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SPACES:

Darrell Bell’s modern new gallery and gift shop P. 8

WHAT MOVES YOU:

Runner goes off-road in ultra-racing sport P. 16

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WINE WORLD:

Thank globalization for bringing this unique wine to Saskatoon P. 23

A STAR P H O E N I X co m m u n it y n e ws pa pe r

CRAFTING A NEW MARKETPLACE HANDMADE GOODS MAKE A COMEBACK IN SASKATCHEWAN P. 10

FREE 3

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T H Esta r p h o e n i x .CO M / b r i d g es

INVENTORY #

We want to hear from you: Tell us about your local business. Email bridges@thestarphoenix.com

D i v i n e G o dd e s s

Amber Volk bought Witch’s Brew a year ago and transformed it into her own store named Divine Goddess. The store has a very calm athmosphere where people are welcome to look around or sit and read a book. They carry a large supply of crystals, gems and silver jewellery as well as books, music, incense and gifts to nurture the soul. Every Wednesday at noon there is a free talk given by spiritual practioners to help improve your way of life. Divine Goddess has a relaxing, positive vibe and is filled with knowledgable staff to give information on using crystals, for smudging, and any other questions to do with the spiritual realm. Christine Devine does tarot

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readings from Wednesday to Saturday. Divine Goddess is located at #103 - 626 Broadway Avenue and is open Monday 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday from noon-5 p.m.

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1. Crystal: $376. 2. Emerald jewelry: $85. 3. Incense: $4.

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4. Osho Zen Tarot cards: $33. 5. Quan Yin statue: $79.99 6. Candle: $20.  ridges photo B by Michelle Berg

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INDEX #

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m y fav o u r i t e p l a c e P. 7

On the cover Pg. 10

Cassie Ozog, left, and Cookie Madill play around in Golden Willow Natural Fibre in Regina.  BRIDGES Photo by TROY FLEECE

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ta b l e o f c o n t e n t s

INVENTORY — 2 Enlighten your soul at Divine Goddess FASHION YXE — 4 A hip school teacher and local designer IN THE CITY — 6 Photographer Michelle Berg’s moment in time snapshot SPACES — 8 Contemporary new gallery and giftshop by Darrell Bell READ MY BOOK — 9 The story behind Canada’s Confederation COVER — 10 Reinvigorating a lost craft

CROSSWORD AND SUDOKU — 17 ON THE SCENE — 18 Women Helping Women at Visions Salon and Spa EVENTS — 20 GARDENING — 22 A September tour of Wales and its gardens WINE WORLD — 23 Dr. Booze recommends Marius for seafood PARENT TO PARENT — 23 Parenthood skills mastered

Sean Shaw walks down Second Avenue, his favourite place in Saskatoon. Bridges photo by Michelle Berg

OUTSIDE THE LINES — 25 Artist Stephanie McKay’s latest creation

Bridges is published by The StarPhoenix – a division of Postmedia Network Inc. – at 204 Fifth Avenue North, Saskatoon, Sask., S7K 2P1. Rob McLaughlin is deputy publisher/editor-in-chief and Marty Klyne is publisher. For advertising inquiries contact 657-6340; editorial, 657-6327; home delivery, 657-6320. Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved and commercial use is prohibited. To make any use of this material you must first obtain the permission of the owner of the copyright. For more information, contact the editor at 657-6327.

MUSIC — 13 Close Talker’s live shows pop with energy

SHARP EATS — 26 Sask. delegates at Terra Madre Slow Food event in Italy

WHAT MOVES YOU — 16 Runner goes off-road in ultra-racing sport

MEET MY PET — 27 Sphynx cat perfect for allergy sufferer


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FASHION YXE #

S a s k at c h e wa n Fa s h i o n

Have an outfit you’ve styled for an upcoming event? Send a photo to bridges@thestarphoenix.com

Reginald Jean Sankey

Lisa Fiorante:

By Jeanette Stewart

By Ashley Martin

Clothing connects friends

The absence of colour Reginald Jean Sankey is a local designer whose work is quite often marked by the absence of colour. Always dressed head to toe in black, Sankey cuts a striking figure. “I’ve been wearing black for as long as I remember. I’m actually kind of afraid of colour.” Sankey shares a favourite quote from Japanese designer Yohji Yamomoto to explain the aesthetic: “Black is modest and arrogant at the same time. Black is lazy and easy — but mysterious. But above all black says this: “I don’t bother you — don’t bother me”.” Sankey has designed professionally under the label Reginald Sankey Designs for the past seven years, and the original clothing can be found at Alchemy Clothing and Salon in Saskatoon. Custom designs are also available. Inspiration is something that never stops for someone who made his first garment at the age of 11. “I just start going. It’s basically art. It comes from within and you just keep going.” 1. Hair: Extensions. “I cut and colour my own hair.” 2. Cape: Reginald Sankey Designs. “I’m obsessed with capes.”

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Fashion is wrapped up in friendship for Lisa Fiorante. The Grade 6/7 teacher at Davin School looks forward to annual “girls trips” to cities like Las Vegas or Edmonton to bond with her friends during “crazy 10-hour days of just shopping, shopping, shopping.” On a smaller scale, the women get together once a month for splurge parties where everyone throws $30 into the pot. The winner must use the money to stylishly spoil herself. “We like shopping and we like giving each other tips, what looks good together,” said Fiorante. One of her girlfriends once told her to mix fabric textures and she’s been putting that advice into practice ever since. She’s also passed it onto others. Aside from advice, Fiorante is big on giving compliments: “It so brightens up their day and how they feel ... I think especially as women, we have to do that for one another, boost each other’s confidence.” Fiorante tends to an edgy/girly style, which is amplified by her shoe collection: “Shoes make such a huge impact on the look of that outfit. It dresses it down, it dresses it up, it can give it an edge,” said the mother of two. She estimates she has a couple hundred pairs of shoes and gravitates to heels. At 5-foot-4, “I need to wear stilettos so I can be a little bit taller than my students.”

2. SHIRT: Winners

4. Top: Reginald Sankey Designs. “This I just made for myself.”

3. BELT: Three in Lumsden 4. JEWELRY: Joe Fresh 7.

6. Pants: Zellers. 7. Boots: Value Village. “Maybe 70 per cent of the stuff I make, the rest I just thrift shop. I never really buy anything brand new.”

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1. JACKET: Las Vegas

3. Fur pelt: Gift.

5. Purse: Gucci, Value Village.

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5. PANTS: United Colors of Benetton in Las Vegas

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6. PURSE: Kenneth Cole, online

Reginald Jean Sankey.Bridges Photo by Michelle Berg

7. BOOTS: Johnston & Murphy in Las Vegas

Lisa Fiorante. Bridges Photo by BRYAN SCHLOSSER


THESTARPHOENIX.COM/BRIDGES

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IN THE CITY #

J a n u a r y 1 7, 2 0 1 3 — 1 : 1 6 p. m .

Slip-sliding away

Brunskill school student Emma learns how to cross-country ski with her classmates Rayne and Emily during their physical education class in picturesque President Murray Park. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG


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YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE What’s your favourite place in Saskatoon? Email bridges@thestarphoenix.com

#

F avourite P lace

Second Avenue a growing hot spot

Sean Shaw stands in the heart of Second Avenue. The area is his favourite place in Saskatoon because of its vibrant cultural scene, both day and night. Bridges photo by Michelle Berg

By Jeanette Stewart

and vibrancy of Second Avenue in downtown Saskatoon.

Sean Shaw is a Saskatoon consultant, activist and last year, a candidate for city council. Shaw has lived in Saskatoon for nine years, and spent lots of time living all over Canada before coming to Saskatoon to complete his PhD at the University of Saskatchewan. He grew up in Hamilton, spent time in Toronto, Guelph, the Maritimes, and decided to settle down in Saskatoon. He enjoys the growing diversity

Q: Why is this your favourite place in Saskatoon? A: I think it’s where I spend my free time, so I associate it with having fun. The restaurants, bars, some of the shopping, the movie theatre, and the river bank. Q: How often do you come to Second Avenue? A: I’m probably here two to three times a week, easily. Definitely on a

Friday night and if I can handle it, a Saturday. Now that I’m getting older two nights in a row doesn’t work like it used to.

Q: What attracts you? A: I think it’s the quality of the restaurants and the pubs down here. When you get down here on a Friday night and it’s eight o’clock and it’s busy, there’s people around, it has that little bit of an energy to it. It’s neat to be involved in that. Even on the coldest day, there’s people out.

Q: How does Saskatoon’s downtown compare to other downtowns you’ve experienced? A: It’s small. It’s small but it’s also vibrant. Second Ave. rivals the vibrancy of a lot of other cities I’ve lived in. Q: How has the downtown changed since you’ve been here? A: I think we’ve seen a lot more things to do. Better shopping, a lot more than just one or two restaurants — just the variety of those businesses as well.

Q: What would you change? A: Patios. Let’s get some patios on the sidewalks. Hopefully we’ll see something like that happen in the city soon. We have great patios on rooftops but it’s the only city I’ve been in where we don’t have patios on the sidewalks. Second Ave., with the large sidewalks, we could do it easily. Q: What are some reasons that people should check out Second Avenue? A: It’s a great place to meet people, and there’s lots of parking, despite what people say.


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SPACES #

S a s k at c h e wa n ' s b e s t s pa c e s

Spaces celebrates beauty both indoors and out. If you have a living space we should highlight email bridges@thestarphoenix.com

New gallery contemporary yet welcoming By Jenn Sharp

Darrell Bell has run galleries for 29 years and during that time he’s learned what works and what doesn’t. The man with a tradition for abstract expressionism in his gallery currently represents a spectrum of about 40 different artists. They range from nationallyrecognized Saskatchewan artist Joe Fafard, to Regina artist David Thauberger (who was recently named a Member of the Order of Canada). A gallery’s artwork isn’t just what you see on the walls. A gallery needs both ample storage and wall space to properly display art and keep other pieces in storage for upcoming exhibits. One of the challenges Bell faced was incorporating functionality into his new gallery while utilizing the wall space to best display the art. Everything is hidden away into unique storage rooms so when the doors are shut, they double as walls for the gallery. There’s even a hidden coat closet, which backs onto a little kitchen — Bell likes to throw a decent art party or two. WHAT?: Lifestyles by Darrell Bell Gallery is a modern gift shop featuring unique pieces from many Saskatchewan crafters, located at 103 — 105 21st St. E, in the heart of Saskatoon’s downtown. Bell’s new gallery space is on the fourth floor of the historic Canada Building, directly above the gift shop. Large, north facing windows are ideal for the gallery space as they provide indirect, bright light all day. WHO?: Owner Darrell Bell and interior designer Aandra Currie-Shearer designed the two spaces. WHEN? After the May purchase, the design and renovation work began. They moved in mid-December from a former location on Third Avenue. The grand opening was Jan. 13.

WHY? “I thought it was time to make a change and move downtown. We wanted to open a gift shop but in the same building as the gallery. Where we were, we couldn’t find a spot. Ecco Shoes moved out here and it’s the perfect retail location, so we saw the opportunity of moving the gallery upstairs. It’s time to reinvent and do something different. “We decided to put a glass wall in (for the office). We also wanted to finish it differently so we put the walnut on one side and wanted a jewel colour — something that would be subtle and feel a little bit ‘old-boys, old office’ but in a contemporary way.” HOW?: “(The gallery is) quite different. It came about because of what the limitations were when we moved in. We had some pillars which are throughout the space. I think there’s a 20-foot section and then a pillar, then a 20-foot section, then a pillar. We wanted wall space because we’re a gallery and we needed storage space as well. How can we utilize this (space) and have it function for us? We have four sections — an office and a store room, a kitchen/reception and a gallery, two gallery spaces with an entry, and two more gallery spaces. “We wanted a gift shop that’s much more contemporary and that brings the gallery tradition – like displaying jewelry in picture frames, but very modern and with great lighting. We also wanted a feature room, which we could use for a trunk show or whatever we need. There’s so much going on and I know I was often looking for gifts. I found it hard to find unique things. Everything (in the gift shop) tends to be handmade or designed. A third of the product is from Saskatchewan. We tried to find some younger artists – the younger ones are looking for opportunity (and aren’t as established).”  ridges Photos by Michelle Berg B


Read my book #

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Lo ca l AUT H O RS: Writers tell us what makes their book worth reading

ANNE MCDONALD

To the Edge of the Sea Who knew that the story of Canada’s Confederation was so interesting? I certainly didn’t. It all started one hot and sleepy July day when I was teaching my English class and we watched a video celebrating Canada’s 125th birthday. There was a drawing of William Pope rowing this small oyster boat out to the Queen Victoria in the Charlottetown harbour to meet the Fathers of Confederation. The first circus in 20 years was in Charlottetown and everyone else had gone to the circus. There were no carriages left for the Fathers — and no rooms in any of the hotels. The circus-goers, who had come from across the Island and over from New Brunswick, had booked everything. I was fascinated and started researching — the circus, the Civil war, farming, politics, politicians — everything.

At the same time hundreds of P.E.I. farmers joined the Tenant League to fight against paying rent to P.E.I.’s Absentee Landlords. Eventually troops had to be brought in. Alex and Reggie, two Island brothers, get caught up with the circus and the Tenant’s League. The novel To the Edge of the Sea just won a Saskatchewan Book Award. The jury said: “a debut novel that is lyrical and precise in its descriptions of land, sea and people, and powerful in its accounts of both personal and political histories of the province and country.” You can buy my book at Chapters, McNally Robinson, Amazon.ca, and many independent bookstores. You can reach me at annemcdonald writer@gmail.com and read more at www. TotheEdgeoftheSea.blogspot.com

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on the cover #

THEsta r p h o e n i x .CO M / b r i d g es

It sounds crazy to say a handmade bowl is going to make you happier than a massproduced bowl, but it does. — Erin Weiss

THE MAKERS OF IT ALL

Upstart craft markets unique to Saskatchewan

Flock and Gather Craft Collective’s Shauna Buck, Wayne Jorgenson and Erin Weiss have organized biannual markets known in Saskatchewan for unique and eclectic handmade items. Bridges photo by Michelle Berg

By Jeanette Stewart Erin Weiss’ home makes you say ‘wow.’ In the afternoon, the magazine-worthy house in Saskatoon’s Caswell Hill area is bathed in natural light and filled with bright colours and unique objects, furniture and lighting. “You can’t quite get it until you have this

stuff in your life. It sounds crazy to say a handmade bowl is going to make you happier than a mass-produced bowl, but it does,” she said. “You notice the details about these things. I always feel like I don’t need to have as much stuff. I have fewer, special handmade things. When those bowls break, you cry.” As a doll maker, crafter and one of the six founding members of the Flock and Gather

Craft Collective, Weiss has an expert esthetic and a deep appreciation for handmade items. She balances a toddler on her lap as a few of the founding members talk about the genesis of the Flock and Gather Craft Collective, an upstart group who host biannual markets full of eclectic, independent crafts and artwork. The group met in late 2010 at another craft sale and realized the city needed more oppor-

tunities for emerging artisans and artists to meet, make and sell their work together. Since their first market, Flock and Gather sales have built a reputation in Saskatchewan for unique and eclectic handmade items. “It was quite obvious that there was certainly an amazing, growing community in Saskatoon of handmade artisans and crafters,” said fellow founder Wayne Jorgenson.


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If we’re not creative, if we’re not doing something crafty that enriches the people that we are, it’s bad news. — Cookie Madill

Steph Canning shown here in her home studio where she designs and sews everything from tea cozies to pin cushions, and bow ties to cake pillows.  BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

At their Christmas sale in December, more than 600 people walked through the door in the first two hours. For the last few sales they’ve received more than 1,000 visitors for each show, lured by snacks, free entry, elaborate decor and a collection of handmade items you just can’t find anywhere else in the city. They also feature their crafters on their blog and hold regular craft nights at the Mendel Art Gallery to get together with the craft community and “to find someone who understands your severe love of glitter,” said Shauna Buck, an illustrator and maker who helped found the collective. She wears a bright sweater adorned with a tiny button that says “Nice to Meet You.” Though many of the artists, artisans and crafters who show their work at the sales are professionally trained, it can be a difficult jump from art school to the real world. Fine arts programs quite often teach the arts, but not how to make a living say Buck and Jorgenson. Bringing “makers” together at craft nights and sales fosters a conversation, says Buck, who moved from Ontario to start her career in Saskatchewan. Many of these people are professionally trained artists and part-time crafters, taking on a side business in addition to full or part-time gigs. “I wouldn’t be able to make a living doing this full-time. It does definitely supplement my living,” said artist Steph Canning. She was accepted to the Flock and Gather show for the first time last spring, where she began selling her quirky, cute and feminine household wares that include decorative tea cozies, bags, bow ties, and cake pillows. Canning admits she may have spent more on fabric last year than she made in sales, but she says she’d be making work with or without the opportunity to sell it. “I’m very driven to do it all the time,” she said. “I have been up nights because I’m thinking of new projects or new fabrics I want to try.” A pair of crafters in Regina say they’re similarly driven to create work, and their desire to create an “entry level” craft sale was what led Cassie Ozog and Cookie Madill to begin the True Knit craft sale in Regina. Continued on Page 12


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I think there’s so much that gets produced commercially all the timethat people don’t have a connection to handmade objects anymore. — Canning

Mike Zimmer, owner of Uncle Mike’s All Natural Products, makes soap, deodorant, lip balm, and healing salve in his basement. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

“Crafting never sleeps,” said Madill, who works full-time in addition to administering the regular craft sales. “If we’re not creative, if we’re not doing something crafty that enriches the people that we are, it’s bad news.” The friends — who met through roller derby — were crafting one night and decided to look into entering their work into a sale. They found the entry cost and the amount of product needed for some of the major craft sales daunting. “We Googled craft shows in Regina and the entry fees, and we were like ‘oh no,’” said Madill. They decided they would create their own event, and the regular sales have become a hub for crafts that aren’t the typical doilies, woodwork or porcelain dolls you’d associate with some of the more established sales —

think knit hats with mohawks for children or skull painting. They’ve created a community for people who make things that are a bit different. “Every once in a while there’s one or two people you can tell who don’t know what we do, and they walk in and look horrified. That’s almost as good as the people who really like us,” said Madill. ■

A row of screen-printed Flock and Gather posters lines the wall in Mike Zimmer’s basement work space. The soap maker, stay-at-home dad and businessman became part of the Flock and Gather markets at the start after meeting the founders at a CFCR community radio craft sale.

His goal is to create products free from the chemicals and additives contained in most commercially-made grooming products. He also wants to make natural products accessible to everyone. “You shouldn’t have to be rich to use natural products, it should just be something that we’re doing on a regular basis,” he explained. The Flock and Gather sales have allowed him to reach out to a new demographic and finds his client base growing each time he sets up his wares — which include natural deodorant, soaps and hand salve — at one of the sales. “The response is always awesome, even if people aren’t necessarily buying product,” he said. “Every show has progressively got better in the sales and in the response.” In some ways, the support for local artists

and artisans can be compared to shopping for local vegetables at the farmers’ market, or going to see a local band perform. “I think there’s so much that gets produced commercially all the time that people don’t have a connection to handmade objects anymore,” said Canning. “People get really excited when something is handmade and they get to meet you, when they meet the person that made it.” Regina’s upstart craft marketers agree. “It’s that sense of community. I think that knowing your local crafters, knowing your local artisans, knowing that the money is staying local too. That’s a bigger movement than just the crafting,” said Ozog. “You would feel good supporting and buying CDs from local Saskatchewan bands, or buying produce from farms that are nearby.”


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thesta rphoe n i x .com / bridges

Music #

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Fol low bridg es on li n e at thestarphoenix.com/bridges, on Twitter @bridgesYXE, or on facebook.com/BridgesYXE

S a s k at c h e w n M u s i c

Close Talker, great distance By Jeanette Stewart Close Talker has gained a lot by being apart. While most people were resting and enjoying some time off in December, the Saskatoon band was busy creating a debut record and playing holiday shows — putting together a couple packed parties seasonal revellers enjoyed thoroughly. The burst of hard work was necessary. Two of the musicians go to school on the west coast during the year, so their brief time together in December marked the first time they were together since the fall. The group was forced to use the time to lay down their debut recording in a week, producing an eightsong studio album called Timbers. “Because there was such a short time frame there was a sense of urgency,” said Matthew Kopperud, the outspoken guitarist, keyboard player and vocalist. The group met for an interview at Avenue Recording Studio above Amigos, lounging together on the couch in a manner that conveyed their sense of comfort and ease with one another. There is a special dynamic between the members of the group. It’s clear they’re not afraid to tell one another the truth. Most spent time as friends before creating the group, which also includes lead vocalist Will Quiring, drummer Chris Morien and bass player Jeremy Olson. “Are you a diva?” I ask Kopperud when he commandeers the interview momentarily. The rest of the band cheers and laughs. Close Talker formed last summer, and though they’ve spent almost as much time apart as together, it’s hard to tell. The group puts on a live show that pops with energy. The new record deftly captures their distinct use of harmony that hints at fellow bro rockers like Yukon Blonde or Half Moon Run. From the few tracks they played

Members of the band Close Talkers get comfy at the Avenue Recording Studio after completing the tracks to their new album. BRIDGES PHOTO BY MICHELLE BERG

during the interview, the new album will sound great. “Because we were so intense about it, it made this a lot easier to do,” said Quiring, explaining how the songs unfolded during their time apart. “I’m super pumped that we waited this long to record.”

“They breathe like a fine wine,” said Kopperud. The musicians harness electronic elements like programmed beats and synthesizers combined with traditional rock band instrumentals. Add to that crackling technical proficiency, inventive percussion

and AN incredible sense of harmony and you have a potent musical synthesis that could insure the group becomes one of those perfect summer bands — the kind that makes you kick your shoes off and dance at an outdoor festival, hands in the air.

The group intends to tour during the summer months, hoping for the best for their new record. “We’d love to go platinum,” deadpans Kopperud. Close Talker will reunite in February for their CD release party Feb. 20 at Vangelis in Saskatoon.


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Turn Up

the

Warm up to savings with an energy efficient home During winter, energy bills can skyrocket as light and heating systems work to keep Canadians comfortable during the winter months. TD Friends of the Environment Foundation offers a few eco-friendly tips for Canadians to reduce their environmental footprint while reducing their energy bills during the winter season. “Canadians can conserve energy and lower their energy bills by implementing simple solutions into their everyday lives,” says Mary Desjardins, the executive director of TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. “For instance, small things like draft-proofing a home can save consumers as much as 10 per cent on energy bills.” Additional tips include: • Put outdoor lights on a timer: Leaving lights on for extended periods wastes energy, so set outdoor lights on a timer to limit energy consumption. Set lights to be on for a five or six hour period, as opposed to all night, and switch to LED light bulbs for increased energy savings. • Set the thermostat: Keeping your home at a

reasonable temperature is an easy way to reduce energy costs. Set the thermostat to 20C (68F), and lower the temperature if you’ll be away for longer periods of time. Using a programmable thermostat to automatically lower the temperature while you are at work or sleeping will further reduce your energy consumption – and your costs. • Seal leaky windows and doors: Reduce energy loss – and subsequent money loss – by sealing leaky doors and windows. Make a homemade “draft snake” – a simple craft project made with a piece of fabric filled with dried beans, old clothing or fabric scraps – and place it at the bottom of doors and windows to keep warm air in your home and money in your pocket. In addition to working with Canadians to conserve energy, TD FEF supports thousands of projects dedicated to protecting Canada’s natural environment. More information about local projects in your community is available online at www.tdfef.com. (News Canada)

Call us today

Heat

Sealing leaky doors and windows can reduce energy loss and save you money. (News Canada photo)

Like an unsung hero, the forgotten basement furnace is expected to keep our home at the perfect indoor temperature day and night. This major piece of household equipment is usually out of sight and out of mind—until the energy bill arrives and instead of appreciation, this unsung hero gets nothing but a frown. Did you know that when polled, only 25 per cent of Canadian homeowners said that ‘booking a furnace maintenance appointment” was a household

Energy Efficiency & Water and Air Leak detection

Replace your windows & doors now!

Tower Tech Monitoring

when you mention this ad!

at (306) 260.1010

or

Call us today for your free in-home consultation!

(306) 292.0998

306.242.7513

CALGARY

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priority? This finding was reported in a Direct Energy survey conducted recently by Angus Reid. In addition, 57 per cent of respondents said they felt ‘concerned’ or ‘angry’ about upcoming winter heating bills. Homeowners can regain far more control of this however. Take a look at this quick and easy tip-list for better heating efficiency, courtesy of Direct Energy: 1. Clean or replace the furnace filter. This one maintenance measure makes a

big difference and should be done every three months. Better still, sign up for a furnace protection and maintenance plan. The better ones give you 24-hour emergency service by licensed technicians, plus an annual inspection. The technicians do safety tests for carbon monoxide and natural gas leaks, and they also test the combustion exhaust of the furnace. 2. Temperature control. Install a programmable thermostat set to lower the temperature throughout the

EDMONTON

KELOWNA

KAMLOOPS

SASKATOON

119-A Cardinal Cres., Saskatoon, Sask., S7L 6H5 Office: 306-244-8248 | Cell: 306-227-6668 Fax: 306-244-8040 Email: office@actionplumbing.ca

’s Favorite t Saskatoon cialis Foam Spe

• Plumbing • Service • Heating Contracts • Gas • Senior • Sheet Metal Discount • Preventative Maintenance www.saskwestmechanical.com

3715 Thatcher Drive, SASKATOON, SASK, S7R 1B8

6) 2 6 3 ( M A O F Ph: 306-653 nes.com

o j y a r p s . www

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www.fivestarheating.ca

PLUMBING HEATING AIR CONDITIONING Free Estimates Service Installation Repair Journeyman Technicians Flexible Payment Plans 24 Hour Emergency Service Available Guaranteed Quality Workmanship

5. Boost the insulation. A good rule-of-thumb is to aim for approximately 30 centimeters (12 inches) of insulation in the attic and make sure basement headers have insulation too. 6. Assess the furnace. Investigate the advantages of replacing your conventional furnace with a high-efficiency one. Reports show that this can result in cost savings as high as 15 per cent – making it well worth the investment. (News Canada)

For a limited time only,

244-2941

® TM Trademarks of AIRMILESInternational Trading B.V. Used under licence by LoyaltyOne Inc. and SaskEnergy Incorporated.

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night, or during the day when you are not at home. 3. Circulate: Remember that warm air rises so turn on your ceiling fan to redistribute it into the rest of the room. In the winter months, the blades should rotate in a clockwise direction. 4. Don’t heat unused spaces: Check to make sure that non-insulated places (like the garage and crawl spaces) are not receiving (and immediately losing) valuable heat. In unused rooms, close the registers to conserve.

Professional Service Technicians

“We install Trane and Bryant & Heil furnaces”

Inside shouldn’t feel like Outside!

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Keep Warm Efficiently

Furnace maintenance key to saving on energy

to learn more about infrared imaging inspections and scans executed by

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14

T h u rs day, Ja n ua ry 24 , 2 0 1 3

Turn Up

the

Warm up to savings with an energy efficient home During winter, energy bills can skyrocket as light and heating systems work to keep Canadians comfortable during the winter months. TD Friends of the Environment Foundation offers a few eco-friendly tips for Canadians to reduce their environmental footprint while reducing their energy bills during the winter season. “Canadians can conserve energy and lower their energy bills by implementing simple solutions into their everyday lives,” says Mary Desjardins, the executive director of TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. “For instance, small things like draft-proofing a home can save consumers as much as 10 per cent on energy bills.” Additional tips include: • Put outdoor lights on a timer: Leaving lights on for extended periods wastes energy, so set outdoor lights on a timer to limit energy consumption. Set lights to be on for a five or six hour period, as opposed to all night, and switch to LED light bulbs for increased energy savings. • Set the thermostat: Keeping your home at a

reasonable temperature is an easy way to reduce energy costs. Set the thermostat to 20C (68F), and lower the temperature if you’ll be away for longer periods of time. Using a programmable thermostat to automatically lower the temperature while you are at work or sleeping will further reduce your energy consumption – and your costs. • Seal leaky windows and doors: Reduce energy loss – and subsequent money loss – by sealing leaky doors and windows. Make a homemade “draft snake” – a simple craft project made with a piece of fabric filled with dried beans, old clothing or fabric scraps – and place it at the bottom of doors and windows to keep warm air in your home and money in your pocket. In addition to working with Canadians to conserve energy, TD FEF supports thousands of projects dedicated to protecting Canada’s natural environment. More information about local projects in your community is available online at www.tdfef.com. (News Canada)

Call us today

Heat

Sealing leaky doors and windows can reduce energy loss and save you money. (News Canada photo)

Like an unsung hero, the forgotten basement furnace is expected to keep our home at the perfect indoor temperature day and night. This major piece of household equipment is usually out of sight and out of mind—until the energy bill arrives and instead of appreciation, this unsung hero gets nothing but a frown. Did you know that when polled, only 25 per cent of Canadian homeowners said that ‘booking a furnace maintenance appointment” was a household

Energy Efficiency & Water and Air Leak detection

Replace your windows & doors now!

Tower Tech Monitoring

when you mention this ad!

at (306) 260.1010

or

Call us today for your free in-home consultation!

(306) 292.0998

306.242.7513

CALGARY

SAS00223470_1_1

SAS00224416_1_1

priority? This finding was reported in a Direct Energy survey conducted recently by Angus Reid. In addition, 57 per cent of respondents said they felt ‘concerned’ or ‘angry’ about upcoming winter heating bills. Homeowners can regain far more control of this however. Take a look at this quick and easy tip-list for better heating efficiency, courtesy of Direct Energy: 1. Clean or replace the furnace filter. This one maintenance measure makes a

big difference and should be done every three months. Better still, sign up for a furnace protection and maintenance plan. The better ones give you 24-hour emergency service by licensed technicians, plus an annual inspection. The technicians do safety tests for carbon monoxide and natural gas leaks, and they also test the combustion exhaust of the furnace. 2. Temperature control. Install a programmable thermostat set to lower the temperature throughout the

EDMONTON

KELOWNA

KAMLOOPS

SASKATOON

119-A Cardinal Cres., Saskatoon, Sask., S7L 6H5 Office: 306-244-8248 | Cell: 306-227-6668 Fax: 306-244-8040 Email: office@actionplumbing.ca

’s Favorite t Saskatoon cialis Foam Spe

• Plumbing • Service • Heating Contracts • Gas • Senior • Sheet Metal Discount • Preventative Maintenance www.saskwestmechanical.com

3715 Thatcher Drive, SASKATOON, SASK, S7R 1B8

6) 2 6 3 ( M A O F Ph: 306-653 nes.com

o j y a r p s . www

SAS00224324_1_1

www.fivestarheating.ca

PLUMBING HEATING AIR CONDITIONING Free Estimates Service Installation Repair Journeyman Technicians Flexible Payment Plans 24 Hour Emergency Service Available Guaranteed Quality Workmanship

5. Boost the insulation. A good rule-of-thumb is to aim for approximately 30 centimeters (12 inches) of insulation in the attic and make sure basement headers have insulation too. 6. Assess the furnace. Investigate the advantages of replacing your conventional furnace with a high-efficiency one. Reports show that this can result in cost savings as high as 15 per cent – making it well worth the investment. (News Canada)

For a limited time only,

244-2941

® TM Trademarks of AIRMILESInternational Trading B.V. Used under licence by LoyaltyOne Inc. and SaskEnergy Incorporated.

SAS00224132_1_1

WINNIPEG

SAS01601640_1_1

night, or during the day when you are not at home. 3. Circulate: Remember that warm air rises so turn on your ceiling fan to redistribute it into the rest of the room. In the winter months, the blades should rotate in a clockwise direction. 4. Don’t heat unused spaces: Check to make sure that non-insulated places (like the garage and crawl spaces) are not receiving (and immediately losing) valuable heat. In unused rooms, close the registers to conserve.

Professional Service Technicians

“We install Trane and Bryant & Heil furnaces”

Inside shouldn’t feel like Outside!

10% off

Keep Warm Efficiently

Furnace maintenance key to saving on energy

to learn more about infrared imaging inspections and scans executed by

Receive

15

T h u rs day, Ja n ua ry 24 , 2 0 1 3

T H Esta r p h o e n i x .CO M / b r i d g es

SAS00224497_1_1

HIGH EFFICIENCY FURNACES

49/MONTH

$

SAS26301787_1_1

'&.(")& &$0&.+"-& #1* )/2 +/!& )13%1.+ "2,

O.A.C*

INCLUDES 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOUR WARRANTY

When Quality Counts

FFICIENCY HEATING & COOLING

934-7002 SAS00224007_1_1

384-4328

Call now for a FREE in-home estimate.

(-16 .5 "5-1 '#4'1. )211!'1 *'28'1 .5*2" &51 288 "5-1 9$,) 1'42!13 72!6.'626+' 26* !60.2882.!56 6''*0/ $!0!. %%%/+211!'1/+2

* TD Canada Trust financing on approved credit - based on a 10 year term with variable or fixed rate based on dollar amount. Payments deferrals up to 12 months. SAS00224298_1_1

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16

T h u rs day, Ja n ua ry 24 , 2 0 1 3

THEsta r p h o e n i x .COM / b r i d g es

what moves you #

Tell us what moves you: Contact us at bridges@thestarphoenix.com

Guy Marx

Ultrarunner goes the distance By Jeanette Stewart Guy Marx is an ultrarunner with a serious commitment to trail running. In November, Marx suffered his second heart attack, but had a speedy recovery due to his fitness levels. He remains undaunted and plans to continue to train in his beloved sport. Marx works for Correctional Services Canada in Saskatoon and will keep hitting the trails as his health recovers.

Q: Why are your feet your favourite way to get around? A: Unlike typical road running, trail running and ultra running is done offroad. In Saskatchewan we don’t have many trails or hills or mountains. I have to travel to these other places. It’s a chance to explore nature and interesting places on your two feet. You can see that much more when you’re running. Even if I’m not racing or doing a particular workout, just to be able to run on trails and explore new areas on location — my feet get me there. To me it’s just the greatest thing in the world. Q: How long have you been running? A: I’ve been trail running for just about 10 years now. I’ve kind of been a runner all of my life. In the last 10 years I’ve focused more on trail running and now ultrarunning, which is running distances anything over the standard marathon distance of 42-kilometres. There’s ultra-races. There’s four main distances and anything else in between: 50 km, 50 miles, 100 km, and 100 miles. Q: What made you want to start ultrarunning? A: Once I got into trail running and learned about ultra-running, it was just a matter of wanting to go further and see how far my feet could take me. It’s a personal challenge as well as a lot of fun, being able to explore places on your own two feet through running. The longer the race the more walking you might incorporate into it, or just a run for fun even. You can incorporate some walking as well so you can extend your endurance.

Q: How do you protect your body from the extreme wear? A: Some would argue (trail running) is easier on the body in some ways than road running, which is on hard, hard surfaces all the time. Trails tend to be a little bit more forgiving. You’re on dirt, you’re on softer ground for the most part. The training, when you slowly build up your mileage, it’s like any sport. You have to be aware that you don’t overdo it. I’m seeing a lot of successful older trail ultra-runners. People that are in their 50s and 60s that do extremely well because even though they’re older they have the time to train properly and it’s just a little easier on their body. Q: What kind of shoes do you wear? A: Trail running shoes. There’s quite a variety of them out there, just as there are road running shoes. It’s not a particular brand. You’re going to pick a brand that fits you well and is suited for the type of terrain you’re going to be running on. Q: Do you do a lot of research online about how to do this? A: Yes. There’s tons of information about how and why. You can really expose yourself to the trail and ultra community online because there’s so many people that have websites and blogs and report on races. Ultra-racing and trail running in general have been exploding for years, with lots of people taking an interest in that. Q: Do you ever see wildlife when you’re out running? A: Not that I can recall. I’ve read about encounters with bears and moose. In terms of races, they’re generally done in places where the trails are frequently used. Wildlife tend to keep their distance. Q: What’s been your proudest accomplishment in running? A: Probably my first ultra, which was last year in September in Oregon. That was my first 50-km trail race, called the Mackenzie River 50-km trail race.

Guy Marx’s feet move him. Here, he goes cross-country while participating in a 50-km ultra marathon. Submitted Photo


# crossword n ew yo rk ti mes Across  1 Hair-raising  6 Secretive org.  9 Cause of everything going up?

14 Hip 16 Range 17 Gamer’s midday

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Michio

21 Villains in the “28Down” films, e.g.

22 Working hours for

director Shyamalan?

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Cameco Meewasin Skating Rink @ PotashCorp Plaza Sunday, January 27 12 - 4 p.m. Join us for a Skating Party as part of

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The party starts at noon with a short program at 2:00 p.m. You can warm up in the new Cameco Meewasin Skaters’ Lodge while enjoying some delicious Tim Hortons hot chocolate and Timbits.

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There will be music, prizes, entertainers and a concession! If you don’t have skates don’t worry! The lodge has a wide variety to borrow.

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Please call 665-6888 for more information.

the Americas

31 Red wing? 34 N.Y.C. subway line in

5

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24 Fourth-largest city in 27 Use, as dishes 28 Nasal spray brand 29 Restaurant’s after-

PotashCorp SKATING Party

Edited by Will Shortz

meal?

18 Quick online message 19 Spot 20 Dancer/choreographer

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t h esta r p h o e n i x .co m / b r i d g es

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one’s imagination?

38 Atomic 39 Fishes or cuts bait, say 40 They take a beating 41 Centipede creator 44 Stops in the country 45 Bozo in a big Mercedes?

50 Peppermint ___ 51 Hearth’s content 52 End of many company names

56 Santa ___ 57 With 63-Across,

extra holiday pay … or what’s in 17-, 22-, 34and 45-Across?

59 Noodle dish 60 Upper 61 Some hard-to-wrap presents

62 Starting O, maybe 63 See 57-Across

63

puzzlE by ian livEngood and j.a.S.a croSSWord claSS

Down  1 Old German duchy name

 2 Team supposedly

cursed by a billy goat

 3 Rent-___  4 Classic theater name  5 Actor Brynner  6 “Pretty, pretty please?”

 7 Sporting a fake nose and glasses, maybe

 8 Sporting figure: Abbr.  9 Discriminatory, in a way

10 Spanish spread 11 Proof positive 12 Lacking

13 Cloud producer, for short

15 Total 21 Narc’s discovery 22 Conservative skirt 23 Early races 24 Diet, commercially 25 As it happens 26 “Give ___ buzz” 28 See 21-Across 29 The weather, commonly

30 Newt, once 32 ___ law 33 Liq. measures 35 Like 36-Down, e.g. 36 Frigg’s husband 37 It may fill a niche

42 Inked up 43 Japanese or Javanese 45 Trades one-twos, say 46 Ear part 47 “Chicago Hope” Emmy winner

48 Umpire of Hamlet’s fencing match with Laertes

49 Impulse 52 French town in ’44 news

53 Gulf land 54 Part of a sitcom signoff

55 Big “birds” of old 57 Ill. hours 58 Fill-in

#

Janric classic SUDoKU Level: Silver Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

Solution to the crossword puzzle and the Sudoku can be found on Page 23

Cameco Meewasin Skating Rink on Spadina Crescent next to the Bessborough Hotel

Meewasin

BRA CLINIC

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WOMEN NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HEALTHY BRAS

Have you gone on a bra shopping trip, only to be frustrated, walking away empty handed? Jeunique International, founded in 1959, manufactures health bras based on the engineering of the Golden Gate Bridge (balanced load suspension). Shirley McInnes (International Executive Director), a Certified Bra Fitter, is coming to Saskatoon for a 2 day Bra Clinic. Bras on the market with frills and lace may look nice, but they are not doing their job. (85% OF WOMEN ARE WEARING THE WRONG BRA!) A women needs support from beneath the breast tissue. The Tab and the Jeunique Bras both fit small to full figure, sports, maternity and mastectomy - 200 sizes and 3 styles to choose from 30A - 46KK; no bounce, no wires to gouge or bruises or impeded lymphatic drainage and circulation. Does not ride up in the back or fall off the shoulders and promotes better posture. Switching to a custom fitted bra is like giving up a floppy pair of slippers for an orthotic shoe. Once women adjust to the uplift and snugness (a couple of weeks) you become a life-long client. Doctors, massage therapists, chiropractors often refer their patients to us.

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Friday, February 1st 10:00 am – 5:00 pm & Saturday, February 2nd 10:00 am – 5:00 pm at Boutique BeYouTeFul 154 – 2nd Avenue South For an appointment on either Friday or Saturday, please call Boutique BeYouTeFul at 373-0129 SAS03001494_1_1


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T h u rs day, Ja n ua ry 24 , 2 0 1 3

T H Esta r p h o e n i x .CO M / b r i d g es

ON THE SCENE #

Women Helping Women

Visions Salon and Spa hosted an evening of pampering and shopping for local women last week. The Women Helping Women Night Out was held in support of the Mumford House, a shelter for homeless women and their children. Saskatoon ladies enjoyed food catered by Weczeria, wine, music and swag bags, along with hand massages, skin care consultations, make-up tips, hair styling, discount shopping, and a photo booth. Over 60 people attended the sold-out event, which raised close to $3,500 for the 36-bed shelter. The Mumford House provides a safe place to call home while women look for safe and sustainable long-term housing.

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1. Chelsey Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary and Samantha Carnduff 2. The ladies enjoyed a glass of wine during an evening of pampering. 3. Lorraine Scott from Mumford House and Visions manager and host Jackie Yochim. 4. Wenona Kook and Jamie Bregenser 5. Amanda Doering styles Sylvia Stevensonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair. 6. Wendy Perry with the owners of Visions and Surface hair care Wayne and Debra Grund. 7. Tracy Stewart and Leah Ferguson  ridges photo by Michelle Berg B

1.


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T h u rs day, Ja n ua ry 24 , 2 0 1 3

T H Esta r p h o e n i x .CO M / b r i d g es

EVENTS #

MUSIC

Thursday, Jan. 24 Undercover Pirates Crackers Restaurant and Lounge, #1-227 Pinehouse Dr. Jazz Jam: David Fong Trio The Bassment, B3-202 Fourth Ave. N. Big Dave McLean Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave. Hannah Georgas w/ The Belle Game Amigos Cantina, 632 10th St. E. Continuum Vangelis Tavern, 801 Broadway Ave. Fri day, Jan . 25 Piano Fridays w/ Ross Nykiforuk Roots Series: Carrie Catherine The Bassment, B3-202 Fourth Ave. N.

606 Spadina Cres. W. Punk Covers: Turbojugend BridgeCity fundraiser Vangelis Tavern, 801 Broadway Ave. The Band Wagon Toon Town Tavern, 1630 Fairlight Dr. Thunder Road Band Stan’s Place, 106-110 Ruth St. E. Mr. Mern Tequila Nightclub, 1201 Albert Ave. S a t u rday, Ja n. 2 6 Ian Sinclair’s a Series of Tubes and I Got Rhythm Section The Bassment, B3-202 Fourth Ave. N. Big Dave McLean Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave.

What you need to know to plan your week. Send events to bridges@thestarphoenix.com

Tequila Nightclub, 1201 Albert Ave. Sunday, Ja n. 27 Harry Startup Nutana Legion, 3021 Louise St. Zion I w/ Transit, Bitter Rhythm and Life Unspoken Amigos Cantina, 632 10th St. E. Icebreaker w/ The Johner Boys, Misterfire and The Rumours The Odeon Events Centre, 241 Second Ave. S. Blues Jam Vangelis Tavern, 801 Broadway Ave. Tonight It’s Poetry Lydia’s Pub, 650 Broadway Ave. Tu esday, Ja n. 2 9

Harry Startup Nutana Legion, 3021 Louise St.

Karaoke Deathstar The Fez, 834B Broadway Ave.

Big Dave McLean Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave.

Driftwood Army & Navy Veterans Club, 359 First Ave. N.

Open Mic Lydia’s Pub, 650 Broadway Ave.

John Antoniuk w/ Kevin Kane and Family Affair Broadway Theatre, 715 Broadway Ave.

The Lost Keys McNally Robinson, 3130 Eighth St. E.

Wednesday, Ja n. 30

Driftwood Army & Navy Veterans Club, 359 First Ave. N.

Paranoid Castle w/ Cam the Wiz, Rewind, Lost Kings and Stone Cold Party Rockers Amigos Cantina, 632 10th St. E.

Wyndham Thiessen McNally Robinson, 3130 Eighth St. E. Nordic Trax 15 Year Anniversary Tour w/ Luke McKeehan Amigos Cantina, 632 10th St. E. Leon Ochs Fairfield Seniors’ Centre, 103 Fairmont Cr. Toon Town Big Band Dance Downtown Legion,

Activist Maguire Buds on Broadway, 817 Broadway Ave. Open Mic The Fez, 834B Broadway Ave.

Bass Invaders w/ Minor Matter Vangelis Tavern, 801 Broadway Ave.

Johnny Broadway Record Club Vangelis Tavern, 801 Broadway Ave.

Rock Dr. Band w/ Despite the Reverence The Fez, 834B Broadway Ave.

Souled Out Lydia’s Pub, 650 Broadway Ave.

Thunder Road Band Stan’s Place, 106-110 Ruth St. E. Dislexik & Modus

#

ART

Mendel Art Gallery On Jan. 25 at 7 p.m., join co-curators Andrea Kunard and Steven Loft for a talk/tour of the exhibition Steeling

the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists, organized by the National Gallery of Canada. This event is followed at 8 p.m. by the opening reception for all the winter exhibitions. Ottawa artist Stephen Hutchings will lead a talk/tour of his exhibition, Landscapes for the End of Time, on Jan. 27 at 2 p.m. Following at 2:30 p.m. will be Quartet for the End of Time, by Olivier Messiaen, performed by members of the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra. This music was the inspiration for Hutchings’ massive landscape paintings. LUNA is an intricate welded steel architectural installation by Saskatoon artist Alison Norlen. She will give a talk/tour on Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. The Artists by Artists exhibition, Outsiders, features drawings by Humboldt Magnussen and his mentor, Zachari Logan. Visit mendel.ca for details on all Mendel exhibitions and events. Void Gallery Until Feb. 3 at 2-1006 Eighth St. E. Oil paintings by Sandra Knoss, depicting Saskatchewan landscapes and wildlife. A reception will be held Jan. 25 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Also, new landscape paintings by Tim Fisher at Luna & Hill, until March 3. Ukrainian Museum of Canada Until Jan. 31 at 910 Spadina Cres. E. Red and Black, the artworks of Iryna Karpenko. Gallery on Third, Watrous By appointment through January at 102 Third Ave. E., Watrous. The Winter Art Show and Sale, featuring local artists. Watrous Library Through January in Watrous. ‘Tis the Season, local art and photography with a holiday theme. Handmade House Showcase Gallery Until Feb. 2 at 710 Broadway Ave. What’s in the Box, wooden boxes by Walter McNabb. Centre East Galleries Until Feb. 3 at The Centre. Work by Bill Epp, Scholarship Winners Kaitlyn Dirk and Laura Pritchard, Rosanna Parry, Stuart Kasdorf Photograph-

ics, Grain Elevators: Vanishing Prairie Landmarks hooked rug exhibition, and displays from the Saskatoon Public School Board. Collector’s Choice Art Gallery Until Feb. 4 at 625D First Ave. N. Annual frame sale and art auction. Also, on display, Looking for a Home, bear sculptures by Vance Theoret. The Gallery, Frances Morrison Library Until Feb. 7 at 311 23rd St. E. Finding a Green Photo, by Barbara Reimer. A photo-based project dealing with sustainability using film and coffee as conceptual elements. Paved Arts/AKA Gallery Until Feb. 15 at 424 20th St. W. If found . . . return to me, by Elisabeth Belliveau. An exhibition of new drawing, writing and video work. Samaritan Place Until Feb. 16 at 375 Cornish Road. Lake, Forest, Sky, paintings by Joy Mendel. Art at Will (formerly Willow Studio) Until March 1 at The Wood Alehouse, 148 Second Ave. N. The Tree Show, works interpreting the tree motif. Includes several Saskatoon and area artists. Call to artists to submit art in all mediums, larger than 24x24, before Feb. 20 to sandraepp101@shaw. ca. Twenty works will be presented at the Woods Alehouse on March 1. The moving show will be replenished as art is sold and reopen at a new surprise location in May. St. Thomas More Gallery Until Feb. 28 at 1437 College Dr. Ancestral ground, a selection of prints and works on canvas, from the 1970s to the present, by artist Ray Keighley. Meewasin Valley Centre Gallery Through February at 402 Third Ave. S. Walks with Gina, by Erich Keser. It is an exhibit depicting images of plants, birds and natural scenes in all seasons. The Nest Through March at 333 Third Ave. S. New work in encaustic and oil by Kathy Bradshaw.


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EVENTS #

Icebreaker Jan. 27, 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., at the Odeon Events Centre. Presented by the GSCS Foundation. A concert for high school students featuring local performers. With the Johner Boys from Holy Cross, The Rumours from St. Joseph and Misterfire from Bethlehem. This is a chem-free event with zerotolerance security. With door prizes. Everyone is welcome. Proceeds will support student leadership programs.

SPECIAL EVENTS

We Day Saskatchewan line-up unveiled Jan. 24, 9:30 a.m., at St. Joseph’s High School, 115 Nelson Rd. Free The Children founder Craig Kielburger, Degrassi cast members Luke Bilyk and Aislinn Paul, and local students will unveil the lineup of award-winning speakers and performers coming to Saskatoon to educate and inspire local youth at the first-ever We Day Saskatchewan, which will take place at Credit Union Centre on Feb. 27. For We Day information, visit www.weday. com/press. Eat Yourself Thin Jan. 24, 7 p.m to 8 p.m., at St. Joseph’s Parish Hall, 1006 Broadway Ave. A presentation by Paulette Millis, registered nutritional consultant and author, to help set you up for lifetime health and weight. A look at the role played by thyroid, liver, adrenals, sleep and stress. No more starvation and deprivation. Email eatingforhealth@sasktel.net or visit www.healingwithnutrition.ca. Writing North 3: Playing with Our Selves: Writing, Audience and Solitude Jan. 25, 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., and Jan. 26, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., in Neatby-Timlin Theatre in the Arts Building at the U of S. A two-day writing festival that targets Saskatoon and a wider Saskatchewan community of aspiring writers and anyone interested in writers and books. With five established writers: Ken Babstock, C.E. Gatchalian, David Poulsen, Donna Michelle St. Bernard and Candace Savage. This is a free event. Visit www. skwriter.com. Book Sale Jan. 25, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Jan. 26, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Jan. 27, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., at Market Mall. Fundraising for New Hope Dog Rescue. For information call 668-8153 or email newhoperescue@ hotmail.com. PotashCorp WinterShines Festival 2013 Jan. 26 to Feb. 10 at The Saskatoon Farmers’ Market at River Landing. Hosted by On Purpose Leadership Inc. With an ice park, a winter playground, an international ice carving competition, a skating party at Meewasin Rink on Jan 27 at 12 p.m., and a two-part soup cook off on Jan. 27 at 12 p.m. and Jan. 30 at 5 p.m. Visit www.potashcorpwintershines.ca. Prairie Master Gardeners Workshop Jan. 26, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Nutana Park Mennonite Church, 1701 Ruth St. A workshop on exploring the nature of urban forest and a workshop on photographing flowers. With a potluck lunch. For information and to register visit www.prairiemastergardeners.ca or email prairie.mastergardeners@gmail.com.

Arab Awakening, but are we hearing the truth? Jan. 29, 7 p.m., in Fr. O’Donnell Auditorium at St. Thomas More College. A talk by international journalist Robert Fisk. An open Q&A will follow the talk. Presented by Canadians for Justice & Peace in the Middle East (CJPME). Visit www.cjpme.org.

Catch the PotashCorp Wintershine Festival Jan. 26 to Feb. 10 at The Saskatoon Farmers’ Market at River Landing. File Photo Hungarian Rhapsody Jan. 26, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., at Third Avenue United Church. An Amati Quartet performance. With pianist Bonnie Nicholson. Featuring both Hungarian and Hungarian-inspired music, including Haydn, Brahms and Dohnanyi. Visit www. amatiquartet.usask.ca. Robbie Burns Night Jan. 26, 6:30 p.m., at Nutana Legion. A legion fundraiser. With a traditional supper of soup, roast beef, tatties and neeps. Includes a dance, a traditional piper, address the haggis, a 50/50 draw and prizes for best dressed. Scottish attire is welcome. Swinging With the Stars Jan 26, 6 p.m., at TCU Place. Presented by GMG Jewellers and Navacare.ca. A fundraising event that includes dinner and entertainment. Eight of Saskatoon’s high-profile celebrities are paired with the city’s best professional dancers to compete for the prestigious best dancer trophy. With break dance company Alpha Kidz and Saskatoon Salsa. All proceeds raised are donated to Prairie Hospice to help provide additional support to families that have a loved one dying of a terminal illness. Walk for Memories Jan. 27, 12:30 p.m. registration, 1:30 p.m. walk, at the Saskatoon Field House. This is the 12th anniversary of the indoor, pledge-based event which funds essential Alzheimer Society of Saskatchewan programs and vital research initiatives. With food and beverages, children’s activities, a grand prize draw for a trip for two sponsored by VIA Rail, and other prizes including iPads (donated by Cameco). To register call 1-800-263-3367, email events@alzheimer. sk.ca or visit www.WalkForMemoriesSK.ca.

Art Classes for Seniors Tuesdays from Jan. 29 to Feb. 26, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., at the Saskatoon Council on Aging. The SCOA and artist Gisele Bauche offer Painting Flowers in Watercolour. Fun and easy instruction on how to create beautiful flowers, leaves and outdoor garden scenes. For beginners and advanced. Limited enrolment. To register call 652-2255 or email admin@scoa.ca. Book Discussion Group Feb. 5, Feb. 19 and March 5, 7 p.m., at the Unitarian Congregation, 213 Second St. E. A four-part discussion series based on Alain de Botton’s book Religion for Atheists: A Non-believer’s Guide to the Uses of Religion. de Botton suggests that even if one rejects religious doctrine there are still important insights to be gained from the study of religion. There is no charge, but advance registration is requested. On-site childcare is available on request (one week advance notice is required). Call 653-2402 or email ucs.office@ sasktel.net.

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GARDENING #

U n i v e r s i t y o f S a s k at c h e wa n T o u r

Touring Wales and its gardens By Jill Turner If you’re thinking about a small group holiday in September, think about Wales. Hauntingly beautiful, Wales is a unique corner of Great Britain with its own history, culture and language. Accompanied by Sara Williams, gardening author and teacher who has a long association with the University of Saskatchewan and has organized many previous tours, it will be led by Idwal Jones, an experienced Welsh guide. “We’re very fortunate to have Idwal, from rural Snowdonia, as our guide on this small group tour. Born in Wales and a Welsh speaker, he is passionate about his land and has been leading tours since 1994. He’s a long standing member of the Penrhyn Male Voice Choir which our group will listen to in their rehearsal rooms,” says Williwams. Among the horticultural highlights will be visits to the world famous gardens of Bodnant, Powis Castle, the secret gardens of Plas Cadnant, and the National Botanic Gardens of Wales. Other gardens on the tour, perhaps not as well known to Canadians, are the Garden House Erbistock, Gwaenynog Hall (where Beatrice Potter wrote The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies), the small cottage garden of Rena Griffiths, Cribyn Garden created by Dutchman Will Ackerman, Dyffryn Gardens, the modern Veddw House Garden, and the early 20th Century gardens of Windcliffe Court. “The scenery is spectacular. Our route will take us through Snowdonia National Park, including a train ride to its summit, a tramway ride to the summit of Great Orme with its unique geology, wildlife and archeology; and a personal tour of Blaen y Nant, a National Trust working farm high in Snowdonia where we’ll see sheep dogs in action among miles of dry stone walls.” There will also be a visit to the National Trust’s 18th Century Llan-

Gardeners will enjoy the serene Welsh Bodnant woodland garden.PHOTO COURTESY VELELLA

ercaeron Estate and Farm including a dairy, brewery and organic fruit and vegetable production areas. Historic sites include a canal boat journey with a traditional Welsh tea aboard. The boat trip will feature Thomas Telford’s famous aqueduct, the walled town and castle of Conway, Bryn Celli Ddu (a Neolithic passage tomb), the Slate Museum; and the unforgettable ruins of Tintern Abbey in the Wye Valley. Among the historic homes visited will be Erddig (reflecting the

upstairs-downstairs life of a gentry family) and Plas Newydd, once the home of the “Ladies of Llangollen.” St. Fagans, a large open-air museum, focuses on Welsh history and heritage. More than 40 original buildings that reflect Welsh history from Celtic times to the present have been moved to the site. There will be walking tours of Langollen, Ruthin, and Conway as well as a leisurely paced coastal walk. The more ambitious can enjoy a walk to the summit of Castel

Dinas Bran (the ruins of an ancient hill fort). Expect spectacular views. Quilters and crafters will enjoy Jen Jones’ Quilt Centre, the Welsh Wool Museum, a tour of the Trefriw Woolen Mills and Weavers Garden, and the craft centre of Ruthin. And foodies will enjoy the Welsh Food and Honey Bee Centre. “We always try to achieve a balance between gardens, history, heritage and culture. Having the expertise, personal knowledge and

contacts of Idwal Jones ensures that this will happen. I think this will be a unique and truly memorable tour,” says Williams. Mark the dates on your calendar: Sept. 3 to 18, 2013. For more information or a brochure please email master.gardener@usask,ca or call 306 966-5546. To register, call 306 966-5539. Turner is a program manager in the Centre for Continuing and Distance Education at the University of Saskatchewan.


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WINE world #

Marius White

Globalization to thank for venerable French wine By James Romanow Sixty years ago if I wanted to drink decent wine, I had to live somewhere else. Now I can live in a particularly lonely part of the Great White North, but still have a choice of hundreds of wines from everywhere in the world at every price point. Thank you globalization! Allow me to direct your attention to the French aisle, in particular to a wine called Marius White. This is an inexpensive wine from Charpoutier, one of the venerated names of French vintners. They produce the famous Hermitage among others, and if the UN ever starts a World Heritage wine list this wine will be among the first elected. In any event, Marius is a wine from the Pays D’Oc, the French side of Catalonia. The wines of this area have long been ridiculed as ‘peasant wines.’ This was undoubtedly true in an era when the farmers only accessed peasant technology. However, a modern vinification technique is now available to every grape (however humble) and the results can be startling. I’ve long been a fan of Vermentino, the white wine of Tuscany. Marius is a blend of Terret, a grape used traditionally for vermouth, and Vermentino. The result is a dry, fruity mouthful with a pleasantly herbal astringent finish. If you like Sauvignon Blanc you need to try

Marius. It’s different, not quite as brisk as Sauvignon Blanc, but absolutely fabulous. There are very few wines as well suited to salads and seafood as this one. I have designated it the official wine of clam linguine. I am sure it also makes a great accompaniment to Manhattan clam chowder and oysters, and the list goes on — so many meals, so little time. Marius White, France, 2010. $15.99 ****

Crossword/Sudoku answers

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Next week: How do you and your kids make forts? What materials do you use? Email bridges@thestarphoenix.com

#p a r e n t

t o pa r e n t

Each week Bridges, in connection with SaskatoonMoms.com, gathers advice from parents to share with other moms and dads. This week we asked:

What skills have you mastered through parenthood?

“I have determined that as a mother I best consider myself a jack of all trades, master of none. They keep me on my toes each and every day. Just as soon as you think you have them figured out, they throw you for a loop. As parents, we keep learning and changing right along with them.” — Terri Leniuk “The art of cooking, cleaning, feeding, changing, crafting, removing little handprints off windows/ mirrors, applying and removing Band-Aids without meltdowns, storytelling, smiling even when I feel too tired to breathe and snuggling all at once. And I wouldn’t trade it for anything.” — Alysia Czmuchalek “Motherhood has taught me many things. It has given me the skills to be flexible while at the same time being a master planner. I have learned that no matter how much I plan and prepare for things, they never turn out quite how I expect and often this is for the better. I have mastered the skill of mediating ... trying to get two three-year-old boys to agree on an activity or to simply get along takes some serious skills some days! Motherhood has given me the skills to see the positive in even the most difficult or trying situations. The best skill of all that I’ve mastered is advocacy; I have learned to

be the voice that my special needs child needs me to be without making any apologies.” — Michelle Grodecki “I have multi-tasking mastered for sure. I also think that I’m pretty good at being patient … better than my husband anyways!” — Chera Miller “I am now good at being an extremely light sleeper — I can hear a pin drop. I can multi-task a lot better, listen to numerous conversations at once and am learning great negotiating skills.” — Nikki Melnyk “I would say patience, but there are many times when that skill is challenged and fails miserably. I could say listening, but a lot of times the ears just pretend to hear. Understanding? I try, but sometimes I just don’t get it. Loving my children unconditionally, no matter what, that’s easy.” — Carla Contreras “I have pretty much mastered knowing what type of injury/problem I will be faced with just by hearing her cry. Motherhood has also taught me to turn to God daily for strength and wisdom in this rewarding, but challenging, blessing of having three daughters.” — Angela Wells


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OUTSIDE THE LINES # Colouring contest Each week, Stephanie McKay creates a timely illustration meant to please kids of all ages. Children can colour the page, have a picture taken with the finished product and email it to bridges@thestarphoenix.com. One winner will be chosen each week. Please send entries by Monday.

Last week’s contest winner is Sydney Dauvin. Thanks to everyone who submitted entries.

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SHARP EATS #

See a food trend you think deserves a highlight in Bridges? Email bridges@thestarphoenix.com or visit Bridges on Facebook

S a s k at c h e wa n f o o d s c e n e

Bringing lessons in food security home By Jenn Sharp Thousands of farmers, herders, cheese makers, fishers, food producers and chefs from around the world joined in Turin, Italy in October for the gastronomy event of the year. Three people represented Saskatchewan at the 2012 Terra Madre. The delegate for Saskatchewan’s only Slow Food convivia, Bryn Rawlyk and his wife Beth, along with Sharon McDaniel, a cheese maker and the proprietor of Herschel Hills (an artisan cheese house specializing in goat and cow’s milk cheese) made the journey to Italy. Terra Madre is a network of food communities that are each committed to producing quality food in a responsible, sustainable way. Representatives from 150 countries attended Terra Madre. Their common desire: “To defend local products from globalized standardization and to promote a production model that respects people and the fertility of the land.” Terra Madre joined with Salone del Gusto this year, another annual gastronomy event that aims to preserve centuries-old food traditions and support the slow food movement. Terra Madre is a deliberately international event. Presenters speak in their native languages and participants don headsets that relay simultaneous translation. Admission costs go toward supporting the objectives of Slow Food, which is to promote good, clean and fair food. Slow Food International was founded in Italy in 1986 and now has more than 100,000 members in 150 countries, including eight in Canada. For McDaniel, attending Terra Madre was an opportunity to learn about cheese making and gain new inspiration for her business. “There were all kinds of cheese and I was most interested in all the different ways they aged and displayed their cheese,” she says. “I learned about some important milking parlour improvements that have

A man touches chillis at the Salone del Gusto gastronomy fair in Turin, Italy. The fair exhibits 8,000 farmers and producers from all around the world. 2012 marked the first year that Salone del Gusto and Terra Madre joined into one event. WIRE PHOTO

helped to deliver a safe raw milk supply.” She was fortunate enough to be invited to return to Italy to learn how to make sheep milk cheeses. Connecting with other like-minded people was also a highlight. “I had many opportunities to speak with local cheese makers and other artisans about the many benefits of eating locally.”

McDaniels and Rawlyk have both been interested in food security and the slow food movement for quite some time. Rawlyk grew up on his family’s farm south of Saskatoon. His childhood diet consisted of food that fewer and fewer children can say they’ve tasted: Fresh garden produce, eggs and meat from farm chickens, along with fresh honey

from the family’s bees. A baker and home chef, he now lives in Saskatoon and does his best to find locally produced food for his own young family. “Many of our neighbourhoods are like food deserts with no close-by grocery stores or markets … I found that in spite of our region’s abundant raw food production, it can be a struggle for individuals in our city

to have easy access to that food,” he states in his Slow Food profile. Terra Madre was an amazing opportunity for Rawlyk to learn from others in the global Slow Food community. His goal is to help connect urban people with local food producers. For more information about Canada’s Slow Food movement go to: www.slowfood.ca.


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#

27

Meet My pet

Allergic pet owner loves his Sphynx By Ashley Martin Growing up, Tyler Bogdan always wanted a pet to cuddle and care for. Because of his allergies to hair, though, he was restricted to fish and an iguana. “I’ve always wanted a cat but I was always allergic,” said Bogdan. Then he and his boyfriend Conner Nix, a veterinary technician, looked into getting a Sphynx cat, a purebred hairless breed. They got their cat Tickles in May from a breeder in Kelowna, B.C., and he has been almost perfect for Bogdan. “I still get a little bit allergic but it’s not so bad. (Maybe once a week) I have to take an allergy pill.” That’s because you can be allergic to hair or dander, and all animals have dander, explained Nix.

Q: What was it like dealing with the breeder? A: Bogdan: The cat got pregnant and (the breeder) would update us

with ultrasounds. She’s got a waiting list. She’s got to have the kittens sold before they’re even impregnated. It was very important to find something reputable ... The genetic line isn’t very big with a Sphynx so you don’t want inbreeding and stuff because then they get sick. Nix: Because I’ve seen some notso-good breeders, I knew that if we were going to do it and spend the money I wanted to do it properly, but also more importantly I wanted to do it ethically for his breed. There’s no sense in breeding animals that have genetic problems, who aren’t healthy.

Q: How much did Tickles cost? A: Bogdan: He cost $1,200. If anything expensive happens (illness), we have him insured. Q: How did you name him? A: Nix: Because I’m a vet tech I’ve heard every name, so I wanted it to be something unique but also kind of funny in a way. Tickles, he’s not

really ticklish and cuddly, he’s bony. Bogdan: He also kind of looks like an armpit I guess. ... You want to name him Fluffy or something because it’s ironic.

Q: How does he behave? A: Nix: He’s really, really outgoing. Bogdan: It is a Sphynx thing. They’re supposed to have a nicer demeanour and be friendly ... When people come over he comes and sits on their lap right away. He’s not scared of anything. I’ve heard him hiss once — because I walked to the kitchen with my coat on and the lights were off and he got scared for some reason. Q: Do you have a funny Tickles story? A: Bogdan: I was baking one time and I left a bag of shredded coconut on top of the fridge and we came home a few hours later and he had eaten almost the whole bag of shredded coconut. (Nix) had to look it up in his books whether that was poi-

Tickles, the hairless cat in his home in Regina. QC PHOTO BY BRYAN SCHLOSSER

sonous or not. You just don’t know off the top of your head.

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PRINCE ALBERT

44 Dracup Ave. N. 782-6677

1525 5th Ave. E 763-3361

• • • •

no data overage charges UNLIMITED calling to over 600,000 SaskTel wireless customers anytime, anywhere in Canada UNLIMITED local calling any time of day UNLIMITED text messaging (Canada and U.S.) UNLIMITED picture and video messaging (Canada and U.S.) And more!

Ends Jan. 31/13

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REGINA

1329 Lorne St. 525-8128

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Sale: $219

We Service What We Sell

www.audiowarehouse.ca

In-Store Service Department with Low Extended Warranty Rates. SAS00222136_1_1


Bridges - January 24, 2013