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PARENT TO PARENT: Moms share their odd pregnancy cravings P. 9

INVENTORY:

Vintage clothing finds at Nouvelle pop-up store P. 11

DAY TRIPS:

Discover province’s history at pioneer museums P. 18

A WORLD OF EXPERIENCE NEWCOMERS LIKE Romulo and Marina Lopez ARE PROVING HOW FAR A LITTLE HARD WORK CAN TAKE YOU p. 4

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INDEX #

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M y Fav o u r i t e p l a c e P. 1 4

O n T h e C o v e r P. 4

Immigrants are finding employment and a better life in Saskatchewan. QC Photo by BRYAN SCHLOSSER

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ta b l e o f c o n t e n t s

COVER — 4 How a sizzling economy can change lives PARENT TO PARENT — 9 From peanut butter and pickles to Reuben sandwiches, moms share their odd pregnancy cravings FASHION — 10 Golden elegance for high school graduate

MUSIC — 22 Tinsel Trees’ sound influenced by ’60s psychedelic rock CROSSWORD AND SUDOKU — 23 EVENTS — 24 ASK ELLIE — 26

INVENTORY — 11 Vintage clothing for women at Nouvelle pop-up shop

OUTSIDE THE LINES — 27 Artist Stephanie McKay’s weekly colouring creation

IN THE CITY — 12, 14 Michael Bell’s Moment In Time shot; local musician has fond memories of Englewood Park

GARDENING — 28 How to broaden your garden’s esthetic with yellow foliage

DAY TRIPS — 18 Discover Saskatchewan’s pioneer past

SHARP EATS — 30 Foodie photo gallery at Saskatoon’s Mandarin Restaurant

READ MY BOOK — 19 ON THE SCENE — 20 At the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies

WINE WORLD — 31 Tart and refreshing Stiegl Radler made for hot summer days

Angus Livingstone at Englewood Park, his favourite place in Regina. QC Photo by Don Healy

Correction: Information was incorrect in last week’s story about summer music festivals. The Eagle Creek Jamboree is held at Eagle Creek Regional Park, which is not owned by Les and Dolores Stack. Also, like many of the festivals mentioned in the story, Eagle Creek happens thanks to a board of directors and plenty of volunteers. We apologize for the confusion and sincerely regret the error.

QC Cover Photo by MICHAEL BELL QC is published by the Leader-Post – a division of Postmedia Network Inc. – at 1964 Park St., Regina, Sask., S4N 3G4. Rob McLaughlin is editor-in-chief. For advertising inquiries contact 781-5221; editorial, 1-855-688-6557; home delivery, 781-5212. Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved and commercial use is prohibited. To make any use of this material you must first obtain the permission of the owner of the copyright. For more information, contact the editor at 1-855-688-6557.


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on the cover #

The good thing about Regina is that you can work. – Maria Barbosa

I M M I G R AT I O N

How a sizzling economy can change lives

The Lopez family moved to Regina from the Philippines for work in the local fast-food industry. QC PHOTO BY MICHAEL BELL

By Andrew Matte Romulo Lopez spent years travelling the world and enjoying family time at home in Southeast Asia. And he traded it all for a job making tacos in Regina.

“It was worth it, absolutely it was,” says Lopez during a work break at a west-end fast-food restaurant. “I work hard and I work all day. I am used to that. But I now have a future and my children can get a good education and there is opportunity here for them. That is why we came to

Regina.” Lopez is among a quickly growing number of men and women who leave countries like the Philippines and India for the lure of Saskatchewan and its jobs, health care and schools. While the federal and provincial governments are sometimes criticized for allowing the hir-

ing of foreign workers, businesses claim they can’t meet demand without help from newcomers, and families arrive by the hundreds. For many, the notion of a no-fee doctor’s visit, access to libraries and good schools are the trade-off for leaving their homes and families to work a job at a restaurant drive-thru.


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Now, we have our own business. This is about the future of my children. – Romulo Lopez

Taco Time owner Tammy Langmaier, seen here with employees Varun Verma, from left, Jyoti and Shanika Smeikle, takes pride in helping families find new lives in Canada. QC PHOTO BY BRYAN SCHLOSSER

Saskatchewan’s sizzling economy has added immigrants to 330 communities from 180 countries in recent years, resulting in unprecedented population growth and a record low rate of unemployment. For the businesses with job openings and the workers who want to fill them, a complicated and usually expensive application process gets underway as government evaluates the qualifications of candidates and requirements of business. In the end, whether a young woman from Mumbai arrives on a student visa that permits her to work at McDonald’s, or a father leaves his wife and children in Manila to work at Dairy Queen on a temporary work visa, both sides usually wind up happy. The stories of enriched lives and commercial success continue to play out under a shadow of controversy over Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s foreign-worker criteria and complaints that applications take too long to approve or that too few — or too many — people are allowed into the country. ■ ■ ■ ■ More than 25 years ago, the concept of economic disparity came into focus for Filipino Romulo Lopez. With a job as a draftsman in his hometown of Legazpi City, news of his girlfriend’s pregnancy prompted the 21-year-old to get married and evaluate the prospects for his growing family. He took to the seas to work on a cruise ship

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and was gone eight months at a time to work 14-hour shifts, six days a week. He earned a tax-free salary of $7,000 per month, most of which was sent home. Though he enjoyed long breaks, he and his wife Marina wondered about the true value of a big paycheque earned at the expense of a usually absent father. Romulo had been out of the country each time Marina gave birth to their four sons. “When it came to enjoying my life in the Philippines, it was a good life. It was easy. My wife didn’t need to work and my kids went to good schools,” says Lopez. “But I was never there.” He learned about a woman looking to fill vacancies at a small chain of fast-food outlets in Canada. The job at a Regina Taco Time didn’t pay much but it was a ticket to a new life. His prospective employer’s willingness to help him gain permanent resident status in Canada was enough to get the Lopez family on a plane to Regina. They arrived in Regina on Dec. 17, 2009. “It was cold but the people here are very nice,” Lopez says. In addition to Lopez’s job, his family benefited from further investment by Tammy Langmaier, owner of the four Taco Time outlets in Regina. Like many small-business owners, she hired many employees overseas and arranged for an apartment and necessities like winter clothes and even a decorated Christmas tree. In Lopez’s case, Langmaier quickly saw a return on the thousands she invested. Continued on Page 6

Romulo Lopez quit his job at Taco Time in Regina to invest in his own franchise. With the help of his wife and sons, he operates Opa! of Greece in Harbour Landing. QC PHOTO BY MICHAEL BELL


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I like to treat people well because I believe people should be treated with respect. – Tammy Langmaier

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Unable to find enough employees for her four Taco Time outlets, Tammy Langmaier supports immigration rules that have allowed her to help dozens of people move to Regina from countries like the Philippines. QC PHOTO BY BRYAN SCHLOSSER

Continued from Page 5

EAST

254 University Park Drive

Buoyed by experience as a cruise-ship waiter, Romulo was promoted quickly to manager of the Cornwall Centre location. Marina and their eldest sons also got jobs at Taco Time. “He was a good employee, a very good employee. They all were,” says Langmaier. She echoes a unanimous sentiment from the service industry, which says it can’t find enough local people to meet demand. Years ago, she says, full-time staff was supported by high school students eager for weekend and after-school hours. Now, many new hires quit after a few shifts or are unwilling to mop floors or remove trash. “A lot of parents don’t instil a work ethic in their kids. I’ve had young people working here who worked out great. Years ago, we’d get all kinds of kids working here. Nowadays, there are hardly any.” Langmaier concedes to having a soft spot for people in need, which has benefited the more

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than two dozen members of eight families she’s helped move to Regina so far. Many of her international recruits have become close friends. “I like to treat people well because I believe people should be treated with respect. I started to do this for business reasons. But I also have an opportunity to help people.” Maria Barbosa also has Langmaier to thank for bringing her husband and two teen daughters to Regina from the Philippines in 2010. Even though they owned a successful waterdelivery business back home, she much prefers a Taco Time career in Regina. “When we came here, the apartment Tammy had was all ready for us. All of what we needed was here,” says Barbosa, who works alongside her daughters. “The good thing about Regina is that you can work. So if you want something, you can get it. All you need to do is work for it.”


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I think back to when my grandfather came here. Canada needed young people back then too. – Larry Mything, Tim Hortons franchisee

“He told me he wanted to buy a car and I told him he shouldn’t. But he bought himself a car. I didn’t know he was working three jobs.” Mything compares the influx of newcomers to Canada to the influx that happened more than a century ago, when the government offered cheap land and covered travel costs for Europeans willing to farm in Western Canada. “I think back to when my grandfather came here. Canada needed young people back then too,” Mything says. Sabrina Golf, the owner of Fuddruckers in Saskatoon, makes a point of celebrating the cultures of staff who come from other countries. A map once hung in the staff room with coloured pins illustrating the homelands of restaurant staff. This summer, Golf is helping organize a staff family party where native dishes will be shared. “When you looked at the map, the pins were scattered all over the place.” Like Taco Time in Regina, many young people have thrived working at Fuddruckers but the number of applicants has dropped. And the difference in the quality of the work between many young people and their overseas colleagues is easy to see, she says.

“I owe her everything. I know that I will never find enough words to repay her,” says Lopez. Though their friendship was strained after Lopez quit last summer to invest in his own restaurant, Langmaier understands. “I try not to let it bother me. We’re still friends,” she says. Today, Lopez is a business owner and operates an Opa! outlet in Harbour Landing, where he struggles to keep local teens on staff while working alongside his wife and sons. “Now, we have our own business. This is about the future of my children,” he explains. ■ ■ ■ ■ Small-business owners share similar stories about how Regina’s cultural makeup is evolving due, at least in part, to economics. Larry Mything, who owns the Albert Street Tim Hortons outlets, says he wouldn’t be able to find enough staff without Canada’s immigration policy. It’s not uncommon for employees to arrive with a rare work ethic. “I had this one employee who was a great guy. I thought I worked hard. But this guy worked hard,” says Mything.

Continued on Page 8

Larry Mything, the owner of this Albert Street Tim Hortons, says he wouldn’t be able to find enough staff without Canada’s immigration policy. QC PHOTO BY DON HEALY

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Canada is great because of the people who live here. And it’s about the money that we make here. But it’s also about the opportunity for my kids. — Jordan Espinoza

There aren’t too many fast food jobs that come with a company car, but Dairy Queen general manager Sandra Hertes (left) has gone to great lengths, including providing vehicles and apartments to employees who move to Regina from other countries. Dairy Queen supervisor Jordan Espinoza (right) recently received his permanent resident status, which allowed his wife and children to join him in Regina. QC PHOTO BY MICHAEL BELL Continued from Page 7

“We watched a couple of employees one day and one kid stood off in the corner, too good to wipe tables. And this new person from overseas was working really hard. She smiled at the customers and her face lit up. She didn’t need to speak to our guests. It was just the way she interacted with people that was so great.” A disinterest in jobs in the service industry or a sense of entitlement among teens can be chalked up to parents overcompensating while trying to give their children a high standard of living, Golf says. “Doing their laundry all the time maybe didn’t help,” says Golf. “They’re entitled. I’m to blame. I’m a parent too … maybe we’re paying for that swing to more liberal parenting. We needed to swing from the older generation where there was spanking and dominating.”

■ ■ ■ ■ Jordan Espinoza, 32, celebrated news of his permanent residency status by getting a part-time job. After nearly four years as a temporary worker at a Regina Dairy Queen, Espinoza’s status was upgraded, enabling him to bring his common-law wife and two children from the Philippines. “It was a long time. But it’s OK because we are all together,” says Espinoza, a supervisor who also works part-time at a local assembly plant. After working for years at a McDonald’s in Manila, he’d dreamt about a life in Canada. “Everybody in the Philippines knows that Canada is one of the best,” says Espinoza, whose wife Arlene was also given a DQ job. “Canada is great because of the people who

live here. And it’s about the money that we can make here. But it’s also about the opportunity for my kids,” he says. “That’s the main reason I came.” Fellow Filipino Jessie Enriquez, 38, arrived in Regina on the same day as Espinoza, but he’s still working under a temporary work visa. Like others from the Philippines, he has access to the company Toyota Prius and lives at an apartment owned by his employer. Enriquez credits DQ general manager Sandra Hertes for not just giving him a job, but improving his life. “She’s probably too good to me, to be honest. I really don’t know how to repay her.” Hertes appreciates the coincidence that she’s made friends following a business decision to hire from abroad. “In many ways, these people are like our

family. Many members of our staff have been to my house. We’ve had a salsa night. Another night, people came over and we learned how to make sushi rolls,” says Hertes. In 2007 she struggled to find staff at the Dairy Queen at 306 McCarthy Blvd. and a new store at 4203 Rochdale Blvd. Local employees sometimes struggled to do the work or lost interest after getting hired. “It was hell getting staff back then. We’d hire 10 people and we’d lose eight,” says Hertes. With the help of an immigration firm, Filipino staff arrived in groups of six to Regina, where Hertes helped get them settled by buying clothing or arranging for things like health cards and driver’s licences. “We went above and beyond. Maybe that’s why most of them are still here. ... Looking back, I am glad we did.”


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Next week: What’s your favourite way to spend summer in the city with kids? Email QC@leaderpost.com

#

pa r e n t t o pa r e n t

Each week QC gathers advice from parents to share with other moms and dads. This week we asked:

Did you have any strange cravings or habits during pregnancy? “When I was pregnant with my twins all I wanted to eat was grilled cheese sandwiches and homemade french fries. I was so desperate to eat grilled cheese everyday (multiple times throughout) I took a loaf of bread, some cheese, margarine and a grilled sandwich maker to work with me! My students loved noon hours and recess because I always made some for them too.” — Michelle Grodecki

UP TO

“The only food I was craving was Indian food. I ate a lot Chicken Al Frazee from Flavors of India. I don’t know why, but the way they make it, even I cannot cook like that. And one time I was craving sushi for a whole week. After that I couldn’t look at it. My baby was way too picky at that time.” — Iryna Fedyk “With my first pregnancy there were two things that I craved: White cake with white icing (I sent hubby to the store late one night so I could get my fix) and Diet Coke. After my daughter was born, I couldn’t stand (still can’t) the taste and smell of Diet Coke. Now cake is another story…” — Terri Leniuk “With both kids I really craved sweets. I was never the type to eat a lot of sweets before. But with my daughter it was pineapple and chocolate. With my son it was chocolate again and basically anything sweet. Unfortunately the cravings for sweets hasn’t gone away!!” — Chera Miller “Everybody thought my cravings for peanut butter and pickle sandwiches was weird. I ate them as a child so I never thought so.” — Jamie Plummer “When I was pregnant with my daughter, I felt sick when I ate. When I was pregnant with my son, I was sick when I didn’t eat. Go figure — different kids, different eating habits.” — Judy S. “Surprisingly, no. I kept waiting to see what weird concoctions I would come up with but was sorely disappointed.” — Shelly Lambert “Not that I can remember, unless smelling fresh dirt obsessively is strange. Ice cream, I guess. I believed that eating lots of vanilla ice cream would guarantee a girl, and it worked!” — Carla Contreras “Sandwiches from Italian Star Deli ... With mustard, cheddar and dill pickles!!!!” — darladee, via Twitter

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“French onion soup and Dilly Bars for first pregnancy. For second pregnancy — Boston creme doughnuts ... I can’t stomach them now.” — Lisa Rawlings, via Twitter “I don’t have any strange cravings during pregnancy but need to eat something every 2-3 hours. The only thing I cannot handle during pregnancy is the smell of garbage, I get sick every time.” — Nikki Melnyk “Reuben sandwiches. I wandered all over downtown (Saskatoon) to find one. I finally found that the Senator Hotel offered them. And good ones too.” — Kelly Davies Potts “I couldn’t get enough sour cream when I was pregnant! I ate it with almost everything.” — Blackie Rhode “I craved ice with all 3 of my kids. I went through bags and bags of ice.” — Sherry Bueckert “I craved pudding with my first. It had to be homemade and not pudding cups.” — Michelle Weber “Theatre popcorn, cream puffs and lots of Miss Vickie’s salt and vinegar chips.” — Katelynn Sherwood

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FASHION #

What’s your favourite summer fashion trend? Email QC@leaderpost.com

s a s k at c h e wa n fa s h i o n

Kate Thompson: Stress free grad dress shopping By Angelina Irinici High school graduation dress shopping can go two ways: It can be nerve-racking and frustrating, or fun and stress-free. Fortunately for Kate Thompson, it was the latter. She and her mom went to only one store, Klassique Designs in Saskatoon, to search for the ideal dress. Her sister got hers there two years ago and Thompson didn’t consider looking elsewhere. Plus, she knew the style of dress she wanted; a long, classic cut with no poof or crinoline. But, the owner of the boutique encouraged her to try on a few “poofy” ones anyway, just in case. The pair went through different dresses and discussed which styles and designers suited her best. “It made me appreciate and learn why I needed a dress like this one,” she says. Although Thompson didn’t find a dress that day, she didn’t go home empty-handed. She was armed with a list of designers that she knew would work for her. Thompson began her online search and it ended as soon as she found the embellished gold Tony Bowls dress. After consulting with her mom, sister and friends, she made the purchase, even if she couldn’t see it in person, let alone try it on. “I was kind of nervous but when it came, it looked better than in the pictures,” she says. And lucky for her, the dress fit perfectly; it only needed to be taken up a couple inches from the bottom. She was prepared well in advance for her graduation at the end of June, where she’s most looking forward to having all of the people she cares about most — friends and family — in one place at one time. The Bishop James Mahoney grad has a long list of activities keeping her busy during the school year — track, volleyball and working on an AP (advanced placement) art portfolio. Although she sometimes puts too much pressure on herself to reach her educational goals, she explains why graduation is about more than grades or passing classes. “High school really shapes who you are, that’s when you’re growing into who you’ll become. I looked back at a picture of me from Grade 9 and I looked so young.” she laughs. “You’re so young and timid and you come out a completely different person. It’s celebrating that more than anything.” Thompson has a lot to celebrate. She’s enrolled in the College of Arts and Science at the University of Saskatchewan this fall. She plans on applying to either physiotherapy or medical school (depending on her marks). Something tells us that her marks will be just fine.

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Outfit: 1. Earrings: Le Chateau. “I thought I’d have to search everywhere for something like these, but it (Le Chateau) turned out being one of the first places I went.” 2. Dress: Tony Bowls. “I narrowed it down to three dresses. This one was the most unique, so I went for it.” 3. Bracelets: The gold one is her mother’s and the pearls are from Aldo. “I wanted the accessories really simple because the dress is so much.” 4. Ring: Suzy Shier. 6.

5. Clutch: Spring. 6. Shoes: Spring. “I just wanted to have flats because I probably wouldn’t make it in heels!”

Grade 12 graduate Kate Thompson poses in the gardens at Boffins, in the Innovation Place research park in Saskatoon. QC photo by Michelle Berg


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INVENTORY #

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We want to hear from you: Tell us about your best garage sale find. Email qc@leaderpost.com

Nouvelle

The building that housed Luisa Graybiel’s store Indigo is set for demolition, so the 25-year retailer plans on retiring. But until then, Graybiel and three friends are running a new store in the space, stocking it with beautiful items, many of which came from their own closets and basements. Nouvelle’s main focus is vintage women’s clothing. There are also some new items in the store, like accessories and linens. Nouvelle is a pop-up store, so catch it before it’s gone (likely in a week or two). Open Thursday to Sunday at 2824 13th Ave. 1. BEAUTIFUL BEADS: Ayala Bar jewelry from Israel: earrings $110, bracelet $390, necklace $595.

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2. ON THE FRINGE: Owen Barry suede purses from England. Shown: $286.

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3. COVER UP: Sharanel shawls, many colours and styles, $25$38. 4. SOPHISTICATED: Vintage 1950s ruched black dress with V-back, $50; woven straw pillbox hat, $20.

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5. EMULATE JACKIE O: Vintage 1960s double-knit wool skirted suit, made in Italy, $70. 1960s hats: Leopold Original tulle high pillbox style or Montreal-made felt hat with bow, $25-$30.

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IN THE CITY #

J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 3 — 1 : 1 1 p. m .

Giggles on the gridiron

Saskatoon Valkyries receiver Kayla Giles (centre right) makes a face at her daughter Zoey Ross, being held by Giles’ mother Katie Giles, during halftime at the Western Women’s Canadian Football League final held at Mosaic Stadium in Regina. QC Photo by Michael Bell


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THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2013

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YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE What’s your favourite place in Regina? Email qc@leaderpost.com

#

M Y FAV O U R I T E P L A C E

Love for neighbourhood park endures

Angus Livingstone’s favourite place in Regina is Englewood Park, located at Petersmeyer Street and Partridge Crescent within Argyle Park. QC Photo by Don Healy

By Andrew Matte When Angus Livingstone was a kid, he walked across an Argyle Park green space and instantly fell in love. Over the years, Englewood Park has remained special to the 24-year-old musician because of the mature trees, large patch of grass and the park’s unexplained ability to encourage creativity. Even when he’s busy in rehearsals with his band Port Noise and can’t find time to visit, Livingstone finds solace in his memories of time spent at his favourite place in Regina.

Q: How did you discover Englewood Park? A: When I was eight years old, I went over to a

buddy’s house and we wound up taking a shortcut through this park. By cutting through the park, there was just something about it that caught my eye even back then.

Q: What about the park interested you? A: There is such an energy in that place. It meant something to me during my childhood. At eight or nine years old, it was a huge distance for me. I lived in Argyle Park but I lived way over on the other side of Sangster. I have always loved the place. Even now I love the place. Q: Was the actual discovery of the park meaningful to you? A: Part of it was that it was just new to me. I

had never been there. To me, it was sort of like breaking new ground because I had never been to that part of Argyle Park before. As the years have gone on, I have found that I can find solace in the place.

Q: What attracts you to the park as an adult? A: It’s a home away from home in a way. It’s like a sanctuary for me and a place where I can be at peace. When I go there, I usually just walk circles around the park. And then I’d often find a comfortable spot to lie down. Or I’d just sit there and soak it all in. Q: What did you do at the park when you were a kid?

A: I’d hang out at the playground. Q: Why do you visit the park today? A: If I’m working on stuff with the band and I really need to hammer out some details on something, I find that there’s some creative energy there that helps focus my thoughts. I’ll find a tree and sit under it or something like that. Q: Did you always just sit under a tree? A: I used to take long walks around the neighbourhood for the longest time. Even if I’m out driving, I sometimes make a point of driving past it. However I can get there, I get there. It’s always fun.


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day trips #

Have you been on a perfect Saskatchewan day trip? We want to hear about it. Email QC@leaderpost.com

pROVINCIAL MUSEUMS

Discover Saskatchewan’s pioneer past By Edna Manning Museums help us identify and connect with the culture and history of a previous generation. They also preserve, protect and display artifacts that would otherwise become lost and forgotten. It’s these reasons that Harry Friesen, chair of the Wilson Museum in Dundurn, says museums are important. It’s also why he enjoys educating everyone from school groups to day tourists about the early pioneers’ experiences. The Wilson Museum is home to a number of noteworthy exhibits, including a medical display with an iron lung, which was used to treat paralysis of muscles and organs of breathing. Other exhibits include a costume belonging to Chief Bill Littlecrow, chief of the Whitecap Dakota Sioux First Nations during the 1950s, a full-length cape made from the heart feathers of the Prairie chicken, a two-headed calf and a restored hay-stacker used by the early settlers in the area. Dundurn’s outlaw farmer Charlie Parmer is also recognized at the museum. This gun-toting homesteader is alleged to have ridden with Jesse James in several bank raids and train robberies. Friesen notes that Charlie and his son Earl homesteaded just north of the museum. His brother Allan was married to Jesse James’ sister. Directors of the museum are trying to bring back artifacts uncovered in a 1924 archaeological excavation eight kilometres north of town. Many of the artifacts recovered were ornaments, arrowheads, knives, tools made of bone, shells and teeth and stones used for grinding purposes. According to Friesen, two men (Dr. J. Finn, a local medical doctor and Dr. William Parks from Ontario), uncovered these items in a spring-fed bog which was used as a water source. In 1983, University of Saskatchewan students conducted more excavations. “The artifacts from the original

A restored plow is on display at the Wilson Museum.

Harry Friesen is chair of the Wilson Museum in Dundurn. He stands beside the Iron Lung, a machine used to treat paralysis of the muscles and breathing organs. QC PHOTOS BY EDNA MANNING

The Saskatchewan River Valley Museum has a traditional Mennonite house-barn built around 1907.

excavation were borrowed from the Royal Ontario Museum for further analysis and documentation, then returned to Ontario where they are still in storage. We’ve been working at having these items returned so we can put them on display here,” said Friesen The Wilson Museum was founded in 1967 by local residents Bob and Maxine Wilson. Both were very involved in the community and worked hard to establish the museum. In 1990, the museum was incorporated and a non-profit organization was formed. Friesen and his wife Anne became involved when health problems prevented the Wilsons from continuing. The Wilson Museum is open Vic-

toria Day to Labour Day, Saturday, Sunday and statutory holidays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Phone (306) 492-4747. ■ ■ ■ ■ The Saskatchewan River Valley Museum reflects all aspects of early settlers’ lives in a turn-of-the-century setting. Some of the artifacts on display include many pre-1950s household furnishings and appliances relating to the cultural aspects of the area from the late 1800s and on. Visitors will enjoy touring the general store, a barber shop, a doctor’s office, a sports area and music room. The museum is located on a three-

View this 1915 Willy’s Overland Touring automobile at the Sask. Valley Museum.

acre site in the town of Hague, north of Saskatoon. It was started by Edgar Knippel and George K. Fehr in 1984. In 1997, a local resident named Tobie Unruh donated thousands of artifacts to the museum and a larger exhibition building was constructed in 1999. The main attraction is the traditional Mennonite house-barn built around 1907. The large building has been fully restored including a central oven used for heating and baking. The barn was attached to the house for convenience and for safety from the whiteout blizzards that frequently hit the prairies. Other original buildings on the site include a blacksmith shop, church and a coun-

try school. Also on display is a 1915 Willy’s Overland Touring automobile, a 1950s John Deere Caterpillar Crawler, a 1946 International McCormick W4 tractor, one of Western Canada’s largest collection of hand tools and a full line of agricultural machinery. The Saskatchewan Valley Museum, located at 306 East Railway St. in Hague, is open until the Thanksgiving weekend in October. Hours of operation are 1 to 5 p.m., Friday to Monday. Private tours are available by appointment; phone (306) 225-2112 or (306) 225-4361. Both are located in picturesque areas and make a perfect Saskatchewan day trip.


Read my book #

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Loca l AUT H O RS: Writers tell us what makes their book worth reading

L E S L E Y- A N N E M c L E O D

A history lesson told in fiction History isn’t actually as boring as it might have seemed in high school. It’s simply an assemblage of stories, of lives, of emotions, of experiences. The Regency Storybook is a collection of such stories set in England in the early 19th century, a place and time of extraordinary happenings. The lives of ordinary people were buffeted by wars abroad and political upheavals at home — not all that different from today. Yet life was rich; arts and literature flourished in a sort of golden age. While society was led by a glittering aristocracy, the characters that populate these particular stories are from a variety of backgrounds, and of a wide range of ages. The Regency Storybook’s fictional people face the challenges of everyday life, but in each case a momentous historical event touches them, even if only briefly. A young

lady is caught up in the assassination of a prime minister; the publication of a literary classic causes problems for a gentleman. A dowager visits with an old friend, who happens to be the Prince Regent’s mistress. The Battle of Waterloo overwhelms a middleclass household as the entire nation is glued to the news. And the tragic death of a princess changes another Lesley-Anne family’s plans as grief McLeod swamps the country. While these events are 200 years past, each one of us today is affected similarly by the momentous happenings of our own time. As I wrote each of these 12 stories, I found myself empathizing more closely than I’d

imagined possible with the characters I’d created as they struggled to deal with both private and public issues. Artist Shakoriel and I wanted to create a gift book in which historical stories and illustrations go hand in hand. Her costume drawings accentuate each story, providing a glimpse of the everyday appearance of each of the protagonists. I hope our book echoes the era of authors like Jane Austen and follows in the tradition of more recent Regency authors such as Georgette Heyer. Lesley-Anne McLeod has been writing for 30 years; she has 14 e-books published (nine Regency romances and five Regency novelettes), and now in print, this collection of Regency short stories. Lesley-Anne is a devoted anglophile and is committed to historical research; she blogs weekly at lesleyannemcleod. blogspot.com.

Treasured Moments DESIGNED D ESIGNED FOR PEOPLE JUST LIKE YOU!

Notice of Members meeting and Basket Social for Riel Métis Council of Regina (formerly locals Riel Metis Council and Queen City #34). Purpose of meeting to consider the following bylaw changes: a) Bylaw 2 - Name change to Regina Riel Métis Council Local #34 (RRMC#34 for short), b) Bylaw 6.2 citizenship boundary changes (45 kms) and circumstance for membership “vicinity... or whose primary business, work or interests are more directly related to the Regina local.”, c) Bylaw 8) Meeting of Members A) Annual or Special Meetings - strike “provided there must be at least 20 members”. Meeting to be held Noon to 4PM June 23rd, at Eastview Community Centre, 615 6th Avenue Regina SK. For more information call 306.216.5504. REG20200594_1_1

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ON THE SCENE

#

S A S K A T C H E W A N S P O R T S H A L L O F F A M E I N D U C T I O N C E R E M O N I E S 1.

2.

Some of the best athletes in the province were honoured on Saturday as the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies were held at the Conexus Arts Centre. The inductees were Garth Boesch, Allan Semeniuk, Vern Pachal, Keith Roney, Gwen (Wall) Ridout, Donald Gallo, Chuck Armstrong, Evelyn (Gorin) Nesdole, and the 1998 University of Saskatchewan Huskies Football team.

3.

4.

1. Allan and Cynthia Semeniuk 2. Tyler Majcher, Jason Weber, Kurtis Albers and Colin Dutton 3. Jamie Diederichs and Derek Hoium 4. Katie Best and Marilyn Pachal 5. Jylelle and Lilla Carpenter-Boesch 6. Jean and Keith Roney

QC PHOTOS BY MICHAEL BELL 5.

6.


LEADERPOST.COM/QC

THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2013

21

Real Estate Listings That Just CLICK.

Regina Real Estate Review has launched a new and improved website: • Ability to compare up to 5 homes at once • Listings snapshot • Hot List, featuring the Top 10 most viewed listings • Enhanced search capabilities

ReginaRealEstateReview.com REG00177749_1_1


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Music #

W e’ r e o n fac eb o o k : Visit us at Facebook.com/qcregina

T I N S E L T REEs

Band’s debut a long time coming

Tinsel Trees is, from left, Michael Gardiner, Jim Lindsay, John De Gennaro and Colin Gaucher. PHOTO BY Chris Graham

By Andrew Matte For most bands, recording a first album is a victory. In the case of Regina’s Tinsel Trees, their debut album will also be a relief. Recording of a full record is now underway from this four-piece pop band whose best efforts to write songs, record and even tour have been thwarted by personnel changes. But today, the band is more stable than it’s ever been and founder Jim Lindsay is hopeful he might reach a goal set nearly a decade ago. “There is a feeling that this has gone long enough. It’s time to record some songs,” says Lindsay during a break from his full-time job as a

painter. “It’s pretty weird we haven’t recorded an album. I admit that. And people around town think it’s pretty weird too.” The band has plans to record its songs in Regina with the help of Jason Plumb and his new studio installed at CBC Regina’s Broad Street facility before heading to Montreal for mixing. Lindsay, 29, launched Tinsel Trees with a plan to get help to make his melodies and music come to life. While the band has benefited from long-term members, Tinsel Trees is also notorious for losing others, usually at important times. “We’ve written material but then stuff would happen with members. Someone would leave the band or

move away and then we’d end up rewriting some stuff. Then something else would happen,” says Lindsay. “I’ve tried really hard to push through. And it was hard sometimes. But today, I believe in the songs we have.” While Lindsay is the main songwriter, guitarist Michael Gardiner is usually the first to add ideas. “Mike adds to it and the rest will contribute to it,” Lindsay says. “Mike is really good working with song structure. So I look to him for a lot of that part of the writing. We’ll shorten or lengthen something or add another part in. That’s where his skill set is.” With a sound described as low-key pop influenced by Lindsay’s affinity for music from the 1960s and psyche-

delic rock, hopes for Tinsel Trees remain modest and haven’t changed much since the band’s inception. “My main objective, and what I have wanted from the beginning, was to just make a record that I was proud of. I want to make a record I would buy,” says Lindsay. “I am not worried about being popular or selling out huge shows. But we hope to tour one day, so if we play some good shows and put out a good record, I’d be happy.” Further challenging Lindsay and his bandmates is family life. With new responsibilities as fathers, stealing away time to rehearse or write music is more challenging than it was in Tinsel Trees’s early days. “Sometimes, life kicks in. But we

work around it,” says Lindsay, a father of two young children. “We find that as time goes on, particularly for those of us with kids, it gets a little more difficult. We’re not just a bunch of kids who play in a band anymore.” Buoyed by new enthusiasm about the prospect of a new album, Tinsel Trees has played several high-profile local shows. The band is also slated to perform with The Besnard Lakes on June 29 at the Exchange in Regina. “I believe in what I do so I’ve never strayed away from it. I have never tried to impress anyone or try to fit into any sort of niche. I just do what I do and if people like it, then great,” Lindsay says. “Some people might not get it but I think we have a big enough crowd that likes what we do.”


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# CROSSWORD N EW YOR K TI MES ACROSS �1 Wine’s partner �5 Overflow �9 Y’s 14 Spingarn of the

N.A.A.C.P.’s Spingarn Medal 15 Astronomical effect 16 Broadway musical that opens with “Maybe” 17 List shortener 18 Come again? 19 Mammal that hums to its young 20 Language that gave us “kowtow” 23 “I know that one!” 24 Rough shelter 28 Clutch performer? 34 Kaplan course subj. 35 “Right You Are, Mr. ___” (1957 novel) 36 “___ aren’t the droids you’re looking for” (“Star Wars” line) 37 On 38 God-fearing 40 The Wildcats of the N.C.A.A. 41 Like some photos 44 Winter playground 45 Hardly Mr. Personality 46 Discuss reasonable outcomes upfront 49 Generic 50 Gent, in Britain 51 Emergency shout … or a possible title for this puzzle 58 One providing assistance after a crash 61 Nonentity 62 Hayseed 63 Filling in a gordita 64 Help list, e.g. 65 It’s got all the answers 66 Cosmetician’s goof 67 Per 68 ___ Anglia

DOWN �1 Entertained at a

reception, maybe

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PUZZLE BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY AND ELIZABETH DONOVAN

�2 Ninth in a series �3 Almost �4 Canadian P.M. Pierre

Trudeau’s middle name �5 1931 film for which Wallace Beery won Best Actor �6 Piece by piece �7 All the way through 12th grade, informally �8 It goes through many phases �9 Least genuine 10 Restrained, as a dog 11 Biology subject 12 One of the Kardashians 13 Setting for much of Homer’s “Odyssey”

21 Scand. land 22 Skull and Bones member

25 Baseball Hall-of-Famer nicknamed Knucksie 26 Give, as a little extra 27 Tops 28 Funny Tracey 29 Often-grated cheese 30 Thin sheet metal 31 Bête ___ 32 Unresponsive? 33 Put up, in a way 39 The English Beat, for one 42 Red, white and blue players 43 Clint Eastwood, for one

COPPER KETTLE

57

45 Split 47 Hotel room amenity 48 Where Archimedes

Gift Certificates Available!

1953 Scarth St.

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had his “Eureka!” moment 52 L. Frank Baum princess 53 No. 2 54 ___ Rapee, longtime Radio City Music Hall conductor 55 Mysterious glow 56 Babe Ruth’s 2,220, for short 57 2012 campaign issue 58 Thinking figs. 59 Rum ___ Tugger (“Cats” cat) 60 “You don’t say!”

Something to “Bregg” about

#

Janric classic SUDoKU

Level: Gold Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

Solution to the crossword puzzle and the Sudoku can be found on Page 31

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EVENTS #

son Fine Arts Until Aug. 16, Regina Centre Crossing, 1621 Albert St.

MUSIC

Thursd ay, Ju ne 20

Dimensions Until Aug. 25 Sask. Craft Council show MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St.

Third Degree Birnz The Pump, 641 Victoria Ave E. Fly Points McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave.

How We Filled the Vault: 60 Years of Collecting at the MacKenzie Art Gallery Until Sept. 1, MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St.

Friday, Ju n e 2 1 Party4Pastures Benefit Concert Featuring The Midnight Roses, Glenn Sutter, Black Drink Crier and Down Home Boys The Artesian, 2627 13th Ave. The Milkman’s Sons 8:30 p.m., Royal Regina Golf Club, 5401 11th Ave. W. We Were Lovers The Exchange, 2431 8th Ave. Third Degree Birnz The Pump, 641 Victoria Ave E. Wonderland McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave. Big Chill Fridays With music by DJ Fatbot The Lancaster, 4529 Gordon Rd. Summer Solstice The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave. Chris Culgin with Kory Istace Vs. The Time Pirates O’Hanlon’s, 1947 Scarth St.

Sam Steele: The Journey of a Canadian Hero Until. Sept. 2, RCMP Heritage Museum, 5907 Dewdney Ave. Fly Points will be performing at McNally’s on Thursday. File Photo McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave. Third Degree Birnz The Pump, 641 Victoria Ave E. Jack Semple 8 p.m., Sawchyn Guitars, 2132 Dewdney Ave. Melechesh, Vreid, Lightning Swords of Death, Reign of Lies The Exchange, 2431 8th Ave. Age of Days Pure Ultra Lounge 2044 Dewdney Ave. Sean Burns The Lancaster, 4529 Gordon Rd. S u n day, Ju n e 2 3

Satu rd ay, June 22

Wake Owl The Artesian, 2627 13th Ave.

Burns & Maciag with Tyler Gilbert 8 p.m., The Artesian 2627 13th Ave.

Kelimines, The Florals The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave.

CKRM Country Talent Search Contest Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr. Summer Solstice The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave. Wonderland

Mo n day, Ju n e 24 Monday Night Jazz & Blues: Uptown Jazz Bushwakker 2206 Dewdney Ave. Showoff: Open Mic 7:30 p.m., The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave.

Three For The Show Monthly Old Time Dance Party Casino Regina Show Lounge 1880 Saskatchewan Dr. Tuesday, Ju ne 2 5 Tuesday Night Troubador jam night Every Tuesday, 8 p.m. Bocados, 2037 Park St. Dead Soft with Sightlines O’Hanlon’s, 1947 Scarth St. Wednesday, Ju ne 2 6 Wednesday Night Folk: Jay Aymar Bushwakker 2206 Dewdney Ave. Jam Night Every Wednesday McNally’s, 2226 Dewdney Ave. The Snake Oil Salesmen, Val Halla, Victory Kicks, The Accomplice The Exchange, 2431 Eighth Ave.

#

ART

Play An interactive installation by Kathleen Irwin and Jeff Morton, using piano sound and images.

Workshop: June 22, 2-4 p.m. City Square Plaza Processional: June 23, 9-10 p.m., City Square Plaza Until Aug. 25, Dunlop Art Gallery – Central Library, 231112th Ave. Draw by Night with Myron Campbell Saturday, June 22, 7:30 p.m. MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St. Sunday Art Market Weekly community-based marketplace with live artistic performances. Sunday, June 23, 3-7 p.m. Cathedral Neighbourhood Centre, 2900 13th Ave. Layered Thoughts Collage Art Show Until June 23, Tae Contemporary Art Gallery, 1621 11th Ave. The Power of Music: Sustainability and the Junos Until July 31, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, 2445 Albert St. Cautionary Tales Watercolours by Joseph Anderson. Until Aug. 11, Dunlop Art Gallery – Central Library, 231112th Ave. The Artists of Scott Nichol-

Greatest Hits: The Juno Tour of Canadian Art Until Nov. 24, MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St. --Assiniboia Gallery 2266 Smith St. Open Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mysteria Gallery 2706 13th Ave. Open Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Neutral Ground #203-1856 Scarth St. Open Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Nouveau Gallery 2146 Albert St. Open Tuesday to Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

#

COMEDY

Pass the Hat June 21, 9 p.m. The Club at the Exchange 2431 8th Ave. Comedy Grind Every Saturday night Gabbo’s, 2338 Dewdney Ave. Tim Kehler with Adam Lojewski and Mike

Schmalenberg June 26, 8:30 p.m. The Artful Dodger 1631 11th Ave.

#

SPECIAL EVENTS

Canada’s Farm Progress Show June 20, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. June 21, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Evraz Place Yoga Party with Bodhi Tree Yoga June 20, 5-6 p.m. Victoria Park Queen City Pride Community Fair June 20, 6-8:30 p.m. Cornwall Centre, 2102 11th Ave. Non-GMO potluck and environmental movie night Hosted by Sask. Eco Network; screening The World According to Monsanto June 20, 6 p.m. Creative City Centre, 1843 Hamilton St. Salsa on the Plaza Hosted by Regina Salseros June 20, 7-10 p.m. City Square Plaza Saskatchewan Roughriders vs. Calgary Stampeders June 20, 8 p.m. Mosaic Stadium All That Glitters Party June 20, 10 p.m. Gabbo’s, 2338 Dewdney Ave. National Aboriginal Day celebrations June 21, 9 a.m. Wascana Centre northwest corner Aboriginal Talent Showcase June 21, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Cornwall Centre, 2102 11th Ave. Peony Show June 21, 1:30-8 p.m. June 22, 10 a.m.-3:45 p.m. Cathedral Neighbourhood Centre, 2900 13th Ave.


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What you need to know to plan your week. Send events to QC@leaderpost.com

K.G. German Harmonie Dancers and Daughters of Penelope Hellenic Dancers Culture on the Plaza, hosted by Regina Multicultural Council June 22, noon-1 p.m. City Square Plaza Theatre in the Park with Globe Theatre School For teens aged 13 to 18 June 21, 2-3:30 p.m. Victoria Park, downtown Jon Ryan celebrity steak night fundraiser Featuring Jeff Reed and Troy Westwood June 21, 6 p.m. The Pump, 641 Victoria Ave E. Regina Red Sox vs. Weyburn Beavers June 21, 7:05 p.m. Currie Field, Ring Road and Winnipeg Street Regina Farmers’ Market

Every Wednesday and Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. City Square Plaza, downtown

June 22, noon-4 p.m. Thompson School, 2033 Toronto St.

SACHM Annual Walkathon June 22 Wascana Centre near the bandshell

Pride in the Park June 22, 1-5 p.m. Victoria Park

Beach Blast Barbecue, bouncy castle, children’s games and pet adoption, hosted by Regina Humane Society June 22, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Between Sears and Co-Op Foods, 3000 block Quance St. Queen City Pride Parade June 22, noon-1 p.m. 2070 Broad St. Kick Off to Summer Fun in the Park! Barbecue, face painting, games, bouncy castle and more, hosted by New Beginnings Lutheran Church.

A Feast for the Eyes “A Taste of Spain” Art Gallery of Regina fundraiser featuring a food competition, silent art auction and more. June 22, 8-11 p.m. Neil Balkwill Civic Arts Centre, 2420 Elphinstone St. What’s Your Colour? Pride Dance June 22, 10 p.m.-4 a.m. Gay and Lesbian Community of Regina 2070 Broad St. Multiculturalism Day June 23, 1-4 p.m. MacKenzie Art Gallery, 3475 Albert St.

Family Fun Day and Bottle Drive Arcola East Community Association June 23, 1-4 p.m. Sandra Schmirler Leisure Centre, 3130 E. Woodhams Dr.

Chess in the Park June 25, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Victoria Park

Regina Red Sox vs. Moose Jaw Miller Express June 23, 2:05 p.m. Currie Field, Ring Road and Winnipeg Street

Regina Red Sox vs. Swift Current Indians June 25, 7:05 p.m. Currie Field, Ring Road and Winnipeg Street

George Reed Golf Tournament Fundraiser for Special Olympics Saskatchewan June 24 Wascana Golf and Country Club, 6500 Wascana Parkway Sports in the Park with Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame June 25, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Victoria Park, downtown

Ultimate Frisbee June 25, 5:15-6:30 p.m. Victoria Park

#

NEW MOVIES

Monsters University Family Mike Wazowski and James P. Sullivan are inseparable, but that wasn’t always the case. Learn how Mike and Sulley became the best of friends. World War Z Thriller

United Nations employee Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) is running out of time as he travels the world to stop a zombie pandemic. Based on Max Brooks’ novel. Galaxy Cinemas 420 McCarthy Blvd. N. 306-522-9098 Cineplex Odeon Southland Mall Cinemas 3025 Gordon Rd.; 306-5853383 --Regina Public Library Theatre 2311 12th Ave.; 306-777-6104 Kramer Imax 2903 Powerhouse Dr. 306-522-4629 Rainbow Cinemas Golden Mile Shopping Centre 3806 Albert St.; 306-3595250

Sun Country Health Region (SCHR) is located in southeast Saskatchewan where more than 2,400 employees deliver a breadth of health services to a population of 56,529 people. SCHR operates 28 facilities,38 public health programs and has a budget of over $141 million.

To advertise or for more information please contact your Leader-Post advertising Career Sales account executive or call (306) 781-5240.

Facility Maintenance Operator Full-Time Permanent This position will operate and monitor computerized building control systems and maintain facility/plant systems and equipment.Independently performs major repairs/ installations on a wide variety of complex building systems and equipment. QUALIFICATIONS: Building Systems Technician certificate, Refrigeration certificate and 5th Class Power Engineer certificate,where required by the job.Position will be based in Weyburn,Saskatchewan. The Sun Country Health Region offers excellent benefits & compensation commensurate with qualifications & experience.

Fax: (306) 842-8740 Email: jobs@schr.sk.ca Web: www.suncountry.sk.ca

Apply in confidence to: Sun Country Health Region Human Resources Box 2003 Weyburn,SK S4H 2Z9

We wish to thank all applicants, however, only those individuals selected for interviews will be contacted. REG27402467_1_1


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ADVICE COLUMN

Moving to ‘fantasy’ relationship not the answer Q: I’m a married man, in love with a married woman. HER: She confided that her husband cheated, but she’s working on her relationship. She’s fun and has two kids. She drops them off at school, we chat every day. She smiles at me. I haven’t told her how I feel. ME: Two kids. On sick leave at home, fighting a problem that’s probably someday going to make me very sick. My wife works 60-70 hours weekly. She’s cold, frigid. I have a sleeping disorder, so we sleep separately; our sex life is non-existent. Only partly her fault. My sickness causes erectile dysfunction (ED). I know she cheats, but I don’t blame her. I know we’re only together for the kids. Should I just let my wife go? Am I a monster, wanting to break up another woman’s marriage, so I can be with her though I cannot fulfil her? She just might be my soulmate. Lonely Guy A: You’re lost in fantasies harmful

Ask Ellie

to YOU — creating an imaginary “soulmate” lifeline. If this little-known woman rejects you, that’d be another emotional wallop on top of illness, adding strain on your physical health. Harmful, too, to HER — sorry, but you’d be the worst escape for her … a man with long-term problems who desperately hopes she’s the answer to making his life perfect. Talk to your wife. Ask what she sees/wants for the future. Maybe she hopes you’ll recover and is cold and angry because you’ve given up. Maybe she wants out, but won’t say so when you’re ill. Talk to your doctor. There are

strategies for sleep disorders, treatments for ED, and other ways for intimacy besides intercourse …. if you seek solutions instead of escape.

Q: My wife’s oldest brother, 40, lives alone in an apartment, has no car, and holds a steady full-time job. He has no friends that we know of. He’s friendly with co-workers only at work. He doesn’t date, hasn’t had a girlfriend in two decades. He’s not seen his family (father, three siblings) for six months though we all live close. He avoided getting together for Christmas. He’s missed occasions before, but usually showed up to the next one. My wife gave birth to our second daughter and there was no contact to congratulate us. He won’t respond to emails whether he’s going to attend an event. His father has visited him at his work several times to assure he’s OK. When he asks him about the next family outing, he always replies he has to work. Their mother once

told my wife, “he hasn’t been given the same tools as everyone else,” and he refused to get help. My wife feels that a confrontation might drive him further away, even lead him to suicide if we make him feel “guilty.” Yet I think we’ll never see him again if we do nothing. Concerned Brother-in-Law A: He’s a loner, functioning for his daily life. His father’s visits should continue regularly — suggesting lunch or a coffee while there, so there’s time to chat. He shouldn’t make him feel guilty. However, if there’s a change in his appearance, or odd behaviour beyond his absences, a family intervention needs to be discussed. I recommend a family meeting with a psychologist experienced with patients who withdraw socially, to discuss this. The brother may be masking deepening social anxiety, may be a hoarder at home living in chaos, and may already be on the edge of despair. Do NOT stop showing him that the

family cares about him, not about showing up.

Q: I’m having problems waking up and going to a job I don’t like. I have to go in order to maintain my life. How can I become more motivated, make the best of it and get up on time? Also, I don’t get along with my coworkers. How can I get to know them and become friends? Lost in my Life A: When depression takes hold, it’s hard to enjoy work or the people there, and the desire to avoid all by sleeping becomes stronger. Get to a doctor right away. Or go to a hospital’s mental health clinic or emergency department and openly express feeling too low to get up and work, though you need to financially. You may be given medication to lift you over this slump. Ask also for ongoing therapy to learn some coping strategies. Once you’re proactive getting help, you’ll have more confidence to make friends.

Next week in

Deidra Roberts is working to advance transgender rights in Regina and beyond


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OUTSIDE THE LINES # Colouring contest Each week, artist Stephanie McKay creates a timely illustration meant to please kids of all ages. Children can colour the page, have a picture taken with the finished product and email it to qc@leaderpost.com by 9 a.m. Monday. One winner will be chosen each week. Please send high-resolution pictures and include the child’s name and contact information.

Last week’s QC colouring contest winner was Alex McCaulder. Congratulations! Thanks to all for your colourful submissions. Try again this week!

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GARDENING

How to incorporate yellow into gardens Foliage is most plants’ primary organ. Plants use it to draw energy from the sun, converting carbon dioxide and water into sugars and oxygen through photosynthesis. In the garden, foliage provides visual appeal with a variety of textures, shapes and sizes. If the leaves are the typical green, then they can act as negative space — a foil, if you will — against which colourful flowers and structures are highlighted. If the leaves aren’t green (a common colour is yellow), then the whole plant stands out. These plants’ colour typically lasts most of the season. In the garden, yellow helps to direct your eye to an area of interest, convincing visitors to investigate and drawing them along a prescribed path. It also helps to brighten an otherwise shady area. Yellow is a great choice to highlight its complementary colour, purple, especially in a shady area where purple can literally disappear. Yellow can be

combined with red and blue to create interesting effects as they play off each other. But, a little goes a long way — avoid creating a circus effect. When working with yellow plants, don’t forget that flowers create periodic and ephemeral contrasts, or complements against the foliage. You have several choices when it comes to yellow plants: Yellow-leafed spireas (Spiraea spp.) are typically uniformly globular shrubs with delicate pink, red or mauve flowers that bloom in early to midsummer. Some yellow cultivars produce red leaves that start to mature to gold. My favourite is Mini Sunglo, aptly named for its shape and bright yellow hue. It’s most colourful in full sun, tending towards limey-yellow in light shade. Tip: trim to 10cm in spring to create a perfect mound. Also, give your plants a light shear right after flowering to encourage a second bloom. Golden hostas (Hosta spp.) come in many shapes and sizes. Hostas are shade tolerant, but in too much shade, gold hostas will be more lime than

yellow. Given too much sun, they can burn. Hostas like evenly moist soil at all times. Their worst enemy is the slug. Golden cultivars include Midas Touch, Gold Standard and August Moon. Golden ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolious), a medium-sized shrub with shaggy bark, produces not-so-special white flower clusters in early summer. Grow in full sun (for best colour) to part shade. Individual branches may experience winter dieback — just prune these out in the spring. Available cultivars include Luteus and Dart’s Gold. Golden hops (Humulus lupulus ‘Aureus’) are a vigorous vine that grows up to 5m and dies to the ground at the end of the season like most perennials. The stems and leaves have short prickles, so wear long sleeves when working around the vines. They actually produce hops. If you make your own beer from scratch you could try using your own home grown hops, but I offer no guarantees on the resulting brew. Finally, there are two dependably

This Mini Sunglo Spirea shines brightly. PHOTO COURTESY ERL SVENDSON

yellow junipers. The first one is the yellow common juniper (Juniperus communes ‘Depressa Aurea’). New growth is bright yellow, fading to bronze in the fall and returning in the spring as lime. The short awl-shaped leaves are sharp and may irritate the skin. Reaching up to .6 m tall, it may spread up to 2m if left unchecked. The other juniper is Motherlode (Junipe-

rus horizontalis ‘Motherlode’). It is a groundhugger, reaching only 15cm tall but spreads to form a dense mat up to 3m wide. Both junipers are easily controlled with judicious pruning. This column is provided courtesy of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society (www.saskperennial.ca; email: hortscene@yahoo.com).

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SHARP EATS #

See a food trend you think deserves a highlight in QC? Email QC@leaderpost.com or visit QC on Facebook

FOODIE PHOTO GALLERY

Come for the food at Mandarin restaurant By Jenn Sharp Hailed by many as having the best Asian eats in Saskatoon, the Mandarin restaurant is located in the heart of the city’s core neighbourhood. Long before it became hip to open a restaurant in Riversdale, the Mandarin was there, serving up authentic Chinese dishes, like Peking Duck and Mushroom Egg Foo Yung, along with mind-bogglingly delicious dim sum. The cavernous restaurant stretches for what seems like an entire block but you’ll often be hard-pressed to get a table there during the weekend’s prime dim sum time. The menu is packed with tofu and vegetable dishes, making it perfect for vegetarians too. If it’s your first visit, don’t be fooled by the Mandarin’s lacklustre interior. The food here more than makes up for the decor (or lack thereof). It’s the perfect place to go with a group of friends — snag a big table where you’ll be served dishes family-style. It’s a good idea to go with a group; it’s easier that way to shrug off and laugh at the (sometimes) bad service. Like I said before, come for the food and you won’t be disappointed.

QC Photos by Jenn Sharp

Sweet and Sour Pineapple Chicken

Singapore Rice Noodles

Chicken with Green Peppers and Black Bean Sauce

BBQ Duck

Seafood Bird’s Nest

Pork Chops with Orange Sauce

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Beef and Mixed Vegetables

Deep-fried crab claws


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WINE world #

Stiegl Radler

Radler low on calories, high on refreshment By James Romanow So there I am on CTV Saskatoon Morning Live, discussing what summer beverages may work for viewers. I am lending the show my glow of highbrow intelligence, the kind of scholarly, cultured persona so lacking in today’s morning television. (You can spot people like me by our Birkenstocks.) You can imagine my horror when having introduced Jeremy Dodge to Stiegl Radler, I watched the entire cast and crew spin out of control. The cameraman seized my Radler flute. Mike, the sportscaster, was waving the can at the camera like a Riders fan at the Grey Cup. Heather is dancing a samba without music in the middle of the studio and Jeremy was the one note of suave stability. All this from a 500 ml can of 2.5-per-cent alcohol. (And Heather didn’t even have any.) “Oho,” think I, “Stiegl has a winner here.” A Radler is literally a cyclist, but also the name for a drink, the German equivalent of a shandy. They were invented in the first fitness craze days, back in the 1890s, when clubs of young men would go cycling in the country. They would naturally stop for a beer but a couple of pints and cycling can be an awkward mix, so the beer was de-alcoholized by watering it down with juice. Stiegl Radler is a mix of grapefruit juice and

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Stiegl’s Gauldbrau. Tremendously tart and refreshing, it makes a great thirst quencher, especially on those hot days in the sun. I’ve never come across this mix before — raspberry or lemon are more common — but I think it brilliant. The calories are low, and refreshment level exceptionally high. Stiegl Radler, $2.99 ***** (as rated by the CTV Saskatoon Morning Live crew) More excellent fun in Monday’s Leader-Post or on Twitter @drbooze.

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