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The Department Heads ride the line between hard rock and progressive P. 4

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

ON THE SCENE: At the Glass Slipper Benefit for Princesses P. 14

GARDENING:

Now’s the time to prune those unruly trees and shrubs P. 20

A STA R P H O E N I X CO M M U N I T Y N E WS PA P E R

PORTRAITS OF A TRAVELLER HOW DUSTIN MAIN FINDS HIMSELF FAR, FAR FROM HOME P. 6

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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

IN THE CITY #

A P R I L 6 , 2 0 1 4 — 1 1 : 0 8 P. M .

Making connections

Robin Poitras, Ashley Johnson and Kana Nemoto participate in a workshop exploring the approaches and connections between creative processes through a series of guided exercises at Studio 2 DSI in Saskatoon. The workshop was held as part of the Remembering Amelia project which celebrates the life and work Amelia Itcush, a dance elder and movement maverick. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG


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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

INDEX #

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ON THE COVER PG. 6

Of all the countries Saskatoon entrepreneur Dustin Main has visited, Burma is his favourite. Here, he shows artwork and souvenirs he brought back from his last trip. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

IN THE CITY — 2 A moment in time: Photographer Michelle Berg’s best shot of the week

GARDENING — 20 Now’s the time to prune those unruly trees and shrubs

MUSIC — 4 The Department Heads ride the line between hard rock and progressive

ASK ELLIE — 21

ON THE COVER — 6 Portraits of a traveller — how Dustin Main finds himself far, far from home READ MY BOOK — 13 Help from author Jenny Sparks on creating your best life ON THE SCENE — 14 At the Princess Shop’s Glass Slipper Benefit for Princesses PERSONALITIES — 18 Taught at the feet of legends, Ramses Calderon plays guitar to help change the world

OUTSIDE THE LINES — 22 Artist Stephanie McKay’s weekly colouring creation CROSSWORD/SUDOKO — 23 EVENTS — 24 What you need to know to plan your week SHARP EATS — 29 Tea time! Cafes bring a European feel to the Prairies WINE WORLD — 31 Valpolicella: A comfort wine to soothe the soul

It’s always tea time at Little Bird Patisserie and Cafe. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

BRIDGES COVER PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG Bridges is published by The StarPhoenix – a division of Postmedia Network Inc. – at 204 Fifth Avenue North, Saskatoon, Sask., S7K 2P1. Rob McLaughlin is editor-in-chief; Heather Persson managing editor; Jenn Sharp associate editor. For advertising inquiries contact 657-6340; editorial, 657-6327; home delivery, 657-6320. Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved and commercial use is prohibited. To make any use of this material you must first obtain the permission of the owner of the copyright. For more information, contact the editor at 657-6327.


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MUSIC #

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FOL LOW BRID G ES ONL INE at thestarphoenix.com/bridges or you can follow us on Twitter @bridgesYXE or on facebook.com/BridgesYXE

T H E D E PA R T M E N T S H E A D S

Hard rock therapy By Sean Trembath After years of taking whatever gig he could find, Sam Mitchell was looking for a release. He found it in the band that would become The Departments Heads. The career Saskatoon musician, who plays a variety of styles and instruments, was feeling the grind. “I had been doing a lot of gigs just for the paycheque. It was just everything I didn’t want to be doing,” Mitchell says. He and fellow local musician Arlan Kapp decided to start a band. Mitchell would play drums and Kapp — normally a drummer — would play bass. They recruited Jeff Cox on guitar and Kapp’s roommate on vocals. They called themselved Rhinkberger. The initial idea was for a punk band, as free of pretension as possible. “It was a conscious choice. I think we were disillusioned with being musicians, for various reasons, and just getting back to the really primal thing seemed to be a possible answer,” Mitchell says. They started with a few covers — Motorhead, Dead Kennedys — but they were writing their own stuff almost right away. Although they were going for the stripped down punk sound, their musical backgrounds led to songs a bit too complex for the label. “It never really ended up being a punk band, because none of our The Department Heads (from left) Jeff Cox, Sam Mitchell, Arlan Kopp and Lindsay Adams. SUPPLIED PHOTOS COURTESY JEFF AND CAROLINE COX arrangements were really simple Then, six months ago, things “If you bring a tune you kind of about a year later. Local singer Lind- the previous band. Lindsay had a enough to call it that,” Cox says. loyal fan base before she was even in hold the trump card. I think we kind changed again. Kapp’s wife had their Rhinkberger lasted three years, say Adams told them she wanted in. of try to help each other realize what- first child. Two month’s later Cox had “Even before she auditioned, we a band,” Mitchell says. but by the end, the three instrumen“She has an incredibly powerful ever we intended that song to be,” his first. All of a sudden rehearsal talist felt they needed a new direc- knew she would be singing in the time had to be scheduled around partion. They dropped their vocalist, band. She had the attitude, and I had voice. And she was excited about it. Cox says. As you would expect, song parts enthood. started working on new stuff and seen her do musical theatre, so I knew That makes a huge difference,” adds “Just time to rehearse, really is the written by one of them take on new Cox. changed their name to The Depart- she could sing,” Mitchell said. biggest thing,” says Cox. With the lineup set, the band start- life in the hands of another. The new lineup played their first ment Heads. It has been an adjustment, but the “We’re different musicians and Their sound became more and gig on New Year’s Eve, just as 2013 ed gigging around town and writing more intricate, riding the line be- was starting out. Right away, it was new material. They all contribute we play in different ways. I play a band members feel like they’ve ridapparent Adams brought new life to songs, Cox says. Usually, one of them lot of guitar parts Sam wrote, and I den it out well. tween hard rock and progressive. “They’re standup guys, so they’re will come to practice with a tune like them a lot, but we have different “It’s always pretty heavy. It doesn’t the group. “What she has added is big-time sketched out and the rest of them hands, different fingers and different rising to that challenge,” says Mitchgive you a lot of time to rest,” says stage presence, and an audience. We lend a hand filling it out, while still styles. I think that gives us a lot more ell. He added that Kapp’s wife has Cox. been a big help along the way. variety,” Cox says. The last piece of the puzzle came struggled to have an audience with respecting the writer’s ownership.


T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

We’re really loud. We had to test it out with their son, and he seems to enjoy it, or at least it doesn’t bother him. — Sam Mitchell

Arlan Kopp

Sam Mitchell

Lindsay Adams

Jeff Cox

“She still lets us, amazingly, practise in the basement at least once a week. We’re really loud. We had to test it out with their son, and he seems to enjoy it, or at least it doesn’t bother him. Really lucky for us,” he says. Now a few months into the parenthood thing, the band has reestablished a rhythm and are back to playing shows. There has been some talk of an album — they definitely have enough material — but money and time are scarce. Recording is something they hope to look at a bit down the road. “It would be tragic if we didn’t put some of this stuff to tape,” says Mitchell. For now they’ll stick to playing shows

around town, with an eye toward some sort of small tour in the near future. For Mitchell, The Departments Heads will continue to be a project that lets him keep his musical passion going. Whatever else happens, happens. “I won’t allow myself big dreams for this band. There was a time where I thought, ‘Well this is funny. I’m in my early 40s, and I put this band that started as a bit of a lark together. Wouldn’t it be ironic if this was the one that we took on the road, and became a big deal.’ I toyed with that idea briefly. I don’t really any more, but life is full of surprises.” strembath@thestarphoenix.com twitter.com/strembath

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ON THE COVER #

T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

Every sunrise is insane and every sunset is magical. . . . Every day is an adventure. — Dustin Main

DUSTIN MAIN

Finding yourself in far-flung places

Saskatoon entrepreneur Dustin Main has filled the living room of his mother’s home with mementos and pictures from his travels in Burma. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

By Jenn Sharp Some people dream about travelling the world. Others do it. In late 2009, Dustin Main took the money he had saved to purchase a home and used it to fund a one-year trip around the world. Five years later, he’s still on the road.

The 33-year-old self-described “super nerd” entrepreneur (he owns a computer services company in Saskatoon and a technology consulting website) and photographer has visited enough countries to fill several passports, but it’s the southeast Asian country of Burma (Myanmar) that has captured his heart. He’s

been there eight times, and often lives there for months at a time. After emerging from half a century of military rule (which included human rights abuses, forcible relocation and the use of forced labour), it’s now a country undergoing rapid change. Main writes about his experiences in this new wild west on his blog, A

Skinny Escape. Main, a lover of art and conversation, doesn’t have anywhere to hang his hat — and that’s just the way he likes it. In Saskatoon, he stays in the home he grew up in and where his mom still lives in Dundonald. He was back home long enough to talk to Bridges about his adventures, seeing

the world through the eyes of another culture and how we can all benefit from a little more travel in our lives.

Q: What happened during the 2008 mountain-climbing trip you took with your dad to Africa that made you want to travel more? Continued on Page 8


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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

I had money saved up (for a house) so I decided to take one year and travel around the world. It was 20 months before I came back here. — Main

Dustin Main shooting the sunrise by hot air balloon over the mountains of Wadi Rum, Jordan.

A: We decided to go walking down this dirt road and we ended up at this market which at the time was like nothing I had ever seen before. Everyone was looking at me because I didn’t belong. I wrote it down in my journal at the time, (thinking) there was no reason I can’t be doing this by myself. When I came back to Canada,

things had already changed.

Q: What had changed within you? A: It was a little scary, but this was the time when housing prices had been going up and up. I had money saved up (for a house) so I decided to take one year and travel around the world. It was 20 months before I came back here.

PHOTO COURTESY DUSTIN MAIN

Q: What were you thinking at the time? A: I remember in high school and talking to friends about going backpacking to Europe for the summer. I didn’t really understand what that meant, though … and it didn’t happen. It was school and work and buying a car — there’s always something. And there will always be

something unless you do something to change that. I remember thinking, “If I buy a house, then I can’t (travel). But if I do this now, I can just buy a house later. That’s fine.”

Q: How soon did you know it wouldn’t be just a one-year journey? A: Very quickly. This was something that was much larger. In my

journals I wrote about how travelling around is like being a kid where every day there’s something new and amazing. But with regular life we live like there isn’t something that’s new or amazing every day — being introduced to a food you’ve never known about or finding all of these interesting people with interesting stories. It’s limitless.


T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

. . . With regular life we live like there isn’t something that’s new or amazing every day. — Main

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

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Custom Solid Wood Heirloom Pieces Custom Finishes Full Catalogue Available Visit our Showroom A monk counts prayer beads while meditating at a hilltop temple near Pindaya, Shan State, in Burma.

PHOTO COURTESY DUSTIN MAIN

Q: Your latest project is a creative photography collective. You’ve said you work frequently with travel and tour companies to provide them with unique photography. Why do you think this is a useful service in a time where more and more people are taking photographs with their smart phones? A: I’ve got a bit of a problem with the whole

Instagram thing. I feel like it devalues photography. When you go to a gallery, you don’t spend two seconds looking at photos or artwork. But that’s totally how Instagram and Facebook work. You see it, you hit a “like” button and it goes away. It’s like a throwaway. And that’s a bummer. Continued on Page 10

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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

When you go to a gallery, you don’t spend two seconds looking at photos or artwork. But that’s totally how Instagram and Facebook work.— Main

Countries visited by Dustin Main

Of all the countries Dustin Main has visited, it’s Burma that has captured his heart. BRIDGES GRAPHIC BY MICHELLE BERG

Q: I noticed you have really big pictures on your website. A: Yeah, it’s kind of hard to scroll away from them. They fill the whole page. (At Light Moves Creative) we’re trying to bring photography back to something where creativity can really shine.

Q: What have you been working on when you live in Burma? A: I’m writing about technology in Burma and travelling there — documenting the changes that have been happening. The things that are happening there are so rapid. Because of the sanctions on the country for years and years there was no way to

get money out. Up until a year ago, if you went there you had to bring all your money as pristine, US$100 bills. They couldn’t be folded or smudged. Now there are some ATMs but that’s new. It was one of the only countries in the world that didn’t have CocaCola. There were no international companies there.

Canada

Germany

Andorra

(Burma)

Sarawak)

U.S.

Spain

Thailand

Brunei

Argentina

Faroe Islands

Czech Republic Estonia

Laos

Singapore

Vietnam

Cambodia

Malaysia & Malaysian Borneo (Sabah /

Australia

Uruguay Antarctica Sweden Scotland

Finland

Egypt

Iceland

Jordan

The Netherlands

Tanzania Myanmar

New Zealand


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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

I’m not Indiana Jones, I’m not the first person that’s been there, but not a whole lot of people have been there. — Main

Q: As yet, there’s not a lot of people visiting Burma — it’s not high on the bucket list for many. What pulls you there? A: Every sunrise is insane and every sunset is magical. It’s a bit of a challenge. Every day is an adventure. It takes very little effort to stumble upon what will be an amazing opportunity or someone’s phenomenal story. I’m not Indiana Jones, I’m not the first person that’s been there, but not a whole lot of people have been there. I end up writing about what people should expect and why they should go. The people are so friendly and they haven’t been jaded in the way people in other places have been where tourists are a given. As the country opens up, values are changing. The subcultures are fascinating — like the punk scene in Yangon. It’s like what punk was like in the ’80s, with the big hair. It’s almost like a time warp. I want to understand how things work. I want to know how their economy works. I want to know how they make a living when their family takes care of a temple and only get paid $40 a month. Q: Have you met people like that? How are they making a living?

A: I wrote a piece about trekking in Burma. It ended up costing the equivalent of $12 a day. That’s a cheap lunch for us, right? But everybody thinks they should be trying to bargain that down. I asked our guide who the money goes to because he was providing the accommodation and all of our meals. We just had to buy water. He got $3 or $4 per day. He would be away from his family for days and would have to take a bus back from the end of the trail. You’re trying to save every dollar but that’s directly coming out of a person’s pocket. It’s not like he’s swimming in cash because he’s getting $12 a day. Q: You talk on your website about why we travel and its benefits. What would you tell others that are contemplating getting off the beaten track? A: The world is much larger than Saskatoon and Saskatchewan. You can learn so much just by getting out of that comfort zone. Travelling around isn’t that hard. Nowadays, we hit buttons on our phones and it tells us where to go. Anybody that says they don’t have time or money — those are excuses that won’t work on me. It’s not as expensive as people think. Continued on Page 12

Youth dress up as zombies and dance to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” in a street procession during the Shwezigon Pagoda festival in the Burmese town Nyaung-U. PHOTO COURTESY DUSTIN MAIN

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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

The world is much larger than Saskatoon and Saskatchewan. You can learn so much just by getting out of that comfort zone. — Main

If you’re at a resort, try getting out of that walled area. The world is not that scary of a place. The vast majority of people are really amazing if you let them be. If you treat people like they’re not the same as you well then … that’s a whole other story.

Q: Two years ago, you hiked the Rockies in a dress with your dad and brother. It was the first Canadian fundraising campaign for One Girl (an Australian non-profit that raises money for school girls in Sierra Leone). Last year, you organized Do It In A Dress, where 30 men (and women) went wall climbing in dresses in Saskatoon and raised over $9,000. What do you have planned for 2014? A: I don’t know what the plan is yet but whatever it is, it’s got to be bigger or crazier than the last two years! That motivates me — how can I keep on setting that bar higher? I’m not really into the status quo. Whatever I did before, I want to do it better. I’d like to recruit more women … in Australia, it’s about 70 per cent women that participate. Whereas here, there is this sideshow aspect about the men in dresses that seems to be resonating here.

Q: What’s your education background? A: I’m a super nerd. I went to university for a very brief amount of time. It was a plan for me to be the first person in my family to go to university but within a week of being there I realized it was not going to work out. I learned (how to run a business) through books and online and networking. A lot of people are really worried but the way I think about it is that if all of my cameras are smashed, all of my companies go under tomorrow, I could build something else again. I will find a need or some sort of a hole that isn’t being filled. I’m not willing to let any of those fears stop me from doing the things that I’m passionate about. I don’t want to be looking back in (regret in) 20 years. And, you never know. I don’t know what’s going to happen tomorrow, so I’m going to make the most of today. Travelling around the world is not going to solve all of your problems, but it will help you look at them in a different light. You can follow Dustin Main’s adventures on his blog, A Skinny Escape, at www.dustinmain.com. This article has been edited and condensed for publication purposes.

When the government failed to deliver on their promise of a new road, two small villages high in the hills of Shan State banded together to build their own. PHOTO COURTESY DUSTIN MAIN

Next week in How those in Saskatoon’s Ukrainian community, like Very Reverend Father Taras Makowsky, are dealing with the turmoil in their country of origin


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READ MY BOOK #

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LOCA L AUT H ORS: Writers tell us what makes their book worth reading

J E N N Y S PA R K S

Working toward creating a life you love As a young mother of two toddlers, I reached a WTF moment when I realized I was out of shape, sleep deprived, disconnected, and barely surviving the pace of my chaotic lifestyle. I knew I was not happy, that I felt lost and uncertain, and that it was time for a change. But, I had no idea where to start so I started with myself. Doing so turned out to be key. I was done neglecting my health and wellness for an extended list of things “to do.” I was done ignoring my intuition and moving through life on autopilot. I wanted to walk through life awake! It was time to take back control and create a life I loved. I craved a healthier lifestyle and I wanted more time to spend

with my two children. I wanted to feel like I was in control of my own life and I was committed to making the change. Fast forward 10 years and I have moved my life from WTF to OMG despite the curve balls that have come my way. Things happen that you do not expect, that is the nature of life. But how prepared you are for the challenges makes all the difference in the quality of your life. I wanted to write this book and share lifestyle strategies (through storytelling) to demonstrate how powerful a healthy mindset can be when creating a life you love. I know many people are struggling like I was and it is more common than I ever imagined. I wasn’t alone and neither are

Jenny Sparks

you. The intention behind WTF to OMG was to create a book that could come to life through your actions. Using storytelling, I give examples of why a mindset shift matters. The

SWIFTKICK tips and downloadable Companion Journal (and other programs) present tools for how you can move from one place to another. But in the end, nothing changes until you act. I am a teacher, certified personal trainer and lifestyle coach, Ironman triathlete, and single mother. I launched new programs in January, including “The Book Club” hosted at d’Lish in Saskatoon Sunday evenings. For more information about my programs and services, please visit www.wtfomgbook.com. Books are available locally at McNally Robinson, d’Lish by Tish Café on 14th Street, Just For You Day Spa (Saskatoon and Regina), and Amazon.com.

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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

ON THE SCENE #

GLASS SLIPPER BENEFIT FOR PRINCESSES

Over 300 people turned out on April 3 to support the seventh annual Glass Slipper Benefit for Princesses at TCU Place. Hosted by The Princess Shop and presented by K+S Potash Canada, the event raised about $25,000 that will go towards programming and support services for future princesses. Guests enjoyed a live and silent auction, along with a performance by the St. Mary Oskayak Dance Troupe. The highlight of the evening was a keynote presentation by Jocelyn Morin, a 2012 princess graduate. She shared her life story, experience with The Princess Shopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs and how her life has been impacted by her involvement with the organization.

The Princess Shop Mentorship and Female Youth Development Inc. is a non-profit organization that provides support to young women in need graduating from high school in Saskatoon. Grad dresses, accessories and services are all donated by the community. A mentorship, scholarship and work placement program are also available for princess graduates. The Princess Shop believes that the community benefits when young women have more self-esteem, confidence and drive. Positively affecting these women impacts their families and other dependents and ultimately, our entire community.

1.

3. 1. (From left) Linda and Shelley Guillet and Andrea Hobman 2. (From left) Mike Scissons, John Fraser and Tareng Patel 3. Kaitlyn Lozinski, Ashley Roszell,Sara Clavelle, Becca McKee and Rachel Pichler 4. Nicole MacKisey, Jesse Haga and Brittany Walter

2.

4.

5. Crystal Skrupski was the photographer for the benefit. 6. Thompson (left) and Ashley Roszell 7. Sheri Seiferling and the executive director of the Princess Shop, Karen Robson 8. Silvia Martini (left) and Auria Hastings

BRIDGES PHOTOS BY RICHARD MARJAN


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T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

ON THE SCENE 5.

7.

6.

8.

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Volunteers

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Thursday, June 5 • Saturday, June 7 • Sunday, June 8

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51st Street & Faithfull Ave. SAS00276869_1_1

Photo by: Eric Beal

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Alll volunteers will receiv receive orientation, ntation, ntat n, an appr apprec appreciation party and a Boogie t-shirt! Also, volunteers lunteers for the Bridge dg City Boogie oogie gi and yo you could coul WIN a voucher for a pair of shoes and socks Brainsport! The voucher is valued at $200 and the staff cks courtesy of Brainspo staff at Brainsport insport will fit fit the winner with the best shoe for their foot. For a complete list of available positions and to register, please visit

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Proud volunteer & on-course entertainment sponsor SAS00276893_1_1


16

SPECIAL FEATURE

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

SPECIAL FEATURE

T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

17

STYLE AND COMFORT Here are a couple of examples of the hottest category in men's fashion today. The Jersey blazer, the more casual style with enzyme washing by Marco Nills and the dressier version that can be worn with dress pants and tie. Several other versions are also available.

F A S H I O N

T R E N D S

Ultimo Euromoda

Bridges Special Advertising Section

306-664-6640

PERFECT FOOTWEAR FOR SPRING

NEW! PUMPKIN PEEL

John Fluevog, Canada's most famous shoe designer, presents the most perfect footwear for spring. This black oxford and taupe bootie complete any wardrobe. Limited quantities available. Come experience Durand's!

FRENCH COTTON HOODIE French cotton hoodie with hood lining and kangaroo pocket in Pendleton Maize Spirit jacquard. Full zip, drawstring hood. $149 at The Trading Post.

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NO BRA REQUIRED /CAMI FOR EVERYONE This comfortable & supportive cami in new coral & stone colors is also available in red, navy, espresso, black or white, pocketed design for breast forms and shaper if needed. Size 8-20. Limited quantities.

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(306) 653-1769

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We Hear, We Listen, We Care.

#47 - 2105 8th St. E., Grosvenor Park Ctr. 1-866-931-1011 • (306) 931-1011 www.lotsoflooks.ca

• Make-up lessons • Professional make-up applications • Deep cleansing, hydrating and anti-aging facials • Waxing - face and body • Manicures and pedicures (SpaRitual) • Artistic nails (Shellac curable polish) • Lash and brow tinting • Ears and nose piercing • Massages - RMT Gift Certificates! Ask about complimentary parking!

Beauty and fashion at your finger tips. Modern and trendsetting styles. Short and easy or long and fabulous. Lots Of Looks Specialty has a range of styles to fit every lifestyle. Medical or fashion wigs. Experienced fitters.

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IS IT REALLY A WIG?

306-931-1011

OUR 2014 GRADUATION SUIT

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Schedule a personalized Pumpkin Peel Facial Service — a professional retexturizing facial with 30% Fruit Acid Complex for the ultimate exfoliation and sensory experience of freshly baked pumpkin bread!

Collections

DKNY • LEIF HORSENS DENMARK TALLIA ORANGE • ANDREW FEZZA

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T R E N D S

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2 hours FREE parking Thurs evenings and Saturdays

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204 3rd Ave. S.

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16

SPECIAL FEATURE

W e d n es day, A p r i l 9, 2 0 1 4

W e d n es day, A p r i l 9, 2 0 1 4

SPECIAL FEATURE

T H Esta r p h o e n i x .CO M / b r i d g es

17

STYLE AND COMFORT Here are a couple of examples of the hottest category in men's fashion today. The Jersey blazer, the more casual style with enzyme washing by Marco Nills and the dressier version that can be worn with dress pants and tie. Several other versions are also available.

F A S H I O N

T R E N D S

Ultimo Euromoda

Bridges Special Advertising Section

306-664-6640

PERFECT FOOTWEAR FOR SPRING

NEW! PUMPKIN PEEL

John Fluevog, Canada's most famous shoe designer, presents the most perfect footwear for spring. This black oxford and taupe bootie complete any wardrobe. Limited quantities available. Come experience Durand's!

FRENCH COTTON HOODIE French cotton hoodie with hood lining and kangaroo pocket in Pendleton Maize Spirit jacquard. Full zip, drawstring hood. $149 at The Trading Post.

Durand's 306-933-3336

The Trading Post 306-653-1769

14900

$

Lots of Looks Specialty

OUTERWEAR BY

NO BRA REQUIRED /CAMI FOR EVERYONE This comfortable & supportive cami in new coral & stone colors is also available in red, navy, espresso, black or white, pocketed design for breast forms and shaper if needed. Size 8-20. Limited quantities.

Valletta

10% OFF

Cami & Tank Tops Expires April 30, 2014

226 2nd Avenue South

(306) 653-1769

www.saskatoontradingpost.com SAS00274867_1_1

We Hear, We Listen, We Care.

#47 - 2105 8th St. E., Grosvenor Park Ctr. 1-866-931-1011 • (306) 931-1011 www.lotsoflooks.ca

• Make-up lessons • Professional make-up applications • Deep cleansing, hydrating and anti-aging facials • Waxing - face and body • Manicures and pedicures (SpaRitual) • Artistic nails (Shellac curable polish) • Lash and brow tinting • Ears and nose piercing • Massages - RMT Gift Certificates! Ask about complimentary parking!

Beauty and fashion at your finger tips. Modern and trendsetting styles. Short and easy or long and fabulous. Lots Of Looks Specialty has a range of styles to fit every lifestyle. Medical or fashion wigs. Experienced fitters.

Merle Norman

Lots Of Looks Specialty

306-653-4696

PUMPKIN, SPICE & EVERYTHING NICE!

IS IT REALLY A WIG?

306-931-1011

OUR 2014 GRADUATION SUIT

STAY

Schedule a personalized Pumpkin Peel Facial Service — a professional retexturizing facial with 30% Fruit Acid Complex for the ultimate exfoliation and sensory experience of freshly baked pumpkin bread!

Collections

DKNY • LEIF HORSENS DENMARK TALLIA ORANGE • ANDREW FEZZA

F A S H I O N

T R E N D S

Bridges Special Advertising Section

275 - $495

$

LY ON

Store in Saskatoon

2 hours FREE parking Thurs evenings and Saturdays

WITH OUR NEXT EDITION COMING YOUR WAY MAY 14, 2014

Quality tailoring in a sleek fitted modern fit exclusively at

ULTIMO EUROMODA

SUITS | SHIRTS | TIES | VESTS | FOOTWEAR

123-2nd Ave S. • Scotia Centre • 653-4696 Individually Owned and Operated ©2013 Merle Norman Cosmetics, Inc.

SAS00276190_1_1

204 3rd Ave. S.

(Across from the Senator Hotel)

MERLENORMAN.COM SAS00275419_1_1

SAS00274808_1_1

664-6640 SAS00274850_1_1


18

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

PERSONALITIES #

C L A S S I C A L G U I TA R I S T

Calderon a guitar guru at home and abroad By Ashley Martin Ramses Calderon barely knew his father. His mother kicked the man out of the house and he died an alcoholic in the streets. Calderon’s stepfather was a drug addict and sometimes dealer. He’d store bags of pot in the boy’s bedroom. Sick of the violence in the home, at age 11 Calderon took his sister Astra and ran away to an orphanage. Before long, his other four siblings followed. “I do believe if I wouldn’t (have gone to the orphanage) or (lived) the type of life that I was living at home when I was little, I wouldn’t be who I am now. That shapes you,” said Calderon, now 39. Living alongside 100 other children, life was a strict routine. But every so often, there was time for music. Calderon’s first instrument was the marimba. Each week, two music teachers would come in to teach the xylophone-like instrument. Then two years later, he started guitar lessons. “To me, the music … helped me to overcome a lot of things, the power of the sound, the music, helped to express yourself through that.” When Calderon was 18, he began studying with five classical experts — all disciples of the legendary Agustin Barrios Mangore — and it started him on another path: He began collecting the music of great Salvadoran composers. Digging around one of their basements, he found scads of scores, by 150 composers, rotting in the humid climate. “I was so fascinated; I was like the big doors just opened.” Though the interest in classical music was generally dwindling at the time, Calderon saw its importance, even as an 18-year-old in a newly reconciled country. “If you know your history, then you’re pretty sure that you will

Ramses Calderon was born in El Salvador and learned to play classical guitar from master guitarists, who were all disciples of Agustin Barrios Mangore, a legendary guitarist and composer from Paraguay. Calderon came to Canada in 2000 and moved to Regina in 2008. BRIDGES PHOTO BY DON HEALY

know who you are and where you’re going.” In 2009 he started the Red Cultural Foundation, with the purpose of cataloguing and digitizing the music. The transcriptions have been requested by the national orchestra in El Salvador, which helps keep youths from joining gangs by offering free music lessons. “It’s very fascinating that the youth now are interested to know

about their history … That motivates me a lot and that also inspires my compositions, my work.” ■ ■ ■ ■ Calderon believes in the power of the arts as a tool for change. They enhance the well-being of a society, stimulate sensitivity and help us relate to other people. “A song, a simple song … in a mat-

ter of seconds (can) change your mood,” said Calderon. “I do believe that’s why most of the governments in the world try to cut the arts, because it’s a powerful tool to change the people’s consciousness.” Even though he gravitated to classical stylings, the meaning of his country’s folk music is not lost on him. “The people who were playing that, most of the people were (fight-

ing) the continuous fight of the indigenous people, for the rights, for centuries.” His blood is in his songs — his indigenous Lenca and Pipil roots mix with Spanish and Turkish lines. Ancestry is important to Calderon; so are future generations. Though his daughter, Xochil Elena, is only nine months old, he’s already thinking about the planet his greatgrandchildren will be left with.


T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

Who knows how long it’s going to take? But if I sit and do nothing it’s never going to happen. — Ramses Calderon

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

19

litz & lamour

Diamonds & Denim

G R I NO R F NG I L B

LADIES NIGHT LA AT THE

GERMAN CULTURAL GER CENTRE 160 Cartwright Ave, Saskatoon, SK S7T 1A8 Sa

Friday F id M May 2, 2014 7:00pm: Champagne, Cocktails, Appetizers 7:30pm to Midnight: Casino & Entertainment

Tickets: $50 Call: 306.374.9458 Ramses Calderon often works with First Nations youth. In 2011, he assisted in bringing music education to Piapot First Nation through the Regina Symphony Orchestra. BRIDGES PHOTO BY DON HEALY

■ ■ ■ ■ Calderon enjoys working with youth, especially those in First Nations communities. He was involved in two video projects in Sandy Bay, a village located 450 kilometres northeast of Prince Albert, in 2010 and 2012. In 2011, he assisted Ed Minevich in bringing music education to Piapot First Nation through the Regina Symphony Orchestra. “I know it is possible to get out of there, to succeed in life, to achieve what you want to do in life. It just requires patience, dedication and perseverance.” He wants to show young people that they can overcome their circumstances, just as he did, between war, violence and natural disasters. His drive to succeed, fuelled by his passion for music, has opened doors. It’s how he came to Canada, first landing in Toronto in 1999 to tour with his band Xolotl (pronounced SO-lo). He officially became a Canadian resident in 2005.

Proceeds to support:

In the meantime, he met Michelle LaVallee, who became his wife in 2012. They moved to Regina in 2008 as she was hired as a curator at the MacKenzie Art Gallery. Calderon’s music has taken him on tour across Canada and Central America. Four years ago, he was involved in developing the cultural platform for El Salvador’s new government. He balances those big events with day to day work: composing, transcribing, and teaching at the University of Regina Conservatory. He dreams of starting a classical music festival in Regina, and creating a radio program for Salvadoran composers in his home country. Though he’s been accused of dreaming too much, Calderon doesn’t think it’s unreasonable to want to leave a legacy. “Who knows how long it’s going to take? But if I sit and do nothing it’s never going to happen. I have to keep hammering to go there.” amartin@leaderpost.com @LPAshleyM SAS01602216_1_1


20

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

GARDENING

#

GARDENING IN THE PRAIRIES

Now’s the time to prune those unruly trees or shrubs By Erl Svendsen Even though there’s still snow on the ground in places, it’s not too early to start working in your garden. This is a perfect time to prune your trees and shrubs, before the buds break and leaves develop. Start by removing broken, dead, diseased or rubbing branches at a natural point: Just above an outward facing bud (if the branch is no thicker than your finger where you wish to cut) or just above where the offending branch joins another. For diseased branches, make your cut at least 15 cm below any signs of infection. Next, remove any branches that have the potential to take an eye out. To promote healing, do not make a flush cut (cut just outside the branch collar or swollen area just above where branches join) or leave a stump. If you can hang your hat on the stump, it’s too long. Some shrubs like spireas and potentillas can be pruned hard, to within 15 cm of the ground, to renew their appearance if they have got leggy or overgrown. Otherwise, avoid removing more than 1/3 of the branches in any one year. Don’t forget to renovate your raspberry patch. Remove old growth (last year’s fruiting canes) and any branches that are weak and spindly. Remember to use sharp tools and wear eye protection when you are pruning. Make sure and use the right tool. For small diameter cuts (less than three cm), hand pruners are fine; for larger cuts, use a saw. Next, tackle your herbaceous perennials before they start putting on new growth. This is especially important at this time of year for early growers like irises, ornamental grasses, daylilies and chives. To prevent or reduce snow mould problems, use a garden rake to spread out remaining snow. Use a leaf rake to break up snow mould on exposed grass. Wear a dusk mask. Wait until after the ground has thawed (and dried) and there are signs of new growth be-

Use a saw to prune the thicker branches of a tree. Proper pruning will extend the life of your tree.

fore power raking to remove built up thatch. If you haven’t already, buy your seeds. It’s not too late to order from a seed catalogue, but popular varieties may be running low. There are also lots of places in the city to buy your seed. Read the package instructions to determine when you can start seedlings. It’s still too early for most like tomatoes, peppers (wait until early May for these for planting out in June), but there be a few that take a while to get started like eggplants. Take the time to clean, sharpen and/or repair your hand tools to start the season off right. Get a comfortable pair of leather gardening gloves to replace your worn out pair from last year.

Finally, take advantage of the many opportunities to learn more about gardening. Check out garden centres, nurseries, and some hardware stores (e.g. Lee Valley and Home Depot) to see what they’re offering in the way of information sessions and demonstrations. These are usually free, as are the information sessions hosted by your local public libraries or the Saskatchewan Perennial Society (see ‘Bulletin Board’ or ‘Calendar’ at www. saskperennial.ca). For more in-depth learning, the University of Saskatchewan offers up a large sampling of spring gardening workshops. Check out http://ccde.usask.ca/hort or call 306-966-5546 for information on upcoming classes. And there’s any number of gardening resources on the Internet including entertaining and informa-

POSTMEDIA FILE PHOTO

A bouquet of pasque flowers, a herald of spring, can be your reward for a job well done. PHOTO COURTESY OLGA FILONENKO

tive videos. After the work is done, buy yourself a bouquet of spring flowers like tulips or daffodils to brighten up your home.

This column is provided courtesy of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society (www.saskperennial.ca; hortscene@ yahoo.com).


#

21

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

ASK ELLIE

Four years is too long to wait to confront boyfriend Q. I’m in my mid-20s, with my boyfriend for five years. The first few months were great; then he became distant. I discovered through snooping that he was in love with another girl. He’d debated breaking up with me to be with her, but she moved far away. It was an emotional affair. I never con fronted him. Instead, I reached out to my ex. When my boyfriend realized we were in contact, he was suddenly very committed. Since then our relationship’s been great. He’s been present and loving. Now we’re discussing moving to where his former flame lives because I received an amazing job offer. I’m excited but nervous, and realize I’m still angry. I wonder if his feelings for her might return, and our relationship would unravel. I also feel that I should’ve confronted him. I still resent him and want to punish him. I was a different person then, and am now ashamed and wish I’d broken up with him back then. Is it too late to discuss what hap-

Ask Ellie

pened four years ago, to let him know how much he hurt me? Still Angry A. Yes, you should’ve confronted him then. But now, after four years of his being a model boyfriend, your anger’s misplaced. You’re mad at yourself for having accepting something that you wouldn’t today, with your greater confidence and maturity. Now use that earned wisdom. Tell him you regret but felt compelled to snoop when he was distant. Say that you were very hurt and won’t allow that to happen again to you. Then say that if he has any leftover feelings for that woman, you

can’t move there with him and will go alone. Whatever his response, believe him. He’s earned the chance to be as open and adult about your relationship as you’re going to be.

Q. I was fired by my therapist. She suggested she stop treating me because I wasn’t making any progress and avoiding hard decisions. She was accurate but I felt I was getting great benefit from just speaking to her. Admittedly, our sessions were all me discussing my insecurities. I work in a stressful field but am expected to be confident and decisive. I cannot confide in colleagues, as that would harm my status. My wife doesn’t want to hear about insecurities as it makes me look weak in her eyes and scares her. I have no one to discuss my problems with and feel my therapist abandoned me. My sessions were the only time I could be honest with anyone, my only peaceful time in the

Time: 6:45 p.m. (90 min tour) Starting Location: Diefenbaker Canada Centre Lobby Refreshments will be provided after each tour.

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caused me to leave him last year. However, he started counselling and begged me to return. I did and he’s been much better. Recently, my dear aunt visited, and though he drinks less now, he had a few and suddenly lashed out at me for something trivial. My aunt was horrified. I told her that we were both working on this, that I sometimes attend counselling with him to keep him going, but the incident unnerved me. Is there no “cure” for deep-seated anger? Worried Again A. The “cure” is management. Drinking is his trigger, and he needs to always control his intake or stop. He also needs to know his other triggers, like work stress or, perhaps, stress from thinking a relative of yours was judging him. And he must consciously understand that his hostile behaviour’s inappropriate and unacceptable today, no matter its early causes. If he’s not committed to managing his anger, he’ll lash out again.

Home 420 Ave. M Sout South, Saskatoon

We invite you to celebrate Earth day at the U of S by joining us in a walking tour of campus that features some of our sustainability initiatives.

Time: 1:15 p.m. (90 min tour) -or-

Q. My husband of 10 years has anger issues when he drinks, which

Building Centre

Earth Day Campus Tours Tuesday, April 22, 2014

week. I feel quite alone now. Should I ask my therapist what I have to do to resume treatment or find someone new? I’m concerned that I’ll have the same problem with a new therapist. Unsettled and Alone A. You could tell your former therapist — OR a new one — that you just want to pay for someone to listen to feelings you don’t care to handle. Your recent therapist was too honest and committed to helping and healing, to just take your money and snooze with eyes open. I’d hope many therapists are similar in professional attitude, but you might find one who’d comply. Or, you could try to find inner peace by exploring the root of these insecurities with the therapist who clearly thinks you can. It’d allow for a more honest connection in all your relationships, including that with your wife.

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22

W E D N ES DAY, A P R I L 9, 2 0 1 4

T H ESTA R P H O E N I X .CO M / B R I D G ES

OUTSIDE THE LINES # Colouring contest Each week, Stephanie McKay creates a timely illustration meant to please kids of all ages. Children can colour the page, have a picture taken with the finished product and email it to bridges@thestarphoenix. com. One winner will be chosen each week. Please send entries by Monday at 9 a.m.

Last week’s contest winner is Samantha Meier. Thanks to everyone who submitted entries!

For the Toys you’ve Always Wanted gigglefactory.ca

The Greatest Toy Store in Saskatoon!!! Largest Selection of Playmobil & Calico Critter. We also carry a huge selection of Unique Toys and Great gigglefactory. ca Party Supplies, Including Balloon Designing

Come See us in our Great Location with Free Parking

150 - 1824 McOrmond Dr. 975-9630 SAS00277649_1_1


# CROSSWORD N EW YO RK TI MES 1

�4 Nutrition label units �9 Town with an

14

15

17

18

eponymous derby

14 Bottom line? 15 Cuban salsa singer Cruz

16 Wide receiver’s

pattern 17 Assent on the Hill

18 20 More than a lot 22 eHarmony users’

3

20

a way 33 Prefix with mural 34 Many a noble element

37 40 Bummed out 41 Money spent 43 Avoid, as a tag 45 Siouan tribesman 46 Flying machines, quaintly 48 Letter starter

52 54 Terra ___ 55 Like “Goosebumps”

DOWN �1 Trophy winners �2 “Psst!” �3 “Kick it up a notch” TV chef

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PROUD TO CARRY

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The difficulty level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

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�4 Popular instant-

messaging app �5 One of two in an English horn �6 What a gimel means on a dreidel �7 “Cool” amount �8 Dictated, as a parent might �9 Aria title that means “It was you” 10 Late 1990s fad 11 They have umbras and penumbras 12 Ear-related prefix 13 Sound from an Abyssinian 19 Domino often played? 21 Tattoo parlor supply 24 It may be bounced off someone

25 Like half of all

congressional elections 26 Cornell of Cornell University 27 Out of juice 29 Word often abbreviated to its middle letter, in texts 32 “Game of Thrones” network 33 Roadside bomb, briefly 34 Tasty 35 Prefix with pilot 36 Fred and Barney’s time 38 Plum relative 39 Conservatory student’s maj. 42 Exact revenge

44 Mark one’s words? 46 Words clarifying a spelling

47 Barely make 49 Like Splenda

vis-à-vis sugar

50 Don of “Trading

Places” 51 Squealed on, with “out” 53 Glacial ridge 54 Satellite broadcasts 56 Kind of mail or bond 57 Rub the wrong way 58 Furrow maker 59 Pro that may be replaced by TurboTax 60 “Total Recall” director Wiseman

JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU

Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle.

Month of April only!

Call us to arrange your Eye Exam

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Level: BRONZE

OFF

FRAMES OR LENSES ON COMPLETE PAIR

1005 BROADWAY AVE • 306-975-9430 OPEN MON-FRI 9-5:30, SAT 10-4

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Solution to the crossword puzzle and the Sudoku can be found on Page 31

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Community Experiences, Resources and Tours

, :7" ;:&)*7+"-52 "#8$&:5+-&1 ;")65$";

CELEBRATE STUDENT ART!

Olga Morozova, Childish Dream, (detail), acrylic on canvas, Grade 12, Holy Cross High School.

School Art | April 11 through June 8 Showcasing outstanding visual art by K to 12 students, in cooperation with Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools and Saskatoon Public Schools.

Free Public Reception | Sunday, April 13 at 2 p.m. Everyone invited. Snacks provided. Family Artmaking Activity at 2:30 p.m.: SCHOOL SmART Party Hats.

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10th Anniversary

Edited by Will Shortz

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EVENTS #

MUSIC

Wednesd ay, A p r il 9 Devon Coyote Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave. Thursd ay, A p r il 10 Whiskey on a Sunday Crackers Restaurant & Lounge, 1-227 Pinehouse Dr. Devon Coyote Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave. Jazz Jam: The Brett Balon Trio The Bassment, 202 Fourth Ave. N. The Zolas w/ James Younger Amigos Cantina, 632 10th St. E. Bastard Poetry w/ Quinzee Town Vangelis Tavern, 801 Broadway Ave. Bleed, Tribune, Destrier, and Black Tremor Rock Bottom, 834 Broadway Ave. Trace the Sky w/ Lucid Skies, No Blood No Foul, A Ghost in Drag, and Bonfire Underground Café, 430 20th St. W. Friday, A p r il 11 Kashmir Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave. Piano Friday: Marion Mendelson Roots Series: The FHoles The Bassment, 202 Fourth Ave. N. Forever Young Army & Navy Club, 359 First Ave. N.

Young Benjamins perform at Vangelis Tavern during the Saskatoon Jazz Festival. Allyson Reigh McNally Robinson, 3130 Eighth St. E.

1403A Idylwyld Dr.

BRIDGES FILE PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

Sa turday, A pril 1 2

Forever Young Army and Navy Club, 359 First Ave. N.

JoMama Piggy’s Pub & Grill, 1403 Idylwyld Dr. N.

Ralph’s Rhythm Kings Fairfield Seniors’ Centre, 103 Fairmont Ct.

Kashmir Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave.

Stetson Nutana Legion, 3021 Louise St.

Sunday, Ap ril 13

Jimmy Rankin Broadway Theatre, 715 Broadway Ave.

The Recliners Toon Town Tavern, 1630 Fairlight Dr.

Avenue Record Company Funeral: Young Benjamins, Classy Chasseys, Gunner & Smith, and Friends of Foes Amigos Cantina, 632 10th St. E.

Phoenix Downtown Legion, 606 Spadina Cres. W.

Stetson Nutana Legion, 3021 Louise St.

Eddie Robertson Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave.

R5 w/ Ross Lynch O’Brian’s Event Centre, 241 Second Ave. S.

#

Piano Series: The Omer Klein Trio The Bassment, 202 Fourth Ave. N.

Fortunate Isles w/ Hunger Hush and Silent Sea Vangelis Tavern, 801 Broadway Ave.

CFCR $5 Membership Drive Show: The Shoeless Joes and The Bad Decisions Amigos Cantina, 632 10th St. E. JoMama Piggy’s Pub & Grill,

Wires ‘n’ Wood McNally Robinson, 3130 Eighth St. E.

Monday, Ap ril 14 The Dillinger Escape Plan w/ Trash Talk, Retox and Shining Louis’ Pub, 93 Campus Dr.

Tuesd ay, Ap ril 15

ART

Mendel Art Gallery Opening April 11 at 950 Spadina Cres. E. Spring exhibitions are David Thauberger: Road Trips and Other Diversions, until June 15; and School Art, art by 200 students in Saskatoon schools,

until June 8. Reception for Thauberger April 11, 8 p.m., with a talk at 7 p.m. Reception for School Art April 13, 2 p.m. RBC Artists by Artists Mentorship Program, Mary Longman and Joi T. Arcand: Through That Which is Scene, until June 15. Gordon Snelgrove Gallery Until April 11 at Room 191, U of S Murray Building. A Matter of Material by Kaja Coleman, Transition by Edna Oleksyn, and Reconstruction by Jessica Sukut. Reception April 11, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.


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What you need to know to plan your week. Send events to bridges@thestarphoenix.com

Watermarks Art Show April 11, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.; and April 12, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at Luther Riverside Terrace, 915 Saskatchewan Cres. W. New works by 20 artists.

AKA Gallery Until April 19 at 424 20th St. W. [Caché] by Josh Schwebel. Work produced during a three-month artist’s residency in Paris, France. Humboldt and District Museum and Gallery Until April 23 at 601 Main St., Humboldt. No Story too Small to Trade: Artist Trading Card. A Local Perspective, paintings and sculptures by Toni Ambrose and Sandy Christensen, runs until June 24.

Big Sky Artists’ 2014 Annual Art Show and Sale April 11, 5 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.; April 12, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and April 13, noon to 4 p.m., at Grace-Westminster United Church Auditorium, 505 10th St. E. Works by Hedie Borne, Jan Buttinger, Celeste Delahey, Donna Delainey, Myrna King, Anneliessa Kristiansen, Lorna Lamothe, Jeanne Marcotte, Norma Rempel, Charlotte Sanford, Laurel Schenstead-Smith, Jean Smith and Betty Ann Whittaker.

Darrell Bell Gallery April 13 to May 10 at 405-105 21st St. E. Paintings and Prints by David Thauberger. Reception April 13, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Coincides with the beginning of a touring retrospective of Thauberger’s work. Ukrainian Museum of Canada Until June 21 at 910 Spadina Cres. E. Moved by the Spirit:

LivEs

Green Ark Collected Home Until April 25 at 212 20th St. W. Andie Nicole: T’works of Art. St. Thomas More Gallery Until April 25 at 1437 College Dr. Collaboration, ninth annual USCAD. An instructors’ and certificate students’ exhibition.

Prairie River Artists’ Annual Show and Sale April 12, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and April 13, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Albert Community Centre’s third floor loft. Admission and refreshments are free and the building is wheelchair accessible. Affinity Gallery (Saskatchewan Craft Council) Until April 12 at 813 Broadway Ave. Wearable Art. Works that were featured in the first Saskatchewan Wearable Art Gala on Oct. 26, 2013. Reception April 12, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Ordinary Women, Extraordinary

Station Arts Centre, Rosthern Until April 26 at 701 Railway Ave. in Rosthern. Obsolete Spaces by Wendy Weseen. Exploring obsolete abandoned and decayed buildings in rural Saskatchewan reflects Weseen’s interest in women and history.

Metamorpho by Anna Hergert is on display at the Ukrainian Museum of Canada. SUBMITTED PHOTO Artistic Interpretations on the Life of Jesus. A multimedia exhibition featuring the works of 12 artists. Reception April 13, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., with curator Louise (Hudec) Tessier. Centre East Galleries Until April 13 at The Centre. A display by the Waldheim School Industrial Arts in The Royal Gallery, work by the Bridge City Needles Arts Guild in The Jade and Amber Galleries, work by the

Saskatoon Woodworkers Guild in The Sienna Gallery, photos by Imagery Photography in The Crimson Gallery, a display by the Students of Georges Vanier School in The Lavender Gallery, and a display by the Saskatoon Public Schools in The Magenta and Indigo Galleries. The Gallery/Art Placement Until April 17 at 228 Third Ave. S. Thelma Pepper: Highway 41 Revisited. Photographs of the prairie

landscape and portraits of its people. Paved Arts Until April 18 at 424 20th St. W. Town and Country, an audio art installation by Anita Hamilton; Equal: Toon’s Kitchen XV by Jordon Schwab, riffing on Double Negative by Michael Heizer; and Kitsch in Toons: Toon’s Kitchen XIV by Peter Stinson and Red Smarteez, a documentary about an art collection.

Prairie Star Gallery Until April 27 at 1136 Eighth St. E. Spring! Works by Anne McElroy, Bris Flanagan, David Shkolny, Edward Epp, Eve Kotyk, Garry Berteig, Kim Ennis, Valerie Senyk and Yulbin Moon. The Spring Collection Until April 30 on the eighth floor of the Delta Bessborough. Presented by Kehrig Fine Art. Bronze sculpture and modern contemporary art by Raphaël Gyllenbjörn, Michael Anthony, Tom Schultz, William Prettie and Tim Johnson.

presents

AwArds dinner MaY 29, 2014

5:30pm champagne reception and silent auction 6:30pm dinner and program

Early bird tickets $120 before May 9 Get your tickets today on Picatic!

www.picatic.com/wodsaskatoon2014

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EVENTS Biggar Museum & Gallery Until April 29 at 105 Third Ave. W. in Biggar. A Wing and a Prayer by Diane Larouche Ellard.

indoor playground for young children. Adults and children under one year are free. There is a separate fenced in area for children under two.

The Stall Gallery Until April 30 at Collective Coffee, 220 20th St. W. Forest Landscapes by Kathy Bradshaw. New abstracts by Jan Corcoran runs until May 25 at City Perks, 801 Seventh Ave. N.

Sign, Play and Explore Workshop First Wednesday of each month through December, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at the Pregnancy and Parenting Health Centre, 248 Third Ave. S. Parents and their babies/ toddlers explore their world, develop skills and engage in developmental learning experiences. Monthly registration is required. Email tanyamw@mysmarthands.com, visit www.mysmarthands.com.

Parkridge Centre Through April at 110 Gropper Cres. Art in the Centre: works by the Saskatoon Quilt Guild. The Gallery at Frances Morrison Library Until May 1 at the library. The Cat that Slept on a Tortoise Shell by Patrick Bulas. Reception April 2, 7 p.m.

Children’s Play Centre Daily at Lawson Heights Mall. A fun, safe, environment for preschool children to play. Please note this is an unsupervised play area, and adults must stay with and supervise children at all times.

Handmade House Showcase Until May 31 at 710 Broadway Ave. Trophy Teapots by potter Jeffrey Taylor.

Market Mall Children’s Play Centre Daily just off the food court at Market Mall. This play area is free and has different level slides. Children must wear socks in the play area.

Diefenbaker Canada Centre Until June 8 at 101 Diefenbaker Pl. A Queen and Her Country. This exhibit commemorates the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II from a uniquely Canadian perspective.

Scooters Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., October to May, at Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1636 Acadia Dr. Parent supervised playgroup for kids ages one to six. Indoor play equipment, games, colouring, dress-up, coffee/ tea for parents. Registration on arrival. Call 477-1234.

Ukrainian Museum of Canada Until June 21 at 910 Spadina Cres. E. Moved by the Spirit. A multimedia exhibition featuring the works of 12 artists.

# FAMILY Parent and Tot Yoga Wednesdays at the Farmers’ Market at 10 a.m. Led by Dianna Stampe and her grandson. For parents with children ages 16 months to threeand-a-half years old. Admission is free with a suggested donation to Vinyasa Yoga for Youth. Bring a mat and snacks. Magical Munsch April 12-21 at The Refinery. Presented by Wide Open. Six stories by Robert Munsch, adapted for hand puppets. Featuring Angela’s Airplane, Get Out of Bed, More Pies, Alligator Baby, 50 Below Zero

Alligator Baby is one of the six Robert Munsch stories that are part of Wide Open’s Magical Munsch. SUBMITTED PHOTO and Moira’s Birthday. With audience participation. Tickets at www. wideopen.ca. Mom and Baby Wednesday mornings, April 9 to June 4, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at Legends Centre in Warman. Learn, share and connect with other moms and babies in your community. Learn from local experts about a variety of

topics for modern moms. Visit www. mommyconnections.ca/saskatoon. Saskatoon Peaceful Parenting Group April 9, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., at the Pregnancy and Parenting Health Centre, 248 Third Ave. S. For any family seeking to raise their children peacefully. A different topic each month. Children are welcome.

Stars and Strollers Wednesdays, 1 p.m., at Centre Cinemas in The Centre. Choice of two movies each week. A baby-friendly environments with lowered volume, dimmed lighting, a changing table and stroller parking in select theatres. Fun Factory Indoor Playground Daily at 1633C Quebec Ave. A giant

Breastfeeding Cafe Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at Westwinds Primary Health Centre, 3311 Fairlight Dr. A drop-in support group for breastfeeding women. Sessions will be facilitated by a lactation consultant with a brief educational presentation, and time for interaction with the other mothers. Movies for Mommies Thursdays, 1 p.m., at Rainbow Cinemas in The Centre. An infantfriendly environment with reduced sound, change tables, bottle warming and stroller parking.


EVENTS Car Seat Clinics Second Thursday each month, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., at Pregnancy and Birth Centre, 3-505 23rd St. E. Get your seats checked and questions answered by a trained Car Seat Technician. Call 306-281-7931 or email wharder@gmail.com to register. Drop-ins also welcome. LLLC Saskatoon Evening Series Meeting April 10, 6:30 p.m., at Holy Covenant Church, 1426 Alexandra Ave. This month’s topic: Nutrition and weaning. All women interested in breastfeeding are welcome. Second Thursday of the month, January to April. Call 306-655-4805, email lllcsaskatooon@gmail.com. Shop ‘n Stroll Fridays, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., meet in front of Customer Service at The Mall at Lawson Heights. Classes consist of power-walking, body-sculpting moves using exercise tubing and a socializing for parents and babies. Preregister at www.runnersandbootiesfitness.com. No classes on stat holidays. Coffee Time for Mom Fridays, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at Bibbidi Bobbidi Boo, 11-705 Central Ave. Moms enjoy a free cup of coffee while children play in the playroom. Baby Talk at SPL Fridays, 10:30 a.m., at Alice Turner Branch; Mondays, 10:30 a.m. at Carlyle King Branch and JS Wood Branch; and Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m., at Cliff Wright Branch. Half-hour singing and rhymes, then mingle with other parents. Outgrow, Outplay: Mega Kids Sale April 12, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and April 13, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Prairieland Park. The sixth semi-annual children’s consignment sale. Anything kids use can be found at the sale.

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Reuse & Recycle Crafts April 12, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., at Meewasin Valley Centre. Drop in and make crafts from as many reused and recycled items as possible. For information call 306-665-6888. Craft and Story Time Saturdays, 3 p.m., at Indigo Books, 3322 Eighth St. E. in the kids’ section. Engineering for Kids April 13, 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m., at the Children’s Discovery Museum. Engineering junior and apprentice classes. For kids ages four to 11. Must register online at engineeringforkids.net/saskatoon. Half the proceeds go to the Children’s Discovery Museum. Something on Sundays Sundays, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., at the Mendel Art Gallery, 950 Spadina Cres. E. Free family fun for ages four to 12, accompanied by an adult. Artmaking activities led by gallery artists. Supplies are provided. April 13, School Art reception followed by building School Art pARTy hats. Postnatal Yoga Mondays, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., at Pregnancy and Parenting Health Centre, 248 Third Ave. S. Beginner to intermediate yoga designed to help with postpartum recovery. Baby friendly class with a certified yoga teacher. Suitable for four weeks to two years postpartum. Register at www. msjpriestley.wix.com/pureenergy. No class on stat holidays. Prenatal Yoga Mondays, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Pregnancy and Parenting Health Centre, 248 Third Ave. S. Taught by a doula and certified yoga teacher. Informative and safe for any stage in pregnancy. Call 306-2510443 or email msjpriestley@ gmail.com. No class on stat holidays.

Drop-In Playground Mondays to Fridays through May, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at Henk Ruys Soccer Centre, 219 Primrose Dr. An indoor public playground with ride-on toys, sporting equipment, toys and books for children up to age six. Food and drinks are welcome, but the building is peanut-free. Bibbidi Bobbidi Boo Playroom Mondays to Fridays, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and late night Thursdays, at Bibbidi Bobbidi Boo, 11-705 Central Ave. With a vet area, kitchen and shopping centre, puppet theatre, stage and crafts. To book groups, or to check for availability, call 306-3844791 or email bbbprincess@ sasktel.net. Playgroup Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at Grace-Westminster United Church. Hosted by Prairie Hearts Learning Community, a group of families inspired by Waldorf philosophies. Programming is aimed at children ages two to five, but all ages are welcome.

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Stay and Play Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., September through April, at Louise St. Community Church. For children up to age five. Semi-structured, crafts, snacks, story time, toys, activities. Email stayandplaysaskatoon@gmail.com or visit the Facebook page. BRICKS 4 KIDZ® Saskatoon Regular after-school programs, preschool classes and camps for kids of all ages at various locations in Saskatoon. An atmosphere for students to build unique creations, play games, and have fun using LEGO® bricks. Visit www.bricks4kidz.com or call 306-979-2749.

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EVENTS Preschool Story Time Tuesdays and Fridays, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., at McNally Robinson, 3130 Eighth St. E. For children ages three to five in the Circle of Trees. Call 306-955-1477. Noah’s Playground Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. at Meewasin Valley United Church, 327 Pinehouse Dr. For children up to age five. Email zmwiser@yahoo.ca. Saskatoon Public Library Programs Ongoing daily programs for children and families. Find the calendar at saskatoonlibrary. ca/node/1016.

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SPECI A L EV E NTS

Saskatoon Regional Science Fair April 9, 9:15 a.m., at the U of S Education Building. Scientific achievements presented by students from Grades Six to Twelve. Visit usask.ca/srsf. 2014 Red Cross Day of Pink April 9 in Saskatoon. Celebrate respect and take a stand against bullying. Wear pink, walk in pink parades and join in pink rallies. All day. Visit www.redcross.ca/PinkSK. Canadian Light Source (CLS) Public Tours Thursdays, 1:30 p.m., and April 17, 7 p.m., at the Canadian Light Source, 44 Innovation Blvd. The synchrotron research facility is open for the public. Preregistration is required. Call 306-657-3644, email outreach@lightsource. ca or visit www.lightsource. ca/education/public_tours. php. Speech Reading and Information for the Hard of Hearing April 9, 23, May 14, 28, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., at Saskatchewan Deaf and Hard of

Hearing Services, 3-511 First Ave. N. Hosted by the Hard of Hearing Association. For information call 306-249-1357. ITEP Poetry Anthology Launch April 10, 4:30 p.m., in the faculty lounge at the U of S Education Building. Presented by the Indian Teacher Education Program (ITEP). Launching Where I’m From: ITEP Creative Writing, 20052013. Poetry readings by some of the 126 poets, book signings, books for sale and refreshments. Burt’s Buzz April 10, 7 p.m., at Broadway Theatre. PAVED Arts’ ongoing documentary series. Burt Shavritz, founder and (bearded) face of the all-natural personal care brand Burt’s Bees, is highlighted in this portrait of a highly idiosyncratic pioneer. With director Jody Shapiro in attendance. 2014 Badge, Shield and Star Dinner April 10, 6 p.m., at Prairieland Park. Hosted by the Rotary Clubs of Saskatoon. A dedicated service to the Saskatoon Police Service, Saskatoon Fire & Protective Services, and Emergency Medical Services. Featuring Ernie Louttit, Donny Parenteau, Vic Dubois and Tim Cholowski. Tickets at picatic. com. Proceeds support the Restorative Action Program and the Rotary Clubs of Saskatoon. Grow Saskatoon Workshop April 10-11 in the community hall at Cathedral of the Holy Family, 123 Nelson Rd. Learn about how community-based food systems can help build healthy communities. Tickets at picatic.com. United in Song April 11, 7:30 p.m., at Third Avenue United Church. The

What you need to know to plan your week. Send events to bridges@thestarphoenix.com

Saskatoon Children’s Choir’s spring concert. Choral folk music from Canada and beyond our borders. Tickets at McNally Robinson or at the door. Saskatoon Tattoo Expo April 11-13 at Prairieland Park. With The Other Guys. Admission at the door. Visit saskatoontattooexpo.ca. Bust a Move for Breast Health April 12, 9 a.m., at the Saskatoon Field House. A fitness fundraiser with six fitness sessions for all fitness levels. A joint initiative of City Hospital and RUH Foundations. Register at www.bustamove. ca. Bridal Shop and Swap April 12, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., at Confederation Mall. Former brides will share their experiences, offer tips and have gently used wedding items for sale. Move for Hope April 12, 10 a.m. registration, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. move, at Station 20 West, 1120 20th St. W. Presented by the Canadian Women’s Foundation. Hosted by Heather Morrison. A one-hour workout for all fitness levels, led by GoodLife Fitness. Funds raised will support local shelters for women and children, and prevention programs in Saskatchewan that break the cycle of violence. Register at canadianwomen.org/saskatoonmove. Puzzling Pieces Jigsaw Puzzle Competition April 12, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., at The Centre Mall. Hosted by Autism Services of Saskatoon to celebrate Autism Awareness month. Teams compete for prizes in a race to complete a jigsaw puzzle. To register call 306-665-7013. Potluck Supper

Saskatoon Soap actors like Tim Feschuk, Sheena Adams, Joshua Beaudry and Jeff Rogstad, bring their comedy antics to the Broadway Theatre stage on April 11. BRIDGES FILE PHOTO BY GREG PENDER April 12, 5 p.m., at Downtown Legion, 606 Spadina Cres. W. Bring a dish and your family for a nice community meal. Fire and Fury April 12, 7:30 p.m., at TCU Place. Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra’s Gyro Masters Series. Featuring pianist Samuel Deason. With works by Murphy, Khachaturian and Tchaikovsky. Tickets at tcutickts.ca. Alerces’ Third Annual Fiesta Latina: Ay Carumba! April 12, 7:30 p.m. to 12 a.m., at Cosmo Senior Centre, 614 11th St. E. Presented by Alerces Spanish Preschool and Kindergarten Inc. Featuring dancing, live music, a cash bar and a silent auction. This is a 19+ event. Contact alercesfiesta@gmail.com. Modern Woman Show & Exhibition April 12, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and April 13, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at

Prairieland Park. A women’s trade show. Retail and consumer merchandise, food, fashion shows, vendors and demonstrations. Visit modernwomansaskatoon.com. A portion of proceeds will go to the Crisis Shelter and Residence and to help with YWCA programs. Saskatoon Men’s Chorus April 13, 2:30 p.m., at GraceWestminster United Church. Their spring concert. Tickets at McNally Robinson, 306220-0812. The Many Sounds of Spring April 13, 3 p.m., at Zion Lutheran Church. The Cecilian Singers’ choral music concert. Tickets at McNally Robinson, www.ceciliansingers.ca, 306-373-8905. Generations April 13, 7 p.m., at Third Avenue United Church. The Saskatoon Youth Orchestra’s spring concert. Featuring

soloist Silas Friesen, conductor Anya Pogorelova, and Sistema Saskatoon. With works by Gilliland, Copland and Tchaikovsky. Tickets at picatic.com or McNally Robinson.

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T H E AT R E

Short Cuts: Ten-Minute Play Festival April 11-13 at The Refinery. Presented by Hardly Arts. Eighteen playwrights, actors and directors collaborate on this fast-paced festival. Because in 10 minutes, your life can change. Six plays, followed by a reception. Tickets at 306653-5191, ontheboards.ca Saskatoon Soaps April 11, 9:30 p.m., at Broadway Theatre. The improve comedy troupe brings laughter to the stage. Event listings are a free, community service offered by Bridges. Listings will be printed if space permits.


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See a food trend you think deserves a highlight in Bridges? Email bridges@thestarphoenix.com or visit Bridges on Facebook

S A S K AT C H E WA N F O O D T R E N D S

Tea time: Cafes bring European ritual to the Prairies By Jenn Sharp Drinking tea is such a pleasant ritual, and one I think should be incorporated more often into the day. Alongside the growing coffee culture (people who appreciate a well-crafted cup made from quality beans), the tea trend has been booming for years. So much so that on a recent weekend in Vancouver, I stumbled upon the O5 Rare Tea Bar. The tea menu was huge and listed tasting notes for each variety. Servers demonstrated the complex ritual of their tea-making skills at a long bar for customers who had taken time out from a busy day for a cuppa. It’s fitting then, that as I write this, I’m sipping a cup of tea from Museo in Saskatoon — a coffee bar and coffee roaster — that makes a mean cup of chai. Tea has been around for centuries, and there’s definitely many who would not consider themselves trendsetters for drinking the beverage. For those who are just discovering it, tea drinking is like entering a whole new (and much more relaxed) world. In Regina, the Vintage Tea Room and Purveyor of British Goods is a cheery respite from the daily grind. Owners Doug and Karen Howden have created an inviting atmosphere that feels like you’re sitting in their living room. Over 30 teas are on offer and all are reasonably priced (a small pot is $2.75; a large is $3). It’s all served in authentic British tea sets, most of which were donated or sourced by Karen at flea markets. A rotating selection of desserts are always available (English toffee pudding is the best-seller), along with soups, sandwiches and British favourites like a cheese and Branston pickle sandwich. The far wall of the tea room is dedicated to a small range of imported foods from the United Kingdom. A rare portrait of Winston Churchill occupies a different wall, while one of the Royal Family during their 1939

Tea time at Little Bird Patisserie and Cafe. BRIDGES PHOTOS BY MICHELLE BERG

visit to Canada is on another. For special occasions or a delightful afternoon out with friends, Victorian ($16.95) or Royal Teas can be reserved. Both include finger sand-

wiches, scones, Devon cream, jam and assorted pastries. The Royal Tea ($21.95) is served on the finest silver tea service and china. Continued on Page 30

The Vintage Tea Room stocks over 30 tea varieties. BRIDGES PHOTO BY TROY FLEECE


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SHARP EATS It’s a popular place and is often full to capacity over the noon hour. I visited one afternoon for a pot of the Cream Earl Grey and found the Howdens doing a brisk business then as well. It’s probably because the couple makes you feel right at home — just what you need to really enjoy a spot of tea. A new café in Saskatoon is easily one of the prettiest places in the city. Kim Butcher and Tasha Altman opened Little Bird Patisserie and Café in December. The attention to detail here is astounding. Vintage touches, like the tufted Victorian style sofas in the corners, work seamlessly with table numbers contained within tiny ornate photo frames. Floor to ceiling west-facing windows bathe the space in natural light all day long. Undoubtedly, Little Bird’s main draw is a large display case where all the housemade European pastries, from tarts to eclairs and macaroons, are laid out in all their glory. The French-style macarons have quickly become so popular you have to get there early in the day if you want to try one. The reason I love this place so much though is the big tea menu wall. Butcher, like me, is not a coffee drinker. A “tea granny at heart” she wanted to bring high quality teas to Saskatoon, along with a beautiful place to drink them. Little Bird’s tea is from Bellocq Tea Atelier, a company that specializes in artisan blends, all organic and without artificial flavours. I tried the Etoile De L’inde, a tropical blend of green tea, passion fruit, rose and marigold. Once summer arrives, Little Bird will be making non-alcoholic tea cocktails with fresh juices. And after a British high tea service Little Bird is offering for Mother’s Day, watch for future Paris tea room style events. Oh yes, there’s also coffee at Little Bird — French press or pour over — but no espresso. It was a conscious choice, says Butcher. There are a lot of excellent cafés in the neighbourhood already, all of which make a mean cup of coffee. Little Bird is sticking to what it’s good at and that’s just fine by me. Find The Vintage Tea Room at 405 Broad St. in Regina. Wild Bird Patisserie and Café is at 258 Ave. B South. There’s street access or take a walk through the Anthology Home Collection store. jksharp@thestarphoenix.com

The pastry options are endless at Little Bird. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

Antique cups abound at The Vintage Tea Room. BRIDGES POHOTOS BY TROY FLEECE

Twitter.com/JennKSharp


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WINE WORLD #

LOCAL WINE SCENE

Valpolicella: a comfort wine to soothe the soul By James Romanow A friend of mine was once going through a particularly nasty bit of online bullying by elderly feminists. I told him to let it go, and to remember there’s always Valpolicella. He wrote back to say he was opening a bottle that night. Valpolicella is one of the pillars of the Italian wine industry. It is grown on a little inland from Venice around Verona, a town mainly known for Shakespearean cross-dressing. The altitude is about 300 metres there. The climate has warm days and cool nights and great drainage, all of which make for perfect grape growing. The varietals in question are primarily rondinella, molinara and corvina with a couple of other even more obscure grapes thrown in. The wine tends to be tremendously smooth, with a black cherry palate, and less herbs than you find in other Italian wines. The acidity is bracing and the finish tastes slightly of bitter almonds. These days the wine is almost rare. In fact there are only three on the shelves and only one Classico, by Bolla. A winemaker gets a premium for turning Valpolicella into ripasso and Amarone, and this in turn is absorbing the majority of the wine produced. Valpolicella is an inexpensive, modest wine. It isn’t asking for a great deal of attention. It is

rather a Jeeves sort of wine, that understands occasionally you just need to relax and enjoy yourself. If your goal is to tease out black current notes in the palate feel free, but that’s not the point. This is a comfort wine. In short this is probably one of the most soothing red wines to drink with pretty much anything from tomato sauce to steak. Bolla Valpolicella, Italy, 2012. $14 **** More great wines in Monday’s paper and on Twitter @drbooze.

Crossword/Sudoku answers

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 2014

THESTARPHOENIX.COM/BRIDGES

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Bridges April 9, 2014