Page 1

APRIL, VOL 1, 2014


CONTENTS Intro

5

Typography Desogn

19

Spot Illustration

7

Web Design

25

Ad Design

9

Branding

27

The Scottish Herald

13

Illustration

31

Package Design

14

Thumbnails

37

Brochure Design

17

(Newspaper Design, Editorial Illustration)

On the cover: vector illustration of Louise Brooks, the iconic silent film actress from the 1920’s, illustrated in 2009. Above “Super Vector Girl”, 2009. Inkscape. •All work herein was done for educational purposes only•


The Ryman Auditorium: “Mother Church� of Country Music

Ad Design: database management software and cute rubber ducky bath

6

9

Vectorific single malt Scotch whisky

11

toy-inspired body wash for kids

Package Design: Bubbly Burp soda in a pick-your-ownflavors six pack carrier

Brochure Design: Latcho Drom, Romany music from the road

Typeface Design: Hand-wrought typefaces

23

14

16

Illustration: A plethora of styles and mediums

31


INTRO

40+ years of creating art

M

y name is Loraine A. Baird and I am a Graphic Designer from Nashville, TN., with 40+ years of creating art. I graduated from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online Division with a BS in Graphic Design March 26, 2014. My areas of expertise are illustration, whether in traditional mediums or digital format, layout and typography, and often I create my own typography. As for digital, I have a preference for vector format. I have four years of Adobe Illustrator experience and six years of experience using Open Source Inkscape Scalable Vector Graphics Editor, and I am advanced user and a wiz at both. I likewise tinker with many of the various digital sketch and paint programs that mimic traditional mediums, and I am well versed in Adobe Photoshop, Dreamweaver and InDesign. My work is often inspired by retro, old school Commercial Art , retro pop culture and retro kitsch from


A vector comic book style self-portrait, and a self-portrait in pencil done for my Drawing class at Memphis College of Art, Memphis, TN. Inkscape, Gimp, and graphite.

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all over the world. My work is often fun, colourful, quirky and humorous, much of it is conceptual, in a variety of styles from highly stylistic to hyper-realistic. More of my work can be found online at the URLs below. Please have a look at my work, and any questions, comments or hiring inquiries, contact me:

quicheloraine@gmail.com http://supervectorgir.aisites.com/Quiche_home.html http://quicheloraine.deviantart.com/

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My love of drawing began as soon as I could hold a pencil. Here I am, age 3, with my custom made easel tricycle.


SPOT ILLUSTRATION Nashville, “Music City” and the “Mother Church” of Country Music If the hallowed walls of the Ryman Auditorium could talk, the remarkable story they would tell is unmatched in entertainment history.


SPOT ILLUSTRATIONS These spot illustrations were created for a magazine article. Copy was borrowed for educational purposes from the Ryman Auditorium website. Adobe Illustrator

The Grand Ole Opry® began just five years after commercial radio was born in the United States. In 1925, the National Life and Accident Insurance Company built a radio station as a public service to the local community and with the hope that the new medium could advertise insurance policies. The station’s call letters, WSM, stood for the company’s motto: “We Shield Millions.”

I

t’s construction is a tale of divine inspiration. In the 1880s, when prominent businessman and steamboat captain Thomas G. Ryman found salvation in the words of fiery evangelist Reverend Sam Jones, he vowed to build a great tabernacle that would project Rev. Jones’s voice clearly and powerfully for all to hear. Designed by rchitect Hugh Cathcart Thompson in the Late Victorian Gothic Revival style popular at the time, Tom Ryman’s vision became a reality with the completion of the UnionGospel Tabernacle in 1892. After his death in 1904, the Union Gospel Tabernacle would henceforth be known as the Ryman Auditorium in honor of the man who built the Nashville landmark. As the largest structure in the area, the Ryman Auditorium soon became a popular place for community events, political rallies and popular turn-of the-century entertainment including operas, symphonies, bands, ballets and theatrical productions. In 1901, the Metropolitan Opera, for whom a stage was installed, put on special performances of Carmen and The Barber of Seville. Greats such as Ignacy Paderewski and Marian Anderson each performed five times at the Ryman during their long careers.

Ethel Barrymore, Roy Rogers, Harry Houdini, Charlie Chaplin, W.C. Fields, Katharine Hepburn, Bob Hope, Mae West and even president Theodore Roosevelt all graced the Ryman stage. It was during these early years the Ryman became known as the “Carnegie Hall of the South.” While the Ryman was gaining recognition as an entertainment site, George D. Hay was creating a radio show that would become an international phenomenon - the Grand Ole Opry®. In 1943, with crowds too big and too rowdy for other Nashville venues, the Opry found a home at the Ryman. For the next thirty-one years, the Ryman served as the premier stage for the Opry’s live radio shows, which included such legends as Elvis Presley, Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Marty Robbins, Minnie Pearl, Patsy Cline and Roy Acuff.

Today, there are more ways to enjoy the Grand Ole Opry than ever before. The show continues to be broadcast on 650 AM WSM as well as wsmonline.com.

For more information, tours and Ryman events: 615.889.3060 116 5th Ave N. Nashville, TN 37219 http://ryman. com/

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AD DESIGN Appealing to the consumer

FileMaker Pro was not my favorite project since it was not a rebranding but simply creating a series of ads for the project that would closely follow the current campaign. What I did was attempt to follow the branding by using the same colour scheme, logos, slogans, box shot photos and typeface to maintain a continuity with the existing campaign. The Lucky Ducky bath soap was inspired by the classic rubber ducky bath toy. I thought a soap in different scents/colours would appeal to kids, especially a body wash that

could also be shampoo. I created a version of the duck and soap bottle, then used the Color Guide in Illustrator to reproduce the respective colours. On the following pages are ads I created for various classes. For the Burpee ad, I was assigned the brand and was asked to develop a product that could be added to the pre-existing campaign. The Garden In A Kit was an all-in-one solution I thought would appeal to would-be gardeners, or folks looking to save money with an all in one kit. Likewise, the kit would offer


seasonal, regional, and combination-oriented kits to insure success. The logo was not supposed to be a re-design, but I did create a variation for the project. Rather than the red flower and leaves above the type, I added the flower design mirrored below the type and added a flag effect, which I think is an improvement on the logo. The Scottish whisky advertisement was one in which we were given simply a slogan and were asked to design an ad for a product that matched the slogan. I did not access to professional, high resolution stock photography, so I did a vector illustration. An ad for a children’s bath soap, below. Ads on the right for Filemaker Pro. The following pages, an ad for Burpee Seed Co., and a fictitious whiskey. Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop.

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Grow your own peck of peppers to pickle

Are you a first time gardener and don’t know where to start, or a seasoned gardener looking for an easy all-in-one solution? Our new varieties of Burpee Garden in a Kit provide an all-in-one solution to newbie gardeners and seasoned gardeners alike, swith seasonal and regional combinations of our customers’ favorites in a variety of themes, just add water and light.

http://ww.burpee.com/

To Request a catalog: 1 (800) 888-1447 W. Atee, Burpee & Co. 300 Park Avenue Warminister, PA 18974


Tuesday 2 July 2013 KENNETH MCNEIL When the independence referendum was announced many of us were looking forward to a great debate. Unfortunately it hasn’t turned out that way. The differing approaches to the campaign have been striking. The Yes campaign has promoted a positive message for independence and a real vision of what an independent Scotland could achieve democratically, economically and socially. By contrast the Better Together campaign has deluged us with a stream of negativity much of which is simply scaremongering. At its heart the debate should be about democracy and governance. So many issues we care about and the policies that affect our everyday lives are decided by the parliaments and the governments we choose. Better Together would have us believe that as they represent the status quo only the independence side has to make a case for change. It is a false premise designed to deny the Scottish electorate the right to hear a positive argument from both sides. By definition an independence referendum is a judgment on the Union and Westminster governance. The democratic case for independence is a strong one. After 300 years of Union, Scotland is still demonstrably a different society. Politically we continue to demonstratethat difference by frequently voting contrarily to the rest of the UK. Devolution has served to underline that political difference. The Conservative and Liberal Democrat parties form the Government at UK level but can command only

Agenda:

Democratic case for independence

Illustration by Loraine Baird for the Scottish Herald

only 16% of Holyrood seats. Scotland has shown that we hold different views on many subjects including further education, the NHS, energy policy, public infrastructure funding, social welfare and nuclear weapons. The Union is our reality but it is not normality. There are 50 countries in Europe, all are independent except Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Wales. Independence will ensure we get the Parliament we vote for and the Government we vote for, 100% of the time. The Union ensures we have only 59 representatives at Westminster out of a total of 650. We are frequently subjected to governments we did not vote for. Since the Second World War, UK governments have been supported by Scottish votes only 45% of the time. Consider the nature of parliamentary democracy. Westminster’s first past the post electoral system allows parties to form governments with large majorities that are elected by little more than one-third of the votes. The Labour Government of 2005 gained a 66-seat majority with only 35.3% of the vote. It

throws up anomalies too. Despite achieving a larger percentage of the poll (36.1%) in 2010 the Conservatives fell short of a majority by 19 seats. The 2011 Holyrood elections by proportional representation (PR) required the SNP to gain 45.5% of the vote for a majority of nine seats. PR also gives voice to smaller parties who have little or no chance of being represented at Westminster. It took until 2010 for the Greens to gain their first Westminster seat. At Holyrood they have been represented in every Parliament since the Scottish Parliament was re-convened in 1999. At present, Scottish votes are diluted by 11 times as many from the rest of the UK. Beyond the simple arithmetic there also lies the wider constitutional question. An independent Scotland will replace the archaic, undemocratic Westminster system with its unelected upper house and Prime Ministerial patronage with fair and representative system guided by a written constitution. The democratic case for independence seems unanswerable. Until

Edinburgh 17.3°C

now Better Together has left it unanswered. The Unionists either have to provide democratic justification for Westminster rule or present a case for the Union so overwhelmingly advantageous to Scotland that Scottish voters would consider it worth the democratic deficit. Kenneth McNeil is a member of Business for Scotland, a co-operatively owned network for business people and professionals who believe Scotland will prosper as an independent country.

RELATED ARTICLES Ruling: Salmond didn’t break code of conduct by flying Saltire at Wimbledon, p15. This negative Unionist campaign isn’t working, p16. Greater control for islands if Scotland votes Yes in 2014, p20. OPINION LETTERS ARTS TELEVISION FAMILY CROSSWORD

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heraldscotland © Copyright 2013 Herald & Times Group All rights reserved

An editorial illustration and page layout for the Scottish Herald. Adobe InDesign and Illustratior


PACKAGE DESIGN ...that isn’t boring

A six pack carrier design for a pick-your-own-flavors at the grocery, similar to Jones soda.

I

am inspired by old product ads of the past that were meticulously illustrated, painted or airbrushed that often looked better than the photographed box shot. Sodas looked mouth-watering, wetter and colder, glass, plastic, chrome and metalic surfaces looked shinier, fruit and vegetables looked juicier, foods looked tastier, and people looked more attractive and happy in a hyper-realistic world. It is pastiche and parodic, but I love that and I attempt to imitate that when the occasion allows. By far, vector is the absolute perfect medium for hyper-realistic illustration.


M

y instructor initially did not like this design, and said it didn’t work because the bottles would never match up perspective-wise with the design on the box, and thought the logo had to be a single colour. She preferred the design below, with simply the enlarged “Burp” logo on the front/back with the waves of soda bubbles, similar to the sides of the box on the box shot. I explained my design rationale. Much like the serve-yourself beer carriers one sees in liquor stores where you can pick different beers, this would be a pick-your-own-flavors soda carrier to be offered in grocery stores that carried the single sodas. The three colours/flavors suggest the idea of picking different flavors, and the three colours simply make for a colourful, inticing advertisement. The bottom example looks generic, in my opinion, like so many of the soda drink carriers out there. The logo itself is distinctive and identifiable, regardless of what colours it is printed in. She did not accept my rationale but said, “If you can show me examples of where this has been done before I’ll accept it.” I showed several examples, including the Corona beer six-pack carrier I used as a template for my carrier, which had the product shots on the sides of the carrier. The instructor also didn’t like the logo being in different colours for the different flavors, thought the logo should be uniform in colour, and again I was asked to show examples of where it had been done before to distinguish similar items while maintaining the branding. I argued that aside from following design principles, just because it might not have been done before does not mean that it shouldn’t be done, and shouldn’t we attempt to be unique? My instructor accepted my choice in its final presentation.

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On the left, a closeup of the vector illustration on the final Burp Soda carrier. Right, the design the instructor initially prefered. Adobe Illustrator


BROCHURE DESIGN A music/charitable event

T

A brochure for a music event. Adobe Illustrator, InDesign

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he project was to create a brochure for a local music or cultural event, so I chose one of my favorite, but less wider known musical genres, Romany “Gypsy” music. The bands I chose present not only traditional Gypsy music from the Balkans and Europe and the variety, but also bands that incorporate Electronica/ dub with traditional tunes. The main focus was to bring some awareness to the plight of the Roma people world over, their unique nomadic culture, and some of the best musicians world-over. I chose the name “Latcho Drom”, a traditional Roma

greeting meaning “safe journey” displayed on an accordion and used the different folds for the list of bands. The “o” in Latcho is the Romani “chakra” or wheel shown on the Roma flag. The colours represent the colours of the Roma flag. The inside pages introduce the bands and give some information about the Roma, particularly the “Lautari”, the name given to itinerant Roma musician troupes. I picked the Ryman Auditorium for the acoustics.


TYPOGRAPHY DESIGN

Handcrafted typefaces

I have been fascinated with type since childhood, took up calligraphy as a child, have had an ink stain from a spilled bottle of ink in nearly every home I’ve lived in, and was the sign painter and “scribe” that hand-calligraphed and lettered the signs, murals and certificates in my high school, and I have even calligraphed in Arabic.


Alice Typeface is a script typeface I created inspired by the book Alice in Wonderland

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A

lice typeface came about from a school project where we chose a favorite book, designed a typeface and illustrated a book cover for it, and I chose a childhood favorite, Alice in Wonderland. I assumed the book would include the original, wonderful, John Tenniel illustrations, that I would be merely illustrating the cover, and my goal would be to attract new generations of viewers, so I wanted to keep the feel of Tenniel’s illustrations and the Victorian feel of Carroll’s story and interpreting it with an updated, more modern twist. A script font seemed to give a Victorian feel to it, but I wanted it to be more functional, legible, easy to kern and streamlined than the usual decorative script fonts and so the typeface follows more or less the standard proportions of italicized serif and sans serif typefaces. If I were to further develop this, I would include alternate glyphs with flourishes and ligatures.

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As for my cover illustration, I wanted to keep the Victorian feel and compliment Tenniel’s illustrations rather than compete with them, so I gave Alice a somewhat hyperrealistic look, included depth, texture and pattern and an aged look to draw the viewer in. I used Tenniel’s Alice as the portrait above the table, and attempted to imitate a painted portrait. I would have enjoyed illustrating and reinterpreting the entire book, but I do think it would be difficult to compete with Tenniel’s illustrations etched in my memory. The mock up on the left is what I envision it would look like on a hardbound book.

Typeface thumbnails for Contemporary Typography class.


A closeup of the Alice in Wonderland bookcover previous page, 2012. Adobe Illustrator


Paragon Slab, Gravel Headline, and Klezmer Space Funk, 2012. Adobe Illustrator


Quiche typeface 2009. Inkscape


M

y first vector typeface was my Quiche ornamental typeface, created in Inkscape and inspired by the decorative showcard typefaces found in George Bruce’s Son & Co. New York Type Foundry specimens book from 1869, and old typeface specimens in general. Since then I have been creating my own typefaces, strictly loose SVG glyphs since I cannot seem to get a version of Font Forge to work to publish them, aside from the steep learning curve, and proprietary font creation software is far too expensive, but technically speaking, they are working typefaces. With all due respect, I disagree with some of the midcentury designers who believe using more than a handful of typefaces is way too many, perhaps with the exception of body type, and I do believe that aside from legibility, each typeface has a unique personality or a voice, just as each client is unique. I do think you can have the wrong combination, for example two similar typefaces of the same type- for example two slab serifs like Clarendon and Rockwell, or two sans serifs like Futura and Helvetica, one for the headline, one for the body text, which would be too similar, but enough of a difference to look like a mistake or an annoyance. I think good combinations of headlines and

Originally created in 2009, and reworked in 2011. Inkscape, Adobe Illustrator

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body text would be a serif and sans serif combination, or the same family in different weights, widths, and or italics. Instead of dummy text for filler where I couldn’t come up with something interesting to say here, I prefer here to use some of my writing from college. The English language is replete with lexical ambiguities, and the reason is because English is made up of many non-English words that have different etymologies. These ambiguities often go undetected without the knowledge of homonyms. A homonym is a word involving two or more different words that are spelled and or pronounced the same but have different meanings (Moore). An example of a homonym would be the word ‘bark’, which could refer to the sound a dog barks, or the outer skin of a tree, or ‘coarse’, or ‘course’, the first meaning the rough texture of something and the second refers to either a path to follow or a lesson plan. There are different types of homonyms. Moore, Andrew. Semantics- Meanings, Etymology and the Lexicon. n.d. 6 October 2011 http://www.teachit.co.uk/ armoore/lang/semantics.htm#15


WEB DESIGN Interactive Portfolio

Only the very basics of Web Design were covered in my degree program, and it isn’t one of my strengths, but I kept experimenting and developed a student portfolio page that gives me experience to build upon


Web Animation One of the few web animations I have done in Adobe Flash was an intro to my web portfolio page. Since I used a soda inspired motif on my web page, a purple version of one of my Burp soda bottles was used, including the soda bubbles I had created. The soda bubbles rise, and the home button drops to reveal the definition of “hypurpley” a play on the word hyperbole. The home button opens to the home page and the replay replays the animation. View it online here: http://supervectorgir.aisites.com/Quiche_ index.html

W

eb Design is not one of my strengths, but I do think I have enough of a barebones foundation and have enough techno-saavy and a love of tinkering and experimenting to build upon those skills. I have minimal experience with Flash animation, shown above, and equally minimal experience with web scripting. Part of the problem with my minimal web scripting experience is the time which I took the course, which was August 2013. Adobe CC had only been out a few months and there were technical issues with the cloud, aside from the cirriculum still largely written for CS5, and many of us were having to upgrade from CS5 to CS6 or CC, and the school only offered/recommended CS6. Many students hadf to roll back from Aside from that, Adobe had all but phased out javascript actions and widgets, and no longer provided updates. The class was based on HTML4 and did not cover newer innovations of HTML5. Taking a class in the midst of a software upgrade/new release is never a good thing. Upgrading to CS6, I have had the same experiencein no time at all, the Adobe Exchange and widgets browser stopped working in CS6,

Left: A screenshot of my homepage. Above: An example of a jQuery slide show gallery featured on my portfolio website Dreamweaver, jQuery

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no doubt because the Exchange is now CC and therefore incompatible with CS6. It makes no sense to me why within two years Adobe came out with CS6 and CC and the CS6 version is now practically obsolete as far as updates or bug fixes. I have an issue with outrageously overpriced proprietary software, “OOPS”.


BRANDING The LAB brand of branding

B

randing- we all understand it, and recognize a good or clever branding strategy when we see one certainly, but no doubt adeptness at branding increases along with experience. I hope to continue my learning and gain experience on the job. The following pages, and throughout this publication, are examples from school. The examples on this page and the following was for a fictitious local indie recording company, loosely modelled on Lost Highway Records. The campaign included a magazine ad, brochure, newspaper ad,

promotional piece (above), and a webpage design mock up. Lost Highway Records is named after the Hank Williams song “Lost Highway�. The label was started by Luke Lewis in 2000, and is now part of Universal Music Group, Nashville. (Ruehl) The artists they produce are 10th Anniversary, Ryan Adams, Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses, Hayes Carll, Johnny Cash, Elvis Costello, Johnny Flynn, Donavon Frankenreiter, Mary Gauthier, Golden Smog, Tom Jones, Robert Earl Keen, Black Joe Lewis, Lyle Lovett, Shelby Lynne,


Van Morrison, Morrissey, Willie Nelson, O Brother Where Art Thou, Fionn Regan, Timothy B. Schmit, The Jayhawks, Whiskey Town, Hank Williams and Lucinda Williams. (Lost Highway Records) I think the list of artists speaks impressively for their accomplishments as a company, as well as quite a variety in terms of genres, 80 albums, 53 Grammy nominations and 15 wins (Roughstock). Lost Highway Records is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group Nashville, and Universal Music Publishing Group. Lost Highway Records and Universal Music Group are record labels, and Universal Music Publishing Group is the songwriting end of the business. Aside from the variety of Americana, Western, Folk, Alternative and Country genres, and award winning artists, I wanted Hillbilly Hula Gal to hold similar ideals to that of Lost Highway Records, that of preserving Nashville’s music, musical heritage and traditions, and independent artists. The Hillbilly Hula Gal logo is based on the name of a Junior Brown song of the same name, twang, a mixture of Western, retro and tiki culture, the “mudflap girly”, and the character mentioned in Junior Brown’s song, aside from a cartoon-like character loosely based on myself. The following pages are more examples of branding projects.

Lost Highway Records. Lost Highway Records. 27 May 2011. 29 May 2011 http://www.losthighwayrecords.com/. Ruehl, Kim. Lost Highway Records, About.com. Unknown. 29 May 2011 http://folkmusic.about.com/od/folklabels/p/ LostHighwayRecords.htm. Staff, Roughstock. Roughstock. 18 January 2011. 29 May 2011 http://www.roughstock.com/blog/lost-highwayrecords-celebrates-10-years-with-special-concert-sxsw. Universal Music Nashville. Universal Music Nashville. 2011. 29 May 2011 http://www.umgnashville.com/. Universal Music Publishing Group Nashville. Universal Publishing Group Nashville. 2011. 29 May 2011 http:// www.umpgnashville.com/dsp_about.asp.

Dandipsam saessin cusdaeped molesse quatibu sdantia errovid quam estet utem.

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Examples from a corporate branding manual for a local restaurant.


Logo designs for various school projects.


Redhead Matches 2013. Adobe Illustrator


ILLUSTRATION A picture of how it is done

I

llustration is my strength. I have been drawing since I could hold a pencil. As for traditional mediums, I prefer graphite, coloured pencil, ink, acrylic and mixed media. Back in 2007 I began using developer pre-releases of Open Source Inkscape SVG editor, along with a Wacom tablet, and quickly became obsessed with vector graphics. It was my experience with Inkscape that helped me to quickly advance in learning Adobe Illustrator, and am an advanced user of both. Before using a Wacom tablet I didn’t create anything substantial on the computer, but the use of a Wacom tablet and pen give me more control and a more natural drawing

experience. Now I cannot imagine using simply a mouse. I also tinker with raster image editing programs, particularly those that mimic natural drawing and painting mediums and frequently used those programs for thumbnailing. What I particularly appreciate about vector is the perfect resolution of vector, objectoriented drawing, the versatility of mixing raster elements in a vector, aside from being able to draw in different styles or mimic other mediums, the precise angles and curves, and the ability to create hyperrealistic images. The above example is a vector drawing of


a brushed stainless steel teapot I did for a class. It looked like a photograph, so for the assignment I included an example of the outlines. The examples on these pages represent work ranging from prior to school, both personal projects as well as school assignments. I do think my skill in drawing is a strength as well as an asset, and has certainly helped my transition from a fine artist to a graphic designer, and opened up the world of digital art to me. In the next section, I show some of my thumbnailing from school projects, which is certainly part and parcel of illustration. I had some instructors who insisted my thumbnails were much too detailed, while others said my thumbnails were suitable for showing a client as roughs. I sketch fast, but I prefer to put in the extra detail to save me time and eliminate guesswork when I go to work on rough drafts.

Below: Coffee Wave, inspired by Hokusai’s Great Wave and coffee, one of my earlier vectors. The print has sold 32 times on DeviantART. Last page: A vector teapot. Inkscape, Adobe Illustrator

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Life drawing, graphite, top and middle, vector top right and bottom right, and middle, conte. Inkscape Adobe Illustrator


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Vectors over the years. Top two and coffee mug done in Inkscape, soup done in Adobe Illustrator. Inkscape Adobe Illustrator


THUMBNAILS The visual process of creativity

The process of creativity doesn’t always begin with a fabulously great idea, it could begin with preconceived notions, been done before and unoriginal idea, but pushing it further, once you get past the “box,” and begin thinking outside the box, is when the real magic happens.


Page to the left: Thumbnails for my spot illustrations on pg 7. Left: Thumbnails for my Burpee Garden-ina-Kit project, pgs 11, 30

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M

y process first begins with research and fact finding. I collect written information, images, typefaces and colour swatches, and when I am satisfied with that I go on to thumbnailing. With thumbnailing, I am exploring layout, image, indicating typeface and image placement options, and even though these are black and white, I envision colour schemes and often write notes indicating those. Given design is an evolutionary and exploratory process, the better, more cohesive ideas are most often the later ones. The further I proceed in thumbnailing, I am attempting to create several unique innovative ideas, not merely variations of the last thumbnail. If I were to forgo the thumbnailing process, and just go with my initial idea, I will be wasting time unproductively on an incomplete, not very well thought out idea. Designing “onthe-fly” digitally rather than hand-drawn thumbnails first, the digital software ends up being a hindrance and can restrict my creative process. The reason why not to simply go with one’s initial idea is that just like any first impression, it is biased, based on incomplete, partial, superficial knowledge

“Twang No 5” and the thumbnails above are from my Hillbilly Hula Gal campaign, pgs 27, 28, 30.

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and understanding, often misconceived at that, and the only reason it seems to stick in one’s mind is only because it is a first impression. The following pages are more examples of my thumbnails for various school projects.


Thank you for viewing!


Loraine A. Baird 615-636-0025 quicheloraine@gmail.com

Loraine A. Baird Graphic Design Portfolio  

Graduate graphic design portfolio

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