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Care tips for green friends


Intro Taking care of plants requires knowledge, knowing the name of the plant is a good start. That’s why I made sure to title all the plants in the room, so ID will not be an issue here. Next step towards lushious foliage is knowing where the plant comes from and what is its natural habitat like. A lot of popular house plants come from tropical environments and although their cultivation made them more accustomed to home environment, it’s important to adjust your care routine and make sure it suits your plants. In this guidebook you will find key aspects of care for each one of the listed plants. The information about the plants is sourced from different websites and blogs, which will all be listed in the sources section. The aim is to create a through guide that covers most vital and verified care requirements, so the information will be constantly updating to ensure relevance and accuracy. This is an on going project, so the guide will keep constantly growing, expect more plants, special sections, tips, and many more plant related content!


Alocasia Zebrina Origin The plant is an evergreen member of the wide-ranging and diverse Alocasia genus. It originated in warm, humid Philippine rainforests, living at a high and welldrained elevation in bright shade as part of the forest undergrowth.

Light

Water

This plant needs a lot of sunlight. Southfacing window witll be best for it. Don’t put it right next to the window though, this will burn its leaves. If your plant gets slightly yellow leaves, the sun was too much for the plant. If you don’t have a room with a south-facing window, that’s no problem! You can also place it next to the window in a west or east facing window. These rooms won’t get as much sun, but by placing the plant right next to the window, it’ll still be enough throughout the day.

This plant needs a humid environment because it’s a tropical plant. If it gets too dry, it’ll be vulnerable to diseases. Misting it ocassionally will do the trick, make sure you do this at least once per week. The fact that this plant likes a humid climate doesn’t mean it likes to be watered a lot. In fact, it’s better to underwater this plant. Its thick stems contain a lot of moisture, so it won’t need to be watered a lot. When it’s in dire need of some water, it will let you know. The stems and leaves will start to hang down when they don’t get enough water.

Food Food Feed every two weeks while actively growing with a ½-dilution of a balanced formula. Flush the soil every few months to prevent salt build-up.

Toxicity

Toxic if ingested by humans or animals. Sap can also cause skin irritation.


Aloe Vera Origin Aloe vera is a succulent plant species of the genus Aloe. An evergreen perennial, it originates from the Arabian Peninsula, but grows wild in tropical, semi-tropical, and arid climates around the world.It is cultivated for agricultural and medicinal uses.The species is also used for decorative purposes and grows successfully indoors as a potted plant.

Light

Water

In the garden, you want your Aloe vera to get 2 or 3 hours of sun a day. As a general rule, along the coast it can take more sun than hot inland areas. It’s best protected from the hot afternoon sun. Indoors, it needs as much light as possible, like a south of west exposure. This is not a low light plant & if it’s not getting the light it needs, the leaves will droop downwards. Just be sure to keep it away from hot glass (like a west exposure) because it’ll burn. It can be near that window but not in it.

No matter where you have it growing, you want your Aloe vera to almost completely dry out before watering it again. Water it thoroughly & make sure all that water drains out – you don’t want it to be sitting in any water. In the summer I water mine every 7-14 days, depending on the weather. Indoors, once a month should do it. In the winter, it might need it even less, maybe once every 2 months. Remember, those fleshy leaves & roots are full of water & they can easily rot out.

Food

Toxicity

Like the majority of succulents, none is really necessary. I top dress mine with a 1″ layer of worm castings every spring. You can do the same indoors or use a balanced liquid houseplant food once in the spring. Either way, don’t over fertilize & never feed in the colder, darker months. Shhhh, the plant is resting!

Toxic for cats, dogs, horses. The gel is not harmful when used topically but has the potential to be toxic when ingested.


Begonia Maculata Origin The beautiful Begonia Maculata belongs to the long line of Begonia species. It was first discovered in Brazil in 1982 by an Italian researcher.However, it is originally native to Mexico, Asia, South Africa and Central America. It grows best in moist subtropical and tropical climates, but indoor species do well in cooler environment

Light

Water

Your Begonia Maculata will do the best bright indirect light. It will tolerate medium light but watch to make sure your plant does not become leggy and stretch for the sun. However, do not place in full sun, as the leaves can burn and dry out.

Water your Begonia thoroughly when the top 2-3 inches of soil are dry until water comes out of the drainage hole in the bottom of the pot. Make sure to empty excess water from the saucer after watering, as Begonias are prone to root rot if left to sit in water. Best to err on the side of drying the pot down just a bit.

Food

Toxicity

Feed your Begonia once a month during spring and summer with a general houseplant fertilizer diluted to half the recommended strength.

Your Begonia is considered toxic and not pet-friendly


Begonia Tamaya Origin Begonia maculata comes originally from South America. Begonia maculata ‘Tamaya’ is a cultivar that has been bred selectively for its distinctive appearance. It produces bat-wing shaped leaves at the end of bald, cane-like stems. The leaves can be up to 25 centimetres long, taper to a point and are covered in white spots.

Light

Water

For an indoor Begonia Tamaya, Avoid situations that would scorch the plant, such as South-facing windows. Select a very luminous spot that isn’t too close to a heating vent. For an outdoor Begonia Tamaya it can only survive outdoors in tropical or subtropical climates because it is vulnerable to the cold in winter. It must have temperatures of at least 60°F (15°C) all year round. Avoid spots with too much direct sun. Favor part sun when outside.

Tamaya must be watered when the surface of the soil is dry. One to 2 watering sessions a week are usually enough to answer its water needs.

Food

Toxicity

Provide flower plant fertilizer on a regular basis to your Tamaya. The interval for this is about once a month from April to September. Almost any type of fertilizer will do, as long as it is balanced. This means it contains equal amounts of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus (the N, K and P symbols). Don’t over-fertilize your begonia, reduce doses written on the packaging by half.

Begonia species are toxic to dogs and cats, the most toxic part being the roots but eating the leaves and/or stems may cause major issues as well.


Calathea Medalion Origin Calathea is a genus of neotropical rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plants; members of which are referred to generally as Calatheas. Calathea leaves are used in the tropics (mostly Brazil) for handicraft and food wrapping. Because of the diversity of the leaf shapes, baskets are weaved with the lanceolate leaves, and food is wrapped with the wider leaves.

Light

Water

Your Calathea Medallion will do best in medium to bright indirect light. Never allow this plant to stand in the direct sunlight—the leaves will get sunburned!

For best results, maintain a regular watering schedule and keep your Calathea Medallion moist, but not wet or saturated. This is not a drought tolerant indoor plant, but it is relatively forgiving if you forget to water it from time to time. Extended periods of dryness can result in brown leaf tips or edges.

Food

Toxicity

For best results, use a general houseplant fertilizer with iron every four weeks during the spring and summer. No fertilizer is necessary for the winter when plant growth naturally slows.

Calatheas are non-poisonous plants and are safe for humans, cats, and dogs.


Calathea Triostar Origin The plant comes from from the jungles of the Amazon in South America, where it lives in the shade beneath dense vegetation. Your Calathea will be happy in a shady spot or in a nice damp bathroom. Somewhere where it isn’t drenched in sunlight.

Light

Water

Position in bright, indirect light as direct light can fade this plant’s beautiful colouring. Plenty of indirect sunlight will encourage greater variegation on the leaves. Direct sun will burn the leaves. Protect it from cold draughts. keep at a normal room temperature, avoid placing anywhere near a radiator. Do not let the temperature drop below 15°C during the winter months.

Aim to always keep the soil slightly damp. Allow the top of the soil to dry out before watering again. In the winter months do not allow the plant to fully dry out but do reduce the frequency of watering. Mist weekly and if planted in a pot without drainage holes, mist more frequently.

Food

Toxicity

Apply a weak dose of a nitrogen rich foliage fertiliser once or twice a month during the growing season.

This plant is non-toxic to cats and dogs.


Dracena Deremensis Origin The name dracaena is derived from the romanized form of the Ancient Greek drakaina, “female dragon”. The majority of the species are native to Africa, southern Asia through to northern Australia, with two species in tropical Central America.

Light

Water

Low light is fine, but they like it a little brighter. New leaves will narrow if there isn’t enough light.

Keep evenly moist, although if you have to err, do so on the dry side. (But keeping it too dry will result in brown leaf tips.) Use non-fluoridated water as they are sensitive to fluoride.

Food

Toxicity

During growing, fertilize with slowrelease fertilizer or use a 20-20-20 liquid fertilizer at half-strength every month.

Toxic to cats and dogs, if eaten. Cats may have dilated pupils, and both cats and dogs can present symptoms such as vomiting, excess saliva and lack of appetite. As a pet owner, it’s important to select your houseplants with care and doing so means being educated about plants that are poisonous to our furry friends.


Ficus Elastica Origin Ficus Elastica was used in the earlier days to produce latex, which in turn is used to fabricate rubber. Nowadays the Elastica is only used as an ornamental plant, as more efficient means of producing rubber now exist. The species of Ficus you can find in homes and offices primarily originate from South-East Asia.

Light

Water

The Rubber Tree is a medium to a high light houseplant. Mine is in my office in an east/south exposure where a trio of windows gives it a good amount of bright natural light all day. Don’t let it get too much direct, hot sun or it could burn. Don’t even try this plant in low light – it’ll be a no go.

In the summer I water mine thoroughly even 7 days. In the winter it’s every 10-14 days because the sun can be out every day here in the Sonoran Desert. You’ll have to adjust the watering frequency according to your growing conditions. Houseplant watering 101 will shed some light on factors to consider. You basically want a happy medium with this plant – not bone dry but not soggy wet.

Food

Toxicity

I use worm compost & compost to feed all my houseplants in early spring. Worm compost is my favorite amendment & am currently using Worm Gold Plus. You want to apply these sparingly indoors; easy does it.If combos aren’t your thing, you might prefer a balanced liquid organic fertilizer. You can use this 1 outdoors too so when it comes to your houseplants, dilute it to half strength. Use this in spring & maybe again in late summer but don’t overdo it because too much fertilizer causes burn.

The Rubber Plant emits a white sap when pruned or broken. It’s irritating to their innards & skin so keep your cats & dogs away from this 1 if you foresee a problem.


Marantha Fascinator Origin Maranta leuconeura is an evergreen, low ground tropical plant famous for its distinctly beautiful and decorative 6-inch long leaves. The colorful marks on the leaves become more vivid as the plant matures. The plant has been noted to have small, white and non-fragrant flowers during the spring, but this usually does not occur indoors, rather only in rainforests where it originates.

Light

Water

Prayer plant requires medium to high light. When there isn’t enough light, the leaves won’t open entirely during the day, and if the light is too strong, it will fade the leaves and in some cases could kill the plant. So, make sure it is always under bright but indirect sunlight. You could also use a sheer curtain or something similar to protect it from the sun. Light shade is best for summer, and a bit brighter light is best in winter, yet it should still be indirect. If you have no other option, this plant could also grow under fluorescent light.

Prayer plants need to be watered generously, especially in spring and summer. The soil, however, should not be soggy. It requires slightly less water in fall and winter, so in these months, water it after the surface of the soil is a bit dry, but never let the soil completely dry out. These plants are sensitive to fluoride, so don’t use hard water. The water for these plants should be warm, or at least at room temperature. Yellowpigmented, spotted, and curled leaves usually indicate under-watering, while limp stems are usually a sign of overwatering, which is most common in winter.

Food This plant doesn’t need much fertilizer; twice per year could be enough. But if you want to boost its growth, feed it with light, half-diluted liquid fertilizer once every two weeks through the growing season. Reduce fertilization in the winter.

Toxicity Non-toxic


Monstera Deliciosa Origin A species of flowering plant native to southern Mexico and Panama, Monstera deliciosa is a hardy and easy to care for plant known by many names, but most commonly the “Swiss cheese plant” due the unique development of ridges and holes on its more mature leaves. The “deliciosa” part of the plant’s name comes from the pineapple-like fruit it bears in its natural habitat!

Light

Water

Place your Monstera where it can receive medium to bright indirect light. While it is tolerant of lower light conditions, you may notice leggy growth as a result, so a spot where it will receive bright indirect light a few feet removed from a southern, western, or eastern facing window is ideal.

When its soil becomes dry to a depth of 1-2”, water your monstera directly into the pot so not to moisten foliage and just enough to keep the soil from completely drying out. Your Monstera is somewhat drought tolerant, so you don’t need to worry about keeping up with the watering all the time. Don’t allow the pot to stand in water, as this will cause root rot. This plant will thrive in almost any environment, but if you want to give it a special treat, gently mist it once a week. It’s best to mist your Monstera in the morning so the water has plenty of time to evaporate before evening.

Food

Toxicity

Large leaves can collect dust. If you notice the leaves are dirty or dusty, wipe the leaves with a damp cloth and gently dry to keep them clean and healthy.

Monstera leaves are mildly toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.


Monstera Adansonii Origin The Swiss cheese plant, Monstera adansonii, gets its name from its large, heart-shaped leaves, which as it ages, become covered with holes that resemble Swiss cheese. The houseplant, which is part of the Araceae family that’s native to South and Central America, is easy to grow and loves to climb.

Light

Water

Monster adansonii are native to the jungles of Central and South America, so they grow in the wild under the coverage of trees. Therefore, the plants grow best in indirect sunlight. If it’s in a spot with direct light, limit it to just 2 to 3 hours of morning sun.

This plant grows best in peat-based potting soil that has a large drainage hole. The peat helps to trap moisture in the soil without allowing it to become waterlogged. If the soil is nearly dry, water it. Don’t let the soil dry out entirely. M. adansonii is best grown in a conservatory or greenhouse where humidity, temperature, and light are all maximized. These are deep-jungle plants that thrive on very high humidity, lots of moisture during the rainy season, and high temps.

Food

Toxicity

Once you’ve potted or repotted the plant, don’t fertilize within four to six months if you’re using a general houseplant potting soil. These soils have slowrelease fertilizer already mixed in. From there, fertilize when you water during the summer and spring months, then refrain from feeding during the fall and winter months.

M. Adansonii is moderately toxic to cats and dogs because of its insoluble calcium oxalates. It can cause swelling, vomiting, or burning in pets.


Musa Banana Origin Often Dwarf Banana plants are found growing in parts of Asia for mass cultivation and they are sometimes grown as tall specimen plants in gardens at the back of borders to add a touch of the tropics. However as they need significant Winter protection it’s relatively uncommon for them to be grown very big by the average gardener.

Light

Water

The Common Banana must have good light, but will actually accept a range of light conditions from part shade to full sun. Young plants and new leaves may scorch in full Summer sun especially if your watering routine is stingy.

A well established Banana plant will need copious watering during the warmest months of the year and a good deal more than most house plants during Spring and Autumn / Fall. Water when the top 4cm / 2 inches of compost is dry. In a very bright, warm spot you could be doing this as much as every other day in Summer. Significantly cut back in Winter though otherwise you will be inviting rot to take over. Low humidity is often a contributing factor to leaf damage so moisture retentive pellets in the drip tray would be helpful, along with a regular misting.

Food

Toxicity

This plant has large leaves which form very rapidly during the growing season, , therefore feeding on a frequent basis is a must to fuel that level of growth. Feed well every 2 or 3 weeks using either a general liquid garden fertiliser such as Miracle Grow or if you make your own, that should be fine to use also. You can of course use a feed designed for house plants too. Do not fertilise when the plant isn’t growing or if you don’t want to support any new growth, for example if it’s already overgrown and further height is undesired.

The banana plant has a lot of great qualities and one of them is that it’s non-toxic to common pets such as cats and dogs and does not harm people if eaten. However the leaves are easily ripped and damaged so try to discourage playful pets or children from interacting with them.


Neon Pothos Origin Pothos, (Epipremnum aureum), also called golden pothos, money plant, or devil’s ivy, hardy indoor foliage plant of the arum family (Araceae) native to southeastern Asia. It resembles, and thus is often confused with, the common philodendron.

Light

Water

Neon Pothos is able to adapt to lower light but thrives in bright, indirect light year-round. Harsh, direct sunlight will scorch the leaves, while too little light will cause the leaves to become a pale green and smaller in size.

Water your Pothos enough to keep the soil moist, but not wet or saturated. It’s best to water when the top inch of the soil is dry. Don’t worry if you forget—it will occasionally tolerate a missed watering! Look out for drooping yellow leaves, they are a symptom of too much water.

Food

Toxicity

Feed monthly in the spring through fall with a general-purpose indoor plant fertilizer. Before applying any fertilizer in any form make sure the soil is damp prior to application.

Pothos is mildly toxic to pets and humans. Typically, ingestion will cause mouth and stomach irritation and possible vomiting.


Philodendron Brasil Origin Philodendrons are vines that clamber in trees in their native tropical habitat, thus the common name, which translates as “tree-lover.” Philodendron Brasil is a hybrid that looks a bit like a cross between heart-leaf philodendron and pothos. Its leaves have a variable broad central band of chartreuse.

Light

Water

Set the Philodendron in a location with bright, indirect sunlight. Find a position near a window where the sun’s rays never actually touch the foliage. While it’s normal for older leaves to yellow, if this happens to several leaves at the same time, the plant may be getting too much light. On the other hand, if the stems are long and leggy with several inches between leaves, the plant probably isn’t getting enough light

When growing philodendron plants, allow the top inch of soil to dry out between waterings. The length of your index finger to the first knuckle is about an inch, so inserting your finger into the soil is a good way to check the moisture level. Droopy leaves can mean that the plant is getting too much or not enough water. But the leaves recover quickly when you correct the watering schedule.

Food

Toxicity

Feed philodendron houseplants with a balanced liquid foliage houseplant fertilizer that contains macro-nutrients. Water the plant with the fertilizer monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter. Slow growth and small leaf size is the plant’s way of telling you that it isn’t getting enough fertilizer. Pale new leaves usually indicate that the plant isn’t getting enough calcium and magnesium, which are essential micro-nutrients for philodendrons.

A multitude of Philodendron species exist. These plants contains insoluble calcium oxalate crystals similar to other plants in the Araceae family. Chewing or biting into this plant will release these crystals causing tissue penetration and irritation the mouth and GI tract. VERY rarely, swelling of the upper airway occurs making it difficult to breathe. See Oxalates (Insoluble) for more information.


Pilea Peperomiodes Origin Pilea Peperomioides is native only to China. In 1946 a Norwegian missionary named Agnar Espegren brought the plant to Europe, giving it another one of its nicknames – the “missionary plant”. Because of how easy the plant is to propagate (giving off pups by itself) it spread around Norway by amateur gardeners without scientists knowing.

Light

Water

Your Pilea will do best in a bright, indirect sunny spot in your home. Even though this plant is part of the succulent family, do not place your Pilea in direct sunlight since it will scorch the leaves. In order to prevent your Pilea from growing lopsided, rotate it at least 2-3 times a week since it grows towards the sun. This plant can adapt to lower light areas, but the leaves will turn a darker green and the plant will spread out more.

Allow the soil to dry between waterings, as Pilea do not like soggy soil. Watch the leaves—when they start looking a tad droopy, it’s time to water your plant. In warmer weather, they need to be watered more frequently. This plant does not require any extra humidity and does well in a drier environment.

Food

Toxicity

For best results, use a general liquid houseplant fertilizer at half the recommended strength twice during the spring and summer.

Pilea are generally non-toxic for humans and pets. However, when ingested in very large quantities, they can cause a mild digestive reaction.


Scindapsus Pictus Origin Scindapsus Pictus Argyraeu, also known as Satin Pothos, is part of the Aracae family and falls under Scindapsus genus together with other two varieties: Silvery Anne and Exotica. Despite many common names it is not a Pothos nor a Philodendron however it is also a very hardy plant. One of the most sought after characteristics of Scindapsus Pictus Argyraeu is it’s foliage- matte green with silver splashes.

Light

Water

Silver pothos prefers bright indirect light, all year round. Full direct sun damages the leaves of the plant and results in the loss of variegation. When growing indoors, make sure not to place the plant near a window, where the plant may receive direct sunlight. Place it in a spot where the lush silk pothos easily gets low light.

Be careful when watering Scindapsus Pictus as the silver vine may wilt easily if given too much water. Check the soil to assess the quantity of water the plant needs. Water it when the soil is slightly dry at the top, but moderately wet around the bottom. Make sure the soil isn’t bone dry or the plant may start to wither away. The plant is tolerant of underwatering to some extent but less tolerant of overwatering.

Food

Toxicity

When fertilizing the plant, use wellbalanced, water-soluble fertilizer and apply it once a month during the growing season.

Scindapsus pictus is toxic to pets including dogs and cats and causes health concerns such as mouth pain, vomiting, appetite loss, and eating difficulties. If ingested by humans, it may cause skin irritation.


Snake Plant Origin The Snake plant is a herbaceous, evergreen, mildly toxic flowering plant that is native to Africa and Asia. People mostly use it as an ornamental plant. It thrives well in small pots. This is because in a small space, its rhizomes are crowded and this enables it to grow faster. It is well known for its capacity to purify the air by converting harmful substances into harmless ones.

Light

Water

Even though Sansevierias prefer medium light (which is about 10′ away from the west or south window), they’ll also tolerate low light and high light. How versatile they are!Note: In lower light conditions, the darker leafed species and varieties ( like S. trifasciata & Sansevieria hanhnii jade) do better. Snake Plants with brighter variegations will become less intense and patterned.Just be sure to keep them out of the direct, hot sun because they’ll burn in a heartbeat.

Easy does it with the watering. You want to be careful not to overdo it because your plant will rot out. Always make sure the soil is almost completely dry before thoroughly watering again.Water your Snake Plants every 2-8 weeks. The watering schedule will vary for you depending on your home environment, type of soil mix, and pot size. You can read my guide to watering indoor plants to get a better idea.

Food

Toxicity

I give most of my houseplants a light application of worm compost with a light layer of compost over that every spring. Easy does it – 1/4 ” layer of each for a 6″ size houseplant. Read about my worm compost/compost feeding right here. If you prefer fertilizing, then an organic allpurpose houseplant food would be fine. Just be sure to fertilize in the spring and/or summer, twice at the most.

Snake Plants are mildly toxic to cats and dogs. I consult the ASPCA website for my info on this subject and see in what way the plant is toxic.


Spatiphyllum Origin Peace lily (officially called Spathiphyllum) is a member of the Araceae (Arum) family and grows in the tropical rainforests of Colombia and Venezuela. The plant was introduced into Europe in 1870. Over 50 different cultivars are known, which virtually all have white bracts with the occasional slight green tinge. The name Spathiphyllum is derived from the Greek: ‘spath’ is a spoon, ‘phyl’ means leaves - a reference to the spoon-shaped leaf.

Light

Water

Peace lilies are shade-loving plants in their native habitats, but when grown indoors they need plenty of filtered light, though not direct sunlight. Some varieties can withstand more light than others. Curled, pale leaves generally indicate that the plant is receiving too much light and scorched leaves indicate too much direct sun. In either case, the plant should be moved to a shadier location.

During the summer, water and mist peace lilies frequently because they thrive with higher humidity, such as that found in the rainforest. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out. If your water is highly chlorinated, use filtered water.

Food

Toxicity

Feed weekly in the summer or use slowrelease pellets at the beginning of the season. Do not fertilize in the winter.

Protect your children and pets from the peace lily. Though they’re not true lilies and are not lethal, they can irritate the stomach or cause extreme salivating if ingested. Like other members of the Araceae family, these plants contain insoluble calcium oxalate crystals, which can interfere with blood calcium levels and lead to renal failure. Cats and dogs that ingest peace lily leaves will begin to salivate profusely due to mouth irritation.


Philodendron Hastatum Origin Philodendron hastatum is commonly known by the name silver sword Philodendron after its shiny, silvery leaf appearance. This species likes to climb, it can reach up to 3m in height given the correct growing conditions. Mature plants can produce green-white flowers arranged in spathe structures. Originating from South-eastern Brazil, this tropical plant is a commonly grown houseplant in many areas, including the UK.

Light

Water

Like most philodendrons, the Hastatum enjoys bright, indirect sunlight. In your home, this could be a place close to a window, but not directly in front of, as this can lead to the foliage burning. The plant is generally easy to grow and has glossy leaves which will usually tolerate lower light conditions (though this is not ideal).

Like other aroid plants, Philodendron Hastatums enjoy well-draining soil. Silver Sword likes to be moist but doesn’t want to have its roots too wet as this can lead to root rot.. As such, make sure the top inch of the soil is dry before re-watering the plant. Humidity requirements are average. The Hastatum can also be grown in 100% spagnum moss

Food

Toxicity

Philodendrons are pretty easy to care for plants, as long as they’re watered the correct amount and fertilised around once a month during the growing season (spring and summer). Though not susceptible to house pests, aphids and mealybugs can cause problems.

All philodendrons are toxic to animals and so should be kept out of reach of pets and children.


Oxalis Triangularis Origin The false shamrock native to Brazil has picked up it’s common name from the Irish shamrock symbol which refers to a triangular three leaved plant or the clover. These are often sold and bought as gift pot plants, especially just before St Patrick’s day.

Light

Water

A good shaded spot within the home from direct sunlight is ideal. Sat back from a window in a bright room is suitable, but if the room is more north facing, place much closer to the window.

One of the worst things you can do with bulbs is over-water, which rots the bulb. Allowing the soil to begin to dry at the top is a good measurement of when to water again. Remember to stop watering if the plant becomes dormant. Average room humidity is fine.

Food

Toxicity

A diluted liquid fertilizer is helpful to use during the growing period. Feed once every 1 or 2 weeks. No feeding is required during dormancy.

Oxalis is classified as an edible plant, however it’s very bitter for humans. Oxalis is poisonous to pets if eaten. Watch out for kitties that chew on the leaves.


Tradescantia Zebrina Origin A native to Southern Mexico and Guatemala, the Tradescantia Zebrina (commonly known as the Wandering Jew Plant) is an easy and fast-growing plant that is loved for its boldly colored leaves and vining growth.

Light Your Tradescantia Zebrina requires bright, indirect light. If the light is too dim, the leaf stripings will fade.

Food Feed monthly in the spring through fall with a general purpose indoor plant fertilizer at half strength. Before applying fertilizer in any form, make sure the soil is damp.

Water Keep the soil moist, as it is best not to let your Wandering Jew become too dry. Water when the top inch of soil is dry and be sure to water the soil underneath the leaves. Don’t worry if you forget once in a while—it will occasionally tolerate a missed watering. Look out for drooping yellow leaves, they are a symptom of too much water. Your bathroom or kitchen would be a great choice for your Tradescantia Zebrina because it does best in a slightly more humid environment. Feel free to mist your plant frequently. If the humidity is too low the leaves will start to brown.

Toxicity

Tradescantia Zebrina are non-toxic to people and pets.


Zamioculcas Zamiifolia Origin Zamioculcas zamiifolia (more commonly known as the ZZ plant) is one of the most hardy plants around and perfect for any brown thumb or new plant parent. Its nickname, “ZZ plant” derives from the first letters of its name. It thrives in zones 9 and 10, but originates from East Africa.

Light

Water

ZZ plants prefer bright, indirect light but can still survive in low-light conditions. These plants can even thrive with bright, fluorescent light. This is one of the main reasons why they are a popular choice for indoor spaces with no windows. One key thing to remember is that ZZ plants do not like direct sunlight. Too much direct exposure to the sun can cause scorched or dried-out leaves. If this happens, you should move your plant to a shadier location until its leaves start to resemble their normal, green state.

Allow the soil to dry between watering. Don’t let your plant sit in water because it can easily cause stem and rhizome rot. Your plant can survive months without water, but will grow faster if watered more regularly. It’s always best to underwater than to overwater, since death by root rot is more likely to occur with your ZZ plant than death by water deprivation.

Food

Toxicity

Fertilize your plant once or twice in the spring or summer months using a diluted liquid fertilizer like 20-20-20.

You should take care when handling this plant because it contains calcium oxalate crystals. This can cause skin irritation or more serious ailments like stomach pain. The oxalate crystals make the plant especially poisonous for cats and dogs, so make sure to keep it out of reach. Zamioculcas zamiifolia are still safe to have in your home as long as you keep them out of reach from curious pets and children. You should wash your hands immediately after tending to your plant or wear gloves to minimize contact with the plant.


Sources https://www.sanityplants.com/origins-of-a-mysterious-plant-pilea-peperomioides/ https://bloomscape.com/plant-care-guide/pilea/#g1 https://plantcareforbeginners.com/articles/how-to-care-for-zebrina-alocasia https://smartgardenguide.com/alocasia-zebrina-care/ https://www.joyusgarden.com/rubber-plant-growing-tips/ http://www.ficusforever.nl/en/Origin https://bloomscape.com/plant-care-guide/begonia/#g1 https://plantophiles.com/plant-care/begonia-maculata/ https://www.proflowers.com/blog/fiddle-leaf-fig-care https://greeneryunlimited.co/blogs/plant-care/fiddle-leaf-fig-care https://www.joyusgarden.com/sansevierias-snake-plant-care/ https://plantcircle.co/product/scindapsus-pictus-argyraeu/ http://unitednursery.com/philo-brasil/ https://www.araflora.com/p2355/begonia_x_tamaya_big_white_flowers https://www.thespruce.com/grow-peace-lilies-1902767 https://bloomscape.com/plant-care-guide/pothos/ https://www.thesill.com/blogs/plants-101/how-to-care-for-calathea https://bloomscape.com/plant-care-guide/calathea/#g1 https://www.beardsanddaisies.co.uk/products/calathea-stromanthe-triostar https://www.thejoyofplants.co.uk/calathea https://www.thespruce.com/grow-d-deremensis-at-home-1902752 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dracaena_(plant) https://www.joyusgarden.com/aloe-vera/


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aloe_vera https://www.greenandvibrant.com/prayer-plant https://bloomscape.com/plant-care-guide/monstera/ https://greeneryunlimited.co/blogs/plant-care/monstera-deliciosa-care https://www.proflowers.com/blog/zz-plant-care https://www.houseplantsexpert.com/false-shamrock-plant.html https://www.thespruce.com/grow-monstera-adansonii-swiss-cheese-plant-1902774 https://www.solosucculents.com/philodendron-hastatum-silver-sword-philodendron/ https://www.ourhouseplants.com/plants/musa-banana https://bloomscape.com/plant-care-guide/tradescantia-zebrina/

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Care tips for green friends  

Care tips for green friends is an evergrowing guide on how to take care of house plants. Composed of various sources online, which will be v...

Care tips for green friends  

Care tips for green friends is an evergrowing guide on how to take care of house plants. Composed of various sources online, which will be v...

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