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HALF HOLLOW HILLS LONG ISLANDER NEWSPAPERS TELECOMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

N E W S P A P E R

Copyright © 2010 Long Islander Newspapers, LLC.

Online at www.LongIslanderNews.com VOLUME THIRTEEN, ISSUE 17

2 SECTIONS, 76 PAGES

THURSDAY, JUNE 24, 2010

DIX HILLS

Neighbors Respond To Cry For Help Local uses donations from residents to purchase tents for victims of Haiti earthquake By Alessandra Malito amalito@longislandernews.com

By going door to door and sending letters to neighbors, a Dix Hills man was able to raise enough money to buy 60 tents for those affected by the earthquake in Haiti. Frank Altenord, 53, who was born and raised in Haiti, raised $1,500 to support families abroad after visiting the country destroyed by the natural disaster. “My wife and I went to Haiti to give the little amount of help that we could right after the earthquake in January. We returned to New York with heavy hearts knowing the catastrophe that we left behind. It was indescribable,” he wrote in a letter to his neighbors in February. After leaving Haiti, he began raising money that would support those who lost their homes. “It was very difficult to handle when I went the first time,” Altenord said. “I wish I could do more but I was limited in terms of resources.” For one week in March, he returned to

Frank Altenord, left, used the donations he received from his neighbors in Dix Hills to purchase tents for families in Haiti still devastated by the earthquake nearly six months later. Haiti to supply people and their families with tents. Because of the terrible weather conditions Haiti faces, including a

hurricane season ahead, Altenord felt that tents would protect families from inclement weather.

Before receiving the tents, Haitian families’ only shelter came from towels and sheets hanging from wood, makeshift protection that does not fare well in storms. Not only did he provide families with the tents, but he helped build them as well. To have tents that can functionally save families from poor weather conditions was something of a blessing for them. After one woman’s tent was built, Altenord recalls turning back to look at her while he was walking away and seeing her pray. She had her arms open wide and was praising God for the shelter. Altenord’s good will doesn’t end with the tents. He plans on going for a third time in August to start another project, which will also protect against terrible weather. “I have a plan to plant trees in Haiti,” he said, concerned about the hurricane season. “Especially with the hurricane season and the fact that there’s no trees to sustain the lands, it’s easy to have a disaster again.” (Continued on page A18)

TOWN OF HUNTINGTON

Inside

Disputed Highway Workers Paid Seven men dividing more than $20K for work performed By Danny Schrafel dschrafel@longislandernews.com

The Annual Guide To Huntington Business 2010

Months after being caught in a messy feud over whether the Huntington highway superintendent has the right to hire staff without town board approval, the town allocated more than $20,000 to pay seven men for the work they did earlier this year while they thought they were on staff. The town confirmed the accuracy of a U.S Department of Labor form quantifying the services provided by the seven men at $20,359.54, and checks were cut prior to the June 15 town board meeting, Highway Superintendent William Naughton said. “Did [the town] really save money? I don’t know, but I’m happy the people will get the money they were owed in the last six months,” Local 342 Long Island Public Service Employees President Bill Hennessey said. The union represents blue-collar workers employed by the Town of Huntington. The men worked as nonpermanent employees last summer as well, but after the highway department moved to make them full-time staff at the end of 2009, the town board sued Naughton on Feb. 3, arguing he ignored a townwide hiring freeze. The town moved to withdraw its suit on March 3, but Naughton sued five days later, demanding a judgment that

his actions to hire the men involved in the case were lawful and within his rights as an elected highway superintendent. Each of the eight men Naughton allegedly tried to hire were notified by letter from Jan. 15 to Jan. 19 and again from Jan. 26 to 27 that they were not employed by the town, were not placed on the payroll because there were no vacancies and that they were performing services at their own risk. Local 342 filed a complaint with the federal Department of Labor, beginning the process leading up to the June 15 resolution. “When you put people to work for you and you don’t pay them, you have protections. That’s what they have the Department of Labor for,” Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. “We’re not happy about the fact that this happened in the first place, but we have to pay people who work.” Five of the seven men now work as part-time nonpermanent workers and can have those positions for six months at most, Naughton said. Their pay is coming out of a separate account for seasonal workers, Huntington spokesman A.J. Carter said. Naughton’s suit against the town is still pending, as the courts decide whether his case can proceed, attorney A. Thomas Levin, of Garden City-based Meyer Suozzi, English & Klein P.C., said. Councilman Mark Mayoka introduced the resolution to (Continued on page A18)

LONG ISLANDER NEWSPAPERS: WINNERS OF FIVE N.Y. PRESS ASSOCIATION AWARDS IN 2008

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A2 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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POLICE REPORT Compiled by Mike Koehler

The Buzz About The Football World Cup mania… Our excitement for the World

At Least It Wasn’t All Four

never see them passing an extra tax on baby formula tax or orthopedic shoes.

Cup soccer competition was short-lived, and between you and me, that’s just fine. As much as I was thrilled Summer in the park… Keep to see the U.S. actually making those blankets and lawn chairs a decent showing in the sport, IN THE KNOW packed and ready to go by the I don’t know how much I WITH AUNT ROSIE back door; Huntington’s Summer could tolerate those British anArts Festival season starts this nouncers calling the games. Nothing against Brits, of weekend. Opening night features course; I just found their intonations better for lulling former Saturday Night Live music man G.E. Smith me into a coma than for getting excited over soccer acand the shows continue nightly (except Mondays) tion. Of course they probably think baseball announcthrough mid-August. As much as I enjoy a celebrity, ers are too loud, talk too much about nothing, and get you’re more likely to find me and my picnic basket on unduly excited when the Yankees win… Th-e-e Yeethe hillside at Heckscher Park when the local performaaank-keees win! ers play. I love those Sweet Adelines, Red Hot Mamas and Huntington Men’s Chorus shows – and after last Vuvuzela envy… You know what the most controseason’s performance, I’ll never miss a Long Island versial thing is at this year’s World Cup other than the Philharmonic show. Our local groups may not have dippy referees? Meet the vuvuzela. It’s a 2-foot long the polish and sophistication of so-called seasoned blowing horn commonly used by soccer fans in South professionals, but they are friends. And hey, those Africa. With a sound akin to angry bees, swarming loshows are plenty good enough for me. Check out the custs and a goat about to be slaughtered, they’re show schedule online at www.huntingtonarts.org. blamed for hearing loss, spreading cold and flu bugs and driving viewers on this side of the pond nuts. Too many rings… Warning. If your phone starts Hundreds have complained and ESPN is mixing their ringing off the hook, call your bank. That’s the strange audio to cut them out. It’s gotten so bad that the iconic warning FBI issued this week. Apparently this is the chalkboard outside Yankee Peddler expressed their newest scheme of financial frauders who use auto-didispleasure with the things for all to see on New York aling programs to overwhelm your phone line with Avenue. All I want to know is this – where can I get calls. When you answer the call you hear dead air, one cheap to strap on to the Buick? Don’t look at me some recorded message, advertisement or phone sex like that… sometimes a GM horn just doesn’t cut the menu. Some people get so fed up they change their mustard. number. Don’t do it, because that’s exactly what the Taxing times… I just read that New York lawmak- scammers want you to do. You see, it’s a diversion that prevents your financial institutions from verifying acers are probably going to vote in another tobacco tax. count changes and transactions. This gives anyone Now I’m not exactly ready to join the tobacco lobby who has hacked into your account time to transfer all and think it would be better if all smokers quit. But I of your money from your accounts to theirs. And have to point out that the governor and the legislature theirs are most likely untraceable, offshore ones, so be are just taking the easiest route on this one. Instead of wary. And if your phone starts ringing off the hook, buckling down and containing their appetite for call your bank, your financial advisor, your broker, and spending, they take it out on the easiest victims. It’s anyone else who you’ve trusted with accounts. called a sin tax and the rationale seems to be choosing the least argumentative victim to carry the load. After (Aunt Rosie wants to hear from you! If you have comall, who’s going to stand up for smokers? They do the ments, ideas, or tips about what’s happening in your neck same thing with alcoholic beverages. You know, if of the woods, write to me today and let me know the latest. things are really so bad, the legislature should just go To contact me, drop a line to Aunt Rosie, c/o The Long-Isahead and tax everybody a little bit more instead of lander, 149 Main Street, Huntington NY 11743. Or try the making so-called sinners carry all the water. But you’ll e-mail at aunt.rosieli@gmail.com)

BABY FACES TIMMY and WALTER KUSTERBECK

“It’s easy to be a studio painter where you can fix mistakes. Plein air painters don’t have that liberty.” Festival To Feature

Send a photo of your pre-school age child along with a brief anecdotal background and we’ll consider it for “Baby Faces.” Include baby’s full name, date of birth, hometown and names of parents and grandparents. Send to: Baby of the Week, c/o Long-Islander, 149 Main St., Huntington, NY 11743. Please include a daytime phone number for verification purposes.

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Supermarket Thief Steals Wallet Suffolk police were called to a Dix Hills supermarket on June 18 about a possible theft. The complainant said an unknown person took her wallet from a shopping cart. The wallet contained credit cards and cash.

Woman Gets Unwanted Call A Dix Hills woman called Suffolk County police on June 18 about aggravated harassment. She told police a man she identified by voice was verbally abusing her over the phone although he refused to identify himself. The two people had gotten along in the past.

Was She Watching TV In The Bathroom? A Centerport woman called Suffolk County police on June 18 about a home burglary. She told police someone stole two cable boxes and damaged a sink and bathtub. A police investigation is ongoing.

So Much For Exhaust Control A Melville man called Suffolk County police on June 17 to report a theft. He told police someone took the catalytic converter, muffler and exhaust pipes from his 2008 SUV on June 12. The vehicle was parked by his house at the time.

Was It Locked Beforehand? Suffolk police were called to a Lloyd Harbor residence on June 17 about thefts from a vehicle. The complainant said she found a laptop computer, GPS, pocketbook, credit cards and various paperwork missing from her unlocked vehicle. It had been parked on her property at the time.

Thief Cut Screen For TVs

QUOTE OF THE WEEK ANTHONY DAVIS

Timmy Kusterbeck, 5, spots his favorite antique fire truck as it comes down Main Street during the Memorial Day parade in Huntington village as his little brother, Walter Jr., 2, wakes up from his morning snooze. The two brothers always shop local and spend many days strolling around town with parents Stacey and Walter, of Huntington village.

Suffolk police were called to a Huntington home on June 18 when a resident noticed car parts had been stolen. The complainant said an unknown person took two tires and rims from a Honda Accord parked in the driveway.

expires

Suffolk police were called to a Huntington Station home on June 14 when a resident reported a burglary. A 42-inch TV, 32-inch TV and two laptop computers were missing. Police discovered a screen window on the side of the house had been cut out.

Cops Bust Suspect In Burglary Suffolk police arrested a suspect on June 7 for the burglary of a Northport restaurant back in April. At the time, employees found that someone broke in through a back window, kicked in the office door and stole a cash box. More than $1,000 was stolen. A detective from the Second Squad told police they recovered the proceeds from another burglary and the defendant wanted to provide information about the restaurant break-in. Suffolk police arrested the alleged burglar a few days later, and Northport police took him into custody the next day. He was released on $2,500 cash bail.

Mail to:

Long-Islander Newspapers, LLC. 149 Main Street, Huntington, NY 11743

THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER


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THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A3

TOWN OF HUNTINGTON

Vowing To Keep Vic’s Vision Alive Hundreds show to pay their final respects to Cinema Arts Centre co-founder Half Hollow Hills photos/Sara-Megan Walsh

By Sara-Megan Walsh swalsh@longislandernews.com

Cinema Arts Centre co-founder Charlotte Sky, Vic Skolnick’s partner of nearly 60 years, receives a standing ovation with their son, Dylan Skolnick, after stating together they will continue with Vic’s vision and legacy of showing independent films. Photo by PJ Schlem Sherris

Hundreds gathered at Huntington’s Cinema Arts Centre to pay their respect to arts visionary Vic Skolnick and give testimony to his lasting legacy. The memorial tribute brought together filmmakers, actors, arts leaders, politicians and local residents on Saturday in memory of the Cinema Arts Centre (CAC)’s co-founder and co-director who died June 10. He was 81. “The first thing I thought when I walked into the theater is, it would have made Vic so happy to see a packed house,” said CAC co-founder Charlotte Sky, his partner of nearly 60 years. As she recounted his life and his quest to share knowledge and the history of the cinema in the eulogy, her words were simultaneously broadcast live across the CAC’s three theaters, the Sky Room and outside, where the overflow stood. “Vic didn’t realize how loved he was. One night I said to him, ‘Vic, do you really think we’re making a difference in people’s lives with all these films they’ve seen?’” Sky said, met by a thunderous round of applause. “There were so many people whose lives were made better because of Vic,” said Vic and Sky’s son, Dylan Skolnick, later explaining, “I think everything he did was an attempt to give others the experience he had of breaking free of the world, to expand their world view, to break free from tunnel vision.” Many recounted the CAC’s early days in a Huntington dance studio with films shown on bedsheets with a rented projector, and then a Huntington gymnasium before moving to its current location in 1977. “In the official history, there is much made of the original story of projecting films on a bed sheet. That hanging bed sheet was like raising a flag to me; the cinema was going to change the world

one person, one film at a importance of Vic’s work in time,” said Kevin Duggan, a showing independent films staff member from the beon Long Island and its imginning. pact on the industry. Duggan recalled how in“It is for people like Chardependent filmmakers lotte, Vic and now Dylan would flock to the CAC with that the cinema is what it a 16mm reel in hopes of getis… a place that protects, ting screened, including promotes and encourages now-famous Hal Hartley. filmmakers to expand and Hartley spoke of Vic and the find new frontiers,” Rossellicinema, providing his early ni said. education in film before he Jazz saxophonist Premik debuted his first film, “The Russell Tubbs, who perUnbelievable Truth,” there forms monthly at the CAC, Vic Skolnick in 1989. took the stage to play a spon“[Vic] took my hand, shaking his head taneous riff in honor of Vic, whom he and said, ‘My God, young man, what do called a newfound, now eternal, friend. you think you are doing?’ Now I can an- Charlotte Koons and Roger Senser each swer that, Vic. I was only doing what read brief poems in Vic’s memory before brave, creative and imaginative people a video montage tribute was played. had taught me: living to work rather than “I miss him so much. I wish he was still working to live. Vic was one of those peo- here. I know he would love that we’re ple,” Hartley said. honoring him by carrying on his vision,” Actress Isabella Rossellini spoke of the Dylan said as it was announced he would

Actress Isabella Rossellini praised Vic and Charlotte Sky for creating an outlet for independents, before sharing insight with Dylan about following in his father’s footsteps. be stepping into the roles of film curator, film historian and film educator. “Together we will continue to keep Vic’s dream alive,” Sky said. Several members of the CAC’s board of trustees spoke of Vic’s traditional pre-film speech about how memberships are the lifeline of the cinema, encouraging attendees to sign up for the membership drive ongoing through June 30. “We sit in Vic’s living, vital legacy,” said board member Marty Haas. “The future depends as much on you and I as it does Charlotte, Dylan, the volunteers and CAC staff members. It depends on a community effort, which is exactly the way Vic wanted it to be.” In lieu of flowers or gifts, the CAC has asked for contributions to the Vic Skolnick Memorial Fund, which will be used to help support future operations. Checks can be sent to: Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington, NY 11743.

MELVILLE

Suit: Doc Lied In Bankruptcy Claim Patients paid thousands before orthodontist Balaban failed to list them as creditors By Mike Koehler mkoehler@longislandernews.com

A band of patients filed a lawsuit earlier this month claiming their former Melville orthodontist illegally hid them as creditors. Dr. Stuart Balaban has been the target of scathing attacks on various Internet blogs and websites since late March for allegedly accepting lump sums of payment for work never performed. Attorney Michael Siegel, of Manhattan-based Siegel & Siegel, filed a lawsuit on behalf of 12 families on June 7. “He didn’t list any of his patients. You’re required to list them as a debt or list them as a contract that still has performance on them,” Siegel said. David Slavin, one of the 12, said he paid Balaban $6,600 for orthodontic work on his son and daughter. In exchange for the large payments, the dentist promised the Merrick man lifetime treatment for his children at no additional charge. Slavin said he works longer hours as a

chiropractor trying to come up with more money for his new orthodontist. The family has also made several cuts, including taking a car off the road. “My kids are undergoing treatment. I am paying monthly and that bothers me because I already paid for my kids’ orthodontics,” Slavin said. “At this point, we’re just sitting and waiting because they’re doing the law stuff.” He is just one of hundreds defrauded by Balaban, Siegel said. Just a dozen families are listed, with about 20 child patients affected, the attorney added, but more victims may join the suit. “People call us all the time,” Siegel said. “There’ll come a time when the client group has to be closed, but we haven’t reached that point yet.” According to the lawsuit, Balaban personally filed for bankruptcy relief on Dec. 11, 2009 through Melville-based attorney Peter Corey. The orthodontist listed 20 creditors and admitted to owing more than $412,000. He listed fewer than $50,000 in assets, including a 2004

BMW X3 and Citibank checking account containing $2,500, both exempt. His private corporation was also listed, but with no value. At the time, Corey said his client intended to care for patients on an ongoing basis before his relationship with another orthodontist fell through. “It’s unfortunate, because Dr. Balaban had a plan in place to treat all these patients. After the bankruptcy he was unable to treat the patients,” Corey said. Siegel said Balaban closed his Melville office and moved into Dr. Jacqueline Fulop-Goodling’s Woodbury office in November 2009. Through the winter, the attorney said, he continued to solicit new patients, claiming he had just lost his lease. It wasn’t until March 23 when his bankruptcy discharge was granted that he told them he was bankrupt, Siegel added. Balaban, of Dix Hills, did not return messages for comment. After news of the orthodontist’s bankruptcy came out, Fulop-Goodling issued a statement through a spokeswoman,

claiming she was also duped, never received a dime from Balaban, and would have to charge his patients again for continued treatment. A number of former patients speculated online that both orthodontists were involved, even alleging it was a scam concocted between them. Siegel said he would begin investigating both once he had Balaban’s bankruptcy discharge reversed. “I’m going to follow the money. If Dr. Jacquie got the money and has the obligation to treat the people, then she has the responsibility to give it back,” he said. Fulop-Goodling’s spokeswoman did not return requests for comment. According to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, the adversary proceeding is waiting for Balaban to respond before it proceeds under Judge Dorothy Eisenberg in Central Islip. “Either he’s going to default because he doesn’t have the money or he’ll fight it,” Siegel said. “I served it two weeks ago; he has a month to respond.”


A4 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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HUNTINGTON STATION

Board Holds AvalonBay Vote Until July Following changes in plans, residents protesting development request vote in September Half Hollow Hills photos/Danny Schrafel

By Danny Schrafel dschrafel@longislandernews.com

The Huntington Town Board moved a vote on the 490-unit AvalonBay Huntington Station housing development until July 6 before residents protested and criticized the proposal at town hall last Tuesday. The vote, initially planned for the evening of June 15, was pushed to July 6 after confusion ensued over when the vote would – and legally, could – be held after a 90day extension for deliberation was enacted May 17. Again citing concerns over density, traffic, school impacts and sewer capacity, several dozen residents, including members of the Conservative Society for Action (CSA) picketed outside Town Hall Tuesday, accusing the board of trying to sneak through a vote in June on a proposal they thought would be settled in September. “This Avalon project and changing the zoning laws will affect tens of thousands of people… you guys are sly, though,” Huntington resident Chris O’Donnell said. “Jam it down our throats like the day laborer site… if any of you board members had a conscience or a care at all about Huntington, please vote no on the Avalon project… don’t let us down, disgust us and sell us out like you have over and over again.” In a June 15 letter to Huntington residents, four board members – although Councilman Mark Mayoka did not sign his name, he stressed he agreed with its message – rebutted a Newsday article that stated the vote would be held in September. “There was a feeling that perhaps we should not proceed tonight to give people the benefit of the doubt,” said Supervisor Frank Petrone, who pulled the vote during the June 15 town board workshop. “The resolution was to extend to September the 90-day period, not to have it voted on in September. I think we explained that, and people understood that.”

Whistle-blowing, Centerport resident John Fox pickets outside Town Hall on June 15 to protest AvalonBay’s proposed Huntington Station development with about three-dozen residents. Since the initial March hearing, the proposal has been trimmed from 530 units to 490, reducing the density to 18.5 units per acre. Revised plans call for one less building, fewer parking spaces and more open space in the development. Three-quarters of the units will be sold at market value, while the 122 income-restricted units will be broken down into affordable, workforce and moderate-income units. Affordable rental units are being set aside for appli-

cants with 50 percent of the median income, while workforce is 80 percent of median income and moderate is 110 percent. Estimated monthly rents for a one-bedroom unit would be $1,018 for an affordable apartment, $1,629 for workforce one-bedroom and $1,961 for moderate, according to a town fact sheet. Estimated sale prices for income-restricted twobedroom units is $183,250 Inside town hall, resident for affordable and $275,000 Chris O’Donnell joined for workforce; there are no about 10 speakers in op- moderate for-sale units. posing AvalonBay and The developer has also pushing a vote on the now pledged $2.25 million to a 490-unit development number of Huntington entiuntil September. ties, including $1.5 million for the Huntington School District and $500,000 for the town’s Economic Development Corporation, which could be used to underwrite developing EDC's proposed commercial building at the intersection of Northridge Street and New York Avenue or fund economic development in Huntington Station. Avalon has agreed to spend up to $25,000 for a bus stop/enclosure at the AvalonBay development if the HART bus system administrators request it; $75,000 for the Friends of the Huntington Train Station; $25,000 for the Family Service League; and $50,000 in donations to community organizations. It also agreed to sponsor the Andy Forsberg Memorial Lacrosse Tournament for five years. Huntington resident Patrick Geyer, who called AvalonBay “a mistake for Huntington Station and a mis(Continued on page A18)

TOWN OF HUNTINGTON

Elder Law Attorney To Lead Bar Sheryl Randazzo elected to serve as 102nd president of Suffolk County Bar Association By Danny Schrafel dschrafel@longislandernews.com

What began as an eye-opening co-op at Boston City Hall drew Northport resident Sheryl Randazzo to elder law, and her passion has taken her to the top of Suffolk County’s professional law association. Randazzo, 43, was installed as the 102nd president of the 3,800-member Suffolk County Bar Association at Holbrook’s Villa Lombardi restaurant on June 3. Her journey leading to that day began at Northeastern University in the late 1980s, where she studied history and political science. A co-op position at Boston City Hall dealing with tenant’s rights drew many elderly Bostonians, an experience that “opened her eyes” to what would become known as elder law. “I was always drawn to law,” Randazzo said. “It wasn’t until I came upon a position at Boston City Hall that it really felt like it connected for me… I wanted to work with seniors, help them plan, anticipate crisis and deal with crisis.” A 1992 graduate of the Catholic University of America’s Columbus School of Law, Randazzo began her legal career in 1993 as an associate/law clerk for Melville-based Garcia & Stallone before becoming an associate with Ronald Fatoullah in 1995. She hung her own shingle in 1996 and partnered with her brother, Ralph, in 2000, forming Randazzo &

Sheryl Randazzo celebrates being named president of the Suffolk County Bar Association with daughter, Ruby, in her arms. Randazzo, which has offices in Huntington and Manhattan. Their practice focuses on elder law and estate planning and administration – drafting wills and trusts, long-term care planning, guardianship, Medicaid/Medicare matters and the needs and rights of the elderly and disabled. Now as the leader of the Suffolk Bar, Randazzo said she’s able to give back more to the organization that was so

helpful to her when she opened a private practice in 1996. “I have the most respectful colleagues who are willing to share their knowledge, experience and perspective,” she said. “Any experience I find myself interacting with attorneys has been so enriching.” For 2010, the Suffolk Bar has adopted the theme “In Celebration of Membership,” with a focus on helping members and Suffolk County during the recession through practice management and wellness awareness events, by maintaining the Suffolk County Academy of Law’s programming, bolstering service availability and improving networking. “My goal is to enhance the sense of community that’s there, just bring more people into that circle of leaders and broaden people’s participation in things we’re often doing quite well,” Randazzo said. A member of the Suffolk Bar since 1993, Randazzo has participated in numerous philanthropic efforts, and chaired and co-chaired numerous committees. She also belongs to many legal associations in Suffolk County and New York and has been a trustee on the Suffolk County Academy of Law since 2003, where she was associate dean from 20012003. In addition to extensive involvement in both public service and legal associations, Randazzo is a frequent lecturer who speaks to her colleagues and the public about elder law, estate planning

An elder law specialist, Randazzo said a co-op in Boston was a pivotal moment. and practice management, and professional ethics. She said being a mother to her daughter, Ruby, is “her proudest role yet.” “I’m hoping to demonstrate to other young professionals that you can’t wait for your life to get in order to accomplish other things. You have to have a global view,” she said. “A lot of women put off having children until much later… I don’t think you have to do that to do it all.” Ruby, who will celebrate her third birthday on July 10, has even benefited the professional organization mom now leads, Randazzo said. “She loves the Bar Association; she knows her way around,” Sheryl said of Ruby. “She’s a real asset… she makes people smile.”


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THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A5

TOWN OF HUNTINGTON

Town Trims Nearly $1M In Midyear Audit Naughton blasts highway cuts as $921K in townwide savings moves into reserve budgets By Danny Schrafel dschrafel@longislandernews.com

For the second consecutive year, the town’s annual budget review has yielded significant savings which were transferred into contingency budgets. Led by Huntington Comptroller Tracy Yogman, the town board agreed to move more than $921,000 into reserves. Yogman’s office sat down with department heads and takes a line-by-line look at what can be trimmed from their budgets. “It’s an ongoing review of spending for the year,” Councilman Mark Cuthbertson said. “We have to take a conservative look at our budget numbers – budgets are living documents. We have to enact them as a plan for a year, but then you have to monitor them.” A result of the review, Yogman said, is that savings are moved to contingency accounts. The only way to spend that money is with town board approval. “We have spent less than we budgeted and this resolution prevents us from spending it somewhere else,” Huntington spokesman A.J. Carter said. Yogman attributed budget savings in fuel lines to conservative estimates holding positions open throughout town government has also led to reductions in health insurance costs. Councilman Mark Mayoka, whose resolution to enact a 5-percent, across-theboard cut to the general fund for 2010 and enforce a 5-percent budget-to-budget reduction for 2011 failed to receive a second at several town board meetings,

praised the 1-percent reduction as a first step. However, he criticized $29,560 in increases for Town Attorney John Leo’s office as an example of excess spending. “The most glaring example is in the legal department, which has exceeded its budget by $30,000, Mayoka said on June 15. “Do we really need to spend more money on lawyers?” Yogman said the expenses are parity increases and do not reflect an increase in staff levels. Mayoka said he hopes to work with the comptroller to further cut spending in “about 10 different areas” by, for example, instituting worker productivity-enhancing measures, creating programs to boost energy efficiency and possibly offering a buyout program for some department heads. The councilman has promised to hold a budget symposium in the coming months. A reduction of more than $400,000 from the town highway department’s budget drew criticism from Highway Superintendent William Naughton. He accused the town of pulling the money to plug other financial holes while depriving him of staff and funding needed to do his job. “I think that [Supervisor] Frank [Petrone] is so deep in debt or whatever potential of debt… keep this money to keep their bond rating from being reduced,” Naughton said. “The whole thing… a bunch of kids wouldn’t do something that stupid.” Councilwoman Susan Berland offered a far less nefarious explanation – the highway department savings are attributable to high-salaried individuals retiring and

Suffolk Smokes Out Violators Businesses Guilty of Selling Tobacco Products to Children The New York State Adolescent Tobacco Use Prevention Act prohibits the sale of tobacco products to minors. The Suffolk County Department of Health Services enforces this law through compliance checks at tobacco retailers. In accordance with New York State law, Suffolk County publishes the names and addresses of violators. The following locations have either pled guilty or have been found guilty of selling tobacco products to minors in the last 6 months of 2009. NAME US Petroleum CVS OK Petroleum Barne’s Country Store P&N Beverage Store CVS Shell Cards & Things Coastal Southdown Cards & Gifts CVS 7-Eleven Gulf Lake Grove Deli Red House Discount Gulf USA Gas Mount Sinai Village Deli Getty

ADDRESS 616 Route 110 355 Broadway 221 W. Main Street 716 Springs Fireplace Road 71 E. Main Street 2000 Jericho Turnpike Route 25A & Fresh Pond Rd. 769 Pulaski Road 1515 Broadway Avenue 210B Wall Street 2 E. Jericho Turnpike 500 Islip Avenue 3309 Sunrise Highway 1003 Hawkins Avenue 394 Old Walt Whitman 475 Walt Whitman Rd. 532 Walt Whitman Rd. 749 Mt. Sinai-Coram Rd 1580 Straight Path

TOWN VIOLATION Amityville 7/8/09 Amityville 7/8/09 Bay Shore 6/2/09 East Hampton 8/12/09 East Islip 12/17/09 East Northport 8/26/09 Fort Salonga 7/16/09 Greenlawn 7/24/09 Holbrook 11/23/09 Huntington 8/13/09 Huntington Station 8/13/09 Islip 0/14/09 Islip Terrace 6/1/09 Lake Grove 11/4/09 Melville 7/2/09 Melville 7/2/09 Melville 7/2/09 Mount Sinai 10/1/09 Wyandanch 9/23/09

To report a business you suspect is selling tobacco products to minors, please contact the Department of Health Services at 853-2967.

being replaced by lower-paid, young recruits. “When there were rehirings in 2010, there were savings because they were rehired at a lower step,” she said “The salaries are the savings from the retirees to

the new hires. We’re all very conscious of where we spend money and how we spend it… For town government to provide the services we provide and not cut at all while saving nearly $1 million, that is a really good thing.”


A6 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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MELVILLE

Charity Keeps Son’s Memory Alive Melville family’s nonprofit raises funds, sponsors family fun days for sick children By Alessandra Malito amalito@longislandernews.com

Even years after their son died of brain cancer, the Gaynes family from Melville has made it their mission to help other children in need through their nonprofit organization, Chillin’ With Adam. The group started in 2005, a year after Adam Gaynes, 11, died, and looks to make “the kids’ experiences a little easier in the hospital,” said David Gaynes, father and co-founder of the nonprofit. “Our son Adam was very strong and we fought for 11 years because he wanted to live. We felt the best way to honor him would be to start a nonprofit and make their lives a bit easier,” David said. “It’s a devastating thing for the whole family. Not a lot of money goes to research, so it’s still challenging families.”

— DAVID GAYNES The Gaynes family raises between $200,000 and $250,000 per year, and gives the money to those who need it.

Taylor Gaynes, 15, Arlene Gaynes, David Gaynes holding their 2-year-old daughter Lindsay, and Dr. Rick Abbott, chief of pediatric neurosurgery at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, enjoy the day at Rye Playland. MELVILLE

BMW Rolls, Injures Driver Photo by Steve Silverman

“We want to continue to honor his memory. It doesn’t take a lot. Every dollar counts. Adam had a really infectious personality and he continues to make a difference one difference at a time.”

David and his wife, Arlene, raise money and use the funds to do family fun days and work with hospitals. They recently took children from Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx to Rye Playland, an annual event that happens in June. The family also works with Brookdale Hospital and NYU Hospital. The Gaynes family raises the money through two major events – a soiree scheduled for Aug. 4 at the Swan Club in Glen Landing, N.Y. and a bar night in the city planned for the fall. The soiree, which will be celebrating its fifth year, makes between $150,000 and $200,000 per year, and they hope to continue making the same amount. “The rest [of the donations] are throughout the year,” David said. “We’ve had schools do car washes for us.” All the money raised goes to charity. Since the beginning, the family has raised around $950,000. “Every dollar raised goes to charity, but we also have a fund that disperses money,” David said. “We’ve done all types of things. If it’s reasonable, we do it.” All this, they do this in honor of Adam, through the nonprofit organization and the fund in his name. “We want to continue to honor his memory. It doesn’t take a lot. Every dollar counts,” David said. “Adam had a really infectious personality and he continues to make a difference one difference at a time.” For more information, visit www.chillinwithadam.org.

Limited Scholarships Available

This BMW sedan rolled over several times while traveling eastbound on the South Service Road of the LIE. By Kaellen Hessel info@longislandernews.com

A BMW sedan rolled over multiple times, injuring the male driver June 19. After several rolls, the car landed right-side-up on the eastbound South Service Road of the Long Island Expressway, west of Half Hollow Road, according to fire officials.

The driver was put into a neck brace and carried away from the scene on a stretcher. He was taken to Huntington Hospital by the Melville Rescue Squad. Melville Fire Chief Robert Warren said he speculated the driver lost control of his car, but he was unsure of the details of how the accident occurred. Warren said the accident was not weather related.

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THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A7

TOWN OF HUNTINGTON

Vietnam Wall To Stop In Town

Is your Pool Ready for Summer?

By Alessandra Malito amalito@longislandernews.com

Community members will soon get the chance to experience a Washington D.C. memorial without even leaving Huntington this fall. The Dignity Memorial Vietnam Wall, a three-quarter-scaled replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C. that has been touring the nation since 1984, will be coming to Huntington in October. “It’s in very high demand,” said Councilman Mark Cuthbertson, who has been working to secure the wall’s trip to Huntington for two years now. The 240-foot wall, which has 58,000 names written on it, is known to have a large audience turn out to view it. “In other towns, it’s gotten up to 35,000 visitors in a three-day weekend,” Cuthbertson said. “We’re optimistic that it will be as well-received here as the most popular places before.” The councilman feels the wall memorial will be a great experience for community members in the town. “We have a very large veterans population and I think the wall would be very much appreciated by them and the Huntington community at large,” he said. “It’s important to Vietnam vets in particular, who returned from service and were the subject of scorn. It’s really important to recognize their service and give them their dues.” The wall, which will stand at Peter Nelson Park in South Huntington, is expected to arrive from Staten Island

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with a motorcycle brigade on Sept. 28. It will be available to the public from Oct. 1-3 before moving on to West Islip.

The Dignity Memorial Vietnam Wall, a replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in the nation’s capital, will be displayed in Huntington this October.

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A8 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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Opinion

Sen

d letters to The Editor, : Half Hollow 149 Main S Hills Newspaper, treet, Huntington , New York 11743 or e-m info@long ail us at islanderne ws.com

‘Not the types set up by the printer return their impression, the meaning, the main concern.’

Keep On Saving At their meeting last Tuesday, Hunting- general fund so that the tax levy is reduced ton Town Board members voted to move by that amount. That is what we would call more than $900,000 into contingency true savings, and if every taxing entity did budgets. By placing it into contingency ac- the same, might result in some real savings counts, town board approval is needed for for taxpayers. When every level of governthe money to be spent. ment does the same – from school boards, While the move reflects a nearlibrary boards and water districts, ly one-percent reduction in EDITORIAL to villages, towns and on up – taxspending, it is in fact somewhat payers may in fact begin to see retroactive in that it reflects money not savings. spent in the first half of the year. For true For taxpayers whose only experience is savings to occur, the money must remain seeing their tax bills go up, it would be a reunspent. There’s no guarantees on that one. freshing change. And in these economic We’d like to see those savings continue times, even the smallest savings can be sigand at the end of the year, returned to the nificant.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Real Issues Or Just Stunts? DEAR EDITOR: I would like to offer my perspective with regards to AvalonBay’s proposed development in Huntington Station and the current debate happening within our community about it, both online on two Facebook sites (Say No to Avalon Bay and Parents of Huntington), as well as what is printed in the newspapers and what is said at town board meetings. When I learned that a rally was being planned to march at Town Hall recently, I got on Facebook to find out why and was told that “corruption” was taking place in Town Hall with regards to the day the vote would occur on AvalonBay. Myself and another poster pointed out that the resolution was for “up to 90 days” and besides, how could one assume that the vote was going to take place on Sept. 5 when it was a Sunday? They chose to ignore these facts and proceeded with the march anyway. So I had to ask myself why and came to the conclusion that politics must have been the true motive! (Read: an antidemocratic political tactic.) As I continued to post on Facebook, I got attacked (read: political tactics on a community activist) whenever I offered facts about the AvalonBay project and other information, like that the MTA had identified the

piece of land for use as a rail yard. These facts can be found at www.mta.info/mta/planning/portj/index.html (click Huntington to Greenlawn) as well as under the East Side Access documents at www.mta.info/capconstr/esas/ (see pages S7 and S15 of the FEIS project document). I live in Huntington Station in Highview, an affordable housing complex, that is located right across the street from the Huntington train station. So I am a YIMBY for Avalon as I prefer that project to be built on that piece of land rather than taking a chance that a rail yard could end up there. In addition, I see many benefits to the Avalon project that will move the community forward with revitalization, but I won’t focus on those here. I have been actively involved with the revitalization efforts of Huntington Station since 2003 when I joined with the folks from Huntington Country Farms to fight the proposed rail yard when it was first presented to the community. Since then, my involvement in Huntington Station issues has included serving as a chartered member of a civic group called Friends of Huntington Train Station. We worked with the LIRR to renovate the interior of the station for its Centennial which occurred in 2009. We have also been the catalyst to get the town to address the improvements needed at the two parking garages (signs are post-

HALF HOLLOW HILLS N E W S P A P E R

Serving the communities of: Dix Hills, Melville and the Half Hollow Hills Central School District. Founded in 1996 by James Koutsis Copyright © 2010 by Long Islander Newspapers, publishers of The Long-Islander, The Record, Northport Journal and Half Hollow Hills Newspaper. Each issue of the The Half Hollow Hills Newspaper and all contents thereof are copyrighted by Long Islander, LLC. None of the contents or articles may be reproduced in any forum or medium without the advance express written permission of the publisher. Infringement hereof is a violation of the Copyright laws.

ed there now showing that Federal Stimulus dollars were applied for to make this happen). Our group’s mission is to continue to improve the station. So I would just like to clear up one other piece of inaccurate piece of information going around, and that is that we accepted a $75,000 bribe to change our minds about Avalon. AvalonBay shares our mission to improve the aesthetics of the station, since the residents of its housing complex will be living near the station and using it as commuters. So Friends of Huntington Train Station has never opposed Avalon and I was not involved in any negotiations of what occurred between the Town of Huntington and Avalon to channel funds for the landscaping improvements that our group is still pushing for. The town leases the land from the MTA and that is why it falls to the town to fund these improvements and not the MTA. Another initiative that I am a charted member of is the formation of the Lost Neighborhood Committee. We recently served on the panel for the Historical Society’s opening reception for “From House Calls to Hospitals” which featured Dr. Samuel Teich’s office located in Huntington Station at 1090 New York Ave. At that event, we announced the launch of our website, www.portraitofalostneighborhood.org/index.html, and the fact that we are now working with the history teachers of

Letters to the editor are welcomed by Long Islander Newspapers. We reserve the right to edit in the interest of space and clarity. All letters must be handsigned and they must include an address and daytime telephone number for verification. Personal attacks and letters considered in poor taste will not be printed. We cannot publish every letter we receive due to space limitations. School District #3 to bring “local history” projects to the students to learn more about the Huntington Station community where their schools are located. So just to be clear, my present role in this Avalon debate is to ensure that facts and the merits of the project are being put forth for Town of Huntington residents to make up their own minds about where they stand on the issue, and to keep the politics out of it. KIM D’AMBROSIO

Huntington Station

Sinful Self-Promotion DEAR EDITOR: In my mailbox [yesterday] I received a four-page, four-color glossy mailer from Congressman Steve Israel entitled “Having troubles making ends meet.” It was “prepared published and mailed at taxpayer expense.” This was a blatant political mailer with no substance and no benefit to the taxpayer. It was a self-promotion of an incumbent who wants to get re-elected

Mike Koehler Danny Schrafel Sara-Megan Walsh Reporters

DENNIS GARETANO

Huntington Station

Correction The June 3 article, “Huntington Gets Its Close-Up,” incorrectly identified Bunny Hoest as the creator of “The Lockhorns” comic strip. Her late husband, Bill Hoest, is the creator, and she inherited rights to the strip when he died in November 1988. She continues to produce the strip in her Lloyd Neck home with artist John Reiner.

Michael Schenkler Publisher Luann Dallojacono Editor

at the taxpayers’ expense. Isn’t it the current Congress that is wasting our tax dollars and isn’t that why the middle class is having trouble making ends meet? Congressman Israel in this mailer is not “working to help Long Island families” with this expensive mailer. He is only introducing us to his Twitter, Facebook and YouTube accounts, at taxpayer expense. Why doesn’t he use his enormous campaign account for this type of self-promotion? I am again convinced that we need to rid ourselves of career politicians like Mr. Israel, who have no problem using our hardearned money while we are “having trouble making ends meet” to promote themselves and their self-serving future financial security at taxpayer expense. In the mailer it states that “Congressman Steve Israel is working to help Long Island families” but what this mailer is really doing is working to help Steve Israel get re-elected.

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THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A9

Life&Style Inside » School A10 | Spotlight A11 | Crossword A16 | Foodie LI 19,21,24 | Community Calendar LI 36,37 LITERATURE

‘7 Keys To Love’ For Changing The World Arts administrator to honor community members, promote book on healthy relationships By Alessandra Malito amalitol@longislandernews.com

Ever wonder about the multiple forms of love? Question yourself and others and the relationships you share with each of them? Sandy Hinden, executive director of the Dix Hills Performing Arts Center at Five Towns College, has written a book that describes seven types of love, from physical love to spiritual love and everything in between, to answer the questions you may have – just like he did. He is promoting his “7 Keys to Love” at Book Revue tonight. For over 30 years Hinden, also the president of the Long Island Men’s Center, has been writing and rewriting this book to make it what it is now. “I first started writing the book about 30 years ago,” he said. “I wanted to understand more about love myself and I was really trying to understand the many facets of love. I was very confused about love so I wanted to understand all the aspects of it.” He proceeded to look through hundreds of books and came up with 800 pages of quotes about love from different aspects. At that time, he had to use construction paper and ended up grouping them together in different sections – self love, emotional love, physical love, family love, platonic/altruistic/community love, creative love (or love for arts and creativity) and universal/spiritual love. “We all want love and all need love, and we need to first begin to love ourselves and develop our self love and self esteem and develop communication so we can have rela-

Sandy Hinden will sign copies of his book, “7 Keys to Love” at Book Revue and honor community members for spreading love throughout the world at 7 p.m. tonight at Book Revue. tionships with others,” he said. That sort of love helps to create family love, which then helps sustain communities, and as he said, “can help the whole world, like nature, and help the world become more sustainable.”

“That requires us to be more kindhearted and generous,” he added. Along with his book, Hinden also wants to create a program called the “Beloved Community,” based on a quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. The program would host an event to honor people who have shown love in their community. This year, multiple people including Long Island Men’s Center Vice President and Pastor Thomas Humphrey and concert pianist Judith Alstadter will be honored. In the future, he would like to hold similar events around the country. “A dream would be to do this type of event in other places around the country and help them create their own beloved community so they can do wonderful things with their local area,” he said. Aside from the Dix Hills Performing Arts Center and the Long Island Men’s Center, Hinden has worked with the United Nations, where he worked on children’s gardens and peace museums. “By doing that, I saw the power of doing love,” he said. “People should believe they have more power to bring more love to their life and their friends and family and community, and to love the arts and nature and to love humanity and the whole world. If they can believe they have the power to do that, it’d make a difference. They should learn the skills and knowledge to bring more love to their lives and to others and the whole world.” The Beloved Community ceremony and a book-signing party will begin at 7 p.m. on June 24 at Book Revue, located at 313 New York Ave. in Huntington.

NORTHPORT

Festival To Feature Live Painting Renowned musicians and artists present works at Plein Air Music Festival as neighbors By Kaellen Hessel info@longislandernews.com

Music and art are bountiful in New York City, but there’s no need to spend $20 on a train ticket when you can find world-class artists just down the street ready to share their work for free. That’s what organizers of the Plein Air Classical Music Festival, sponsored by the Northport Arts Coalition, hope to show residents. “We want to foster the long and rich art history Northport has,” said Christine Darch, music festival coordinator. That history includes beatnik writer Jack Kerouac, who drank at a Northport bar, and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, who finished writing “The Little Prince” in Northport. The Plein Air Painting Event begins Friday, with painters spread out along the village green by Northport Harbor and Main Street from 10 a.m. to dusk. Painters will finish their works the following day by 5 p.m. The festival concludes Sunday with a reception from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and silent auction for the paintings at La Mantia Gallery, located at 127 Main Street in Northport. One painting will be awarded “Best in Show” by gallery owners. Painters will work rain or shine, huddling under umbrellas or awnings if need be. Artists are usually known to be recluses hiding out in their studios, said Anthony Davis, Plein Air coordinator. Many only get to see these artists’ finished works and not the emotional process of painting. With this event, they can see Long Island artists create masterpieces while making mistakes along the way, he said.

“They’re putting their hearts on the line here,” he said. All of the painters are willing to expose attendees to this personal process, talking with onlookers while they create. “It’s easy to be a studio painter where you can fix mistakes,” Davis said. “Plein air painters don’t have that liberty.” During the second day of the Plein Air Festival on Saturday, the Classical Music Festival begins by allowing people looking over painters’ shoulders to listen to worldclass music in the background. Attendees are encouraged by the Northport Arts Coalition to bring blankets, chairs and picnic baskets, and spread out by the Northport Village Park Gazebo. The music festival runs from 12:30-4 p.m., weather permitting, with Ron and Julie Meixsell singing opera at 12:30 p.m., Rey Burns’ Crossroad fusing classical music and jazz at 1 p.m., the Matthew Pierce Ensemble performing New American classical music at 2 p.m. and Bassam Saba and The New York Arabic Orchestra performing classical Arabic music. “They’re world-class musicians and they’re your neighbors,” Darch said. You might see them at the grocery store one day and the next week they’re playing at Carnegie Hall, she added. These highly trained professionals are giving their time to share their talent with their neighbors, said Matthew Pierce, music director and event performer. Pierce, who helped pick the musicians, said it would be easy to put together a music festival, pulling in musicians from the city, but there’s no need. “You can just step outside your door and find out there’s a great violinist next door,” he said. “There’s more than

Long Island painters will continue memorializing Northport and its harbor at the Plein Air Classical Music Festival, just as artist Matt Mahurin did at a previous festival.


A10 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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HALF HOLLOW HILLS

Climbing To The Top Of Their Class After four years of climbing the ladder of success, four Half Hollow Hills seniors are perched at the top just in time for graduation. Due to their academic diligence and hard work, at Half Hollow Hills High School East, Chelsea Renter was named valedictorian while Carly Emmer earned the title of salutatorian. In High School West, Dennis Chen earned the distinction of valedictorian, and Lennie Zhu was named salutatorian. As a student at High School East, Renter was elected president of the We the People Club, vice president of the National Honor Society and secretary of the French Honor Society. During her high school career, she received many awards and accolades including being named a National Merit Commended Scholar and AP Scholar with Honors. She was also given the Marie Curie Award. Athletics and music are both part of Renter’s many talents. She is a member of the junior varsity volleyball team and played the flute in the marching band,

School Notebook Pen Pals Are Great Pals Students in the Half Hollow Hills School District have pen pals – right around the corner. Throughout the school year, Lindsay Kuschel in Signal Hill and Carrie McCabe in Otsego implemented a pen pal letter-

Chelsea Renter was named valedictorian at Half Hollow Hills High School East while Carly Emmer earned the title of salutatorian. wind ensemble, symphony orchestra and New York State School Music Association. She will attend

Compiled by Luann Dallojacono writing project between students in their classes. The exercise in writing reinforced English Language Arts, enhanced character education, and encouraged new friendships. Students later got to meet their pen pals face-to-face during a bagel breakfast when Signal Hill students visited Otsego Elementary School.

After getting to know one another by writing letters, students got to meet their pen pals face-to-face during a bagel breakfast.

At Half Hollow Hills High School West, Dennis Chen earned the distinction of valedictorian and Lennie Zhu was named salutatorian.

Northwestern University in the fall. Similarly, Emmer not only excelled in academics, but also in music and athletics while attending High School East. She was elected president of both the National Honor Society and the French Honor Society and vice president of Unite For Sight. Excelling in music, Emmer was a member of the Tri-M music honor society and pit band, and was selected to play the cello for LIFSA and SCMEA. As a scholar athlete, she was also an All-League and All-County track athlete, and played soccer for three years of her high school career. She was named an Intel Science Talent Search semifinalist, National Merit Commended Scholar, and was awarded the American Association of University Women award, Cal Tech Signature Book Award and Dartmouth College Book Award. She will be attending Dartmouth College in the fall. While attending High School West, Chen was named a National Merit semifinalist, AP Scholar with Distinction, National Spanish Exam gold medalist, National Spanish Exam silver medalist, Long Island Stock Market Game finalist and Long Island Math Fair gold medalist. Bound for Princeton University in the fall, he was awarded the Harvard

Book Award, Rensselaer Medal Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement in Math and Science, and the Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony Award for Social Studies. Elected as senior class president and treasurer/vice president of the Federal Reserve Challenge, Chen also participated in DECA, Science Olympiads, Mathletes, National Honor Society, Spanish Club and Spanish Honor Society. His musical accomplishments include attending the LISMA International Music Competition, a master class at Adelphi University, NYSSMA, an All-State piano competition, being named an All-District pianist, being named to the All-County orchestra, and playing in the Long Island String Festival and the Gemini Youth Orchestra. Zhu was named an AP scholar and a National Merit finalist. She also received the Xerox Award for Innovation and Technology, Caltech Signature Award, and the Brown University Award. She was also involved in extracurricular activities including Key Club, Asian Club, Art Club of which she was the secretary, and played on the varsity tennis team. She will be attending the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

Hills Takes The Gold

A Forest Park second-grade class gets a lesson in recycling from Town of Huntington representatives.

Learning Recycling Basics Students of Forest Park Elementary School in the Half Hollow Hills School District were treated to an informational assembly by Stephen Jimenez and Audrey

Gallo of Town of Huntington Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and Councilwoman Glenda Jackson's office. Jimenez and Gallo taught the students about what items can be recycled and what happens to recycled items once they leave the home.

Half Hollow Hills's High School East Concert Chorus received a gold medal for their performance at the New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) Majors Festival on April 22. Danielle McRoy is the choral director.


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LONG ISLANDER LIFE • JUNE 24, 2010 • LI

• JUNE 24, 2010 • LONG ISLANDER LIFE

MAP LEGEND 34 New Street Almarco Italian Grill American Community Bank A Rise Above Bake Shop Art League of Long Island Assemblyman Andrew Raia Atomic Tae Kwon Do Bad Dawgs Bistro 44 Bistro Cassis Blond Bon Bon’s Chocolatier Bruce Cabinet Carillon Nursing Home & Rehabilitation Cactus Academy Cactus Salon Café Buenos Aires Caffé Portofino Canterbury Ales CFC Flor-All Chamber Of Commerce Christopher’s Courtyard Café Coindre Hall Community Thrift Shop Copenhagen Bakery Daniel Gale Agency Dynamic Physical Therapy Elder Care Law Offices Of Brian Tully Family Service League Georgio’s Coffee Roasters Great Bear Harras Bloom & Archer Huntington Center for the Performing Arts Huntington Antiques Center Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition Huntington Hospital Huntington Township Chamber Of Commerce Huntington Toyota Huntington YMCA Jake’s Island Outpost Junior’s Pizza J.W. Hirschfeld Agency Kehillath Shalom Synagogue Knutson Marine Kura Barn La Bottega La Spada Laura Cordero, New York Life Lane Realty Larkfield Optical Life Center Long Islander Newspapers Mac’s Steakhouse Manor Fuel Mariamante Moulles Et Frites Munson & Son Cornish Inc. Neurological Surgery Nikki Sturges, Daniel Gale North Shore Radiation Therapy Porto Vivo Prime - An American Kitchen Ralph Rotten’s Nut Pound Rookies Sports Club Smoking Sloes SPM Tutoring Spuntino Skorpios St. Johnland Nursing Center Suburban Water Gardens The Lite Choice Tre Scalini Triangle Equities Value Drugs, Greenlawn Value Drugs, Huntington Visiting Nurse Services Huntington Town Hall Frank Petrone Supervisor Susan Berland Council Member Glenda Jackson Council Member Mark Mayoka Council Member Suffolk County Legislators Jon Cooper Lou D’Amaro Steven Stern

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• JUNE 24 2010 • LONG ISLANDER LIFE

THURSDAY Feast Of A Festival Find fun and games at the annual St. Anthony’s Family Feast and Festival June 2427 at Trinity Regional School, 5th Avenue, East Northport, featuring international foods, games, rides and entertainment. $11 pay-one-price general admission/$5 seniors. $25 Mega 3-day pass. 631-262-1891.

Calendar O M M U N I T Y

Youth In Suits Network with other young professionals at the Melville-East Farmingdale Chamber of Commerce’s Young Professional Group’s meeting on June 24, 5:30-8 p.m. at The Crestwood Manor, 1036 Fort Salonga Road, Northport. Complimentary food and one complimentary drink with cash bar. Members free/$20 nonmembers. RSVP mandatory, 631-777-6260 or info@melvillechamber.org. Learn the “7 Keys To Love: Opening Love’s Door to Joy and Well Being” from Long Island author Sandy Hinden, executive director of the Dix Hills Performing Arts Center at Five Towns College, on June 24, 7 p.m. at Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. 631-271-1442. Free.

Love In Every Stitch

FRIDAY Jazz It Up Listen to live jazz music every Friday night at The Elks, 195 Main St., Huntington, featuring Halley’s Comets, 7:30-11:30 p.m. $5.

SATURDAY Positive For Passion Meet Long Island author Rob Goldman as he speaks about and signs his new book, “Shoot From The Heart: Creating Passion and Purpose In Your Life and Work” on June 26, 7 p.m. at Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. Free. 631-271-1442.

Line Up For Laughter Get ready to share a few laughs at Long Island’s fifth annual Comedy Festival, featuring Ellen Karis of Fox TV, Randy Levin and Maria Walsh, which kicks off June 26, 8:30 p.m. in the Oak Room of Meehan’s Restaurant, 371 New York Ave., Huntington. $20.

Glimpse The Light Hop a boat and take a guided tour of the Huntington Lighthouse on June 27 11 a.m. - 3 p.m., leaving from Gold Star Beach. Tours are first-come, first-served if weather permits. Sneakers or other flat-soled, rubber shoes required. Suggested donation: $10 adults, $8 seniors, $5 children ages 5-12 or $20 for four-person family. No children under 5 permitted. 631-421-1985 the Lawn Program starting on June 28 at Heckscher Park: Monster vs. Aliens (rated PG). Bring lawn chairs, blankets or picnic dinner. Movies begin at darkness. In case of inclement weather, movies will be shown at Elwood Middle School, 478 Elwood Road, Elwood. Free. 631-351-3112.

Red Is For Passion Love the color red and enjoy living it up? The Red Hat women are looking for new members who enjoy going places and making new friends. Their motto: Fun, Frolic and Friendship. 631-271-6470 or flarpp@yahoo.com.

Celebrate Good Times The Huntington High School class of 1952 will be holding a reunion July 9-11 at the Melville Marriott. 631-499-7163 or 301-462-9850.

Rock While You Shop Head down to The Tanger Outlets at the Arches for special “Sounds of Summer” performances on Saturdays in June. On June 26: Carlos Santana tribute. Street performers, dance teams and local musical groups kick off at 2 p.m., main performances at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.

SUNDAY A Dog’s Journey Meet Long Island children’s author Heather Hill Worthington as she speaks about and signs her new picture book, “Miles of Smiles: The Story of Roxey, the Long Island Rail Road Dog” about Roxey, who served as the mascot of the Long Island Rail Road until 1915, on June 27, 3 p.m. at Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. 631-271-1442. Free.

Glimpse The Light Hop a boat and take a guided tour of the Huntington Lighthouse on June 27 11 a.m.-3 p.m., leaving from Gold Star Beach. Tours are first-come, first-serve if weather permits. Sneakers or other flat-soled, rubber shoes required. Suggested donation: $10 adults, $8 seniors, $5 children ages 5-12 or $20 for fourperson family. No children under 5 permitted. 631-421-1985.

MONDAY Run For Summer Fun Attention all runners! Get ready to hit Caumsett State Historic Park’s 5K as part of Long Island State Parks’ Summer Run Series on June 28, 7 p.m. $15 day of race. Register at www.flrrt.com or www.active.com, or call 631321-3510 on weekdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Movies In The Park Bring the family down for a treat on the big screen at the Town of Huntington’s Movies on

Harborfields Public Library 31 Broadway, Greenlawn. 631-757-4200. harb.suffolk.lib.ny.us • The Harborfields Board of Library Trustees will hold their next meeting on Thursday, June 24 at 7 p.m. • Catch a screening of “Valentine’s Day” featuring Julia Roberts, Jennifer Garner, Bradley Cooper, Anne Hathaway, Jamie Foxx, Patrick Dempsey and more as part of the Afternoon Movies series on Friday, June 25, 1:30 p.m.

Huntington Public Library

Unlocking Love’s Secrets

Love to quilt? Join the quilting group at Old First Church to make quilts for cancer patients, every Thursday at 9:30 a.m. 631-427-2101.

on Friday, June 25, 2 p.m. at the Dix Hills branch. Film in French, English and Kurdish with English subtitles. • Meet local author Mike Sullivan as he discusses his newest book “Necessary Heartbreak: Book One” of the When Time Forgets trilogy on Wednesday, June 30, at 7 p.m. at the Dix Hills branch. Free.

TUESDAY Addictive Behavior Learn more about “Addiction: How the Brain Measures Rewards & Response” during a panel discussion at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Grace Auditorium, sponsored by St. Johnland Nursing Center on June 29, 7 p.m. Free. 516-367-8455 to reserve seats. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor.

Telling Herstory Every Tuesday, join Herstory writers group “Black, Brown & White” for a bridge-building women’s guided memoir writing workshop taught by Lonnie Mathis at Huntington Station Enrichment Center, 1264 New York Ave., 7-9 p.m. $35 per class with monthly discounts. Newcomers welcome. 631-676-7395.

Calling All Shutterbugs The Huntington Camera Club meets every Tuesday, September through June, at the Huntington Public Library, 338 Main St., Huntington, in the Main Meeting Room on the lower level, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. www.huntingtoncameraclub.org.

Children’s Story Time Children of all ages can enjoy stories read by a member of Barnes & Noble’s staff every Tuesday and Thursday from 10:30-11 a.m. Barnes & Noble, 4000 E. Jericho Turnpike, East Northport. Free. 631-462-0208.

WEDNESDAY

Ave., Huntington. Free. 631-271-1442.

Business Breakfast Pull on your power suit and join other business professionals at BNI Executive Referral Exchange’s breakfast networking meeting every Wednesday, 7-8:30 a.m. at the Dix Hills Diner, 1800 Jericho Turnpike, Dix Hills. 800853-9356.

Help For Kids Of Divorcees Children in grades 3-5 can find support at a new separation/divorce group hosted by Family Service League on Wednesday nights, 5:306:30 p.m. at 790 Park Ave., Huntington. 631427-3700.

AT THE LIBRARIES Cold Spring Harbor Library 95 Harbor Road, Cold Spring Harbor. 631-6926820. cshlibrary.org. • Improve your safety on the water with the U.S. Coast Guard Auxillary’s one-day course on Saturday, June 26, 10 a.m.-5p.m. $35, registration required. cgauxcsh@gmail.com or 516-223-3887. • Watercolors by Marija Lasalde, embracing landscape, architecture, still life and floral themes through scenes including New York City’s Central Park, Italy, Slovena and France will be on display through June in the art gallery.

Commack Public Library 18 Hauppauge Road, Commack. 631-4990888. • Learn how easy it is to make hand-painted glass from instructor Irene Marchese to create tumblers and a gift bag in sunflower motif on Tuesday, June 26, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $15 non-refundable materials fee. In person registration only.

Deer Park Public Library 44 Lake Ave., Deer Park. 631-586-3000. • Check the website for the latest updates.

Elwood Public Library 3027 Jericho Turnpike, Elwood. 631-499-3722. www.elwoodlibrary.org. • Learn about the history of women’s fashion from artist and teacher Emilia Rabito Baer based on the exhibit “American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity” currently on display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Thursday, June 24, 2 p.m. Free.

Two Faces Of War

Half Hollow Hills Library

Meet Long Island author Rob Scott as he speaks about and signs his debut novel, “Face of the Enemy,” which tells the story two men of different backgrounds who find themselves victims of circumstance, the Vietnam War, on June 29, 7 p.m. at Book Revue, 313 New York

Dix Hills Branch: 55 Vanderbilt Parkway. 631421-4530; Melville: 510 Sweet Hollow Road. 631-421-4535. hhhl.suffolk.lib.ny.us • Catch a showing of “The Screening Room,” in which a young man trains to swim across the English Channel to reunite with his girlfriend,

Main Branch: 338 Main St., Huntington. 631427-5165. Station Branch: 1335 New York Ave., Huntington Station. 631-421-5053. hpl.suffolk.lib.ny.us • Bring the family to Huntington Public Library’s 13th annual “Fun In The Sun” Summer Kickoff Party” on Friday, June 25 featuring the vaudeville physical comedy show of Chip Bryant at 1 p.m., followed by games, prizes, face painters, and more until 4 p.m. at the Main Branch. • Learn about the new responsibilities in “Getting Ready for Babysitting” for students entering grades 7-12, which goes over responsibilities and skills necessary for the job on Monday, June 28, 5:30-8:30 p.m. at the Main branch. Registration required.

Northport-East Northport Public Library 151 Laurel Ave., Northport. 631-261-6930. 185 Larkfield Road, East Northport. 631-261-2313. www.nenpl.org. • Take a refresher course to sharpen your driving skills at the AARP’s Driver Safety Program on Tuesdays, June 29 and July 1, 7-11 p.m. $14 fee/$12 AARP members, registration required in advance. Bring your New York State driver’s license to class. • Calling all Mets fans! Meet author Dana Brand of “The Last Days of Shea: Delight and Despair in the Life of a Mets Fan” as he talks about and signs his book on Wednesday, June 30, 7:30-9 p.m. Copies will be available for purchase.

South Huntington Public Library 145 Pigeon Hill Road, Huntington Station. 631549-4411. www.shpl.info. • Celebrate summer with the Liverpool Shuffle, back from their standing-room-only show, as they perform songs from The Beatles on Friday, June 25, 7 p.m. Free tickets for district residents, all others will seated at 6:50 p.m. Bring a blanket or chair for the upper lawn level. If raining, show will be held in theater.

THEATER and FILM Arena Players Children’s Theatre 294 Route 109, East Farmingdale. 516-2930674. • Explore the world of “Alice in Wonderland” as it takes the stage at the Vanderbilt Museum Carriage House starting July 3.

Arena Players Repertory Theatre 296 Route 109, East Farmingdale. 516-2930674. All Main Stage Productions performed as scheduled. Friday, 8 p.m. $18; Saturday, 8 p.m. $22; and Sunday, 3 p.m. $18. • “You Know I Can’t Hear You When The Water’s Running” by Robert Anderson, a comedic series of four one-act plays with a common theme of poor interpersonal communications, steals the spotlight of the main stage through July 11. • “Dead Certain” by Marcus Lloyd tells the story of an out-of-work actor and a theatreobsessed, wheelchair-bound ex-dancer who meet in a large isolation country house. This psychological thriller takes the stage through June 27.

Cinema Arts Centre 423 Park Ave., Huntington. www.cinemaartscentre.org. 631-423-7611. • “Stonewall Uprising,” featuring archival footage of the three-day rebellion that helped launch the gay rights movement in 1969 including Stonewall patrons, Village Voice reporters and the police who led the raid, will be shown on June 24, 7:30 p.m. with guest speaker filmmaker Kate Davis. $9 members/$13 public. • Hear Premik Russell Tubbs live at the cinema


LONG ISLANDER LIFE • JUNE 24, 2010 • LI

in a night of expecting the unexpected, featuring an ensemble of New York performers with various instruments with a special segment dedicated to young composers on the rise on June 25, 8 p.m. followed by a wine and cheese reception. $15 members/$20 public/$10 children under 16. • “Sleeping and Waking” by director Joe Banno tells the story of Sullivan Daniels who, while battling terminal cancer, agrees to undergo massive surgery that will replace nearly his entire body but leaves him in a spiritual quandary of “Who am I now?” Showing June 30, 7:30 p.m. followed by discussion with the director. $9 members/$13 public includes reception.

Mr. Broadway’s Musical In Dix Hills See the world premiere of “A Moment in Time,” a musical by four-time Tony-winning producer Stewart F. Lane about a Marine in Afghanistan who, moments before battle, recalls a happier, safer place. Showing June 25-27 at Dix Hills Center For The Performing Arts, Five Towns College, 305 N. Service Road, Dix Hills, with shows at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. 631-656-2148. www.dhpac.org.

Dix Hills Center For The Performing Arts Five Towns College, 305 N. Service Road, Dix Hills. Box Office: 631-656-2148. www.dhpac.org • See the world premiere of “A Moment in Time,” a musical by four-time Tony-winning producer Stewart F. Lane, about a marine in Afghanistan who, moments before battle, recalls a happier, safer place. Shows June 25-27 with shows at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

The Minstrel Players Of Northport Performing at Houghton Hall theatre at Trinity Episcopal Church 130 Main St., Northport Village. 631-732-2926, www.minstrelplayers.org. • “Whodunnit,” a mystery by Anthony Shaffer directed by Edward Kyle III, will be performed on Saturdays, July 24 and 31 at 8 p.m.; Sundays July 25 and Aug. 1 at 3 p.m.

John W. Engeman Theater At Northport 350 Main St., Northport. www.johnwengemantheater.com. 631-261-2900. • Enjoy the best of Broadway on Ladies Night featuring Heidi Blickenstaff of “The Little Mermaid” and “The Fully Monty,” Karen Mason of “Hairspray,” Savannah Wise of “Ragtime” and “Les Miserables,” Janine LaManna of “Kiss Me, Kate” and “Ragtime,” and Jill Paice of “Curtains” and “The Woman In White” on June 26, 8 p.m. $50. • “Damn Yankees,” based on the book by George Abbott and Douglass Wallop, about a boy tired of watching his favorite baseball team lose to the New York Yankees who trades his soul to become a star baseball player, eventually leading to a showdown in a musical comedy, will run July 8-Aug. 29. Performances are 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays, 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturdays, 2 p.m. and select dates 7 p.m. on Sunday. $60.

Star Playhouse At the Suffolk Y JCC, 74 Hauppauge Road, Commack. 631-462-9800 ext. 136.

Tilles Center For Performing Arts 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville. www.tillescenter.org. 516-299-3100. • Hear The Laurie Berkner Band, children’s music superstars as seen on Nick Jr., who will perform a live birthday party featuring old and new songs from their CD “Rocketship Run” on July 18, 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., presented by Metropolitan Talent. Bring your favorite party hat, picture of a birthday cake from their website and an animal for your head, because animals have birthdays too. $25-$35.

CASTING CALLS Become An Ice Girl The New York Islanders will host auditions for their 2010-2011 Ice Girls team on July 10 at noon at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Turnpike, Uniondale. Participants must at least 18 years old; should wear a form-fitting crop top, athletic fit pants and have figure skates. Bring a photo and resume, and have hair and make-up prepared prior to auditions. All auditions will be recorded. 516-501-6783 or 516-501-6874.

Alfred Van Leon Gallery 145 Pidgeon Hill Road. Huntington Station. 631-549-4411 Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 9 .am.-9 p.m. Wed. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 1-6 p.m. • Long Island Sculptors presents “Read My LIPSS” IV Animals and Objects featuring both indoor and outdoor exhibits ranging from animals to architectural structures, images from the sea at more opening June 24 with a reception from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Alpan Gallery 2 West Carver St., Huntington. Gallery hours: Wednesday - Saturday 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 631423-4433. www.alpangallery.com. • Alpan International 2010, featuring international artists selected by Director of Exhibitions/Curator Hitomi Iwasaki of the Queens Museum of Art is on display.

Art League of Long Island 107 East Deer Park Road, Dix Hills. Gallery hours: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. weekends. 631-462-5400. www.ArtLeagueLI.org. • The 54th annual Long Island Artist’s Exhibition, celebrating the work of artists from Suffolk, Nassau, Queens and beyond and juried by Heidi Lange of the DC Moore Gallery in New York, is on display through July 3.

b.j. spoke gallery 299 Main St., Huntington. Gallery hours: Monday-Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. 631-549-5106. • “Water Colors of Happiness” by Joyce Rosen and “Olio” featuring oils by Irwin Traugot is on display through June 27 as gallery artists portray “Roads, Avenues and Intersections.”

Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery 1660 Route 25A, Cold Spring Harbor. Open seven days a week, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday and Sundays until 6 p.m.: $6 adults; $4 children 3 - 12 and seniors over 65; members and children under 3 are free. 516-692-6768. http://www.cshfha.org/ • Summer enrichment programs are offered for children in grades kindergarten and older start in July including “Close Encounters of the Natural Kind” to “Nature Photography.” For detailed information on various programs, visit the website. • The Hatchery holds the largest living collection of New York State freshwater reptiles, fish and amphibians. Visitors can tour two aquarium buildings and eight outdoor ponds, feed the hungry trout or try the “Catch & Keep Fishing” program.

fotofoto Gallery 372 New York Ave., Huntington. Gallery hours: Friday 5-8 p.m., Saturday 12-8 p.m., Sunday 124 p.m. 631-549-0448. www.fotofotogallery.com. • “Leaf Drawings” by Kristin Holcomb will be opening on June 25, with an artist’s reception on June 26, 5-7 p.m. The exhibition will be on display through Aug. 1.

Seeking Strings

Greenlawn-Centerport Historical Association

The Northport Symphony Orchestra (formerly the Northport Community Orchestra) is seeking new members in all sections. Rehearsals are Wednesday evenings. 631-462-6617. northportorchestra.org.

P.O. Box 354, Greenlawn. 631-754-1180.

Cloggers Wanted The Bruce Spruce Cloggers Dance Company is seeking dancers for future shows on Long Island. Dance background wanted; preferably experience in tap, clog or Irish-step dancing. 631-476-1228.

MUSEUMS & EXHIBITS

Huntington Arts Council Main Street Petite Gallery: 213 Main St., Huntington. Gallery hours: Monday - Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Art in the Art-trium: 25 Melville Park Road, Melville. Gallery Hours: Monday Friday 7 a.m.-7 p.m. 631-271-8423. www.huntingtonarts.org. • “Streetwise,” an exhibition showing a different perspective of the streets we cross every day or come upon, is on display in the Art-rium Gallery through June 28. • The Masters Exhibit featuring Best in Show and Honorable Mention works from various

juried exhibits opens June 24 with reception June 25, 6-8 p.m. • The 45th annual Huntington Summer Arts Festival will kick off in Heckscher Park on June 26 with blues/rock guitarist G.E. Smith.

Heckscher Museum Of Art 2 Prime Ave., Huntington. Museum hours: Wednesday - Friday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., first Fridays from 4 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission $68/adults, $4-6/seniors, and $4-5/children; members and children under 10 free. 631-351-3250. • “The Heckscher: Now and Then” presenting original works from August Heckscher in celebration of the museum’s 90th anniversary is on display through July 18.

Huntington Historical Society Main office/library: 209 Main St., Huntington. Museums: Conklin House, 2 High St. Kissam House/Museum Shop, 434 Park Ave. 631-4277045, ext. 401. http://www.huntingtonhistoricalsociety.org/ • A new exhibit, “From House Calls to Hospitals” featuring Dr. Samuel Teich’s 1940s-era office and life, is on display at the Conklin House. • The next meeting of the genealogy workshop will be the annual picnic on June 23, 7 p.m.

Joseph Lloyd Manor House

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hours: Tuesday - Friday, 12-4 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, 12-5 p.m.; closed Mondays except for holiday weeks. Grounds admission: $7 adults, $6 seniors, students, and $3 children under 12. Museum tour, add $3 per person. 631-854-5555. www.vanderbiltmuseum.org. • Take a trip to Wizard University, the Vanderbilt’s series of week-long summer programs for children ages 6-12 about rare marine, natural history and ethnographic artifact collectionsm, and the planetarium, bird and animal exhibits on the 43-acre estate of William K. Vanderbilt, July 5-August. • Image Cycling puts a twist on your typical “spin” classes by combining music, imagines on a ride in the planetarium. Next Session on June 24: “Kilimanjaro: Ride to the Top of Africa”at both 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. or on June 29: “Ride the Elements” at 6:30 and 8 p.m. Bring a water bottle, towel. Imagecycling.com to register.

Walt Whitman Birthplace 246 Old Walt Whitman Rd, Huntington Station. Hours: Wednesday-Friday, 1-4 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Admission: $5 adults, $4 seniors/students, and children under 5 are free. 631-427-5240. www.waltwhitman.org • Registration is open for “A Children’s Paumanok Summer Program,” for a creative literary educational adventure featuring Walt Whitman themes, crafts and writing exercises for children ages 8-12 from July 12-16, 9:30 a.m.-noon at the Birthplace. $100 per child, enrollment is limited.

The Whaling Museum Main Street, Cold Spring Harbor. Museum hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $4 adults, $3 seniors, $3 students 5 -18, family $12; military and children under 5 are free. 631-367-3418. www.cshwhalingmuseum.org. • Take a Historic Walking Tour of Cold Spring Harbor while learning about the families and personalities who lives there in the 1800s on June 30, 2:30 p.m. Members free/free with public admission. RVSP required. • “Tales & Treasure: From the Attic & Archive,” an exhibition exploring the 1800s through artifacts and stories, is on display through Labor Day 2010.

Lloyd Lane and Lloyd Harbor Road, Lloyd Neck Saturday-Sunday 1-5 p.m. (last tour at 4:30). Adults $3, Children 7 -14, $2, groups by appointment only. 631-692-4664. www.splia.org.

Ridotto, Concerts with a Touch of Class

LaMantia Gallery

At Old First Church, Route 25A in Huntington. 631-385-0373. www.Ridotto.org.

127 Main St., East Northport. 631-754-8414. www.lamantiagallery.com. • The gallery will be participating in the Northport Plein Air Painting Event from June 25-27 around the village. An auction for “wet” paintings created by these artists will be held on June 27, 1-3 p.m. at the gallery.

MUSIC & DANCE

VOLUNTEERING Voice For The Children

716 New York Ave., Huntington. 631-421-0258. Www.martinlermangallery.com Hours: Monday - Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Parents for Megan’s Law and the Crime Victims Center are seeking volunteers to assist with general office duties during daytime hours. Candidates should be positive, energetic and professional with good communication skills. Resume and three references required. 631689-2672 or fax resume to 631-751-1695.

Northport Historical Society Museum

Helping Furry Friends

215 Main St., Northport. Museum hours: Tuesday - Sunday, 1-4:30 p.m. 631-757-9859. www.Northporthistorical.org. • “Parading Down Main Street” offers a historic informative walking tour of Northport’s business district at 5:30 p.m. on June 24 with a Silas Wood Society reception. The society is for individuals interested in history that is coordinated through the Town of Huntington Historic Partnership. • “Recording Memories, a Historic Overview: Over 150 Years of Scrapbooking, Journaling, Photo Albums and more” is an exhibition sponsored by Not Just a Scrap of Centerport, on display in the main gallery. $3 suggested donation.

Little Shelter Animal Rescue and Adoption Center is looking for volunteers who want to make a difference in the lives of companion animals. In addition to volunteering to be hands on with our cats and dogs, there are other opportunities available in the offices, at events, satellite adoption locations and fundraisers. Visit www.littleshelter.com or contact Anne Ryan, anne@littleshelter.com, 631-368-8770 ext. 204.

Martin Lerman Gallery

Ripe Art Gallery 67 Broadway, Greenlawn. 631-807-5296. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Thursday 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Friday 2-9 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. www.ripeartgal.com. • Artist Mick Du Russel, founder of Sound Success for ALS, brings his Artist Trading Cards, miniatures created on 2.5-inch by 3.5inch cardstock as a fundraiser.

Suffolk Y JCC 74 Hauppauge Road, Commack. 631-4629800, ext. 140. Tuesday 1-4 p.m. Admission: $5 per person, $18 per family. Special group programs available

Vanderbilt Museum and Planetarium 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport. Museum

A Loving Touch The Hospice Care Network is seeking licensed massage therapists who are passionate and committed to making a difference for their new complementary therapy program, which will provide services at Franklin Medical Center in Valley Stream, Peninsula Hospital Center in Far Rockaway and the Hospice Inn in Melville. Two-day training course provided by the organization. ependleton@hospicecarenetwork.org or 516-832-7100.

Send us your listings Submissions must be in by 5 p.m. 10 days prior to publication date. Send to Community Calendar at 149 Main Street, Huntington, NY 11743, or e-mail to info@longislandernews.com


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NEW SALES DAILY BENEFITS GO TO: Day Top, Cancer Care, Family Service League, Planned Parenthood Hudson Peconic, Visiting Nurse Service & Hospice, Huntington Hospital Open Monday through Saturday • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tax Deductible donations accepted daily until 3 p.m. Collectibles, Decorations, Clothing ... and much more

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Get Your Car Into

SUMMER Shape Servicing the community for more than 50 years

Complete & Honest Auto Repair For All Foreign & Domestic Vehicles • V3D Imaging 4 PT Wheel Alignment • Professional Oil Change /SVC Specialists • Brakes • A/C • Tires • Transmissions • etc. • Free Concierge Pick Up / Delivery • Night Owl / Early drop off convenience *Mention this ad & receive 10% Discount on service NYS Authorized Inspection Facility

Howard H. Munson & Son Cornish, Inc. 197 197 New New York York Avenue Avenue Huntington Village (across (across from from Balance Balance Chiropractic) Chiropractic)

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Brian Tully, Elder Law Attorney

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Protect Your Health And Your Home FREE Educational Seminars Weekly Presentations Every Friday Throughout The Summer July 9 - August 20 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at The Elder Care Resource Center, Inc. Upcoming Lectures & Workshops Many of us are concerned with the confusion and issues associated with Elder Care. It can be overwhelming, uncertain and intimidating. The Elder Care Resource Center, Inc. offers expertise to guide and support you in these STRESSFUL matters. Attend our Free seminars to learn valuable information on understanding the natural progression of aging and its impact on a loved one’s health, mobility, housing and financial resources. Seating is Limited & You Must Register in Advance Please Call (631) 424-2800 to Reserve Your Seat!

444 New York Ave. Huntington New York, 11743

July 9

Medical Guidelines for You & Your Aging Loved One presented by geriatrician, Gail Lowenstein, MD

July 16

Home Care 101 presented by Jennifer Devine, LMSW, Director of Community Outreach, Caring People Home Care Agency

July 23

Home Safety & Managing Your Loved Ones Medications presented by Wendy Brofman, RN

July 30

Various Home Care Options With Medicaid presented by Brian Andrew Tully Esq., Elder Law Attorney & founder of the ElderCare Resource Center, Inc., and Shannon Mallon, Marketing Associate of GuildNet

August 6

Cost vs. Value of Remodeling to Stay at Home presented by Frank Gucciardo, Aging in Place Specialist & President, Frangeli Consulting and Remodeling

August 13

Fall Prevention presented by Rosario Accardi, DPT and President, At Home Active Motion Physical Therapy Services

August 20

When Staying at Home is no Longer an Option presented by Pam Winter, Director of Community Relations, Somerset Gardens & Suzanne Paolucci LCSW, Elder Care Coordinator of The Elder Law Office of Brian Andrew Tully, PLLC

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50 LI • LONG ISLANDER LIFE • JUNE 24, 2010

You Call That A Scandal?

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Triangle Equities has been committed to excellence and integrity in the real estate sector for close to 30 years. The company continually develops and expertly manages a diverse portfolio that beneits its tenants and, most importantly, the communities in which its developments are located. Here in Huntington, Triangle is committed to providing residents with much-needed housing alternatives with Kensington Estates. Kensington is a proposed 80-unit, 55 and-over, luxury townhouse community featuring tennis courts, a pool, a club house and other amenities. This proposed development will give empty nesters the chance to downsize, stay in their home community and remain close to their families. At a recent public hearing, Kensington received overwhelming support from the Huntington community. Over 450 letters of support from local Huntington residents, a petition of support from the neighbors adjacent to the site, several hundred names of support from a social networking site and numerous speakers, all verifying the need for such a community and demonstrating the positive response to Kensington. This hearing demonstrated one of Triangle Equities key trademarks in that they endeavor to collaborate closely with community leaders and their neighbors. The company is skilled at identifying needs in emerging and underserved markets and fulilling those key community needs with both public and private amenities.

If you have any questions or comments regarding ensington states, or would like to meet with us, please call Elysa Goldman at (718) 463-5757 or via e-mail at i fo rie sof e si to states om

30-56 Whitestone Expressway Whitestone, NY 11354 Tel: (718) 463-5757 Fax: (718) 321-8279 tria lee uities om www.facebook.com/KensingtonEstates

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The Annual Guide To Huntington Business 2010

THE THE

BUSINESS BUSINESS

THE FOODIES FOODIES DO DO THE

Weathering The Storm

Bin 56

Inside Scoop

CREATIVITYIS ISKEY KEY CREATIVITY

WINE, TAPAS TAPAS AND AND MORE MORE WINE,

LICONFIDENTIAL CONFIDENTIAL LI

THE LONG ISLANDER • THE RECORD • NORTHPORT JOURNAL • HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER


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• JUNE 24, 2010 • LONG ISLANDER LIFE

The Silver Lining

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Businesses are using creative sales strategies to draw customers into their stores and stay afloat in tough times. Some, like Value Drugs, above, are even expanding.

Michael Schenkler Publisher The official newspaper of the Town of Huntington; Half Hollow Hills School District; Harborfields Public Library District; South Huntington Water District; Cold Spring Harbor School District; Greenlawn Water District; South Huntington School District; Village of Lloyd Harbor; Village of Huntington Bay; and the Centerport, Cold Spring Harbor, Dix Hills, East Northport, Greenlawn, Halesite, Huntington, Huntington Manor and Melville Fire Districts.

Luann Dallojacono Editor Mike Koehler Danny Schrafel Sara Walsh Reporters

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BUY LOCALLY HUNTINGTON TOWNSHIP BUSINESS COUNCIL

Peter Sloggatt Associate Publisher/Managing Editor Robert Nieter Sheauwei Pidd Production/ Art Department

Linda Gilbert Office / Legals David Viejo Michele Caro Susan Mandel Account Executives

Copyright © 2009 by Long Islander Newspapers, publishers of The Long-Islander, The Record, Northport Journal and Half Hollow Hills Newspaper. Each issue of the The Long-Islander and all contents thereof are copyrighted by Long Islander, LLC. None of the contents or articles may be reproduced in any forum or medium without the advance express written permission of the publisher. Infringement hereof is a violation of the Copyright laws.

newspapers

149 Main Street, Huntington, New York 11743 631.427.7000


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LONG ISLANDER LIFE • JUNE 24, 2010 • LI

2 0 10 H U N T I N G T O N

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BUSINESS HONOR ROLL 172 Years Long Islander Newspapers

39 Years Value Drugs, Huntington

144 Years St. Johnland Nursing Center

35 Years Great Bear Kura Barn

93 Years Huntington Hospital 88 Years Daniel Gale Agency 85 Years Huntington Township Chamber Of Commerce Manor Fuel 82 Years Family Service League J.W. Hirschfeld Agency 80 Years Howard H. Munson & Son Cornish Inc. 75 Years Knutson Marine 58 Years Visiting Nurse Services 57 Years Huntington YMCA 55 Years Art League of Long Island 52 Years Neurological Surgery 50 Years Community Thrift Shop 49 Years Suburban Water Gardens 45 Years Bruce Cabinet

34 Years Canterbury Ales 32 Years Cactus Salon 31 Years A Rise Above Bake Shop Bon Bon’s Chocolatier Triangle Equities Lane Realty 28 Years Christopher’s Courtyard Café Junior’s Pizza 25 Years Nikki Sturges, Daniel Gale 24 Years Huntington Antiques Center Ralph Rotten’s Nut Pound 23 Years CFC Flor-All 21 Years North Shore Radiation Therapy 20 Years Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition Tre Scalini 17 Years Mariamante 16 Years Larkfield Optical 15 Years Mr. Sausage

41 Years Carillon Nursing Home & Rehabilitation Kehillath Shalom Synagogue Skorpios

12 Years Copenhagen Bakery 10 Years 34 New Street Bistro Cassis American Community Bank

9 Years Elder Care Law Offices Of Brian Tully 8 Years Assemblyman Andrew Raia Caffé Portofino 7 Years Smoking Sloes 6 Years Harras Bloom & Archer SPM Tutoring 5 Years Almarco Italian Grill Huntington Center for the Performing Arts Atomic Tae Kwon Do 4 Years Café Buenos Aires Cupcake Gourmet Prime 3 Years Georgio’s Coffee Roasters Mac’s Steakhouse Spuntino 2 Years Life Center Rookies Sports Club Laura Cordero, New York Life 1 Year Blond Cactus Academy Dynamic Physical Therapy La Bottega Porto Vivo Huntington Toyota Coindre Hall Brand New Bistro 44 Moulles Et Frites Value Drugs, Greenlawn Bad Dawgs Jake’s Island Outpost The Lite Choice

The listings above are based on information supplied by the advertisers.

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• JUNE 24, 2010 • LONG ISLANDER LIFE

Challenging Times Spark Creativity Businesses stay afloat by changing market strategies, finding niches M

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By Sara-Megan Walsh

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Jacqui Maggio, owner of Sophu Blu in Northport, found a niche in baby clothing.

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For more information call (631)421-4242 A

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SUMMERTIME SALE!

* 20 to 30% Off Everything!

HUNTINGTON ANTIQUES CENTER in Cold Spring Harbor 129 Main Street (Route 25A), Cold Spring Harbor, LI, New York 11724 • 1-631-549-0105 American Express, Visa & Mastercard accepted. Tuesday - Saturday: 10:30 to 5:00, Sunday & Monday: 12:00 to 5:00 *Starts Thursday July 1st thru Saturday July 31st. This offer can not be combined with any other discounts. www.huntingtonantiquescenter.com


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• JUNE 24, 2010 • LONG ISLANDER LIFE

LIZ & PETER

Providing quality physical therapy services to our community for more than 10 years.

Elizabeth A. Perlstein, DPT Peter Yeager, MSPT 164 East Main Street, Huntington 631-470-9515 • dynamicsportspt@aol.com

• Orthopedic/ Sports injuries • Post- Operative Rehab • Acute & Chronic Pain • General Conditioning • No-Fault • Workman’s Compensation

• Neck/Back Pain • Arthritis Pain • Pre-Season Orthopedic Screenings • Neurological Disorders • Health & Wellness Education

MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED


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Buying Into This Local Campaign ‘Buy Local’ program wins multiple awards as it spreads throughout LI By Mike Koehler mkoehler@longislandernews.com

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CBS anchor Kristine Johnson presents Huntington Business Council’s Tom Kehoe, left, and Long Islander Newspaper’s Peter Sloggatt, right, with a folio award for the “Buy Locally” campaign.

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Loading A New Customer Base Small businesses using social media and the Internet to connect with clientele By Alessandra Malito amalito@longislandernews.com

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Businesses have turned to the Internet and social utility sites like Facebook for cheap, efficient ways to communicate with their customers on a daily basis. I

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Legislator Lou D'Amaro 17th District

Legislator Jon Cooper 18th District

1842 East Jericho Turnpike, Suite P 130 West Jericho Turnpike Huntington, NY 11743 Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 854-5100 (631) 854-4433

50 Gerard Street, Suite 100 Huntington, NY 11743 (631) 854-4500

Legislator Steve Stern 16th District

Steve.Stern@suffolkcountyny.gov http://legis.suffolkcountyny.gov/do/do16.html

Lou.DAmaro@suffolkcountyny.gov http://legis.suffolkcountyny.gov/do/do17.html

Jon.Cooper@suffolkcountyny.gov www.legislatorcooper.com


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249 Main Street Huntington Village 631-923-1290

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JakesOutpost@optonline.net • www.jakesislandoutpost.com

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Long Island’s Premier Counseling & Health Services Center

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214 Wall Street, Suite 300 Huntington, NY 11743 Tel: 631-673-5433 Fax: 631-673-5435

i i s er p i p es er p es e s er p E i is r ers r se i se i ie i Exe i e i r er p i r e e i i reer E i se i

Health and

p i ee E er e i ir pr ri i p sis ss e si r i -s ei i

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• JUNE 24, 2010 • LONG ISLANDER LIFE • OND • . . •

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SUMMER SPECIALS

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Air Conditioning SPECIAL 5W/30 OIL $2.00

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ost Domestic Cars Check All luids Ad ust Air Pressure In Tires ube Chassis eplace ilter Up To 5 ts. A IP otor il 0 30 Synthetic il Available

ADDITIONAL $19.95 (MOST FOREIGN CARS) PLUS EPA FEE 5/20 OIL ADDITIONAL PRICE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

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Mention This Ad & Receive a FREE TIRE ROTATION WITH ANY SERVICE

LET US DO A DIAGNOSTIC CIRCUIT CHECK

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FRONT or REAR Pads or Shoes Additional

Is Your Check Engine Light On?

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• Install Brake Shoes • Install Disc Pads • Check Complete Brake System • Resurface 2 Brake Drums or 2 Disc Rotors • Adjust Brake and Add Brake Fluid if Needed • Free Brake Adjustment for Life of Linings

NY INSPECTIONS NOW REQUIRE CHECK ENGINE LIGHT TO BE OFF

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“FREE” BRAKE INSPECTION

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• Check System Pressure • Check For Leaks • Add Up To 1LB. Of R134a Refrigerant • Clean The Condenser • Check Vent Temperature

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(3 Blocks East of Rte. 110)

Mon.-Fri. 7:30AM-6PM Saturday 7:30AM-4PM

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99 E. JERICHO TPKE. HUNTINGTON STATION

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FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED • SERVING HUNTINGTON FOR OVER 35 YEARS

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NORTHPORT

CENTERPORT

CENTERPORT

64 Makamah Beach Rd Bedrooms 4 Baths 2 Price $939,000 ML# 2269425 SD#4

8 Sea Spray Dr Bedrooms 4 Baths 3.5 Price $719,000 ML# 2270997 SD#6

162 Centerport Rd Bedrooms 7 Baths 5 Price $1,450,000 ML# 2280154 SD#6

COLD SPRING HARBOR

HUNTINGTON STATION

WEST ISLIP

84 Woodchuck Hollow Rd Bedrooms 6 Baths 4.5 Price $1,195,000 ML# 2294747 SD#2

9 Bettina Ct Bedrooms 4 Baths 2.5 Price $399,000 ML# 2254393 SD#13

151 Wagstaff Ln Bedrooms 4 Baths 6.5 Price $3,999,000 ML# 2249651 SD#9

GREENLAWN

HUNTINGTON

Nikki Sturges Licensed Associate Broker nikkisturges@danielgale.com

see 25 Cuba Hill Rd Bedrooms 3 Baths 2 Price $459,000 ML# 2238173 SD#6

130 West Neck Rd Bedrooms 5 Baths 2.5 Price $649,000 ML# 226673 SD#3

ese ine e e se i i

160 E. Main Street, Huntington, NY 11743 Tel 631.427.6650 ext. 211 Cell 631.375.8557 Fax 631.423.7518


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Michael L. McCarthy, P.C. is a full service law firm located in the heart of Huntington Village, concentrating in land-use, zoning and municipal law. The firm handles real estate and business transactions, estate planning and property- related litigation. Michael L. McCarthy, Esq. Lee A. Reynolds, Esq.

Michael L. McCarthy, P.C. - 7 East Carver Street - Huntington, NY 11743 ph: 631-351-4000/ fax: 631-351-4024 - email: mlm@michaelmccarthy.com


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Andrew P. Raia New York State ASSEMBLYMAN 9th DISTRICT

75 WOODBINE AVENUE, NORTHPORT, NY 11768 ph 631-261-4151 fax 631-261-2992

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continuing on our tradition of professional care for today, tomorrow and into the future.

Carillon dialysis

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e are proud to announce our grand opening

Of our new state of the art Dialysis Center (Carillon Dialysis). We grow and change to meet the diverse needs of our community. Carillon Nursing, Rehabilitation and Dialysis Center is located on a beautifully-landscaped, 11-acre country setting.

830 PARK AVENUE HUNTINGTON, NEW YORK 11743-4599 www.carillonnursing.com

Unique Features of Carillon dialysis • The Latest design and technology featuring new individual flat panel cable TV, patient privacy and personal storage access. All in a comfortable home-like environment offering the latest in modern comfort and care. • State of the Art 8 Station Dialysis Unit accommodating our residents currently diagnosed with ESRD and open to residents in our community. • Carillon is one of the first nursing homes offering our quality standards in a unique community based central location for inpatient and outpatient dialysis treatment. • Both Inpatient and Outpatient Hemodialysis including a highly skilled support team for medical, nursing, social work and nutritional needs. • Separate convenient entrance for easy treatment access. An Affiliate of

For More Information

631.630.0398

This center is conveniently located in Huntington, Long Island. Carillon does not discriminate with regard to admission or care because of race, creed, color, national origin, gender, disability, blindness, age, source of payment, source of sponsorship, marital status or sexual preference.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


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The

Foodie SECTION

Get Your Start, Finish And More At Bin 56

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

Presenting a New American Cuisine Menu featuring the freshest produce, all natural chicken & highest quality meats... served in a newly renovated, elegant setting, the perfect combination for a memorable dining experience.

We hope to see you soon! From left, the ceviche, tuna tartare and poached figs are some items from the “cold & crisp” section of the menu at Bin 56. By Luann & Margaret Ann

Paul Gallowitsch, Jr. Proprietor

foodie@longislandernews.com

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Outside Dining In Our Beautiful Private Enclosed Patio

The sweet tomato jam served with the lamb chops is not to be missed.

44 Main Street, Northport Village (631) 262-9744 bistro44.net

OPEN FOR LUNCH & DINNER

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LONG ISLANDER LIFE • JUNE 24, 2010 • LI

The

There’s a New Dawg in town...

Foodie SECTION

Tempting tapas at Bin 56 (Continued from page A19)

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44 Gerard Street, Huntington Village (Across From The Movie Theater)

The ceviche contains a medley of seafood, including bay scallops, shrimp and mussels.

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631-923-1201 www.BadDawgsLI.com

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The upscale bric o en pi eria restaurant, where ou can en o fine dining reasonable prices S S V C

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O e Roasted asparagus and Serrano ham are brilliantly complemented by a cool, crisp white wine.

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Jumbo shrimp and chorizo are pan-roasted and full of flavor.

Visit us at

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S u ti oo li e om

lu es oi es Of O er asta is es Sala offee a oli

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Side Dish DINE HUNTINGTON.COM By DineHuntington.com Foodie@longislandernews.com

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A gala to open the newly restored Italian Garden at Planting Fields stars celebrity chef Lidia Bastianich.

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Scalini

~ THE ORIGINAL ~

GRaduations • Communions

Private Parties Starting At $19.95 p.p. (Sat & Sun. afternoons call for details)

Open For Lunch & Dinner 7 Days A Week

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Monday-Thursday • Expires July 31, 2010 Cash Only • Eat In • Take Out

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LONG ISLANDER LIFE • JUNE 24, 2010 • LI

REVIEWS:

Celebrating Our 3rd Year ! Open for Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week 10 Big Screen TV’s and Individual TV’s in every booth Book Your Party Now! Available For All Occasions

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“Rookies is one of the 2008 “Rookies is where sporty Top Restaurants of Long Island.” meets sophisticated.” - Newsday - Long-Islander

“The term Rookies usually applies to someone that is just “Rookies game plan sets itself apart from starting out but everything about it - from the design to the competition. They voted Rookies one of staff and especially the food is definitely major league.” the top 10 restaurants on the Island.” - Village Connection - LI Merchant


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The

Foodie SECTION

You can’t have strawberry shortcake or flan without one of Bin 56’s sweet dessert wines.

Dining at Bin 56 (Continued from page A21)

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THE BEST BAR-BE-QUE IN TOWN All You Can Eat

Have the most talked about Party of the Summer Cater Your ...BQ ll B Lar ge or Sm a Graduation ent C orporate Ev Festival...

with us

Spare Ribs $15.95

Includes:

BYOB

u n e M e e r F n e t Glu

Coleslaw Cornbread and two sides of your choice

Monday - Friday

847 Fort Salonga Rd • Northport • 631-651-8812 • www.smokingsloes.com


LONG ISLANDER LIFE • JUNE 24, 2010 • LI

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Please mention The Long Islander Newspapers when doing business with our advertisers.

www.LongIslanderNews.com

THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A11

TOWN OF HUNTINGTON

Putting Collectors Over The Moon Collectors shop offers something for everyone with sports memorabilia, gifts, chocolates Half Hollow Hills photos/Sara-Megan Walsh

Spotlight On

Huntington Businesses By Sara-Megan Walsh swalsh@longislandernews.com

Window shoppers can find a variety of stores to peruse in Huntington village, but few offer the eclectic mix of Cow Over the Moon. Owner Joe Dennett opened shop on Main Street offering a unique mix of sports memorabilia, gifts, decorative accessories, timeworks clocks, fine chocolates and gift baskets approximately six years ago. “My idea is, I wanted a store that was interesting to men, women and children. I wanted a family to walk in and everyone have something to be interested in,” he said. Dennett used his retirement from the refrigeration industry as an opportunity to combine his three passions – collecting sports memorabilia and antiques, and his sweet tooth – to form Cow Over The Moon. The storefront’s name is a tribute to his wife’s love for collecting cow keepsakes in various forms, giving birth to the store’s wide selection for collectors of all kinds, particularly sports memorabilia. “A lot of people call the store a little bit of Cooperstown here in Huntington, because they have seen our collection

If you need a quick pick-me-up, Cow Over The Moon sells fine chocolates and has a variety of candies from glass jars in a 1860s drugstore case just behind the counter. here and think it’s impressive,” Dennett said, referencing the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Baseball fans can find almost any trading card in existence, from retired hall of famers to the hottest rookies, framed jerseys, autographed black-and-white photos of the classics and a display case of signed baseballs. Each item sold undergoes a strict authenticity verification process, the owner said. Don’t worry, if reliving diamond days isn’t for you – football, basketball, hockey, tennis and golf are also part of the store’s mix. “Sports is a big part of our social net-

work in this country,” Dennett said. “Even if you’re not a sports fan, I see people who would never buy a sports item go back [in the store] because there’s history back there.” Dennett said one of his favorite things about running Cow Over the Moon is talking with customers about their own sports experiences and memories when he does custom sports framing, or sharing stories of the greats while looking over the store’s collection. “When a kid comes into the store, it’s a learning experience. It’s a chance for them to learn how to keep a sports card,

Owner Joel Dennett took his love for sports memorabilia and combined it in retirement with other collectible gift items to open Cow Over The Moon. how to touch and handle a sports card, and learn about old-time hall of famers,” the retiree said, as his collection started with his two sons forming a lifelong bond between them. For those not interested in sports, Cow Over the Moon carries a few antiques and now offers gift items for all occasions, including Timeworks clocks, Bearington bears, artisan wine glasses, coffee mugs, snowglobes, candles and more. The selection is ever changing. Yet, if you just need a sweet treat, fine chocolates and candies beckon from the display case and from glass jars in a 1860s drugstore cabinet – the perfect fix to put anyone over the moon.

HISTORY

Whitman’s Meteor Finally Discovered Texas State University astronomers uncover poet’s references in Leaves of Grass By Kristen Catania info@longislandernews.com

The mysterious meteor Walt Whitman described 150 years ago in Leaves of Grass has finally been solved, thanks to a team of astronomers at Texas State University. The team – comprised of Texas State physics professors Donald Olson and Russell Doescher, English professor Marilynn S. Olson, and honors student Ava G. Pope – suspected that what Whitman described as a “strange huge meteor procession” was something more than just a single comet or meteor. For years, astronomers have attributed what Whitman saw to Leonid meteor showers in 1833, 1858 or to a fireball that occurred in 1859. However, the time frame Whitman references in his poem “Year of the Meteors (1859-1860)” does not match up with any of these events. Olson and his team were determined to find the event Whitman witnessed. “This phenomenon, the meteor procession described by Whitman, is something that I have been working on for more than a decade,” Olson said. “Back in 1994, I started teaching an honors course called ‘Astronomy in Art, History and Literature.’ While putting together material for those class meetings, it became clear that Walt Whitman was a very rich source for descriptions of the sky that were not just beautifully written but were also unusual-

This Frederic Church painting that records the meteor procession that Whitman references in Leaves of Grass. ly specific and detailed.” Whitman’s attention to detail led Olson and his team to attempt to find what specifically the poet had witnessed. The breakthrough occurred, according to Olson, when he discovered a reproduction of a Frederic Church painting on the back of a catalogue. At that time, it became clear to Olson that both Church and Whitman along with thousands of other eyewitnesses throughout the northeastern U.S., had witnessed the same phenomenon – occurring on July 20, 1860.

“This is the 150th anniversary of the event that inspired both Whitman and Church,” Olson said. “It was an Earthgrazing meteor procession.” A meteor procession, according to the team’s report of findings in Sky and Telescope magazine, occurs when “an Earth-grazing meteor fragments early in its encounter with the atmosphere, creating multiple meteors traveling in nearly identical paths.” This occurrence is fairly rare, and has occurred just three times other than the event Whitman and

Many thought the Leonid meteor shower of 1833 was the event Whitman described. However, the Texas State team discovered that this was not what Whitman was referencing in “Year of the Meteors.” Church witnessed. Whitman also referenced the Great Comet of 1860, providing further evidence that the event witnessed was the 1860 meteor procession.


A12 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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TOWN OF HUNTINGTON

Down Under Visitors Come Up To LI New Zealanders travel across Suffolk, Nassau seeing the sights and making new friends

Members of the Long Island Friendship Force Club and the New Zealand club listen to a tour guide tell them about the history of Oheka Castle in Huntington. By Kaellen Hessel info@longislandernews.com

New Zealanders spent the past week island hopping all over metropolitan New York – including across Huntington. The group of 26 traveled to Long Island as part of a Friendship Force International home-stay exchange program.

Barry Bridges, of Marlborough, New Zealand, shows off his fun-loving nature as he dances with a friend in the Oheka ballroom.

Friendship Force is an organization made up of 346 clubs in 59 countries that tries to encourage peace by promoting cultural understanding and global friendships. The visitors from Marlborough, New Zealand were hosted and entertained by 40 members of the Long Island Friendship Force club, many of whom live in Huntington. They visited Oheka Castle in Cold Spring Harbor, New York City landmarks, the Nassau County Art Museum in Roslyn, the West Hamptons, Sagamore Hill in Oyster Bay and Baycrest Beach in Huntington. As they toured the house and grounds of Oheka Castle, one of the New Zealanders was awed by how much history there was on Long Island. New Zealand, which has only been a country for less than 200 years, doesn’t have nearly as much, she said. Barry Bridges, the New Zealand exchange director, said the best part of traveling with Friendship Force was meeting and living with local people. “That’s something we as tourists would never see,” he said. Eli Bluestone, Bridges’ host from Huntington, echoed his sentiments. “It’s faces, not places,” Bluestone said. Bonne Gettinger, of Huntington Bay, has only been a club member for two years and hasn’t traveled abroad with the Long Island club, but enjoys spending time with their international visitors. “I think it’s always interesting to ex-

Twenty-six New Zealanders visited Huntington from June 10-17 and learned all about its history as part of the Gold Coast during the Roaring ‘20s. change ideas and learn about other cultures,” Gettinger said. The Long Islanders were entertained by the phrases their visitors used, like “shrimp on the Barbie,” while one of the things that surprised Bridges about Long Island was its high population density and traffic. New Zealand doesn’t have traffic like this, he said. “We haven’t even taken them out during rush hour,” exclaimed host Emma Bluestone. Mike Harris, a former “panelbreaker,” or automotive mechanic, noticed a big part of his life was the same in America

as his own country. Harris, who owned an automotive shop, visited one on Long Island and said the equipment used there was the same as he used. The Long Island club is always welcoming newcomers, and the trips are quite reasonably priced, Emma said. Members have to pay a couple hundred dollars to the international organization and the host club and then pay for their airfare. Members don’t have to travel; they can just host guests and attend other cultural events with the group, she said. Anyone interested in joining can call Emma at 516-367-4208.

HUNTINGTON

Kudos On A Perfect Game

TOWN HUNTINGTON

Tips For Going Green Add a little green to your kitchen and spice to your cooking by growing an indoor herb garden. All that’s needed are herb plants, pots, soil-less potting mix, fertilizer that can be used for edible plants and a windowsill for the plants to sit on. A south window that gets at least five hours of sunlight a day is ideal. The Sierra Club, a national environ-

mental organization, recommends beginner gardeners grow basil, sage, thyme, parsley and oregano. Using your herbs often is best, never trimming more than a third of the foliage. In addition, snipping plants often causes them to grow fuller, according to about.com’s gardening guide. — HESSEL

Long-Islander reporter Danny Schrafel found himself on the other side of the camera Tuesday night when the town board honored him for bowling a 300 game May 27 at AMF Garden City Lanes. “This is nuts,” Schrafel said with a smile after receiving the special gift of a bowling pin from East Northport’s Larkfield Lanes signed by Town board members and workers.


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THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A13

HUNTINGTON

45th Summer Arts Fest Kicks Off June 26 A summer of music, arts and more set to begin with the music of blues-rock artist G.E. Smith By Kristen Catania info@longislandernews.com

The Huntington Summer Arts Festival is back for its 45th year, bringing 44 evenings of free performances to the Chapin Rainbow Stage in Heckscher Park. The festival runs from June 26-Aug. 15, with an event occurring almost every night of the week. It seems to have something for everyone, with a variety of performers making their way to the Heckscher stage at 8:30 p.m. throughout the week. John Chicherio took the helm as the new performing arts director for the Huntington Arts Council and is optimistic about this year’s festival. “This year, our lineup includes a wide range of performances, from puppets to world-class dance to silent film,” he said. “For our 45th anniversary, we are especially pleased to present some of the greats; from the blues/jazz world: the legendary Heath Brothers Quartet, featuring two National Endowment for the Arts jazz masters, along with our final act, the James Cotton ‘Superharp’ Band, and Guy Davis and the High Flying Rockets.” The festival will kick off this Saturday with a performance by G.E. Smith, a blues/rock guitarist known best for his stint fronting the Saturday Night Live band. His performance is the perfect way to jump-start the festival, giving everybody a fun and exciting taste of what is to come this summer. On Sunday, The Revelations, featuring Tré Williams, will take the stage at Heckscher, bringing the “concrete jungle grit of the streets” and the “midnight

The Revelations featuring Tré Williams will take the stage at Heckscher on Sunday, creating a unique Motown sound of soul. blues of the rural South.” Together, they create a unique Motown sound of pure soul that is sure to please every listener. On Tuesday nights, Bethpage Federal Credit Union brings “It’s Showtime” family performances to the park, providing an evening of fun for all ages. These special shows begin at 7:30 p.m. On June 29, Plaza theatrical presents “Sleeping Beauty” as the first family performance of the summer. This classic tale about a beautiful princess and true love is guaranteed to delight viewers of all ages. People are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and/or blankets to sit on while enjoying the performances. On Wednesday, the Huntington

Community Band opens their 65th season with “American Masters.” This performance is a compilation of music by Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, Samuel Barber and more. The band, which strives to “continue bringing the highest quality of concert band music to its community,” is sure to wow audience members of all ages, and of all musical backgrounds. “We have something for every taste, and we are very pleased to welcome as our presenting sponsor the Bethpage Federal Credit Union,” Chicherio said. “It is a real benefit to both the culture and economy of the area to be able to offer 44 evenings of free performances of world-

G.E. Smith, a blues/rock guitarist known best for his stint fronting the Saturday Night Live band, will open the Summer Arts Festival on Saturday. class entertainment to not just the Huntington community, but all of Long Island and beyond." In addition to the performances at Heckscher, July performances include free concerts at the harbor’s edge in Northport, with “Great Band Music Under the Stars” by the Northport Community Band. These performances take place at 8:30 p.m. on Thursdays in July. For more information on the Summer Arts Festival, visit the Huntington Arts Council website at www.huntingtonarts.org, or call the festival hotline at 631-271-8423, ext. 5.

SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING

Simple Basics Build A Strong Foundation Small Business Marketing With Mike DeLuise They call it marketing. For our purposes, let’s consider it the magic formula that instills energy and productivity in your business. It goes far beyond the fancy logo design you hang over your door and place on your business cards. Your website, the advertisements you place in the media, and even the fancy experiments with social media are not as important as the simple basics of marketing needed to build a strong foundation for your business. Why are some companies more successful than those they compete with? And why do the owners of so many businesses refuse to learn from their own mistakes? The rules of marketing success are simple, but that doesn't mean they are always easily followed. In business and in life, we are often drawn to the promise of instant, easy success. Wise business owners cannot allow the “hot topic” of the season to distract them

toward ineffective programs that do not deliver positive results. Twitter and Facebook are not the answers for everyone. Each business has its own unique strengths, weaknesses and needs. The secret to any magician’s act is that there is really no such thing as magic. My friend and former client David Copperfield may be the most popular magician of our time. As extravagant as his “tricks” appear to be, this master performer has focused his success on the basics. Yes, he works very hard – but by focusing on the basics. He maintains a simple formula that has resulted in a monumental career by delivering the product his audience appreciates and buys. So how does this relate to your business? Whatever business you’re in, chances are you feel you know your business well. You may own a restaurant and have hired a terrific chef, built a state-of-theart kitchen and put together a fine menu. You have purchased excellent produce at a good price. When you started your business, you were filled with excitement and confidence. You were hopeful that customers would flock to you because you uniquely would serve what they crave in a meal. Before opening the doors to your new restaurant, chances are you spent countless hours dreaming about the name, designing the

logo in your head and planning the menu your heart told you will draw frequent and loyal customers. This is the way most businesses begin. Whether we are talking about a restaurant, a regional bank or a global telecommunications company, every business starts with a dream created by one or more entrepreneurs. It's just like the creation of a universe. A spark of energy ignites something special that hopefully will turn into a profitable business. Those companies that understand how to utilize the “magic” found in the formula for basic marketing are businesses that will live long into the future. If you're looking to build a solid business, you cannot allow yourself to be tricked by the illusion of easy marketing solutions. The successful companies I have worked with over the years understand that good marketing is built into and nurtured throughout the culture of the organization. A smart restaurateur does not open an establishment just because there is a building available. He explores the interests of the community. He researches the success and challenges of his competition. He plans for parking, accessibility and any local codes that may help or hinder his business. A successful business owner dedicates more energy toward recruiting and training a strong team of colleagues rather than wasting time

deciding what color the menu will be. The secret to marketing success is simple. A company dedicating countless dollars to an extravagant advertising campaign has wasted it all if, when a customer calls, the person answering the phone is not responsive. No business is perfect. We all make mistakes. Sometimes we misjudge our market. At times, we lose track of our business plan. We experiment in technologies that move us too quickly into new areas we do not fully understand. Those companies with a corporate culture that encourages them to learn from mistakes, quickly accept the challenge of new opportunities, and focus on filling the needs of their customers understand the true magic of strong marketing. The key to success may not be easy, but it can be simple. Let me know if you have any questions or if there is anything I can do to help you succeed. You can always e-mail me at mdeluise@aol.com.

Editor’s note: Michael DeLuise has spent four decades managing the marketing, advertising and communications for some of the most interesting clients in entertainment, education, media and nonprofit. He currently serves as president of the board of directors of the Melville-East Farmingdale Chamber of Commerce.


A14 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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HUNTINGTON OPEN HOUSES Want to get your open houses listed Get your listings for free on this page every week in the Long Islander Newspapers. Call Associate Publisher Peter Sloggat at or send an e-mail to psloggatt longislandernews.com.

HUNTINGTON: HARBOR HEIGHTS

22 Maple Lane Bedrooms 3 Baths 2 Reduced to $509,000 Open House 6/26 + 6/27 1 - 4 pm Jane Spalholz 516-635-5423 Jillian James Realty 631-425-0774

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DIX HILLS

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Town Address Beds Baths Price Taxes Date Dix Hills 19 Darius Ct 5 4 $855,000 $19,912 6/24 E. Northport 37 Seneca St 2 2 $389,000 $7,247 6/24 Huntington 122 Willow Ave 4 3 $449,000 $9,911 6/24 Huntington 21 W Mall Dr 4 3 $960,000 $21,359 6/24 Huntington Sta 8 Kilburn Ave 4 2 $359,000 $5,449 6/24 Centerport 21 North Dr 4 2 $425,000 $10,806 6/26 Centerport 71 Bankside Dr 4 3 $599,000 $14,448 6/26 Centerport 8 Sea Spray Dr 4 4 $719,000 $14,521 6/26 Centerport 92 Centerport Rd 5 3 $849,000 $12,126 6/26 Commack 15 Rhonda Ln 3 2 $399,900 $11,999 6/26 Commack 64 Walter Ct 3 2 $439,000 $7,341 6/26 Commack 123 Hayrick Ln 4 2 $519,000 $11,436 6/26 Dix Hills 7 Lauren Ave South 3 2 $485,000 $10,339 6/26 Dix Hills 5 Curtis Path 2 2 $585,000 $8,812 6/26 Dix Hills 21 Avon Ct 3 3 $659,000 $9,492 6/26 Dix Hills 113 Majestic Dr 4 3 $800,000 $16,970 6/26 E. Northport 11 Imperial Ct 4 3 $489,000 $9,175 6/26 E. Northport 5 Selma Ct 4 3 $499,000 $13,242 6/26 E. Northport N/C Montauk St 3 3 $529,000 N/A 6/26 E. Northport 7 Hemlock Ave 5 2 $579,000 $10,100 6/26 E. Northport 26 Mansfield Ln 4 3 $799,999 N/A 6/26 Greenlawn 74 Alton Ave 3 2 $419,000 $9,662 6/26 Greenlawn 1 N Manor Rd 4 3 $549,000 $15,902 6/26 Huntington 5 Pine St 2 3 $429,000 $8,957 6/26 Huntington 30 Delamere St 4 3 $439,900 N/A 6/26 Huntington 69 Bay Ave 3 3 $440,000 $8,507 6/26 Huntington 80 Brennan St 5 2 $449,000 $10,777 6/26 Huntington 27 Noyes Ln 4 3 $499,000 $10,092 6/26 Huntington 22 Maple Ln 3 2 $509,000 $8,382 6/26 Huntington 63 Hennessey Dr 3 2 $519,000 $10,300 6/26 Huntington 46 Bunkerhill Dr 5 3 $599,000 $16,184 6/26 Huntington 94 Woodhull Rd 5 4 $639,950 $12,504 6/26 Huntington 230 West Neck Rd 5 3 $649,000 $15,833 6/26 Huntington 16 Ashford Ln 5 3 $899,000 $16,255 6/26 Melville 7 Elderwood Ln 3 2 $499,900 $9,373 6/26 Melville 6 Ray Ct 3 3 $519,000 $6,909 6/26 Melville 86 Chateau Dr 4 3 $535,000 $9,849 6/26 Melville 102 Bagatelle Rd 5 4 $670,000 $14,600 6/26 Melville 22 Westbourne Ln 4 3 $699,900 $15,384 6/26 Melville 34 Tamara Ct 5 4 $949,000 $18,924 6/26 Northport 90 Ocean Ave 3 2 $399,000 $3,761 6/26 Northport 18 Butler Pl 4 2 $509,000 $8,099 6/26 Northport 23 Johnston Ave 4 3 $598,876 $8,440 6/26 Northport 62 Hastings Dr 5 4 $799,000 $17,915 6/26 Northport 106 Middleville Rd 3 3 $975,000 $6,319 6/26 S. Huntington 17 Firtree Ln 4 2 $479,000 $9,714 6/26 S. Huntington 23 Collingwood Dr 3 2 $659,000 $14,063 6/26 S. Huntington 147 Beverly Rd 9 7 $924,900 $15,896 6/26 Centerport 276 Jackson Cres 3 3 $639,000 $14,883 6/27 Centerport 73 Laurel Hill Rd 4 3 $649,500 $15,500 6/27 Centerport 2A Bittersweet Ct 5 3 $925,000 $18,000 6/27 Centerport 5 Ale Ct 4 5 $1,390,000 $23,102 6/27 Cold Spring Hrbr6 Goose Hill Rd 3 2 $949,000 $9,522 6/27 Commack 104 Wicks Rd 4 2 $419,000 $9,683 6/27 Commack 17 Sandy Hollow Dr 4 3 $485,000 $11,733 6/27 Commack 14 Splitrail Pl 4 3 $489,000 $11,003 6/27 Commack 142A Wicks Rd 4 3 $689,000 $13,000 6/27 Commack 142B Wicks Rd 4 3 $689,000 $13,000 6/27 Dix Hills 11 Maryland St 4 3 $589,000 $10,715 6/27 Dix Hills 104 Ryder Ave 4 3 $599,000 $14,480 6/27 Dix Hills 40 Seneca Ave 5 3 $665,000 $12,534 6/27 Dix Hills 27 Cedar Ridge Ln 3 2 $669,000 $15,707 6/27 Dix Hills 432 Wolf Hill Rd 5 3 $679,000 $13,018 6/27 Dix Hills 10 Ibsen Ct 4 3 $699,000 $13,750 6/27 Dix Hills 14 Gallatin Dr 5 3 $779,900 $14,563 6/27 Dix Hills 20 Truxton Rd 4 3 $784,900 $12,990 6/27 Dix Hills 2 Chantilly Ct 4 3 $799,000 $12,381 6/27 Dix Hills 4 Hemingway Dr 4 3 $799,000 $17,529 6/27 Dix Hills 61 Hearthstone Dr 5 4 $849,000 $19,102 6/27 Dix Hills 107B Deer Park Rd 5 4 $899,000 $16,049 6/27 Dix Hills 24 SteppingStoneCres 5 4 $989,900 $21,727 6/27 Dix Hills 4 Stonyrun Ct 5 4 $997,000 $19,600 6/27 Dix Hills 119 Ryder Ave 5 4 $1,295,000 $18,000 6/27 Dix Hills 15 Elderberry Rd 5 5 $1,299,000$20,687,000 6/27 E. Northport 100 Franklin Ave 3 1 $339,000 $5,796 6/27 E. Northport 163 Vernon Valley Rd 3 2 $349,000 $7,271 6/27 E. Northport 18 Cedar Rd 4 3 $399,999 $11,273 6/27 E. Northport 467 Atlantic St 3 2 $410,000 $6,920 6/27 E. Northport 13 Cedar Hill Dr 4 3 $429,000 $7,509 6/27 E. Northport 19 Wendy Ln 5 3 $499,000 $12,326 6/27 E. Northport 72 Cedar Rd 4 2 $499,000 $11,502 6/27 E. Northport 144 Daly Rd 3 3 $675,000 $15,325 6/27 Fort Salonga 5 Meadowood Ln 3 4 $779,000 $14,499 6/27 Greenlawn 46 Gates St 3 2 $399,999 $7,235 6/27 Greenlawn 12 Kipling Dr 3 1 $424,900 $9,265 6/27 Greenlawn 3 Butterfield Ct 4 3 $549,000 $11,982 6/27

You open the door...We’ll bring ’em in!

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Phone 631-261-7800 631-549-5800 631-427-6600 631-367-1212 631-757-7272 631-757-7272 631-692-6770 631-427-6600 631-547-5300 631-499-1000 631-499-0500 631-351-6000 631-673-4444 631-673-6800 631-673-4444 631-360-1900 631-757-7272 631-499-0500 631-547-5300 631-499-1000 631-754-4800 631-547-5300 631-549-4400 631-673-3700 631-758-2552 631-427-6600 631-427-1200 631-427-6600 631-425-0774 631-261-6800 631-757-7272 631-549-4400 631-427-6600 631-427-1200 631-427-9100 631-499-9191 631-757-7272 631-499-9191 631-261-7800 631-499-9191 631-673-6800 631-757-7272 631-261-6800 631-261-6800 631-754-4800 631-673-4444 631-427-1200 631-673-3700 631-673-6800 631-757-7272 631-751-6000 631-427-1200 631-427-6600 631-757-7272 631-499-1000 631-757-7272 631-499-1000 631-499-1000 631-499-9191 631-673-6800 631-427-2244 631-427-9100 516-364-4663 631-673-4444 631-673-4444 516-575-7500 631-673-4444 631-499-9191 631-499-9191 631-754-3400 631-360-1900 631-360-1900 516-364-4663 631-673-4444 631-261-6800 631-547-5300 631-547-5300 631-360-1900 631-261-6800 631-673-4444 631-757-7272 631-673-6800 631-757-4000 631-673-2222 631-427-9100 631-673-6800

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BOYS TRACK

Students Named All-State Athletes

The Half Hollow Hills Board of Education recognized High School East seniors Andre Doughty and Gregory Perrier on being named All-State athletes for boys winter track. Superintendent Sheldon Karnilow, right, Board of Education President Jay Marcucci, left, and Suffolk County Legislator Steven Stern, not pictured, presented them with proclamations.

THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A15


A16 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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Answer to E’S OFF

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ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S CRYPTOQUIP IF YOU ABHOR THE IDEA OF ANYONE HAVING CONTROL OVER YOU, YOU MIGHT CALL THAT DOMINATION ABOMINATION. Published June 17, 2010 ©2010 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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PA G E

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THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A17

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SEE THIS WEEKS LOCAL OPEN HOUSES ON PG 14


A18 • THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010

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Avalon vote moved (Continued from page A4)

take for Huntington,” was one of several residents who pushed the town to hold the vote until September so residents could get a handle on it. “The facts continue to change. It’s called a transportation district… but it’s a half-mile walk to the railroad station at its closest point,” he said. “On July 6, most of us will be on vacation… it’ll be tough for them to get here,” he said. “I recommend we move it back to September so we can all be here and discuss it and come up with a reasonable solution.” Ilene Fucci said she has laid low in advocating against Avalon because she said she wanted to be fully informed before she spoke out and hoped the community could build a consensus on Avalon. “There are a lot of incensed citizens in Huntington Station. We want to have the time to vet this properly; we want to start doing things differently in Huntington Station,” she said. “If I’m confused [on when the vote is], it’s because I sincerely believe you tried to confuse me… there are hundreds and hundreds of Huntington Station resi-

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Local donates tents

dents who are confused as well.” Petrone argued the public has had ample time to conduct research since March – and also ample time to voice their concerns. “I don’t think it takes that much time to get the facts. You had a public hearing where you had 54 people turn out [to speak],” he said last Wednesday. “I think people have had their opportunity; they had it [June 15] and they’ll have it again. Whether it’s three weeks or two months, I don’t think it really makes a difference.” Members of the Long Island Progressive Coalition’s pro-AvalonBay YIMBY (Yes In My Backyard) program AvalonBay project were planning to attend Tuesday’s meeting, but decided to hold back when they learned the vote had been pulled from the agenda. They will be back for July 6, though. “We made our comment on the project in March,” Long Island Progressive Coalition community organizer Maritza Silva-Farrell said. “One-hundred-fifty people came out, said yes in my backyard and spoke out in favor of the project… the reality is, many people are in favor of this project.”

Before Frank Altenord, of Dix Hills, brought tents to families in Haiti, they were seeking shelter from makeshift tents of towels and sheets like the one above. (Continued from page A1)

His goal is to plant 5,000 trees, and hopes the community can help as much as they did last time. “While we know that you may not be able to go to Haiti with us, you can still be part of this project. By sending your gift

of one tent to distribute to one homeless family, our hands and feet will be an extension of your hands and feet in Haiti,” he wrote in his letter. For more information, call Altenord at 347-385-7938.

Town finally pays some temporary workers (Continued from page A1)

approve payment for the men and used the floor to accuse the town of wasting money through legal wrangling. “This resolution is a settlement mandated by the courts,” Mayoka said. “I would prefer that cases are settled out of court as to save the residents money for paying legal fees. I would have liked to see

this negotiated in-house with the vast number of in-house attorneys that are available.” Mandated, sure, but not by the courts, said Cuthbertson, who audibly scoffed as Mayoka made his statement prior to the vote. The Department of Labor ordered the town to make the payment. “It was absurd,” Cuthbertson said. “My

colleague is kind of making things up as he goes along up there.” Mayoka later argued that the order came from the Department of Labor and conceded he may have misspoken on the dais, but defended his statement’s validity. “In generalities, it’s a type of a determining body, so you can still call it ‘court,’” he said.

Naughton and Hennessey are pleased about the men receiving back pay, but a union grievance against the town is still active. As nonpermanent employees, the workers do not qualify for benefits afforded to full-time staff, Naughton said. “I hope the resolution is they’ll be able to get a full-time position,” Hennessey said.

Don’t Miss An Issue... Readers and advertisers can look forward to a new edition of Long-Islander LIfe every month. Published as a second section — in full color — to our community newspapers, Long-Islander LIfe is also distributed free at high-traffic locations townwide. Each month we’ll explore a different theme and always, Long-Islander LIfe will include arts and entertainment in our Life & Style section; restaurant news and reviews in our popular Foodie Section; and our comprehensive Community Calendar.

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THE HALF HOLLOW HILLS NEWSPAPER • JUNE 24, 2010 • A19

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HillSPORTS GIRLS BASKETBALL

JV Hoops Coach Makes Slam Dunk

SWIMMING & DIVING

Superintendent Sheldon Karnilow, Board of Education President Jay Marcucci and Suffolk County Legislator Steve Stern congratulate the boys swimming and diving team on being Suffolk County champions.

Swim Team Nets Honors Half Hollow Hills High School East girls junior varsity basketball coach Brian Doelger was congratulated by the Half Hollow Hills Board of Education last month on being named Suffolk County Coach of the Year.

The combined Half Hollow Hills East and West boys swim and dive teams achieved their fourth consecutive year as undefeated Suffolk County champions and were recognized for their achievements by Superintendent Sheldon Karnilow, Board of Education President Jay Marcucci and Suffolk County Legislator Steve Stern.

Some team members also won individual honors. All-State athletes Matt DeBlasio was named All-American, while Jacob Golan was named Long Island Swim Scholar Athlete. Jonathon Hinds, John Pangal, Isaac Vingan, Ryan Savitt and Nicholas Monteleone were named All-State athletes.

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