. I even had the courage to fly it out for the beach shot at Chileno Bay at the Stars & Stripes tournament’s shotgun start.

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plan was to offer “takeout”, do a nice varied menu with a mix of various Asian foods with an emphasis on Thai and do it in an environment that had an outdoor feel to it. As far as I can tell this plan is working out beautifully. They started doing five days a week but found that four days (Tuesday through Friday) worked best for them and their customers. I promised that this wouldn’t be a PR piece on the restaurant---but having eaten there a number of times I can tell you that the food and service is terrific. Of course I’m a big fan of Thai food so that taints my judgment. I asked what else might be on their bucket list for the future. They shared that they’ve traveled to about 45 different countries and that hitting a 100 more would be high on their list. I’m hoping and betting that they do it. Please stop into Sabaidee and introduce yourself to these very nice and very interesting people, and heck while you’re there you may as well try some of their great food.

continued from page 21 They got jobs at the same Yoga center but this time growing organic vegetables instead of preparing the food. In 2011 they visited Los Barriles and fell in love with it---haven’t we all? They packed up the RV and moved into the East Cape RV Resort. Brigitte started teaching Yoga and Zumba classes and Peter started doing a Friday night Asian food dinner. It started with 15 or 20 folks and rapidly grew to 40 or more. Then two years ago off they went to Thailand where Peter completed a professional culinary training program. My guess is that these folks are a couple of the very few in our area that have the professional training in the culinary arts that they do. After two years of once a week dinners at the RV grounds with a set menu (you got what they cooked) they took the bold step and leased a space in the plaza next to Bancomber and UPS. Their

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Hotel Rancho Buena Vista Resurrected By Gary Graham (Previously published in Western Outdoor News, August 26, 2014) otel Rancho Buena Vista was brought to life in 1952 when Herb Tansey began transforming the “goat farm” into a fishing destination. After several trips with his pal Ray Cannon, retired U.S. Army Colonel Gene Walters bought the 12-room hotel, expanded it and turned it into the resort of choice for his friends from Hollywood, including Richard Boone, Chuck Connors, James Garner, John Wayne, and even Dwight Eisenhower after he was no longer President. Located on the shore of the Sea of Cortez south of La Paz and north of Cabo San Lucas, the Ranch offered some of the finest fishing in the world. The hotel thrived, adding rooms and the first portable pier, thanks to the ingenuity of a transplanted MIT graduate, Ted Bonney, who escaped the U.S. and made his home at the Ranch until his death; plus generations of local families who were employees of the hotel… captains, waiters, cooks, and maids. And there were the three generations of Walters: the Colonel, then Chuck and Mark. Then, in 2008, with Mark Walters as the on-site manager, Seby R. “Russ” Jones, President of Davidson and Jones Corporation of North Carolina, elected to take out an option to purchase this quiet, successful fishing lodge with the intent of turning it into something first-class, something grand… the first of its kind in East Cape. But they didn’t succeed. In 2011, Jones announced via e-mail the permanent

Read the color version online at www.eastcapearts.com

closing of Rancho Buena Vista Hotel, noting that, “RBV has aged well, but we no longer foresee the ability to keep the hotel in good enough shape to offer that experience. So, after six decades of operation, it’s time to say goodbye.” This was quickly followed by a second e-mail from Mark Walters, a partner of Rancho Buena Vista Hotel, and grandson of the Colonel, and third generation Baja entrepreneur. Paraphrasing Mark Twain, Walters wrote, “The reports of RBV’s closing are greatly exaggerated.”

Mark Walters, Owner of Rancho Buena Vista and grandson of its founder, with bartender Tony Marron.

He continued, “The Davidson and Jones Corporation has been managing/operating the hotel for the past few years and has decided to call it quits. The actual owners, the Hermosillo family and myself, are currently reviewing our options. The hotel will be closed only temporarily.” Since 2011, Rancho Buena Vista with Walters as on -site manager, has confounded the dire predictions of the U.S. businessman by going back to the basics of capitalizing on existing assets.

Continued on page 20

A Swiss Gal, a Guy from Britain and an Asian Restaurant in Los Barriles By Hank Darlington s a twenty year resident of Los Barriles, I’ve seen our little town change from dirt streets, no sidewalks, no street lights, no telephones, no water (at least where I live), TP like sandpaper and only one restaurant (Tio’s) to a regular little thriving community. Plus the Gringo population has grown from about a hundred to several thousand. All good. I probably have more friends here than I do in Sacramento, Ca where I live the other six months a year. Being a guy that likes people and very curious by nature I’m always asking folks that I’ve just met where they are from, what they did for a living and other personal stuff that’s probably none of my business. But what the heck I learn a lot and most folks don’t mind sharing. Of course one of the questions is “How in the world did you end up down here? These answers are all over the place. Last winter I met two very interesting people for the first time and bombarded them with my questions. I had gone to dinner with friends at the new Thai restaurant next to Bancomer. The meal was terrific but this little piece isn’t a PR plug for the restaurant—it’s about two very personable, active, adventuresome people that just happen to be the owners/operators and complete staff of Sabaidee Bistro and Takeaway (sah-bahee-dee) the aforementioned eatery. Brigitte Meier a native of Switzerland and Peter Barrett from Brittan are the topic of this human interest story. Think about this for just a moment---a gal from Switzerland, a guy from Brittan doing an Asian restaurant in Los Barriles. That just tickles me a whole bunch. Let’s begin with Brigitte who started her working life doing a number of interesting jobs. She sold woman’s clothing, worked in a nursing home for the elderly, worked for an architect that refurbished movie theaters and then for the Swiss post office where she managed properties. Peter did a three year apprenticeship in a five star hotel while attending a college for culinary arts. He then worked for a caterer and became the number two chef. After a few years of that his adventuresome spirit kicked in and he went to Switzerland and worked for a ski resort In the winter and a

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tennis club in the summer. The tennis job involved responsibility for the food. (there you go—another connection to cooking). Then, he too went to work for the Swiss Post Office. This is where these two interesting folks met. Their first date was a bicycle ride. They discovered that they had a number of strong mutual interests----biking, tennis, traveling and of course food (both eating it and cooking it). In 2005 they packed up their bikes and some camping gear and flew to Los Angeles. The plan was to bike from LA to Cabo—the whole way down the Baja. Well I’ve driven the Baja about forty times and I’m a pretty serious bike rider (having ridden from Los Angeles to Boston and from Maine to Florida in the past five years), so when I heard this I thought they were nuts. No way should you ride a bike on our highway 1 (there is no highway 2). They admitted that maybe they hadn’t done as much research on what the road was like as they should have. It looked better on the internet than it did in person. Anyway off they went. All was okay until they got to Catavina—yep, that place in the middle of nowhere. The torrential rains had hit, roads were flooded out and there was no way a bike loaded with camping stuff could get through. They used some good judgment and jumped on a bus. They ended up in Todas Santos. They got the bikes out and explored a bunch of Baja Sur riding a total of about 1800 miles. As a fellow peddler I admire this. Back to Todas Santos. After living in a tent, then a beat up camper shell they moved up in the world— they pooled their Swiss Francs--- oh no I’m sorry, their pesos and bought a used but very serviceable RV. They both got jobs working at a Yoga center in Pescadero (just South of Todas Santos). They were in charge of the food. There’s that food connection again. In 2007 Peter was diagnosed with eye cancer (there’s a big name for it but you wouldn’t remember it anyway). They went back to England where he had surgery removing his right eye and part of his jaw. Knowing that the survival odds were only so-so they decided to live every day to the fullest. That meant coming back to Mexico picking up the RV and doing a 45,000 mile drive- about. This adventure included the Southern half of the USA, the Eastern coast of Mexico, Central America, back up the western coast of Mexico up to Alaska, then back down to Todas Santos. This was a two year sojourn and thank goodness the cancer seems to be in remission.

Continued on page 22 21


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continued from page 16 On a recent visit to RBV, I was pleased to see the seaside pool surrounded by both Mexican and American families taking advantage of another sparkling sunny Baja summer day. Kids and adults alike plunged into the pool to cool off in the afternoon heat. Later, I caught up with Mark in the palapa-covered bar overlooking the Sea of Cortez. “Have a seat,” he beckoned, pulling out a leather-woven rattan chair. “Join me for a virgin Bloody Mary? I hope you like Tabasco sauce!” he grinned as he ordered a couple from Tony Marron behind the bar. In answer to my question of what he had been up to, Mark replied, “Still playing lots of golf and tennis.” Tony set the drinks on the leather-topped table and Mark continued. “I’ve also been playing quite a bit in our band, ‘Skeleton Key.’ We’ve had 50 gigs since last November,” he said with an infectious grin. “Aside from that, it’s business as usual, more or less, since the Davidson and Jones Corporation group fled in 2011. The Hermosillos and I first decided to reopen the bar, which was always popular. Next, we started renting rooms on a nightly basis. The basic difference is that while the kitchen is operational, it is used only occasionally for private parties.”

20

Read the color version online at www.eastcapearts.com

“RBV has become very popular with locals, with relocated foreign retirees, as well as with many of our former clients. We have 25 rooms available during the week and during the summer months they are very popular with both working and professional families and with groups from Cabo and La Paz who just want to get away for a weekend.” “On weekends, all those barbeques you see out there around the pool are in use. We even added a DIY barbeque where folks in the bar can cook their own hot dogs and hamburgers. My wife Jesi came up with that idea and it was a good one,” he said with pride. “Jesi and I often stop by in the afternoon when different groups are serving everything from carne asada to ceviche. They often invite us to sample their fantastic dishes. It’s great! We also host weddings and parties, you know, everything from birthdays to anniversaries. It’s all a lot of fun! We even offer two 31-foot Island Hopper sportfishers for our guests now.” They recently re-listed the hotel. “If it sells, Jesi and I will simply build a new house on some property we own and remain in the area. This is our home and we just want to live happily ever after.” Not only is the hotel back and thriving, so is Mark Walters.

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Fitness Q and A’s By Sefi Held eing a part of the Fitness Industry for over four decades has been informative, frustrating, enlightening and downright fun. What was the hottest trend and latest information available in the 1980’s, 1990’s and 2000’s has quickly been pushed aside as more and more research becomes available to us on what is needed to stay fit and healthy. Staying current with fitness information and research can be quite a challenge and I have been attending the same annual, fitness conference with world renowned presenters for the past 15 years to ensure that my continuing education credits are up to date and despite all this new information, it is still difficult to keep up with the latest trends evolving each year. No wonder my participants and clients are boggled when it comes to making lifestyle and activity choices!! One of the big questions I always get asked “Is cardiovascular (aerobic) fitness more important than either strength or flexibility and balance training?” To me the answer is a simple NO, because you need strength, flexibility and balance for overall fitness. Maintaining aerobic fitness has been shown to reduce the risks of coronary artery disease and its related problems, regular strength training can help reduce the risk for problems of Osteopenia and Osteoporosis. Maintaining flexibility helps reduce the risk of injury when you are doing other exercises and recreational sports and activities and balance is a key component in keeping us from falling and incurring bone breaks, especially in the hip area, as we age.

Read the color version online at www.eastcapearts.com

The question of “Which of the following techniques is best for my mind and body fitness lifestyle; yoga, tai chi, mediation, Pilates, or biofeedback, etc.” is also a popular one and all of them can have a dramatic impact and are all wonderful and valid disciplines. Research has proven that optimal fitness encompasses much more than physical capabilities. What’s important is the practiced integration of both mental and physical functions. Whatever practice or technique you choose, the benefits of a mind/body program can include reduced stress, lower blood pressure, and an enhanced capability to deal with stressful situations and you may find yourself smiling a lot more! Exercise is not only a well-documented means of maintaining muscle and losing fat, recent studies propose that it can also revitalize your sex life. In the Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists found that sexual dysfunction is more likely among those with poor physical and emotional health and plays a major role with overall well-being. Doctors believe that exercise has the effect it does on increasing sexual potency because it strengthens the cardiovascular system and improves circulation and good circulation is important for sexual function. Exercise, while not a panacea can be just what the doctor ordered for physical and psychological complaints. What exercise is right for you? It is the one that you enjoy and the one you can do consistently. In order to reap the full benefits of the time you spend exercising, you must warm up. Taking those extra few

Continued on page 19

minutes to adjust to increased activity will ensure a better performance from your body, and, in turn, will make your workout more efficient, productive and enjoyable The new lifestyle paradigm focuses on things other than exercise and weight loss: healthy eating, positive self esteem, and perhaps most importantly, selfacceptance is key to making positive, healthy changes. Being healthy has less to do with a number on a scale or a dress size than the ability to balance and nurture all aspects of one’s life: the emotional, mental and spiritual as well as the physical and keeping your heart and muscles challenged. The key to staying healthy is to do everything in moderation. Moderation is best viewed as something relative to one’s OWN fitness level and goals. Don’t expect to exercise several hours every day simply because your very fit friend does. The body needs to adjust, adapt and even recuperate in response to exercise – exercising to the point of overtraining is simply taking one step forward and two steps back. Our Sukhasana Yoga and Pilates Studio will commence the class schedule again in early November and all our instructors are fully qualified and certified, including CPR, and would like to provide you with the safest and most enjoyable classes possible. Stay tuned to the Baja Pony Express and you will find the entire studio schedule posted on the Calendar. See you all real soon! Sefi Held, A.C.E., CanfitPro certified Personal Trainer, Fitness, Yoga, Pilates and Older Adult Fitness Specialist Instructor, Resist-A-Ball and Zumba certified.

Another related question is “To get stronger, do I need to work each muscle group with weights at least three times per week or more?” Many studies have shown that doing strength training exercises (weights, machines, elastic bands, body weight) just twice a week will lead to significant strength gains. The key is to take the muscle to fatigue by performing about eight to 12 repetitions – fatigue means that the muscles being worked tire to the point that you cannot complete any more repetitions using proper and correct form. Wayne Wescott performed a study where senior participants did just one set of eight to 12 repetitions twice per week and it lead to substantial strength improvement in just 12 short weeks. If you are new to resistance training, it is always a good idea to work with a qualified, certified professional to ensure that your program works all the major muscle groups in a balanced fashion.

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Recycle and share with a friend.

Fitness Q and A’s By Sefi Held eing a part of the Fitness Industry for over four decades has been informative, frustrating, enlightening and downright fun. What was the hottest trend and latest information available in the 1980’s, 1990’s and 2000’s has quickly been pushed aside as more and more research becomes available to us on what is needed to stay fit and healthy. Staying current with fitness information and research can be quite a challenge and I have been attending the same annual, fitness conference with world renowned presenters for the past 15 years to ensure that my continuing education credits are up to date and despite all this new information, it is still difficult to keep up with the latest trends evolving each year. No wonder my participants and clients are boggled when it comes to making lifestyle and activity choices!! One of the big questions I always get asked “Is cardiovascular (aerobic) fitness more important than either strength or flexibility and balance training?” To me the answer is a simple NO, because you need strength, flexibility and balance for overall fitness. Maintaining aerobic fitness has been shown to reduce the risks of coronary artery disease and its related problems, regular strength training can help reduce the risk for problems of Osteopenia and Osteoporosis. Maintaining flexibility helps reduce the risk of injury when you are doing other exercises and recreational sports and activities and balance is a key component in keeping us from falling and incurring bone breaks, especially in the hip area, as we age.

Read the color version online at www.eastcapearts.com

The question of “Which of the following techniques is best for my mind and body fitness lifestyle; yoga, tai chi, mediation, Pilates, or biofeedback, etc.” is also a popular one and all of them can have a dramatic impact and are all wonderful and valid disciplines. Research has proven that optimal fitness encompasses much more than physical capabilities. What’s important is the practiced integration of both mental and physical functions. Whatever practice or technique you choose, the benefits of a mind/body program can include reduced stress, lower blood pressure, and an enhanced capability to deal with stressful situations and you may find yourself smiling a lot more! Exercise is not only a well-documented means of maintaining muscle and losing fat, recent studies propose that it can also revitalize your sex life. In the Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists found that sexual dysfunction is more likely among those with poor physical and emotional health and plays a major role with overall well-being. Doctors believe that exercise has the effect it does on increasing sexual potency because it strengthens the cardiovascular system and improves circulation and good circulation is important for sexual function. Exercise, while not a panacea can be just what the doctor ordered for physical and psychological complaints. What exercise is right for you? It is the one that you enjoy and the one you can do consistently. In order to reap the full benefits of the time you spend exercising, you must warm up. Taking those extra few

Continued on page 19

minutes to adjust to increased activity will ensure a better performance from your body, and, in turn, will make your workout more efficient, productive and enjoyable The new lifestyle paradigm focuses on things other than exercise and weight loss: healthy eating, positive self esteem, and perhaps most importantly, selfacceptance is key to making positive, healthy changes. Being healthy has less to do with a number on a scale or a dress size than the ability to balance and nurture all aspects of one’s life: the emotional, mental and spiritual as well as the physical and keeping your heart and muscles challenged. The key to staying healthy is to do everything in moderation. Moderation is best viewed as something relative to one’s OWN fitness level and goals. Don’t expect to exercise several hours every day simply because your very fit friend does. The body needs to adjust, adapt and even recuperate in response to exercise – exercising to the point of overtraining is simply taking one step forward and two steps back. Our Sukhasana Yoga and Pilates Studio will commence the class schedule again in early November and all our instructors are fully qualified and certified, including CPR, and would like to provide you with the safest and most enjoyable classes possible. Stay tuned to the Baja Pony Express and you will find the entire studio schedule posted on the Calendar. See you all real soon! Sefi Held, A.C.E., CanfitPro certified Personal Trainer, Fitness, Yoga, Pilates and Older Adult Fitness Specialist Instructor, Resist-A-Ball and Zumba certified.

Another related question is “To get stronger, do I need to work each muscle group with weights at least three times per week or more?” Many studies have shown that doing strength training exercises (weights, machines, elastic bands, body weight) just twice a week will lead to significant strength gains. The key is to take the muscle to fatigue by performing about eight to 12 repetitions – fatigue means that the muscles being worked tire to the point that you cannot complete any more repetitions using proper and correct form. Wayne Wescott performed a study where senior participants did just one set of eight to 12 repetitions twice per week and it lead to substantial strength improvement in just 12 short weeks. If you are new to resistance training, it is always a good idea to work with a qualified, certified professional to ensure that your program works all the major muscle groups in a balanced fashion.

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Recycle and share with a friend.

continued from page 16 On a recent visit to RBV, I was pleased to see the seaside pool surrounded by both Mexican and American families taking advantage of another sparkling sunny Baja summer day. Kids and adults alike plunged into the pool to cool off in the afternoon heat. Later, I caught up with Mark in the palapa-covered bar overlooking the Sea of Cortez. “Have a seat,” he beckoned, pulling out a leather-woven rattan chair. “Join me for a virgin Bloody Mary? I hope you like Tabasco sauce!” he grinned as he ordered a couple from Tony Marron behind the bar. In answer to my question of what he had been up to, Mark replied, “Still playing lots of golf and tennis.” Tony set the drinks on the leather-topped table and Mark continued. “I’ve also been playing quite a bit in our band, ‘Skeleton Key.’ We’ve had 50 gigs since last November,” he said with an infectious grin. “Aside from that, it’s business as usual, more or less, since the Davidson and Jones Corporation group fled in 2011. The Hermosillos and I first decided to reopen the bar, which was always popular. Next, we started renting rooms on a nightly basis. The basic difference is that while the kitchen is operational, it is used only occasionally for private parties.”

20

Read the color version online at www.eastcapearts.com

“RBV has become very popular with locals, with relocated foreign retirees, as well as with many of our former clients. We have 25 rooms available during the week and during the summer months they are very popular with both working and professional families and with groups from Cabo and La Paz who just want to get away for a weekend.” “On weekends, all those barbeques you see out there around the pool are in use. We even added a DIY barbeque where folks in the bar can cook their own hot dogs and hamburgers. My wife Jesi came up with that idea and it was a good one,” he said with pride. “Jesi and I often stop by in the afternoon when different groups are serving everything from carne asada to ceviche. They often invite us to sample their fantastic dishes. It’s great! We also host weddings and parties, you know, everything from birthdays to anniversaries. It’s all a lot of fun! We even offer two 31-foot Island Hopper sportfishers for our guests now.” They recently re-listed the hotel. “If it sells, Jesi and I will simply build a new house on some property we own and remain in the area. This is our home and we just want to live happily ever after.” Not only is the hotel back and thriving, so is Mark Walters.

Continued on page 26 Oct/Nov

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Hotel Rancho Buena Vista Resurrected By Gary Graham (Previously published in Western Outdoor News, August 26, 2014) otel Rancho Buena Vista was brought to life in 1952 when Herb Tansey began transforming the “goat farm” into a fishing destination. After several trips with his pal Ray Cannon, retired U.S. Army Colonel Gene Walters bought the 12-room hotel, expanded it and turned it into the resort of choice for his friends from Hollywood, including Richard Boone, Chuck Connors, James Garner, John Wayne, and even Dwight Eisenhower after he was no longer President. Located on the shore of the Sea of Cortez south of La Paz and north of Cabo San Lucas, the Ranch offered some of the finest fishing in the world. The hotel thrived, adding rooms and the first portable pier, thanks to the ingenuity of a transplanted MIT graduate, Ted Bonney, who escaped the U.S. and made his home at the Ranch until his death; plus generations of local families who were employees of the hotel… captains, waiters, cooks, and maids. And there were the three generations of Walters: the Colonel, then Chuck and Mark. Then, in 2008, with Mark Walters as the on-site manager, Seby R. “Russ” Jones, President of Davidson and Jones Corporation of North Carolina, elected to take out an option to purchase this quiet, successful fishing lodge with the intent of turning it into something first-class, something grand… the first of its kind in East Cape. But they didn’t succeed. In 2011, Jones announced via e-mail the permanent

Read the color version online at www.eastcapearts.com

closing of Rancho Buena Vista Hotel, noting that, “RBV has aged well, but we no longer foresee the ability to keep the hotel in good enough shape to offer that experience. So, after six decades of operation, it’s time to say goodbye.” This was quickly followed by a second e-mail from Mark Walters, a partner of Rancho Buena Vista Hotel, and grandson of the Colonel, and third generation Baja entrepreneur. Paraphrasing Mark Twain, Walters wrote, “The reports of RBV’s closing are greatly exaggerated.”

Mark Walters, Owner of Rancho Buena Vista and grandson of its founder, with bartender Tony Marron.

He continued, “The Davidson and Jones Corporation has been managing/operating the hotel for the past few years and has decided to call it quits. The actual owners, the Hermosillo family and myself, are currently reviewing our options. The hotel will be closed only temporarily.” Since 2011, Rancho Buena Vista with Walters as on -site manager, has confounded the dire predictions of the U.S. businessman by going back to the basics of capitalizing on existing assets.

Continued on page 20

A Swiss Gal, a Guy from Britain and an Asian Restaurant in Los Barriles By Hank Darlington s a twenty year resident of Los Barriles, I’ve seen our little town change from dirt streets, no sidewalks, no street lights, no telephones, no water (at least where I live), TP like sandpaper and only one restaurant (Tio’s) to a regular little thriving community. Plus the Gringo population has grown from about a hundred to several thousand. All good. I probably have more friends here than I do in Sacramento, Ca where I live the other six months a year. Being a guy that likes people and very curious by nature I’m always asking folks that I’ve just met where they are from, what they did for a living and other personal stuff that’s probably none of my business. But what the heck I learn a lot and most folks don’t mind sharing. Of course one of the questions is “How in the world did you end up down here? These answers are all over the place. Last winter I met two very interesting people for the first time and bombarded them with my questions. I had gone to dinner with friends at the new Thai restaurant next to Bancomer. The meal was terrific but this little piece isn’t a PR plug for the restaurant—it’s about two very personable, active, adventuresome people that just happen to be the owners/operators and complete staff of Sabaidee Bistro and Takeaway (sah-bahee-dee) the aforementioned eatery. Brigitte Meier a native of Switzerland and Peter Barrett from Brittan are the topic of this human interest story. Think about this for just a moment---a gal from Switzerland, a guy from Brittan doing an Asian restaurant in Los Barriles. That just tickles me a whole bunch. Let’s begin with Brigitte who started her working life doing a number of interesting jobs. She sold woman’s clothing, worked in a nursing home for the elderly, worked for an architect that refurbished movie theaters and then for the Swiss post office where she managed properties. Peter did a three year apprenticeship in a five star hotel while attending a college for culinary arts. He then worked for a caterer and became the number two chef. After a few years of that his adventuresome spirit kicked in and he went to Switzerland and worked for a ski resort In the winter and a

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tennis club in the summer. The tennis job involved responsibility for the food. (there you go—another connection to cooking). Then, he too went to work for the Swiss Post Office. This is where these two interesting folks met. Their first date was a bicycle ride. They discovered that they had a number of strong mutual interests----biking, tennis, traveling and of course food (both eating it and cooking it). In 2005 they packed up their bikes and some camping gear and flew to Los Angeles. The plan was to bike from LA to Cabo—the whole way down the Baja. Well I’ve driven the Baja about forty times and I’m a pretty serious bike rider (having ridden from Los Angeles to Boston and from Maine to Florida in the past five years), so when I heard this I thought they were nuts. No way should you ride a bike on our highway 1 (there is no highway 2). They admitted that maybe they hadn’t done as much research on what the road was like as they should have. It looked better on the internet than it did in person. Anyway off they went. All was okay until they got to Catavina—yep, that place in the middle of nowhere. The torrential rains had hit, roads were flooded out and there was no way a bike loaded with camping stuff could get through. They used some good judgment and jumped on a bus. They ended up in Todas Santos. They got the bikes out and explored a bunch of Baja Sur riding a total of about 1800 miles. As a fellow peddler I admire this. Back to Todas Santos. After living in a tent, then a beat up camper shell they moved up in the world— they pooled their Swiss Francs--- oh no I’m sorry, their pesos and bought a used but very serviceable RV. They both got jobs working at a Yoga center in Pescadero (just South of Todas Santos). They were in charge of the food. There’s that food connection again. In 2007 Peter was diagnosed with eye cancer (there’s a big name for it but you wouldn’t remember it anyway). They went back to England where he had surgery removing his right eye and part of his jaw. Knowing that the survival odds were only so-so they decided to live every day to the fullest. That meant coming back to Mexico picking up the RV and doing a 45,000 mile drive- about. This adventure included the Southern half of the USA, the Eastern coast of Mexico, Central America, back up the western coast of Mexico up to Alaska, then back down to Todas Santos. This was a two year sojourn and thank goodness the cancer seems to be in remission.

Continued on page 22 21


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plan was to offer “takeout”, do a nice varied menu with a mix of various Asian foods with an emphasis on Thai and do it in an environment that had an outdoor feel to it. As far as I can tell this plan is working out beautifully. They started doing five days a week but found that four days (Tuesday through Friday) worked best for them and their customers. I promised that this wouldn’t be a PR piece on the restaurant---but having eaten there a number of times I can tell you that the food and service is terrific. Of course I’m a big fan of Thai food so that taints my judgment. I asked what else might be on their bucket list for the future. They shared that they’ve traveled to about 45 different countries and that hitting a 100 more would be high on their list. I’m hoping and betting that they do it. Please stop into Sabaidee and introduce yourself to these very nice and very interesting people, and heck while you’re there you may as well try some of their great food.

continued from page 21 They got jobs at the same Yoga center but this time growing organic vegetables instead of preparing the food. In 2011 they visited Los Barriles and fell in love with it---haven’t we all? They packed up the RV and moved into the East Cape RV Resort. Brigitte started teaching Yoga and Zumba classes and Peter started doing a Friday night Asian food dinner. It started with 15 or 20 folks and rapidly grew to 40 or more. Then two years ago off they went to Thailand where Peter completed a professional culinary training program. My guess is that these folks are a couple of the very few in our area that have the professional training in the culinary arts that they do. After two years of once a week dinners at the RV grounds with a set menu (you got what they cooked) they took the bold step and leased a space in the plaza next to Bancomber and UPS. Their

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continued from page 11 For the next few weeks, I flew at the drop of a hat, taking off from my front yard overlooking the lake. To begin, I flew pretty much straight up and down, and then slowly, as my confidence grew, the flights extended farther. I flew it to the edge of the lake, as well as a block or so in either direction, going higher and higher until I sent it to 250 feet and lost sight of it. There were remarkably few mishaps. I discovered the dreaded death spiral when I descended too quickly causing the drone to drop like a stone! I was in luck! My error was high enough for me to slow the drone’s descent down so instead of a crash, well, we will simply call it a hard landing. No fault, no foul, aside from a nicked up prop or two that a little sandpaper took care of. It was ready to resume training, but the question is, just who was training who?

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Jonathan had two clients who attempted to use theirs from a panga and ended up float-testing them (by the way, they don't float). Both were a total loss; however, one was insured. At this point, almost every flight drew a crowd full of questions. The best description I've come up with is that it’s like an incredibly stable tri-pod in the sky with the difference that the drone will hover in the same place when you release the two joy sticks until you sort out what you want to do, sort of like a “pause” button. "Doing the Drone" has gained momentum within the fishing community. It has added a dimension that has been missing in this serious challenge of fishing. Find a drone overhead and you’ll find grown men once again playing with their toys.

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Common Spanish Phrases

Then it came time for me to head to Baja. I safely stored it in the trusty Roadtrek for the drive down to East Cape in its own custom case in early June.

English

Spanish

Pronunciation

Good morning.

Buenos días.

Upon my arrival, I flew it often. Mark and Jennifer Rayor's beachfront home; at Rancho Leonero; at East Cape RV and then I headed up to La Paz for WON Panga Slam.

booEHN-os DEEas

Good afternoon.

Buenas tardes.

booEHN-as TARdehs

Good evening. (greeting)

Buenas noches.

booEHN-as NOchehs

Hello, my name is John.

Hola, me llamo Juan.

OH-la meh YAmo Wahn

What is your name?

¿Cómo se llama usted?

KOH-moh seh YA -mah oos-TEHD

How are you?

¿Cómo está usted?

KOH-moh ehs-TA oos-TEHD

Jonathan Roldan, Tailhunter International, my WON column partner, and I flew them together at Muertos and Balandra Bay. Swapping tips we began to grasp the possibilities that the drone offered. Some of our Drone images ended up in the La Paz Panga Slam story. I even had the courage to fly it out for the beach shot at Chileno Bay at the Stars & Stripes tournament’s shotgun start.

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continued from page 13

Ironman Triathlon Comes to Baja

my number one fan and emotional support. I needed a boost, badly. Ok I just take it easy and plod along. I am not in the running for a spot to Kona any longer so why kill myself during the run? Next check point. No Randy and I feel like crying. I stay away from thinking about my Dad (who just passed away two weeks earlier and I am dedicating the race to him) because I feel deep pain in my stomach immediately. Not good when you are battling negative thoughts most of the time anyways. I catch up to Brenda (bike superstar) now wearing bright pink compression socks and she is walking. She has stomach cramps. I can relate. I had to walk a few times to try to get rid of mine. I was afraid to eat anything but force myself to drink water. Anything I take makes my stomach angry. I see Randy! I am so relieved, I almost start to cry but have no tears since any hydration has been sweated out. He tells me I am in fifth or sixth position. But I am guessing the others are massively ahead of me so why push myself. Last lap, eight miles to go. When I pass Randy he yells out to me that I am now in forth position and that the woman in fifth is hot on my ass. Brenda, Miss Pink Socks!! She is super close, 50 feet away. I tell Randy that I just don't think I have it in me and he orders me not to let her beat me! He said it with such vengeance that he kick started my determination. This is when I detached from mind from my legs. They are two pieces of wood and one goes in front of the other and I focus my mind on only one thing, that there is no way that woman is going to beat me. I start my mantra: “NO NO NO” and I push as hard as I can passing everyone ahead of me, really worrying that my body will give out at any second. On a turn around, I can see that she is still close by. I push harder to stay ahead but she keeps answering back. The last two miles and now I am on autopilot. This is when my mind shuts down and joins my legs in having no feeling or real function anymore. All the blood feels like it has left my brain and whatever energy is left is solely to move my momentum forward. I round the last corner to the finish chute where the crowd is cheering its loudest. The energy that I was striving to find comes to me from the crowd and I am suddenly lighter on my feet. I skip through the finish line and stop because I don’t believe I have anything left to take another step. I wait expecting to fall over because I gave every last ounce of myself to keep ahead of Brenda. I limp my way into Randy’s arms.

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My Ironman Race Report By Catherine Matsalla Editor's Note: Beginning in 2013, athletes begin with a 2.4-mile swim in the blue waters of the Sea of Cortes. They then biked 112 miles and run 26.2 miles along a 20-mile corridor between Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo. Ironman Los Cabos offered 40 qualifying slots to the Ironman World Championship in Kailua-Kona, HI. San Jose Del Cabo resident Catherine Matsalla participated in both competitions, finishing fourth in her age group both years. Below is Catherine's race report for the March 30, 2014 competition.

Stage One: The Battle Swim... WWIII In the Ocean

When I am able to look up, my friends are telling me that that I beat my time from last year. I don’t believe them. I turn to see the clock and realize that I have! I came through at 11:56 and Brenda is two minutes behind. I find her and we embrace. The only other person in the world who knows our effort in that last eight miles. Through tears, she tells me of her friend she lost only weeks before and I tell her about my father. We are bonded through tragedy and triumph. I thank her for helping me discover what I am truly capable of.

The mass start of 1,300 of us all sprinting into the water at the same time becomes a thick soup of bobbing heads in black slick wetsuits and I was in the thick of it. I was kicked countless times, punched in the mouth, in the goggles twice, swam directly over top of and my ankle grabbed. I picked a bad line in the water which meant that it was the most popular. Last year I took an outside line with clear water to swim in. This year I was surrounded by heathens. I had to stop about six times to let the big guys go because they literally squeezed me out. I thought it was a horrendous swim but my time was 1:06, a personal record.

The Battle with My Bike Right off the start there was an annoying noise coming from somewhere on my bike. Loud enough for everyone to hear, but could not figure it out. After about an hour or so, a flat tire. I pulled up to a truck full of guys. My strategy was that they would jump to

my rescue, but they were all confused about what to do so I barked out instructions and they jumped to attention. Well as you can imagine how that goes in a panicked state because I was pretty sure I was in the running second or third spot at that point and I was super frustrated as I could see competitors zoom by one after another as the clock ticked. I ride like mad to make up time. Then I think, bad plan; I might burn out near the end, but I felt ok so I passed a bunch of people in search of other women with a U on their leg, signifying that they are in my age group. I feel I am making progress then along came FLAT NUMBER 2!! So I pull off to the side once again and yell for help. Thankfully a real mechanic showed up and I rounded up other guys, who held up the bike while I barked orders again. This time I barked a few other words that cannot be mentioned here. They did their best to calm me down and assure me. Now I was out of tubes and cartridges and would be out of the race with another flat. With this thought I stopped at the bike mechanic station to replenish my supplies but they did not have what I needed. A waste of time. I start to push again, but Lord it was a bit hard to get the mind in gear after that and the wind was blowing against me. I ended up playing a cat and mouse game with Brenda, another competitor in my age group. She finally passes me and there is no way I can keep up. So I let her go. I always think that if they can press me and I cannot answer back, then they deserve to beat me. Then the stomach cramps start and they get bad. I have to ease up my efforts and stop eating. Everything I down causes spasms.

The Comeback Kid - on the run In transition I decide not to wear socks in my shoes. Bad idea! I am out of the tent and can’t find Randy,

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With the best moments passed, that run down the chute and the announcer says, “Catherine Matsalla, you are an Ironman!”; I am a little sad, but reflective. I am able to feel the vibrations of the joy of my accomplishment. That feeling will last forever.

For more information about the Ironman Triathlon and the next race in Cabo, visit the official website at: http://www.ironman.com/. Oct/Nov

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Healing Winds Holistic Center By Tehroma Lask he Center is like no other place in Los Barriles. Watch for it as you drive along the delegation road. A wash of sea green lines the curvy parapet, flowing gently over the color of adobe, finally sinking into a wash of deep violet blue. Broken tile line a curved organic cantilevered entrance. Walk into our central courtyard and studios beyond… Recently my dear friend, Camilla asked where I got the idea to create our Center, a place that feels like home away from home, where old and new friends, as well as, family share yoga, art and other interests. In my family, three generations gather here. About seven years ago, immersed in work and raising a family, stressed to a degree, my mom took notice and suggested I try yoga. My reply was less than original: I don’t have time: work, family, etc. Yet, I longed to take better care of myself in the midst of my busy life. I took my first yoga class with Jackie Reeves in the Palapa building south of the Primary School, asking her if I could take the 8am intermediate class as that timeslot fit best into my full schedule. Her answer was yes, as long as I promised to take care of myself in a class full of intermediate students. What a gentle and welcome introduction to yoga. If you have ever taken a class or more with Jackie, you know how easy it is to love the practice of yoga. The following summer, my husband Javier and I were on the water, not a fish in sight. After a few bites of our sandwiches, looking back at our beautiful town, I shared how much I loved yoga and how I felt its practice changing my life. I asked him to help me build a yoga studio. Inspired by a recent trip to Barcelona, I proceeded to design our Center, which includes four studios and a central courtyard that will embrace you with its curves, and draw your eyes upward through its organically shaped opening to the bright blue Baja sky. The overhang sparkles with droplets of light randomly placed along the courtyard’s perimeter. The broken tiles are a tribute to projects designed and built by our company over the years and friendships forged with clients through the creation of their homes. In February of 2009, Jackie inaugurated Sukhasana

Yoga and Pilates Studio leading the first of many classes to be held there since. Under her knowledgeable and efficient leadership, our studio has grown to include a wide range of choices and time-

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slots to fit varying schedules: Yoga, Meditation, Pilates, On The Ball, Strength Training, Zumba, Samba and Salsa. Our group of talented, Certified and CPR trained instructors offer experiences that range from quiet introspective stillness, strength and flexibility, to shake those hips and dance like nobody is watching. After a ten year hiatus from my own art, I began painting again and realized the next addition to our Center would be an art studio. At Camilla’s suggestion, Cheri and I met for iced tea where she shared the concept of art therapy and inspiring copies of her workshop ideas. Shortly thereafter, my dear friend Jo Quinn came to visit, sharing about her current job in an art studio and her plan to move back to Baja. That fall, Jo inaugurated Libelula Art Studio with an art journaling class. Our art studio enjoyed a successful first season under the insightful organization of Cheri Epstein, offering a wide range of classes and workshops (no experience necessary), as well as, drop in times for many to enjoy, immersed in natural light, surrounded by soulful and like minded company. Shortly after attending the Creative Approaches to the Healing Arts conference in Santa Fe with Jo and Cheri, I received an email from Jules Harris inquiring about the use of one of our spaces. She was moving back to Baja, part time, and would like to be part of our team. Yes! Over ten years ago, I met Jules and thought: we could be friends. Jules now manages The Sanctuary, our quietest and most serene space, where Rolfing (structural bodywork and functional movement), Hakomi Bodywork and Personal Counseling are offered under the spectacular care of Trained and Licensed Professionals, like Jules Harris and Susan Ackerman, to name a lovely few.

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Menudo Rojo (Red Menudo)

-ented Camilla Ford for organizing a magical evening where friends, family, community and storytellers gathered in our courtyard under the indigo star sparkled sky for True Stories. One of my personal favorite moments at Healing Winds: my mom sharing her story about Don Chapito and her grandchildren smiling, wide eyed and listening intently nearby.

Ingredients:

Ultimately, the overall vision is to offer a wide variety of classes and treatments in both English and Spanish thus bridging the predominant cultures in the East Cape and offering something for everyone. Next year, we plan to offer yoga classes in Spanish. Join us on Facebook where schedules, updates, inspiring quotes and photos are posted regularly. Schedules are also posted on the BPE. Watch for your favorites, as well as: New Classes, Treatments and Retreats. Healing Winds is mirrored in friendship, family and community. It is as warm and inviting as the East Cape itself. May you feel at home in our Center, finding yourself surrounded by friends, old and new and may your family come together – in multiple generations if possible, to share the gift of time and shared interests. A special shout out with Love and Gratitude to Jackie Reeves, my dear friend, beloved yoga teacher and Healing Winds General Manager --SHAKTI! And to our amazing community: our Center would not exist without all of you. Thank you for your continued support. Questions and feedback are encouraged: Tehroma Lask romalask@prodigy.net.mx, Owner, founder and collaborator. HWHC presented by UVERDE, A.C. “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” Gandhi.

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3 gallons water, divided 2 1/2 pounds beef tripe, cut into 1-inch pieces 6 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 large white onion, finely chopped 1 1/2 tablespoons salt 1 tablespoon ground black pepper 1 1/2 tablespoons dried oregano 2 tablespoons ground red pepper 5 de arbol chile peppers 6 japones chile peppers, seeds removed 6 cups canned white or yellow hominy, drained 8 es v 1/2 white onion, chopped r Se 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro 2 limes, juiced

Directions: 1. In a large pot, bring 1 gallon water to a boil. Place tripe in the pot, reduce heat, and simmer 2 hours. Periodically skim off fat with a spoon. Drain water, reduce heat, and pour in a fresh gallon of water. Continue to simmer tripe for 2 hours; drain. 2. Pour remaining 1 gallon water into the pot with tripe, and bring to a boil. Stir in garlic and 1 white onion. Season with salt, pepper, oregano, and red pepper. Reduce heat, and simmer 1 hour. 3. Preheat the broiler. 4. Arrange the de arbol chile peppers on a baking sheet, and broil about 2 minutes, just until they begin to scorch. Remove from heat, slit lengthwise, and remove seeds. In a blender or food processor, blend the de arbol chile peppers and japones chile peppers until very finely chopped. Mix into the pot, and continue cooking 2 hours over low heat. 5. Mix the hominy into the pot. Continue cooking 1 hour. Serve with remaining onion, cilantro, and lime juice.

Last winter, we enjoyed our first community event after dark. Thanks to our beautiful, artistic and tal-

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Continued from page 20 “You know, I almost killed myself with addiction by the time I was 38. Now I look back at all the fun I’ve had from then to now, and I’m so thankful that I had friends who stood by me through that period of my life,” Mark concluded. Although the “suits” decided to decline on their company’s option to purchase RBV and were willing to walk away from six decades of history, Mark Walters and his partners, the Hermosillos, went back to basics and breathed new life into the old girl; RBV seems to be thriving once again.

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I carefully stepped across the cattle guard as Walters commented, “We have had many great folks visit Rancho Buena Vista throughout the years; I miss seeing them, and mourn the loss of the ones who are gone forever.” But Rancho Buena Vista endures.

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continued from page 10 He smiled and said, “Yes. Cafe de talega. If your server is young and especially if they are female, they might giggle but in a few minutes you will have a delicious cup of coffee.” “What a great scam” I thought. “I can't wait to pull this on some of my friends.” But after a few minutes of conversation, I finally believed he was telling me the truth. Ok, I admit to being a bit prudish on occasion, but I wasn’t going to let that stand between me and a good cup of coffee! The opportunity came in a few days. Naturally my waiter was a young female. I could feel my ears reddening as I carefully, with my best pronunciation, asked for “una tasa de café talega, por favor.” And exactly as advertised, she giggled, disappeared for a bit and returned with a delicious cup of freshly brewed coffee.

As we departed, the laughter and shouts echoed in my ears as Mark and I walked past the pool. Then we headed to my road trek, strolling past the famous rock table still sitting in its place of honor on the long porch where hundreds if not thousands of card games had taken place, on past the scales where an equal number of trophy fish had been hung and photographed during the past seven decades.

When I left, she must have wondered why I was grinning from ear to ear and acting like the luckiest guy in town.

actually ordered. The day it arrived, I cautiously unpacked the carton and followed directions, being very careful when I assembled the Quad Copter. That’s probably not an accurate statement since all that was required was that I tighten the self-locking propeller blades and charge the battery before it was ready to fly. But truthfully, I wasn't quite ready! I felt a little bit intimidated by this 24- x 24-inch bundle of technology resting on our coffee table. I studied the instruction manual from cover to cover – all 75 pages – for several days. I devoured the information on the camera, Wi-Fi, GPS, software and cell phone app – all of which needed to be understood before I took on the challenge of flying this machine that had set me back about $1,500. I had not been this nervous about taking control of boats that had cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and yes, a few owned by others that were even more dear than that!

The historical significance of RBV surrounded us like the cool breezes that were blowing across the sea.

Doing the Drone By Gary Graham (Previously published in Western Outdoor News, July 29, 2014) here’s no doubt that 2014 will go down in history as the “Year of the Drone" within the fishing community. Forget the latest and greatest tackle innovations or superduper electronics. Nope, this year the buzz is definitely about drones and who can take the most awe some photos with them. The list of people who have purchased the flying cameras is growing faster than I can keep up! So far, my WON column partner, Jonathan Roldan, and Ali Hussainy, President, BD Outdoors; Erik Landesfeind, and Barry Brightenburg all determined they had to have one. If you search the web, you’ll find plenty of entertaining videos that were shot with drones by crews and anglers on the sportfishing fleet. I, too, couldn't resist; mine arrived in mid-May. By the time it actually got here, I had watched hours of U-Tube videos on quad-copters in general, and had logged in many how-to hours on the DJI Technology Phantom 2 Vision Plus website, the drone that I

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EVER SO CAUTIOUSLY, I moved the left stick forward and watched as it leaped into the air.

Okay, call me crazy, but the only thing I had ever flown was a model airplane tethered by a control line which I flew in a circle … often crashing it before the full circle had even been completed. Early one morning, after days of procrastinating, drone in tow, Yvonne and I walked across the street to the park. Going through the checklist printed on the underbelly of the unit as carefully as a 747 pilot, with great trepidation I turned on the controller, and started the drone. Ever so cautiously, I moved the left stick forward and watched as it leaped into the air. Thank God I knew to let go of the stick so it could spring back to the center! It hovered at 30 feet or so and I began "Doing the Drone" for real.

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rest of my life in Alaska. After a few years of visiting Baja Sur on vacation, I moved to the Los Cabos area permanently. I arrived with the plan of opening a restaurant/coffee shop/bakery in San Jose del Cabo. This provided me with some money and solved the coffee problem for myself and many others.

No More Sanka By Bob Farmer have been a coffee drinker for as long as I can remember. Brewed black coffee, freshly made, no old burnt stuff. When the espresso craze started, I was a natural convert. Not only could I buy a good cup of regular coffee just about anywhere in town for a buck, I could buy a triple shot raspberry latte for only half a day’s pay. (I calculated my latte habit was about $3,500 bucks a year at the height of my addiction.) I was very interested in the source of the beans. The labels on the bags listed countries from all over the world but almost every blend included beans from Mexico. This was very comforting to me because I was planning on visiting Baja California Sur. Naturally I assumed that there would be good coffee. Imagine my shock and dismay when I discovered how flawed that assumption was. On my first trip to Baja Sur, I stayed at the Palmas de Cortez hotel in Los Barriles, right on the beautiful Sea of Cortez. The room was a nice, palapa roofed bungalow, complete with fireplace: no locks, no worries. For 2 weeks I enjoyed great food, nice folks and perfect weather. My only complaint was the coffee! Just about every place in Los Cabos served Sanka. Sanka???? This is Mexico for crying out loud. Starbucks even buys Mexican beans! Being without any Spanish skills, I couldn't even explain my problem. However, bad coffee didn’t keep me from falling under the spell of warm weather and sandy beaches. By the time I left, I knew I wasn’t going to spend the

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Still, the coffee situation in general hadn’t changed. If I drove to La Paz, there were a couple of places with really good coffee but Sanka seemed to be the standard. When returning from La Paz one day, I stopped for a cup at a highway restaurant near Todos Santos. The young man who was helping me offered American coffee in almost flawless English. Out of curiosity, I asked him to describe how it was made. He e xp la i ne d that they put fresh ground coffee in a cloth bag and dipped it in boiling w a t e r . Saweet. High end cowboy coffee! I had a cup and it was absolutely d e l ic io us . We talked for a bit and joked about the Sanka routine. He told me that good coffee was always available but you have to know how to ask for it. I threatened the poor fellow with bodily harm if he didn’t teach me the phrase in Spanish. He said, “You ask for cafe de talega” After I got over feeling like I had just won the lottery; I asked him what the word meant. He grinned and lifted the large wet bag of spent coffee grounds from the pot. “What does that remind you of?” he asked. I had no clue. He continued, “You’ve seen our huge bulls wandering around, no?” Of course, how can you miss them with that big hump on their shoulders and their huge masculinity hanging….. wait. I was slowly getting the picture. So talega means…. that?

Costco Wardrobe By Pablo Ponce ’ve often wondered at what age in a person’s life do they throw caution to the wind and decide that top shelf clothing brand names no longer matter. They have decided, it is time to replace everything in their closet and drawers with an all new wardrobe consisting of clothing that comes solely from stores such as Costco. Just recently I had the opportunity to see this transformation firsthand. Here’s what happened….. It was April 7th, 2012 when I found myself at a cousin’s birthday party. He was splashing around with his kids in his in-laws pool and I was kicking back under the patio shade when my uncle says to my cousin’s father-in-law (FIL), “hey I like that tshirt.” FIL says, “Thanks I got it at Costco. I also got these shorts there.” I was sitting there thinking, I thought Costco sold bulk food? When did they start selling clothes? The volley continued with my uncle saying, “Yeah, I’ve got that shirt and those shorts too. My wife buys all my clothes at Costco.” FIL says, “mine too!” I found myself in the middle of the two old guys as they continued their talk of cargo shorts and coupons, of socks and savings, and it hits me…for a couple’a geezers these guys look pretty hip in their Costco gear. I can’t see myself at age 44 trading in my Nike Cross trainers for a pair of sport shoes that say Kirkland on the side, but maybe when I get to their age, 60, I’ll change my mind. Then this happened… It was early January and I was online searching for a pair of shoes I could wear on my next season-long trip down to Baja. This was no ordinary pair of shoes though. I was looking for what they call a “sport sandal” that I’d specifically use while riding my quad. Last years flip flops were just too flip floppy so this pair had to be rugged yet stylish, not to mention cheap. After a few days of searching I had narrowed it down to about three choices. First though, I must tell you, whoever came up with the design of these sandals must have a screw loose, and the person in charge of color schemes has got to be color blind, because everything I found online was hideous, not to mention expensive. Eventually I chose one but just before Adding to Cart, my mom saw them on the screen and said, “They have the exact same

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thing at Costco for about a third of the cost.” Now I’m not what you would call a Costco fan. Actually I never even realized they sold clothes or shoes until I found myself there with my mom the next day, looking for this sport sandal. I did find them online just like mom said, and they did look just like the other pricey pairs at the outdoor stores, but I wanted to try them on just to feel how weird they were going to feel and then I’d decide if I’d buy them or not. It took a while to discover, no thanks to the brain surgeon behind the counter, that this particular store did not have what I wanted so we took off and ended up finding them at another Costco nearby. I brought them home and tried them on and sure enough they felt and looked strange but I think they just might do the trick. I’ll just have to ride with a bag over my head until they get scuffed up enough that they don’t look so ugly. Since getting the initial sport sandals, I’ve been back to Costco to pick up socks, briefs, cargo shorts, t-shirts, and even a pair of running shoes which are pretty cool. So going back to my question regarding how old a person should be before they switch on over to a full on Costco wardrobe? I guess it’s age 44.

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Baja Recent History he Mexican-American War (1846-1848) had major repercussions in Baja California. The war began after Mexico refused the United States’ offer to buy California, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming. In the treaty ending the war, Mexico gave in to U.S. demands and ceded the vast territory in exchange for $15 million. The original draft of the treaty included Baja California in the sale, but the United States eventually agreed to omit the peninsula because of its proximity to Sonora, which is located just across the narrow Sea of Cortés. In 1853, an American named William Walker invaded the peninsula with 50 mercenaries, intent on annexing the land for the United States. Although he had no support from the U.S. government, Walker sailed from San Francisco to La Paz, arrested the governor, took possession of the public buildings and raised the flag of a new republic. He even declared himself president and installed cabinet members. Without reinforcements, however, Walker was forced to retreat, first to Cabo San Lucas and eventually back across the border.

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Fishing: The Silent Killer By Jorge Bergin

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over, I go back to my patio slouch mode, Bloody Mary in hand and hardly move again until the next outing.

s I come closer to the big 80 I am forced to change meds, make other changes in my life. I don’t get much exercise at all (I force myself to take a walk now and then) so I know I’m not treating my heart right.

I’m no doctor but I think most of them would call this routine "the widow maker." My version, live or die is doing what I like to do interrupted by what I like to do even more. I don’t need a prescription for this particular regimen.

There’s no gym in my village --- I know some of you will say “You don’t need a gym, there are plenty of exercises you can do to get your heart rate up”. I need a gym. I’m glad we don’t have one or I would have to go there and work out.

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I don’t just sit and vegetate. I have an exercise program - I fish. Once or twice a month I find a calm day and talk my Mexican pal into a half-day boat ride looking for mean and tasty fish in his small boat. It usually means 6 to 7 hours sitting on the hard bench seats (I use 2 soft cushions) while we troll or mooch or fish the bottom. On a good day there is a break almost every hour when the reel alarms go off and my heart gets a nice 10 to 20 minute workout with the rod and reel. When this great healthy fun is

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Los Barriles Community Market Community - a feeling of fellowship with others, as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests, and goals.

he aftermath of hurricane Odile will affect all of us in the East Cape, so it seems particularly appropriate to celebrate this idea of community this year. The Los Barriles Community Market begins its 4th year this fall and thanks to local farmers, food vendors, musicians and artists, the market has become a "thing you do" on Saturday morning. You go get a cup of coffee, grab some breakfast, shop for your veggies, listen to music, visit friend and celebrate community.

Historic East Cape Mining Town Hosts Art Festival he town of San Antonio Real, located south of El Triunfo on Highway #1 in the Sierra de La Laguna mountains, will celebrate its 4th annual Art Festival on Sunday, November 16th. Signs will be posted on the west side of the highway directing you to the road which leads to the historic center of town where the festival will be held. Ample parking will be available close by. San Antonio was noted for its mining activities back in the 1700s. Silver ore was first discovered nearby in Santa Ana in 1720 by Ignacio de Rojas, a soldier attached to Padre Jaime Bravo from the Jesuit Mission in La Paz, who was on a quest to find and develop a new mission site.

Local artists from the area will be present to display and sell their pottery, hand made from local clay, along with other original art works produced by BCS artists. Food and music will also be part of the event. San Antonio’s annual festival also give attendees an opportunity to stroll through the Zocalo ( town square) and view the 250 year old historic buildings, some abandoned and others occupied. Across from the church on the south corner, is the San Antonio Cultural Center. Marizonia Diaz, the Director of the Center, has created a welcoming environment for local residents to practice their artistic skills, where they also can sell their art work to visitors. Marizonia is responsible for coordinating the activities at the annual Art Festivals in both San Antonio and El Triunfo.

The Market is starting earlier this year, by request, so you mark Nov 22 on your calendars--Opening day, 9am -1pm at the NEW CITY PARK( same place, same time) and it will run EVERY Saturday until April 4th,2015. The Market has grown over its short life thanks to all you out there but so has the town, so we need more diversity in food products and produce -We encourage any and all of you to participate with what ever your talent m ay be. We look forward to seeing the whole town on Nov 22, 9am -1pm. Bring your support and good spirits. We welcome all comments, suggestions, vendor sign-ups at: losbarrilescommunitymarket@gmail.com

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In the late 1750s San Antonio had become a place of some note in the territory of Baja California Sur after a new silver mine had been opened up. As the village grew, a mining company, established by Manuel de Ocio, the “Pearl King” of La Paz, continued to extract ore and the population increased. As a result, San Antonio Real remains today as the oldest continuously occupied Civil community in all the Californias. After Mexico had won its battle for independence from Spain in 1822, the territory of Baja California Sur became a part of Mexico with Loreto as the site for the capital. In 1828, when Loreto was destroyed by flooding from a hurricane, San Antonio served as the interim capital city until the seat of power was moved to La Paz in 1830. Original art work is highlighted at the San Antonio Art Festival.

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Day 10 P. O. (Post Odile) By Larry Epstein he room is ethereal and bright, with walls that blend into the landscape and a sheer roof that looks to be fabric, but it must be made of sterner stuff, for it stands intact. I proceed inside. People of all shapes and sizes jostle to seat themselves at closely spaced tables. I notice that all of the staff are large well-fed men, ‘though graceful. One man in particular smiles at me, and we exchange greetings in the vernacular “buen dia.” I approach a crystal pitcher in which float small chips of ice and liquid the color of the sun at dawn. Pouring it into a tumbler, I sip tentatively. It is as though the nectar from an entire orange grove has been transported onto my tongue, and I down what remains in my glass, refreshed, before refilling it. To my right are fruits --- papaya, pineapple, grapefruit, watermelon, jicama, peaches and cantaloupe --- sliced and chilling. I mound them onto a plate and settle at a table. Blesséd coffee awaits. Across the table my wife Cheri waits for no one. She has made her own choices and devours them with a lust I realize that I covet and soon readily ape. Next I survey an array of hot foods --- tender sliced beef in a sauce of mild chilies, corn, tomatoes, onion and leaves of forest green cilantro; eggs with a fresh salsa of lime, bright yellow and red peppers and more veggies and spices; bits of chicken with its own mix of vegetables; tortillas dipped in egg, fried and sprinkled with cheese; salsa-simmered chilaquiles; papas fritas; ham and the ubiquitous refried beans. I sample some of each. Then there is a grill attended by Daniel, a large man in traditional white chef’s garb and jaunty black chapeau. He juggles ingredients, blending them into omelets or stuffing them into tortillas. For me Daniel folds mushrooms and cheeses into an omelet, plates the upshot and hands it to me smiling. I can barely wait to return to my table before digging in. It is hot and delicious. Finishing I belch contentedly. Cheri smiles as she savors her third cup of coffee. We are blessed in many ways. Our casa survived the storm unscathed. We had plenty of water. Our car had a full tank, and we could shop daily for victuals. For eight days after the storm, our good friend Donna, and her daughter-in-law Mayte, made sure that we had at least one yummy hot meal at Roadrunner. But eight days without power was enough. We came to Hotel Araiza Palmira in La Paz for A/C and Internet and discovered the hotel’s scrumptious breakfast. The Buddha says that the way to end suffering is to forsake attachment, especially to the physical world. If you have nothing to regret, he reasoned, you will not suffer. He was wise for sure. Perhaps in my next life, I will do a better job of following his teachings. But after 60some years of creature comforts, I gotta admit, the A/C is nice.

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The History of Mexican Mural Artists By JoAnn Hyslop talented group of modern artists responded to the revolutionary upheaval of 1910 through the medium of public murals. Lead by Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Jose Clemente Orozco and David Alfaro Siqueiros, a whole new mythology surrounding the revolution could be seen on public buildings throughout the country. Although these artists all differed in their style of painting and their outlook on life, each believed that art was the highest form of human expression and a vital element in social revolution. In 1923, the artists established the “Syndicate of Revolutionary Mexican Painters, Sculptors and Engravers”. The organization’s newspaper, El Machete, proclaimed that “collective art” should replace the “individualist” art of the bourgeois. This was why murals were popular. They were available for everybody to enjoy: not just a few wealthy art collectors. The legacy of Mexican muralism can be traced to the US government-sponsored arts programs of President Roosevelt’s WPA and Farm Security Administration during the 1930. Artists were commissioned to paint murals in Schools and post offices throughout the country. In 1932, The Los Angeles City Council commissioned David Alfaro Siqueiros to paint a large mural on the south wall of the historic Italian Hall overlooking Olvera Street in downtown LA which the artist named, “America Tropical”. The left and right sides of the mural featured rainforests and Mayan pyra-

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mids. Siqueiros left the final center part of the mural unpainted, choosing to come in the middle of the night and finish the final image depicting a brownskinned man crucified under a massive eagle. At the unveiling, the city officials were shocked at the image and ordered it white-washed over. In the 1970s, when the white wash started to fall off, a new City Council voted to restore the mural. A $10 million restoration funded by the City of Los Angeles and the Getty Conservation Institute brought the mural back to life. The mural was finally unveiled for public viewing on October 9, 2012 along with an accompanying Cultural Center which invites visitors to learn more about the mural through exhibits featuring of its past and the techniques used to create it, as well as the conservation process and the artistic legacy of its creator.

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Mexican Proverbs El que adelante no mira, atás se queda (He who doesn’t look ahead stays behind) Mona en seda pero mona queda (A monkey dressed in silk is still a monkey) En la tierra de los ciegos el tuerto es rey (In the land of the blind the one-eyed man is king) Lo mío, mío y lo tuyo de entreambos (What is mine is mine; what’s yours is ours)

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continued from page 3 immediately started raising funds for the 2006 season. I had come to realize that it was possible to divide my year in half, teaching part time (summer school and fall semester) at the college and spending my winters in Baja tracking the humpbacks. All of my whale experiences thus far had strongly reinforced my personal opinion - shared by many - that these creatures were far beyond the level of intelligence and sensitivity we gave them credit for. That following 2006 season was another good year but there were fewer whales (or I wasn’t in the right place at the right time) so I only obtained about a dozen good IDs and only one or two of those were “World Class”. During the fall semester of 2006 at the college, one of my students brought in a video made by her friend Bill Kreutzmann, one of the drummers for “The Grateful Dead” rock band. It was called “Ocean Spirit” and it recorded a voyage taken by him and four of his friends into the North Pacific specifically to swim with as many ocean critters as they could find. Watching these men swim with whales, sharks, rays, sea lions etc. I was inspired! Humans, free diving with all manner of critters, fear-

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less, full of respectful loving energy, I was hooked.

Mexican Seafood In Foil Packets:

How can you look into the eye of the whale if you don’t enter its world? I vowed to myself that the next season, 2007, I would swim with the whales.

By Karen Hursh Graber, Senior Food Editor for Mexico Connect Magazine

Mariscos Empapelados

exican seafood in parchment paper is a wonderfully easy, informal dish — great for picnics, barbeques, or grilling on the beach. The seafood packets can be prepared ahead of time, kept in a cooler, and popped onto the grill, or cooked indoors in the oven. Cilantro is present in so many Mexican seafood dishes simply because its flavor compliments fish and shellfish so well. Try using it in place of parsley in making linguine with clam sauce and other nonMexican seafood dishes.

My book – THE OTHERS “The Whale People” A personal Journey of Discovery, Transformation and Healing (Balboa Press) is available online at Amazon.com & Barnes and Noble. Copies are also available locally at Homes and Land Real Estate and by contacting me at ukaldveer@gmail.com - I live in El Cardonal full time.

Ingredients  1/2 lb. each: fish filets, chopped shrimp, shelled, deveined and chopped squid or octopus, cleaned and chopped shucked clams or oysters, chopped  1/2 cup finely chopped white onion  2 roma tomatoes, finely chopped  1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro  2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed  1/4 cup butter, softened  1 teaspoon salsa ingelesa (Worcestershire Sauce)

Amigo a Amigo Hurricane Odile Disaster Relief By Steve Fowler s we start our sixth day of the Rotary Club of Los Barriles Cabo Este relief fund project we have been identified by the national news as one of the organizations working to bring help to the East Cape. See link What You Can Do to Help Rebuild Los Cabos. Our funding goal of $30,000 in thirty days is aggressive but so is the challenge of bringing help. On our 6th day we have now exceeded $9,000 collected. These funds will go to help with the relief programs in the East Cape. Please join us in helping our neighbors by visiting our website Amigo a Amigo Hurricane Odile Disaster Relief and giving to our clubs disaster relief program: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/amigo-aamigo-hurricane-odile-disaster-relief.

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Directions 1. In a large bowl, combine the fish, shrimp, squid or octopus, clams or oysters, onion, tomato and cilantro. 2. Cream the garlic, butter and Worcestershire Sauce together with a wooden spoon and add it to the seafood mixture, using the spoon to combine the ingredients. 3. Cut aluminum foil into a 6" squares; divide the mixture among them and fold each one over, envelope style, double-folding the edges to seal in juices. 4. Place the packets on a grill over hot coals, or in a 375º F oven, until they inflate, about ten minutes. 5. Serve packets directly onto plates and let each diner unwrap his own. Accompany with crusty French bread to soak up the juices. Serves 8.

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See

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By John David Lionel Brooke

have, the better we can teach and the more fun for the kids it will be. I am also collecting donations so we can have a camp shirt for each child participating. With the recent hard times caused by the hurricane, this camp would be a welcomed diversion for the kids!

Noontime's blue troposphere Visualize mashed potato clouds my dear Wink at twenty trillion stars this night Gaze by mummy moon's silver light

Anyone interested in helping or donating, please contact Chris Courtright at: jonandchris@juno.com.

Glimpse rainbows in imagined views Your color palette is within, dear muse.

Ideas and suggestions are greatly appreciated. Let's get ready to play ball!

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Hear By John David Lionel Brooke Cicadas humming in the afternoon Howling coyotes laughing at the moon Thundering heaven's raindrops weep on you Whispering Morning Doves sweetly coo Nature's music sings lyrically into your ear Melodies only you, my deaf muse, can hear.

The Environmental Beat of the ‘Percubetas’ Resounds with the Community A Report from the Recycling Comradres By Holly Burgin he 80 children participating in East Cape’s Recycling Baja’s environmental music program greeted this summer’s Cursos de Verano (Summer DayCamp) with anticipation and enthusiasm. The kids transformed recycled buckets, tin cans, 5gallon water bottles, individual water bottles, metal bottle caps, and other recyclables into percussion instruments. Then they sent a rousing message to the community to protect our environment with their impeccable synchronized percussion performance. Our wonderful professional drummer and maestro, Pablo Ruiz, from San Jose, designed a music program that inspired and motivated the kids to learn a complicated percussion routine, and a “percubeta call to action” song that Pablo wrote. “Percubetas” are percussion musicians that play drums made from buckets. The performance at the Cursos de Verano closing ceremony was FABULOSO! Watch

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this wonderful performance on YouTube. It will knock your socks off! https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=z3BEs7jQlYY. Every detail of our program was attended and managed to its fabulous culmination, with the help of great volunteers, Renee Lagloire, Janine Barnes Webb, and Erica Martz and others in the community. We thank Sofia Gomez from Wild Coast for introducing us to Pablo, and providing environmental education support for our program. We thank and acknowledge East Cape Casas and RV Resort in hosting our program and the special help of Omar Araiza and Randall in managing the venue details. Cursos de Verano environmental education program would not be complete without the Recycling Contest. This year the kids and their families collected a half-ton of recyclables! The two kids, from each of the four age groups, who collected the most recyclables by weight, won a fishing trip with one of their parents on the Awesome and Too Awesome fishing boats. Special thanks to Captains Luis and Adan and their crews for donating their time, Awesome Sport Fishing for donating the fishing boats, and to Kathy Obenshain for helping make this an unforgettable day for the winners. And there is more!

East Cape Seasonings By John David Lionel Brooke Piquant summer sizzles Seas run hot as desert Waterfalls slow to steam Chubasco saucy tormentas Naked Ocotillos prickle Pitahaya Dulce swell red Skinny vaca gain again Baja California riches Emerge from undercover It is Snow Bird’s time You know it is winter When under a salty sky Peppered colored kites Skitter with half wings Fly over windblown sea Spring clears the skies Keen sports fishers growl Plough wavy water troughs Through the tranquil gulf On chili primavera morns

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continued from page 32 Himno de los Percubetas Separamos la basura La volvemos a ocupar Protegemos la natura Respetamos nuestro mar Somos los ninos de Percubetas Tenemos que estar siempre alertas Cuidamos el ambiente Le damos proteccion De reciclage te damos lección East Cape Recycling Baja participated in a special Off-Road Racing program to teach the kids about off -road racing with race sponsor Manolo Nuñoz and our Los Barriles racecar drivers, who attended this event with their amazing racecars. We are very pleased that Sr. Nuñoz made a commitment to ensure that there will be trash barrels available along the spectator areas of the future race routes and to help educate spectators about using them.

East Cape Guild Events By Jill Borggreve he season is about to get busy. The East Cape Guild will hold two of its popular events in November. Monte Carlo Night will be November 22 at Buena Vista Beach Resort (Spa). This is the once a year opportunity to play blackjack, craps and this year we will add a roulette table for your gaming fun. Play and win donated prizes. Dinner is included in the ticket price of $30 or 400 pesos. There will also be a silent auction with many valuable prizes available.

Contact Jill Borggreve at b2jborg@gmail.com for additional information on the East Cape Guild or for information about how to donate to help local students stay in school.

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East Cape Recycling Baja discussed with the kids the importance of the spectators’ cleaning up their trash from the arroyos and beaches upon leaving the race and the responsibility of each of us to help sustain our local economy, which depends and thrives on keeping our beaches and ocean clean. As a reminder to everyone to protect our beaches, East Cape Recycling Baja created a bumper sticker and distributed them at this event. Many were attached to the off-road racecars. The bumper stickers are free. If you would like a bumper sticker, please stop by East Cape Casas and RV Resort and pick one up to attach to your vehicle. The kids were not the only ones to get in on the action…East Cape Recycling Baja sponsored a special 8-hour “Solo para Mujeres” (For Women Only)

On November 29, its time to work off that Thanksgiving meal by playing golf at the Los Barriles Country Club. All golfers invited, even if you have never golfed before you will have fun at this morning event. Hot dogs and drinks, including Bloody Marys, will be available as well. Watch the Baja Pony Express for details.

Anthem of the Percubetas We separate garbage We fulfill the need We protect nature We respect our sea We are the children of 'Percubetas' We must be ever vigilant We take care of the environment We give it protection We give you the recycling lesson environmental workshop over two days. Sofia Gomez with Wild Coast taught the local women how to separate inorganic waste and recycle plastic, metal, cardboard/paper, glass and EPS 6 foam (packaging for appliances). The women made wonderful craft projects from recyclable materials and learned how to compost organic waste to be used to supplement the soil and make their gardens beautiful. The program was a great success and we have had requests and plan to repeat the program with WildCoast in the fall. We are very proud of all that was accomplished this summer. The best news is that change is happening; the messages we are communicating to respect our environment and cherish it's resources are setting; the children and their families are creating a new ethos and embracing a philosophy that will surely have positive and profound effects on our local environment. More than ever, we need volunteers!!! If protecting our environment is important to you, it only takes one hour a month to make a difference. Many hands make light work and we have lots of fun. Please contact us at info@eastcaperecyclingbaja.com.

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Bumper Sticker

All proceeds from these events go to fund scholarships for local students to complete their high school education. If you share a passion to help educate our students or just want to meet others in the community please come to one of our monthly meetings in October (22nd) or November (19th).

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East Cape Vignettes By Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr. (With permission of Destino Magazine)

Mexican Retablos: 19 Century Devotional Art As you travel around the East Cape visiting its many quaint shops, you are bound to come across Retablos, which means “Altarpieces” in Spanish. They are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper. Used in home altars to venerate Catholic saints, Retablos are a type of folk art, which is deeply rooted in Spanish history. They represented the very foundations of religious beliefs in the 17, 18 and 19century Mexican culture. These colorful and charming unique art forms are a mixture of century’s-old Catholic iconography and indigenous art. The historical and cultural links between the "old" and the "new" worlds are reflected in this art. With the introduction of inexpensive mediums such as tin, Retablo as an art form flourished, reaching its pinnacle of popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century. With some exceptions, mostly untrained artists worked to produce and reproduce these sacred images. Some artists painted more prolifically than others painted and where known to have duplicated the same image hundreds, if not thousands of times in his career.

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La Ribera “Three Rivers” La Ribera is Spanish for “the shore.” Originally, this little East Cape fishing village was known as Tres Rios (Three Rivers). Although there are no rivers near the town today, it is easy to imagine how the town got its name. Three broad arroyos fan out from the slopes of the nearby La Laguna mountain range and run to the Sea of Cortez on either side of the town. When the canyons high up in the Lagunas absorb more rainfall than they can hold, these arroyos run like shallow rivers. Many years ago, the main village of La Ribera was located on a flat shelf of land touching the beach. Over the years, hurricanes and monsoonal rains flooded the area, devastating the town. As a result, residents were forced to abandon the site and rebuild their homes and businesses on higher ground. The skeletons of two or three crumbling concrete and brick structures remain to mark the site.

Crossing the Sierra de la Lagunas Hiking the Sierra de la Laguna mountain range is a perfect way to enjoy the East Cape and Southern

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The Black Pearls of the East Cape When Hernan Cortez visited Bahia de La Paz at the beginning of the 16th century, he and his soldiers encountered several hundred naked Indians fishing in the clear aquamarine water of the bay. Cortez was not looking for fish though. He had heard about the beautiful black pearls of La Paz from other Spanish adventurers. He was after the riches they would bring. He and his men rounded the tip of a large island on their way to the pearling grounds. He then gave Isla Espiritu Santo its first name - Isla de Perlas. To this day, some still call La Paz by its nickname - La Perla. From the time of their discovery, to the last half of the 19th century, black pearl beds were wide spread along the gulf shores of the Baja peninsula. From present day Los Barriles on the Bahia de Palmas a few miles north of the Tropic of Cancer, to beyond La Paz, pearl oysters were located at depths up to a hundred feet on rocky bottoms in almost any place protected from the violent actions of waves and currents.

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The Intimate and True Adventures of “El Ballenero” Episode 6: Treated to an introduction and to whale song By: Urmas Kaldveer, PhD would like to elaborate on two of my stories from the last episode (#5 – April/May) that were important in the evolution of my greater and greater intimacy with “The Whale People”. Early in that season of 2005 we came across the first mother (I cannot abide using the term “cow” for a mother whale) and calf pair that I had ever encountered. We were about one mile off shore from Punta Pescadero in the southern half of my grid and “the girls” (my interns - they accepted this term as one of endearment) spotted a large humpback moving slowly north. The second blow indicated two whales but one considerably smaller. Seeing that it was an M/C pair we approached carefully and to our surprise and delight, it wasn’t we that were looking for an encounter but the whales. The calf was quite young, most likely a yearling born in Mexican Waters the previous season and due to be weaned the present season. The mother circled the panga with her calf a number of times (I asked Vicente to cut the engine) and then allowed the calf to approach us more closely. The calf not only came close but actually brushed against the side of the panga and blew a fine mist of seawater and “bad breath” on us in the boat (this is often the case when observing grey whales on the Pacific side but very rare with humpbacks and almost unknown with blue whales). We were able to look directly into its eye from only three feet away as it passed and I was struck by the level of awareness, curiosity and intelligence that was manifested in that glance. Not only was I literally looking into the eye of the whale I was in a very real sense “communing” with it. Oct/Nov

Since 2005 I have had numerous “eyeball to eyeball” encounters with humpbacks from the panga, from my kayak and often under the surface with them as we dove together but you know what they say about your “first time”! More than half of those times it has been with a mother and calf pair “seeking” encounters with me out of what I can only describe as curiosity and friendship - more on that later. The other story I wish to relate about that first research year occurred the last day we went out for the season. Lenee (one of my interns) had become increasingly adamant about wanting to swim near a whale. As she was my responsibility I had to tell her no, even though in hindsight it would have been perfectly safe. What made things different that day was that after tracking a humpback for a while and getting a good photo ID the whale swam under the panga and began to “sing”. This was a new experience for me and it was thrilling to not only hear that ancient and intelligent voice but to have the sound vibrate the bottom of the panga so our entire bodies experienced the song. Humpback whale song is far more complex and intricate than most people are aware. This was all too much for Lenee. She threw off her shirt and shorts (we always had suits under our outer gear just in case) and without asking simply dove over the side and threaded water, diving deeper every so often to hear the song better. This was too much for Kristin, so she did the same. It was a delight to see these two young students who had been so “scientifically” involved with the project totally letting go and entering into “whale space”. The whale moved on, the girls climbed out and I realized that they had taught me something about following your heart. I on the other hand was 64 years old, certainly too old to start swimming with whales, no? Returning once again to Ukiah In June after that first season, I

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Advertising in East Capers Advertising in the East Capers gets the word out about your business AND your ad money supports the 3 week 'Cursos de Verano' summer school, for over 120 local children and provides art supplies for 18 East Cape public schools. In addition to space in the printed version, your color ad appears in the online version at no additional cost. You can download the 2014/15 Advertising K it by visit ing our website at: www.eastcapearts.com.

Tax-deductable Contributions to the Asociación de Artes The Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C., Los Barriles, B.C. Sur, Mexico is a legal non-profit Mexican corporation not affiliated with any other organization, association, club or business. The Asociación is in full compliance with the terms of the NAFTA agreement of January 1, 1994. As such, contributions made to the Asociación de Artes are tax-deductable in the United States, Mexico and Canada. For more information visit: www.eastcapearts.com or the NAFTA Website at: http://www.ustr.gov/trade-agreements/freetrade-agreements/north-american-free-tradeagreement-nafta.

Volunteers Needed! The Asociación de Artes needs volunteers to help support their programs that bring the arts to the local communities and the schools. To learn more about these programs, visit: www.eastcapearts.com. If you would like to volunteer, send an email to: eastcapearts@gmail.com.

Call for Articles East Capers is looking for fiction and true stories about our region and items that affect our residents. If you are interested in submitting articles, recipes, stories or your personal experiences in Baja, email your 1,000-words or less article to: kaojaa@gmail.com.

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East Capers Periódico Publisher Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C., Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico Editor Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr.

Copy Editor Pako Ford

Circulation

The Sierra de La Laguna range is a protected biosphere reserve. Several rangers watch for fires and tend a weather station in the meadow. During your hike, you will enjoy the diversity of flora. At the beginning of the ascent, you will find barrel cactus, thorn shrub and palo verde. As you climb higher, you will encounter new and different species of shrub, trees and wildflowers. At the top, you are surrounded by madrone, oak and piñon.

Brian Cummings

Advertising Kathy Obenshain Denise Linnet

Contributors Jorge Bergin Holly Burgin Jill Borggreve John David Lionel Brooke Christine Courtright Hank Darlington Larry Epstein Bob Farmer Steve Fowler Karen Hursh Graber Gary Graham Sefi Held JoAnn Hyslop Urmas Kaldveer, PhD Tehroma Lask Catherine Matsalla Pablo Ponce Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr.

Big Horn Sheep have been part of Baja California Sur’s landscape for many years. They arrived here after the ice age. They settled in the northern Mexican State of Sonora and the costal fringe of the peninsular mountain ranges of the Baja California Sur. Big Horn Sheep are found as far north as the San Francisco mountain range between Guerrerro Negro and San Ignacio and as far south to an area at the northern fringe of the East Cape near the Bay of La Paz. The sound of their large horns clashing during mating season echoes throughout the canyons and ravines of the rugged mountain ranges. Thanks to the structure of their hooves, Big Horn Sheep have a remarkable capacity for climbing and jumping. The halves of each hoof separate, so the feet can cling firmly to the rocky terrain. The soles are soft and like a cushion, allowing the Big Horn to keep its balance as it moves across uneven or slippery ground. Males have thick spiral horns, measuring up to four feet.

The Beaches of East Cape Generations of local residents have identified the East Cape beaches as the area along the western edge of the Sea of Cortez between Punta Pescadero on the north and Cabo Pulmo on the south. Los Barriles, Buena Vista and La Ribera are located within the East Cape, on the shores of Bahia de Palmas. Visiting East Cape beaches is a seasonal experience.

Printer Imprenta Ciudad Los Niños, La Paz, BCS, Mexico To learn about Ciudad Los Niños, visit their website at: http://ciudadninoslapaz.org/english/home.htm ———————————

The opinions expressed within the articles in East Capers are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez A.C.

Thank You! This publication is possible with the help of the board members of the Asociación de Artes and members of the community.

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Baja. The mountains are southern Baja’s only granitic range. The highest point is about 7,000 feet. The Sierra de la Lagunas receive more rainfall than any other place in Baja and once hosted a series of lakes. The largest drained around 1870 when a rockslide opened a path on the east side for the water to pour down Cañon San Dionisio. This event left a flat, grassy depression near the top of the peak. Two small streams flow through the meadow, one toward the Sea of Cortez and the other toward the Pacific.

Baja California Sur: Land of Big Horn Sheep

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Walter S. Zapotoczny Jr. is an award-winning writer, historian and editor, with over 25 years experience producing many different types of copy. He is the author of over 150 published articles and three books. You can read some of his writing at www. wzaponline.com.

North winds between November and March make the beaches a perfect launching pad for wind surfers. The rest of the year, those who prefer less strenuous activities populate the beaches. Day access to most of the beaches in the East Cape is not restricted. A visit to East Cape beaches would not be complete without a trip to the Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park. One of the largest coral reefs in the world is located off the beach at Pulmo, within an underwater ecological reserve. Fishing, spear fishing and shell collecting are not permitted here. It is also one of the most famous diving locations in the Sea of Cortez.

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Free / Gratis

Baseball Day Camp Coming to the East Cape Christine Courtright

Issue No. 68

To Baseball Fans:

Oct/Nov

What we discovered is the kids here love baseball, but equipment is expensive and hard to come by. We also thought that maybe teaching some basic skills would make the game more enjoyable and maybe open doors for their future!

So, Sawyers ‘Camp’ was formed. The camp will be one day – during November 17 – 19 or 24 - 26. The exact date is to be determined….hurricane changed our plans! Time will be 9am – 4pm in Campam ento. We will do some kind I have been of lunch, collecting old hopefully baseball with help equipment from some from my of the mothcoaches, to ers to cook, bring down morning/ to the kids Children playing with the first batch of equipment brought down afternoon who can't snacks. We will also invite the students from Las afford to buy their own. My aunt took baseCuevas and Santa Cruz schools. Ages will be K – ball stuff last year and she told me the kids th 8 grade for this first camp. The focus will be on played everyday. hitting, throwing & catching, fielding and pitchingI think the kids need a baseball camp so that covering the basic skills and rules. This camp is they can learn the rules and have more fun. also an official sanctioned event with the Asociación de Artes del Mar de Cortez. Sawyer Kenck How can you be involved? — As the above letter says, it started with To make this camp successful we need to get some one kid’s visit. After his visit, we got thinking equipment – namely, mitts, balls and bats in all and started asking some questions. The next sizes…. even one thing helps – used is perfect! We spring we brought down baseball equipment need instructors and assistants – no coaching exand gave it to a friend living in Campamento. perience necessary. Spanish language knowledge Our friend kept the gear at his house near the is nice, but not required. The more helpers we school. He felt that if it stays in one location and the kids get it when they want to play, Continued on page 5 and then returns it, it will stay a complete set Oct/Nov

Oct / Nov 2014 36

My name is Sawyer. I'm 10 years old and baseball is my favorite sport. I have played for 6 years. I want to play pro some day.

longer. Each afternoon the kids would come and get the gear, play until dark and return it. Soon the parents came out and played too!

When I went to Baja to visit my aunt, I brought 2 baseball mitts so I could play catch. The o n l y neighbor boy didn't know how to play baseball.

Issue 68 oct nov 2014(color)  

East Capers Periódico, Issue 68, October/November 2014

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