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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Lorton Primary School Prospectus

Studying Bowderbeck on a field trip to Buttermere

2010 - 11 1


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Telephone 01900 325700

October 2010

Dear Parent/Guardian Welcome to Lorton School In this booklet we hope to tell you a little about the school and the curriculum. However, there is no substitute for first hand experience and we would urge you to visit the school to see for yourself what a happy and attractive place it is. As parents you play a very big part in your child’s education, and as a school we aim to do the very best for your child, whatever his or her needs. If you child does join the school we hope the partnership between us will help your child achieve their full potential.

Yours sincerely

Mrs Olivia Harrison Headteacher.

Headteacher: Mrs Olivia Harrison

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

CONTENTS

The School Introduction Staff List Governors Aims and Objectives School Plan Friends of Lorton School

4 5 6 7 7 8

Admissions From home to school Catchment area Map Admissions Policy

9 9 10-11

Teaching and Learning Pupils with disabilities Class organisation The National Curriculum Religious Education Sex Education Parents as Partners Homework Teaching Methods Special Needs

12 12 12 - 17 17 17 18 18 19 20 - 21

Assessment and Recording Children’s Records SATs Tests & Results

21 22 24 - 25

The School Day Health, Safety, Well-being School Discipline Medical Information Absences Times Late Arrivals Change of circumstances Office Hours Parking Milk Meals Clothing Jewellery Sports Additional subjects Clubs Swimming Term Dates

26 27 27 28 - 29 29 29 29 30 30 31 31 31 31 32 32 32 33 33

Community Links Cockermouth School Educational Visits Visitors to School

34 35 35 36

The Small Print Charging Policy Insurance Formal complaints Disclaimer Financial Statement

36 36 37 37 38

OFSTED

39 – 40

Parent and Pupil Comments

3

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Reception children enjoying reading their gifts of picture books when starting Lorton School. INTRODUCTION Lorton School is a small rural school in the beautiful Vale of Lorton some four miles south of Cockermouth, and traditionally serves the villages of Buttermere, Loweswater, Lorton, Embleton and Wythop. There are currently 70 children on roll between the ages of 4 and 11. The original schoolroom was built in 1859 with a second classroom being added in 1895. From then the teaching accommodation remained unchanged until 1997 when a small hall was constructed and, due to increasing numbers, an additional classroom was built in 1998. The now extensive facilities allow for flexibility in teaching methods and approaches as appropriate to the needs of individuals, small groups or whole classes. Our aim at Lorton School is to create a stimulating learning environment through which all children will achieve success. Throughout your child’s education we will keep you up to date and informed of their development, but it is important to remember that you are welcome to see us at any time, particularly if you have any concerns or worries. We see the education of every child as being very much a partnership between home and school, so it is important to have good communication between teachers and parents. Information regarding staffing, school governors, the curriculum, teaching methods, school organisation, SATs results, etc, is provided in the rest of the booklet. Please read through the booklet and if you have any questions please do not hesitate to get in touch.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

STAFF

Teaching staff Headteacher

Teachers

Mrs Olivia Harrison

Mrs Laura Henderson Reception, Year 1 & 2(part-time) Mrs Nicola Robinson Reception, Year 1 & 2(part-time) SENCo Mrs Jane Bell Year 3 & 4 (part-time) Mrs Heather Crompton Year 3 & 4 (part-time) Mr Andrew Liles Year 5 & 6 Mrs Gabrielle Sanders Music ( part-time) Mr John Taylor Music (part-time)

Teaching Assistants

Mrs Susan Marshall Mrs Chrissie Baker

Reception, Year 1 & 2 Year 3 & 4, Year 5 & 6

Clerical

Mrs Chrissie Baker Mrs Beverley Wilson

Caretaking

Miss Julie Ray

School Meals

Helen Aubert-Milburn Ann Norman

Chef Dining Assistant

Marjorie Blamire

Mid-day Supervisor

(part-time) Admin Assistant (part-time) Admin Assistant

Lorton School phone number (01900) 325700 Lorton School fax number (01900) 325700 Lorton School office e-mail : central@lorton.cumbria.sch.uk Lorton School Website: www.lorton.cumbria.sch.uk

The school is a Community School under The Local Authority, Children’s Services.

CARLISLE

Cumbria County Council Education Office 5 Portland Square CA1 1PU Telephone : (01228) 606060

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

THE GOVERNING BODY OF LORTON SCHOOL Name

Status

Expiry

Mr Simon Hughes(Chair)

Parent

10/09

Vacancy

Parent

10/09

Mrs Helen Crouch

Parent

10/09

Mr Graham Wigginton

Parent

10/09

Rev. Margaret Jenkinson

Co-opted

07/10

Mr Roger Coles

Co-opted

Mr Bev Rowlands

Co-opted

Mr Darren Ward

LEA Appointed

07/10

Mrs Beverly Wilson

Non Teaching Staff

10/09

Mrs Olivia Harrison

Headteacher

10/09

Mrs Nicola Robinson

Teaching Staff

04/08

Clerk to the Governors

Mr David Walmsley Godferhead Loweswater Cockermouth CA13 0RT Tel (01900) 85013

Children enjoying a Bird of Prey display during Science Week, June 2009

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

The Governors’ Aims and Objectives for the school are : Aims: the children should Be independent, co-operative and reflective Be tolerant, understanding and sympathetic Fulfil their own academic potential Feel safe, happy and confident Feel socially and emotionally secure Have a sense of community

Objectives: the school should provide a stimulating learning environment provide high quality education promote equal opportunities provide active community links provide a positive caring atmosphere for children and adults provide a safe and secure building provide appropriate resources

FROM OFSTED: Sept 2007 ‘Lorton is a good school. Within a family atmosphere it provides a good academic education and high quality pastoral care. The school’s ethos is valued highly by parents and enjoyed by pupils. All pupils make good progress in their learning and their personal development is outstanding.’

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

THE FRIENDS OF LORTON SCHOOL We have a very active Friends organisation at Lorton School (F.O.L.S.), which raises funds to support the school and organises social events for both children and adults. Over the years the association has provided the school with a great deal of equipment as well as giving much needed support in all sorts of other ways. Their contribution includes such things as theatre trips, computers, a data video projector and digital camera, library books etc. Many other items have been provided along the way and all for the benefit of your children. The current officers of the Friends of Lorton School are : Chair : Jonathan Green Secretary : Lyndsaye Wynne Treasurer: Kath Armstrong All meetings are open to all parents. If you are interested in playing an active role in the Association, please do not hesitate to contact the Chairman, Jonathan Green.

Children on the adventure playground provided by F.O.L.S.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Your child’s first few weeks at school should be happy and exciting. A happy and secure child can devote all their energies to learning. We recognise that you are your child’s main educators. Our role is to support, extend and provide new experiences. It is important that we know as much as you can tell us about your child so that their settling-in period is as smooth as possible. Once you have had chance to read the school brochure and complete the admissions form we would like you and your children to visit us so that you can have a look around the school and we can answer any questions you may have. Please contact us to make an appointment. For those of you who have children approaching school age the admission procedure is as follows: Children who will be 5 years of age between September 1st 2010 and August 31st 20011 (inclusive) should start school in the Foundation Stage class in September 2010. For the first two weeks of the Autumn Term, Foundation Stage children will attend school on a part time basis only. You will be notified of the details nearer the time. From the third week of term all children will attend full time. The induction programme for all Foundation Stage children and their parents takes place in the Summer term prior to starting school. Arrangements will be made for a member of staff to visit you and your child at home and at their nursery, and children will have the opportunity to visit school on a number of occasions to meet their teachers and mix with the other children who will be in their class. Parents will have the opportunity to find out much more about Lorton School and how we provide for the children. There will also be plenty of opportunity to ask questions and meet many of the people who will be responsible for various aspects of your child's education and development. The school’s published admission number is 10 per year group. The school may, at the governors’ discretion, admit children who do not reside in its catchment area (see below) For details of the County’s Admissions policy please see page 7.

Catchment Area Map

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

CUMBRIA EDUCATION SERVICE GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICY 2009/10 Community and Voluntary Controlled Schools Where there are more applications than places available at a community or voluntary controlled school, applications will be prioritised using the criteria below. The criteria will be applied in conjunction with the explanatory notes overleaf which form part of the policy. In the main intake allocation processes defined in the co-ordinated admissions schemes, they will be applied to first preference applicants first. Second, and subsequently third, preferences will be considered if places remain after parents who have given a school as a higher preference have been allocated a place. 1.

Children looked after, ie in public care, giving priority, if necessary, to the youngest child(ren) - see note 1 overleaf.

2.

Children living in the catchment area who have brothers or sisters in the school (or associated infant or junior school) at the time of their admission - see notes 2 and 3 overleaf.

3.

Children living outside the catchment area who, at the time of their admission, have brothers or sisters in the school (or associated infant or junior school) who were directed to that school by the Local Authority either (a) in the absence of a place being available in the catchment area school due to oversubscription and the school was identified by the Local Authority as the next nearest with a place available or (b) in their Statement of Special Educational Need - see notes 2, 3 and 4 overleaf.

4.

In relation to Church of England Voluntary Controlled Schools, children living in the catchment area with a parent on the electoral roll of a C of E church. - see note 5 overleaf.

5.

Other children living in the catchment area giving priority to those living furthest away from an alternative school where the Local Authority is able to determine that a place is available, measured by the shortest walking route by road - see notes 6 and 7 overleaf.

6.

Children living outside the catchment area who have brothers or sisters in the school (or associated infant or junior school) at the time of their admission - see notes 2 and 3 overleaf.

7.

In relation to Church of England Voluntary Controlled schools, children living outside the catchment area with a parent on the electoral roll of a C of E church. - see note 5 overleaf.

8.

Children living outside the catchment area, giving priority to those who live closest to the school, measured by the shortest walking route by road - see note 6 overleaf.

Applications will be prioritised on the above basis. An exception will be made:under the Authority's policy for the education of children with special needs (i) where a child holds a Statement of Special Educational Needs, or (ii) is currently undergoing a statutory assessment, and in either case it is considered that attendance at a particular school is necessary to meet the identified needs of that child; in considering a parent's second or third preference and in relation to the next nearest school with a place available where admission has been refused to the catchment area school because of oversubscription. (Such an exception would not be made if this school is also unable to accommodate its catchment area applicants)

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Explanatory Notes [These notes are part of the policy]

Note 1 A child looked after, i.e., in public care, is defined as a child who is looked after by a local authority within the meaning of Section 22 of the Children Act 1989. Note 2 To prioritise in criteria 2, 3 and 6, priority will be given to those children with the youngest siblings. Brothers and sisters are those living at the same address and includes step and foster children. Priority will only be given where it is known at the time of allocating places that a sibling will be attending the school (excluding a nursery class) at the time of admission. Note 3 Where reference is made to associated infant and junior schools this is to describe those situations where infant and junior schools share the same catchment area. Note 4 If parents believe they qualify for consideration under criterion 3, they should indicate this on their preference form in the place provided for this purpose. In relation to a child with a Statement of Special Educational Need, the Statement must state that the child is directed by the Local Authority to attend a particular school which is necessary to meet his or her identified needs. It does not include those situations where the Statement indicates that the Local Authority considers a mainstream school of parental choice to be appropriate. Note 5 To be considered under criteria 4 or 7 parents must provide proof with the completed form that they are on an electoral roll of a C of E church and have been for two years before the closing date for preference forms. It may relate to more than one church. To prioritise in criteria 4 or 7 the measurement criteria in criteria 5 and 8 respectively will be used. Note 6 Distance measurements will be undertaken using the Local Authority’s computerised Geographical Information System [GIS] and will be to the nearest entrance on the school site which is available to pupils at the time of undertaking the assessment. Note 7 Under criterion 5, an alternative school will only be regarded as having a place available if it is able to accommodate its catchment area applicants and still has places available.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

PUPILS WITH DISABILITIES Wherever possible children with disabilities will be admitted to Lorton School using the usual criteria, and will be treated as far as possible the same as other pupils. There are ramps to allow children in wheelchairs physical access to the building. The whole school is on one level so there is access throughout. CLASSES Classes will normally be made up of children from more than one year group. Classes have between 23 and 28 pupils, but this may vary from year to year up to a maximum of 30 per class. THE CURRICULUM In providing for your children we are guided by the requirements of the National Curriculum and the requirements of Cumbria LEA. Children in the Reception year follow the Early Years Foundation Stage which covers Personal, social and emotional development Communication, language and literacy Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy Knowledge and understanding of the world Physical development Creative development Children in Years 1 to 6 follow the National Curriculum which includes Core Subjects :

English Mathematics Science Information Technology

Foundation Subjects :

Art Design and Technology Geography History Music Physical Education

Additional Subjects :

Religious Education Personal, Social and Health Education

Playing the Gamelan – Multicultural Week, June 2008

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Curriculum planning involves all members of the teaching staff to ensure there is progression and continuity in learning as your child passes through the school and all our planning processes give due regard to the requirements of the National Curriculum. The following statements about the importance of these curriculum areas is taken from the QCA curriculum handbook for primary school teachers : ENGLISH English is a vital way of communicating in school, in public life and internationally.. In studying English pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. It enables them to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others effectively. Pupils learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction and media texts. The study of English helps pupils understand how language works by looking at its patterns, structures and origins. Using this knowledge pupils can choose and adapt what they say and write in different situations.

Year 3/4 children taking part in a National KNEX challenge MATHEMATICS Mathematics equips pupils with a set of tools to understand and change the world. These tools include logical reasoning, problem-solving skills, and the ability to think in abstract ways. Mathematics is important in everyday life, many forms of employment, in understanding science, technology, and the environment. Mathematics is a creative discipline, exploring the fascination of numbers and calculations. SCIENCE Science stimulates and excites pupils’ curiosity about phenomena and events in the world around them. It also satisfies this curiosity with knowledge. Through science, pupils understand how major scientific ideas contribute to technological change – impacting on industry, business and medicine and improving quality of life. Pupils recognise the cultural significance of science and trace its worldwide development.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

They learn to question and discuss science-based issues that may affect their own lives, the direction of society and the future of the world. ICT Information and Communication Technology prepares pupils to participate in a rapidly changing world in which work and other activities are increasingly transformed by access to varied and developing technology. Pupils use ICT tools to find, explore, analyse, exchange and present information responsibly and creatively. Increased capability in the use of ICT promotes initiative and independent learning, with pupils being able to make informed judgments about when and where to use ICT to best effect, and to consider its implications for home and work both now and in the future. Each classroom has an interactive whiteboard and computers. In addition, there is a set of 20 laptops that can be used throughout the school.

Children in KS2 have use of laptops for use across the curriculum

ART Art and design stimulates creativity and imagination. It provides visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a unique way of understanding and responding to the world. Pupils use colour form texture pastern and different materials and processes to communicate what they see, feel and think. They explore ideas and meanings in the work of artists, craftspeople and designers. They learn about the diverse roles and functions of art, craft and design in contemporary life, and in different times and cultures.

Enjoying Art

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY Design and technology prepares pupils to participate in tomorrow’s rapidly changing technologies. They learn to become creative problem solvers, as individuals and members of a team. They combine practical skills with an understanding of aesthetics, social and environmental issues, function and industrial practices. As they do so, they reflect on and evaluate present and past design and technology, its uses and effects. Through design and technology, all pupils can become discriminating and informed users of products and become innovators.

Design Technology – Making biscuits

GEOGRAPHY Geography provokes and answers questions about the natural and human worlds, using different scales of enquiry to view them from different perspectives. It develops knowledge of places and environments throughout the world, an understanding of maps, and a range of investigative and problemsolving skills both inside and outside the classroom. Geography is a focus within the curriculum for understanding and resolving issues about the environment and sustainable deOur annual field trip to Buttermere velopment. It is also an important link between the natural and social sciences. As pupils study geography, they encounter different societies and cultures. This helps them realise how nations rely on each other. It can inspire them to think about their own place in the world, their values, and their rights and responsibilities to other people and the environment.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

HISTORY History fires pupils’ curiosity about the past in Britain and the wider world. Pupils consider how the past influences the present, what past societies were like, how these societies organised their politics, and what beliefs and cultures influenced people’s actions. As they do this, pupils develop a chronological framework for their knowledge of significant events and people. In history, pupils find evidence, weigh it up and reach their own conclusions. To do this they need to be able to research, sift through evidence, and argue for their point of views – skills that are prized in adult life.

Key Stage 1 children at a NationalTrust “Living History” day Wordsworth House, Cockermouth

at

MUSIC Music is a powerful, unique form of communication that can change the way pupils feel, think and act. It brings together intellect and feeling and enables personal expression, reflection and emotional development. The teaching of music develops pupils’ ability to listen and appreciate a wide variety of music and to make judgments about musical quality. It encourages active involvement in different forms of amateur music making, both individual and communal, developing a sense of group identity and togetherness.

Being taught to use Djembes drums as part of an after school club Our annual Christmas concert at Lorton Church 16


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education develops pupils’ physical competence and confidence, providing opportunities for pupils to be creative, competitive and to face up to different challenges as individuals and in groups and teams. It promotes positive attitudes towards active and healthy lifestyles. Through this process pupils discover their aptitudes, abilities and preferences, and make choices about how to get involved in lifelong physical activity.

Reception and KS1 children enjoying a series of Gymnastics lessons

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (extract from Cumbria Agreed Syllabus for RE) Religious Education helps pupils to : Acquire and develop knowledge and understanding of Christianity and other principal religions represented in Britain. Gain some experience of what it is like to be a member of a faith community, without indoctrination or proselytising Develop an understanding of the influence of beliefs, values and traditions on individuals, community, societies an cultures. Develop the ability to make reasoned and informed judgments about religious and moral issues Develop a positive attitude towards other people (respecting their right to hold different beliefs from their own) and towards living in a multi-faith society Enhance their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development by : developing awareness of the fundamental questions of life raised by human experiences, and of how religious teachings and philosophical ideas can relate to them. responding to such questions with reference to the teachings and practices of religions, and to their own understanding and experience; reflecting on their own thoughts, feelings, relationships, beliefs, values and experiences in the light of their study. Parents have the right to withdraw their children from religious education and collective worship if they wish. Please contact the Headteacher if you wish to exercise this right.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

SEX EDUCATION After much consideration and in view of the varying age range within each class, the Governors have decided not to introduce a programme of sex education. Questions and concerns about growing up are covered within the science curriculum.

Working in partnership with parents during a Parent and Governor Open Morning PARENTS AS PARTNERS Support and help from parents is an essential ingredient in a child’s education. The delivery of the planned curriculum involves parents helping/encouraging children at home with such things as reading, number work, consolidation of acquired skills, etc. It is our intention to maximise the use of all available facilities and resources including staff/parent expertise. We look for high levels of achievement in every area of the curriculum but in particular we wish all children to establish a firm grasp of the basics of reading, writing and number work. HOMEWORK We believe that work at home is an essential element in a child’s education and we will continue to seek parental support with regard to any homework set. Children from Reception through to Year Six will be expected to do homework which, will vary in type and quantity depending on age/ability. Reading, learning tables and spellings, completing worksheets in Maths and English, preparing project work, planning literacy activities, revising, etc. are the types of activity children will be required to do for homework.

Learning to sail with Bassenthwaite Sailing Club

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

KS1 children at the Ace Dance Festival in Carlisle

TEACHING METHODS Throughout your child’s schooling various teaching methods will be used such as the whole class approach, small group work and individual learning. Each has its place in a balanced and well developed curriculum. In any class of 20 to 28 children of a similar age there will be a range of abilities including those who need extra support generally, those to whom everything comes easily and those who struggle or excel in perhaps just one curriculum area. Grouping children mainly according to their levels of understanding allows the teacher to focus very closely on the next stage in their learning. Each group of children, no matter what their level, will be able to move forward at a pace which is appropriate for them. Groups will be operated in a variety of ways. A group of children will at times be engaged on a single task with each child performing a different but distinct element of that task, i.e. co-operative group work (team work) with the end product being something to which all group members have contributed. A scientific investigation will often be conducted in this manner. A teacher may introduce a new idea or concept to the whole group, give a thorough explanation and then instruct the children to work individually so that they can consolidate and extend their new understanding. The children, though grouped at a common level, work quite independently of each other. Maths and English will often be taught in this way. Class teaching still has an important part to play in a child’s education. Throughout the course of each week, various activities will be undertaken as a whole class including such things as P.E., story time, music/singing and certain elements of the core curriculum areas. The decision as to which approach to adopt for any given lesson will be determined by what is seen to be the most appropriate way to achieve the intended degree of learning. Issues and decisions regarding different teaching methods are addressed in the teacher’s detailed planning files.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Working together – Sharing and Celebrating work CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL OR PARTICULAR NEEDS The individual needs of all children will normally be catered for within the classroom situation by the class teacher. On occasions, however, some children may have a learning difficulty that requires extra support. This may be a learning difficulty in general or in one area of the curriculum, for example, Maths. When such a situation arises the teacher responsible for Special Needs throughout the school will advise and support the class teacher in providing a thorough programme of work, which will lead that child through his difficulties. Sometimes this may be a short-term measure and other times throughout the child’s school career. If we feel unable to adequately provide for a special needs child from within the school we can readily call upon the services of the Cumbria LEA Learning Support Services. For children with more complex learning difficulties there are clear Review and Statement procedures which enable the support services to assist with such things as extra staffing, resources, the preparation of specific work programmes, additional funding etc. Review meetings include a range of people concerned and involved with the development and education of a child with special educational needs. The meetings do, of course, include the parents/guardians. Such meetings will identify the needs of a child and recommendations will be made as to how best to provide for those Throughout your child’s education at Lorton School judgements will be made as to which approach will best meet his/her needs. We will regularly keep you informed of progress and will consult you from time to time if and when various types of extra support are being considered, such as the provision of speech therapy. Usually the teachers will identify when a child needs extra support but sometimes the parents may be the first to notice it or perhaps a child starting school for the first time is already receiving support. If you have any concerns, questions or information relating to your child and the need for additional support, it is vital for the child’s sake that there are good communications between home and school. Children are not always able to be wholly consistent in their performance at school. Just like adults they have their “off days”. The occasional “off day” can be the result

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of a late night, the excitement of their birthday, feeling unwell etc. and is perfectly understandable. Cause for concern occurs when the “off days” become regular features and can be an indicator that something more serious is troubling the child. If a situation arises that may cause a deterioration of your child’s performance such as the arrival of a new baby, the illness of a grandparent or separation of parents it is important that, at least to some degree, we are made aware of the problem. Any information given will be confidential and only those who need to know will be informed. Often the teachers can make some adjustments in the provision for a child, which will at least partially help support them during a period of personal difficulty. The governors consider that these principles have been followed and the policy successfully implemented in the past year. ASSESSMENT AND RECORDING The progress and performance of every child will be regularly assessed throughout his or her school career. The Foundation Stage Curriculum and the National curriculum require that children be assessed at certain stages of their schooling : At the end of the Foundation Stage against the EYFS At the end of Key Stage One using Teacher Assessment At the end of Key Stage 2 using Standard Assessment Tests (SATs). The majority of assessments will occur on a continuous basis from the moment the child starts school. The main aims of assessing and recording children’s work are as follows: To have an accurate picture of what each child can do; i.e. skills and concepts achieved and understood. This knowledge enables the teacher to carefully plan ahead and ensure all children are given appropriate and challenging work, which will continually move them forwards. To identify gaps in the children’s knowledge and understanding Accurate assessment can highlight areas of uncertainty and weakness thereby allowing the teacher to ensure that a child can be helped through his difficulties. To ensure there is progression and continuity in learning as children pass through the school When children change classes their new teacher can be accurately informed of their levels of understanding so that each child will continue from the point at which their previous teacher left them. To be able to accurately inform parents of their child’s progress.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Parents’ Evenings will normally be held twice a year in October and May To inform secondary schools of the levels of achievement of the children they are to receive. Both formal and informal methods of assessment are undertaken at (school name) School. Informal assessment occurs on a daily basis when the teachers are working closely with the children. Often the teacher will keep personal notes about each child as an aide-memoire but such notes will not form part of our official record keeping system. Formal assessment involves testing and teacher assessment, the results of which are recorded and held centrally. There is an individual file for each child in the school. Testing and teacher assessment occurs throughout all areas of the curriculum but with an emphasis on the National Curriculum Core Subjects, namely Mathematics, English and Science. Updating of the records is an on-going process so that they reflect the progress being made and provide us with the information we require.

Year 3/4 children on their overnight trip to Skiddaw House

CHILDREN’S RECORDS The children’s records contain a variety of information, mostly relating to their progress at school and are held centrally in individual files. Some information is also stored on the computer but this consists of information supplied by parents on the pupil record form. The records consist of: General information such as address, emergency telephone numbers, medical information as supplied by parents. A pupil tracking sheet summarising results and targets. Attendance records. Personal Reading record books. Special Needs information and target sheets if applicable. Annual reports. Any additional information as decided by individual teachers which may include such things as informal notes on the children’s progress.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Children’s exercise books will form an on-going record of work for all areas of the curriculum.

Racing home-designed boats, on our annual KS2 Buttermere field trip.

NATIONAL CURRICULUM TESTS (SATS) The results of the National Curriculum Tests, which are more commonly known as SATs, are reported to parents at the end of each Key Stage. (Year 2 and Year 6) Each child’s results are reported in the form of the level achieved for every test taken. All Year 2 and Year 6 children in England and Wales have to undergo the tests and, in our experience, the levels achieved are generally an accurate reflection of what the children know and of what they can do. They are national standards by which you can judge your child’s progress and the results can be interpreted in the following way : A typical 7 year old child is expected to achieve level 2 A typical 11 year old is expected to achieve level 4 Level 2 for Year 2 children is however, a very broad level and so for some level 2 results an additional “Accuracy Grade” has been given to indicate their standard within that level. They only apply to level 2 in Reading, Writing and Number. Accuracy Grades do not apply to any levels other than level 2 as they are not so broad. Level 2A is the highest of the accuracy grades followed by 2B and then 2C. W means the child is “working towards” (and has not yet achieved) Level 1. In exceptional circumstances, a child may be “disapplied” from studying the curriculum and taking the tests, depending on the severity of their learning difficulties. The most recent results in the National Curriculum Statutory Tests for the children at Lorton School are shown at the end of this section.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

KEY STAGE 1

Key stage 1 school and national level data (number of eligible pupils – 13) This table shows the percentage of eligible children at Lorton School achieving each level, compared to national end of key stage 1 teacher assessment levels. The shaded sections of the table represent 2008 national teacher assessment data for core subjects.Figures may not total 100 per cent because of rounding. Results of teacher assessment 2009 Percentage at each level W Speaking and listening Speaking and listening

2

1

2

15

38

46

11

65

21

Reading Reading

3

Writing Writing

5

2

2

2A

3 or above

Disapplied children

Absent children

0

0

23

15

54

13

13

22

24

25

0

0

15

15

23

46

15

22

27

19

12

0

0

7

15

46

30

16

25

27

21

0

0

0

0

8

Science Science

2B

7

Mathematics Mathematics

2C

9

77

23

67

22

'W' represents children who are working towards level 1, but have not yet achieved the standards needed for level 1.

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Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

KEY STAGE 2

Key stage 2 school and national level data (number of eligble pupils – 7) These tables show the percentage of year 6 pupils at Lorton School achieving each level, compared to national end of key stage 2 teacher assessment levels and test results. The shaded sections of the tables represent 2008 national teacher assessment and test result data. Figures may not total 100 per cent because of rounding. Teacher assessment Percentage at each level W

1

2

3

4

5

6

Pupils disapplied

English

0

0

0

0

14

70

0

(14%)

English

0

1

4

16

49

30

0

0

Mathematics

0

0

0

0

42

42

Mathematics

0

1

4

16

46

33

0

0

Science

0

0

0

0

14

70

0

(14%)

Science

0

0

2

12

47

38

0

0

Pupils absent

0

(14%) 0

0

Test results Percentage at each level Below level 3*

3

4

5

Pupils not # entered

Pupils absent

English

0

0

28

56

(14%)

0

English

6

13

51

30

0

1

Reading

0

0

28

56

(14%)

0

Reading

6

6

38

49

0

1

Writing

0

0

14

70

(14%)

0

Writing

6

26

48

20

0

1

Mathematics

0

0

56

28

(14%)

0

Mathematics

5

15

47

31

0

1

Science

0

0

14

70

(14%)

0

Science

2

8

44

44

0

1

'W' *

#

represents pupils who are working towards level 1, but have not yet achieved the standards needed for level 1. represents pupils who were not entered for the tests because they were working below level 3 in English, mathematics or science; pupils awarded a compensatory level from the tests and pupils entered for but not achieving a level from the tests. pupils working at the levels of the tests, but unable to access them.

25


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELL-BEING: The health safety and well-being of all the children in our care is of the utmost importance. To this end we have in place a range of policies, systems and procedures which all members of the teaching and non-teaching staff follow. They cover such things as lunchtime supervision, evacuation in the event of an emergency, medical care, out of school activities, the use of safety equipment, bullying and so on. We also have in place for the children a Home/School Agreement, which is given below :

Parents/Guardians undertake to : “see that my child goes to school regularly and on time make the school aware of any problems or concerns that might affect my child’s work or behaviour support the school in maintaining good standards of behaviour support my child when doing homework take an interest in my child’s education.” The School undertakes to : “care for your child’s safety and happiness ensure that your child is a valued member of the school community provide a balanced curriculum achieve high standards of work and behaviour through building good relationships and developing a sense of responsibility keep you informed about general school, matters and about your child’s progress be welcoming and approachable” the child undertakes to : “attend school regularly and on time bring all the equipment I need every day do all my class work and homework as well as I can be polite and helpful to others keep the school tidy”

Year 5/6 celebrating their Ancient Greek Day

26


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

SCHOOL DISCIPLINE Whilst your child is at school, we, as teachers, are taking your place as parents and as such we should act as a responsible parent where care or punishment are concerned. Each child is encouraged to be self-disciplined and to respect and consider others. Communication with parents would always be a first step where a problem arose and the best way forward planned as a consistent home/school approach. Lorton School prides itself on the high standard of behaviour of its pupils and their respect for others.

Children in KS1 enjoying making bread

MEDICAL INFORMATION The school nurse carries out a health assessment when your child is in the first year of school. It is an informal discussion about your child’s health; at the same time your child will be weighed and measured and have their sight and hearing tested. If you are concerned about your child’s hearing the school nurse can arrange for a test to be carried out. The same applies to eye tests, though these are carried out in school routinely at the age of seven and ten years. If your child requires any type of medication while in school you must request a form from the school office. Although every attempt will be made to comply with requests, staff must be happy with arrangements and agree to administer medication – decisions will be made on an individual basis. All medicines will be kept safely in the staff room. Inhalers will be kept safely but available at any time throughout the school day. 27


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

ABSENCES The following is an extract from a letter from Moira Swann, Corporate Director, Children’s Services: September 2009 Dear Parent There is continuing concern about the amount of time lost by pupils due to family holidays in term time and the disruption it causes to their education. In addition, there is a general misunderstanding of the law in relation to the absence of pupils from school whilst on holiday in term time. Whenever possible, absence from school should be avoided as it can have a serious effect on a child’s educational progress, and can create difficulties for them on their return to school, particularly if they are joining a new school or class. If, however after serious consideration of this you propose to take your child away from school, only the Headteacher can authorise the absence. Parents cannot authorise the absence themselves. Whenever possible therefore, family holidays should be arranged during school holidays. Schools do have discretion to grant up to 10 days leave during term time, but before doing so will consider your child’s situation carefully. In considering a request, the school will take into account the child’s age, the time of year of the holiday, the nature of the visit and parental wishes. The Headteacher will also consider the child’s stage of education and progress and the child’s overall attendance record. Headteachers will not authorise absence if they believe that your request is unreasonable and you must ensure that your request is made to the school at least two weeks before the start of the holiday. Only in exceptional circumstances can a Headteacher grant leave of more than 10 days in term time. In all cases it is best have a discussion with the Headteacher in order to look at the issues as they affect your child. Where a family holiday during term time is agreed to be unavoidable, it is vital that it does not coincide with examinations or other important tests that your child has to take. Headteachers are advised not to authorise absence for holidays where the pupil will miss a public examination. I trust that you will make every effort to co-operate in this matter in partnership with your child’s school and the Education Service.

Holiday Request forms are available from the school office. All absences, both authorised and unauthorised will be recorded and reported to parents in July of each year. The Attendance Summary Report for Lorton School for the year 2008/9 is as follows: Average attendance 95% Authorised absence rate 4.97% Unauthorised absence rate 0.02% Number of pupils of compulsory school age on roll 2008/9 : 67 In the event of absence from school, parents should contact the school office as soon as possible giving the reason for absence and an approximate estimation of how long the absence is likely to last. This can be done by telephone, fax, e-mail or by sending in a note to school. When your child has had a stomach upset and sickness it is important that you allow a period of at least 24 hours to elapse after the sickness has finished before sending him/her back to school. Such action will help to prevent the infection spreading unnecessarily to others in the school.

28


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

A Cosmic Chemistry display

THE SCHOOL DAY TIMES Morning

8.50 am to 12.00 noon.

Afternoon

1.00 pm to 3.05 pm

Please do not send children to school before 8.30 am. On wet days, children will be supervised in their classrooms until the bell rings at 8.50 am. LATE ARRIVALS The late arrival of children to school causes unnecessary disruption to the classes and creates difficulties with regard to registration, dinner and milk numbers, etc. The school bell rings at 8.50 am and children should be in the playground a few minutes before that time. Please note that children arriving late will be given a “late mark” and parents will be informed if the frequency of “late marks” is too high. Late arrivals due to medical appointments are perfectly understandable but it would help if you could let the school know in advance if at all possible

CHANGE OF CIRCUMSTANCES Should your address or emergency contact numbers change or pick-up procedures differ from usual, please inform the school so that our records can be updated. It is important to maintain accurate information on every child. If you think our records might be out of date please contact the office for a new form.

29


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

OFFICE HOURS The school office will normally be attended by our school administrative staff at the following times: Monday: 1.00pm – 3.30pm Tuesday: 8.30am – 11.00am and 3.00pm – 3.30pm Wednesday: 8.30am – 3.30pm Thursday: 2.30pm – 3.30pm Friday: 2.00pm – 3.30pm

The best times to ring the school if you wish to speak to the Headteacher or a member of teaching staff are : 8.30am to 8.50am ;

12 noon to 1pm;

3.15 pm to 4.30pm

The Headteacher will also hold one morning “surgery” per term – dates are notified in the Newsletter.

Robin Hood – from our Summer Production of „Hoodwinked‟.

PARKING Please observe all the road markings and car park markings to help ease congestion and make the area outside school safer for everyone, especially young children. In particular please do not park on the zig-zag lines or in the staff car park.

30


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Please be aware that the road narrows near the tennis courts and is therefore unsuitable for parking, as this causes an obstruction for the service bus.

MILK Children in Reception receive a free glass of milk at morning break. There is a chilled water dispenser in the entrance hall, in addition to the water fountain. Children can refill their own water containers from this, and take them into the classroom. FRUIT All children receive free fruit at morning playtime. SCHOOL MEALS Children may stay for a school meal, bring a packed lunch or go home for lunch. At present about 70% of children have a school meal and about 30% bring a packed lunch. None go home for lunch. Hot meals are prepared on the premises from fresh ingredients by Helen Aubert-Milburn, our fully qualified chef. The cost of a school meal is currently £1.80 per day. Meals may be paid for by cash or cheque. We request payment half termly or termly in advance. Cheques should be made payable to Cumbria County Council. Please enclose payment in a sealed envelope clearly marked with your child’s name and class and “Dinner Money” . Children on packed lunches should have a proper lunch container, which is clearly marked with their name. Please note that hot drinks and glass bottles are not permitted. If your child has a school dinner and payment has been made for a week during which an absence occurs, a credit for any missed dinners will be recorded on the school meals’ register. Depending on family circumstances, children may be eligible for free school meals. It is important that any children entitled to free school meals claim them, as this affects the school’s level of funding. If you think you may be entitled to free school meals for your children, please contact the Deputy Headteacher, in confidence. SCHOOL CLOTHING There is no official school uniform. The school does have a sweatshirt which can be obtained from the office. Your child’s day will be active and varied so clothes suitable for these kinds of activities would be appreciated. For infant children, simple, easyto-change clothes are best. The junior children will need trainers, shorts and a tee shirt for PE/Games. It would be very useful if any clothing likely to be removed during the day could be named.

31


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

JEWELLERY, MAKE-UP ETC Jewellery and make up (including nail varnish) should not be worn in school. Earrings are not allowed, nor are studs. This is on safety grounds. Children may wear an ordinary watch when they are able to tell the time but responsibility for its safe keeping belongs to them, and the school will not be held responsible for any losses. SPORTING ACTIVITIES The children will be able to participate in various sporting activities during their school life. Some of these will be part of the normal curriculum whilst others will be after school or lunchtime activities such as football, netball, tennis etc. School teams play in school t-shirts and sweatshirts, which can be bought, either new or second hand from the school. Items such as shorts, boots and socks are also available second-hand.

Getting ready to begin the Annual Fell Race ADDITIONAL SUBJECTS Children in Key Stage Two are given the opportunity to learn to play the recorder. Penny Whistle is also offered to small groups at no charge. Instrumental lessons take place during the normal school day. CLUBS We have introduced a number of after school activities for all ages of children. Last year they included: First Aid, Art & Craft, Drama, African Drumming, Ju-jitsu, Ball Skills and Film Club. An After-School Club offers child care Mon-Fri, 3.05pm – 5.00pm.

32


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Ju-Jitsu – an after school club

SWIMMING

The older children attend Cockermouth Sports Centre once per week for a swimming lesson. Years 5 & 6 go in the Autumn term and Years 3 & 4 in the Spring. The lesson is taken by a qualified swimming instructor and the Sports Centre provides a life guard. Towards the end of each term the children’s abilities are assessed and appropriate certificates awarded.

TERM DATES 2010/11

AUTUMN TERM 2010 STARTS – Monday 6 September ENDS – Friday 17 December HALF – TERM HOLIDAY Monday 25 October – Friday 29th October SPRING TERM 2011 STARTS - Wednesday 5th January ENDS – Friday 8th April HALF – TERM HOLIDAY Monday 21 February – Friday 25th February SUMMER TERM 2011 Bank Holiday - Monday 2 May STARTS – Monday 27th April ENDS – Friday 22nd July HALF – TERM HOLIDAY Monday 30 May – Friday 3rd June

33


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

Children in the playground using equipment from the “Huff and Puff” Scheme. A scheme they manage themselves.

Working with Sellafield Ambassadors and the local community during Science Week, 2009 Links with the Local Community The school hosts a parent/carer and toddler group on Tuesday mornings. This is held in the pavilion, a building shared with the Lorton Tennis Club. We hold an annual carol service in one of the churches that serve the five parishes of our catchment area.

34


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

The school is fortunate to be situated in such an outstanding area of natural beauty, and we try to make as much use as we can of our environment. We have worked closely with the Education Department of the National Trust. We have welcomed into the school visitors able to talk about their first hand experiences of life in the Second World War, and have formed links with the local History Society, creating a large-scale artwork to accompany their celebration of the Lorton Yew Tree. The overnight residential visit to Buttermere Youth Hostel gives an opportunity to study the locality in a more intensive way, and strengthens relationships between children and their peers and between children and staff. The urban experience is not excluded: every other year children in Year 5 & 6 have the opportunity of a week’s residential visit based in Newcastle upon Tyne.

KS1 Art and Craft After School Club

LINKS WITH COCKERMOUTH SCHOOL The majority of our children go on to Cockermouth School, a mixed comprehensive with approximately 1,200 pupils. Throughout the year we work closely with Cockermouth School to ensure the transfer is enjoyable and runs as smoothly as possible. The First Year tutor visits the Year Six children to talk to them about their new school. They then spend two days in the summer term with other new starters. Following this visit parents are invited to visit the school to meet the staff and look around. There are also Gifted and Talented links with Cockermouth School.

35


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

EDUCATIONAL VISITS

Our Bi-ennial Outdoor Pursuits week in Southern Scotland As children learn best from first hand experience we like to take them on educational visits as much as possible. Some of the visits made include : Newcastle-upon-Tyne (Years 5 & 6 Residential) Whinlatter Visitor Centre (Key Stage 1) Buttermere Youth Hostel (Year 3 to 6 Residential) Maryport Aquarium Wordsworth House The Upfront Puppet Theatre. Outdoor Adventure course at Barcaple, Dumfries & Galloway. ( Residential Years 5&6) We also welcome visitors into school . These have included: Jessie Binnns, National Trust Education Officer “Birds of Prey” demonstration Storytellers & Musicians during Cockermouth Festival Cliff Ismay, to talk about The Titanic Ian McNicol, historical interpreter African drummer Phil & Maggie ( N.I.S.C.U)

36


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

SCHOOL POLICY ON CHARGING 1. The admission of a child to Lorton School and the formal Curriculum offered to a registered pupil is not subject to charge or the parent’s willingness to make a voluntary contribution. 2. The Governors wish to see the curriculum enriched as far as possible for the benefit of all pupils. They recognise that whatever public funds are made available they will never be sufficient to fund all desirable activities at the required level. They therefore reserve the right to : (a) Charge parents for activities offered as an optional extra wholly or mainly outside school hours. (b) Reclaim from parents the cost of wilful breakages and damages. (c) Draw the attention of parents to activities organised by a third party, thereby giving parents the opportunity to request leave of absence for their children during the school day to join those activities. In those circumstances, charges may well be levied by the third party. (d) Seek voluntary contributions from parents to fund activities either within or outside school hours and to provide incidentals , e.g. books and equipment INSURANCE The school has insurance for visits outside school under the HSBC scheme. There is also limited insurance for children while on school premises. Some parents wrongly assume that if a child is injured at school, the County Council is held to be responsible regardless of the circumstances and its insurance will automatically cover. This is not so – The County Council’s responsibility is strictly limited to cases where there is negligence by them or their staff. Accidents can happen in school, on the sports field or during school visits, when the County Council or its staff are in no way at fault and therefore, not responsible. The provision of personal accident insurance is considered to be the responsibility of the parents. Parents who are interested in this form of insurance can contact their local insurance broker, but there are various private insurance schemes available, including one offered by Blackfriars Insurance which is recommended by Cumbria County Council, details of which are available in the school office. FORMAL COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE If you become concerned in any way about your child’s education, it is important that you tell us about this. As a first step you should discuss your concerns with your child’s teacher. If you are still concerned after talking with the teacher, you should arrange to meet with the Deputy Headteacher. Obviously, as a staff we will do all we

37


Lorton School Brochure 2010 – 2011

can to resolve your concerns and to ensure you are happy with your child’s education. There may be some occasions when parents wish to complain about matters relating to the curriculum and collective worship which are the responsibility of the governing body and/ or the Local Education Authority. Special formal arrangements exist for dealing with complaints of this kind. Copies of a leaflet which outlines these arrangements are available from the school, as are copies of the full arrangements themselves. Advice on how to pursue a formal complaint is also available from Schools Section, Education Department, 5 Portland Square, CARLISLE CA1 1PU (Tel : Carlisle 606060 ext 2530) DISCLAIMER The information supplied in this document is in accordance with information at present available to the governors and is believed to be correct as at the date of printing (October 2006) but its accuracy is not guaranteed. In particular, nothing herein prejudices the right of the School to make any decision relating to the school as it sees fit, without regard to whether this will affect the accuracy of any matters contained in this publication. Further, neither the governors nor the Education Authority nor the school nor any members of staff of the Authority or school is deemed responsible for any erroneous information contained in this document.

Lunch time on Fleetwith Pike during a study on footpath erosion

38


Lorton School Prospectus 2007/08

FINANCIAL STATEMENT EXPENDITURE 2008/09 EMPLOYEES PREMISES SUPPLIES AND SERVICES INCOME

£206,246 £19,656 £32,959 - £26,513 £232,348

BUDGET AVAILABLE

£243,566

BUDGET DEFICIT from 07/08

-£693

BALANCE CARRIED FORWARD

£10,535

The Farne Islands Year 5/6 children on their biennial residential to Newcastle

39


Lorton School Prospectus 2007/08

EXTRACTS FROM LORTON SCHOOL’S MOST RECENT OFSTED INSPECTION: SEPTEMBER 2007 ‘Lorton is a good school. Within a family atmosphere it provides a good academic education and high quality pastoral care. The school’s ethos is valued highly by parents and enjoyed by pupils. All pupils make good progress in their learning and their personal development is outstanding. The staff work together well. They are committed to doing the best for pupils and maintaining the school’s ethos. They, with the Governors, have the capacity to improve the school further.’ The school‟s main strengths are: Children get a good start in the Reception (Foundation Stage). They settle in quickly and, by the end of the year, many reach standards that exceed the national expectation for children of their age. The teaching is good. All groups of pupils achieve well overall. Those who have particular difficulty learning get the extra help they need and the more able are pushed on in their learning. Personal development and well-being are outstanding. In the schools very caring atmosphere, where each is treated as a valued individual member of the school community, pupils make good progress in their personal development. Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is outstanding, particularly so in the social and moral aspects. From their earliest days at school, pupils learn independence and responsibility and contribute to the life of the school as a community. Pupils enjoy school greatly. They say it is unique and brilliant and they appreciate what the staff do for them, especially the support they get if they find any learning difficult. Throughout the school teaching is good and the staff clearly enjoy their work. They have extremely good relationships with their pupils and create a positive atmosphere for learning. Consequently pupils are confident to ask for help when they need it. Pastoral care is excellent and as a result, pupils feel safe at school and supported by the staff. Pupils are quite definite that there is no bullying at their school. “The pupils are delightful, friendly and courteous. Parents are unequivocal in rating their behaviour very highly and inspection findings agree with them. At playtimes, pupils are actively encouraged to socialise and play co-operatively. They have much at their disposal, including a quiet area with seating, space for impromptu football and tennis, skipping and an amazing, much-loved adventure playground which parents funded. There is something for everyone, with suitable challenges for those who prefer to be more energetic. This provision significantly helps pupils to achieve their firstrate behaviour and relationships. Older pupils are very good at looking after and befriending younger ones.”

40


Lorton School Prospectus 2007/08

PARENT AND PUPIL COMMENTS These comments are taken from our most recent Parent/Carer survey.

"(Lorton) provides a safe, friendly, family orientated environment where children are treated as individuals."

"I admire the clever way teachers interact with the children and get to know the individuals' strengths and weaknesses."

"We have been really happy with the way in which our child settled into school. He seems to be learning fast and gaining in confidence."

"It's so important to do things as a family - Lorton School does this very well."

"I don't think I would change anything."

"I like the way the school turns boring lessons into fun lessons!"

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: A summary, or full Ofsted Report, is available from the school or can be accessed by following the links on www.ofsted.gov.uk The School Profile – which replaces the Annual Governor’s Report to Parents - is also available on line by entering Lorton into the search at http://schoolprofile.parentscentre.gov.uk .

41


Lorton School Prospectus 2007/08

42

School Prospectus 2010/11  

Current Lorton School Prospectus

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