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l e a d e r p o st.co m /Q C | A LEADER - POST P u b l i cat i o n

City News:

The Queen City’s never-ending battle with shifting ground P. 26

Sharp eats:

An etiquette critique on texting at the dinner table P.36

Book Club:

A discussion about fate and Laura Schroff’s Invisible Thread P. 38

For THE record In business and health, going against the grain is vintage pat baumet. p.5

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FASHION #

Have you been fall clothing shopping? We want to see your outfit! Email QC@leaderpost.com

S A S K AT C H E WA N S T Y L E

Alex Shalashniy:

Ian Chang: Fashion

The laws of colour

is 100% important

By Ashley Martin Even though he’s a lawyer, Alex Shalashniy isn’t immune to colour. The 26-year-old recognizes that legal eagles gravitate to conservative hues, but says colour “can really make a wardrobe pop.” Though by day he works at Kanuka Thuringer LLP, Shalashniy moonlights as a fashion columnist for Mind This, a web magazine for young professionals. He’s given a lot of thought to the fashion of world leaders, citing BBC announcer Komla Dumor as one of the best-dressed. Shalashniy, who defines his look as “GQ meets The Economist,” says there’s more to style than mad spending. “You can go to a high-end store, spend thousands of dollars and come out looking like a mannequin or like something in a magazine. The true fun in shopping and fashion in this world is looking great and not breaking the bank.” 1.

2.

JACK ET: The Bay. “You can dress it up; you can dress it down. It’s very versatile.”

By Jeanette Stewart

1.

2.

3. 4.

Shirt: Gift from a store owner in Regina. “It looks like it came off my grandma’s couch fabric, but it’s Hugo Boss.” 5.

7. 6.

POC K ET SQUARE : Zara. “I have a shoebox full of pocket squares. Probably about 60. I’ve been collecting them for over five years. I’ve even made a few myself.”

WATCH: Skagen, bought online.

7.

PANTS: Winners.

8.

S HOES: Vintage from Value Village.

2.

Pants: J. Lindeberg, Ultimo Euromoda. “Ultimo has good fitted jeans,” he said. “I needed something that was fitted for a runway show. I didn’t own any tight fitted pants so I had to buy them specifically for that.”

4.

6.

Belt: J. Lindeberg, Ultimo Euromoda. “It goes right along with the pants.” 2.

3.

3. TIE : Banana Republic.

CU FF LINKS a nd TIE - CLI P : Le Chateau.

1.

1.

S HIRT: The Bay.

5.

Ian Chang is a dentistry student at the University of Saskatchewan and a part-time model. He’s interested in fashion, and says style has a “10 out of 10” importance to him. “It reflects how you hold yourself, and I think it’s a reflection on your self-esteem and how you want to be perceived by others who surround you,” he said.

Shoes: Aldo. “These shoes I got in Calgary at the Chinook mall and I think they’re from Aldo. I had an outfit in mind and I wanted to have the outfit put together by the end of the day and I ran around the mall for about four hours until I had the perfect (look) together. Plus I hate tying shoelaces so slip-ons are just perfect.” 4.

Watch: Tag-heuer, Roset by Reid. “I didn’t like watches at first. My first watch I got was at Grade 8 grad from my parents. I wore it out of pure respect because they bought it for me. After a couple years it just grew on me. I figured if there’s one way to be different besides dressing differently, why not have a watch on?” 5.

8.

QC PHOTO BY DoN healy

3. 5.

4.

QC photo by Andrew Spearin

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INDEX #

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Sp a c e s p g . 9

On the cover Pg. 5

Pat Baumet, owner of Vintage Vinyl, inside his store. QC Photo by Troy Fleece

#

ta b l e o f c o n t e n t s

FASHION — 2 Lawyer looking good in colour INVENTORY — 4 COVER — 5 Pat Baumet on business, cancer and marijuana SPACES — 9 Fran Zerr’s unique potted vegetable garden READ MY BOOK — 11 IN THE CITY — 12 Totem pole central to parties in Wascana Park

PARENT TO PARENT — 16 Thoughtful insights on school uniforms

OUTSIDE THE LINES — 32 Stephanie McKay’s drawings inspire children of all ages

WINE WORLD — 25 Falernia made for foodies on a budget

CROSSWORD AND SUDOKU — 33

CITY NEWS — 26 WHAT MOVES YOU — 28 Chelsey Wilson has a need for speed EVENTS — 30 Between BreakOut West and Culture Days, you won’t be bored this weekend

ON THE SCENE — 34 SHARP EATS — 36 Keep your smartphones off the table HOROSCOPE — 37 BOOK CLUB — 38 Ashley Martin and Jenn Sharp discuss An Invisible Thread

Fran Zerr’s backyard garden demonstrates the wide variety of plants and vegetables that can be grown in pots. QC Photo by Troy Fleece QC is published by the Leader-Post – a division of Postmedia Network Inc. – at 1964 Park St., Regina, Sask., S4N 3G4. Marty Klyne is publisher. Rob McLaughlin is deputy publisher/editor-in-chief. For advertising inquiries contact 781-5221; editorial, 1-855-688-6557; home delivery, 781-5212. Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, noncommercial purposes. All other rights are reserved and commercial use is prohibited. To make any use of this material you must first obtain the permission of the owner of the copyright. For more information, contact the editor at 1-855-688-6557.

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INVENTORY #

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5.

4: B EST OF BOT H WOR L DS : Fender acoustic-electric 12-string guitar. CJ Series. $499. 5: COOL FO R SC H OO L : Trumpet made of yellow brass. XTR 2330. $771. QC PHOTOS BY BRYAN SCHLOSSER

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on the cover

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Marijuana should be legal anyway. – Pat Baumet

Pat Baumet, owner of Vintage Vinyl, stands in his legal marijuana grow operation. The facility, which houses four dozen plants, is in a secret location. QC Photo by Troy Fleece

#

Pat B a u m e t

Business branching out for entrepreneur By Andrew Matte Nobody likes the “ladies” quite like Regina’s Pat Baumet. “They’re about ready to harvest,” Baumet said during a tour of the secret facility where four dozen marijuana plants bask under

bright, hot lights. “It’s a great smell, isn’t it?” The ladies stand shoulder high. They take about six months to grow from seed to a vast, leafy crop for patients with permission to use marijuana for medical reasons. Baumet, one of nearly 4,000 Canadians al-

lowed to operate a grow-op, is also a customer. “I smoke all day long. And it doesn’t affect me.” A marijuana theme has run through much of Baumet’s life — it got him into serious trouble with the law in his 20s. But his experi-

ence in the illegal drug trade helped him launch one of the city’s most successful retail stores. Today, at 52, he credits the calming effects of smoking marijuana for helping him through several operations and treatments for his cancer. His affinity for the plant and experience as

an entrepreneur help him in his side business of providing marijuana to the federal government. The government that sent him to jail for drugs is now a customer. “Marijuana should be legal anyway,” he said. Continued on Page 6

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I was shocked. At that price, I was like, ‘I’ll take two.’ I paid more for my car (than for the surgeries). – Pat Baumet

***** Baumet couldn’t have known it at the time, but a visit to a downtown Regina record shop in the late 1980s helped shape the rest of his life. He saw a customer sell an armful of records for a few dollars. As a lover of rock music and a serious record collector, Baumet knew what sort of profit the store was making. “It gave me a glimpse of the possibilities,” he said. At a time when music fans were replacing their collections of records with CDs, Baumet did a little advertising and bought as many records as he could find. He was hoarding them in hopes they’d someday become valuable again. He made a little money selling them to Regina vinyl collectors. “My wife didn’t like how people were coming into the house all the time. So she said, ‘Why don’t you open up a little store someplace?’” The timing was perfect. He had an infant daughter, no job, and was seeking a way to earn a living. The Regina entrepreneur is usually guarded about his past. After serving five years in jail, he took stock of his skills and interests and applied what he learned on the street to his passion for music and vinyl records. “I knew a lot about how to sell and how that side of the business worked,” Baumet said. “I had a hard time getting a job back then. So I thought to myself, ‘I’d better get something going here. But what am I good at in life?’” On Sept. 24, 1991, Vintage Vinyl opened its doors at 2425 11th Ave. “The CD, to me, was always a poor imitation of the record. So as crazy as it sounded back then, I decided to open a record store,” said Baumet. “My top price at the time was 10 cents. I never paid more than a dime. But I was getting huge Beatles collections, Pink Floyd collections, Stones collections. “On the day we opened, I made $81. And it was great. But I suppose I’d cry if I made $81 in one day today,” he said. “In the early days, I wasn’t making a lot of money. But I was keeping the doors open. I had about a dozen loyal customers who would come in

Pat Baumet opened Vintage VInyl in 1991. The record store has become a profitable business and has expanded to a second location in Moose Jaw. QC Photo by Troy Fleece

every day at noon.” The early years were lean. But by the mid-1990s, he expanded into the shop next door with music-related clothing and accessories. Business boomed. “I was absolutely floored. If I could double my floor space and double my

sales, then I figured, hey, I could just keep doing this.” Over the years, the store has expanded several times and now includes several lines of clothing and music-themed souvenirs in addition to drug paraphernalia like bongs and pipes.

He began selling accessories used by dope smokers in the 1990s when there was a federal law forbidding it. However, while other shops were the subject of police raids, Baumet and his shop where never approached by police, he said. Some years ago, Baumet bought

the building. He also owns a threestorey brick building at on 11th Avenue which he uses for living space and office space for his small import business, Vintage Wholesale. His business interests also include a Vintage Vinyl outlet in Moose Jaw.

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I was, like, ‘do whatever you need to do.’ I had nothing to lose. – Pat Baumet

*****

Pat Baumet with some of the paraphernalia available at Vintage Vinyl. QC Photo by Troy Fleece

In January of 2011, Pat Baumet left for Bangkok with his daughter Janelle to set up a deal with a clothing manufacturer. It was part business, part holiday and part succession plan: Baumet was gravely ill and had been given four months to live. He wanted to show Janelle how his business worked. Baumet was battling colon and lung cancer, and there were cancerous lesions on his spine. For four years, he’d gone through operations and long sessions of radiation and chemotherapy at the Pasqua Hospital’s Allan Blair Cancer Centre. “They told me there wasn’t anything more I could do,” Baumet said. His health got worse on the long flight to Thailand. Baumet went to the hospital for what he believed was a digestive problem. The doctors evaluated his cancer and proposed radical surgeries. “I was, like, ‘do whatever you need to do.’ I had nothing to lose.” He underwent four operations over five days and ended up staying nearly three months. Surgeons removed a portion of Baumet’s spine to get at the cancerous lesions. The operation included the temporary severing of his nervous system, he said. They also removed a portion of a lung and about two feet of his bowel. He uses a colostomy bag and has a large hole in his back where surgeons accessed his spine. He visits a Regina clinic every three days to have the wound “repacked” and the dressing changed. Despite the horrors of the ordeal, Baumet is stunned he’s managed to live 14 months longer than he was given. He’s critical of the treatment he received in Saskatchewan and argues the Canadian health-care system doesn’t necessarily provide Canadians with the best care available. “We think we’re a first-world country. But in many ways, we’re a thirdworld country. Our medical system is far behind what they’re doing over there.” Baumet was also stunned when he got his $38,000 medical bill. He believes it would have been more than half a million dollars in North America. Continued on Page 8

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He’s come from a middle-class background to become one of the most successful business owners in Regina.” — Collin Middleton

“I was shocked. At that price, I was like, ‘I’ll take two.’ I paid more for my car.” Collin Middleton, a Vintage Vinyl manager, wasn’t sure he would see his boss again when Baumet left for Bangkok. “It was very emotional for me. (Before he left) his skin was grey. He was sick. And he was thin,” said Middleton, 36. “When he came down the escalator (at the airport), it was emotional again. He was tanned and he looked great. He looked 10 years younger. It was crazy.” Middleton said Baumet’s story is inspiring even without the health concerns. “He’s come from a middle-class background to become one of the most successful business owners in Regina. He has become an uncle to me. I go to him for advice and I try to be a good, loyal employee to him.” Today, Baumet is happy to leave day-to-day business to others, including his daughter and son Dylan. However, he still describes himself as a workaholic. “Ever since my cancer, my staff has gone out of their way to protect me. I don’t like to deal with a lot of people like I used to. I have backed off things in the last few years. I haven’t been around like I used to.” But he’s always eager to talk up the benefits of smoking pot. “Marijuana is a very common thing. People who don’t live in that world don’t realize it,” he said. “I still lead a stressful life. And I find smoking marijuana very relaxing. But if it were drinking, or doing cocaine or doing heroin or whatever else people out there do, I wouldn’t be able to function.”

Pat Baumet describes himself as a workaholic. QC Photo by Troy Fleece

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SPACES #

S a s k at c h e wa n ’ S B E S T S PA C E S

Is your house the spookiest place on the block? Would ghosts and goblins be right at home in your living room? If you like to decorate for Halloween, email QC@leaderpost.com

Garden has more variety than a grocery store By Ashley Martin WHO ? Fran Zerr WHAT? The vegetable garden in her east Regina back yard WHE N? Zerr has lived in this house for 25 years. She used to garden at the lake, but wanted a garden at home so she started planting in beds and containers. WHY? “I heard it grows better (in pots), but for me it was a lot less crawling around on the ground. It’s easier, it’s neater and I just think it looks nice,” Zerr explained. “I’m most proud of the watermelons; I couldn’t believe they could grow in a pot ... It’s actually kind of amazing what you can grow in a pot.” H OW ? This year, Zerr planted about 24 different fruits and vegetables in her yard, including cantaloupe, squash, squash, peppers, bok choy, beans, horseradish, strawberries, fennel, garlic, potatoes and sunflowers (treats for the blue jays). Zerr has many varieties of tomatoes, including cherry tomatoes she calls

“candy” — they are jaw-clenchingly sweet. There’s nothing Zerr won’t try to grow. She has sweet potatoes in a barrel and a fragrant lemon tree that she started from seed. Along the fence there are flowers — it’s too shaded to grow vegetables there — and a cherry tree that produced only one cherry this year. A bush of Concord grapes, sweetened by the cold weather, are destined to become jam. Her yard is perfect for a garden: It gets full sun until the end of the day and feels degrees hotter than the actual temperature. Aside from the plants, the yard is sparsely decorated. Zerr has some birdfeeders and knick-knacks, but her most cherished decorations are some ceramic flowers sculpted by her sister, and some large wagon wheels that came from her mother’s garden. Zerr spends at least three hours a day outside, weeding and watering, and now is the time to taste the fruits of her labour. She cans beets but otherwise freezes the vegetables, and gives away bags of tomatoes. Slicing a piece of Armenian cucumber, the crunchiest cucumber she’s ever had, Zerr says this is why she plants a garden. “It totally relaxes me and there is nothing like picking it fresh.” QC photos by Troy Fleece

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

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Read my book #

11

Loca l AUT H O RS: Writers tell us what makes their book worth reading

D a v i d W . L e tts , w i th S i o f r a B r a d i g a n & M o i t a

A fascination of high-energy dreams By David Letts Suddenly, a family wrests themselves from Regina circa 1980 for rustic life in a remote B.C. mountain valley, settling in log cabins under the stars, among bears and ravens, forming new friendships. An adventure many fantasize, but few undertake. Why these people? From a previous life of mine years ago, it’s time to tell the story. Delving deeply into nature, healing body and soul, interacting with a David Letts variety of people, learning to live simply in partnership with the Earth, expanding awareness, creating beauty ... All these were motives for two

alternative community ventures — one highprofile, one not. The Findhorn Community in northern Scotland first became famous for its miraculous garden and well-documented communication with nature spirits, later for its socially transformative vision. The venture I was involved in never became a physical community. But it centred around an inward opening similar to those guiding Findhorn — and has strong Regina connections. Perhaps my 1960s peace activism stimulated my dream life, as many intriguing “teaching” dreams followed. Consequently, by the late 1970s I was a psychology PhD student here. Fascinated by the wisdom in high-energy dreams, I pursued its source in meditation and my experiential workshops — which included one particularly receptive, intuitive person, Kelly (Siofra Bradigan). We found that, with right conditions, a gentle, wise presence began to

speak through her — eyes lucid, ageless serenity softening Kelly’s breezy personality. It turned out Moita has been with Kelly since her beginnings. Some Reginans remember our gatherings sharing “this experiment in communication between worlds.” One older man said, “[Moita] looks right into your soul. I’ve never seen anybody look at somebody with such total love.” But we departed after that first year, guided intuitively to a quieter place where we would explore and deepen community in unexpected ways, journeying across lifetimes and dimensions, weaving people’s energies together. This book relates that multi-faceted adventure, as we came to understand what was bewildering before — the evolution of consciousness, the depths and heights of human nature, the rising energies affecting our planet, and awakening the dream of Earth. “A big hug for the love

and support of your old medicine woman,” said Elisabeth Kubler-Ross after seeking Moita’s help. “Highly recommended ... prophetic and relevant for this time,” says the political/spiritual journal Both Sides Now. You may have heard me at the Paranormal Symposium. Available through dwletts@gmail. com, www.trafford.com or www.amazon.ca.

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Mercury rises on sunny morning

Jennifer Gerwing, Paula Lichtenwald and Melissa Lichtenwald (from left) enjoy the morning sunlight at on the patio of the The Mercury. QC Photo by Michael Bell

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IN THE CITY #

M Y FAV O U R I T E P L A C E

Totem pole a landmark for parties in the park By Ashley Martin

The object is to hit the stick with the Frisbee, then you’ve got to clear the carpet. If you clear the carpet, the Frisbee’s live. If it hits the ground on the other side of the carpet, that’s a point. If somebody catches it, you’re out. You get three throws. If you hit the stick and you don’t clear the carpet, it comes off the side or whatever, that’s a foul, so like baseball you can continually foul out. If you miss the stick entirely that’s a strike. You miss three times, you’re out. We call it Danger Zone because there’s lots of different ways to throw the Frisbee. You can really throw it hard or feather it or whatever. People might be playing well back, so you feather one in and you’ll keep getting those until somebody moves up, and then they move up and you start really winging it in there. Then you end up with a Frisbee in the face and you never know where it’s going to go. It’s tons of fun.

For the past four years on Canada Day, Dan Bowman and his friends and family have gathered on the south shore of Wascana Lake for a day in the park. Everyone knows where to meet because of the totem pole, which was given to Saskatchewan by British Columbia in 1971. At 16 feet high, 3½ feet wide and 3,500 pounds, it is a noticeable landmark. “People know where it is; you can see it from quite a ways away. You can say ‘I’m by the totem pole’ and for the most part people can find you,” said Bowman.

Q: What does a typical Canada Day look like? A: We get here before the rush, which is difficult because lots of people like to be here. In order for us to get a table and a spot and a place by a barbecue we usually show up by 11. Then we spend the day here. We spend the whole day in the park and we barbecue and watch the fireworks at night and play games and enjoy the day, and it’s just a great spot. Usually (the weather) is pretty good. Last year it was not bad for most of the day but it rained during the fireworks. ... I had a tarp so we were able to get underneath the tarp and we brought our rain gear. Q: Who’s in your group? A: There’s usually 10 of us, plus kids, maybe more. Other people show up and pass through and say hi; people are starting to realize that we do that so they look for us here. My wife (Suzanne), my kids (Savannah and Daelen). My brother and my sister will usually show up and they may bring some friends. Some other close friends of the family will come by and we’re very laid back about it; whoever wants to join us can join us.

Q: What’s your favourite memory of Canada Day here? A: I don’t have a specific one. We enjoy all of it so much. It’s a great time.

Dan Bowman’s favourite place is the area of Wascana Centre near the totem pole. QC photo by Troy Fleece

Q: Are there events around here? A: If you go down the walking path, the festivities are kind of over there, but we’re not really here for the festivities. We’re just here to spend a day in the park and enjoy it and ultimately watch the fireworks. We’ve got our little spot (near the lake), so we’ll pack up our camp and we’ll get out onto that little spot ... to watch the fireworks. We barbecue, we play our own games; we’ve got

some pretty cool games that we play. There’s a game that my brother and his friends in Calgary invented ... It’s called Danger Zone and it’s the greatest game ever.

Q: How do you play Danger Zone? A: You need a Frisbee and you separate into teams; you can play two on two or three on three or four on four — you could even go five on five ... It’s kind of like baseball rules.

You need a line that you can’t cross and that’s where you throw the Frisbee from. Then you need a stick, kind of like a shovel handle that you’ll stick into the ground and it’ll be oriented at a (45-degree) angle. Then the catching team is (facing you, with the stick aimed up toward them). Then you need a carpet or a runner or something to lay down (between the stick and the catching team).

Q: What kinds of food do you guys bring? A: We do one barbecue so we’ll do a picnic kind of lunch, sandwiches or whatever, and then we’ll do hotdogs and hamburgers for supper, and snacks and beverages. Q: Why do you love this space? A: It’s ideal for Danger Zone if we get this spot. There’s a nice open space for Danger Zone, there’s a big open field (across the road) for football, which is pretty awesome. There’s your choice of shade or sun; if it’s really hot and sunny out you can find a spot in the shade. There’s lots of traffic and people-watching. It’s just a great spot. The bathrooms are nice and close, which with a pottytraining boy, that’s pretty handy.

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Next week: What’s the most extravagant item your baby has (or had)? Email qc@leaderpost.com

#

pa r e n t t o pa r e n t

Each week QC gathers advice from parents to share with other moms and dads. This week we asked:

If it was up to you, would your child have a school uniform or wear regular clothes to school? “There are pros and cons for both answers. As a parent — pro: They know what they are wearing to school that day. Con: You always look the same as everyone else in the school. As a child — pro: You don’t have to think about what to wear. Con: Where’s the individuality?” — Judy S. “Uniforms would make getting my twins dressed in the morning super easy because there wouldn’t be any argument over who was wearing what. However I like the fact that they can pick what they want to wear. Having attended a private high school in Regina where this was often a debate, I still have to say I’m on the fence. Uniforms would remove some of the divide we see among students from varying socioeconomic statuses but they also create a world of problems in terms of enforcement. Some would argue individuality is at stake if we made students wear uniforms ... I don’t think there’s ever going to be a right (or mutually agreed upon) answer on this one.” — Michelle Grodecki “I don’t think a school uniform is necessary AND I don’t have time to ensure that a uniform is washed and ready every morning. It’s fun to wear new clothes to school, it’s fun to dress up for different occasions (i.e. Rider Pride day). If going somewhere after school, it’s not necessary to stop and change. Kids need to express their individuality.” — Carla Contreras “Uniforms would be a lot easier for parents and it may cut down on some of the teasing from other kids. However a bully is a bully and they would just find something else to tease kids about. Clothing is often one of the first decisions that kids get to make for themselves and you get to see a lot of their personalities come out so I am still for kids wearing regular clothes to school.” — Nikki Melnyk “I think a uniform would be great; children’s personalities standing out rather than what their parents can afford. And no pressure for the child to live up to an expectation set out by other children who sometimes base another child’s worth by the label on their clothes.” — Alysia Czmuchalek

“While I am sure my daughter would prefer to wear her own clothes, I would prefer uniforms. A lot of our mornings revolve around finding my daughter an outfit to wear that she wants to wear and is appropriate in my and the weather’s standards. A uniform would take that stress out of the mornings. Not to mention the fact that I wouldn’t have to worry about her wrecking clothes during art anymore!” — Amanda Dyck “I love to see the things my daughter puts together for her outfits. So no, I wouldn’t want uniforms.” — Crystal Beauregard “I like the uniform idea. I’ve seen way too many younger teens dress like they are ready to hit the clubs when going to school. You can’t really blame the parents though when you see the selection out there.” — Julie-ann Clark “I think uniforms are a great idea. The mornings are hectic and some relief would be nice. But keep in mind I have three boys and I don’t have to worry so much about what they wear.” — Rochelle Jones “In my opinion uniforms force everyone to conform to some other person’s ideas. Don’t we want our children to be individuals and not something someone else wants? Although, yes I do agree uniforms would prevent these young teens degrading their self-image by wearing inappropriate clothing. When I was in school I had a principal that wanted to call us by numbers instead of names (taking away our identity) and I personally feel uniforms do that same thing (although not to that extreme).” — Ashley Pratt “I think uniforms are great. It puts everyone on equal terms. We grew up with a single mom and we were always embarrassed that we couldn’t afford the cool brand name clothes. A uniform takes away one thing bullies use to pick on kids. As for individualism I think it is important that kids learn to be an individual without depending on what they’re wearing. Clothes are just window dressing.” — Rina Fradette

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Fall Fashion

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From Regina to Rogue By Christeen Jesse L-P Specialty Products At first, Olivia Medina didn’t know what she was getting herself into. Some days, she still doesn’t. But with a career that has taken the 21-year-old Reginaborn model from photo shoots in Shanghai to runway shows in Tokyo, there’s no time for second-guessing. Since taking her modelling career international in 2010, Medina has found herself constantly shifting between airports, make-up chairs and designer bodysuits. But in the last year, Medina has grown to find comfort in the craziness, along with skyrocketing success. By looking at her extensive portfolio of high-fashion photos, you might never know, but the gorgeous professionalism that is Olivia Medina all started on a runway in Victoria Square Mall. “My agent Lisa Marie [Schwartz] asked if I was interested in doing a fashion show in the mall … and since it involved me missing a day of Kindergarten, I just couldn’t say no!” said Medina in an interview squeezed between flights from the Philippians to Toronto. “After I did the show, it was the best moment of my life — even at age six. I had so much fun even though it made me so nervous.” Growing up — and subsequently growing into her long legs and slender frame — she continued to model in local fashion shows with Edge Agency. With a signature self-taught runway walk and a face that is flattering at any angle, Medina quickly built up a poised portfolio of work. By her teens, she was modelling for local magazines and became a poster girl for NWL Contemporary Dresses. But Medina has never been the type to stay in one place for too long. With her sights set on travelling, Medina’s agent, Lisa Marie Schwartz, turned to agencies in Tokyo with her portfolio. The feedback was positive — and resulted in 18-year-old Medina hugging her parents goodbye and boarding a one-way flight to Asia. “I promised my parents I’d finish high school before leaving Regina. So once I graduated, I was off to Tokyo,” she said. “It was a huge step in my life. Leaving not just Regina for the first time, but leaving the country itself was scary — especially since I was doing everything on my own with no one to rely on or hold my hand through it all.” For the next year, Medina flew back and forth from Tokyo to Shanghai, working jobs in both markets, and living in hotel rooms in between. She spent Christmas, Thanksgiving, New Year’s Eve and her 19th birthday alone. Struggling with the fact that she never had a permanent place to call home, Medina quickly learned that in order to succeed in the industry, she was going to have to make sacrifices. “At first it was really hard for me to adjust to living in hotels and travelling on planes and trains long hours. You meet someone, but either you’re leaving the country in the next month or they are leaving, which leaves you no time to have a normal relationship. The modelling lifestyle isn’t for everyone. As much as it

“I stood in front of the magazine stand with a huge smile on my face. I really couldn’t believe it was me.” —Olivia Medina looks like a glamorous career, there is always a price you pay. It’s a price every model has to pay sometime in their life.” Paying that price at a young age has helped Medina to reach new heights in her career as an international model. In a matter of months, her consistent commitment in front of the camera has taken her from a fresh-faced prairie import to a recognized, professional model. It has secured her spots walking in runway shows for popular brands like La Senza, Penshoppe and BENCH, as well as acting roles in commercials for Downy, and contracts with widely recognized clothing designers like Boom Sassoon. It has also landed her, quite literally, modeling in a country that is deeply rooted in her bronzed skin and unique features. Medina flew to the Philippines in August of 2011, and has since been making waves in front of the lens and on runways around the country. “I’ve always wanted to leave Regina and explore, expand my options in life and learn more about my roots back in the Philippines. My father is Filipino — he was born and raised there and then immigrated to Canada. I wasn’t exactly sure how or when I would leave, but it was always set in my heart that it was something I had to do one day when I was old enough,” she said. And in the past year, not only has she reconnected with her roots, Medina has appeared in nine TV commercials, 23 fashion shows and done 88 photo shoots. This September, she graced the cover of Rogue, one of the largest fashion magazines in the country — a dream for any model, but especially for Medina. “Since I had arrived in the Philippines, every month I would pick up a Rogue magazine and wish one day it was me [on the cover]. Well, that wish finally came true,” said Medina, gushing with pride. “The day of the shoot I was still in awe. Then, as soon as the book stores and Rogue tweeted me saying that the magazine was in stores, I rushed out to buy a copy. I stood in front of the magazine stand with a huge smile on my face. I really couldn’t believe it was me.” Confident that it’s only the first of many covers to come, Medina is still humble, knowing her success didn’t come without sacrifice, and won’t continue without a few more lonely nights in a hotel in a foreign country. “I look at every job as an opportunity, regardless Continued on Page 19

(Above) Regina’s Olivia Medina on the cover of the September issue of Rogue, a men’s fashion magazine from the Philippines.

L E A D E R P O ST.CO M /Q C

From Regina to Rogue Continued from Page 18 if it’s a big job or small job. It means a lot to me that every day I wake up having the opportunity and ability to do what I enjoy and love most,” she said. “No matter how discouraging some situations can be, I have to rise above it stay positive and work hard to reach the success point that I want to be at in my career.” She doesn’t even have to say it for people to believe it. “It’s so obvious that for Olivia, modelling really is who she is. She lives and breathes the fashion industry,” said Schwartz. “She always wants to do better for herself and proves that time and time again with the clients that she works with and the designers that keep hiring her. She is one of those unique models that wants to perfect everything that she does in the industry, and I think that keeps her ahead of the other girls.” “She wants to, and has, made it a career, but she also wants longevity in this industry. This is not just a

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“It’s so obvious that for Olivia, modelling really is who she is. She lives and breathes the fashion industry.” —Lisa Marie Schwartz Edge Agency part-time thing for her.” With plans to continue her modelling career in Asia, or expand it into Europe or New York, it’s clear that Medina’s passion is not fading anytime soon. And with experience and exposure like hers, neither are the opportunities.

Since taking her modelling career international in 2010, Olivia Medina has modeled for countless designers around the world.

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Keep your face fresh-looking in fall (NC) The fresh-faced look doesn’t just have to be for the summer. These four tips will help ensure that your face maintains its natural glow as we transition into the harsher, colder months. Add moisture to your routine: The fall months are less humid than their summer counterparts, so adding more moisture to your skin care regime is important. As the air gets dryer use a richer, thicker moisturizer such as Simple Replenishing Rich Moisturizer to give back to your skin. Use sensitive skin care products: Even if you don’t have sensitive skin, when the weather changes from warm to cold everyone’s skin could use a gentler skin care approach. You might notice that your face is more prone to redness and flushing as the wind picks up and the temperature

drops. Environmental changes can often bring on skin sensitivities, so be kind to your skin and use products that are designed with this in mind. Maintain the SPF: Don’t be fooled - the sun is still shining even though summer has come to a close. Make sure you keep SPF in your skin care regime as it will continue to help protect your skin and help fight the signs of aging, such as wrinkles – look for a moisturizer with a broad-spectrum SPF. Face, Neck and Hands: Your face isn’t the only part of your body that can benefit from your skincare regime - your neck and hands can too. This is particularly true in the fall as these delicate parts of your body are the most exposed to the cooler, crisper air.

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“We’ve poured a lot of energy into this event,” said Lindsay. “We’ve got a lot of talented people working alongside us on our committee, and we’ve been privileged, through their dedication and talent, to year after year build on our success. We reach our goals because of the people who build us up.” An obvious remark perhaps, but DISCOVERED has consistently reached their goals of: impacting the children of Saskatchewan through the Children’s Wish Foundation, raising funds, creating a memorable experience for gala evening guests and launching a successful modeling career for one dedicated and hard-working young person. Through three rounds of photo shoots, competitors are challenged to complete a different look that will test their versatility, teach them modeling skills for editorial shoots and lays down guidelines for the runway walk that promises a chance at the grand prize package that includes a contract with NEXT Models Canada. The DISCOVERED gala evening promises to bring together community and concludes with the announcement of the model search winner. While the remaining model search finalists walk the runway at the Capital Cadillac showroom, a scout from NEXT Models will make their choice of the remaining search candidates. The runway show promises to highlight the best of Regina’s creative professionals and will feature the fashions of several of Regina’s premier retailers as well as top-end design names and unique fashion creations including Dean Renwick and the hair and makeup talents of Regina’s best salons and Sara Lindsay Makeup Artistry.

“We are so privileged to work with the best of the best across all industries — hair, makeup, photography and videography,” said Lisa Marie Schwartz. “We’ve been able to give each contestant an opportunity to learn from each of them and to raise the calibre of DISCOVERED to its full height through their professionalism and industry knowledge.” “We are truly impacting lives through this event,” added Gregg Schwartz. “We’ve even had the good fortune to meet modeling contestants through our search who themselves have benefited from The Children’s Wish Foundation and who have grown up to benefit from our competition two-fold; it’s a great feeling to know that something that began as a concept three years ago has grown into its own and now impacts not only the contestants, but the children of Saskatchewan who may be future contestants.” You have to hand it to them. DISCOVERED continues to surprise, year after year. DISCOVERED’s gala, this Saturday, September 29, promises a red carpet evening and expects a sell-out crowd. A truly exceptional experience for contestants and gala guests is set to roll out and raise funds for a truly worthy cause through its runway show and silent auction. For the latest details on the remaining contestants and the red carpet gala event, visit DISCOVERED online at www.bediscovered.ca. You can also follow them on Twitter: @bediscovered_ca and like them on Facebook. Tickets are available online at picatic.com. DISCOVERED brings it all together this weekend in Regina – don’t miss this highlight of the fall’s premiere events.

Haley Reoch – 20 years old 5’6 from Regina

DISCOVERED 2011 Winner

Kyle Schachtel

The top finalists are: Bevan Buhler – 20 years old 5’11 from Saskatoon

Ian Chang – 22 years old 6’1.5 from Regina

Mikaela Muscoby – 18 years old 6’0 from Winthorst

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Montana Friskie – 16 years old 5’8 from Yorkton

DISCOVERED prepares to change lives Submitted by Mackenzie Kulcsár, Edge Agency DISCOVERED: Co-presented by Edge Agency and Sara Lindsay Makeup Artistry, the annual model search and gala evening prepares to turn heads and to change lives this weekend at the Capital Cadillac showroom in Regina. A search and showcase for international modeling talent and cutting-edge hair, makeup and styling professionals, DISCOVERED has become a first-rate runway show and gala evening. It is also a chance to make a difference in the lives of children living with illness across Saskatchewan. DISCOVERED is a total package that packs the house with entertainment, excitement and endows the province with funds raised for The Children’s Wish Foundation — and presents another young person with their first international modeling assignment. DISCOVERED is swiftly becoming the premier event of the fall for citizens of Regina, and it’s right around the corner. Every year, the three co-founders of DISCOVERED — Sara Lindsay of Sara Lindsay Makeup Artistry and Lisa Marie and Gregg Schwartz of EDGE Agency — sit down to discuss their goals for the ever-evolving event. As it builds momentum, DISCOVERED builds up the children of Saskatchewan through their fundraising dollars, while also building confidence and a solid career base for the models competing in the three rounds of elimination photo shoots. As the final evening of DISCOVERED draws closer, the competition reaches its full height and heightens the goals the DISCOVERED team has created for themselves.

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Jade Nedilenka – 16 years old 5’7 from Regina

Daryn Nevill – 12 years old 5’8 from Melville

Brianne Punk – 18 years old 5’6 from Humbolt

Kyle Schachtel was an 18-year-old living in Quinton, Saskatchewan, working as a mechanic in Raymore before entering DISCOVERED 2011. In competition with 54 other hopefuls from across the province, Kyle was chosen by talent scouts from Toronto and Asia at the DISCOVERED runway show. After winning the DISCOVERED Model Search last year, his career has taken him overseas where he presently lives in Shanghai, China working as a professional model.

Children’s Wish Foundation

Over the past two years, DISCOVERED has raised over $50,000 for the Children’s Wish Foundation. Our donations have provided heartfelt wishes to children between the ages of three and seventeen in Saskatchewan who have been diagnosed with a life-threatening illness. Some of those wishes were a library/clubhouse for a young boy looking for a special place in his backyard that was “no girls allowed”, family trips to Disney, a visit with relatives in Finland and an opportunity for a youngster to swim with dolphins. We hope to grant many more wishes with this years DISCOVERED event.

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a s p e c i a l f e at u r e

T h u rs day, S e p t e m b e r 27, 2 0 1 2

“We’ve poured a lot of energy into this event,” said Lindsay. “We’ve got a lot of talented people working alongside us on our committee, and we’ve been privileged, through their dedication and talent, to year after year build on our success. We reach our goals because of the people who build us up.” An obvious remark perhaps, but DISCOVERED has consistently reached their goals of: impacting the children of Saskatchewan through the Children’s Wish Foundation, raising funds, creating a memorable experience for gala evening guests and launching a successful modeling career for one dedicated and hard-working young person. Through three rounds of photo shoots, competitors are challenged to complete a different look that will test their versatility, teach them modeling skills for editorial shoots and lays down guidelines for the runway walk that promises a chance at the grand prize package that includes a contract with NEXT Models Canada. The DISCOVERED gala evening promises to bring together community and concludes with the announcement of the model search winner. While the remaining model search finalists walk the runway at the Capital Cadillac showroom, a scout from NEXT Models will make their choice of the remaining search candidates. The runway show promises to highlight the best of Regina’s creative professionals and will feature the fashions of several of Regina’s premier retailers as well as top-end design names and unique fashion creations including Dean Renwick and the hair and makeup talents of Regina’s best salons and Sara Lindsay Makeup Artistry.

“We are so privileged to work with the best of the best across all industries — hair, makeup, photography and videography,” said Lisa Marie Schwartz. “We’ve been able to give each contestant an opportunity to learn from each of them and to raise the calibre of DISCOVERED to its full height through their professionalism and industry knowledge.” “We are truly impacting lives through this event,” added Gregg Schwartz. “We’ve even had the good fortune to meet modeling contestants through our search who themselves have benefited from The Children’s Wish Foundation and who have grown up to benefit from our competition two-fold; it’s a great feeling to know that something that began as a concept three years ago has grown into its own and now impacts not only the contestants, but the children of Saskatchewan who may be future contestants.” You have to hand it to them. DISCOVERED continues to surprise, year after year. DISCOVERED’s gala, this Saturday, September 29, promises a red carpet evening and expects a sell-out crowd. A truly exceptional experience for contestants and gala guests is set to roll out and raise funds for a truly worthy cause through its runway show and silent auction. For the latest details on the remaining contestants and the red carpet gala event, visit DISCOVERED online at www.bediscovered.ca. You can also follow them on Twitter: @bediscovered_ca and like them on Facebook. Tickets are available online at picatic.com. DISCOVERED brings it all together this weekend in Regina – don’t miss this highlight of the fall’s premiere events.

Haley Reoch – 20 years old 5’6 from Regina

DISCOVERED 2011 Winner

Kyle Schachtel

The top finalists are: Bevan Buhler – 20 years old 5’11 from Saskatoon

Ian Chang – 22 years old 6’1.5 from Regina

Mikaela Muscoby – 18 years old 6’0 from Winthorst

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Montana Friskie – 16 years old 5’8 from Yorkton

DISCOVERED prepares to change lives Submitted by Mackenzie Kulcsár, Edge Agency DISCOVERED: Co-presented by Edge Agency and Sara Lindsay Makeup Artistry, the annual model search and gala evening prepares to turn heads and to change lives this weekend at the Capital Cadillac showroom in Regina. A search and showcase for international modeling talent and cutting-edge hair, makeup and styling professionals, DISCOVERED has become a first-rate runway show and gala evening. It is also a chance to make a difference in the lives of children living with illness across Saskatchewan. DISCOVERED is a total package that packs the house with entertainment, excitement and endows the province with funds raised for The Children’s Wish Foundation — and presents another young person with their first international modeling assignment. DISCOVERED is swiftly becoming the premier event of the fall for citizens of Regina, and it’s right around the corner. Every year, the three co-founders of DISCOVERED — Sara Lindsay of Sara Lindsay Makeup Artistry and Lisa Marie and Gregg Schwartz of EDGE Agency — sit down to discuss their goals for the ever-evolving event. As it builds momentum, DISCOVERED builds up the children of Saskatchewan through their fundraising dollars, while also building confidence and a solid career base for the models competing in the three rounds of elimination photo shoots. As the final evening of DISCOVERED draws closer, the competition reaches its full height and heightens the goals the DISCOVERED team has created for themselves.

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Jade Nedilenka – 16 years old 5’7 from Regina

Daryn Nevill – 12 years old 5’8 from Melville

Brianne Punk – 18 years old 5’6 from Humbolt

Kyle Schachtel was an 18-year-old living in Quinton, Saskatchewan, working as a mechanic in Raymore before entering DISCOVERED 2011. In competition with 54 other hopefuls from across the province, Kyle was chosen by talent scouts from Toronto and Asia at the DISCOVERED runway show. After winning the DISCOVERED Model Search last year, his career has taken him overseas where he presently lives in Shanghai, China working as a professional model.

Children’s Wish Foundation

Over the past two years, DISCOVERED has raised over $50,000 for the Children’s Wish Foundation. Our donations have provided heartfelt wishes to children between the ages of three and seventeen in Saskatchewan who have been diagnosed with a life-threatening illness. Some of those wishes were a library/clubhouse for a young boy looking for a special place in his backyard that was “no girls allowed”, family trips to Disney, a visit with relatives in Finland and an opportunity for a youngster to swim with dolphins. We hope to grant many more wishes with this years DISCOVERED event.

Fall Fashion

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A S P E C I A L F E AT U R E

Bringing big city style to the streets of the Queen City The D.A.M. Hair Company offers edgy renditions of classic styles

In an industry where style is never static and trends are always transitioning, Daniel McDonald focuses his salon on the one thing he knows will never change— the client. Owner of The D.A.M. Hair Company in Regina, McDonald runs his edgy, innovative salon on the simple principle that it’s not just about styling hair, but rather providing an experience for people sitting in the chairs. “It’s about doing what we do, and doing it well — making whoever is sitting in the chair happy. This salon is totally, utterly and completely about the client,” said McDonald. “Nowadays, hair is the new accessory. Shoes and purses used to be, but everyone is now back into their hair. If it’s bad, they feel bad. And if it’s good, they strut … so if they are leaving our salon doing that, then we are doing our jobs.” The style-savvy business owner and chief creative stylist spent years training and working in Winnipeg salons where he from carries a full selection of perfected the art of edginess. Armed with Redken retail products as well the knowledge and the drive to bring some their six color lines — from of that big city flare to the locks of those in “It’s all about texture.” blonde to black and everything his hometown, he opened The D.A.M. Hair “The newest looks are about in between. The fully-stocked Company in Regina in May of 2010. texture, disconnection, and to a color bar is a focal point of the “In Regina, it seems like everybody is the point, androgyny — like having a open-concept salon, which same. I wanted to be able to take the regular offers stylists and clients the female taking a traditional client who, say is blonde or brunette, and opportunity to interact with the really kind of edge them up and get them men’s haircut and making it entire salon — an important outside of their box and start a new trend for feminine.” part of their team-focused them,” said McDonald. “Education in Regina “As for color, highlights are business model. salons was lacking and there was no pushing out. It’s more about underlying, “If I have a client in my chair, the envelope. I figured in order to get that, accenting and creating but I’m not really sure what I there was no better way than to open my own dimension and texture with color, want to do with their hair, I’ll shop and to hire people under the pretense ask another stylist — right rather than with the cut.” that they could build their career while there in front of my client,” educating people and keeping up on current said McDonald. “We’re always styles.” bouncing ideas around and that All employees at The D.A.M. Hair Company shows the clients that we care about what’s going on with their are local stylists, with creative brains and fierce finesse. The hair. I’m going to ask for a second opinion. When we’re mixing team is heavily involved in training and competing, which the color, they are watching us, so it’s not like we’re a ‘behind McDonald says keeps everyone up-to-date on current trends, the scenes, what are they doing to our hair?’ place. They really while challenging individuals to style outside their box. In the get to see what we are using and doing at all times.” last two years, the team has travelled to Las Vegas, Montreal, With just two years in the community, the salon has already Winnipeg and Saskatoon for training and competitions where developed a strong client base, and is known for their inviting, they’ve trained with international professionals and racked up a interactive atmosphere, and creative quirks (like flavored coffee number of individual awards. and candy!) that make the experience about more than just a “Competitions are really big for us. I like to push the stylists past their boundaries,” said McDonald. “It’s very easy for people haircut. “After two years, we already have clients who just stop in for like us to get stuck in a rut because of the clientele we’re coffee. So it’s really turned into that small-town feel with the big servicing. We are in a very creative industry, so competitions city edge. And I like that because it’s our clients who keep us and training are a good way to juice up our creativity, which open, and we’re nothing without them.” relates directly back to what we’re doing in our chairs. If we The D.A.M. Hair Company is located at 2719 Quance Street aren’t up on the most current styles and products, then we aren’t East and is open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays doing a good service to our clients.” A Premier Flagship Redken Salon, The D.A.M. Hair Company from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Fall style tips

Daniel McDonald:

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More than just a snapshot Collin Stumpf has been enamored with images since he was a kid collecting hockey cards. A product of small-town Saskatchewan, his lifelong view through the lens has landed him with a well-known photography business and a large collection of perfectly captured moments. “I loved taking photos even when I was a kid. Before digital, I carried around one of the old point-and-shoot cameras with film rolls of 24 — not photography, just photo taking. That’s where it started,” said Stumpf, who owns Collin Stumpf Photography, a self-titled photography business based in Regina. “I know it’s cliché, but I always liked the idea that photography captures an instant in time and freezes it so that you can look at it later on. There’s the idea that memories are fleeting, but a photograph lasts forever.” “I don’t want to forget a lot of things — I feel bad if I forget. So [photography] kind of fills in that gap. I love the feeling that looking at old photographs gives me, that nostalgia, the reminiscence.” Stumpf further explored his passion for photography in university while taking media production at the University of Regina. Originally entering the program with a desire to produce documentary films, he decided halfway through that he would rather be a still photographer. Now, Stumpf is making

waves with his own photography business and is recognized for his relaxed style that captures candid moments. “The pinnacle of my style is very natural. It’s very organic, with daylight playing into my photos a lot,” said Stumpf. “I don’t bring any off-camera lighting when I do my outdoor shoots. Many photographers will bring studio lights outside, whereas I just use natural sunlight. And that helps my photos look more authentic.” His classic style transcends into all his photos, and has led him to become recognized as one of Canada’s premiere wedding and portrait photographers. “I made my name predominantly with weddings. They are my bread and butter,” said Stumpf. “I really love photographing weddings — not only is it challenging, but it keeps you on your toes, it pushes your boundaries and keeps you sharp. It’s almost like photographing a sport … if you miss that moment, it’s gone. There’s no replaying it. But when you do capture those moments, well-composed and really in focus, it’s like scoring that goal. It feels good, plus these photos are an important legacy to the family.” “It’s a very fulfilling thing to deliver wedding photos to someone and them be so happy that they cry. Not a lot of people have that kind of job satisfaction.” Continued on Page 23

Collin Stumpf Photography

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A S P E C I A L F E AT U R E

More than just a snapshot Continued from Page 22 And the gratification that comes from client approval is supplemented by the personal satisfaction that Stumpf gets from taking photos for a living. “Definitely one of the bonuses to a job like this is creativity. Lots of people who have creative tendencies don’t have a creative outlet in their jobs, and that’s hard on them. So having this creative outlet and being able to make a living doing it is really great. [I’m] never in complete creative control — [I’m] always up against factors like the weather and the time of day and the model, but I do get to have a lot of control, and that definitely is a positive aspect of this line of work,” he said. “Making those creative decisions, seeing the outcomes and being fulfilled by making a piece of art is a great feeling.” Not limited to just wedding photography, Stumpf engages in all kinds of photography — from boudoir and maternity shoots to landscape and architectural

photography. He enjoys dabbling in fashion photography and has worked with a number of local models, but realizes that Regina offers limited opportunity to snap high-fashion images. “This isn’t New York. It’s Regina. And there isn’t a lot of legit fashion photography going on here … there is some opportunity for that, but it’s on a pretty small scale. So generally what I do is for fun or for models who want shots for their portfolio to launch them into international markets,’ he said. “It’s fun for me to do that. Working with a model that knows what they’re doing makes it much easier and so enjoyable. They know how to pose, they know how to stand, and they know how to adjust their bodies.” With plans to keep his business localized in Saskatchewan, Stumpf will continue to pursue his passion in photography while professionally capturing and preserving his clients’ special moments.

Venice Tailors Ltd. now carries women’s suits After providing a selection of men’s suits for the last 25 years, Venice Tailors now offers the same professional look for women. “We are introducing the women’s line for the first time this fall,” said Venice Tailors lead seamstress and fashion consultant Paula Silva. “We have always had men’s and are just adding women’s suits now. The demand was there — there aren’t many places in the city that carry women’s suits — so we thought we’d try it out.” Venice Tailors now stocks women’s two-piece pant suits in a variety of sizes, as well as a selection Paula Silva shows off the new line of women’s suits now of women’s dress shirts. They available at Venice Tailors Ltd. currently carry the suits in black and navy, but every month, as new try to cater to the European styles and fabrics.” supply comes in, a new color will be Silva, who has 21 years of experience as available. The next shipment of suits will add a grey a seamstress and fashion consultant, said all business suit as well as a taupe plaid into the mix. alterations are complimentary, as the fit of a suit is Silva says they will also be getting some skirt suits just as important as the style. in stock in the next few months. “Having a suit fit properly is a huge deal. If you “What we have now is classy, professional, look good, you feel good.” comfortable and something for everyday business. Venice Tailors is located at 4625 Albert Street [The suits] aren’t too formal, so they can be worn to and is open Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 6 work or dressed up to a formal event,” she said. p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. “If this goes well, we will bring in more lines and

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WINE world #

FA L E R N I A

Falernia for foodies on a budget By James Romanow One of the peculiarities of the modern wine industry is the New World wine pioneers used France as their benchmark. The French believed the quality of their wine was due to the varietals. The New World vineyards ended up planting Bordeaux and Burgundy varietals in climates that had about as much in common with the original region as Saskatoon has with Rankin Inlet. I’ve thought for a long time that places like Australia and California and Chile ought to be experimenting with Italian, Portuguese and Spanish varietals because A: They make great wine, and B: The grapes are less heat sensitive and less water needy. However, when the consumers climbed on board the New World wine train, they were educated to love the French varietals, so there has been remarkably little experimentation in the vineyard. You can imagine my surprise and pleasure when I found a bottle of Sangiovese, the brilliant grape of Chianti in the Chilean section. Chianti, if you’ve never had the pleasure (poor baby!), is a medium bodied wine, with a slightly lean palate that pairs with just about everything from cocktails on the piazza through pasta, red meats and barbecue. Everything Pinot Noir can do Chianti can do, and usually for significantly less money. Falernia’s version is a little darker in colour than Italian versions but the bouquet is typical: Dry and slightly earthy. The pal-

ate is lean, crisp, full of fruit and with that nice finish similar to bitter almonds. They’ve rounded the acidity somewhat with ML fermentation which will please most drinkers. (I prefer more angular wines, but I’m a minority.) This is a great deal and a great drinking wine. If you’re a foodie, on a budget buy this one. Falernia Sangiovese, Elqui Valley, Chile, 2009 $13.15 ****

Crossword/Sudoku answers

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CITY NEWS

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wat e r l e a k s

Shifting ground no break for city workers By Andrew Matte City of Regina crews are scrambling to repair a higher than usual number of underground water leaks caused by ground shifting and a dry 2012. The problems started near the end of August when homeowners and commercial property owners began to report a high number of leaks to underground pipes. While occasional breaks aren’t out of the ordinary, the city is facing more breaks than usual because the ground is shifting more than it usually does. That’s because a lack of summer and fall rainfall has meant the ground is drier than it’s been in years, causing the unique combination of soil and clay found throughout the Regina area to shrink. John Ullrich, the city’s manager of water and sewer construction, said the ground is

contracting more than usual because of a lack of rainfall. “We haven’t had a high number of leaks in the last two years. Then all of a sudden, July came and things got very dry,” he said. “Any time the soil gets wet, it expands. And when it gets dry, it shrinks.” Ullrich said the issue arises when the ground puts pressure on pipes, prompting lines to leak or collapse. Residents know something is wrong when they see water collect in their yard over a severed pipe or discover they have no water or low water pressure. It can take a city crew several hours to dig and repair a broken line, he said. “Whenever the ground shifts, it makes movement against the pipe. And it can cause breaks,” Ullrich said, adding most of the recent leaks are found in the older parts of Regina.

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The water table was quite high. So only now, we’re seeing the amount of moisture drop. – Mark Cote

“The older areas and the older type of pipes are more susceptible to breaks.” He said the problem peaked in the second week of September but crews are now catching up to calls from property owners. “We take care of the major breaks first. The minor leaks, we can let run. In many cases, we’re working late into the evenings,” he said. The shifting ground under the Queen City has always been an issue for homeowners. This fall, deep cracks can be seen in yards and parks across the city caused by shrinking clay and soil. The clay, or “Regina gumbo,” that stretches across this part of southern Saskatchewan causes headaches for thousands of homeowners who discover shifting earth pushes on foundations, causing cracks, leaks and even collapsed walls. Built on land that was once a lake bed about 14,000 years ago, the clay ab-

sorbs and holds water than land found in most parts of Canada. Mark Cote, who teaches meteorology and climatology at the University of Regina, believes the shifting earth issue is happening because ground conditions are simply returning to normal. “It’s not that things are uncommonly dry. It has more to do with the last few years, particularly in 2010 and 2011 when we had lots of rainfall,” said Cote. “The water table was quite high. So only now, we’re seeing the amount of moisture drop.” Andy Mclauchlan, whose construction firm Doing It Right Construction and Welding specializes in foundation repairs, said homeowners should always be wary of shifting ground on their property. He said this fall’s dry weather will likely mean the ground will actually take pressure off foundations, but the shrinking soil can cause issues with walkways, driveways and other areas where there’s cement.

“Anywhere you have flat concrete on your property, or where flat concrete is attached to your home, the ground shrinks underneath; it could create voids underneath,” he said. Mclauchlan said Regina gumbo can expand or contract by as much as 33 per cent, so homeowners should be wary next spring when the melting of snow and spring runoff will moisten the ground and cause expansion. “We’re not seeing a lot of problems with basements this fall … We are going to see a lot of problems in the spring,” he said. At SaskEnergy, where officials have discovered a higher than usual number of gas line breaks in recent years due to high moisture levels, crews haven’t been scrambling like the city workers . Gas lines are more susceptible to the expansion of clay, which causes uncommon pressure on pipes, said spokesman Dave Burdeniuk. “We’ve had a lot fewer leaks due to ground shifting this year,” Burdeniuk City crews are only now catching up on calls from property owners regarding water main breaks. QC Photo by Troy Fleece said.

RE-THINK THURSDAYS. AND KNIHT-ER REGINA. L E A D E R P O ST.CO

EMBER 13, 2012 T H U RS DAY, S E P T

FASHION:

SPACES:

This week features a a campus cool look and P. 2 lawyer suited for action

ION R - P O ST PU B L I CAT M /Q C | A L E A D E

GARDENING:

QC tours a historic ’s brick home in Regina Cathedral area P. 4

Tips on preventing frost and getting the final harvest off P. 14

QC TURNS ONE

QC – Turns one! Thank you Regina and area residents for embracing QC. We are working hard to continue to deliver the unique perspectives that reflect our increasingly affluent, urban and diverse community. So grab another espresso or chai latte and re-think Regina.

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what moves you #

Tell us WHAT MOVES YOU. Email qc@ leaderpost.com

Go-Kart RACING

Chelsey Wilson is making her mark at the race track By Jeanette Stewart Chelsey Wilson began racing Go Karts when she was 12 years old. The aspiring teacher has since traded up for a Legends car, which she bought with her father when she was 16. Wilson, 19, is a student at the Indian Teacher Education Program (ITEP) at the University of Saskatchewan, but still finds time to make laps around the track.

Q: What drew you to racing? A: Honestly, I just love racing. I always have. My dad raced for 30 years, so I think it’s just kind of hereditary. Q: Describe your ride: A: Technically, it’s a 5/8 scale size of a 1934 Ford Coupe. The engine in it is 1250

cc Yamaha motorbike engine. The engines are sealed in Legends to ensure close competition. My car is blue with a white racing stripe and I run number 13. The cars are pretty much all the same. We all run the same tires, which are federal tires. In Legends there’s four different classes, there’s lions, semi-pro, pro and masters and I run in semi-pro. At the track we all run at the same time but we are racing for different points.

Q: What does semi-pro mean? A: Semi-pro is kind of the beginner class. If you haven’t raced before or if you’re younger you go in semi-pro. Young lions is under 16. Pro is advanced. If you win in semi-pro then you move up to pro or if you win three races, or if you win the championships. Anyone can go into masters as long as you’re over 40. Sometimes it’s age, sometimes it’s skill.

Race car driver Chelsey Wilson at Auto Clearing Motor Sports Speedway.

QC photo by Gord Waldner

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Next week: A Regina man tells us about his homemade bicycle. Email qc@leaderpost.com

Q: Does your dad also drive the same car? A: He doesn’t drive that car. He actually hasn’t raced for a long time, but he used to drive street stocks at the old Bridge City race track. Q: How often do you get to race your car? A: This year we’ve raced about six to eight races. It kind of depends on the year. This year Legends just started a local series. Before the home track was Wetaskiwin in Alberta and we had a couple races at Saskatoon, a couple at Medicine Hat and one in Regina. It was called the Max Series. But this year there’s races in Wetaskiwin, Regina, Medicine Hat and Saskatoon and that’s the Max Series. There’s also more races in Wetaskiwin alone and that’s called the Edmonton Series and there’s also a local Legends Series in Saskatoon. Q: Are you doing more than one series? A: I’m doing the Saskatchewan Series and the Max Series. Q: Do you get better the more you race? A: Totally. We call it seat time. The more seat time you have the better you are and the more seat time you have at different tracks the better you are. You don’t just get used to one track, you have to learn how to set up your car for different tracks. Q: What do you like about being behind the wheel? A: I love racing. I love the rush that you get when you pass someone, when you have a good battle with someone, if you win. It’s such a rush. It’s unexplainable. I just have a competitive drive and racing seems to be the best outlet. Q: What are your goals for the sport? A: For short term goals, I won my first race this year at Auto Clearing Motor Speedway. I’m really hoping to win the championship for the Saskatchewan Series this year. Long term, I think I want to move up into pro and see how I can do in there. I’m not sure if we’re going to stay in Legends or if we’re going to move into full sized cars such as Street Strock or Pro Truck. It’s kind of up in the air with me going to school. Q: Is racing an expensive pursuit? A: From the outside looking in I guess it is pretty expensive. It’s mostly startup costs though. To buy your car and to buy all your safety equipment and spare parts and stuff, that makes it expensive at the start. As long as you keep your nose relatively clean it’s not expensive to maintain. Q: Do you have a pit crew? A: My dad is the crew chief and my mom does a lot of other stuff. Sometimes I have my

Chelsey Wilson QC PHOTO BY GORD WALDNER

friends there.

Q: Are you one of the few women racing? A: I’m the only woman racing Legends. There’s more now in the last couple years in racing in general. Over all there’s not many female race car drivers. Q: What’s it like competing in a man’s world? A: I learned a lot in kart racing. It’s hard. You never want to say this but you get treated differently, and it’s not always in the best way. But I mean once you put the helmet on — which is what my dad always says — everyone is the same. Everyone is a racer, it doesn’t matter if you’re a girl or a guy or anything else. Once you have your helmet on and you’re in your car, you’re the same as the person beside you and in front of you and behind you. It’s tough but you have to deal with it. If you love racing so much, it really doesn’t matter. Q: Does racing on the track help your driving skills overall? A: It sounds ridiculous but it really does. You’re way more aware. In a race car you’re travelling at high rates of speed in close quarters with many other people. And you have a cement wall on both sides of you. If you screw up, you’re going to crash. With racing, it helps me read other people’s driving. When you’re racing you have to read the person in front of you.

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Q: Have you crashed before? A: Yah. I actually crashed last week. Any racer will tell you crashing is part of it. It happens. You always want to avoid it, but it happens. When you’re racing two inches ahead of another car at 200 km/hour going into a corner you can’t always save it. Q: How fast are you driving on the track? A: Probably upwards of 120 km/h. We don’t have speedometers though.

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EVENTS

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MUSIC

Thursd ay, S e p t . 27 Dan Silljer Band with The Boom Booms McNally’s Tavern 2226 Dewdney Ave. Gavin Harrison Drum Clinic The Exchange, 2431 8th Ave. 54-40 Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr. Friday, Se pt . 28 BreakOut West Kickoff Concert: Rah Rah and Jason Plumb & The Willing 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. City Square Plaza BreakOut West Kickoff Concert: Foam Lake, Said The Whale and Library Voices 4-8 p.m., City Square Plaza Mary Caroline — 8-8:45 p.m. Fur Eel — 9-9:45 p.m. Sidney York — 10-10:45 p.m. Smokekiller — 11-11:45 p.m. The Steadies — 12-12:45 a.m. Fountains of Youth — 1-1:45 a.m. McNally’s Tavern 2226 Dewdney Ave. Magnetic North — 8-8:45 p.m. Indian City 9-9:45 p.m. Slow Down, Molasses — 1010:45 p.m. Shuyler Jansen — 11-11:45 p.m. Castle River — 12-12:45 a.m. Cityreal — 1-1:45 a.m. The Exchange, 2431 8th Ave. Sarah MacDougall — 8-8:45 p.m. Belle Plaine — 9-9:45 p.m. Dana Sipos — 10-10:45 p.m. Oh My Darling — 11-11:45 p.m. The Club at the Exchange 2431 8th Ave. Blake Berglund — 8-8:45 p.m. Tenille — 9-9:45 p.m. Sean Hogan — 10-10:45 p.m. Keith and Renee — 11-11:45 p.m. Jerry Sereda — 12-12:45 a.m. The Artful Dodger, 1631 11th Ave.

Scott Benson Band — 8-8:45 p.m. Alexis Normand — 9-9:45 p.m. Michel Lalonde — 10-10:45 p.m. Marco Castillo — 11-11:45 p.m. Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St. Jeff McLeod — 8-8:45 p.m. Val Halla — 9-9:45 p.m. Indio Saravanja — 10-10:45 p.m. Cam Penner — 11-11:45 p.m. Slow Food Pub, 2124 Albert St. Joal Kamps — 8-8:45 p.m. Mireille Moquin — 9-9:45 p.m. Zachary Lucky — 10-10:45 p.m. Rosie and The Riveters — 11-11:45 p.m. Crave, 1925 Victoria Ave. Don Amero — 9-9:45 p.m. Brandon Isaak — 10-10:45 p.m. David Gogo — 11-11:45 p.m. The Harpoonist & the Axe Murderer — 12-12:45 a.m. The Ramblin’ Ambassadors — 1-1:45 a.m. The Gaslight Saloon 1235 Broad St.

Murderer — 10-10:45 p.m. The Ramblin’ Ambassadors — 11-11:45 p.m. Imaginary Cities — 12-12:45 a.m. Slow Down, Molasses — 1-1:45 a.m. McNally’s Tavern 2226 Dewdney Ave. Indigo Joseph — 8-8:45 p.m. JP Hoe — 9-9:45 p.m. Magnetic North — 10-10:45 p.m. Rococode — 11-11:45 p.m. Sidney York — 12-12:45 a.m. Said The Whale — 1-1:45 a.m. The Exchange, 2431 8th Ave. Zachary Lucky — 8-8:45 p.m. Mary Caroline — 9-9:45 p.m. Sean Hogan — 10-10:45 p.m. Keith and Renee — 11-11:45 p.m. The Club at the Exchange 2431 8th Ave. Don Amero — 8-8:45 p.m. Murray Porter — 9-9:45 p.m. Jerry Sereda — 10-10:45 p.m. Indian City — 11-11:45 p.m. Rellik — 12-12:45 a.m. The Artful Dodger, 1631 11th Ave.

Flo — 9-9:45 p.m. Animal Nation — 10-10:45 p.m. Georgia Murray — 11-11:45 p.m. Evil Ebenezer — 12-12:45 a.m. Rellik — 1-1:45 a.m. O’Hanlon’s, 1947 Scarth St.

Michel Lalonde — 8-8:45 p.m. Mireille Moquin — 9-9:45 p.m. Alexis Normand — 10-10:45 p.m. Daniel ROA — 11-11:45 p.m. Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St.

Indigo Joseph — 9-9:45 p.m. Federal Lights — 10-10:45 p.m. JP Hoe — 11-11:45 p.m. Rococode — 12-12:45 a.m. The Lonesome Weekends — 1-1:45 a.m. The Artesian, 2627 13th Ave.

Smokekiller — 8-8:45 p.m. Flo — 9-9:45 p.m. Jeans Boots — 10-10:45 p.m. Library Voices — 11-11:45 p.m. Foam Lake — 12-12:45 a.m. Federal Lights — 1-1:45 a.m. O’Hanlon’s, 1947 Scarth St.

S a t u rday, S e p t . 2 9

Val Halla — 8-8:45 p.m. Joal Kamps — 9-9:45 p.m. Brandon Isaak — 10-10:45 p.m. David Gogo — 11-11:45 p.m. Slow Food Pub, 2124 Albert St.

The Sip’s Got Talent Metis jigging, fiddle playing 2-4 p.m., The Sip, 306 Albert St. BreakOut West Classical Music Showcase 7-9 p.m. Knox Metropolitan Church 2340 Victoria Ave. Tenille — 8-8:45 p.m. Blake Berglund — 9-9:45 p.m. The Harpoonist & the Axe

Scott Benson Band — 8-8:45 p.m. Jeff McLeod — 9-9:45 p.m. Belle Plaine — 10-10:45 p.m. Cam Penner — 11-11:45 p.m. Indio Saravanja — 12-12:45 a.m. Jason Plumb & The Willing — 1-1:45 a.m. The Artesian, 2627 13th Ave.

Marco Castillo — 8-8:45 p.m. Sarah MacDougall — 9-9:45 p.m. Oh My Darling — 10-10:45 p.m. Dana Sipos — 11-11:45 p.m. Crave, 1925 Victoria Ave. Shuyler Jansen — 9-9:45 p.m. Castle River — 10-10:45 p.m. Fountains of Youth — 11-11:45 p.m. Makeshift Innocence — 12-12:45 a.m. The Steadies — 1-1:45 a.m. The Gaslight Saloon 1235 Broad St. Georgia Murray — 9-9:45 p.m. Cityreal — 10-10:45 p.m. Animal Nation — 11-11:45 p.m. Evil Ebenezer — 12-12:45 a.m. Sound Society — 1-1:45 a.m. Pure Ultra Lounge 2044 Dewdney Ave. Sunday, Se pt . 30 Conservatory Centennial Concert Series: Flute Trio and Guitar 2:30 p.m. Darke Hall, 2155 College Ave. SOCAN Songwriters Circle Featuring Jay Semko, Greg MacPherson, Bob Kemmis and Tenille 4-5:30 p.m., Cannington Room, Regina Inn, 1975 Broad St. S. Nick Faye with Tara Holloway and Tiny Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St. Monday, O c t . 1 Monday Night Jazz & Blues: The Whole Half Steps Bushwakker, 2206 Dewdney Oktoberfest featuring the Western Senators Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr. Tuesday, O c t . 2 Tuesday Night Troubador jam night Every Tuesday, 8 p.m. Bocados, 2037 Park St.

Kathleen Edwards, Jenn Grant The Exchange, 2431 8th Ave. Wed n esd ay, O c t . 3 Wednesday Night Folk: The Sean Burns Trio Bushwakker 2206 Dewdney Ave. Jam Night Every Wednesday McNally’s Tavern 2226 Dewdney Ave. Kathleen Edwards, Jenn Grant The Exchange, 2431 8th Ave.

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ART

Out of the Gate Art by Cate Francis, Up Morelli, Gerda Ostenick, Michelle Brownridge, Andre Norberg, Donna Stackdale, Theresa Gagne and Neema Baghela. On display from Monday, Sept. 24 to Friday, Sept. 28 Reception Friday, Sept. 28, 2-7 p.m. CARFAC Regina office, 1734 Dewdney Ave. NG30 Friday, Sept. 28, noon-5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, noon-5 p.m. Neutral Ground, 1856 Scarth St., second floor Art Bound Books: A Sketchbook Library Launch Saturday, Sept. 29, 1-4 p.m. Dunlop Art Gallery, Central Library, 2311-12th Ave. Beyond the Box Saturday, Sept. 29, noon-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30, noon-5 p.m. Neil Balkwill Civic Arts Centre, 2420 Elphinstone St. Portraits of Survivors: The Art of Linda Moskalyk Until Oct. 2 Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St. Magnetic Fields: Art by Marie Lannoo Until Oct. 6

Art Gallery of Regina Neil Balkwill Civic Arts Centre, 2420 Elphinstone St. Jane Evans: Fresh Prospects Until Oct. 13 McIntyre Gallery 2347 McIntyre St. Ruins to Renaissance: The Rise of the MacKenzie Bequest Until Oct. 14 MacKenzie Art Gallery 3475 Albert St. Twenty Paintings: Sean William Randall Until Oct. 19 Nouveau Gallery 2146 Albert St.

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T H E AT R E

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Regina Little Theatre Wednesday, Oct. 3-Saturday, Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m. Regina Performing Arts Centre, 1077 Angus St.

# SPECIAL EVENTS Thursday Night Salsa on the Plaza Thursday, Sept. 27, 7 p.m. City Square Plaza BreakOut West conference Thursday, Sept. 27-Sunday, Sept. 30 Regina Inn, 1975 Broad St. S. Organization of Saskatchewan Arts Councils (OSAC) open house Friday, Sept. 28, 2-4:30 p.m. 1102 8th Ave. Print Culture: Monoprint workshop at CARFAC Sask. Friday, Sept. 28, 2-7 p.m. 1734A Dewdney Ave. Flatland Artists Studios Open House Friday, Sept. 28, 5-8 p.m. 1100 Broad St.

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EVENTS Returning Messages to the Earth: seed papermaking workshop Friday, Sept. 28, 6-6:45 p.m., First Nations University of Canada Art Gallery U of R Rams vs. Manitoba Bisons Friday, Sept. 28, 7 p.m. Mosaic Stadium Men’s hockey U of R Cougars vs. UBC Friday, Sept. 28, 7 p.m. The Co-operators Centre, Evraz Place Poetry Slam Friday, Sept. 28, 7:30-10 p.m., 2936 13th Ave. Historic Downtown walking tour Saturday, Sept. 29, 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Tour lasts one hour. Meet at the Lorne

Street entrance of the Central Library, 2311-12th Ave. Discovering Regina’s past with Historypin Saturday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Central Library, 2311-12th Ave. Edit-a-What? Wikipedia Editathon Saturday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Prairie History Room, Central Library, 2311-12th Ave. BreakOut West: Family Day Mini Breakout West Featuring Kindermusik, RSO Chamber Players, hip-hop, drumming, face painting, balloon sculpting and more! Saturday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Royal Saskatchewan Museum

Dorkbot Regina Electronic jam session with instruments and computers Saturday, Sept. 29, 1-5 p.m., 1856 Scarth St., second floor

Globe Theatre open house Saturday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., 1801 Scarth A Play Day Free workshop and performance in creative play Saturday, Sept. 29, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 2627 13th Ave. Articulate Ink printmaking open studio Saturday, Sept. 29, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St. Say “Yes!” – An introduction to theatrical improvisation with Judy Wensel Saturday, Sept. 29, 1 to 3 p.m. Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St.

Under the Harvest Moon Heritage community celebration Saturday, Sept. 29, 3-8 p.m. Regina Senior Citizens Centre, 2134 Winnipeg St. and Maple Leaf Park, 1120 14th Ave. India Supper Night Saturday, Sept. 29, 5:30 p.m., Conexus Arts Centre, 200 Lakeshore Dr.

Saskatchewan Roughriders vs. B.C. Lions Saturday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m. Mosaic Stadium

Wednesday, Oct. 3, 7 p.m. Brandt Centre, Evraz Place

to walk in and fall in love with Dracula’s daughter, Mavis (Selena Gomez).

#

Wordplay creativewriting workshop Sunday, Sept. 30, 1-4 p.m. Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton St.

Comedy Grind Gabbo’s 2338 Dewdney Ave. Every Saturday night

West Meadows Raceway live harness racing Sunday, Sept. 30, 1:30 p.m. Pinkie Road, one mile north of the Trans-Canada Highway

#

Looper Action/Sci-Fi A hit man (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) works for the mob of the future, which employs “loopers” to dispose of people who are sent from the future. When he recognizes one hit as his future self (Bruce Willis), he hesitates to do the job.

Western Canadian Music Awards Gala Sunday, Sept. 30, 8 p.m. Casino Regina Show Lounge, 1880 Sask Dr.

Men’s hockey U of R Cougars vs. UBC Saturday, Sept. 29, 7 p.m. The Co-operators Centre, Evraz Place

Regina Pats vs. Moose Jaw Warriors

COMEDY

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Hotel Transylvania Family/Animated Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) runs a five-star resort, Hotel Transylvania, where monsters and their families can live it up without worrying about frightening humans. But their world may come crashing down when an ordinary guy happens

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OUTSIDE THE LINES # Colouring contest Each week, Stephanie McKay creates a timely illustration meant to please kids of all ages. Children can colour the page, have a picture taken with the finished product and email it to QC@leaderpost.com. One winner will be chosen each week.

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ON THE SCENE 1.

The Regina Humane Society’s FurBall was held on Friday, Sept. 21.

2.

3.

4.

5.

The Regina Humane Society hosted its first ever FurBall fundraiser on Friday, Sept. 21. It was a blast from the past for 175 guests at the Conexus Arts Centre. The event’s ’80s night theme was everywhere in sight — even during supper, with cassette-tape centre pieces at every table. After the meal, guests took in games like ’80s trivia, made use of a photo booth, and danced the night away to Regina cover band Dangerous Cheese. The event raised over $20,000 for the shelter, which cares for 4,500 animals in the course of a year.

1: Brie Hamblin, Lindsay West, Kristin Folk and Theresa Sabourin 2: Giles Nicholl and Amber Sikorski 3: Sharlene and Chris Arklie 4: Karyn Struble, Rebecca Mycock, Adriana Tomic, Maria Doyle and Kirby Bezan 5: Mik Supial, Michele Ailsby, Robin Canham and Kirk Nordick

QC PHOTOGRAPHY BY TROY FLEECE

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SHARP EATS

See a food trend you think deserves a highlight? Email QC@leaderpost.com or visit QC on Facebook

#SASKATCHEWAN FOOD TRENDS

Texting: A modern etiquette critique By Jenn Sharp I’ve worked in restaurants since I was 17 and still work a few weekend shifts. During this time I’ve noticed a change in the way some people eat together and I don’t like it. I’m sure you’ve seen it — maybe you’ve done it. Two people are out for dinner together. But they hardly speak a word. Why? They’re using their smart phones the entire time. I’ve seen it so many times. A couple comes in, orders their meals and proceeds to spend the rest of the evening texting, Facebooking, checking email, playing with apps or scrolling through their Twitter feed. It’s ridiculous. What’s more ridiculous is the fact that people would choose to spend their hard earned dollars on a meal they’re not going to enjoy. Have you seen someone eating while texting? I have and it looks stupid. Not to mention insecure. The manager of a place I worked at after high school used to meet his wife for an after-work drink (she worked nearby). They rarely talked to each other because he was busy on his phone. She would just sit there and play with the straw in her drink, trying to look like she wasn’t utterly bored. It’s even worse with kids. I went out for lunch a few weeks ago with a friend. She brought along her preteen daughter who had just received a portable video game for her birthday. Not only did her daughter not say hello to me when I greeted her, she also ignored her mom when asked what she wanted for lunch. When our food arrived she tried to eat it while playing her game. My friend told her to put the game away but the girl refused. A fight ensued. Why did she have her video game at the table in a restaurant in the first place? She was old enough to join our conversation (we directed a few questions her way but got ignored). I realize it was a new toy but there needs to be boundaries on where and when to use it. The problem is that children seem to be stimulated by electronics of some sort ALL THE TIME. And parents have fallen into the trap of allowing them to be constantly wired. I’ll admit, it’s way easier than fighting or trying to engage them in conversation but is it better? I’m going to sound old but what kind of a generation are we raising? It’s a generation that goes out for a dinner date just to sit at the table and post to Facebook what restaurant they’re at and who they’re with. How about actually talking to the person you chose to share a meal with? I’m not sure when talking to people at the table became old-fashioned but from what I’ve seen, everyone has his or her cell sitting out. You know, just in case someone more stimulating calls. What’s even more absurd than the couple texting throughout dinner is watching a large group of people all involved in their phones and completely ignoring one another. What’s the point? Why didn’t you just stay home and save your money? I’m not going to lie — I love my smart phone and can’t go anywhere without it. But when I’m out to enjoy a nice meal with a friend, I turn the ringer off and I leave it in my bag. I think it’s rude to leave it out on the table (unless you’re expecting an important call, you have a sick kid at home, etc.). The message it sends is this: You’re OK to talk to for now but there’s always the potential of someone better coming along.

The food may be awesome and the conversation stimulating, but it’s no match for a smart phone. qc photo by Andrew Spearin

#

r e c i p e s f o r a S u n d ay a f t e r n o o n

Garden Tomato Bruschetta If your garden is anything like mine, you’ve got an abundance of tomatoes right now and no way to eat them all before they rot. Bruschetta is a beautiful and easy way to use them — either as an appetizer or a main meal. I don’t always measure out ingredients when I cook, I just add whatever looks right. Adjust this recipe to how many people you’ll feed and your own tastes. Prepared as below, it will feed four as an appetizer or two as a main meal (just add some roast chicken on the side). Ingredients: > 2 tbsp. Three Farmers Camelina Oil (or olive oil) > 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar > 2 to 3 tbsp. of your favourite pesto > 1 small white onion > 4 to 5 medium sized tomatoes

> 6 to 8 fresh basil leaves > Salt and pepper to taste > ½ cup Parmesan cheese > Small loaf of your favourite bread (I like baguettes or multigrain loaves that can be thinly sliced)

Method: 1. Finely chop the onion and basil. Mix in a bowl with the white wine vinegar and oil. 2. Chop the tomatoes and add to the onion mixture. 3. Add the pesto, salt and pepper. Stir together gently so you don’t crush the tomatoes. 4. Cut bread into small (three bite) portions. 5. Spoon bruschetta onto bread. Top with Parmesan. Bake in 350 oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until the bread has turned slightly brown and crusty, but not over-cooked. Enjoy!

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37

H o r o s c o p e s b y h o l i d ay

For week of Sept. 23, 2012 By Holiday Mathis This is the first full week of the Libra sun. The scales represent justice for all. Even the day and night want to be equalized. This solar transit is also marked by beauty, as Libra is one of the most artistic and visually astute signs of the zodiac. We’ll see our environment with new eyes this week, noting how we might increase the fabulous factor or turn up the functionality. The best changes will do both. ARIES (March 21-April 19).

Your thoughts return to that individual who doesn’t consistently return your calls, acknowledge your contributions or support your self-esteem. This person makes you work for love and approval. Maybe you’re a better person for the effort, but ultimately, you should be the one who determines your value. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Your original ideas are often stellar, but you’ve also learned to respect the advice of others.

This week, the same wisdom will be expressed through three different sources, confirming your suspicions that it’s just the information that could catapult you into a new realm of accomplishment should you choose to act on it. GEMINI (May 21-June 21).

Singing secretly and all alone feels cathartic. Singing in front of people, should you be brave enough to do it, is a different experience, one in which your feelings are laid bare. You don’t have to be musically talented to consider this an option this week. There is a feeling you want to express, and express it you will.

CANCER (June 22-July 22). Have you ever forgiven someone so thoroughly that you really did forget the transgression occurred at all? It’s easier to do when the transgression in question truly had little impact or no offense was

taken. You’ll have fewer rules for yourself and others this week, consciously striving to love unconditionally. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). The

activities you choose will vary, but your quest remains. Whether baking the most delectable cake you have ever made, selling a product with extreme elegance or achieving top ranking in an online video game, your desire to do your very best will guide you. Mastery is mastery no matter how you focus this intention. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).

Last week, your dance card was filled with admiring souls clamoring for your attention. Then suddenly the sun left your party and took the disco ball, too. Every celebration has to end eventually. You may be happy for the break now. Take stock of all that has happened in recent history, and organize the photos. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You

may be inexplicably drawn

to someone older than you, as you are subconsciously feeling mature Saturn slowly chugging through your realm of the sky. Is your attraction more to do with love or learning? Either way, there’s something to gain from relating to those who have been there, done that and lived to tell. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).

The passionate energy of Mars in your sign is fueling a chase. Whether you approach the challenge strategically or let your innate strengths lead you on an instinctual journey, the thrill will be in the approach. Once the prize is attained, the excitement is over. So revel in the action as it unfolds this week.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). An unsystematic life takes

too much effort. That’s why you create systems: series of steps you can repeat in order to maintain a level of functionality in your world. You are still running a certain part of your life without rhyme or

reason. This week, you’ll introduce some much needed structure to the scene. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).

Showing someone how awesome you are will not make that person like you more, and it may have the opposite result. What people love is when you can reveal to them how awesome they are -- something you do well this week. You shine a light on the internal riches of others.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).

Even though you are usually striving to improve yourself, your environment or the world at large, there are times when it’s best not to. A perpetual state of self-improvement can be exhausting and counterproductive. Right now, it’s best to accept what is and, for the time being, decide that it’s absolutely good enough.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).

You’ll change your experience of another person after being introduced to another

TAKE SOME TIME

FORYOU AND GET THE

WHOLE STORY.

piece of this person’s life. It’s like the lighting has shifted. Your sign mate Albert Einstein suggested that “reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.” With illusions, lighting can be crucial. THIS

WEEK’S

BIRTHDAYS:

You’ll express yourself well and often over the next seven weeks. This puts you in hot water at times, but ultimately, people will know you for who you really are, and you’ll get to live in a more authentic way. Artistic or literary fields will call on you before the year is over. The new year brings a happy partnership that works in both a business and personal context. A mix of salesmanship and creativity brings extra money in December, May and June. Holiday Mathis is the author of “Rock Your Stars.” If you would like to write to her, please go to www.creators.com and click on “Write the Author” on the Holiday Mathis page, or you may send her a postcard in the mail.

st

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Book club #

NEXT MONTH: How To Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran

AN INVISIBLE THREAD

One small decision changed two lives By Jenn Sharp and Ashley Martin In 1986, Laura Schroff was 35 and a successful advertising executive for USA Today. Maurice Mazyck was an 11-year-old boy, starving and panhandling in the streets of New York City. They met when Schroff, rather than ignoring the boy’s request for spare change, decided to take him to lunch at McDonalds. It was the beginning of an unlikely friendship that ultimately saved each of them. ASHLEY MARTIN: At points in her book, Laura Schroff asks herself if she was doing more harm than good by befriending Maurice — whether giving him support, homecooked meals and the ability to trust other people, was taking away the skills he needed to survive on the streets. What do you think? Would Maurice have been better off if he’d never met Laura? JENN SHARP: No, I don’t think Maurice would have been better off. She definitely had a positive impact on his life. Like any relationship there were ups and downs and moments of doubt. I think it was huge for Maurice to have someone that cared about him and wanted him to succeed. As much as he loved his mother, she wasn’t able to give that to him. Children need someone that loves them enough to provide encouragement and strength, and to say no when it’s needed. Schroff provided these mother qualities that Maurice’s mom lacked. Maurice likely chose the path he did (and not one of addiction and gang involvement) thanks to Schroff ’s influence.

Schroff frequently talks about her own childhood and her abusive father. Despite all the damage he did to the family, she still yearned for the man he could have been if he had stopped drinking. Maurice also loved his mother unconditionally, despite her shortcomings. For me, this was a lesson in how much children will love their parents — no matter the circumstances. What do you think? AM: While Schroff ’s father Nunzie was drunk, he would terrorize his children and beat his wife. In one instance, he threw whole bottles of liquor at the wall above his daughter’s bed, soaking the mattress in liquor and spraying

Laura Schroff and Maurice Mazyck 25 years after they first met.

shards of glass all over his children, who were cowering in fear. At another point, his wife suffered three broken ribs because he kicked her torso repeatedly. Another time, he nearly killed the family as he drunkenly drove them home in a snowstorm, decided to speed, lost control of the vehicle and nearly crashed into a bus. In spite of all of this, Schroff says there were times he was a good father. Eventually as an adult, she cut him off for being a bully and didn’t speak to him for the rest of his life, but throughout her book she excuses his behaviour: “The tragedy of my father’s life is that he truly did love my mother,” “... what a great fa-

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ther he sometimes was, and might have been, if only he had known how,” and, “Years later Steven told me that in one of his last conversations with my father, he asked him why he acted the way he did. ‘I don’t know,’ my father said. ‘I don’t mean to yell at you. I am sorry that I was the way I was.’ ” Schroff is critical of Nunzie and his abuse, yet still believes he could have been a good father. Maurice seems to unconditionally love his mother, Darcella, and never questions the fact that she loved him. Even though Darcella would shoot up in front of him, “these were the best moments — when his mother found her peace … his mother was happy now and that’s all that mattered to him.” Schroff and Maurice each had a parent with a vice, but in the end, Darcella got sober and Nunzie didn’t. Throughout his childhood, Maurice’s mother really tried to get sober a few times. I wonder if this makes it easier for Maurice to unconditionally love Darcella. Nunzie never even admitted he had a problem. When Schroff met her future husband Mi-

chael, it meant Maurice was no longer the only man in her life. How did these relationships each impact the other? (Michael excluding Maurice, etc.) JS: I wish Schroff had stood up to her husband more. Michael didn’t want Maurice to be in their lives and I found it hard to take that he would want to alienate a person that obviously meant so much to his wife. I understand how difficult it must have been for Schroff to feel like she was deserting Maurice or choosing her husband over him. I also understand that people make sacrifices and compromises for relationships all the time. And of course hindsight is always 20/20. It’s so easy to say “I wish I had said this or done that,” but the reality is she didn’t and it affected her relationship with Maurice. He pulled away when he became a young father (because he didn’t want to disappoint her) and they lost touch for years. They’ve found each other again though and Schroff visits Maurice and his family often (he has seven children).

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