Issuu on Google+

SINGLES Weekend March 23-25, 2012

tWo nIGHts

$350* per person

*Plus Tax & service charge based on double occuPancy. single raTe available.

Includes Oceanview ROOm, dinneR and bReakfast daily, lOts Of activities, and use Of the sea wateR spa facilities! 290 Old MOntauk Hwy., MOntauk, ny News

Columns

F e at u r e s

631-668-1717 urneys C l a s s i f i e d | Gw w w . l o nIgnn i s l. cOM andpress.com

F oSince o d 1926 P r e s s P l ay

|

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

1


2

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


Sound Smart at a Party Here’s an invention that blows to the age of seven. It found that of the automobile, the telephone and the the 45 percent of children who did light bulb out of the water. Sprinkles not have sleep-disordered breathing,

Beverly Hills has unveiled a 24-hour cupcake ATM dispenser providing fresh treats that will be continuously restocked and individually boxed. Soon ATM users will also be able to dole out cupcake mixes, doggie cupcakes and Sprinkles apparel. And we didn’t even get to the best part: The company recently announced that the next three locations for the machine of wonder are Midtown, Downtown Upper West Side. That’s only a train ride away…

According to new research, young children who snore or have other sleeping difficulties may have a heightened risk of behavioral and emotional problems like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or anxiety later in life. The study followed more

only 8 percent had signs of behavioral problems by the time they were seven years old. The “worst” case set of children, made up of 8 percent of the total group, had breathing problems that peaked between the ages of two and three and persisted. Researchers found that 18 percent of this group had signs of behavioral and emotional problems by age seven. While this isn’t the first study to make the connection between sleep disorders and emotional problems, it’s the largest… A man in Colorado went to great lengths to skip out on his bar tab last week. Robert Engles was arrested after

he allegedly cut a hole in the plastic patio wall of Centro Latin Kitchen and crawled through it in an attempt than 13,000 children from infancy to dodge his $33 bill. Unfortunately

Contact Us Phone: 516-284-3300 Fax: 516-284-3310 575 underhill blvd. Suite 210, syosset, ny 11791 News contact: assignmentdesk@longislandpress.com Sales@longislandpress.com twitter.com/longislandpress

longislandpress.com

Copyright©2012. The Long Island Press is a trademark of Morey Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

for him, a 4.5-foot metal fence surrounds the patio, thwarting his escape. Employees were able to restrain him until the cops came and took him to jail for suspicion of felony menacing, defrauding an innkeeper and criminal mischief… How much money does a three-year-old McDonald’s Chicken McNugget go for? Well,

if it resembles our country’s first president, the answer is $8,100. Nebraska mom Rebekah Speight nabbed that amount for the nugget on eBay. Three years ago she was about to throw out her children’s uneaten food during a visit to the fast food chain when she noticed that one nugget bore a striking resemblance to George Washington. She’s been keeping the fried piece of presidential poultry in her freezer, and even though eBay took down the item because it violated rules regulating expired food, they put it back up when they heard she’s planning on using the money for a drive to raise $15,000 to send 50 children to summer church camp…

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

“I didn’t need permission. Permission was understood.” —Desperate Housewives creator and executive producer Marc Cherry testified during Nicollette Sheridan’s wrongful termination trial. Sheridan alleges that Cherry struck her on the back of the head on the set of the series, and afterwards killed off her character. She is seeking more than $6 million in damages. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

3


Long Island's #1 Gold Buyer 2 Years in a Row!

INSTANT CASH For All Gold, Diamonds, Silver, Platinum, Watches, Coins & More! Even broken or damaged items!

WE ARE #1 FOR A REASON! ✓ CASH ON THE SPOT ✓ HIGHEST PRICES PAID ✓ NO HIDDEN FEES

• COLLATERAL LOANS • CONSTRUCTION LOANS • BRIDGE LOANS • SHORT TERM LOANS • LONG TERM LOANS • BILL CONSOLIDATION • GIFT LOANS • MORTGAGE PAYMENT • SECTOR LOAN PAYMENT • MEDICAL LOANS • OUT OF WORK LOANS • SEASONAL LOANS

SECURE AN

INSTANT CASH LOAN WITH YOUR VALUABLES

✓NO CREDIT CHECK

✓FAST CASH ON THE SPOT ✓NO HASSLE

GOLD DIAMONDS WATCHES COINS STERLING SILVER PLATINUM ESTATE JEWELRY AND MUCH MORE!

Letter from the Reporter

A Few Rotten Apples

For more than 25 years I have reported on the Nassau Police. My stories often involved me spending days, weeks, and sometimes even months observing the cops on the street. It meant getting into their minds and sometimes into their souls. Those years enabled me to cross over the “Blue Wall” and learn not only what the job was about, but what it took to do that job. I watched officers as their adrenalin spiked while waiting to make a major undercover narcotics bust, and I watched them as their eyes teared up when a baby died in an ambulance. I developed a deep respect for the people who had to deal with one of the hardest jobs a person could have. I learned that these men and women brought with them a strong sense of integrity and honesty. When I first began my police reporting, a Deputy Commissioner named Charlie Spahr became my mentor. He saw something in me that made him open doors that few reporters ever got through. He wanted me to see firsthand what it took to be a cop—a good cop. He never hid anything because he believed every cop in the county was a good cop. Now, I know that if Charlie was still alive, he would be angry and ashamed—not of the cops on the street who are still doing what they did when I first started working with them, but

of the few bad apples who have cast a dark light on the whole department. Nassau County has been known nationally as one of the best police departments in the country. Scandals were very few and far between. The people who ran the department had strict standards, and every cop on the street knew they had to meet them. They were the gold standard of policing. When I first heard of the scandals that were occurring in the department, I was reluctant to report on them. I felt they were, at the very least, exaggerated. That’s why it took nine months to fully research the story that led to the Nassau County District Attorney’s recent arrest of three high-ranking officers. But it’s important for the public to know that these few are the exception, not the rule. Despite what was happening at the top, the cops on the street kept doing their job. They still do. This is a time when the cops need the public’s support, not their disgust. The public is sheltered from the reality of what cops face—the dark side of Nassau County, where residents have illegal guns, knives and other weapons, and are not afraid to use them. Where drug deals go down daily, and where someone high on these drugs will lash out at anyone, cop or not. And despite the perception, not every cop in Nassau brings home $100,000-plus salaries. An entry-level officer makes $34,000 for risking his or her life on a daily basis. When we are in trouble we call a cop. Now they are in trouble, and they need to call the public. The public shouldn’t paint the department with one brush. The cop that is there when you call has done nothing wrong. Shelly Feuer Domash

SYOSSET 150 Aerial Way

MERRICK 2201 Merrick Rd.

FLORAL PARK 254-10 Hillside Ave.

CARLE PLACE 349 Old Country Rd.

HEWLETT 1195 Broadway

FOREST HILLS 70-58 Austin St.

LIC# 6/6

DCA#1377300/1377299

LIC# 032-2011

LIC# 0050/014/2012

DCA#1362206/1318764

ROSLYN HEIGHTS 386 Willis Ave.

BETHPAGE 4117 Hempstead Tpke.

OAKLAND GARDENS 61-21 Springfield Blvd.

OCEANSIDE 404 Merrick Rd.

GARDEN CITY PARK 2299 Jericho Tpke.

ASTORIA 36-16 30th Ave

LIC# 033-2011

LIC# 0049/012-2012

4

LIC# 0048/013-2012

Long Island Press

LIC# 63/11

LIC# 048-2011

for

DCA#1391315/1391592

DCA#1393594/1393598

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

LICENSED, BONDED AND INSURED.

ALL LOCATIONS OPEN 7 DAYS 10AM-6PM OPEN LATE WEDNESDAYS UNTIL 8 PM WALK-INS WELCOME 800-316-7060 | GoldStandardNY.com

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


The Plantar Wart Solution The Cherrywood Footcare located in Bellmore was recently voted “Best Podiatrist on Long Island” by the Long Island Press for good reason. Dr.Burke and the staff of Cherrywood Footcare offer cutting edge emerging technologies that treat many ailments as well as boasting a friendly staff and a modern office. Cherrywood Footcare is a leader in podiatry. It’s not only affiliated with two local hospitals but also has a state of the art operating room within the office. In fact, Cherrywood Foot Care is one of only a handful of podiatrists in the county offering laser therapy for fungus nails with one of the most advanced laser systems. Plantar warts, also known as verruca plantaris, are the most common viral infection of the skin. Plantar warts are noncancerous skin growths on the plantar surface, or the sole, of the foot. They can be found anywhere on the foot but tend to produce symptoms in areas of pressure and friction causing pain and discomfort. The human papilloma virus causes warts infecting only the superficial layer of skin entering through tiny cuts, breaks or other vulnerable areas on the skin. It is estimated that 7-10 percent of the U.S. population is infected, most commonly affecting children but also seen in adults. Infection typically occurs from moist walking surfaces such as showers or swimming pools. The virus can survive many months without a host, making it highly contagious. After infection, warts may not become visible for several weeks or months. Because of pressure on the sole of the foot or toe, the wart is pushed inward and a layer of hard skin may form over the wart that can often be mistaken for a callus or corn. They may fuse or develop into clusters called mosaic warts. Some signs and symptoms of a plantar wart include small, firm, fleshy, grainy lesions or growths on the soles of your feet, which NE eW wS s

CCoOlLuUm MnNsS

ADVERTORIAL

can resemble a cauliflower; hard, thickened skin over a well-defined spot on the skin,where a wart has grown inwards; black pinpoints which are small, clotted blood vessels; pain or tenderness when walking or standing; and the virus does thrive in warm, moist environments and also needs a point of entry into the skin such as cuts or dry skin. Plantar warts require treatment especially people with diabetes, nerve damage in their feet or weakened immunity. People with these conditions need treatment under a podiatrist’s supervision to closely monitor the treatment effect and the quality of the wound healing. Plantar warts are usually self-limiting within a few years, but treatment is generally recommended to lessen symptoms, which may include pain, decrease duration and reduce transmission. It’s much easier to treat a few small warts than several large warts. Plantar warts can stubbornly resist treatment. Therefore, most treatments require patience, persistence and multiple interventions. Cherrywood Foot Care offers a variety of methods to treat this contagious condition based on individual needs as well as severity of the condition. To reduce the risk of plantar warts, avoid direct contact with warts including your own, keep your foot clean and try by changing shoes and socks often; don’t go barefoot in public areas by wearing sandals or flip-flops in public pools, showers and locker rooms; don’t pick at your warts, by picking they may spread to other parts of your foot and hands; don’t use the same file, pumice stone or nail clipper, your warts a you use on your healthy skin and nails; and wash your hands carefully after touching your warts to prevent spreading the infection. Put your “Best” foot forward.Call us today to see why we were voted #1 BEST Podiatrist On Long Island!

F eFaEtAuT rU eRsE S P r e FO ss O DP l a y A & F oE o d

C lL a AS sS s Ii f F iI e Ed D

ww W Ww W..lLoOnNgGi IsSlLaAnNdDp P rR e sE sS.Sc.oCm OM

||

LLoOnNgG IIsSlLaAnNdD PP r R eE sS sS

ff oo rr

MmAaRrCcHh 88 - - MmAaRrCcHh 1144 ,, 22 00 1 2

31 5


C Ex h pr ec ess ko ut

The Target

Pink Slip

Mitt Romney—partial score R-Money takes six of 10 states on Super Tuesday—not quite enough to knock out Rick Santorum, but still a statistical win for Mitt. Well, he does seem like the least unelectable of three totally unelectable candidates!

Mitt Rick New t

i

KIRK

Snook

ing

Mann

Rick Santorum—partial score Still, Frothy Rick holds on, winning three states and coming within a percentage point of a win in Ohio, keeping him in the cloudy mix for the GOP nod. Do you ever imagine Santorum entered this thing as a prank and now has no idea how to stop it? Yep, so do we.

Newt Gingrich—partial score And Newt takes home the bronze, winning one state and splitting the far-right vote with Santorum, allowing Romney a slight edge in the polls. So right now, the only person standing between a fundamentalist bigot and the GOP nomination is…Newt Gingrich. How has it come to this? Peyton Manning—partial score The Hall of Fame-bound QB has parted ways with the Indianapolis Colts, his team of 14 years, and among his suitors are none other than our own New York Jets. It’s not easy to imagine a scenario in which Peyton Manning comes to a new stadium and is not only the second-best QB in that stadium, but the second-best QB in that stadium sired by Archie Manning. But remember, folks: This is the Jets we’re talking about. Snooki—bull’s eye The Jersey Shore star confirms she is pregnant with fiancé Jionni LaValle’s baby. Well, it’s good to know that amid all these “sluts” and “prostitutes” demanding contraception, someone out there is taking on the responsibility of populating the Earth! Kirk Cameron—off target After appearing on Piers Morgan’s CNN show and saying he feels that homosexuality is “unnatural…detrimental and ultimately destructive to so many of the foundations of civilization,” the former Growing Pains star writes an e-mail to ABC News in which he asks for tolerance of his views. Why is he asking for tolerance? He should be asking to share the ticket with Santorum!

Rush Limbaugh Rush Hudson Limbaugh III has made millions with his motor mouth. And every working day millions of Americans—those self-proclaimed “ditto heads” —hang on every word. This right-wing radical political pooh-bah has ruined “Republicans in Name Only,” championed the Tea Party conservatives and mocked “wacko environmentalists” and “feminazis” (feminists). Yet he didn’t register to vote until he was 35, and, though he attacks liberals for having no cajones for fighting wars he supports, he avoided Vietnam by having a cyst on his ass. He says he can say whatever he wants because he’s really just an entertainer. But just as Rep. Joe McCarthy did years ago, Rush finally went too far when he called Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute” because “she wants to be paid to have sex. She’s having so much sex she can’t afford contraception. She wants you and me and the taxpayers to pay her to have sex.” Fluke, whose name Rush had so much fun with on his radio show, testified before a House Democratic committee that the insurance policies of her Jesuit university were having a harmful impact on female students who depended on contraception coverage for their health and well being. Rush, married four times with no children, looked at her this way: “If we are going to pay for your contraceptives, thus pay for you to have sex, we want something for it, and I’ll tell you what it is: We want you to post the videos online so we can all watch.” This sick fat man has been using the First Amendment like toilet paper. It’s time we flush Rush right into the sewer where he belongs. Hang up your headphones and go, Rush Limbaugh, you’re fired!

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

The Quote

“The truth is worse than we could have imagined, but it’s reality.”

The Photo

—Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, in his opening remarks to the Suffolk County Legislature Tuesday, preceding a report from an independent fiscal task force which stated that the county’s budget deficit could be as high as $530 million by 2013.

The Equation

William House of Huntsville, Ala., waits for Republican presidential candidate, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, to arrive during a campaign stop at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Tuesday, March 6, 2012, in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

NASSAU POLICE CRIME + SHUTTERING of HALF OF 8 – MORE THAN x INDICTMENT OF = MERCY! LAB SCANDAL NASSAU PRECINCTS 100 police POSITIONS THREE EX-TOP nassau COPS MERCY!!!

6

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


3. GOOGLE “DICK CLARK FLINTSTONE HOUSE”: One of Dick Clark’s many humble abodes, the 23-acre Malibu property that looks like it was built in Bedrock is up for sale. It sits on top of a bluff, has a 360-degree view of the ocean and mountains, and for a cool $3.5 million it can be all yours, brontosaurus not included. 4. CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK’S DAY WITH THE DROPKICK MURPHY’S: March is synonymous with everyone’s favorite Irish holiday, and the Irish punk-rock icons, along with folk/punk singer songwriter Frank Turner, come to The Paramount in Huntington March 11 to celebrate and help set the mood for next week’s festivities.

5. DOWNLOAD THE APP LADIDA: If you love to sing but Adele is just way out of your league, then you’re in luck, because there’s an app for that. The application, created by Khush Inc., is essentially a reverse karaoke program. You simply sing into your iPhone and it creates a melody to complement your singing, it also adjusts your pitch to make you sound like a diva. For $2.99 this app is absolutely worth it, just don’t try using it in the shower. 6. TIVO THE BOBBI KRISTINA INTERVIEW: Pretend you’re not interested all you want, but you know you want to see it. Oprah Winfrey’s exclusive interview with Whitney Houston’s 18-year-old daughter on Oprah’s Next Chapter airs March 11 on OWN at 7 p.m. 7. GO SEE JOHN CARTER: Based on the “Barsoom” novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the Disney movie follows the story of its title character, John Carter. A weary civil war veteran trying to find his place in the world, Carter’s life changes paths when he is transported to the red planet. With a charming cast and impressive special effects, John Carter comes to Earth March 9.

8. AUDITION FOR THE ROCKETTES: If you’re over 5’6”, proficient in tap, jazz and ballet and at least 18 years old, you could be kicking on the Radio City stage come next Christmas. From March 6 through March 26, Rockette hopefuls can submit their best dance video on www.facebook.com/therockettes to compete for the chance to “Jump the Line” and participate in Rockettes open auditions taking place at Radio City Music Hall in May. A Rockettes Choreographer will review the video submissions and select the top 10 finalists whose videos will be posted on Facebook and open to fan voting in April. 9. QUOTE ALBERT EINSTEIN ON HIS BIRTHDAY: “Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute, and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a minute. THAT’S relativity.” The genius born on March 14, 1879, has amongst his long list of accomplishments: the theory of relativity (E = mc2), alerting the U.S. of Germany’s nuclear plans during WWII, the Manhattan Project—and hundreds of great quotes and one-liners. 10. BEWARE THE IDES OF MARCH (MADNESS)! The first three rounds of the NCAA tournament kick-off March 13 and 14, as the first four go head to head. With that in mind, its time to start scrambling to get your brackets straight! Not a game is to be missed if you want to come out on top. With the volume of games going on throughout the tournament, it’s important to get your stats set up ASAP. The second and third rounds continue through the weekend of March 15 before the final four wrap up March 31, and the championship April 2. News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

2. CELEBRATE OREO’S 100TH BIRTHDAY: You’re probably going to want a treat with that free coffee and you just happen to be in luck, it’s Oreo’s special day. In celebration, everyone’s favorite cream-filled cookie—20.5 million of them are sold each day— has transformed, for a limited time only, into a sexier version of itself, the Birthday Cake cookie, sprinkles and all.

The Rundown

1. LOSE AN HOUR, GET FREE COFFEE: It’s that time of year again…when Daylight Saving Time begins. The good news is: it’s almost spring. The bad news: you lose an hour. But Ikea in Hicksville is looking to help people wake up after losing precious sleep by offering free cups of coffee to commuters on their way to work on the first Monday after Daylight Saving Time begins (March 12) from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. But first, remember to set your clocks ahead one hour on March 11 at 2 a.m. Do it for yourself, but most importantly, do it for the coffee.

The Book It Chooses You By Miranda July It’s expected that anything with the name Miranda July on it will be charming and probably oppressively twee. But charming! Don’t forget the charm. July has established a singular voice that runs throughout her prolific work, which spans performance art, music and multimedia art, but is best-known to most through her films (Me and You and Everyone We Know; The Future) and her fiction writing (the short-story collection No One Belongs Here More Than You). Now turning to nonfiction, July’s It Chooses You is a series of interviews conducted by the author with folks selling things through the Pennysaver (the last bastion of nonInternet commerce). And the result turns out to be very low in twee, by July’s usual standards. The book is sweet, varied and offers a story in the end about a feisty married couple wherein the man wrote dirty limericks to (and about) his wife for many, many years. This story made me cry. July is also very candid when writing about the interviewees and the circumstances she was in while putting this together (also writing her script for The Future), which made the book read like a long and excellent personal essay. —Jenn Kane For more of Jenn Kane’s book reviews, go to allreadup.wordpress.com. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

$5.25 Million

The amount of the settlement being handed over by celebrity chef Mario Batali to workers at his New York restaurants. The workers opened a class-action suit in 2010 against Batali, claiming “pervasive, illegal” tip-skimming. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

B-List B-Day Fabio “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter!” Lanzoni March 15, 1959 International fashion model Fabio Lanzoni is a Pisces known for being “dreamy”—or in the vernacular of the Jersey Shore, “a tan, gorilla juicehead”. Pisces are represented by the element water, which Fabio likes to trickle down his oiled up chest while reclining his nude body under a very tiny fig leaf. Sexually alluring, Piscean men are often pigeonholed as mimbos. But this Italian Stallion doesn’t just pick things up and put them down. Fabio not only appears on the covers of romance novels, he writes them. A sign of thinkers, those born under Pisces spend much of their time contemplating the mysteries of life, whether it be recording soliloquies about their philosophies of love (Fabio after Dark) or simply holding a tub of butter substitute while thinking, “It’s the taste I love, but…without the cholesterol.”

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

7


Off the Reservation BY Jed Morey, Publisher, Long Island press Facebook.com/JedMorey

@JedMorey

President Christ Tim Pawlenty must be ready to hang himself. With Rick Santoruminejad defying the polls and pundits at every turn and stymieing Super PAC’s and Romneybots, surely this field would have been accepting of another milquetoast social conservative candidate like Pawlenty. Alas, this is now the Romney/Santorum show as the GOP accepts that its fate is linked to the enthusiasm of the evangelical Christian voter. When then-Sen. Barack Obama proclaimed that “there is not a liberal America and a conservative America — there is the United States of America” at the 2004 Democratic Convention, he couldn’t have been more wrong. But it sure sounded great. The 2012 GOP primary season has proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that there are indeed two very distinct Americas. Having grown up as a Republican in a blue state, I can honestly say that the only thing I share in common with Republicans in red states is contiguous

land because our idea of what constitutes democratic principles couldn’t be further apart. The New Millennium has ushered in a resounding victory for democracy and with it the greatest placebo ever absorbed into the global body politic. Citizens of the world have bought into the hype that the American Dream is now available anywhere on the globe and is as attainable as a fake diamond necklace on a late-night infomercial. For my money, it is the inimitable H.L. Mencken who best captured the folly of American democracy as the means to prosperity nearly a century ago saying, “Of all those ancient promises there is none more comforting than the one to the effect that the lowly shall inherit the earth. It is at the bottom of the dominant religious system of the modern world, and it is at the bottom of the dominant political system. Democracy gives it a certain appearance of objective and demonstrable truth.”

Even Mencken would be impressed by the effectiveness of today’s political hucksters who peddle faux versions of democracy. Modernday snake oil salesmen dressed in suits adorned with flag pins on their lapels preach the gospel of the American Dream with the zeal of born-again evangelists. Their wide-eyed followers devour their every word believing that But the system was intuitive and they too might someday reach the flexible enough to allow its citizens to Promised Land. battle one another and hammer out Gone are the days of dreaming universal suffrage and civil rights. It of white picket fences and a pension; is also our right to freely and openly this is the era of winning lottery criticize the government and protest tickets and gaining salvation through perceived injustices. No system works instant affluence. The most troubling perfectly for all of its inhabitants but phenomenon is the gospel of Jesus liberties such as these that we often Christ as capitalist that has somehow take for granted are glorious enough tethered itself to our new collective to make America’s democratic system interpretation of democracy. This enviable by most standards. mixing of religious and ideological I am an insider, an avowed metaphors has seeped into the con- critic of the hand that feeds me. I’m sciousness of American politics and not writing in exile or from behind given life to a bizarre fundamental- a prison wall, but that is not to say ist ideology that has inculcated the we aren’t metaphorically imprisoned public with the notion that financial by the image we project of ourselves. success is the product of divine right. Much of what we believe to be true According to this newly adopted about democracy is belied by our very testament of faith, Jesus Christ is a real actions and circumstances. champion of corporate rights and free Americans are trapped by the markets who offers his disciples unfet- conviction that we live in a free society tered VIP access to the pearly gates of despite having the highest incarcerathe hereafter. tion rate per capita of any nation in “All these forms of happiness, of the world. We see ourselves as the course, are illusory. They don’t last,” purveyors of peace and democracy, warned Mencken. “The Democrat, having defeated the Communist leaping into the air to flap his wings menace and dethroned dictators, yet and praise God, is forever coming no other nation in modern times has down with a thump. The seeds of his initiated unprovoked foreign wars disaster lie in his own stupidity; he more than we have or dropped a can never get rid of the naïve delusion nuclear bomb (twice) on its enemies. — so beautifully Christian! — that We believe in the theory of fair comhappiness is something to be got by petition and the ability to achieve taking it away from the other fellow.” success through hard work and disIt is the idea that only the uncompro- cipline but we exist within a system mising person in the self-righteous that discourages competitiveness and pursuit of wealth emerges triumphant has consolidated 40 percent of the in a life that has separated humans nation’s wealth into the hands of 1 from their humanity. Community, percent of the population. environment and the welfare of others Our state of denial has caused us have been subjugated by a new dogma to drift far from the nation we believe that places faith over reason, prosper- ourselves to be while holding tightly ity over compassion. to an image of the nation we wish Capitalism and to be. And whoever Christianity, mutually prevails on the GOP exclusive by design, ticket will have no are no longer distinct facebook.com/jedmorey choice but to continue from one another touting the conservaunder the all-encompassing umbrella tive agenda and wooing the evangeliof democracy. And who could argue? cal vote. I am a Republican living in a We credit democracy with ushering blue state; an American capitalist who in the most technologically innova- was born in socialist Canada. I have tive century in recorded history. There Mohawk and Dutch roots. In short, have also been real victories along I’m a walking contradiction. But the way. America as it was originally I’m far from confused because this I conceived was a place where inalien- know: Jesus Christ isn’t on the ballot able rights were intended exclusively and fundamentalism is the opposite for white, male property owners. of freedom.

LIKE ME

to comment on “Off the Reservation” email jed at JMorey@longislandpress.com

8

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


Jerry’s Ink BY JERRY DELLA FEMINA, Publisher, the Independent

My Troubles With Fake Phone Voices Continues Last week was a strange week when, after a half hour of being switched from fake voice to fake voice by American Express, I finally reached a human, a man in India who insisted that he must cancel my American Express card because someone using my card number tried to buy a $1,500 refrigerator at a Virgin Megastore in Beirut, Lebanon. You can’t make this stuff up. I also had an encounter last week with a humorless fake voice at Delta Airlines, who answered my call for flight information, “Delta, KLM, Air France. Are you a Sky Miles member?” My stupid answer was, “Is that anything like the mile high club?” Naturally the voice immediately switched me to the dreaded Delta Flightline service voice. I wrote this a few years ago:

GULFPORT-BILOXI BLUES I don’t know what got into me. I’m so ashamed. One minute I was a normal, upstanding citizen politely seeking information on the telephone. The next I was screaming out incredible profanities. And then I was a defeated, broken man. But in the end I emerged victorious. The only excuse I can make for myself was that at no time did I ever converse with a human voice. Have you tried to call anyone for information about anything lately? There are no humans answering phones these days. They all have these voice systems that are activated by any sound you make. So I called Delta Airlines (1-800-221-1212) and all I wanted to know was, “Does the Delta Shuttle fly to Washington D.C. on the hour or on the half hour?” A simple question that a human could have answered in a second. What I got was a recording of an incredibly deep, fake male voice asking me if I wanted to use their web site for discounts and to warn me that this call may be monitored for quality assurance. Let me get this straight: This is a fake voice worrying about the quality of the message I was going to get from other fake voices? Mr. Testicle Throat (my name for him) gave me a menu choice of four numbers which I could push. None of the choices was about whether the plane

to Washington was leaving on the hour or the half hour. I pressed number two because he mentioned schedules. Now came this recording of a woman’s voice, who I will call Deaf Dora, and she came on with a breezy “Hi!” as though I was her next-door neighbor in her totally fake world. She was too cheerful and sounded like she had swallowed a handful of uppers. Deaf Dora asked me if I had a flight number and what was my departure or arrival city. Now you must understand this voice recording stuff is in its infancy and all of the equipment is so sensitive it can pick up the slightest sound and then translate it into the name of a city. At that point I coughed and the fake automated woman’s voice immediately said, “PITTSBURGH!!!! Is that your arrival or your departure city?” “Oh damn,” I said. “SPOKANE!!!” she said happily. “Is that your arrival city?” she wondered. “NOT PITTSBURGH. NOT PITTSBURGH. YOU DEAF PUTZ!!!” I screamed. “Let me repeat that,” she said. “You are departing Pittsburgh and you are arriving in Pittsburgh? Is Pittsburgh your arrival city?” “OH %@#&!” I screamed. “Let me see if I have this right. You are departing Pittsburgh and your arrival city is Gulfport-Biloxi.” This simple call was now taking more than 15 minutes and I was heading for Gulfport-Biloxi — a place I didn’t even know existed before I made the call. It was like a conversation with my late father who, when he was 92 was deaf in both ears and when I kissed him on the forehead and said, “I love you, Papa,” he would answer, “She went to the store. Why do you ask?” Of course the smart thing to do was to hang up and quit, but I couldn’t let go. The voice was now in complete control of the conversation and I must admit I was intrigued. Just what could I say to this automated voice and what would she hear? This is my dirty little confession. I said, “You sound cute. I’m a fake voice, too. What if the two of us find a place where we can talk privately?” That’s when, I swear, the automated voice said,“Please hold while I connect you to a Delta representative.”

If you wish to comment on “Jerry’s Ink” email Jerry at jerry@dfjp.com News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

Spectacular from any angle.

Visions Ring with Aquamarine and Diamonds in 18K White Gold by Bellarri $3,300

Roosevelt Field Upper Level between Macy’s and Nordstrom, 516-248-7200 NaHoku.com

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

9


Cover Story Update INDICTED: (L-R) Retired Nassau Police Detective Sergeant Al Sharpe, former Deputy Chief Inspector John Hunter and former Second Deputy Commissioner William Flanagan

Press Investigation Sparks Indictments of Three Ex-Top Nassau Cops source: D.A. Probe Ongoing By Shelly Feuer Domash and Christopher Twarowski

Shortly after sunrise on March 1, former Nassau County Police Second Deputy Commissioner William Flanagan, former Deputy Chief Inspector John Hunter and retired Detective Sergeant Al Sharpe surrendered, heads down, in silence, to the Nassau District Attorney’s office. Reporters and camera crews clamored to get a shot as they turned themselves in to face charges they had squashed a criminal investigation into the son of a wealthy police foundation donor. Some had staked out the building’s two entrances in the drizzling rain for hours to get a peek. Handcuffed, the former law enforcement officials were soon led past flashing bulbs, shouts and video cameras into tinted-out black Suburbans, whisked to their longtime home at police headquarters for processing, and before long, seated before Nassau Court Judge John Kase in a packed courtroom. All pled not guilty. All face potential jail or prison time. For Flanagan, 54, of Islip, the spectacle marked the first day of his retirement. With nearly three decades on the job, the third-highest ranking police official in Nassau had abruptly resigned less than 24 hours earlier— just nine days short of his scheduled departure. So had Hunter. “I’ve been a police officer in Nassau County for 29 years,” said Flanagan outside the courtroom, flanked by his attorney Bruce Barket, following his indictment. ”I committed no criminal acts here. I’m confident at a trial I’ll be vindicated and exonerated.” For the NCPD, the trio’s lengthy indictments—of which Flanagan holds 10

Long Island Press

for

the top charge, receiving reward for official misconduct, a felony—were just the latest bombshells in what’s been an unprecedented proceeding. Last year, the department became the subject of national scrutiny when its police crime laboratory became the only one in the country to be put on probation for a second time and then shuttered—a scandal that required Gov. Andrew Cuomo to appoint the state Inspector General’s Office to investigate. Earlier this week, the Nassau Legislature approved a historic plan by County Executive Ed Mangano to shutter half its precincts and shed more than 100 positions within the department. As earth-shaking as the recent indictments are, however, the scandal once again involves the 87-year-old department’s top brass, not its rankand-file members. A March 31, 2011, Long Island Press cover story titled “Membership Has Its Privileges: Is NCPD Selling Preferential Treatment” sparked an investigation by the Nassau District Attorney’s Office, which led to the indictments, according to its own press release announcing the charges. The article—the first of a five-part investigative series last year into the NCPD and its dealings with the nonprofit Nassau County Police Department Foundation, of which former Nassau Police Commissioner Lawrence Mulvey was the brainchild— detailed a May 2009 break-in at Bellmore’s John F. Kennedy High School, in which more than $3,000 worth of electronic equipment was stolen, and the thwarting of its subsequent police investigation. The latter was stalled

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

despite the school principal’s desire for prosecution. The alleged perpetrator, Zachary Parker, 20, of Merrick, whose name was kept out of the initial Press article but included in an Oct. 20 follow-up titled “Press Article Sparks Investigation, Arrest,” is the son of Gary Parker, an associate and donor of the foundation, the Press reported. The group has raised more than $1.6 million to date for a new police academy. The March 31 article reported how Foundation members were given police shields and police identification, and detailed a March 5, 2010, memo sent out to all commands of the department informing personnel of the group’s “benevolent business executives” and instructing that should officers “come into contact with any of these individuals”...“in the course of your police work,” a 24/seven hotline was available for their verification. After the Press expose, Zachary Parker was indicted by a grand jury last October on three felony counts related to the incident and charged with burglary, grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property following an investigation by the Nassau County District Attorney. Then-Commissioner Mulvey retired from office the day after the Press’ March 31 story. In addition to Flanagan’s felony count, all three are charged with official misconduct and conspiracy. Flanagan faces up to four years in prison, Sharpe faces up to two years, and Hunter faces up to a year in jail. “Commissioner Flanagan committed no crime, he did nothing improper, he was acting in the course of his police responsibilities and simply went about that,” Barket told reporters outside the courtroom March 1. “To have his 29-year career come down to this indictment for this petty theft is nothing short of outrageous.” Hunter and Sharpe, through attorneys William Petrillo and Anthony Grandinette, respectively, also maintained their innocence. The district attorney’s indictment says differently, documenting a long paper trail of e-mails, “gift cards,” the wining and dining of Hunter, Flanagan and other Nassau police brass with “lunches and dinners”—totaling more than $17,000, says a source close to the investigation—from Parker, and failed

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

attempts to get the school principal to sign a withdrawal of prosecution. Flanagan called the gift cards, which totaled several hundred dollars, says a source close to the investigation, “[o]ver the top” in a Sept. 10, 2009, e-mail included in the indictment. In an e-mail the day before, he replied “de nada family” after informing Parker that some of the stolen property had been returned to the school. Parker donated $110,000 to the Foundation, according to 2010 tax filings with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. His son Zachary’s license had been checked by law enforcement more than 20 times for traffic violations but had never received a ticket, says a source close to the investigation. Besides the Bellmore burglary, he also faces drug charges in Nassau and Broward County, Fla. A law enforcement source close to that investigation tells the Press that when arrested, Parker displayed two official-looking badges and told police he was an EMT. He also insisted his father was connected with the police. Hunter “was instrumental” in getting the younger Parker a civilian job within the police department, according to the indictment. Hunter intervened when the case was referred to the Internal Affairs Unit when Parker was named as a suspect in the Bellmore burglary, it reads. As an NCPD employee, he would automatically be investigated by Internal Affairs, per police procedure. Hunter, “who was not in this unit’s direct chain of command,” continues the indictment, “informed the commanding officer of the 7th Precinct Detective Squad that the felony investigation would be handled by the 7th Precinct Detective Squad and not by the Internal Affairs Unit.” A spokesperson for the NCPD tells the Press that the police commissioner, who is briefed at least a couple of times a week about Internal Affairs investigations, would have had the ultimate authority to dismiss or move a case out of Internal Affairs. “Our office would review any Internal Affairs investigation that contained an issue of criminality,” says Nassau District Attorney’s Office spokesman Chris Munzing. A source close to the District Attorney’s probe tells the Press its investigation is ongoing.

F e at u r e s

With additional reporting by Rashed Mian. P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


It’s Our Mission. Quality Health Coverage Family Health Plus with Fidelis Care

• Health insurance coverage for adults 19-64 in New York State who qualify • Checkups with your own doctor • X-rays and lab tests • Hospital and emergency care • Dental and vision care • Speech and hearing services • Behavioral health services • More than 48,000 quality providers Family Health Plus is a New York State-sponsored health insurance program offered by Fidelis Care. Some services require a copayment.

Proof of age, income, and address necessary to enroll. To find out if you are eligible for one of our government-sponsored health insurance programs, call Fidelis Care at:

1-888-FIDELIS (1-888-343-3547) (TTY: 1-800-421-1220) News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

fideliscare.org

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

1-866-435-9521 for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

11


Has The New Heroin Hit Long Island? By Jaclyn Gallucci jgallucci@longislandpress.com

ell-known by New Yorkers as one of the last places to get cheap gas in Jersey, the Vince Lombardi Service Area off the New Jersey Turnpike is a popular stop for Giants fans and concertgoers headed back to Long Island from the Meadowlands Arena just down the road. But last Fourth of July weekend, outside the lines at the food court and the gas pumps, it was the last stop on a 1,700-mile journey that began in Mexico for 700,000 bags of methamphetamine headed straight for the streets of New York City. Instead of simply crossing the border into California, where there is a huge and profitable market for meth already established, drug traffickers moved the drugs via a complex network of truck drivers carrying loads of bulldozer parts across the border, through multiple states and into the hands of New York-based reputed drug trafficker, 61-year-old Jose Mauro Mota, who was waiting in the New Jersey parking lot for an unassuming black suitcase with contents worth $10 million. In the past, LI seemed worlds away from the meth-ravaged towns of the Midwest. Not only are these areas thousands of miles away, but they are isolated within miles of empty land, perfect for producing a drug that gives off strong chemical odors. That is, if the drug needs to 12

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

be produced at all. With booming super labs—where meth is produced in bulk—located just over the Mexican border, the ready-made drug is readily available in large quantities, and therefore cheaper than heroin, cocaine and prescription drugs, the drugs of choice in wealthier areas like Long Island. But at this popular family rest stop, just 20 miles away from Nassau County, a record-breaking 51 pounds of meth—five times the amount seized in the New York area in all of 2010, according to the Office of the Special Narcotics Prosecutor—was intercepted by DEA agents, who said it was “remarkably pure” at levels higher than 90 percent, a purity level rarely seen in the drug market, especially on the East Coast. “Methamphetamine is not historically a drug of choice in the New York area,” DEA Special Agent in Charge John Gilbride said in a statement following the bust. “[This case] shows the influence drug traffickers based in Mexico are having in the New York area, where they are bringing in methamphetamine and trying to create a market for that methamphetamine.” Meth is a threat that has so far remained distant from the Island. A “poor man’s cocaine” made from common household items, typically on farms and in cabins in the woods—meth has made few headlines in the Northeast, until |

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

recently, when these homemade labs began popping up on familiar ground. In 1999, only two meth labs were reported in New York, both of them upstate, according to the DEA. In 2010, that number jumped to 31 and included labs in dense residential areas of New York City and Long Island. And as Nassau and Suffolk counties are in the midst of dealing with a heroin and prescription drug crisis, meth has become an easier sell than ever before. For the first time in the New York area drug market, meth is a cheaper buy than heroin. One hit can cost as low as $5. It’s considered a stronger alternative to other drugs and is becoming more available where it never had been before. And because meth can be made at home, eliminating dealers and public transactions, its use generally eludes an increasingly watchful public eye. “Our picture of the heroin user had once been a long-term chronic user hanging out on the Lower East Side with a needle in his arm, and the drug trade found a way to get young people to sell this, to freshen up the image,” says Jeffrey Reynolds, executive director of the Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (LICADD), a pioneer not-for-profit agency that helps individuals and families prevent and recover from addiction. “Heroin gained increased News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


acceptability, and you wound up with a whole bunch of addicted kids on Long Island who, in order to finance their habit, turned their friends on to it, and then applied all the power of social networking. The dealer was not a guy in an Escalade, it was the kid on the cul-de-sac, and we should learn from that because the same thing could happen with meth. I look at this beginning to pop on the horizon, and I hope it’s not the same thing, but I feel like the stars are aligned for this to happen.” And now, for the first time, news headlines reporting on the national meth epidemic not only include far-off places like Missoula, Mont., and Searcy, Ark., but upscale, suburban communities— like East Hampton.

2.5 Years LATER

HEADLINES HEAD NORTH

8 months LATER

Just minutes away from the brick-lined sidewalks of Main Street, a short walk away from the pristine beaches and high-end shopping that keeps East Hampton on the national radar, a one-lane road marked by the kind of white picket street sign familiar to the East End reads Neighborhood House Drive. In the basement of a typical shake-shingled home on this private gravel road, police discovered the makings of a small meth lab in June 2011, including the volatile and explosive chemical red phosphorus, just yards away from neighboring homes. It was the last place anyone expected it. But the news didn’t come as a complete shock to LICADD’s Reynolds, who has seen it all play out before. “We denied heroin was a problem that could impact our kids; we said it could never happen here, this is Long Island after all,” he says. “Well, it found a way to get past the white picket fences.” Reynolds says he’s seen a significant increase in meth use on LI in the past few months alone. One local school district has recently reached out to him after

1.5 Years LATER

2.5 Years LATER

Faces of Meth

4 Years LATER

Faces of Meth (www.facesofmeth.us) is a project of the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon that began when a deputy in the Corrections Division Classification Unit, Bret King, put together mug shots of those booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center. Deputy King worked with his co-workers to identify people who had been in custody more than once. He then worked to verify criminal records and files to determine a history of methamphetamine-related use in order to create a realistic presentation about the drug. (Photos: Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office)

3 Months LATER

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

several students were found under the influence of meth on school grounds, and the drug was found in their possession. “The areas I’ve heard the most concern are precisely those areas where heroin first emerged—the South Shore, Nassau/Suffolk border,” he says. “That’s what’s frightening is if you look at the pattern we endured through the heroin crisis—you begin to hear the anecdotal reports about young people using heroin, everyone says, ‘No, really?’—it was in very specific communities, and over time it grew and grew and grew, and so here we are today.” New drug use often sprouts in pockets lingering just below the public radar. And local police confirm that meth is not something they come across regularly as they do in some other states that report thousands, not dozens, of meth lab busts per year. In Montana, where meth has surpassed epidemic proportions, 50 percent of the state’s adult inmates are incarcerated due to meth-related crimes, according to the Montana Attorney General “We have almost zero meth arrests,” Nassau County Police spokesman Deputy Inspector Kenneth Lack tells the Press. “We’re nowhere near experiencing the issues they’re experiencing out west.” The same holds true for local treatment centers, where methaddicted clients are seen far less than those addicted to heroin and prescription drugs. “At our Long Island treatment centers, we have not seen an increase in the number of clients listing meth as their primary drug of choice,” says Traci Donnelly, regional director of Phoenix House New York. “This does not necessarily mean that meth isn’t affecting our communities. When a particular drug hits the streets, it may take a year or longer before users seek help and treatment admissions rise.” And that is exactly what Reynolds worries is happening while LI’s focus is elsewhere. “We’re only now just beginning to deal with a prescription drug crisis that started 10 years ago, and as we constrict the supply of opiate pain killers and we shut down doctor shopping and pharmacy hopping, and do all those things that we should absolutely be doing, some of those folks will wind up going into treatment when their supply dries up,” he says. “Some of them will turn to other drugs, and those other drugs are likely [to include] methamphetamine.”

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

for

His concern isn’t without just cause. Tennessee, one state currently dealing with a large meth problem, reported three treatment admissions for meth addiction statewide in 1996, according to the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Since then admissions gradually increased each year and by 2004, less than a decade later, they had hit 558, a figure that has remained relatively steady. After all, meth has one major advantage over other drugs—it can be made in the privacy of the home with relatively easy to come by materials. A handful of meth labs on LI were discovered in dense, residential areas of Patchogue, Ridge and Farmingville in 2006 as part of a sting the DEA called Operation Red Fusion, named after the primary chemical used in making meth— red phosphorous. Each suspected “cook” was working alone, making meth for personal use. They were only caught because they bought ingredients on the Internet through transactions the DEA intercepted. Agents arrested seven in all, including a corporate Citigroup executive who had been cooking meth in the living room of his Manhattan penthouse overlooking the United Nations and a doctoral student and Fulbright Scholar at Columbia University cooking meth in his apartment in order to stay awake to write his dissertation. The faces of meth were changing. Meth was no longer the poor man’s cocaine. Not only had cooking it become a do-it-yourself project that eliminated the middle man of a dealer, but new methods were also making the process simpler than ever. The science had evolved and, like everything these days, dozens of “recipes” became available on the Internet provided by users claiming to be experts, hiding under the Web’s veil of anonymity.

HIGH EVOLUTION

In the AMC series Breaking Bad, which brought the terrifying realities of meth into the homes of millions across the nation, a terminally ill and broke chemistry teacher partners with a former student to cook and sell high-quality meth. The first thing they do is buy a trailer: a large space they fill with complex lab equipment and drive into the middle of nowhere, to mask the odor given off by the battery acid, drain cleaner, lithium, ammonia and other highly toxic substances used in meth m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

13


production. Things have gotten a lot easier than on the show. “My way was developed to be quick and to not give off as much smell as other methods,” boasts one nameless blogger who posts step-bystep, detailed instructions on how to make meth using a two-liter soda bottle. “I still only recommend doing it if you have had previous experience making dope.” Above the instructions on the Web page, a disclaimer states: “This material is for educational purposes only…to inform the general public of the materials and methods used in manufacturing this highly illegal substance.”  Various users explain potentially deadly procedures, some that are portable. In fact, one of the seven arrested in Operation Red Fusion was found with a meth lab in the back of his pickup truck. Writers promise the ultimate high, glossing over the very real and high risk of death from toxic fumes, chemical explosions and fires often ignited by amateur chemists mixing volatile chemicals while already under the influence of drugs. In February, 52-year-old Brion Peters was found guilty of causing the fire that killed a 20-year-old woman in a rural upstate New York cabin being used as a meth lab. Kanisha Wood of Elmira was killed when a plastic pitcher

In 2011, a recordbreaking 51 pounds of meth—five times the amount seized in the entire New York area in 2010—was seized by the dea. The drugs originated in mexico and were headed to the nyc drug market, but the shipment was intercepted by agents as it was being transferred in this black suitcase [right] from a tractor trailer to a car trunk at the vince lombardi rest stop in new jersey. (Photos: DEA)

containing liquid fuel exploded on a wood stove. Between 2004 and 2011, 89 meth labs were reported in New York, according to the National Clandestine Laboratory Register, a federal database compiled by the DEA, containing addresses of some, but not all, locations where law enforcement agencies said they found chemicals or other items indicating the presence of either clandestine drug laboratories or dump sites. Currently there is no comprehensive method for tracking or listing former meth labs.  “Sooner or later, what happens is if you have a strong enough network of people who are using it, you’re going to have people who will say, ‘[Meth] is a cash crop, we should make it right here,’”

says Reynolds. And tracking those people is a whole other ball game. Since meth tends to be sold in tight circles or produced at home, law enforcement is often only tipped off when a lab explodes or a user turns violent, an all-too-common side effect of the highly addictive stimulant.

RISKY BEHAVIOR

A California mother was convicted of stabbing her newborn baby to death in January. In 2010, an Oklahoma mother drowned her child in a washing machine, a New Mexico woman claiming to be god stabbed her son in the neck with a screwdriver, and a 23-year-old Fresno, Calif., woman fatally shot her two toddlers and a cousin, critically wounded her husband

and then killed herself.  These are only a handful of the accounts of violence attributed to meth use. “Most of the drugs out there don’t readily prompt psychosis or psychotic symptoms—meth does,” says Reynolds. “As serious as heroin is, people don’t take heroin and jump off buildings, but people take meth and do all sorts of things they wouldn’t otherwise do—and the level of addiction tends to progress very quickly.” New studies conducted at Brookhaven Laboratory in Upton show that meth, which is known to cause intense paranoia, feelings of invincibility, visual and auditory hallucinations, in addition to aggressive and violent behavior, actually alters the chemistry

Lose yourself for a summer... Find yourself for a lifetime. Usdan: America’s Premier Arts Day Camp Artistic exploration, collaboration, and fun on Usdan’s 200-acre, woodland campus. Usdan’s professional faculty offers programs for students ages 6-18 in over 40 classes including: Orchestra, Band, Chorus, Video Arts, Musical Theater, Chess, and Organic Gardening. (For a complete listing, please visit www.usdan.com.) Weekdays: 4 weeks or 7 weeks. A/C buses from most Long Island neighborhoods. Tuition: $2,925 - $3,825 plus transportation and fees.

Usdan

Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts

www.usdan.com

212-772-6060 | 631-643-7900

14

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


Methamphetamine and a used glass pipe [left] seized by the DEA. In 1999, two meth labs were reported in New York, both of them located upstate. In 2010, that number jumped to 31 and included labs in dense residential areas of New York City and Long Island. Areas where meth labs have been seized in nassau and suffolk counties include farmingville, patchogue, brentwood, ridge and east hampton. There is currently no comprehensive list of homes and buildings once used to produce meth. (Photos: DEA)

of the brain, causing schizophrenia-like psychosis that continues long after the user stops using. The study of meth’s effects on the brain was the first of its kind, and explains why the drug is so highly addictive. “Methamphetamine is one of the most addictive and neurotoxic drugs of abuse,” says Brookhaven chemist Joanna Fowler, lead author on the study. “It produces large increases in dopamine, a brain chemical associated with feelings of pleasure and reward— both by increasing dopamine’s release from nerve cells and by blocking its re-uptake.” Like cocaine, the study showed that meth entered the brain quickly, but it stayed there much longer.

And while cocaine remained concentrated in only the reward center of the brain, meth was concentrated all over the brain. “This slow clearance of methamphetamine from such widespread brain regions may help explain why the drug has such long-lasting behavioral and neurotoxic effects,” Fowler says. “Meth is known to produce lasting damage.” That damage includes extensive physical deterioration. The “Faces of Meth,” a campaign that has gone viral on the Internet, is a series of mug shots of meth users compiled by the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon which show once vibrant people at the beginning of their addiction and—less than a year later, in some cases—they

look like zombies, with rotted teeth and collapsed jaws commonly referred to as “meth mouth,” severely aged and wrinkled skin, and festering sores covering their faces due to compulsive picking at imaginary “meth bugs” that users perceive on their skin. Meth use has also led to a major health crisis in the gay community. Recent reports by the National Drug Intelligence Center show rave attendees are abusing meth at an increasing rate. Over the past decade, crystal meth, or “Tina,” has been used as a sex drug commonly found at raves in the community and has been blamed for spreading HIV among users. “I’m a sex addict when I’m on crystal,” says one participant in

Dynamics of Methamphetamine Markets in NYC, a 2011  study of 132 men in the NYC party scene who used crystal meth. “My morals go out the window. It’s a must-have thing. You have sex with people, with people you wouldn’t normally have sex with.” A series of campaigns targeting the club scene have since been launched, including the Long Island GLBT Community Center’s Crystal Meth Project, aimed at providing education, support, information and referrals to gay and bisexual men on LI who are at risk for or living with meth addiction. But meth is not merely a sex drug. Its use has also increased among teens looking for a new way to get high. According to the CDC’s NY High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey in 2009, 4.8 percent—or 14,288—of teens said they had used methamphetamines one or more times as an alternative to other drugs. Heroin use, which reached epidemic proportions on LI that same year, came in at 3.8 percent. “[Methamphetamine] lasts longer and you don’t have to spend so much money,” said another participant in the study. “The [immediate] rush lasts for 20 minutes; [the overall high] lasts longer. It’s a better high. Nowadays, the crack is garbage.” And for those making it themselves, all it took—until recently—was a trip to the local supermarket.

Volunteers Needed for Diabetes and Periodontal Study THE STONY BROOK SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE is seeking volunteers for a diabetes and periodontal therapy trial, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The study will test whether periodontal therapy can help improve blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes, periodontal or gum disease. TO BE ELIGIBLE, you must have TYPE 2 DIABETES, PERIODONTAL OR GUM DISEASE AND BE AT LEAST AGE 35. Study visits will take place at Stony Brook Dental Care Center. Participants will receive a periodontal examination and periodontal therapy at no cost, as well as compensation for time and travel. Call (631) 632-9703 for more information.

Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer. 12021066H

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

15


A sign at walgreens directs customers to bring a red cardboard ticket [right] to the pharmacy to purchase sudafed pills. Federal law requires all products containing pseudoephedrine, the primary ingredient in cooking meth, to be kept behind the counter. Buyers must show photo ID and can only buy a 30-day supply.

CHANGING TIMES In 2006, the federal Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act became effective across the nation, setting restrictions on the retail sale of cold medicines and other products containing pseudoephedrine. The law requires these products to be kept behind the pharmacy counter. Buyers must show their photo ID and can only purchase a 30-day supply. The transaction is tracked and kept on file for at least two years to prevent people from skirting the law by purchasing small quantities of the drug at multiple stores. “Before that was done, all those items that we [now] place under lock and key, they were being stolen daily—loaded backpacks, duffle bags,” a manager at a major supermarket/ pharmacy chain in Nassau County who wishes to remain anonymous tells the Press. “It was obvious what it was going to be used for.” “The stealing has stopped because the access is in the pharmacy now,” he continues. “Now you can tell who the drug addicts are because they are stealing other items that they can quickly sell for cash.” Some states are even considering bills that would require a doctor’s prescription for popular decongestants containing pseudoephedrine. Mississippi and Oregon already require prescriptions

for these products. But many companies are trying to avoid this rule by taking another route. “Because of changes to federal legislation, products that contain the decongestant pseudoephedrine HCl cannot be sold over-the counter, causing many leading brands to reformulate their cold, allergy, and sinus products,” said Tylenol in a statement. “Most of our over-thecounter products containing pseudoephedrine are being discontinued.”  Many of Tylenol’s products have undergone name changes to reflect this policy and contain other decongestants—that cannot be used in meth production—in place of pseudoephedrine. All of these measures have resulted in a

significant decrease in pseudoephedrine purchases and thefts, the manager says. “Addicts always find other ways if they really want to,” he says. “But if you saw the amounts being stolen in some of our stores [before], there is no way it hasn’t helped at least a little.” In 2004, Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY), alarmed by reports that meth seizures in New York had surged 31 percent since the prior year, announced his plans to sharply increase penalties for dealing the drug and to get the state millions of dollars in federal funds for meth education, prevention and treatment. He compared the emergence of meth to the crack epidemic of the ’80s.

“Twenty years ago, crack was headed east across the United States like a Mack truck out of control, and it slammed New York hard because we just didn’t see the warning signs,” Schumer told the media from the steps of DEA headquarters in Manhattan. “Well, the headlights are glaring bright off in the distance again, this time with meth. We are still paying the price of missing the warning signs back then, and if we don’t remember our history, we will be doomed to repeat it.” Schumer said he was shocked when his staff ran an Internet search for “how to make crystal meth” and got 55,200 hits. Today, that same search yields 750,000 hits. “We tend to say, ‘All right, so heroin is on the scene,’ and we wait 10 years before we acknowledge it’s a problem,” says Reynolds. “Then we quickly throw together these two-hour heroin forums—and then another drug pops up and then we just go putting out fires. “It’s like whack-a-mole,” he continues. “Unless you begin dealing with the core reasons why kids and adults use drugs, we’re shoveling against the tide. We have to teach elementary school kids about decision-making and peer pressure and self-esteem and all those core competencies that are going to serve you well—no matter what the next drug du jour is.”

Don’t Take Chances. There Could Be Medical Reasons Why You Have Been Unable To Lose Weight & Keep It Off MEDICALLY SUPERVISED WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAM DETOX/CLEANSE PROGRAMS NOW OFFERING ZERONA® Call for more information.

OUR PLEDGE

You Will Lose 4-40 lbs. in the 1st Stage of Your Treatment

Our Program consists of several stages in your weight loss development Evaluation & Counseling • Body Composition • Testing BMI • Review Data

Patient Protocol Includes:

Diet • Nutrition • Exercise & Medical Management

Dipro • Phendimetrazine • Lomanim • Xenacal

HARVARD Weight Loss Program 200 Motor Parkway, Suite D-23 Hauppauge • 935 Northern Blvd., Suite 301 Great Neck

www.getthinmd.com 631.435.4300 • 516.858.0008 www.howlp.com

16

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


Awards Presented by

Program Sponsors

Program

This Week: Smithtown

To get your school involved!

Email Beverly Fortune at bfortune@longislandpress.com

To read this story in full—and more from Smithtown High School East!—go to highschool.longislandoress.com/smithtown

broader implications, however. Online charter schools, for example, have been championed for their fiscal and practical benefits, though they have achieved varying levels of success. They are generally associated with substantial withdrawal rates due to the self-motivation they require from their students and the strain they put on their students’ parents. Students who neglect to do the work that is required of them are sometimes able to remain on school rosters because it allows the for-profit programs to continue receiving public funding for them. The increasingly emphasized financial aspect of education (which

Education + Technology = ? By Haleigh Williams

Recently, there has been an amplified push to incorporate technology into the educational process. Between the increasingly ubiquitous SMART Boards throughout the school and the mounting usage of such websites as JupiterGrades and Turnitin, students have surely noticed that many teachers have been endeavoring to make recent technological developments work to their advantage. The movement away from the traditional education system and toward one based upon modern advancements has much

is augmented by this type of academic setup) is worrisome to many, and rightfully so given the current state of our economy and its impact on our country and our mindsets. Online charter schools relegate teachers to a role far below the one that they have traditionally held. They rob students of the opportunity to interact face-to-face with their educators, who are in turn robbed of the opportunity to fully realize their instructive potential. Obviously, that is not a positive direction in which to go. In another attempt to bring the educational process up to date,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is leading the way in the move toward accessibility for establishments of higher education, pioneering the field by making plans to introduce unprecedented pedagogical resources to the online realm. MIT will possess the first university-associated online program to offer actual documentation of course completion in the form of a certificate of mastery. There will be a small, to-be-determined fee, and the accumulation of these monies will reportedly be used to further the university’s undertaking…

Read This and other students’ Stories at highschool.longislandpress.com

Rates so attractive you’ll want to start early.

YOUTH SAVINGS

4

Up to 21 Years Old

Bethpage is proud to sponsor the LI Press High School Journalism Program.

.00%

APY*

On the first $1,000. 1.00% APY interest on balances higher than $1,000.

At Hofstra, you’re at the center of everything. So you can learn more. Think more. Be more.

Find a branch near you at lovebethpage.com to open an account today! * Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 11/1/11 and is subject to change without notice. Dividends calculated on a simple interest day-of-deposit to day-of-withdrawal basis. Fees or other conditions could reduce earnings. Consumer accounts only. Minimum balance to open account and certain restrictions may apply. Account activity restrictions may apply.

More than 140 degree programs. Hundreds of clubs and activities. A well-connected alumni network. And easy 30-minute access to all the jobs, internships and entertainment New York City has to offer. All on a suburban Long Island campus so beautiful, it’s a registered arboretum. If you’re ready to do more with your education, Hofstra University is ready for you.

prideandpurpose

Spring Open House | Sunday, April 29 Find out more @ hofstra.edu/springopen

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

News

lovebethpage.com 800-628-7070 Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

hofstra.edu You’ll love banking here.

Food

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Ad_BeMore_AprSOH_LIPress.indd 1

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

17

1/31/12 1:05 PM


YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS.

I

t’s that time of year Isles fans. The games are ramping up and the players are ready to go. This is when you want to be in the Coliseum! Join us as we push through the Eastern Conference against some of our fiercest rivals in the most intense action of the season!

SATURDAY, MARCH 10 @7PM VS. DEVILS TUESDAY, MARCH 13 @ 7PM VS. CAPITALS THURSDAY, MARCH 15 @ 7PM VS. FLYERS THURSDAY, MARCH 29 @ 7PM VS. PENGUINS

SATURDAY, MARCH 31 @ 1PM VS. BRUINS SUNDAY, APRIL 1 @ 3PM VS. SENATORS THURSDAY, APRIL 5 @ 7PM VS. JETS

MENTION: LONG ISLAND PRESS

PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS TODAY:

I.800.882.ISLES(47537) EXT. I NEWYORKISLANDERS.COM FACEBOOK.COM/NEWYORKISLANDERS • TWITTER.COM/NYIISLANDERS

389U_11_12_Li_Press_ROS_Quarter_Page_Color_Ad.indd 1

18

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

2/29/12 4:55 PM

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


Long Island Press Arts, Entertainment & Nightlife

Events

Thursday p.27

Friday p.28

Saturday p.29

Sunday p.29

Week of March 8 - March 15, 2012

Monday p.30

Tuesday p.30

Wednesday p.30

Ongoing Birthday Bar Fridays @ Mulcahy’s 2-for-1 Bud Light pints from 3 p.m.-3 a.m. Bring your friends for your birthday any Friday night and get free apps, VIP seating, a bucket of Bud Lights and birthday cupcakes!

ESOL Classes @ Baldwin Library This program helps adults whose native language is not English improve skills in speaking, comprehending, reading and writing English. Classes will be held on 10 consecutive Wednesdays beginning March 21, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Fee is $55. In-person registration is ongoing at the Adult Reference Desk

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////

This Fire

Paula Cole performs at the City Winery in Manhattan on Sunday, 3.11. Schafers Fridays @

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

ROCK ‘N’ ROLL NEVER FORGETS @ DIX HILLS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER During his time at the legendary WNEW-FM and continuing today on WFUV and Sirius/XM Classic Vinyl, radio personality Dennis Elsas has interviewed rock legends including John Lennon, Jerry Garcia, and more. Join Elsas for a live multi-media journey through his historic rock archives. Sunday, 3.11.—Daphne Livingston More on this event on page 31

IRISH FESTIVAL @ HOFSTRA Celebrating the Irish music, food and culture to with a number of music and dance performances throughout the day, as well activities for children, more than 50 craft vendors and authentic Irish food. New to the 2012 entertainment lineup are Stone Row, performing Celtic and world music with a contemporary edge, and The Black Velvet Band returns with The Hirten Family Irish Dancers. Visit hofstra.edu/festivals for full lineup. Sunday, 3.11.—DL

Venue addresses and information can be found on Page 28

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Venue Info p.28

Do This Event Listings

Adventures In Plymptoons! @ cinema arts centre A special evening with artist and animator Bill Plympton and Northport filmmaker Alexia Anastasio, celebrating the Long Island premiere of the documentary about the artist world-renowned for his cartoon shorts and feature films, including Idiots & Angels, Guard Dog, Mutant Aliens, I Married A Strange Person, and his work on MTV, in a career spanning three decades. Thursday, 3.8.—JG SPRING CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL @ NASSAU COLISEUM Back for its sixth year in a row, the Spring Craft Beer Festival features more than 50 craft brewers from around the country, pouring samples of more than 100 of their finest brews. This years lineup will include new and award-winning breweries from Long Island as well as stellar craft breweries from across the country. Visit www.springcraftbeerexpo.com for details. Saturday, 3.10.—Jaclyn Gallucci

Thursday p.30

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

Schafers The two-floor venue with retractable roof hosts a dueling pianos 8 p.m. every Friday. Nathan Sawaya: Recent Works @ Nassau County Museum of Art Sawaya is well known for his groundbreaking fusion of pop art, surrealism and LEGO® building blocks. Through 3.18. Lisa Ahronee Golub: A Visit to the Bronx Zoo @ Huntington Public Library Soft pastels, oil

for

paints and oil pastels. Through 4.27. The Paintings of Louis Comfort Tiffany: Works from a Long Island Collection @ Nassau County Museum of Art A major exhibition showcasing more than 100 oils and works on paper. Screenings of Louis Comfort Tiffany Remembered—a rare 58-minute video hosted by Hugh F. McKean, director of the Morse Museum who also studied with Tiffany during the 1930s—daily through 3.18. thursday 3.8 Mutemath @ Best Buy Theater Todd Snider @ Irving Plaza Kaiser Chiefs @ Terminal 5 Filter @ Gramercy Theatre March Healing Circle /Creating Extraordinary Mind & Body Wellness @ Family Wellness Center Waking Sleeping Beauty @ Molloy College The true story of how Disney regained it magic with a staggering output of hits. A “talkback” Continued on page 20

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

19


Do This Where it’s At Do This Venue Information Continued from page 19 /////////////////////

with the producer will follow the event. Into It. Over It. @ Vibe Lounge Eilen Jewell/The Sweetback Sisters @ Bell House Altan @ City Winery Bowlive @ Brooklyn Bowl Through 3.10.

Barn Burner/Natur/ Spirits of the Dead/ Brickeater @ St. Vitus O.A.R. @ Bowery Ballroom Through 3.10. Craig Finn (of The Hold Steady) @ Music Hall of Williamsburg Friday 3.9 Pints for Pets @ Portside Bar & Grill Raise your beer glasses for Save-aPet Animal Rescue. Faster Pussycat @ Ollies Point This L.A. outfit is a relic of the ’80s hairmetal movement. And while the band was best known for the radio hits “House of

Pain,” “Poison Ivy” and a cover of Carly Simon’s “You’re So Vain,” there was a time when Faster Pussycat was broken up until the original lineup reunited in 2001. With Stiletto, Kore Rozzik, Mr. Murray, DB Sleeze & Tired Wings.—Dave Gil de Rubio The ’70s Soul Jam @ NYCB Theatre at Westbury The Mandolin Experience @ BACCA

Classic Albums Live: The Beatles, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band @ Tilles Center William Holden Weekend @ Bay Street Theatre Also 3.10. Flower & Garden Show @ Hicks Nurseries Through 3.18. Diego Garcia @ Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center Even though Diego Continued on page 21

Schafer’s—111 W. Broad- room.com way, Port Jefferson Irving Plaza—17 Irving Staller Center—Stony Pl. 212-777-6800. www. Brook University, Nicolls irvingplaza.com Road, Stony Brook. www. Looney Tunes—31 stallercenter.sunysb.edu Joe’s Pub—425 Lafayette St. 212-539-8778. www. netto Hill Rd., Plainview. Brookvale Ave., West Nassau County Suffolk county Westhampton Beach joespub.com 516-822-3535 841 East Lounge—841 E. Babylon. 631-587-7722. Performing Arts Baldwin Public Library— Jericho Tpke., Huntington www.looneytunescds.com Center—76 Main St., Madison Square Garden— Molloy College—1000 Brokerage Comedy 2 Penn Plaza. 212-465Hempstead Ave., Rockville Station McGuires Comedy Westhampton Beach. Club—2797 Merrick Rd, 6741. www.thegarden.com Centre 631-288-1500. www. BACCA Arts Center—149 Club—1627 Smithtown Bellmore. 516-785-8655. N. Wellwood Ave., Linden- Ave., Bohemia. 631-467- whbpac.org www.brokeragecomedy. Mercury Lounge—217 E. Mulcahy’s—3232 5413. www.mcguirescomhurst. www.babylonarts. com Houston St. 212-260Railroad Ave., Wantagh. YMCA Boulton Cenedyshows.com com 4700. www.mercuryloung516-783-7500. www. ter—37 W. Main St., Bay Cold Spring Harbor Whal- muls.com enyc.com Shore. 631-969-1101. Bay Street Theatre—The Melville Marriot—1350 ing Museum— 279 Main www.boultoncenter.org Street  Cold Spring Hbr Radio City Music Nassau Coliseum—1255 Long Wharf, Sag Harbor. Old Walt Whitman Rd Hall—1260 6th Ave. www. Hempstead Tpke., Union- 631-725-9500. www. Napper Tandy’s NorthElmont Public Libaystreet.org Manhattan radiocity.com dale. 631-920-1203. port—229 Laurel Ave., brary—700 Hempstead www.nassaucoliseum. Northport. 631-757-4141. B.B. Kings Blues Club Bayard Cutting ArboreTpke., Elmont. 516-354Terminal 5—610 W. 56th com & Grill—237 West 42nd tum— Montauk Highway, www.nappertandys.com 5280 St. 212-582-6600. www. St. 212-997-4144. www. terminal5nyc.com Nassau County Museum East Islip Napper Tandy’s SmithFamily Wellness Center— bbkingblues.com of Art—1 Museum Dr., town—15 E. Main St., Book Revue—313 New 641-B Old Country Rd., Webster Hall—125 E 11th Roslyn Harbor. 516-484- York Ave., Huntington. Beacon Theatre—2124 Smithtown. 631-360Plainview St. 212-353-1600. www. 9337. www.nassaumu0606. www.nappertand- Broadway. 212-465-6500. websterhall.com 631-271-1442. www. seum.com Governor’s Comedy www.beacontheatre.com ys.com bookrevue.com Club—90 Division Ave., NYCB Theatre at WestBest Buy Theater—1515 Brentwood Recreational Napper Tandy’s Miller Brooklyn/queens Levittown. 516-731-3358. bury—960 Brush Hollow Broadway. 212-930-1950. Place—275 Route 25A, Center—99 Third Ave, www.govs.com Bell House—149 Seventh Rd., Westbury. 877-598- Brentwood. www.bestbuytheater.com Miller Place. 631-331St., Gowanus 718-643Hicks Nurseries—100 Jeri- 8694. www.thetheatreat5454. www.nappertand6510. www.thebellhouseBowery Ballroom—6 Cinema Arts Centre—423 ys.com westbury.com cho Tpke., Westbury ny.com Delancey St. 212-533Park Ave., Huntington Hofstra University—Hemp- Ollies Point—140 Merrick 631-423-FILM. www. 2111. www.boweryballParamount—370 New Brooklyn Bowl—61 Wythe Rd., Amityville. 516-208- cinemaartscentre.org stead Turnpike, Hemproom.com York Ave., Huntington Ave., Williamsburg 7186590. www.clubloaded. stead. www.hofstra.edu 963-3369. www.brooklynDix Hills Performing Arts Patchogue Theatre— 71 Calvary Baptist com La Famiglia—641 Old East Main St., Patchogue. Church—123 W, 57th St. bowl.com Center—305 N. Service Portside Bar & Grill—242 Rd., Dix Hills. 631-656Country Rd, Plainview 212-975-0170 631-207-1300. www. Music Hall of WilliamsE. Main St., Port Jefferson 2148. www.dhpac.org patchoguetheatre.com burg—66 N. Sixth St., WilLandmark on Main City Winery—155 Varick Street— 232 Main St., Port RC Dugans—2314 Hemp- Doggie University K9 St. 212-608-0555. www. liamsburg 212-486-5400. Quogue Community www.musichallofwilliamsstead Tpke., East Meadow Academy—41 Saxon Ave., Hall—126 Jessup Ave., Washington. 516-767citywinery.com burg.com 6444. www.landmarkonQuogue Bay Shore Tilles Center—720 NorthGramercy Theatre—127 mainstreet.org St. Vitus—1120 Manhatern Blvd., Greenvale. E. 23rd St. 212-777Grey Horse Tavern—291 Ripe Art Gallery—67A McFadden’s—210 Merrick www.tilles.org 6800. www.thegramercy- tan Ave., Greenpoint. www. Broadway, Greenlawn. Bayport Ave., Bayport. saintvitusbar.com Rd., Rockville Centre. 516theatre.com www.ripeartgal.com 631-472-1868 Vibe Lounge—60 N. Park 442-2600. www.mcfadFlushing Town Hall—137Ave., Rockville Centre. Highline Ballroom—431 St. Luke’s RC Church—AuHuntington Public Lidensrvc.com 35 Northern Blvd., Flush516-208-6590. www. brary—New York Avenue, ditorium, Lower Level 266 W. 16th St. 212-414Mid-Island Y JCC—45 Ma- vibeloungeli.com ing. 718-463-7700 5994. www.highlineballHuntington Station Wicks Rd., Brentwood. John W. Engeman Theater—250 Main St., Northport. 631-261-2900. www.johnwengementheater.com

To Submit your own event Listings go to www.longislandpress.com/dothis

One of the top hospitals in the country for cardiology and heart surgery.

-U.S.News & World Report

No other hospital on Long Island can make that statement.

And no other hospital on Long Island can say it’s made the U.S.News & World Report list of the country’s best hospitals for cardiology and heart surgery the last five years in a row. Or that it performs more heart surgeries than any other hospital in New York State. And that dominance should continue because St. Francis is a premier center for clinical trials in cardiac imaging and treatments. So, while there are many excellent hospitals on Long Island, when it comes to your heart, there’s only one.

Member of Catholic Health Services of Long Island. 100 Port Washington Blvd., Roslyn, NY 11576 For a physician referral, call 1-888 -HEARTNY. w w w. s t f r a nc i s he a r t c e nt e r. c om

20

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


Do This Continued from page 20 /////////////////////

Garcia’s former band Elefant was on a post-punk trip that found them sounding like either warmedover Joy Division or ’90s Suede for the past decade, the group has since broken up, allowing its former front man to get his solo career underway. But rather than continue to put on his best Mozz impression, Garcia has instead chosen to go the Latin balladeer route of Julio Iglesias and Antonio Carlos Jobim.—DGdR Jim David @ Brokerage Comedy Club Interwoven Worlds: Exploring Domestic and Nomadic Life in Turkey @ Flushing Town Hall Recreating the living spaces of a nomad’s tent and an Ottoman-style interior.  Through 4.30. Casino Singles Night @ 841 East Lounge All ages. www. weekenddating.com Pete Lee @ McGuire’s Comedy Club Also 3.10. Anthony Green @ Looney Tunes Celebrating the release Beautiful Things with a performance and autograph signing at 6 p.m. RC Smith @ Governor’s Comedy Club Also 3.10. Stephen Baldwin hosts Awakening @ Calvary Baptist Church Sophie B. Hawkins @ YMCA Boulton Center Hate Eternal/ Cerebral Bore/ Pyrrhon/Gang Signs/Humanity Falls @ St. Vitus Los Amigos Invisibles @ Music Hall of Williamsburg Paul Thorn & Ruthie Foster @ City Winery Young the Giant @ Terminal 5 Phil Keaggy Band @ B.B. King Blues Club & Grill Michael Schenker Group @ Gramercy Theatre News

Columns

Big Time Rush @ Radio City Bobby Keys & the Suffering Bastards @ Highline Ballroom Also 3.11. ’70s Soul Jam @ NYCB Theatre Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theatre Throuh 3.25. Saturday 3.10 March Birthday Bash @ McFadden’s Celebrating a birthday in March?  Drink free! Call Nicole at 516-4422600 to set up your party. Cowboy Junkies @ Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center Featuring the wispy vocals of Margo Timmins, whose brothers Michael and Peter round out the band along with bassist Alan Anton, the Junkies always remained huge in their home country of Canada while maintaining a healthy following in the States in the midst of bouncing between label deals. Since 2010, the Canadian quartet has embarked on the ambitious four-CD Nomad Series, with each disc covering a different theme. The last set, The Wilderness, drops in March.—DGdR Scout Spaghetti Dinner & Silent Auction @ St. Luke’s RC Church Auditorium, Lower Level. 4-8 p.m Spring Doo Wop Extravaganza @ NYCB Theatre I Love the 80s Singles party @ RC Dugans Ages 27-49. www. weekenddating.com Pump It Up! @ Hicks Nurseries Learn how to grow the biggest pumpkin on your block at 11 a.m.! Mainframe @ Ripe Art Gallery Digital paintings by Zig. Dresden Philharmonic @ Tilles Center Learn to Pickle @ Hicks Nurseries Learn the basics from the Pickle People. Also 3.11. F e at u r e s

Sister Act w/ Andrea & Celeste @ Elmont Library Theatre Celebrating the music of great vocal legends such as Cher, Tina Turner, The Andrew Sisters, Cyndi Lauper and more. St. Baldrick’s @ Napper Tandy’s—All Locations Golden Gloves Amateur Boxing @ Brentwood Recreational Center Bouts start at 2 p.m. sharp. $20 donation Women’s History Sunday for Girls & Girl Scouts @ Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum What’s a corset busk? How did a woman wear her hair in 1850? Enjoy handson history! Two Man Advantage @ Ollies Point This hardcore punk outfit made up of Merrick natives take to the stage in hockey gear and often sing songs about the ’80s Pittsburgh Penguins, beer and the Melon Arena. With former members bearing the names Teemu Heineken and Amstel Fuhr, there’s no doubting Two Man’s Advantage’s tonguein-cheek allegiance to puck and ale that most notably got them dragged them into court by the Zamboni Company back in 2004 thanks to the TMA song “Zamboni Driving Maniac.” With This Life We Live, Wiretap Crash & Arc of Decent.—DGdR Jon Anderson of Yes @ B.B. King Blues Club & Grill Symphony X/Iced Earth @ Best Buy Theater With Warbringer Jonah Matranga (from Far & Onedrawing) @ Vibe Lounge Eric “Monty” Morris & Crazy Baldhead @ Bell House Bebe Neuwirth @ Staller Center Casual fans may know her as steelyeyed battleaxe Dr. Lilith Sternin on Cheers, but Neuwirth has also hit the road with a one-woman cabaret show, with the current production entitled “Stories With a Piano,” which will mix stories and song.—DGdR Juan Luis Guerra @

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Radio City

POKER NIGHT

The Might Be Giants @ Terminal 5

Presented By

Spring Doo Wop Extravaganza @ NYCB Theatre @ Westbury With Kenny Vance & The Planotones, Buddy Holly’s Original Crickets, The Tymes, Lenny Coco & The Chimes, The Excellents and The Original Brooklyn Reunion featuring The Mystics, The Passions & Emil Stucchio & The Classics.

Tuesday, March 27th at Social Sports Kitchen Uniondale, NY

100 per person

$

Includes Open Bar, food & entry into FREE poker tournament Registration 6pm ● Poker begins 7pm

Table Sponsors - $200 Includes logo signage on table at event.

Contact: Robert Bommarito at robert@bommaritolaw.com More information: www.ebalongisland.com/poker-night-2012

David Halley @ Grey Horse Tavern Saw Doctors @ Irving Plaza Also 3.16. Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes @ Landmark on Main Street David Johansen @ Highline Ballroom John Wesley Harding’s Cabinet of Wonders @ City Winery

12th Annual Spring Luncheon Presented by

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Networking & Luncheon 11:30am - 2:30pm HONORING

Bulldog Match/ LIBC Match Show @ Doggie University

The 2012 Spring Luncheon benefits EAC’s underfunded programs helping people in need.

For more information, call (516) 539-0150 or visit www.eacinc.org

GRAND CELEBRATION SPONSOR Bethpage Federal Credit Union

Continued on page 22

Classified

Crest Hollow Country Club

John Murcott, Founder & CEO

Black 47 @ YMCA Boulton Center Sunday 3.11 The Dropkick Murphys/Frank Walker @ The Paramount Coming from the same class of punkmeets-Celtic music as The Pogues and Flogging Molly, Beantown outfit The Dropkick Murphys are best known for “Shipping Up to Boston,” featuring lyrics from an unreleased Woody Guthrie poem. With it becoming the millennial answer to Gary Glitter’s “Rock and Roll Part 2,” thanks to the song’s far-reaching use in sports arenas around North America, the Murphys have shared stages with numerous artists including Bruce Springsteen and fellow New Englanders Aerosmith and are working on the band’s forthcoming eighth studio album. Making more of a punch into this already fiery bill is punk-turnedalt-folkie Frank Walker, whose 2011 album England Keep My Bones cleverly included allusions to Merry Old England, Shakespeare and included the odd traditional folk song. —DGdR

Crest Hollow Country Club, Woodbury, NY

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

PLATINUM SPONSORS

MSC Industrial Direct Company, Inc. New York Community Bank Foundation The Treeline Companies

Long Island Press

for

PREMIER SPONSORS AmeriCorp CA, Inc.

Sponsors as of February 18, 2010

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

21


Do This

Continued from page 21 /////////////////////

K9 Academy St. Patrick’s Day Parade @ Patchogue/Holbrook Roads, Lake Ronkonkoma Pipers, community bands, organizations and floats. 2 p.m. Artspace: The Musical @ Patchogue Theatre Rhonda Denét & the Silver Fox Songs Trio “From Jazz to Soul” @ Elmont Library Theatre

Corned Beef & Comedy @ John W. Engeman Theater St. Patty’s Day food and festivities.

James Maddock @ University Café

Creating Extraordinary Mind & Body Wellness @ Family Wellness Center

Mindless Self Indulgence @ Irving Plaza With Morningwood. The Clancy Legacy @ Tilles Center Gomez @ Bowery Ballroom With Hey Rosetta! Monday 3.12 LI Writers Guild @ Book Revue Bad Girlfriend/ Throwing Up/Street Smells @ St. Vitus

Join today and melt away the pounds.

The Black Keys @ Madison Square Garden With Arctic Monkeys. Tuesday 3.13 The Luck of the Laureates @ MidIsland Y JCC Past and present Nassau and Suffolk Poets Laureate read. Adrenaline Mob @ Looney Tunes Autograph signing at 7 p.m. Tee-Off Party and Sponsor Expo @ Melville Marriott A fun-filled evening of festivities and networking with the Executive Women’s Golf Association. Italy’s First Female Rabbi @ Hofstra Rabbi Barbara Aiello presents “The Jews of Southern Italy: A Lost History Rediscovered” at 8 p.m.

new york sports clubs MySportsClubs.com • 108 tri-state locations Like us on

facebook.com/myNYSC

RATE-LOCK GUARANTEE

Your monthly dues will never increase.

New Build (Members of LCD Soundsystem & Hot Chip) @ Mercury Lounge With Reverend John Wilkins. Also 3.14. The Tossers/We Are the Union @ Bell House Celtic Tenors @ City Winery

22

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

Coco Montoya @ B.B. King Blues Club Wednesday 3.14 Smokey & The Bandit @ Cinema Arts Centre With Director and legendary stuntman Hal Needham.

Celtic Woman @ Radio City

due to global warming, bathing suit season starts next week.

Special St. Patrick’s Day Album Release Show.

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Willie Nile @ Joe’s Pub Jay Farrar/Will Johnson/Yim Yames/Anders Parker @ Webster Hall With Bobby Bare, Jr. Jackie Greene @ City Winery Special acoustic set. Rosetta/Kings Destroy/Hollow Leg/Clamfight @ St. Vitus Thursday 3.15 Squarepusher @ Webster Hall Joe Hurley & the Gents @ Joe’s Pub Ballyhoo! @ Ollies Point Immortal Technique @ Irving Plaza YOSH/Picastro/ Sondra Sun-Odeon @ St. Vitus Marianne Faithfull & Marc Ribot @ City Winery Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish @ Book Revue Authors of How to Talk so Kids Will Listen & Listen so Kids will Talk. Becky’s New Car @ Quogue Community Hall Featuring the Hampton Theatre Company. Through 4.1. Beginner’s Class @ Bayard Cutting Arboretum Learn how to grow dahlias. www. LongIslandDahlia.com Dinner Talk: Live Free of Pain & Stress @ LaFamiglia Restaurant Call 516-822-8499 to RSVP. Food

Classified


Rock and Roll Gatekeeper Dennis Elsas and His Multi-Media Time Machine

By Dave Gil de Rubio It may have started out as the name of the opening song on Bob Seger’s 1976 album Night Moves, but “Rock and Roll Never Forgets” struck a chord with legendary DJ Dennis Elsas, who borrowed the name for his live multimedia presentation, which will be presented on March 11 at the Dix Hills Performing Arts Center. “‘Rock and Roll Never Forgets’ was a great song by Bob Seger that came out in the 1970s,” Elsas remembers today. “When it came out, I was on the air from 6 p.m.-10 p.m. at WNEW-FM. There’s something about the phrase that says to me [it’s] not just the celebration of old songs but it’s about loyalty, friendship and this continuing legacy of the celebration of rock and roll.” Over the past four decades-plus, the Queens native has been a mainstay on New York radio, first as an onair personality and music director for WNEW-FM from 1971 through 1998, and since summer 2000, his on-air home has been at 90.7 WFUV-FM, where he holds down the 2-6 p.m. weekday shift. In 2004, Elsas added satellite radio host of the “Classic Vinyl” channel on Sirius/ XM satellite radio to his resume. Given the fact that Elsas has had a front-row seat for much of the history of New York rock radio, who better to be a kind of gatekeeper for so much of this rich history? Along with the treasure trove of photographs and memories recounted on his site, www.denniselsas. com, he has a wealth of on-air interviews done over the years. While legendary artists ranging from Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey to Elton John, Ray Davies and John Fogerty make up some of this impressive audio archive, it is the two-hour on-air sit-down he conducted with John Lennon back in 1974 that

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

is the segment for which Elsas is bestknown. Elsas had been invited to the Record Plant to watch the ex-Beatle mix Walls and Bridges, prior to the album’s release and after meeting him, flippantly invited the Liverpool native for an onair visit at WNEW-FM. “I asked John to come down full well knowing that no Beatle had ever been up to the radio station,” Elsas recalls. “The phone rang a week or so later, and it was [thengirlfriend] May Pang calling to say John was game to come, [asking] when he should arrive and if it would be all right to bring a few of his own records.” For the next two hours, the late rock legend and his on-air host discussed the new record, his immigration problems and even wound up with Lennon doing a cheeky on-air promotion for New Jersey rock club Joint In the Woods. “The fascinating thing is that years later, so much of what he talked about became Beatles legend—the King Lear lines at the end of ‘I Am the Walrus.’ The description of the person saying ‘number nine” at the end of “Revolution” being an engineer’s voice—if he told that before, I don’t know, I hadn’t heard it,” Elsas explains. This storied lore is just a small part of the music history shared by the Queens College alum throughout the “Rock ‘N’ Roll Never Forgets” live event. “Bob Seger sings, ‘All Chuck’s children are out there playing his licks,’” says Elsas. “I don’t play an instrument but I like to feel like I keep the continuity going.” Dennis Elsas presents Rock ‘N’ Roll Never Forgets March 11 at Dix Hills Performing Arts Center. For more information, visit www.denniselsas.com.

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

23


this boat rocks: andrea, bartender at port jeff brewing co., keeps the brews flowing in the tasting room, where the bar is a boat

Cheers for Local Beers Long Island’s Craft Brewery Boom Takes Off By Timothy Bolger tbolger@longislandpress.com A veritable local beer boom is flowing across Long Island, where the number of craft brewing companies building breweries nearly doubled in the past year, drawn from a burgeoning cottage industry of home brewers— despite negative economic news. Long Ireland Beer Co. opened in Riverhead last summer, Port Jeff Brewing Co. set up shop in its namesake village downtown in the fall, and Great South Bay Brewery opened its Bay Shore headquarters this winter. They join Barrier Brewing Co.— poised to quintuple its bare-bones Oceanside operations this spring—by following in the footsteps of LI foamfathers Blue Point Brewing Co., Southampton Ales and Lagers along with fellow newcomers Greenport Harbor Brewing Co., founded just after the 2008 financial crisis hit. It’s no surprise that free samples of fresh, cold beer tend to draw a thirsty crowd. “There’s an interesting thing happening here,” says Mike Philbrick, the Port Jefferson brewmaster, noting how surrounding regions established microbreweries about 20 years ago. “It’s funny it hasn’t happened until now.” And they’re not alone. Fire Island Beer Co.—which, like its rookie craft brewer brethren, is on tap at nearly 100 bars and restaurants—has been looking for a home while outsourcing their four-year-old brewing operations. Spider Bite Beer Co. in Holbrook and Blind Bat Brewery in Centerport are small, home-based brewers among those who may quit their day jobs next. The local brewers are distinct from brew pubs like Brickhouse Brewery in Patchogue, German-owned Back Forest Brew Haus in Farmingdale and Mass.-based John Harvard’s Brew House in Lake Grove, which only sell their suds in-house. Although it may seem like the Island is awash in local beer—enough for charter buses to offer LI brewery tours—a communal spirit comes with the competition. Same as competing restaurants share stock, the brewers swap ingredients when they’re short. “We wouldn’t be able to do what we do if they didn’t do what they did,” says Greg Martin, co-founder of Long Ireland, referring to local innovators Blue Point and Southampton, both established in the mid-1990s. He sold

24

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

his first keg in 2009 after an apprenticeship, then secured investors and found a location in a barn-like old warehouse, ironically in the Polish Town section of Riverhead. The proof is in his crowded tasting room, where traditional Irish folk songs are piped in while East Enders mingle with far-flung daytrippers. Bus-tour stops from nearby North Fork wine country are not uncommon. But the flannel-wearing duo at the lone Nassau County-based brewery of the bunch, Barrier Brewing, were not shy about showing their competitive side after being named best brewery in New York State last year at the TAP New York Craft Beer and Food Festival. “Some people [think] that because it’s local, it’s good,” said co-founder Evan Klein alongside partner Craig Frymark during a recent tasting. “Drink local only if it’s good.” Mark Burfurd, co-founder of Blue Point, who is pleased with the trend and exploring a second location, cautions that despite the successes, “We’re all small guys in the big picture of brewers.” Phil Ebel, director of sales for Great South Bay, likes it that way, given their glowing reception. “Connecting with the people that drink your beer, that’s irreplaceable,” he says. To the average hop head, a local brewer has “made it” when their six packs are sold at neighborhood stores. Aside from Blue Point and Southampton, Fire Island is the only other local beer currently available in 12-oz. bottles. Although some hope to expand into that market, most are only available on tap at bars and restaurants, although tasting rooms and select beer distributors offer the local selections in growlers, or half gallon jugs—often with tasting-room-only special releases. Blue Point, Southampton, Long Ireland and Port Jeff also offer some selections in 22-oz. bottles, dubbed bombers. Some might say these LI craft brewers are still nursing their beer, as this boom has just begun. But they’re confident there’s still a large thirst in need of quenching. “We can use a few more,” says Philbrick from his nautical-themed brewery with a view of Port Jefferson Harbor. “People like to drink local. And when it comes to beer especially, people don’t buy the same beer every time.”

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


“#1 Hotel on L.I.” Join us for L.I.’s Top Sunday Brunch The Hotel’s award-winning brunch designed by Chef Steven De Bruyn features a culinary showcase of made-to-order omelets, gourmet pastas, seasonal salads, a seafood extravaganza of lobster, shrimp, and smoked salmon and a dazzling array of pastries and confections. Plus, unlimited Bloody Mary, Screwdriver and Mimosa cocktails. Seatings begin at noon.

45 Seventh Street in Garden City ~ For reservations, please call 516.663.REIN For additional details, please visit www.gchevents.com

If this doesn’t belong in your living room, neither do cheap windows.

get the window You pay the intere s, st we

5 YEARS 0% financing

with our Instant Product Rewards1 Offer expires April 15, 2012

Call for your FREE Window Diagnosis

1-800-561-6395

FindGreatWindows.com/LIP

DETAILS OF OFFER: Offer valid through April 15, 2012. Restrictions and conditions apply; see your local representative for details. Cannot be combined with prior purchases, other offers, or coupons. No adjustments to previous orders. Minimum purchase of 4 windows required. Offer excludes patio doors, bay and bow windows. Minimum payments are required, but no Finance Charges will be assessed if (1) promo balance is paid in full in 60 months, and (2) all minimum monthly payments on account paid when due. Offer valid at participating locations. Renewal by Andersen of Long Island is neither a broker nor lender. Financing is provided by third-party lenders unaffiliated with Renewal by Andersen of Long Island. As part of the Instant Product Rewards Plan, all homeowners must be present and must purchase during the initial visit to qualify for offer. “Renewal by Andersen®” and the Renewal by Andersen logos are registered trademarks of Andersen Corporation. © 2012 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2012 Lead Surge, LLC. All rights reserved. Renewal by Andersen is the exclusive start-to-finish window replacement subsidiary of Andersen Corporation. Andersen Corporation, including its subsidiary Renewal by Andersen Corporation, was named ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year. Nassau Consumer Affair License # H081015000, Suffolk Consumer Affairs License # 43991-H. NYC 1307704. Renewal by Andersen of Long Island is an independently owned and operated affiliate operating in the NY metropolitan area.

1

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

25


Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day all week!

Simply Fondue

24 Great Neck Road Great Neck, NY “NY’s most romantic restaurant”

For Reservations: 516-466-4900 or opentable.com Buy a four-course dinner at the regular price of $38 and get one glass of wine, standard cocktail or any of our 65 martinis

FREE

Dinner includes salad, cheese fondue, fondue entree & chocolate fondue. Lots of varieties to choose from. Must present this coupon to qualify. Not to be combined with other offers. Valid 3/9-3/18 SF-LI

Saturday, March 17th: Irish drink specials! Bailey’s, Jameson’s & more.

For each full-priced 4-course dinner ( $38) one leprechaun eats for

FREE

(kids’ menu only - $19 value) Kids’ dinner includes cheese fondue, fondue entree & chocolate fondue. Must present this coupon to qualify. Not to be combined with other offers. Valid 3/9-3/18 SF-LI

Like” us on Facebook (Simply Fondue - Long Island) or e-mail contact@simplyfonduelongisland to join our e-mail list for more great deals. www.simplyfonduelongisland.com

Places To Party On St. Patrick’s Day By Licia Avelar lavelar@longislandpress.com St. Patrick’s Day is March 17, on the slight chance you didn’t remember, and it’s celebrated by people around the world who raise their glasses to the patron saint of Ireland and all that’s green. And there’s no better way to celebrate than with a Guinness. After all, St. Patty’s Day and Guinness go hand in hand as the stout is among the most popular brands of Irish beer. Guiness dates back to 1759 in Dublin when Arthur Guinness founded the famous brewery. And now the company which dubbed St. Patrick’s day “the friendliest day of the year,” is inviting everyone to join the world’s biggest party in an effort to achieve a Guinness World Record by pledging on their website to party responsibly in 2012. After you take the pledge, head down to a local bar, pub, restaurant or a friend’s home and celebrate with a cold one. Here are a few choice party spots. Massapequa Park 516-798-2196

Boston Garden Pub. 596 Merrick Rd, Baldwin. 516623-1830 Brennans Irish Pub. 546 Rte. 111, Hauppauge. 631979-7855 Bulldog Grille. 292 Merrick Rd., Amityville. 631-691-1947. Thebulldoggrille. com. $4 Guinness Pints, $3 Jameson Shots and a Free Irish Buffet from 4-6 p.m. Cavanaugh’s Irish Pub. 255 Blue Point Ave., Blue Point 631-363-2666. Croxley Ale House. Multiple Locations. www.Croxley.com Croxley’s hosts an all-day party Saturday with free corned beef and cabbage at 3 p.m. D.S. Shanahan’s. 515 Old Dock Rd, Kings Park. 631-5444545 Guido’s Irish Pub. 1923 Wantagh Ave., Wantagh. 516826-7623. www. guidospub.com Half Penny Pub. 220 N. Main St., Sayville 631567-1948. www. TheHalfPennyPub. com Irish Coffee Pub. 131 Carlton Ave., East Islip 631277-0007. During March, they host Irish Madness on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays with corned beef and cabbage and $5 Guinness! Irish Cottage. 1010 Park Blvd.,

26

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

Irish Pub, Baldwin. 734 Sunrise Hwy, Baldwin. 516867-9706 Irish Times Pub, 975B Main St., Holbrook 631467-4330. www. IrishTimesPubNY. com  Jack Duggan’s Pub. 145 Tulip Ave., Floral Park. 516-3583690. www. JackDuggansPub. com  Jackie Reilley’s Bar & Grill. 3964 Hempstead Tpke., Bethpage. 516-7317544 Johnny McGorey’s, 131 Front St., Massapequa Park. 516-797-8584. www.JohnnyMcGoreysPub.com Katie’s Of Smithtown. 145 W. Main St., Smithtown. 631360-8556. www. katiesofsmithtown. com. A party featuring music of SouthBound and Irish Step Dancers. The Lark Pub & Grub. 93 Larkfield Rd., East Northport. 631262-9700. www. thelarkpubandgrub. com Library Café. 274 Main St., Farmingdale. 516752-7678. www. thelibrarycafe.com Lily Flanagan’s Pub. 345 Deer Park Ave., Babylon. 631539-0816. www. LilyFlanagansPub.

News

Columns

com. Lily’s opens their doors at 9 a.m. for a full Irish breakfast and at 11 a.m. showing the Ireland vs England rugby game. At 3 p.m., Irish Step Dancers and buffet. At 8 p.m. DJ spins.

the Green,” the pub offers traditional Irish fare, step dancers, bag pipers and Irish breakfast. Nutty Irishman. Multiple Locations. www. thenuttyirishman. com. The Bay Shore pub hosts a St. Patty’s Day party with live music by Maniac while the Farmingdale pub will be serving a special Irish lunch and later host That 70s Band, Green Machine and DJ Rumor.

Limerick’s Irish Pub. 742 Middle Country Rd., Selden 631-451-2386. McFadden’s 210 Merrick Rd., Rockville Centre. www. McFaddenRVC.com A special St. Paddy’s event with kegs & eggs from 10 a.m. to noon with unlimited draft for $20. Meehan’s of Huntington. 371 New York Ave., Huntington. 631351-0831. www. MeehanRestaurant. com. Great brews and extensive menu with Corned Beef & Cabbage, Dublin Fingers, Shepherd’s Pie and Irish Stew. Middle Country Beer Garden. 1702 Middle Country Rd., Centereach. www. Middlecountrybeergarden.com. A party with DJ Doug O’Mara and DJ Soco. Mr. Beery’s. 4019 Hempstead Tpke., Bethpage. www. Mrbeerys.com Ten Pints In plays on St. Pat’s at 7 p.m. Corned Beef and Cabbage with potatos and bread. Additional Irish Beer and drink specials offered. Mulcahy’s. 3232 Railroad Ave., Wantagh. 516-7837500. www.Muls. com. From Noon till 5 p.m. on St. Patty’s Day, Roger & JP’s 12th Annual Corned Beef and Chaos 2012 features $1.02 beer, free buffet, t-shirts, performances and special guests.

Paddy’s Loft. 1286 Hicksville Rd., Massapequa. 516798-7660. www. Paddysloft.com Irish Breakfast served at 10 a.m. with Barry’s Irish Tea and festivities. Patty Buchanan’s Irish American Bar. 1095 Route 25A, Stony Brook. 631-6892390. www. PattyBuchanans. com  Port Jeff Brewing Company, 22 Mill Creek Rd., Port Jefferson. An afternoon of music and specials with The Fian playing the brewery porch. Post Office Café.,130 W. Main St., Babylon. 631669-9224. www. Thepostofficecafe. com. Kegs & eggs, Irish Buffet and live music. $15 bucket of greens and $4 Guinness pints all night long! RC Dugans, 2314 Hempstead Tpke., East Meadow. 516520-0325. www. Rcdugans.com Party with $3 Green Beers and Corned Beef & Cabbage! T.J. Finley’s—42 E. Main St., Bay Shore. 631-647-4856. www.tjfinleys.com

Murphy’s Bar & Grill—234 Old Country Rd., Mineola. 516741-1776. www. murphysbarny.com

Trinity Restaurant and Bar. 190 Jericho Tpke, Floral Park. 516-3585584

Napper Tandy’s Multiple Locations. www.nappertandys. com. “The pub that parties like a club” is definitely a St. Patty’s Day staple. Named after James Napper Tandy, an Irish politician who’s memorialized in the Irish ballad, “The Wearing of

VFW Hall. 400 Lakeland Ave., Sayville. 631-5899674. From 8 p.m. to 12 p.m., VFW Hall will be hosting a St. Patrick’s Dinner and Dance. It’ll be an evening full of delicious buffet, beer, wine, soda, and music. $25 for tickets.

F e at u r e s

P r e s s P l ay

Food

Classified


Got an Idea?

Let Your Voice Be Heard!

A public forum where citizens can learn about important policy issues in Nassau County and let their ideas and views be known. With Nassau Suggestion Box, residents can: • Educate themselves about the issues facing Nassau County • Submit ideas to improve county government • Vote and comment on the ideas they like or dislike

• Learn about the candidates running for office • Participate in weekly straw polls on current issues • Learn how to easily contact their local representatives

NassauSuggestionBox.com Brought to you by Adam Haber

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

Food

P r e s s P l ay

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

27


www.acmedating.com

make a real connection Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

646.507.9500

28

Long Island Press

for

Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Espa単ol 18+ www.livelinks.com

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

Food

P r e s s P l ay

Classified


Want to help others and get paid while doing it? Maybe it’s time you learn hypnosis! Learn from some of the best hypnosis certification trainers in the country.

Buffalo, NY — April 12 TH-15 TH (LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE)

Call Now 716-874-9050 • www.buffalohypnosis.com You must possess a HS diploma & pass an oral phone interview to be accepted.

Weightloss Medications Phentermine, Phendimetrazine, etc Office visit & one month supply for $80

(631) 462-6161 & (516) 754-6001

www.MDThin.com

LOOK YOUR BEST

Help for people with

Macular Degeneration

Find out if special glasses can help you see better. Call for a FREE phone consultation with Dr. Schoenbart, Optometrist. NY state certified in low vision since 1987

(516) 794-0704

Dr. Steven Schoenbart

SchoenbartVisionCare.com

Reverse Mortgages

Men 45 and older Urinating often? Weak or hesitant flow? Bladder is not emptying completely? Wake up in the night having to urinate?

Draw all eligible cash out of your home and make no mortgage payments EVER!

Clinical drug trial. No cost. No pills. Complete urological evaluation and follow-up for one year. You will be compensated for your time ($$$).

CALL 1-888-660-3033 TODAY TO S SEE EE HOW MUCH YOU QUALIFY FOR and for a FREE 25 page catalog!

All Island Mortgage

Call Diane 516-742-3200 Ext. 302

A Leader in Reverse Mortgages 496 Route 347, Suite 308 • Smithtown, NY 11787

Night time trips to the bathroom keepiNg you awake?

• No change in ownership. You retain the title • No income or credit requirements • Must be 62 or older! • SAFE, SIMPLE & SECURE • Allows homeowners to live in their home • FHA gov’t insured • TAX FREE CASH

WAREHOUSE Seasonal-to-Hire

We are currently recruiting men & women, age 50 & older who urinate 2x or more each night, for a research study to evaluate the effectiveness of an investigational nasal spray to reduce the number of times you wake up to urinate.

Full-Time, 1st and 2nd Shifts

• Assemblers • Machine Operators • Pickers & Packers • Forklift • Shipping & Receiving Forklift position requires NYS Driver’s lic. Pleasant, upbeat working environment.

Physician exam, tests & meds at no cost. Compensation ($$$) for travel/expenses.

Apply in person at: 15 Gilpin Ave, Hauppauge, NY. Bring I.D. US Citizenship req’d.

Call Diane 516-742-3200 Ext. Client: 302 Advanced Urology Centers of NY

or Apply online at: www.positivepromotions.com Email: hr@positivepromotions.com • Fax: 631.232.3129

Publication: Community Newspaper Group Date: 2/27/12 at 1-800-OLD-BARN. day!Size: 1-800-267-1591 3.792 x 2” BW

Adoption Pregnant? Consider a loving, courageous adoption plan. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, free confidential help, local agency, choose from pre-approved families.† Photos/ updates available. Call Joy: 914-939-1180. www.ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption.org.

Autos ThisWanted ad prepared by SMM Advertising, Inc. DONATE VEHICLE: RECEIVE 631-265-5160 $1000 GROCERY COUPONS. National Animal Welfare Foundation. Support NO KILL Shelters. Help Homeless Pets. Free Towing, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NONRUNNERS Accepted 1-888-333-3848

www.woodfordbros. com. Suffolk Cty~ License #41959-H Nassau Cty~ License #H18G7160000

Condos For Sale NAPLES FLORIDA AREA! Bank Acquired Luxury Condos. Brand new 2BR/2BA, only $239,900. Same unit sold for $624,771. Own for below builder cost Buildings for Sale Autos Wanted Client: Advanced Urology Centers of NY in warm, sunny SW HASCommunity YOUR BUILDING CASH FOR CARS! WePublication: Newspaper Group Florida! High-end comSHIFTED OR SETTLED? Buy ANY Car or Truck, Date: 2/27/12 Contact Broth- munity - walk to over 20 Running or NOT! Size: Woodford 3.792 x2” BW restaurants/ 100 shops! ers Inc, for straightenDamaged, Wrecked, Must see. Call 1-866ing,This leveling, foundation Salvaged OK! Get a top ad prepared by 959-2825, x 43 and wood frame repairs dollar INSTANT offer toSMM Advertising, Inc.

EquAl opporTuniTy EmployEr

For Sale Privacy Hedges - Blowout Sale 6’ Arborvitae (cedar) Reg $129 Now $59 Beautiful, Nursery Grown. FREE Installation & FREE delivery 518-536-1367 www. lowcosttrees.com Will beat any offer!

Columns

F e at u r e s

Food

P r e s s P l ay

AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

9300. lovelllaw@aol. com. Miscellaneous ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-201-8657 www. CenturaOnline.com

Help Wanted Legal Drivers- DAILY PAY! REAL ESTATE CLOSINGS Home time choices: $875. Expd Attorney. Express Lanes 7-ONFree Buy/Sell Guide. 7/OFF, 14/ON- 7/ Music Gear TRAFFIC TICKETS/ OFF WEEKLY. Full and Client: Positive Promotions CENTER STAGE MUSIC CRIMINAL RichardNewspapers H. Part-time. New Trucks!Publication: Community We Buy/Sell/Trade/ReP.C., 3/5/12 10748 CDL-A, 3 months recent Lovell,Date: pair all fine new & used Cross Bay, Ozone Park, experience required Size: 3.792 x 2” BW gear. Guaranteed lowNY 11417 718 835800-414-9569 www.

631-265-5160

News

driveknight.com

Classified

This ad prepared by w w w . l o n g i s l a n dSMM p r e sAdvertising s.com 631-265-5160

|

Long Island Press

est price on everything from amps to guitars, PAs, DJ equipment, lighting, etc. Professional technician on site. 100% satisfaction guaranteed. Open Mon.-Thurs. 11-6pm Fri & Sat. 11-9pm. 18-40 Newbridge Rd., Bellmore. Mention this ad. Get a discount. 516-557-2527 Real Estate Delaware: 1 Family Ranch Homes. Peaceful Setting, 55 + Community. Close to shopping, beach,bay & I-95. Low 100’s, low taxes. Call 302-659-5800 or bonayrehomes.com Vacation Rentals OCEAN CITY, MARYfor

LAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com Wanted BUYING ALL Gold & Silver COINS FOR CASH! Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc Near NYC 1-800-9593419 Wanted to Buy Wanted : Will Pay Up to $15.00 For High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School / Any State. Yearbookusa@yahoo. com or 972-768-1338

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

29


Crossword STRICTLY SPEAKING ACROSS 1 Summer stinger 5 Sailor’s quaff 9 In the sack 13 Master, in Madras 18 “Dies -” 19 Melodious McEntire 20 -Valley, CA 21 Walked confidently 22 Tenured? 24 Ex-wife, sometimes? 26 Roman official 27 Umps 29 Bus. bigwig 30 Plant part 31 Writer Blyton 33 Tabula 37 At full tilt 40 Violin bows? 44 Evils 45 Terry-cloth inscription 46 Cookbook author Rombauer 47 Deed 49 Wraps up 52 Incompetent 55 Neighbor of Latvia 57 TV’s “The Game” 59 Melodramatic 60 Progress 61 Chaka Khan’s group 63 Pigeon English? 64 To boot 66 Spud bud 67 Bulldog, for one 68 “Blame - Rio” (‘84 film) 69 Capone impersonator?

73 Hire a private eye? 75 Landed 76 Palm Sunday animal 77 Humbug lead-in 79 Act like an antelope 80 Oxford figure 81 Vote in 83 “Watership Down” author 85 Defy a dictator 89 Salad veggie 91 Geronimo’s birthplace 93 Draw 94 Donated 95 Swedish currency 96 Mardi 98 It may be white 99 Signor Ferrari 101 Stockbrokers? 105 Petite pet 108 Blood components 109 Kid at court 110 Former govt. agcy. 111 Carpenter 113 Wine valley 116 Exit 120 FDA-approved snack? 126 “Equus,” for instance? 128 Inventor Otis 129 Dingy digs 130 Pat on the buns? 131 Kuwaiti ruler 132 Blackboard 133 Type of chalcedony 134 Holler 135 Odense denizen

DOWN 1 Man’s altar ego? 2 Like the Kalahari 3 Agra attire 4 Prepared a pineapple 5 Whippet’s warning 6 Keep the shelves stocked 7 Crumhorn cousin 8 Sail support 9 Furniture wood 10 Jacket info 11 Big bird 12 - brakes 13 Canonized Mlle. 14 “- you for real?” 15 Was an optimist 16 Unimprovable 17 Juicy fruit 21 Toast word 23 Await judgment 25 Macabre 28 - Lanka 32 Tennis pro Nastase 34 Moss Hart’s autobiography 35 “- Game” (‘71 film) 36 Up and about 38 Requests 39 Ain’t right? 40 Spanish sherry 41 Author Dinesen 42 “Peter Pan” pirate 43 Tried a mouthful 45 “What?” 48 Crack up 50 Proclamations 51 A nose that shows

53 Coat-of-arms figure 54 Lovett or Waggoner

56 Italian greyhound, e.g. 57 Ignoramus 58 Used up

60 Gaggle gal 62 Wood and gas 65 Sedimentary stuff

Sudoku

68 Force 69 Lose luster 70 “- Comes Mary” (‘66 song) 71 Dano or Darnell 72 Messy Madison 73 Nickels and dimes 74 Designer Lagerfeld 77 Church sale 78 Bustle 81 Happening 82 Latin class nonos 84 Scratches the surface 86 Zodiac animal 87 Buffalo waterfront 88 Actor Horsley 90 Currier’s partner 92 Memo start 93 On a whale watch, perhaps 95 Asian nation 97 Clothes 100 African equine

102 Quayle or Blocker 103 Eye appreciatively 104 Acted like a chick 105 Garden supplies 106 In the slightest degree 107 “GoodFellas” group 112 Return address? 114 “Hi, sailor!” 115 Battery part 117 - mater 118 Self-smitten 119 Thornfield governess 121 Cornerstone abbr. 122 “Evita” character 123 “- -Tiki” 124 TV Tarzan 125 King’s handle? 127 Costa del -

Last Week’s Answers

All Games © 2012 King Features Synd. All Rights Reserved

30

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

Food

P r e s s P l ay

Classified


No Clipping Required.

357 SAVINGS

$

ON AVERAGE, AARP MEMBERS ENJOY

*

ON AUTO INSURANCE

when they switch from companies like

GEICO, State Farm and Allstate CALL THE HARTFORD

Your savings could be even more!

1-888-413-8967

The AARP® Auto Insurance Program from The Hartford. The only Auto Insurance Program endorsed by AARP.

Saving is easy! Drivers who switch save an average of $357 in the first year alone — and they get all the benefits and privileges you’d expect with the AARP Auto Insurance Program. (Since drivers 50+ are safer, you don’t pay for younger drivers’ mistakes.) Homeowners could save even more — an average of $157!* That means potential combined savings of $514! Call now to request a FREE money-saving quote. No coupon necessary. Call The Hartford Today

1-888-413-8967

Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. or Saturday and Sunday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time).

Or Request a Quote Online at:

aarp.thehartford.com/clip1

Most AARP ® members qualify for an immediate phone quote. Please have your policy handy.

n 24-hour

Claims Service

n Lifetime

Renewability†

n Lock

in Your Rate for

12 Months, Not Six n Lifetime

Repair and New Car

Replacement Protection

Prefer a local agent? Simply go online and use our agent locator to find a Hartford independent agent in your area who is authorized to offer the AARP Auto & Home Insurance Program.

Not an AARP member? If you’re 50 or over, request a FREE quote and more information today!

*Savings amounts are based on information from The Hartford’s AARP Auto and Home Insurance Program customers who became new auto insurance policyholders or new homeowners insurance policyholders between 7/1/10 and 6/30/11, and provided data regarding their savings and prior carrier. Your savings may vary. Average auto insurance savings for the period was $357. Average homeowners insurance savings for the period was $157. Homeowners product is not available in all areas, including the state of Florida. The AARP Automobile & Homeowners Insurance Program from The Hartford is underwritten by Hartford Fire Insurance Company and its affiliates, One Hartford Plaza, Hartford, CT 06155. CA License #5152. In Washington, the Auto Program is underwritten by Hartford Casualty Insurance Company and the Home Program is underwritten by Trumbull Insurance Company. In Michigan, the Auto and Home programs are underwritten by Trumbull Insurance Company. AARP and its affiliates are not insurers. Paid endorsement. The Hartford pays a royalty fee to AARP for the use of AARP’s intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. AARP membership is required for Program eligibility in most states. Applicants are individually underwritten and some may not qualify. Specific features, credits, and discounts may vary and may not be available in all states in accordance with state filings and applicable law. † If you are age 50 or older, once you’re insured through this Program for at least 60 days, you cannot be refused renewal as long as applicable premiums are paid when due. Also, you and other customary drivers of your vehicles must retain valid licenses, remain physically and mentally capable of operating an automobile, have no convictions for driving while intoxicated and must not have obtained your policy through material misrepresentation. Benefit currently not available in Hawaii, Michigan, New Hampshire and North Carolina. NCR-LA -

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

Food

P r e s s P l ay

Classified

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

|

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

31


32

Long Island Press

for

m a rc h 8 - m a rc h 14 , 2 01 2

|

w w w. lo n g i s l a n d p r e s s . c o m

News

Columns

F e at u r e s

Food

P r e s s P l ay

Classified


Volume 10, Issue 10 - Meth