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CITY NEWS:

The truth behind Regina’s shifting foundations   P. 10

FASHION:

Noisy and fragile, this dress takes fashion to a new level  P. 14

SHARP EATS:

La Bodega named one of the top 50 restaurants in Canada  P. 31

THE CALL AND THE DUTY

HOW PADRES LIKE DonG Joo Kim MINISTER TO THE MEN AND WOMEN OF CANADA’S MILITARY P. 4

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INDEX #

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I N T H E C I T Y P. 8

O n Th e C o v e r P . 4

Part of the kit of Padre Dong Joo Kim, a captain with the Royal Regina Rifles Reserve.  Photo by Don Healy QC

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ta b l e o f c o n t e n t s

COVER — 4 IN THE CITY — 8 Fond memories of Wascana School CITY NEWS — 10 INVENTORY — 13 FASHION — 14 While it’s difficult to sit down, magazine dress is pure style PARENT TO PARENT — 15 Do you judge reality TV families? MUSIC — 18 READ MY BOOK — 19 Clay Stacey’s The Inquiring Reporter SPACES — 20 A functional new kitchen for character home

WINE WORLD — 21 A taste of Sicily ON THE SCENE — 23 A Sparkling Brunch in support of Osteoporosis Canada WHAT MOVES YOU — 25 The next best thing to a ship for this landlocked pirate MEET MY PET — 26 Sassy the radio mascot Wascana School is a “favourite place” for Regina’s Leasa Gibbons. QC PhoTo by TROY FLEECE CROSSWORD AND SUDOKU — 27 OUTSIDE THE LINES — 28 Artist Stephanie McKay’s weekly drawing for children of all ages EVENTS — 30 SHARP EATS — 31 Regina’s La Bodega sole Saskatchewan entry on Maclean’s top 50 list

QC is published by the Leader-Post – a division of Postmedia Network Inc. – at 1964 Park St., Regina, Sask., S4N 3G4. Marty Klyne is publisher. Rob McLaughlin is deputy publisher/editor-in-chief. For advertising inquiries contact 781-5221; editorial, 1-855-688-6557; home delivery, 781-5212. Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved and commercial use is prohibited. To make any use of this material you must first obtain the permission of the owner of the copyright. For more information, contact the editor at 1-855-688-6557.


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on the cover #

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You know, at that point, all that is left is prayer. — Padre Sandy Scott

R e m e m b r a n c e D ay

Ministering to the troops, in war and peace

Padre Sandy Scott of the North Saskatchewan Regiment recounts the events of March 6, 2010, when Cpl. Darren Fitzpatrick was hit by an improvised explosive device. QC Photo by DREW FOSSUM

By Drew Fossum Major Sandy Scott’s small office is packed with memorabilia from his career in the Canadian Forces. Covering the wall are newspaper clippings, photos of Afghanistan and a picture of Scott receiving a Meritorious Service Medal from the Chief of Defence Staff. There is also a stack of free Bibles on a shelf by the door next to his preacher’s scarf. Scott is a reservist chaplain in the Canadian Army. A

padre, as they are called in the forces — a holy soldier tasked with a mission to keep soldiers spiritually sound. Scott sits back in his chair and smiles when he talks about becoming a chaplain. But his tone is different when the subject is Afghanistan. ■ ■ ■ ■ March 6, 2010. Scott has been in Afghanistan for just over six months and has only a couple

more to go. The Afghan winter is long over but the morning desert is cold as a Canadian Forces patrol rolls out of Forward Operating Base Wilson. Scott is spending time with the troops. He knows them well after the six-month deployment. Just as he finishes a workout, reports scream over the radio that a soldier has been hit by an improvised explosive device (IED). Chaplains offer their soldiers guidance and support. In times of crisis, they also break the bad news. This is one of those days.

Scott tells the troops that one of their own has been seriously hurt in an IED attack. They bow their heads for a short prayer and wait to hear more. What they learn is that Cpl. Darren Fitzpatrick lost both his legs, close to his waist. He was loaded onto a Black Hawk helicopter and taken to hospital at Kandahar Air Field, but the situation is dire. The Commanding Officer of the unit, who was near Fitzpatrick when the bomb went off, orders Scott to lead another round of prayer.


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When a wounded soldier makes it back to Canada, you think he is going to be OK. You think he has it made in the shade. — Scott

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Padre Sandy Scott and Cpl. Tyler Pouteux discuss a training exercise at the Prince Albert armouries.  QC PHOTO BY DREW FOSSUM

“You know, at that point, all that is left is prayer,” Scott says. Canadian riflemen worked hard to keep Fitzpatrick alive. He had been a driver with a unit that was tasked to train the Afghan National Army. With only a couple of months left in his tour, he wanted to put some miles on his boots. The March 6 foot patrol was his first. On March 20, back home in Canada, Cpl. Fitzpatrick died. ■ ■ ■ ■

As Scott remembers that day, he chooses his words carefully, often backing up to add details. He is determined to honour the story. Finally, he shakes his head and concedes it was the lowest point of his tour of duty. “When a wounded soldier makes it back to Canada, you think he is going to be OK. You think he has it made in the shade,” he says. After six months overseas, Scott was emotionally drained from being the crutch that soldiers lean on in the unforgiving heat and on

their darkest days. Fitzpatrick’s was not the first military death Scott experienced. During the course of his career, and throughout the mission in Afghanistan, he had to notify the families of seven soldiers killed in action overseas. Every death is unique, but breaking the news is routine. In his dress uniform, the padre knocks on the door with a high-ranking officer beside him. As the officer gives them the news, loved ones often collapse. Then the officer’s stoic facade dissolves. The padre steps in to help him regain composure. He is committed to stay by the family’s side for the next two weeks. Scott has deep roots in the military. “In some way, shape, or form, I have always been a part of the military for as long as I can remember,” he says. His uncle was Staff Sgt. Hugh Cairns, who won a Victoria Cross in the First World War. During university, Scott was a student chaplain on army bases in the summer. He even met his wife, Elizabeth Moor, on an army base. Continued on Page 6

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Day or night, my boys know my phone is on 24 hours a day. — Padre Dong Joo Kim

Scott and his wife put down roots in Prince Albert in 1995. He then joined the North Saskatchewan Regiment’s “B” Company out of Prince Albert in 2001 as the unit’s padre. Life is hectic. He balances military obligations with those of his church, St. Paul’s Presbyterian. “I love doing parish ministering and I love doing this work. I love soldiering and soldiers need good chaplains,” Scott says. Chaplains have been an integral part of the army since the beginning of the Canadian military. They were active in both world wars and every multinational mission the Canadian military has participated in. Just like any soldier, basic training is mandatory for padres. They undergo regular physical testing and endure the same elements as the troops in training. “You build relationships with those soldiers. Those relationships, particularly when we deploy, bear a lot of fruit,” Scott says. It’s about loitering with intent. Being present in the good times and the bad. Being a padre isn’t only about caring for soldiers during conflict. The effects of war last long after the troops come home. The memory of lost friends and traumatic moments settle like sand in water but rise to the top when unexpectedly shaken. ■

■ ■ ■

Padre Dong Joo Kim, a captain in the Royal Regina Rifles, waits for that moment. “I am not here to convert anybody. I am here to help the troops make sense of what they do. These guys run forward, into danger when everyone else runs away. They need someone to help them make sense of that. “Day or night, my boys know my phone is on 24 hours a day,” Kim says. One night, Padre Kim rushed to a soldier’s house, after getting a desperate plea. After a long chat, the troop told him: “Padre, if you were five minutes later, I am not sure we would be having this conversation. You saved my life.”

Padre Dong Joo Kim, a captain with the Royal Regina Rifles Reserve, at the armouries building in Regina. QC Photo by Don Healy

“Those are the good days,” Kim says. “The days when you make a difference with a soldier.” Kim is solidly built for a man of 53 and sports black hair with only a smattering of grey. He animates what he says with gestures and facial expressions. Around soldiers, he tells self-deprecating jokes and falls back on physical humour when all else fails. He talks about his troops with affection, saying he gets back all the love he gives them. Kim illustrates that with a story

that almost brings him to tears. He was on a brigade exercise last May in southern Manitoba. It was classic spring weather, blazing sun one moment and sleet the next. He spent the week humping out patrols and pumping the troops full of morale. Near the end of the exercise, he received a call from his wife. The sewer was backing up into their newly renovated basement. Four hours away and with no family to come to his aid, Kim did the only thing he could think of. “I texted one of my riflemen and asked for

his help. He said, ‘Padre, don’t worry. You take care of our boys in the field, we will take care of your family back here’,” Kim says. Ten minutes later, a handful of reservists poured into his house, moved the furniture to higher ground, fixed the backed up sewer and minimized the damage to basement. “I was overwhelmed. It affirmed the work I was doing. I knew I was taking care of the guys, when they took that good of care of me,” he says. Kim joined the Canadian Army

Reserve as a padre in 2008, but it wasn’t his first military experience. He served with the South Korean infantry for three years. He was deployed on the North/ South Korean border, where tensions often run high amid constant threats from the isolated neighbour to the north. In 1993, he moved to Canada to attend the Concordia Lutheran Seminary. Afterwards, he and his family moved to Neudorf, Sask., to minister a church with the Lutheran Church of Canada Central District.


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Once a soldier always a soldier. I felt like I needed to be a part of (the army) again. Be with the men in the field. — Dong Joo Kim

“God picks me and my family up from a city of 1.5 million people and puts us down in rural Saskatchewan. He certainly has a sense of humour,” Kim says with a laugh. There were some adjustments, but he and his family fell in love with smalltown living: Hockey, community suppers, school sports. But, he never lost his desire to be a soldier again. “Once a soldier always a soldier. I felt like I needed to be a part of (the army) again. Be with the men in the field.” Kim said goodbye to his congregation, moved his family to Regina and took a pay cut to become a street minister and army padre. He’s also a chaplain with the Regina Police Service. Being a padre and police chaplain, Kim seems always to be on the front lines. ■

■ ■ ■

On Remembrance Day, Canada’s sol-

diers will march onto parade squares, lay wreaths and fire salutes to their fallen comrades. The public will watch. Padres like Maj. Scott and Capt. Kim will be looking on as well, but in a different way. They will be watching for those who need help making sense of it all. The padres suffered losses too, but they restrain their emotions so they can be there for the soldiers who need them. Services and vigils at monuments will come to a quiet end. The soldiers will gather for a couple of customary pitchers at the local legion. The public will go back to a normal day. But the padres will go home. They will sort through their own emotions. And wait for the next call. Drew Fossum is journalism student and a veteran of the Canadian Forces. He served with the 1st Royal Canadian Horse Artillery in southern Afghanistan from October 2009 to May 2010.

Padre Sandy Scott looks at a newspaper clipping from the funeral of Cpl. Jamie Murphy, Canada’s seventh soldier to die in Afghanistan. It was his first military death notification. BRIDGES PHOTO BY DREW FOSSUM

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IN THE CITY #

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Waiting for customers

Jean Tiefenback waits for customers at a flea market and craft sale held at Martin Collegiate in Regina. QC Photo by Michael Bell

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M Y FAV O U R I T E P L A C E

Diversity key to young student’s education By Andrew Matte Leasa Gibbons might have her eye on downtown Regina, but a part of her heart remains in North Central. Gibbons, who works as Downtown Regina’s marketing manager, fondly remembers growing up on Sussex Crescent where she thrived in a neighbourhood represented by many different cultures and econonic backgrounds. She attended classes at Wascana School where she enjoyed learning about children who came from different backgrounds than her own. It also helped her learn plenty about herself.

Q: What drew you to Wascana Community School? A: When I was a kid, it was half a block from my house. So I spent a lot of time there even before I went to school. I went to the playground a lot. I was an only child, so it was a chance for me to interact with other kids. I would run away from home so I could go to the school. I could hear kids outside playing from my house, so that is where I went. Q: What sorts of thing do you remember from your days as an elementary school student? A: Because I was an only child, it felt like I was part of a big family, and it was a very diverse family. the Canadian Bible College was across street. We had folks from Vietnam and we had a large First Nation/Metis population. I was certainly not in the majority. White kids were not the majority at Wascana School. It was awesome. Q: Sounds like you thrived in that diverse environment, right? A: We had kids bused in from more affluent areas to take subjects like home economics and industrial arts. You saw the preppy kids who were probably scared back in the day. You had the farm kids who would get bussed in too. And then there were all the international students. I had a great experience. Q: What do you remember about Grade 8? A: We had an awesome Grade 8 teacher — Mr. Wotherspoon. He had a very tough class to manage. You got everything from parents who have a stable family to parents who are not around at all. He had a variety of kids; some who were beaten and some who hadn’t had breakfast. Q: What else do you remember about Mr. Wotherspoon? A: Mr. Wotherspoon pushed me a lot to the point where I was comfortable to speak in front of the class, which I was terrified of. I learned that I could come out of my comfort zone and still be alive. For me, Grade 8 was a nice stepping stone into high school. Q: Do you go back to the old neighbourhood? A: I drive by all the time. I used to take my kids on a little tour and I’d say, ‘This is where mommy grew up.’ For many people, it might have seemed like an inner-city school. But for me, it was an adventure zone. Q: Did anything bad happen when you were a student there? A: There are baseball diamonds behind the street. And we’d spend a lot of time running around out there. It was also where I had my first fight.

Leasa Gibbons has fond memories from her time as a student at Wascana School in Regina. QC Photo by TROY FLEECE


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CITY NEWS # GLACIAL LAKE REGINA

The real dirt on Regina gumbo

Dale Obleman, left, owner of AAA Solid Foundation Repair Ltd., and his stepson Travis Zerie work at installing waterproof membrane on a house on McTavish Street in Regina. QC Photo by Troy Fleece

By Andrew Matte If you want to know why there’s a crack in your home’s foundation or if you have a bedroom door that sticks when it didn’t used to, you have to look back more than 11,000 years. It all started long before human life came to the Prairies when Glacial Lake Regina covered a significant

portion of southern Saskatchewan. It formed as a giant pool of water run-off for glaciers that covered most of the province. Thanks to educators and documents produced by the likes of the Geological Association of Canada and the Saskatchewan Geological Society, as well as the provincial and federal governments, there is plenty of published material on what many

frustrated homeowners refer to as “Regina gumbo.” The receding glaciers created a varied landscape that included rolling plains, deep valleys and vast sections of land described by geologists as “pool table flat.” The lake — it covered an area about 150 kilometres long and 75 kilometres wide, extending from north of Regina to Weyburn — drained

slowly but left behind land that was uncommonly flat. The soil had a unique chemical makeup that frustrates municipalities and homeowners to this day. “It all has to do with the clay mineral,” said Ulrike Hardenbicker, an associate professor at the University of Regina’s geography department. The issue with the soil has to do with sodium bentonite, a component

that makes the soil eager to take on water and expand. Different versions of bentonite are used for its absorbent qualities for more practical purposes including cat litter and wine making. “If you have 10 grams of clay, it can absorb up to 30 grams of water. And when that happens, it swells. When it’s wet, it changes its volume,” said Hardenbicker.


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If you have 10 grams of clay, it can absorb up to 30 grams of water. And when that happens, it swells. When it’s wet, it changes its volume. —Ulrike Hardenbicker

So the reaction to all of the mucky clay on which Regina was built is relatively straightforward — when it gets wet, the clay grows and holds onto its expanded size for long periods of time. It drains slowly and the soil similarly shrinks to its original size. Specific rates of expansion and absorption vary depending on the chemical makeup of the clay — the amount of this mineral-infused soil differs across the former lake bed. This unique clay is anywhere from five metres to more than 15 metres deep across the former lake bed. The size and shape of the former lake bed can sometimes be seen from the air because the flat terrain is slightly lower and differs from the rolling land that’s beside it. It’s also the reason Regina’s skyline can be seen by motorists driving from Moose Jaw — because it’s on the same elevation. Motorists driving south from Saskatoon on Highway 11 don’t see Regina from the same distance because the city and the lake bed aren’t as visible.

The expansion of clay is bad for concrete foundations — the swollen earth can push against exterior walls or force basement floors to rise more than a few inches. Most homeowners in Regina and other places like Moose Jaw and Weyburn know all about this. Thousands of homeowners have required the services of engineers and foundation-repair experts to help prevent the earth’s movement from harming their house. Bracing basement walls with vertical steel beams bolted to foundation floors and ceiling joists is a common way to keep foundation walls from moving inward. Dale Obleman, owner of AAA Solid Foundation Repair, understands how and why houses shift and heave over the years due to moisture and clay expansion. His advice is to hire an expert who can take measurements that can determine whether repairs are necessary or whether something more drastic is needed to prevent walls from collapsing. Continued on Page 12

This map illustrates the location of Glacial Lake Regina, the large body of glacial runoff that formed thousands of years ago. Map published with permission from the Saskatchewan Geological Society

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There are foundations in Regina that have stood up very well over the years and there are some that have done very poorly. — Wayne Clifton

“The clay expands and the pressure it puts on foundations is something else,” said Obleman. “I’ve seen older houses in need of bracing and I have seen brand new houses where the walls have already started to come in.” While opinions differ among real-estate agents, house builders, contractors and homeowners, the majority agree that house shifting and clay expansion is worse in south Regina than it is in north and east Regina. However, all areas of the city and beyond have experienced shifting, Obleman said. While there’s no foolproof method when it comes to preventing cracked basement walls or heaving basement floors, new construction methods are helping. This includes the building of piles, which are usually long strands of cement strengthened with rebar that extend deep into the ground to help stabilize house foun-

Framer Kelly Harper helps build a floating wall in the basement of a new house on Anthony Place in northwest Regina. qc Photo by Troy Fleece

dations. Some builders use piles and create voids under houses so that the movement of earth can be accommodated. However, despite the best efforts of engineers and builders, preventing shifting altogether is impossible — construction crews

still build “floating walls” when they frame basements for living space. The walls are built to accommodate a few inches of movement in case basement floors rise under pressure from swelling Regina gumbo. Regina engineer Wayne Clifton

said that no building, no subdivision and no municipality within Glacial Lake Regina is immune from the effects of shifting earth. However, the amount of shifting can depend on the depth of the gumbo, as well as the efficiency of drainage and the moisture content of the ground at the time of construction. These are among the reasons some basements have collapsed while others have remained solid. “There are foundations in Regina that have stood up very well over the years and there are some that have done very poorly,” he said. Engineers are regularly called in to prepare geo-technical reports before houses, subdivisions and commercial structures are built so the depth and moisture content of the gumbo can be predicted and the builders know how to best limit ground shifting. The number and depth of piles also depends on the depth of gumbo,

as well as the weight and size of building, Clifton added. The shifting affects highways and sidewalks just as much as foundations — municipalities routinely send crews to repair sidewalks, streets and even lightposts that have been toppled by the shifting ground. There is, however, an upside to living and farming on land known for its abilities to attract and retain moisture. The sodium bentoniteinfused soil means it’s ideal for growing; farmland on the former Glacial Lake is considered to be some of the best in the world. “This soil retains water but it also means it retains nutrients,” said Hardenbicker. “So in a way, it’s also the best kind of soil to have in this part of the province.” She added the slow-drainage rates also mean the land is susceptible to flooding, an occurence many have recently experienced.

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INVENTORY #

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We want to hear from you: Tell us about your local business. Email qc@leaderpost.com

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FASHION #

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Have you created a unique outfit you’d like to share? Email us at qc@leaderpost.com

S a s k at c h e wa n Fa s h i o n

Fashion magazine takes on a whole new meaning By Ashley Martin A paper dress is rustly and not the most comfortable thing to wear, but it looks pretty cool. So when Holly Schaeffer saw photos of San Francisco photographer Bambi Cantrell’s newspaper ball gown, it inspired the 21-year-old to make her own paper dress. Using her 15-year-old sister Zoey as a model, the Schaeffers verbally planned out the dress — without drawing a pattern — and created it right onto a tank top and shorts that Zoey was wearing. The dress took about two hours to make and is made up of “mostly National Geographic (magazines) and a couple of free other ones that I just picked up around Regina,” said Holly, who studied photography at McKay Career College in Saskatoon and now runs her own business (hollyschaeffer photography.com). “We almost ran out of tape,” she added.

Holly Schaeffer 1. EARRINGS: Online 2. DRESS: American Eagle. “I like the style. It’s kind of vintage, almost Addams Family or something but kind of classy.” 3. RINGS: Ardene. “Cheap. Three for $10.” NAILS: “I just painted 4. over the tape and peeled the tape off and made some stripes.”

QC PHOTO BY DON HEALY

Zoey Schaeffer 1. FASCINATOR: Made from a table centrepiece 2. DRESS: Made from magazines, scotch tape and duct tape. “It’s not too bad considering it’s made out of paper. I wouldn’t want to wear it all day, especially not to sit down in.”


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Each week QC gathers advice from parents to share with other moms and dads. This week we asked:

Do you judge reality TV families? “I know I sure do! The Honey Boo Boos and the men who have six wives or 30 kids or whatever they are up to now ... it’s all a bit ridiculous already. It’s not entertainment, it’s people who want to get their 15 minutes of fame and outdo the next person. I’d like to see a reality show about families who go out of their way to help out another family. Something positive like swapping babysitting or offering rides to school or sports when they know both parents have to work.” — Kristin Froese “I try not to judge the families, but I do judge TLC! I turned it off a long time ago!” — Roberta Cain “I judge TLC for the crap they broadcast! But I gotta admit that the mind-numbing comedy of Honey Boo Boo on the DVR has got me through many 3 a.m. feeds. And Extreme Cheapskates can’t be beat!” — Annette A. Klassen “No. I suspect most of what happens on screen is scripted and/or staged, so I don’t think that’s their ‘real’ life.” — Kim Hambleton “I do not judge TV families, nor do I watch them very often. It is interesting and sometimes entertaining to have a glimpse into how other people live.” — Carla Contreras “I do but I don’t watch any reality shows. So I guess I judge them based on things I read on the Internet.” — Dee B. “I do not watch reality TV, however I did watch Jon and Kate Plus 8 and Kate’s need for ‘star status’ was disturbing and I believe affected the well-being of her children.” — Angela O. “No … not usually. I really don’t watch a lot of reality TV families. I used to watch Jon & Kate Plus 8 diligently and I never judged the family’s decisions. I was just thankful that that wasn’t me with eight kids. I also really enjoyed watching the Duggars and the Roloffs. All of them seemed/seem to portray good family values that are becoming less common in our society today, which is so sad.” — Chera Miller “We don’t watch TV so I have no comment :)” — Nicole Storms “I don’t believe that reality TV families are ‘real.’ I think a lot of it is scripted. I didn’t mind John and Kate plus 8 but the new Honey Boo Boo show is ridiculous and is basically poking fun at the family. I think reality TV is going too far.” — Nikki Melnyk “Don’t judge reality TV families negatively. As we

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watch you can almost picture yourself in the same situations and brings back memories and laughs. You’re sitting there thinking I can totally see myself doing that or I have done that or the remember when we did that lol.” — Jason F.

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“We don’t really watch reality family shows ... The Voice, Survivor, and Amazing Race mostly, and I’m not sure that applies. I guess we don’t get in to family dramas because we would compare ourselves as either better or beneath them in certain areas of our life. I don’t want to fall into the trap that can set, and instead want to strive for healthy balance for me and my family, and in turn influence others I can to do the same.” — Angela Wells “I would have to say yes. The families who act or should I say pretend life is perfect, but then their lives fall apart onscreen. It seems the more money, the more fake and you can just tell all of their crazy experiences are scripted. I do have a favourite that if I catch it on TV I will watch, Here Comes Honey BooBoo! You just know how they present themselves on TV would be no different than if you came across them in person. I think the majority of the population relates more to this redneck family and their shenanigans.” — Alysia Czmuchalek “I refuse to watch any of that. Even commercials put me in a blinding rage. So I guess I judge by not taking part.” — Angie Douville “We don’t really watch the reality family sort of programmes, don’t really have anything to say about them, apart from WHY?” — Debbie Amor “We do not judge reality TV families because we do not watch any reality TV shows. We actually do not watch much TV and do not have cable.” — Shelly Lambert “Well, overall, yes. The biggest thing I had a problem with was airing all of the families trials & tribulations in public. Just imagine 10-20 years from now, how all those kids will feel about having zero privacy growing up. I feel sorry for them. If child actors grow up messed up, just imagine how these reality TV kids must be affected.” — Judy S. “If you are willing to open your lives up to television you are going to be judged. We all have parts of our lives we’d rather not put on public display, I think they are brave (maybe slightly crazy) for putting it all out there. It’s all taken with a grain of salt as well as I don’t believe just because it’s ‘reality’ television, it’s always a good representation of what’s real.” — Terri Leniuk

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Music #

W e’ r e o n fac eb o o k : Visit us at Facebook.com/qcregina

OB L I V I ON ’ S E Y E

Metal band eager to move things forward

Regina band Oblivion’s Eye is a “small band with a big-band” attitude. Members include Damian Smith, from left, Keenan Jamerson-Delorme, Adam Horvey and Brad Beecher. Photo COURTESY Eagleclaw Thom

By Andrew Matte Regina metal band Oblivion’s Eye is a “little band that acts like a big band.” So says guitarist and singer Brad Beecher, who transplanted his band to Regina several years ago after uprooting it from Vancouver Island so he could enlist a pair of Saskatchewan bandmates. The decision also happened because Beecher and fellow founding member and guitarist Damian Smith were having issues with finding B.C.

musicians willing to take the project as seriously as they did. “It was a pretty big move … we had some band issues,” said Beecher, who works full-time as a plumber. “There weren’t a lot of musicians around who had the dedication. There weren’t many guys who wanted to spend a lot of time on band stuff like we did.” He also liked Regina because its location makes travelling easier. “Regina is smack-dab in the middle of Canada and it’s right on the highway. So we can drive to any city that we want.”

Today, the band is made up of Beecher, Smith, Keenan Delorme on bass and Adam Horvey on drums. While the band exists only as a part-time band, its members hope that changes. The current mandate is to take everything seriously, and on the road. “Our hopes are to just start touring as soon as possible,” Beecher said. “So we’re a little band that acts like a big band so far. We want to present ourselves as professionally as possible under the circumstances. “We want to start out with something small, like maybe around West-

ern Canada and then maybe beyond that. We’d like to be at the point where we’re self-sustaining.” The band is busy working on its next record, which is expected to be a tad faster and more intricate than previous efforts. While the band is known for “atmospheric metal,” Beecher and his bandmates expect the sound to change as they continue to challenge themselves on their instruments. “The next album will be a lot faster and more complicated than the last album. We have an established sound. And we’re finding new ways to bring

new things to it,” said Beecher, who was living in B.C. in 2010 when Oblivion’s Eye released its debut effort Radiance. Beecher said he and Smith came up with the band’s original sound, which is different than what fans can expect from an Oblivion’s Eye show. “We just found a sound that we both liked and it was something that we could both contribute to. But since then, it’s spiralled out of control. It’s something completely different now. To challenge ourselves now, to come up with something that moves the band forward.”


Read my book #

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Loca l AUT H O RS: Writers tell us what makes their book worth reading

C L A Y S T AC E Y

The Inquiring Reporter For several years before retiring, while I was still actively involved in the publishing business, I promised (threatened?) to reveal what it was like to be a newspaper reporter for 50 years. Earlier this year, I finally got around to it and typed out more than 60 intriguing stories that I either uncovered personally or was involved in over five decades as a news hound. My 256-page book is called The Inquiring Reporter. “Why did you write the book?” is a question I’ve often been asked. Truthfully, I penned it to pass along my memoirs to my adult kids and grandkids, and to bring back memories for many of those involved in my long career. Many of the stories I covered were not for the faint of heart. Deana Driver, of the Regina publishing firm DriverWorks Ink, is a journalist and longtime author who, in taking on the task of publish-

ing my book, described me as an inquisitive newspaperman: “Clay followed leads down dirt roads and had guns pointed at him. He covered education, politics, mystery and mayhem — and had pies thrown in his face. For five decades, he worked as a reporter, editor and publisher in Manitoba, British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan, ending his career as editor-at-large of The Senior paper. Clay typed his reports of rodeos, pranks, fist fights, fires, awards and accidents on an old Underwood typewriter. Now his fascinating, funny and daring adventures are shared in The Inquiring Reporter.” Parts of my book may sound like raw fiction. To the contrary, the episodes are all true. I’ve interviewed prime ministers, provincial premiers and skid-row drunks. I been on the scene and reported on horrific accidents, devastating fires and an array of other tragedies. Through my writings, I once filled the cup-

board with donated groceries for an apparent destitute family and then discovered, to my chagrin, I had been conned in an unscrupulous fraud. I helped spur on a major city in a massive fundraising effort to send a dying freckle-faced teenage girl to a cancer clinic in New York. Later, I spearheaded a quilt project that landed senior citizens from all parts of Saskatchewan in the Guinness Book of Records. And there was so much more. Readers will enjoy the book because it will take them behind the scenes in the life of a working reporter, where members of the general public seldom have access. The Inquiring Reporter is available from www.driverworks.ca online and at DriverWorks Ink trade show booths, at Coles and Chapters stores in Regina and in Saskatoon at Indigo and McNally Robinson Booksellers. The Inquiring Reporter is also available from your favourite e-book retailer (search for the book by title or author’s name).

Clay Stacey and his book The Inquiring Reporter.

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• Check out our heat map - “Stories Around Me” shows you what stories are the most popular • Our integrated video player makes it easy to view and convert videos in a variety of formats • Photo gallery lets you view the world in gorgeous, high resolution pictures

Download it today! * Trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the and other countries. Storemark is a of service mark of Apple Inc.Standard and data charges apply. * Trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. andU.S. other countries. App Store isApp a service Apple Inc. Standard message and datamessage charges apply. 46402554 REG00170914_1_1


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SPACES #

R E G I N A’ S B E S T S PA C E S

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Spaces celebrates beauty both indoors and out. If you have a living space we should highlight email qc@leaderpost.com

A modern kitchen in a heritage home By Ashley Martin WHO? Bea Gerbrands, a doctor who works at the Regina General Hospital. WHAT? The kitchen of her two-storey heritage home in Regina’s Lakeview neighbourhood. WHEN? Gerbrands moved into this house in 1995 and immediately wanted to renovate her kitchen. After redoing the rest of her house, the kitchen was finally completed about two years ago. WHY? “I wanted to do the kitchen as soon as I moved in because of the problem that I didn’t have enough cupboard space. The whole thing was to make it more functional and to create more room,” she explains. Gerbrands considered making the kitchen open concept, but that would have meant losing a wall of valuable cupboard space. She also considered expanding the kitchen by building an addition onto the house, but eventually decided to work with the space that was there. “There’s a lot of surprises when you start tearing walls down in an old home,” says Gerbrands. “I know the thing nowadays is these open plans, but this is a type of heritage home and in those days you kept your dining room and kitchen separate and there are a lot of people that actually prefer having the mess in the kitchen and serve a more formal meal.” HOW? Gerbrands enlisted interior designer Gisela Boersch to help with the project. To create the illusion of space, the maple cabinets are built up to the ceiling for height and have a horizontal striped pattern for depth. “Because that kitchen was so small, every centimetre mattered,” says Gerbrands. Considering its size and modern decor, “This is kind of a European style kitchen,” she says. To maximize the space, she opted for small appliances — a 24-inch fridge ordered from Germany, a dishwasher drawer, a below-counter microwave and a small oven. There is no range hood because cracking the window creates enough of a draft. Access to the basement is gained by a custom sliding barn door. Everything in the kitchen is subdued: the lighting is simple; the colour scheme is in light maple, soft green and grey, which ties into the rest of the main floor, decorated mainly in neutrals. Though it’s small, the kitchen feels big enough to work in, and “when I cook, everything is within reach,” says Gerbrands. While she has been very happy with her kitchen, Gerbrands says it has one downside: “When I have guests, they don’t all fit into my kitchen ... They can’t really sit in my kitchen with me.”

QC Photos by BRYAN SCHLOSSER


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WINE world #

21

Reinvent yourself with SIAST

M o n ta lt o N e r o D ’Av o l a C a b e r n e t S a u v i g n o n

Sicilian blend a treat for local wine drinkers

By James Romanow

There are more than 1,000 grape varietals in the world that are used to make wine. Globalization has both tremendously helped these wines and hindered them. Consumer determination to only drink Merlot means that the local varietals — often much better suited to climate and growing conditions — are replanted. But the flip side of this same coin is that folks who travel, or otherwise broaden their taste buds, are interested in drinking those same oddball wines in their local market. Fast forward to Saskatchewan circa 2012, where some faceless bureaucrat in the SLGA shoves yet another middle of the road red overboard to make space for a Sicilian wine, a Nero D’Avola Cabernet Sauvignon blend. To you sir, whomever you are, I raise a glass in salute! Nero D’Avola was the black wine Michael Corleone drank by the pitcher while sojourning in Sicily in the movie The Godfather. Nero, of course, is Italian for black and the heady alcoholic café wine of the island is almost always Nero D’Avola. It’s a wine similar to Shiraz. Rich, fruity and tending to high alcohol (until very recently this was the only wine you could regularly find at 16 per cent.) It has enough tannin to survive any grilled meat including mutton and goat.

Short Order Cooking Are you interested in training to be a short order cook? Become part of the bustling food services industry and spice up your cooking skills with the Short Order Cooking program. Job-ready applicants who are able to fully participate in training and shift work and those who are on social assistance are encouraged to apply.

The Montalto version is somewhat tamer than the café version. They’ve blended in about half Cabernet Sauvignon to add some brightness and formality to a wine that is often described as ‘of the earth’. If you find the austerity of most Northern Italian wines too much for you, this is a bottle you need to try. It has a kind of warmth and charm that make for an easy drinking wine at a great price. Montalto Nero D’Avola Cabernet Sauvignon, Italy, 2011. $11.99 ****

Crossword/Sudoku answers

SIAST, in partnership with ACERT (the Regina Food Bank), is offering a Short Order Cooking program. You will receive two weeks of employability skills training and 12 weeks of specific skill training, preparing you to begin your career in culinary arts. Successful graduates will receive SIAST’s Short Order Cooking applied certificate and time credit towards journeyperson status. Program dates • December 10, 2012 – March 18, 2013 • Must attend employability skills training Nov 26 – Dec 7

Costs • Tuition and fees: $1,622.50 You may be eligible for a Provincial Training Allowance or Skills Training Benefit funding.

Admission requirements • Grade 10 (or entrance testing) • Unemployed (or working less than 20 hrs/wk) • Successful completion of the employability skills training prior to the Short Order Cook specific training.

To apply, attend the information session on: Thursday, November 1, 2012 or Tuesday, November 13, 2012 2:00 p.m. ACERT, Regina Food Bank 425 Winnipeg Street, Regina For more information, contact: Marnie Knelsen at 306-775-7469 or marnie.knelsen@siast.sk.ca SIAST encourages applications from people of Aboriginal ancestry, people with disabilities, visible minorities and women interested in non-traditional occupations.

Note: Each of the four black circles represents a MOON in the Down answer obscuring a SUN reading across.

1-866-goSIAST (467-4278) www.goSIAST.com/CE REG32101280_1_1


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012

LEADERPOST.COM/QC

Director of Sales

Pratts Wholesale (Sask) Ltd., an established Canadian family owned company requires an energetic and highly motivated professional to oversee our retail grocery sales division.

Qualifications include:

-Sales management experience (grocery industry) -Strong desire to lead and motivate sales staff to achieve corporate objectives -Exceptional organizational and analytical skills

The SALPN requires a Practice Consultant. Reporting to the Executive Director, the Practice Consultant provides leadership and consultation on professional nursing practice issues in Saskatchewan.

The SALPN is seeking an individual with the following qualifications: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Must be a Practical Nurse with a minimum of 3 years experience, eligible for licensure with the SALPN Familiarity with the SALPN Strong knowledge and understanding of LPN practice Ability to problem solve, critically think and exercise judgement Well-developed written and verbal communication skills are required Expertise in providing customer service Must be fluent in terminology specific to nursing health care Competent user of Microsoft Office products; Outlook, Power point, Word and Excel Ability to work independently, interdependently, coordinate and collaborate on a variety of projects Ability to create and deliver presentations Professional presence A commitment to continuing education

• Travel requirements: within and outside of province • Must hold a valid drivers license with access to reliable transportation This position is based in Regina. Please reply with resume and cover letter to the Executive Director by, November 12th, 2012. Please submit your applications and direct inquiries to:

Please send your resumes to: ed.holowaty.pratts@sasktel.net Those selected will be contacted

Pauline Mason Interim Executive Director Saskatchewan Association of Licensed Practical Nurses exdir@salpn.com 700A 4400 4th Ave Regina, Saskatchewan S4T 0H8 Tel: (306) 525-1436 Ext 227 Toll Free: 1 888 257-2576

C620877

Toshiba Business Solutions Solutions Sales Engineer Responsibilities: • Provide solutions training to Toshiba sales staff and end user/customers • Provide pre and post-implementation support on all Toshiba Solution products • Provide technical infrastructure planning and implementation services • Assist in analysis and documentation of business processes and technology • Develop strong working relationships with partner, client, and Toshiba team members • Create SoW documents • Position is based out of Regina and travel throughout the province is required. Qualifications: • Degree in computer science preferred • Knowledge of Windows 2000/2003 client and server operating systems • Knowledge of SQL Server/MySQL/Oracle databases desired • Knowledge of Web protocols (e.g., HTTP, ASP, XML, etc.) • Familiarity with TCP/IP-based networking • Minimum of 1-2 years of related work experience including a demonstrated track record of success in technical sales support and/or industry related experience • MCSE, MCP, CDIA+ certifications preferred • Knowledge/experience with Document Management and workflow applications preferred (laserfiche/docuware etc.) • Exceptional analytical and problem-solving skills and ability to work independently • A highly motivated self-starter with very strong presentation, consultation and technical skills • Excellent written & oral Communication Skills • Sound time management skills with the ability to prioritize Interested? Please forward your resume to: E-mail: resumes@toshiba.ca, www.tbscanada.ca REG33102299_1_1


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ON THE SCENE #

S PA R K L I N G B R U N C H 1.

2.

Osteoporosis Canada’s Regina chapter hosted a Sparkling Brunch at the Conexus Arts Centre on Sunday, Nov. 4. MC’d by Dr. Roberta McKay, the event was a fundraiser for the organization. It also featured guest speaker Dr. Bill Leslie. 1. Marion Bjerke (far left) measures Alice Pompu’s (left) height. 2. Madhu Kumar and Miriam Gabrysh 3. Nancy McEwen and Frances Olson 4. Nancy Williams and Elaine Hopfner 5. Dave and Marilyn Elliott 6. Betty Ann Golly, Annette Lang and Lynn Shaw 7. Sharron Bryce and Elaine Kivisto 8. Sarina Clarke and Sue Luchuck

QC PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL BELL

3.

6.

4.

7.

5.

8.


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012

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what moves you #

25

Tell us WHAT MOVES YOU. Email qc@leaderpost.com

C am F u l l e r

Shiver me timbers: pirate bike sets sail By Jeanette Stewart As a summer project, Cam Fuller, The StarPhoenix’s entertainment editor, turned a dilapidated mountain bike into a swashbuckling ride for a landlocked pirate.

Q: Describe your ride: A: It’s a former 1990s-era 12-speed mountain bike that I converted many years ago to a one-speed because the gears broke. Q: At what point did you start customizing it? A: I rode it like that for years and this spring it needed new tires. I don’t think it ever had new tires after 20 years. I splurged on these really expensive tires, and then everything else looked really old. First I cleaned the rust off the rims, and then polished them. Then the frame looked really old so I sanded the frame down and took all the old logos off and repainted it. At that point I realized I didn’t have any logos, so I needed a theme. Q: How did you arrive at pirate? A: It was a black bike and pirates are scary and rad. Q: Why fix it instead of getting a new bike? A: It’s a survivor and it’s old and it’s never been stolen. I tend to hold onto things too long and I’m a bit of a hoarder. I just loved the idea of making something old new again. Q: How long did it take you to do all the work? A: Three weeks. It took eight hours just to strip it and sand it and probably another six hours to repaint it. Q: What customizations did you make to the bike? A: It has new brake cables and new cool grips with aluminum red trim, which are neat. It’s got a carrier in

Cam Fuller’s Pirate Bike. QC photos by Andrew Spearin

the back and I bolted a little pirate cap gun, which actually works, on the back of the carrier. Then I decided it needed some sort of rope theme so I bought a cleat that you would use on a dock and I bolted that to where the water bottle cage would go and wrapped rope around it, so that’s totally awesome. A new seat. The best part are the badges on the front and the back. I made them out of an old mailbox and then got a Jolly Roger image from the Internet and made a stencil out of that and then hand-painted it. It went great. I didn’t even know what I was doing to start with.

Q: Had you done that kind of project before? A: I’ve had a couple car projects I kind of learned on. The thing with cars is they’re really expensive and you’re never really finished. This thing was within my grasp. I could actually do it from start to finish the way I wanted to. Q: Are you scared it will get stolen now that it looks good? A: That’s the problem. I was downtown one day this summer without a lock. I had to find a sidewalk cafe so I could park it within view. It took a bit of doing. I don’t ride it a lot anyway.

Q: Has this inspired you to do other projects? A: I think it has to be more organic than that. This worked out perfectly, just one thing after another. Before I knew it I was doing the whole thing. When you’re looking at the whole thing from start to finish, at the beginning of it, then it seems like work. This didn’t. Q: Do you have any tips for people taking on their own bike reno project? A: Almost everything I did on this was easier than I thought it would be. I was worried about taking the

whole crank assembly apart because I’d never done that before ... A lot of the tools are specialized but some of the bike shops will lend you the tool. Of course, if you foul up you can just bring the parts in and have someone else fix your mistake, which kind of happened to me at one point in this project.

Q: Have you received any compliments on it? A: The funny thing is, just talking about it with people, they get it right away. For some reason it just made sense. Of course, it’s a pirate bike. Why wouldn’t it be?


26

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MEET MY PET #

P ET love rs: We want to meet your pet! Email QC@leaderpost.com

S h a u n a F o s te r a n d S a s s y

A sassy Rawlco mascot By Jenn Sharp Employees at Saskatoon’s Rawlco radio station know they’ll be greeted by a familiar face every morning. C95’s Shauna Foster has been bringing her dog Sassy to work for years and she’s a welcome addition to the team. She rarely makes a peep except when someone gets nasty with Shauna — then Sassy turns vicious. Similar in many ways to a child, Sassy loves chocolate, and Justin Bieber too.

Q: How long have you owned her? A: I’ve had Sassy since she was five and she’s 11 now. She was adopted and it’s nice because I’ve never had a dog that I’ve taken from an older age. If you can adopt a dog that needs a great home — that’s always been my philosophy. All of those pets need a good home, especially some of the older ones. Adopt the ones that you can and get them off the streets because a lot of them have been in bad situations. Q: What mix is that? A: A border collie-blue heeler cross. Border collies are the smartest of any dog and she is crazy intelligent — I always compare her to a five-year-old child. Q: What kinds of smart things does she do? A: She just knows a lot of things. If you tell her to go into any one of the rooms in the house, she knows exactly which room it is and she’ll go lie in there. She’s very well-travelled — Los Angeles, Las Vegas. This is the dog that goes everywhere with me so I think because of that she’s extremely wellbehaved. She’s had lots of adventures, so she’s good with people and great with kids. She has a very, very calm demeanour. My co-hosts always joke that they’ve never heard Sassy make a noise because she sits in the control room with us almost every day while we’re doing the show and you cannot hear her. Unless someone is trying to do something to me, she will not make a peep.

Q: But if someone is bothering you, she’ll get upset? A: Try to hit me. We’ll see what she does. You’ll see — she gets right up in your face and gets very upset. She’s also weirdly emotional and her feelings get hurt. If you leave her for a couple of hours she’s devastated. I’ve talked to some dog experts about that because it worries me that she gets that sad. They said she’s probably suffering from separation anxiety which is why I bring her to work with me. Q: That’s pretty cool that you bring her to work with you. A: It is cool. There’s not a lot of jobs that would allow you to do that. She’s become this fixture around the radio station — everyone knows to expect her. I come in at four in the morning and Sassy trots along with me. It’s fun — she’s been a great companion to have. And she still loves her exercise. We can run 10K no problem. As she gets older, she’s obviously slowing down a little bit more but that’s good for me too. If she wants to nap that’s fine! Q: What’s one of her standout adventures? A: She took a very long road trip to Los Angeles where she ended up living for a few months. She takes part in a lot of our contests we do on air. When we first announced that Justin Bieber was coming back, Rob and Sherry, my co-hosts, didn’t really believe that I could dress Sassy up as Justin Bieber. So I did — I found a Bieber wig, a purple hoodie and a sideways hat for her. Weirdly she looked a lot like him. Q: Does she have any favourite foods? A: She loves cheese. She really likes sweet stuff. If you open a bag of chips she won’t come but if you open up a chocolate bar she knows the difference and she’ll come running for that. She’s become very picky with her meats. If I try to give her lamb-based food she won’t eat it but she will eat chicken. Preferably though, it has to be beef. Shauna Foster hangs out with her dog Sassy at the Rawlco Radio office in Saskatoon. QC Photo by Andrew Spearin She’s got a hierarchy of meat!


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27

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T h u rs day, N ov e m b e r 8, 2 0 1 2

OUTSIDE THE LINES # COLOURING CONTEST Each week, artist Stephanie McKay creates a timely illustration meant to please kids of all ages. Children can colour the page, have a picture taken with the finished product and email it to qc@leaderpost.com. One winner will be chosen each week for a special Leader-Post prize. Please send a high-resolution picture and include the childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full name and contact information.

Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s QC colouring contest winner was Katie Keleman. Congratulations! Thanks to all for your colourful submissions. Try again this week.

l e a d e r p o st.co m /q c


LEADERPOST.COM/QC

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012

THE

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proudly present… A Leader-Post annual tradition featuring, babies born during the past year will be published on Saturday, December 31st, 2012. This feature will also be posted online at: Leaderpost.com for all your family and friends to access.

…the Babies

of

2012!

January 5, 2011 8 lbs. 10 oz. 20”long Proud parents are John and Mary Smith

SINGLE SPOT Early Bird Price

BABIES OF 2012

c/o Leader-Post Classifieds 1964 Park St., Regina, SK, S4P 3G4.

Please include your daytime & evening phone number so we can contact you for credit card payment. Or visit us in person at our classified advertising counter Mon-Fri. 8:30 – 4:30.

Monday, Novemb er 19, Final Dea 2012 dline Thursday : , Decembe r 6, 201 2

For further information please contact us at 781-5466

1100 each $ 85 …………………… 3 each

Framed Announcement: …… Laminations: Limited quantities of frames available

80 37 After Early Bird $ 4200 $

Complete the attached form, include a clear picture of your baby and prepayment of your announcement to:

Email a jpeg photo and your wording to mluti@leaderpost.com.

EARLYB IRD DEADLI NE:

JOHN SMITH JR.

This feature has proven to be a favorite of our readers and a great keepsake. You can be one of the proud parents or grandparents to announce the newest member of your family.

$

**All prices include applicable taxes.

GST INCL

Final Booking Deadline: Thursday, December 6, 2012 — PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY — Please do not include any photos larger than 5x7. If you would like us to mail your photo back, please print name and address on back.

GST INCL

TRACY JOHNSON Born December 27, 2011 7 lbs. 2 oz. 19” long

Proud parents are Bill and Susan Johnson

DOUBLE SPOT Early Bird Price

35 49 After Early Bird $ 5460 $

GST INCL

GST INCL

FRONT PAGE SPOT EMILY ZIMMER

$

Born January 2, 2011 7 lbs. 3 oz. 21” long

10500

Daytime Phone: ______________________________ Home Phone:___________________________________ ____________________ Customer Name: ___________________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________City: ___________________ Postal Code: ____________ Email address: _____________________________________________________________________________ Select from the following options (only 12 front page announcements available): Front Page:______________Inside Full Color: _____________________ Double Spot: _______________Single Spot: ______________________ Framed Announcement: _________________ Lamination: Blue ________________ Pink ________________ (please specify how many) BABIES NAME (AS IT WILL APPEAR IN PRINT): __________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth: _________________ Weight: ______________ Length: __________________ Check one for your choice of phrasing: Proud Parents are: __________________________ Son of: ______________ Daughter of:______________ First and Last Name of Parents:_____________________________________________________________ __ Or specify alternate wording – “Grandson of Bill and Jean Smith” If you choose the Front Page, Inside Full Color or Double Spot option please include any additional write up about your baby that you would like included in the announcement.

GST INCL

Limited Space

Maximum words for Front Page, Inside Full Color and Double Sport – 30 words Single Spot – 18 words Requests to place cousins side by side must be placed at the same time to accommodate.

Proud parents are Michael & Shauna Zimmer Proud grandparents are Richard & Kim Smith and Fred & Milly White

INSIDE FULL COLOR SPOT Early Bird Price

05 87 After Early Bird $ 9240 $

Credit Card Number:___________________________________________ Expiry Date (Mo/Yr): __________________________________________ TOTAL AMOUNT PAID: _______________________________________

For every “Babies of 2012” announcement you place, you will receive a coupon for a one-ofa-kind baby hand or foot imprint ornament (a value of $25) courtesy of....

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Payment Method: Visa _____MC______ Amex ______ Cheque ________

Regina Wee Piggies and Paws

For more information: Call 545-6654 or visit www.WeePiggies.com REG27402768_1_4


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EVENTS #

What you need to know to plan your week. Send events to QC@leaderpost.com

Canadian Musical Golden Apple Theatre Wednesday, Nov. 7 to Sunday, Nov. 18, 8 p.m. The Artesian, 2627 13th Ave.

MUSIC

Thursd ay, N ov. 8 Plants and Animals with Rah Rah The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave.

#

SPECIAL EVENTS

The Vertigo Series/Thursday Night Live Featuring InfoRed, Tara Dawn Solheim, the Local Onlyz Thursday, Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m. MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St.

Friday, N ov. 9 Ryan Boldt with Kacy & Clayton The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave. Satu rday, N ov. 1 0

Our Best to You Art & Craft Sale Friday, Nov. 9, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Canada Centre East, Evraz Place

World on a String Regina Symphony Orchestra Shumiatcher Pops 8 p.m., Conexus Arts Centre 200 Lakeshore Dr. Party Like It’s 1945 Remembrance Day concert, featuring The Project and Morgan Mayer The Lancaster Taphouse 4529 Gordon Rd.

Regina Farmers’ Market Every Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Cathedral Neighbourhood Centre, 2900 13th Ave.

Sund ay, N ov. 1 1 Andy Shauf, Julia & Her Piano and Evening Hymns The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave.

Sawyer Brown is performing at the Casino Regina Show Lounge on Nov. 12. File Photo

The Isotopes The Exchange 2431 8th Ave. Evening Hymns The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave.

Wedn esday, N ov. 1 4

Mon day, N ov. 1 2 Monday Night Jazz & Blues: Round Midnight Bushwakker 2206 Dewdney Ave. Sawyer Brown Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr. Tuesday, N ov. 1 3 Tuesday Night Troubador jam night

Every Tuesday, 8 p.m. Bocados, 2037 Park St.

Wednesday Night Folk: Glenn Chatten Bushwakker 2206 Dewdney Ave. Jam Night Every Wednesday McNally’s Tavern 2226 Dewdney Ave.

#

ART

The Right Pair of Boots Photo exhibit, charity auction and book release party Entertainment by Indigo Joseph Thursday, Nov. 8 The Lancaster Taphouse, 4529 Gordon Rd.

Jennifer Wanner: Immuto Until Nov. 10 Dunlop Gallery, Central Library, 2311 12th Ave. Beth Gaffney: Stuff and Nonsense Until Nov. 17 McIntyre Gallery, 2347 McIntyre St. Carl Beam Until Nov. 18 MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St. Katherine Boyer: Five Blue Skies Until Nov. 23 Hague Gallery Creative City Centre, 1843 Hamilton St. Holly Fay: Systems Until Nov. 24

Art Gallery of Regina Neil Balkwill Civic Arts Centre, 2420 Elphinstone St. Mindfulness and the Creative Spirit Until Jan. 6 MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St. Inuit Sculpture Until Feb. 17 MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St.

#

T H E AT R E

A Christmas Carol Presented by O’Neill High School students Nov. 7-9, 7:30 p.m. O’Neill High School, 134 Argyle St. In Flanders Fields: A New

Mosaic 2012 Festival of Trees Gala and Auction Saturday, Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m. Conexus Arts Centre, 200 Lakeshore Dr. Regina Pats vs. Lethbridge Hurricanes Saturday, Nov. 10, 7 p.m. Brandt Centre Men’s hockey U of R Cougars vs. U of S Huskies Saturday, Nov. 10, 7 p.m. The Co-operators Centre, Evraz Place Regina Remembrance Day Service Sunday, Nov. 11, 9:45 a.m. Brandt Centre, Evraz Place Remembrance Day Ceremony Sunday, Nov. 11, 10:45 a.m. Victoria Park Café Scientifique discussing

Arctic issues Wednesday, Nov. 14, 7 p.m. Saskatchewan Science Centre, 2903 Powerhouse Dr. Word Up Wednesday community stage Wednesday, Nov. 14, 7 p.m. Creative City Centre, 1843 Hamilton St.

#

COMEDY

Comedy Grind Gabbo’s 2338 Dewdney Ave. Every Saturday night

#

NEW MOVIES

Skyfall Action James Bond’s loyalty to M is tested when top-secret MI6 files are leaked. When the agency comes under attack, Bond goes on a mission to track down and destroy the threat. Galaxy Cinemas 420 McCarthy Blvd. N. Call 522-9098 for movies and times Cineplex Odeon Southland Mall Cinemas 3025 Gordon Rd. Call 585-3383 for movies and times --Regina Public Library Theatre 2311 12th Ave. Call 777-6104 for movies and times Kramer Imax 2903 Powerhouse Dr. Call 522-4629 for movies and times Rainbow Cinemas Golden Mile Shopping Centre 3806 Albert St. Call 359-5250 for movies and times Paradise Cinemas 1011 Devonshire Dr. N. Call 522-7888 for movies and times


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SHARP EATS #

See a food trend you think deserves a highlight in QC? Email qc@leaderpost.com or visit QC on Facebook

S a s k a t c h e w a n F o o d T R END S

One Sask. restaurant makes Maclean’s top 50 list By Jenn Sharp For the first time Maclean’s released a list of Canada’s top 50 places to eat. Ten spots went to restaurants located in the Prairies, one of which is in Saskatchewan. This sole honour was awarded to Regina’s long-celebrated La Bodega and for good reason. La Bodega (Spanish for wine cellar) is owned by Adam Sperling and Alla Sidorenko and is located in a beautifully restored character home on Albert Street. For the last seven years, the outdoor patio is transformed into an ice bar by Peter Fogarty (of Fire and Ice Creations) every winter. Proceeds from the ice bar have gone towards a variety of Regina charities, but last year Sperling and Sidorenko decided to change it up a bit after visiting Italy in 2010 for Terra Madre (a food conference in support of sustainable agriculture, fishing and breeding.) The ice bar is now raising money for a scholarship award for a master’s degree at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy. Open to all Canadian citizens who are permanent Saskatchewan residents, the recipient must agree to return to Saskatchewan and work here for three years. It’s a “fantastic program.” according to Sperling. “You might think it’s about cooking, but really cooking is the least important part of this degree. It’s about food. Where and how it is produced, and how it affects our economy and environment.” The gastronomy scholarship program fits the ethos at La Bodega perfectly. Much of the restaurant’s food is sourced locally, from sustainable and/or organic sources. The building was renovated to LEED standards, and is equipped with wind turbines, solar panels and geothermal heating. All of this is wonderful but how’s the food you ask? Because when we

31

get right down to it, if the food is inedible, it doesn’t matter how environmentally conscious the restaurant’s owners may be. Well, La Bodega didn’t win top 50 in Canada for nothing. The dinner menu is large — probably overwhelming for many (the lunch menu is much more manageable). I was delighted at the unique options; La Bodega takes pride in providing international fine dining with an emphasis on Latin dishes. There’s a wide range of tapas (smaller portions), along with appetizers, mains and sharing platters. The night I visited there was a nine-course chef ’s tasting menu, served tapas style for $35. Recommended for “the adventurous palate,” diners were encouraged to “enjoy each course with an open spirit.” My time for dinner that night wasn’t open enough for the tasting but I’ll be trying it next time. My server was attentive, friendly and informed; she helped me navigate the menu and (impressive) wine list with ease. While I’m extremely happy La Bodega made it onto Maclean’s list, I have to ask where the other Saskatchewan restaurants are? Maclean’s food columnist Jacob Richler and photographer John Cullen spent two months travel- La Bodega was named one of the top 50 restaurants in Canada by Maclean’s magazine. QC PHOTO BY TROY FLEECE ling the country, choosing the top 50 list. Undoubtedly it was a hard MACLEAN’S TOP 50 RESTAURANT WINNERS FROM THE PRAIRIES task, choosing just 50. But come on! Nothing from Saskatoon made the in the heart of downtown Edmonton… Spanish tapas restaurant and bar. CALGARY cut? I disagree. we three are dedicated to the close Charcut Roast House: charcut.com Maclean’s states: “When a travelfood movement, sustainability and Model Milk: modelmilk.ca “Local chef-drive, urban-rustic cuisine.” ler is stranded and hungry in Sascommunity.” “(Chef) Justin hopes to leave behind katoon, for example, the best resthe confines of fine dining and shift the The River Café: river-café.com taurant in the world is not in Paris WINNIPEG focus to what is important: having fun “Chefs who are passionate about qualanymore, but across the street. Segovia: segoviatapasbar.com while creating food that tastes great.” ity and the regional seasonal ingrediWithin reason, we tried to accom“We are a Spanish restaurant specialents that bring to your palate a taste modate that need for geographic izing in Spanish food and wine.” EDMONTON of place.” inclusiveness.” Corso 32: corso32.com Sorry, you don’t get points for Pizzeria Gusto: pizzeriagusto.com “Our ingredients are always as local as Cassis Bistro: thecassisbistro.ca geographic inclusiveness by men“We believe that pizza is the perfect possible.” “South of France flavour with local flair. tioning one restaurant from Sasfood. A blank canvas that has unlimSimple, flavourful delicious.” katchewan. But good effort — we ited possibilities in both taste and Tres Carnales: trescarnales.com appreciate that you didn’t just fly texture.” “An authentic street food joint located Ox & Angela: oxandangela.com right over us.


32

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LEADERPOST.COM/QC

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QC - November 8, 2012