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may 13 • hollywood palladium Tickets on sale at aneveningwithwomen.org Co-Chairs: Clea Duvall & Mia Weier l Annie Goto & Kelly Lynch l Brent Bolthouse


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Marketing & Communications Staff Christopher Artalejo-Price Creative Services Coordinator

Ari DeSano Website Manager

Gil Diaz Communications Manager

Kelly Freter Associate Director

Melantha Hodge Project Manager

Joe Hui Digital Communications Manager

Megan Kastner Communications Coordinator

Jim Key Chief Marketing Officer

Josiah Pak Creative Services Coordinator

Sophia Puglisi Digital Communications Coordinator

Callie Rodgers Creative Services Coordinator

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Kurt Thomas Creative Services Manager

Erin Faith Wilson

SPRING 2017

Content Manager

Contributors Lisa Allen Photographer

Photographer

Lorri L. Jean

Chris Stewart

CEO, Los Angeles LGBT Center

Photographer

Betsy Martinez Photographer

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Photographer

Garrett Wedel

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Tess Ayers

Michael Lombardo Mercedes Marquez Merryll McElwain

LuAnn Boylan

Carlos Medina

Tad Brown

Mike Mueller

Tyler Cassity

Brad Ong

Kin Cheng

Loren S. Ostrow

Carolyn A. Dye

Board Treasurer

Susan Feniger

Peter Paige

Annie Goto

Jayzen Patria

The Buzz JOIN OUR CONVERSATION ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Board of Directors David J. Bailey

CEO Letter

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WHEN PUSH COMES TO SHOVE, WE RALLY

Cedric Terrell

Photographer

Board Co-chair

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Abbey Sacks

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Have No Fear PrEP’D FOR OUR BOLD CAMPAIGN

Acting Up

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WHY CENTER CLIENTS AND ALLIES BECOME ACTIVISTS

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AIDS/LifeCycle

Making Cents A COUPLE (OF FINANCIAL PLANNERS) GIVES BACK TO THE CENTER

A MARINE CORPS VET RIDES INTO BATTLE TO END HIV/AIDS

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Center Notes

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Center Voices

Take Five

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Photo Finish

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Why I Give

WITH HEALTH SERVICES NURSE PRACTITIONER ANGIE MAGANA AND VOLUNTEER ALFREDO SALUDADO

BY GIGI GORGEOUS

Subscriptions

Dean Hansell

Eric M. Shore

Vanguard is published quarterly by the Los Angeles LGBT Center, a nonprofit corporation. 1625 N. Schrader Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90028, Voice 323-993-7400 • TDD 323-993-7698. Copyright 2017, Vanguard. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. Publication of the name, quotation or photograph of a person in articles or advertising is not an indication of the sexual orientation or the HIV status of such person.

Marki J. Knox, M.D.

Bruce Vilanch

Moving, getting duplicate mailings, or wish to be removed from the Vanguard mailing list? Please email mediarelations@lalgbtcenter.org.

Board Secretary

Board Co-chair

Frank Pond

Spring 2017

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CEO

LETTER

WE ARE RELENTLESS

We Are an Unstoppable Force in the Fight Against Bigotry!

I

CEO Lorri L. Jean  @LorriLJean

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Spring 2017

’ve been thinking a great deal lately response to the police harassment started about grassroots activism and com- a newsletter that became The Advocate, munity mobilizing. also celebrating its 50th anniversary this As our president, his administration, year. and leaders in Congress work to rollback Few people know that the very first equality for LGBT people and restrict uprising to protest police harassment of access to healthcare (among many other LGBT people was here in Los Angeles. terrible actions), Cooper Do-nuts I f ind it helpful was a hangout to remind myself for LGBT peohow much our ple, particularly community has transgender folks. accomplished As a result, it was against odds that regularly harassed were equally, if by the police. One not even more, night in May, 58 formidable. We’ve years ago, the had setbacks beCooper Do-nuts fore, but we have regulars said, never let them “Enough!” Led Cooper Do-nuts circa 1958. stop us in our by a transgender Courtesy of Milestone Films quest for full and woman, the group complete equality. began pelting the police with donuts, cofI f ind great inspiration in those who fee, paper plates, trash, utensils, whatever were f ighting for our community long they could get their hands on. The officers before I came out and began doing so in fled to get reinforcements. When they 1979. Many of the early pioneers were returned, a riot ensued that shut down right here in Los Angeles, which has Main Street for the entire day. This was a rarely been given its just due for being at decade before Stonewall! the forefront of our movement. For exAnd I bet you didn’t know that on ample, two-and-a-half years before New Armed Services Day, 51 years ago this York’s famed Stonewall riots, LGBT May, LGBT activists in Los Angeles held people at the Black Cat Tavern in Silver the very first demonstration against the Lake rioted after police raided the bar. ban on military service by people who are This January marked the 50th anniver- LGBT. A 13-plus car motorcade of demsary of that riot, sparked because police onstrators wound its way through 20 miles arrested two men who dared to ring in of Los Angeles streets, much to the shock the new year with a kiss. Later that year, of many along the route. Each of the car the organization which was founded in roofs had four-sided, four-foot-tall signs


with such messages as, “10% OF ALL GIs ARE GAY,” and “WRITE LBJ TODAY.” Perhaps most astonishing of all: this June will be the 70th anniversary of the debut of the world’s very f irst lesbian “publication,” called Vice Versa, written by the late Edythe Eyde under the pseudonym/anagram Lisa Ben. Edythe was a secretary at RKO Studios whose boss told her she needed to “look busy,” even though she didn’t have a lot of work. So, she used her time to type issues of the 9 to 20 page newsletter on f ive carbons. By one account, she ceased “publication” the next year after learning that she could be arrested for sending Vice Versa through the mail; any discussion of homosexuality was then deemed obscene. In the 1950s she began writing for the famed Daughters of Bilitis publication The Ladder, the f irst nationally distributed lesbian publication. I’m in awe of the courage of these early activists. They no doubt never imagined the progress that would be made by the movement they were birthing. And that progress happened because people got involved. That’s what we need to do again. Even a cursory review of LGBT history illustrates that when we’ve worked together, mobilized ourselves strategically, refused to give up, and even taken to the streets—no matter the opposition—we have consistently advanced. That kind of activism, that kind of strategic mobilization, is what we must revive given what we stand to lose at the hands of those in the Trump administration and Congress who are hostile to our very existence. That is part of the answer to the question I’ve been asked at virtually every gathering since Election Day. Everywhere I go, people are expressing a desire to fight back against the actual or anticipated initiatives of the Trump administration that are anti-LGBT, anti-woman, anti-immigrant, anti-healthcare, and more. Everyone asks some version of the same question, “What

can I DO that can help make a difference?” As we’ve seen, people have already been doing a lot, including marching and posting on social media. I’ve especially enjoyed the multi-generational groups of women and men who may be bringing new life to the women’s movement. Marches and working social media (and talking incessantly with our friends

Edythe Eyde’s pseudonym was “Lisa Ben” —an anagram for “lesbian.” Courtesy of ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives

about all of this) are important ways to express our views. The Center has been doing this, too. But such actions alone are not enough if we really want to make a difference and impede the harmful policies being implemented or proposed. Unfortunately, very few national leaders on the progressive side of the ledger have given us a blueprint for what can be done. So, your Center is developing its own plan for those of us who really want to DO something more.

First, it’s clear that individually and collectively we must channel the boldness of Edythe, the audacity of those motorcade organizers, and the anger and courage of the Cooper Do-nuts and Black Cat Tavern protesters. We must dedicate ourselves to spending at least some of our time doing work that will protect LGBT rights, health and social services for the most vulnerable in our community, and other issues and services we all care so much about. Second, our community needs to mobilize in pursuit of resistance, taking actions that are strategically designed to have an impact. That means all of us committing to get involved. As this issue of Vanguard goes to press, the Center’s Policy and Community Building department is engaged in a mobilization experiment focused on protecting the Affordable Care Act. More than 300 people who came to our grassroots activism training on March 1 are being put to work to inf luence what happens with this vital program. We’re strategically targeting a few senators because if we can persuade only THREE of them ( just three!), we can change the equation. During this month-long experiment we’re developing strategies for the coming months to put thousands of people to work on a wider range of issues—whether you have two hours or 20 hours to give to the cause. And we know that this isn’t a sprint. We’ve got to hunker down for a long-haul marathon. Whether you’re new to this kind of activism, or whether you have to dust off the cobwebs and return to your involvement of yesteryear, we need you. To find out more about how you can get involved, visit lalgbtcenter.org/do.

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Saturday, April 29 9 a.m.—4 p.m. Take action and protect your body, mind, and politics in challenging times. Enjoy interactive workshops, powerful speakers, and our health and civil rights wellness fair.

with special guest

Amita Swadhin

Free event. RSVP at

Health & Empowerment Fair for LBTQ Women

lalgbtcenter.org/360 Los Angeles LGBT Center | The Village at Ed Gould Plaza 1125 N. McCadden Place, Los Angeles, 90038

APRIL/ABRIL 21, 22, 23

Full schedule and tickets at Horario completo y entradas en

CineArteLA.org #CineArte @LALGBTCenter

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Spring 2017

Los Angeles LGBT Center The Village at Ed Gould Plaza 1125 N. McCadden Place, Los Angeles, 90038


BUZZ WORTHY 3

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Get Social

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THE CENTER’S SOCIAL MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

JOIN the CONVO

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For even more Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram interactions like these, plus all the latest LGBT community news, local highlights, and original content, find us on social media at:

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 @LALGBTCENTER

We’d love to hear from you.

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FIRST NAME: SIA

KYLIE SPARKS INTEREST

THANK YOU, CENTER FAMILY

TAKING THE PLEDGE

Sia helped spread the word about the Center & Bet Tzedek’s free legal clinic.

Actress Kylie Sparks shared her excitement about becoming a Center volunteer, reminding followers that anyone interested can sign up at lalgbtcenter.org/volunteer.

After the Center was vandalized with anti-LGBT slurs, we received a huge outpouring of support.

Comedy icons Margaret Cho and Lily Tomlin joined the Center’s campaign to mobilize during Trump’s first 100 days in office.

@bettzedek is doing a name and gender marker change clinic next week at the LA LGBT Center!–Team Sia  @Sia 2

PROTECT TRANS YOUTH Actress Kerry O’Malley responded to the Trump administration’s rollback of protections for transgender students, encouraging fans to support the Center as an ally to trans youth.

Today is a good day to take a stand and help someone. Donate to @SRLP and @ LALGBTCenter and @ LGBTCenterNYC Be an ally. #ProtectTransKids  @TheKerryOMalley

Really looking forward to going to the @LALGBTCenter’s volunteer orientation February 1st. Who wants to join me?  @KylieSparks 4

EVENING ENLIGHTENMENT Sister Gaia Love of the L.A. Drag Nuns received some LGBT enlightenment on our Get Centered tour. Sign up to take a tour at bit.ly/GetCentered.

Shoutout to Erin for an enlightened evening touring @LALGBTCenter to see firsthand the many vital health & human services they provide  @SrGaia

We love you @LALGBTCenter and all our LGBTQ family.  @TeganAndSara

The center is not going anywhere, nor is this trans woman who proudly works there!  @MISSBLOSSOM9210 Blossom C. Brown

This hurts my heart. Let’s all do something nice for someone today.  @BriaandChrissy

We won’t be intimidated. We won’t be silenced. Standing united against hate w/ @LALGBTCenter & LGBTQ ppl everywhere!  @HRC Human Rights Campaign

Stay informed. Speak out. Take the pledge to protect the rights and freedoms of #LGBT Americans at 100DaysAndMe.org #100andMe  @MargaretCho

I pledge to stay informed and speak out to protect #LGBT people — and you can too! Act now at 100DaysAndMe.org #100andMe  @LilyTomlin


YOU’RE F CKING WORTH IT SAFE. AFFORDABLE. EFFECTIVE.

Schedule a free PrEP consultation today: PrEPhere.org

PREPHERE.ORG


PrEP TALK

Get Fear less: De-Bunking

NEW CENTER CAMPAIGN BOOSTS AWARENESS, UNDERSTANDING OF PILL TO PREVENT HIV

Myths About

PreP

Spring 2017

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PrEP TALK

L

ike

many

people

who

could

from the pill that prevents HIV infection, known as PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), Dimitrius Sharp thought a prescription was more than he could afford. “I had heard of PrEP, but to be honest I didn’t think much about it because I figured it would be way too expensive for me,” said the 31-year-old African American resident of Los Angeles. Of the few who know about PrEP, he’s one of the many who mistakenly believe it’s unaffordable. A recent study by APLA Health of young gay and bisexual men revealed that Latino and African-American youth are the least likely to know there is a once-a-day pill that can protect them from HIV. Alarmingly, it’s gay and bisexual youth of color—and transgender women—who are at greatest risk of HIV. Among those who do know about PrEP, the study revealed many have misconceptions about its safety, efficacy, and affordability. “The Center’s new PrEP campaign caught my attention, and since the ads say it’s affordable, I booked a free consultation at the Center-WeHo to learn more,” said Sharp. “What I learned is that it’s actually covered by my HMO. There’s still a co-pay for the prescription, but they told me about programs to help with even that.” The Center’s sex-positive F*ck w/out Fear campaign uses raw, real language to get people’s attention and spur conversation. It also combats misconceptions about the safety and efficacy of PrEP and the belief that it’s unaffordable. PrEP is now covered by most insurance plans and for those who are uninsured, the Center benefit

can help make it affordable through patient assistance programs. It’s also easy to book a free PrEP consultation—they can now be scheduled online. “We’ve got the tools to not only end the fear of HIV, but to end it as an epidemic. Those at risk have to know about the tools, though, and they need honest information about them,” said Center Chief of Staff Darrel Cummings. “Our campaign provides the truth about PrEP, the information and support to help people get a prescription, and a reminder that condoms are necessary to prevent other sexually transmitted diseases.” Though it just launched in early January, the number of free PrEP consultations the Center offers has already doubled to about 30 to 40 each week, and the majority of people coming are gay and bisexual men of color—many of them young. “We’re reaching those most at risk of HIV where they are,” said Brian Toynes, manager of the Center’s Sexual Health Program, “including hook-up apps, in clubs, online, through the House and Ball community, and other Center programs. We’re also offering transportation assistance for those who don’t live close to the Center’s facilities in Hollywood and West Hollywood.” The campaign, and each medical provider at the Center, advises people that the medicine is up to 99% effective at preventing HIV but offers no protection from other sexually transmitted infections. Condoms remain the best protection for most STIs. To renew a threemonth prescription for PrEP, patients need to return to their provider for HIV and STD screenings.

We’ve got the tools to not only end the fear of HIV, but to end it as an epidemic.

To learn more about PrEP, and to schedule a free PrEP consultation, visit PrEPhere.org. Spring 2017

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RESIST AND PERSIST The Center’s Los Angeles Women’s Network (LAWN) and Audre Lorde Health Program for lesbian and bi women spearheaded the Center’s contingent in the Women’s March in Los Angeles ( January) and for International Women’s Day (March).


EYES ON THE FOR THE CENTER AND

OUR LGBT COMMUNITY, THE PERSONAL IS

B U T T O N S C O U R T E S Y O F O N E N AT I O N A L G AY & L E S B I A N A R C H I V E S

STILL POLITICAL

T

HE HISTORY OF the Los Angeles LGBT Center, like the LGBT community, is rooted in activism. In 1969 a group of volunteer activists in Los Angeles began working together to provide services to LGBT people in need. The organization they formed eventually became today’s Center, which provides services for more LGBT people than any other organization in the world. In the wake of last November’s election, the Center evaluated how its policy and advocacy work–to build a world where LGBT people can thrive as healthy, equal, and Spring 2017

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complete members of society–should adapt to protect our clients and the LGBT community. That process began the day after the election when the Center hosted a community gathering for those who were scared and upset. With just a few hours of notice, more than 300 people filled The Village at Ed Gould Plaza courtyard to commiserate with each other and hear from Rep. Adam Schiff, a hero for LGBT equality, and Center CEO Lorri L. Jean. “We must keep our eyes on the prize of the kind of world we want for ourselves and for those who are coming next,” said Center CEO Lorri L. Jean. “Now, more than ever, progressive and fair-minded people of all parties must stand tall, strong, and together to fight for our values and the well-being of the most vulnerable in our society.” Days after the election, the Center reached out to leaders of dozens of other progressive organizations in Los Angeles to form even stronger collaborations with each other. The first in-person meeting of the group was hosted at the Center’s Renberg Theatre. Representatives from more than 50 organizations attended. “So much is happening in Washington that is either a potential or real threat to our community,” said Center Director of Policy and Community Building Dave Garcia. “Our team is working every day to analyze those threats and mobilize effective responses, in conjunction with our community partners, to help protect LGBT people.” The Trump administration’s early days have been marked by a rollout of an ultra-conservative, anti-equality agenda. From the anti-Muslim travel bans that make it more difficult or impossible for LGBT people in the Middle East to get asylum in the U.S. to policies that harm transgender students and deport LGBT immigrants, the administration is targeting the most vulnerable members of our community. “We’ve always put the health and well-being of our community first, no matter the change in political winds,” said Jean. “Under the new administration, funding for many of our health and social services—and others like them around the country—are at risk, as are the people who depend on them. More than that, our basic civil rights and equality may be at stake. We need people to stay informed, and we need people ready to respond.” 14

Spring 2017

We're seeing red.

Tell Congress to get their ACA repeal off our bodies.

#IWD #lgbtRights

Justice deferred is justice denied. Protect our trans youth now.

#lgbtRights


GET INVOLVED Express your activism through your skills, experience, and passions to make a difference for the LGBT community by volunteering: you won’t be alone. Each month since the election, nearly 300 people have been attending the Center’s volunteer orientations.

STAY INFORMED Information is power. On Inauguration Day, the Center launched 100 Days and Me, a community information and engagement campaign focused on federal legislative and policy threats to LGBT people during the first 100 days of the Trump administration. At 100DaysAndMe.org, visitors can find issue briefs, tools, and suggested actions. — Sign up for updates at lalgbtcenter.org/signup and always be sure to follow us on    @lalgbtcenter.

Visit lalgbtcenter.org/volunteer to learn more about all the ways you can get involved. ­­­—

I grab copies of the Center’s Vanguard magazine, or other LGBT publications in the news rack at The Village, and leave them in different places on the buses I ride. Someone is going to pick them up and look at them. That’s planting a seed that can help someone.

LUPE, 44 VO LU NTEER

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MOBILIZE As part of a new mobilization campaign in March, the Center’s Leadership LAB (Learn Act Build) trained and mobilized hundreds of Center staff, clients, and volunteers to help stem the tide of anti-LGBT legislation. Initially, the campaign is focusing on changes to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that threaten the health and well-being of so many LGBT people. After they’re trained, “mobilizers” make calls to voters in key states and connect them with their senators so they can urge them to protect the ACA. “The response has been amazing. So many people are putting their hearts, energy, and time into helping our community,” said Leadership LAB National Mentoring Coordinator Stephen Deline. “The passion and response we’ve experienced in the very early days of this mobilization make it feel like the end stages of a major campaign instead of something that just started.”

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SPEAK OUT The Center’s Leadership LAB also is organizing canvassers to do voter outreach in parts of Los Angeles County that overwhelming voted for President Trump. The team’s work to create lasting change at the ballot box by engaging voters in these doorto-door, often difficult conversations about LGBT issues has been nationally recognized for its effectiveness. Learn how you can help at lalgbtcenter.org/LAB.


AARON, 23 LE AD ERSH I P L AB VO LU NTEER

T H RO U G H MY AC T I V I S M , I WA N T T O R E AC H AC R O S S T H E D I V I D E TO S O M E O N E W H O D O ES N ’ T T H I N K T H E S A M E WAY T H AT I D O.


ANDRE, 19 CLIENT

I WA N T P E O P L E TO U N D E RS TA N D T H AT, R E GA R D L ES S O F MY G E N D E R I D E N T I T Y, I ’M A H U M A N, TO O. T H E CENTER HAS HELPED ME GET THE CONFIDENCE AND STRENGTH T O F I N D MY VO I C E A N D U S E MY E X P E R I E N C ES TO H E L P OT H E R P E O P L E.


TAKE ACTION As this issue of Vanguard was going to press, an executive order that would legalize anti-LGBT prejudice under the guise of protecting so-called “religious freedom” is still pending. If such an order is signed by the president, the Center will join other organizations to host a rally. — Be ready to take action! Register to receive a text alert when such an order is signed and get immediate details about the rally. Visit lalgbtcenter.org/march.

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THINK GLOBAL, ACT LOCAL From healthcare to affordable housing, immigration and education, the LGBT community is acutely impacted by almost every political issue making headlines. Local victories can help build momentum on the national and even international levels to help LGBT people. In March, responding to the affordable housing crisis in Los Angeles that disproportionately impacts LGBT youth and seniors, the Center joined in the fight against Measure S, which would have had the effect of delaying or banning many future housing and building initiatives. The measure was defeated by a 2-to-1 margin. The Center also supported Measure H, which now will help fund mental health services, substance abuse treatment, healthcare, education, job training, affordable housing, and much more in Los Angeles.

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SHARE YOUR STORY We want to hear how you’re helping to build a world where LGBT people can thrive as healthy, equal, and complete members of society. — Share your activist story now at lalgbtcenter.org/mystory.


FOR MORE ACTIVIST STORIES Visit VanguardNow.org/activists

JULES VO LU NTEER AN D L I FE WO R KS M EN TO R

MARLON CLIENT

STEVEN, 27 CLIENT

IF I DIDN’T HAVE INSURANCE UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, I WOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN ABLE TO MANAGE MY CANCER TREATMENTS WITHOUT THE FEAR OF LOSING MY COVERAGE OR PAYING $80,000 IN MEDICAL EXPENSES. SO, I WILL PROTEST AND I WILL SHARE MY STORY TO HELP OTHER PEOPLE UNDERSTAND WHAT AFFORDABLE CARE MEANS.

ROBERT CLIENT AND A I D S/ L I F E C YC L E PA R T I C I PA N T

Spring 2017

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AIDS/

LIFECYCLE

Riding Tough A MILITARY VET TAKES ON HIS FIRST AIDS/LIFECYCLE

A

s a M arine , C edric Terr ell has endured some tough assignments, but as of a few months ago he was feeling particular angst regarding a challenge that has been conquered by people of all ages, sizes, and physical abilities: riding in AIDS/LifeCycle for the f irst time. “I’m an athletic guy so I’ve been doing a lot of cross training, but my teammates have been freaking me out!” said Terrell, 31. “When we’re riding hills, they make it sound so diff icult. I’m sure I’m over-preparing, because honestly, I have an edge to completing the ride.” That edge he boasts is his years of training in the Marine Corps. After graduating from high school, the Florida

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Spring 2017

native wanted to travel and see the world so he joined the Marines. Surviving boot camp, Terrell soon found himself deployed around the world for the next eight years, including China, El Salvador, and Morocco, to guard U.S. embassies. In June, his newest deployment will be to San Francisco to begin the seven-day, 545-mile journey to Los Angeles, where he currently lives. His previous boyfriend in Washington, D.C.—as well as all his friends who are living with HIV—will be on Terrell’s mind every mile of the way. “Since he was the f irst HIV-positive guy I dated, I sought information about maintaining my own health,” said Terrell. “I participated in a year-long drug trial of an injectable version of PrEP because I wanted to do my part to prevent new infections.” Participating in his f irst AIDS/LifeCycle with Team VegOut, Terrell is also riding to take a stand against HIV in the black community. According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in two black gay and bisexual men will become

HIV-positive in their lifetime if the rate of infection doesn’t change. “I f ind that statistic troubling, and from my own experience, I think it’s happening because of what churches preach,” said Terrell, now working as a portrait and fashion photographer. “The most diff icult thing I struggled with while growing up in the church was the notion that having sex with another man was abhorrent.” Conversations about sex and HIV between gay and bisexual men and their doctors can also be diff icult. That may contribute to the astronomically high HIV infection rate among this demographic, but Terrell is ready to shut down HIV’s racial disparities—another tough assignment. “If we can love ourselves and protect the ones we love, then we’ll be further along with finding a cure,” Terrell said. “One day HIV and AIDS will be a distant memory.”

If we can love ourselves and protect the ones we love, then we’ll be further along with finding a cure.


TAKE FIVE

Take 5 Minutes GET TO KNOW CENTER STAFF MEMBERS & VOLUNTEERS

Volunteer ››

ALFREDO SALUDADO PRONOUNS He/Him/His HOMETOWN Pacoima, CA YEAR STARTED AT THE CENTER Summer 2016 VOLUNTEER POSITION Information Specialist

HOW HAS YOUR LIFE CHANGED SINCE YOU BECAME A CENTER VOLUNTEER? Before I started volunteering at the Center, I didn’t feel part of the community. Now, I get to meet a lot of great people from all walks of life. Volunteering gives me a chance to connect with people on a much more meaningful level. I always look forward to my volunteer shift and feeling appreciated by the clients and staff. I’m usually in the lobby of the Center’s McDonald/Wright building. For me, being the first point of contact when someone walks in the door is so important. People need to know that this is a safe, welcoming space. For anyone thinking of volunteering, I would say do it. This is such a rewarding experience. The volunteer orientation is great—it’s really informative and will give you a good picture of all the different opportunities and great ways to get involved…and give back.

Staff ››

ANGIE MAGANA ALFREDO SALUDADO

PRONOUNS She/Her/Hers HOMETOWN Houston, TX YEAR STARTED AT THE CENTER 2014 STAFF POSITION Nurse Practitioner

ANGIE MAGANA

WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW ABOUT THE CENTER’S HEALTHCARE SERVICES? The Center offers amazing care to our patients and I’m enormously proud of that. Primarily, I provide comprehensive care to women and transgender individuals. Many of them are among the most marginalized and vulnerable people in our community, and the most likely to have had multiple negative healthcare experiences. As a lesbian, I’ve had multiple bad healthcare experiences myself. Even today, a patient’s sexual orientation or gender identity can be a big issue for healthcare providers. That’s why I’m so proud that at the Center, I’m able to ensure people have positive experiences. Here they know they’ll always be heard, taken seriously, and feel completely comfortable being open and honest. Without the Center, a lot of LGBT people would be without healthcare. Some wouldn’t be able to afford it and others would just stop getting care because their providers make them so uncomfortable. Thankfully, the Center is a safe, welcoming space that encourages and promotes the well-being of everyone in our community. Spring 2017

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THANK

YOU

The Los Angeles LGBT Center is extremely grateful for the support of the following new Sustaining Donors and Circle of Life members.

DIAMOND CIRCLE

SILVER CIRCLE

$18,000-$49,999 Jay Ayers & Matthew Walker* Gregory Evans* Michael Lombardo & Charles Ward*

$2,400-$3,599 Fred Abdelnour* J. Lynne Boylan* Broken Good Inc Michelle Giguere* Scott Halloran & Peter Rusch Jason Hendler & Chad Billmyer* Leonora Horwin* Henry Hurd* Danielle Knight* David Kuivanen & Karim Ongko* David Landau* Kuo-Wei Lee, M.D.* Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles Kevin McDonald James McNamara & Francisco Laguna* John Parker David Rose* John Schwartz* George Sealey Alison Smith* Deric Walters* Lisa Weinberg Spector

PLATINUM CIRCLE $12,000-$17,999 Cynthia Holland Brad Springer & Neil Hedin* Benjamin Squire & John Latimer*

GOLD CIRCLE $6,000-$11,999 Anonymous Neil Beecher* Paul Feig & Laura Feig Bill Frew Kenith Goodman* Todd Holland & Scotch Loring* Adam Lisagor* John Sealy & Ron Hills* Lily Tomlin & Jane Wagner Kelly Weinhart-Henry & Bridgett Henry

For information about Planned Giving or becoming a Sustaining Donor, please contact: Jennifer Dawson Director of Major Gifts jdawson@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-8932

Dave Dell Major Gifts Associate ddell@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-8903

Tim Lee Major Gifts Officer tlee@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-8945

Frank Stasio Senior Director of Planned Giving fstasio@lalgbtcenter.org 323-993-7690 Donor list as of January 31, 2017 *Indicates an increase in membership level. ^Indicates a multiyear pledge.

STERLING CIRCLE $3,600-$5,999 Keith Ashburn, M.D.* Paul Attanasio & Amanda Attanasio Marc Berton* Adriene Bowles* Ranney Draper Reza Farahan* Harry Ford Kenneth Jamison* Michael Koch & Andrew Kohler Quentin O’Brien & Kenneth Blakeley* Fred Silberberg & Douglas Levy* James Stovitz & James Brenner* Henry Tirado* Brian Wilson*

SILVER CIRCLE $1,800-$2,399 David Azulay & Andre Caraco Jon Robin Baitz Stan Smith James Campbell* Jilda Castaldo & Lyzette Villalvazo Bruce Fatz Arthur Flores* Barry Goldbaum & Michael Rey Winifred Holzman & Paul Dooley Michael Lovitz & Lawrence Martinez* Laurie Owyang Naoya Matsuda* Josh Ravetch James D. Tuttle

REALIZE THE POWER OF A GIFT. Making the Center part of your legacy in your will is the most important contribution you can make to the organization. Ways to give include wills and living trusts; beneficiary designations; charitable gift annuities, remainder trusts, and lead trusts; memorials and tribute gifts; and real estate. By including the Center in your estate plan or making another type of planned gift, you help ensure a strong and vibrant future for the Center as we build a world where LGBT people thrive as healthy, equal, and complete members of society.

LEARN MORE AT LALGBTCENTER.ORG/LEGACY. 24

Spring 2017


DONOR

PROFILE

SILVER CIRCLE $1,500-$1,799 Cole Buford Thomas Campbell Jarryd Christensen Amanda Cunningham & Trina Hazzah Rolf Danner & Jeff Rothenbach Kenneth Delalcazar Jim Durree & Michael Turner Chelsea Field Peter Georgianni Alexandra Glickman & Gayle Whittemore Kevin Goetz Eliot Graham & John Celowanchik Craig Grantham & Tony Colantino Cheryl Groves & Kathleen O’Kane Eliette Krakora Zaher Lopez Jessica Lowrey & Kristin Dehnert Daryl McCullough Ryne Meadors & Dave Rae Joel Mendias & Michael Damodio William Miller Margaret Nash & Susan Harlow David Nelson Ruben Ochoa John Oden & Mark Dizik Liz Rosenblatt Robert Saltzman & Ed Pierce William Randall Sheriff & Jeff Heglin Pamela Silverstrim Ryan Simpkins Gary Soltys Ricardo Sosapavon Michael Strand Edward Takashima Brent Thornburg Javier Vasquez David Williams

CIRCLE OF LIFE Jeffrey A. Fischer & James Van Beek Robert Jacobsen Jack A. Jones Dakota Sands Mary R. Power & Librada Hernandez Susan A. Simons

CIRCLE OF LIFE IN MEMORIAM Edward V. Costanzo Peter E. Geissler Daniel A. Moeller George Walker Donald Leon Williams

• Circle of Life members Sophie (left) and Holly (right) with their dogs

In Perfect Harmony THIS COUPLE’S PLANNED GIVING IS SECURING OUR FUTURE

C

enter C ircle of L ife members Holly and Sophie Hanson are no strangers to planning for their financial future. As founders of Harmony Financial Strategies, they have been helping the LGBT community with their financial planning for 20 years. In fact, Holly’s book The LGBT and Modern Family Money Manual has become a go-to resource for LGBT individuals and couples who are looking to financially plan for their future no matter their sexual orientation or family dynamic. In addition to helping others, Holly and Sophie have prepared for their own financial future by including the Center in their estate plan as a way to give back to the community they love. “Becoming a Circle of Life donor is a really great avenue and a way to give back that was an easy fit for us,” said Holly.

Holly and Sophie recognized the importance of the Center and its place in the community the moment they took their first tour. “I had no idea the Center’s health services were so broad, including mental health services and HIV testing, until we went on a tour,” said Sophie. After the presidential election last November, the couple took time to consider what the community would be losing if the Center experienced cuts in its funding under the new administration. “We knew it was time to jump in and help any way we could,” said Holly. “The Center and its services are needed now more than ever and people need to figure out how they can step up. Whether you are giving back to the Center with money or with your time, you’ll help protect the Center’s future.” “Now more than ever, we are confident about our decision to be part of the Center’s future as Circle of Life donors. That part of the future we can be sure of,” said Sophie.

We knew it was time to jump in and help any way we could.

Spring 2017

25


Center Classes

Life Drawing Lounge

Introducing our newly updated

Tuesdays, 7–9:30 p.m. Master the art of drawing the human body! Beginners and experienced artists welcome. Join this fun, weekly event focused on developing and honing your artistic abilities. Different nude models each week.

A Musical Theatre Writing Class The Center welcomes back one of our most popular offerings in an exciting, new format. Join in the fun when it is convenient for you!

Paid minors must be accompanied by a paid adult.

Class meets every Tuesday, 7 – 9:30 p.m.

Tickets: $18 Available online or at the door. Tickets do not expire. Discounts for multiple tickets.

Class passes: $20 each. Buy class passes and learn about multiple pass discounts at

To purchase tickets, visit

lalgbtcenter.org/wordsandmusic

lalgbtcenter.org/lifedrawing

e n k a i n w g A introduces

BREATH, BODY & SOUL

A Weekly Feel Good Yoga Flow.

Free Saturday Morning Meditation Join a supportive and non-denominational meditation practice. Learn to raise your gaze beyond finite understanding and explore the vastness of our infinite being.

Admission: Free (donations requested)

Location: The Village at Ed Gould Plaza

Information, days, times, class updates, and schedule changes, at

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Spring 2017

lalgbtcenter.org/awakening

In this FREE, weekly, drop in class, you can expect to move, breathe, sweat, smile, and spend time with like-minded individuals in a safe, non-judgmental space.

Class meets every Wednesday, 7 – 8 p.m. Free. No RSVP required, but you must be a Trans* Lounge member to participate.

To register for the Trans* Lounge, visit:

translounge.org.


Peer-Led Groups

v AA Happy Hour Tues.–Fri., 6:15–7:15 p.m.

v Village Readers An LGBT reading and discussion group Every 1st Wed., 7:30–9 p.m.

v Al-Anon Gay Focus Thurs., 7:30–8:30 p.m. v Alcoholics Anonymous: It’s Come to This Mon., 6:15–7:15 p.m. Canceled May 29 v Crystal Meth Anonymous Sat., 9:15–10:15 a.m.

July 5: Jazz Moon by Joe Okonkwo

Debtors Anonymous Tues., 7:30–8:30 p.m.

30+ Lesbian Chat Meet women outside of the bars Every 1st & 3rd Fri., 7:30–9 p.m. v

v Gay & Lesbian CODA Tues., 7:30–8:30 p.m.

Marijuana Anonymous Wed., 7:30–8:30 p.m. v

Community Groups

v NA: Heartbeat of Recovery Mon., 7:30–8:30 p.m. Canceled May 29

v LGBT Adult Special Needs Support Group Every 2nd Wed., 6–7:45 p.m.

OA Thurs., 6:15–7:15 p.m. v

v Bears L.A. Every 3rd Mon., 7–10 p.m.

Sex & Love Addicts Anonymous Thurs., 6:15–7:15 p.m. v

L.A. Leather Coalition Every 1st Thurs., 7–9 p.m. v

v Sexual Compulsives Anonymous Mon., 8:45–9:45 p.m. Wed., 7:30–8:30 p.m. Sat., 10:30–11:30 a.m. Canceled May 29

Positive Images HIV+ Men’s Forum M Every Mon., 1–3 p.m. M Every Wed., 7–9 p.m. M Every Thurs., 6–8 p.m. Canceled May 29 Call 323-860-7321 to RSVP

UA: Artist in Prosperity Tues., 6:15–7:15 p.m. v

Gay Men’s Prostate Cancer Support Group Every 1st & 3rd Tues., 7–9 p.m. Sponsored by Cancer Support Community Benjamin Center. Call 310-314-2555 or visit CancerSupportCommunityBenjaminCenter.org M

v Women’s AA Wed., 8:45–9:45 p.m.

Coming Out Coming Out Workshops for Women Coming Out Workshops for Men Safe, nurturing workshops for anyone who is facing their own coming out process.
 Call 877-OUT-4-LIFE for recorded information and instructions for enrollment. More information at comingoutla.org.

The Village 1125 N. McCadden Place

May 3: The Rainbow Comes and Goes: A Mother and Son On Life, Love, and Loss by Anderson Cooper & Gloria Vanderbilt June 7: In The Dark Room by Susan Faludi

v

V

April 5: Flagrant Conduct: The Story of Lawrence v. Texas by Dale Carpenter

M

McDonald/Wright 1625 N. Schrader Blvd.

Group Meetings

12-Step Groups

Social Networking Groups v Bi-osphere* Explore and discuss the many shades of today’s diverse bisexual community Every 2nd & 4th Mon., 8–9:30 p.m. v HERstories* A gathering place for all LGBT women who want strong community and great conversation Every Mon., 8–9:30 p.m. Canceled May 29 v Men’s Speakeasy* Great conversation for gay and bisexual men Every Tues., 8–9:30 p.m. v Transgender Perceptions* Conversation & community-building for transgender people Every Fri., 8–9:30 p.m.

* Groups may not welcome late arrivals.

Senior Groups For more information about Senior Services classes, please call 323-860-7322 or visit facebook.com/50pluslgbt. To RSVP, email seniors@lalgbtcenter.org or call 323-860-5830. v Art Lab Call 323-860-5830 for date and time v Chair Yoga with Master Lakshmi Call 323-860-5830 for date and time v HIV+ 50+ Men’s Drop-In Support Group Thurs., 1–3 p.m. v Lunch for Everyone Call 323-860-5830 for date and time v Men’s Drop-In Support Group Wed., 10 a.m.–Noon v Movies for Everyone Call 323-860-5830 for date and time

Valley Social and Networking Group Thurs., Noon–1:30 p.m. Metropolitan Community Church 5730 Cahuenga Blvd., North Hollywood Call 323-860-5830

H

Highland Annex 1220 N. Highland Ave.

Empty= Offsite

Spring 2017

27


CENTER NOTES

News and notes from the Center’s life-changing and life-saving programs and services BREAKING NEW GROUND Construction of the Center’s Anita May Rosenstein Campus has begun! Groundbreaking happened in late March for the revolutionary new campus located across the street from The Village at Ed Gould Plaza. The new campus will include 135 units of affordable housing for seniors and youth, 100 beds for homeless youth, new senior and youth centers, and more. The new facility is scheduled to be completed in early 2019.

View renderings of the new campus at lalgbtcenter.org/amrc.

BIG BROTHERS, BIG SISTERS, BIG DEAL Over the next two years, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) will engage in a pilot project to establish more inclusive mentoring services and relationships for its LGBTQ youth members by using the best practices of the Center’s LifeWorks mentoring program, currently helmed by Mentoring Coordinator Nia Clark. BBBSA’s pilot sites for the mentoring project include Seattle, Philadelphia, Chicago, Nashville, and Richmond, Virginia.

Do you want to make a difference in an LGBTQ youth’s life? Become a mentor! Visit lifeworksla.org for more information. 28

Spring 2017

MAKE ROOM FOR #BOOM #BOOM!—the city’s premier sober New Year’s Eve party—broke attendance records with more than 650 guests and 100 volunteers packing the West Hollywood Park Auditorium. This was the event’s fourth year in partnership with the Center’s Recovery Services.

OH-VATION! Congratulations to the Center’s Lily Tomlin/Jane Wagner Cultural Arts Center for nabbing top honors at this year’s Ovation Awards that recognize the best in L.A.’s theatrical community. The Center won Best Season, Best Production of a Musical (Ham: A Musical Memoir), Best Direction of a Play (Ken Sawyer for Hit the Wall), among others.

This summer, make plans to attend SIZZLE, the sober section of the L.A. Pride Festival, co-produced by #BOOM! organizers. “These two events have become an important part of the recovering community,” said Mike Rizzo, manager of the Center’s Crystal Meth Recovery Services. “It’s important to continue to offer events that are alternatives to the alcohol and drug-fueled parties that monopolize the holidays.”

Discover the Center’s artistic productions and special events at lalgbtcenter.org/theatre.

WELCOME TO THE LOVE BUBBLE Tracy Evans has joined AIDS/ LifeCycle as the new Ride Director. An avid cyclist, Tracy comes to the organization with extensive experience in peer-to-peer fundraising, marketing, and corporate relations as well as a passion for work in the LGBT, HIV, and cycling spheres. Formerly the National Director of Lupus Foundation of America, Evans helped to create the wildly-successful Nike Women’s Marathon.

There’s still time to register for this year’s AIDS/ LifeCycle, June 4–10, at aidslifecycle.org! Use code VANGUARD for $20 off the registration fee.


CENTER VOICES

Analysis and insight from the Center’s staff on current issues and events facing our community As reported by the Bay Area Reporter, many LGBT people may lose access to medical care if the Trump Administration makes good on its promise to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

The first-ever transgender doll, based on trans teen personality Jazz Jennings, debuted at this year’s New York Toy Fair, as reported by KCBS-TV.

Law enforcement is working with members of the LGBT community and the Center, among other organizations, to ensure hate crimes are reported properly and victims are assisted promptly, as reported by the Beverly Press.

The Boy Scouts of America has decided to allow transgender boys to enroll. As reported by CBS News, this decision marks a dramatic shift in the organization’s attitudes about LGBT members.

ROGER COGGAN

Director, Policy and Community Building

DRIAN JUAREZ CHRISTOPHER BROWN Director, Health and Mental Health Services

Program Manager, Transgender Economic Empowerment Project

Excerpt: “I think it’s about reflecting the world.

Excerpt: “A number of our clients are nervous about if they are going to be able to maintain their health insurance.

Trans people are a part of society. We’re a part of culture.

Because of the ACA, we have been able to provide life-saving primary care to many more people.

People of my generation grew up with no role models, with no language. We didn’t see ourselves on TV. We didn’t see ourselves in magazines. We were invisible. What we are talking about [with the doll] is gender identity and saying that if you’re a transgender child, you are okay. You are fine just the way you are.”

It has been a game changer for many of our clients.”

DAVE GARCIA

Director, Legal Services

Excerpt: “We applaud the city attorney for focusing on this.

Transgender people and undocumented immigrants, especially LGBT undocumented immigrants, may be hesitant to report hate crimes. Law enforcement in California is increasingly taking this more seriously.”

Excerpt: “The young people in the scouts…they don’t have a problem with this. It’s mostly the adults that are having a hard time coming along.

If you truly care about young people… you have compassion and understanding for the young kids that you’re taking care of.”

Read the entire article at:

Read the entire article at

Read the entire article at:

Read the entire article at:

bit.ly/ObamaCareRepeal

bit.ly/TransDoll

bit.ly/HateCrimeReporting

bit.ly/TransBoyScouts

Spring 2017

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PHOTO FINISH

Women’s March (1) Led by the Los Angeles Women’s Network, the Center joined the masses in solidarity at a demonstration held in downtown L.A. as (2,3) participants held the Center’s bilingual signs, which included a quote from lesbian activist and feminist Audre Lorde. Lorde is also the namesake of the Center’s health program for lesbian and bi women, (4) which was widely promoted by Center staff members at a community festival held in conjunction with the march. For more info about LAWN, visit lalgbtcenter.org/lawn. For more info about the Center’s Audre Lorde Health Program for lesbian and bi women, visit lalgbtcenter.org/audrelorde.

1

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2

3

6

5

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Point Foundation Regional Leadership Forum (5-8) The Center’s LifeWorks partnered with Point Foundation, the nation’s largest LGBT scholarship program, to host a regional leadership forum intended to help LGBT young adults meet their educational goals. Held at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza, more than 100 guests, including scholarship recipients, Point Foundation alumni, and mentors attended the event. For more info about LifeWorks youth development and mentoring program visit lifeworksla.org. 30

Spring 2017

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Simply diVine Kickoff Party (9) With bartenders at PUMP Restaurant in West Hollywood livening spirits, (10, l-r) Simply diVine co-chairs and Center board members Susan Feniger and David Bailey officially launched the annual food and wine tasting event benefiting the Center’s programs and services. Guests included (11, l-r) Ken Jamison and Joe Chu; (12, l-r) Diana Howard, Aissatou Diallo, Lauren Blakely, and Amy DuPont; and (13, l-r) David Eichman and Dr. Richard Mehlman.

AIDS/LifeCycle Expo and Resolution Ride (14) More than 400 cyclists trekked through scenic Griffith Park to keep their New Year’s health resolutions. (15) This year’s Resolution Ride was held in conjunction with the Expo, in which cyclists and roadies learned more about training, fundraising, and life in camp during the seven-day, 545-mile ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles. (16) Coney the Safety Mascot made a special appearance with the cheer squad! There’s still time to register for this year’s ride, June 4-1 0! Visit aidslifecycle.org and save $20 off the registration fee with discount code VANGUARD.

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Spring 2017

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PHOTO FINISH

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Loving Your Blackness (17) A community art project was one of the popular activities offered at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza during the Center’s inaugural event honoring Black History Month. (18, l-r) Trans activists The Duchess, Sir Lady Java, and Eva Aubry spoke at a panel discussion held inside the Renberg Theatre, which included (19) a performance by Show Off Dance Crew. (20) Staff members of the Center’s Sexual Health and Education Program also conducted an “HIV 101” workshop.

Circle of Life Brunch (21) Donors and their guests were honored at a Hancock Park residence for their planned gifts to the Center. Guests included (22, l-r) Jeff Soref, Bill Weinberger, Danny Gibson, Center Board Member Dean Hansell, Eric Kugler, and Paul Lombardi; (23, back row) Hope Faust, Center Board Member Carolyn Dye, Kathleen Briley, Dakota Sands, Pamela Shuman; and (23, front row) Renee Steele, Lynn Harrill, Wendy Hartmann, and Center Donor Membership Associate Rani DeMesme-Anders.

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Spring 2017

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Celebration for New Sustaining Donors Held at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza’s Advocate & Gochis Galleries, the Center’s newest Sustaining Donors were recognized for their contributions in supporting the Center’s life-changing and life-saving programs and services. Guests included (26, l-r) Jeff Heglin, William Sheriff, and Center Chief of Staff Darrel Cummings; and (27, l-r) Cheryl Groves, Kathleen O’Kane, and Center Board Member Carolyn Dye. For more information about becoming a Sustaining Donor, visit lalgbtcenter.org/sustainingdonors.

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LifeWorks Valentine’s Day Party (24-25) Love was in the air at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza, as more than two dozen youth members designed handcrafted Valentine’s Day cards for each other and posed for fun photos.

27

In 1972 the Center—then known as the Gay Community Services Center—established the world’s first lesbian health clinic, staffed by volunteers who were all lesbian medical professionals. Forty-five years later, the Center has expanded its health programs and services for LBTQ women, including the creation of the 360 Health & Empowerment Fair. The Center’s primary care for women has evolved to become known as the Audre Lorde Health Program for lesbian and bi women. For more info about the Audre Lorde Health Program for lesbian and bi women, visit lalgbtcenter.org/audrelorde. For more info about the 360 Health & Empowerment Fair for LBTQ Women on April 29 at The Village at Ed Gould Plaza, visit lalgbtcenter.org/360. Image courtesy of ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives Spring 2017

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WHY I GIVE

Why I Give Gigi Gorgeous

B

eing detained and held at the Dubai Airport for over five hours last year was one of the scariest moments of my entire life. Being denied entry into a country just because I’m transgender is seriously disgusting and very scary! Discrimination is real, and it’s still happening in so many parts of the world—including the United States. It’s a huge step back for the president to withdraw protection for trans youth and force them to use the school restroom that doesn’t correspond with their gender identities. Trans people go to school, go to work, go grocery shopping, watch a movie, and we—like everyone else—go to the bathroom. Most people don’t have to think twice before going to the bathroom, so why should trans people be any different? I read something recently about what George Takei tweeted, and it really stuck with me: “It’s not about bathrooms, just like it was never about water fountains.” It’s more important than ever to support the Center because it’s a champion for our cause and the community. By supporting the Center and finding ways to get involved, you will only further what

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Spring 2017

we are fighting for. What impresses me most about the Center is that it’s one of the nation’s largest providers of services for trans people. Its transgender health program pro-

More transgenderspecific healthcare options like the Center’s should exist nationwide for the exact same reason it’s important for people in general to receive healthcare: we are all human. vides the quality care that we deserve. More transgender-specific healthcare options like the Center’s should exist nationwide for the exact same reason it’s important for people in general to receive healthcare: we are all human.

Last fall I taught a beauty and makeup seminar at the Center’s Models of Pride youth conference. As someone who came out as trans on YouTube at the age of 19, I was excited to meet students who could relate to me and my struggles. We had the opportunity to take selfies in an intimate setting and talk about music, pop culture, fashion—and most importantly—about equal rights in school and just about everywhere. It was such a memorable day because we were at our most authentic selves. Now that our rights are beginning to be taken away, that happy time seems like a faded memory. But, we can still make a difference! I’m using my voice to help build awareness of the threats our community faces, and to encourage people to take action, because we all need to stand up for what we believe in and for what is right. The Center cannot do it without me and you. Gigi Gorgeous is a model, actress, and internet personality with more than 7 million followers on social media. Her feature length documentary, This Is Everything: Gigi Gorgeous, can now be seen on YouTube Red.


Help right history.

lalgbtcenter.org/lgbtrights


McDonald/Wright Building 1625 N. Schrader Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028

R EG I ST E R TO VO LU N T E E R !

SAVE $20 CODE: VANGUARD

JUNE 4 - 10, 2017

AIDSLIFECYCLE.ORG Photo By: Georg Lester

PRODUCED BY & BENEFITING

Vanguard Quarterly Spring 2017  

The latest issue of the Los Angeles LGBT Center's award-winning member magazine.

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