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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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Availability is limited please call 516-777-1358 to reserve a spot. Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009


Farmingdale State College • Roosevelt Hall (Expo Room and Auditorium) 2350 Broadhollow Road (Route 110) • Farmingdale, NY 11735 Join us for interactive discussions and presentations, featuring Tennis Pros, College Coaches and Tennis Industry Insiders covering: G The road to collegiate tennis and the pursuit of tennis scholarships G Training techniques for the serious tennis player

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September/October 2009 Volume 1, Number 5

Cover story 14 What Does it Take to be Number One? Who sits atop of the tennis hill? Long Island Tennis Magazine discusses the players deemed the “greatest of all time,” and argues if there is actually a “greatest tennis player ever.”

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Cover photo credit: Squeaky Knees from Flickr

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Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@longislandtennismag.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Literary Corner By Brent Shearer

Brent Shearer reviews Randy Walker’s day-by-day tennis encyclopedia, On This Day in Tennis History.

Long Island Tennis Magazine picks the brains of the area’s top coaches and pros in this roundtable discussion featuring a panel of Carl Barnett, Stonar Coleman, Dan Dwyer, Laurie Fehrs, Steven Kaplan, Lawrence Kleger, Pat Mosquera and Louis Vallejo.

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The Girl Behind the Desk By Dana Blasucci

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Tennis: Helping to Make ‘Healthy Nassau’ a Reality

Tips From the Tennis Pro: Training the Mind or the Muscle? By Carl Barnett Carl Barnett takes a closer look at impact of the human brain on fatigue.

Tennis Coaches Roundtable Discussion

Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller USTA/Long Island Adult League Coordinator Kathy Miller recaps the 2009 USTA Adult & Senior Leagues.

A Message From Scott Axler, USTA/Eastern Long Island Regional President Scott Axler discusses the upcoming Long Island Tennis Expo, set for Saturday, Nov. 7 at Farmingdale State College.

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College Tennis Advice: Putting the “We” in “Win” By Clark D. Ruiz II

Clark D. Ruiz II shares the collegiate experiences of a current NCAA Division I player and the dynamics of team success.

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Long Island Tennis Club Directory

A recap of USTA’s QuickStart Day in the Parks in Nassau County.

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Long Island Rankings

Always Think the Ball is Coming Back … Your Game Will Improve By Steve Hu

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USTA/Long Island Region 2009 Tournament Schedule

Steve Hu discusses how proper preparation of the next shot will take your game to the next level.

News Briefs

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Up and Coming American Players to Watch at the 2009 U.S. Open

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Final Wild Cards Announced for U.S. Open

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Bogomolov Wins First Prize in Gotham Tennis Academy’s Hamptons 20-Ball Open

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Wimbledon ’09 Features a Match for the Ages

Lonnie Mitchel discusses changes in the game over the past few decades.

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A Look Back at Girlz 4 Girlz Tennis Camp: July 9-12 in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

WTT Wraps Another Successful Year

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Scenes From the Long Island Pro Tennis League: Sunday, July 19 at the Pine Hollow Country Club

Annual Suffolk Rally Day Held in Islip By Bill Mecca

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Top 10 Building Blocks to Bettering Your Game By Rob Glickman

Rob Glickman’s checklist for building your tennis game.

Tennis “The Dark Side: … The Unfortunate Truth By Lonnie Mitchel

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Special U.S. Open Fashion Apparel Section By Emilie Katz

Bill Mecca looks back at the successful USTA Rally Day, held at Casamento Park.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2009 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Certified Personal Trainer Lazlo Elek discusses the importance of abdominal strength and a solid core workout and Dr. Arnie Sherman, O.D. provides great visual exercises to improve hand-eye coordination.

My Opinion: What’s the Story With the Greatest Player of All Time? By Eric Meditz

Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Featured Tennis Travel Destinations

Fitness and Nutrition: Core Fitness for Tennis & Visual Calisthenic Exercises for Tennis Players

By Bill Mecca

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Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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Learn about some tropical destinations where you can enjoy fun in the sun and sharpen your on-court skills from MSC Cruises and Club Med.

42 To receive subscription information, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@longislandtennismag.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600.

Columns

Carefree Racquet Club’s Dana Blasucci shares her thoughts on her experiences at her North Merrick club and how maintaining composure is the key to a good tennis experience.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@litennismag.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

A look ahead to this fall’s girl’s tennis season, including Nassau and Suffolk players to watch, an interview with Manhasset’s Mia Vecchio and a look at Port Washington Coach Stan Makover.

Steven Kaplan dissects the effects of poor performance and its longterm impact on one’s tennis game.

Find out what Ivanovic, Safina, Woziniacki, Djokovic, Verdasco and Tsonga will be wearing as they take center stage in New York at this year’s U.S. Open.

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Girls High School Tennis Preview

Non-Psychological Solutions to Choking By Steven Kaplan

Is it Laver? Is it Sampras? Is it Federer? Eric Meditz’s opinion is sure to surprise you all.

Karen Krizman Senior Account Executive Beatrice Marcus Office Manager

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The City of Long Beach, N.Y. prepares itself for “The Lollapalooza of Tennis,” the 2009 BTUSA Championship.

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief Domenica Trafficanda Managing Art Director

The Sand Pit: Beach Tennis … Long Beach to Host the 2009 BTUSA National Championship

A look back at the 2009 World Team Tennis season, including an exclusive chat with legend John McEnroe, an interview with managing partner of Sportime and WTT’s New York Sportimes Claude Okin, and a Sportimes photo gallery.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

Photos by Franklyn Higgs


The Sand Pit

Beach Tennis: Long Beach to Host the 2009 BTUSA National Championship “The Lollapalooza of Tennis” returns home for fifth consecutive year

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or the fifth consecutive year, the City of Long Beach, N.Y. will play host to the Beach Tennis USA National Championship Tournament on Labor Day weekend. For those of you who have been there before, it’s easy to understand why some people describe it as “Lollapalooza meets tennis on the beach.” Beach Tennis USA (BTUSA) culminates its 10-city national tour with a grandiose event. Whether you’re a spectator or a participant in the tournament, this Labor Day weekend will be nothing but a day at the beach. Featuring live music, sampling tents, audience giveaways and raffles, this event has something for everyone. The weekend-long event kicks off on Saturday, Sept. 5 with a new addition to the Beach Tennis National Championship, the “Paddle Battle.” BTUSA has begun integrating the use of paddles in their competitions and are giving credence to it by pitting beach tennis veterans against one another using specially-designed paddles. The Amateur and Junior Paddle Battles begin at 9:00 a.m. and are open to first-time players through intermediates. The Men’s and Ladies Pro Divisions begin at 10:30 a.m., with the finals of both divisions at 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., respectively. To kick off the paddle version of beach tennis, BTUSA will be providing complimentary paddles for all players. The events conclude with a family movie night on the beach as Beach Tennis USA and the City of Long Beach sponsor the Starlight Movie Night. The racquet tournament that the BTUSA sport has come to be known for kicks off bright and early on Sunday, Sept. 6. This year, there is an Amateur-Mixed Tournament open to first-timers through intermediates that begins at 9:30 a.m. The Pro Division starts at 10:00 a.m. and there are certainly a lot of players to keep your eye on. This year, as many as 75 Men’s and Ladies Pro Division teams from 12 countries are expected to compete in the National Championship event. Although the two-time defending champions,

Matteo Marighella and Alex Mingozzi from Ravenna, Italy are favored to win, several teams from the U.S. and other countries are hoping to quell the Italian duo’s dominance in the new pro sport. One such team that looks to have the best chance to bring the title back to the U.S. is comprised of two California-na-

tives, Marty “Kid Kodiac” Salokas and Donny “The Golden Bullet” Young. They are atop the 2009 Point Standings and are looking to add a National Championship to an already successful season. Not to be discounted are the 2005-2006 Men’s Pro Division National Champions, Chris Henderson and Phil Whitesell from Charleston, S.C. Whitesell and Henderson showed early signs of potentially upsetting the Italians in last season’s National Championship finals match, winning three of

SPORTIME

the match’s first six games. But in the end, the Italians grabbed control, taking five of the last six games to collect their second BTUSA National Championship in as many years. In the Women’s Pro Division, three-time National Champion and Long Beach native Nadia Johnston entered this year’s national tour with new partner, Nicole Melch (also of Long Beach). The duo have dominated throughout the season, as Johnston is looking to reclaim her title after having lost her first National Championship title match last season to the sister team of Laura and Lisa Maloney from San Diego. Labor Day weekend is sure to be an exciting time for the City of Long Beach. To learn more about the great sport of beach tennis, visit www.beachtennisusa.net. There, you can view photos from previous stops on the 2009 National Tour, register for the National Championship event, as well stock up on all of your favorite BTUSA gear, including balls, sand socks, paddles, and a full line of BTUSA hats and other apparel. G For more information, visit www.beachtennisusa.net.

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Non-Psychological Solutions to Choking he biggest fear of many tournament players that I have encountered is “choking” or performing poorly due to the emotional and mental strain of a match. Indisputably, there is a strong psychological component to breaking down and choking, and while so-called mental weakness is a contributing factor to this problem, I would like to address the often overlooked nonpsychological solutions to choking.

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Mechanics I would define the foundation of sound mechanics as the ability to keep the racket face in the path of the ball for as long as practically possible, using the biggest and most stable muscles possible. This mechanical paradigm will reduce choking tremendously. The reasoning here is that, as the timing of the hit becomes more critical and precise, more errors unavoidably occur. Moreover, small muscles with less stability and a

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greater nerve-to-muscle-mass ratio are less reliable and are more prone to breaking down, especially under stress. The player with poor mechanics who fears missing at inopportune times might simply be realistic and perceptive, rather than emotionally vulnerable. Chris Evert was the winner of 18 Grand Slam singles titles, and was often called “The Ice Maiden” early in her career because she played with a cold resolve as if she had ice water in her veins. It is no coincidence, in my mind, that her strokes were as synchronized into a single unit, as perhaps any player before or since. Conversely, when a player complains to me that they have a fear of double faulting, I cannot avoid thinking that “if I had produced my second serve like yours, I’d be nervous too.” Conditioning I used to play a little schoolyard basketball and I was pretty good for a non-basketball

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

player. Sometimes, I would go the basketball court and shoot foul shots. I would consistently make 65-70 percent of my shots, which is better than the NCAA Division I average of 62 percent and just below the NBA average of 71 percent. How could I shoot almost as well as the pros? Simple … I did it slowly and walked. My heart rate rarely exceeded 60 beats per minute. The pros are consistently above 160 beats per minute and at that heart rate, I would be lucky to make two out of 10 shots. Note that as your heart rate approaches its maximum, your coordination drops precipitously. Reggie Miller, a member of the 1992 Olympic basketball “Dream Team,” was renowned for his clutch outside shooting (Knicks fans still have nightmares!). When tested at the Olympic training center in Colorado Springs before the games, Miller had the highest VO2 max scores of any of continued on page 9


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Up and Coming American Players to Watch at the 2009 U.S. Open Men’s players

Women’s players

John Isner

Vania King

Twenty-four-year-old John Isner played his collegiate tennis at Georgia and is currently ranked 96th on the ATP Tour. He burst on to the scene at the 2007 U.S. Open as he made it to the third round in his first-ever Grand Slam appearance before losing to eventual champion Roger Federer in four sets. At the 2008 U.S. Open, Isner lost in the first round. If he is serving big as he normally does, he will be tough to beat in 2009.

Vania King is a 20-year-old from Long Beach, Calif. Her current ranking is 107th. Lifetime at the U.S. Open, King has a 2-4 record. She recently advanced to the second round at Wimbledon. She will look to use the home crowd to her advantage and make a run at this year’s U.S. Open championship.

Alexa Glatch Robert Kendrick Coming off his strong season playing for the New York Sportimes in World Team Tennis, Robert Kendrick will look to continue his climb up the rankings. In 2008, he finished the year in the top 100 for the first time in his career. The California native is currently ranked 69th on the ATP Tour. At the 2008 U.S. Open, Kendrick reached the second round before falling to third-seeded Novak Djokovic. With the right draw, Kendrick can certainly surprise some people this year and advance deep into the Open. Sam Querrey A 22-year-old from California, Sam Querrey is currently ranked number 37 on the ATP Tour. The American finished last year in the top 50 for the first time in his career. He will be looking to improve on last year’s fourth round loss which is his best Grand Slam result thus far. With his well-tooled all-around game, Querrey has a good chance to surprise some people at this year’s Open.

Alexa Glatch is a 19-year-old from Newport Beach, Calif., currently ranked 108th in the world. She lost in the first round of the 2008 U.S. Open, but will be looking to surprise a ranked player early on as she did at this year’s French Open when she defeated 14th seeded Flavia Panetta in the first round.

Melanie Oudin The 17-year-old from Marietta, Ga. turned pro in February 2008. At the 2008 U.S. Open, she lost in the first round as a wild card. Oudin is currently ranked 71st on the WTA Tour. At this year’s Open, she will be looking to build on the great run she recently had at Wimbledon where she advanced all the way to the fourth round as a qualifier. Look for Oudin to provide some tough opposition this year.

For more information, visit www.usopen.org. 6

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009


my opinion BY ERIC MEDITZ

What’s the Story With the Greatest Player of All Time? A couple of days ago, I was in a bar somewhere in New York City. This bar wasn’t your trendy, place-to-be-scene bar you see on television and in the movies. It wasn’t a bar where you have a bouncer out front that won’t let you in because you are wearing a hat. There were no long lines in front or beautiful women all decked out in short skirts and high heels. No cover charge. No bells and whistles go off when you see this place. The bar looked like the sun never shined in it. The few patrons that did inhabit it were scattered throughout on bar stools and looked as if their ex-wives took everything. This was a bar where you can think about all the mistakes that you have made in your life. This was the perfect place to be miserable at and just drown your sorrows away. They had one (not a flat screen) television hanging above the ugliest bartender in New York City. And on that television, they were showing Roger Federer playing some guy in one of the early rounds of this years Wimbledon. I was sipping on my pint of Stella and occasionally catching every other point of the match. An old guy sitting a few seats away from me saw that I was somewhat attentive to the tennis on TV. He must have been one of those lonely guys who just likes to talk to strangers about nothing. I could sense he was about to try to start a conversation with me. He leaned over in my direction and said, “Roger Federer is the greatest tennis player of all time!” Because it looked as if life had won its war with him, I decided to make his day and respond to his silly statement. “No, he’s not!” I always hear tennis commentators on TV giving their opinions on who is the best ever to play. Everyone has their own reasons on

who they think. Some say that their player won on all surfaces in one year. Others give the argument that their player is the best of all time, because they won the most major titles. The bottom line is that when people argue about this, the same three or four players come up. Like anything else, I know everything, and I have unalienable proof of who the best player is to have ever picked up a tennis racquet. Now, before I name my guy, let’s go over a list of the usual suspects. Rod Laver All I hear from old, cranky, out-of-date tennis instructors is how great of a player Rod Laver was. “Blah … blah … blah … Rod Laver this, Rod Laver that … blah … blah … blah, Rod Laver in his prime would still be the best today … blah … blah … blah.” Now since I was born after the Civil War, I have never seen Rod Laver hit a tennis ball.

TOPSPIN

So I decided one day to give these pros, who still teach close-stance forehands, a chance. I went on YouTube and did a search for Rod Laver. Fortunately, they did invent some type of camera back then, and I was able to see Rod Laver play in his “socalled” prime. I was mildly impressed, and bored, all at the same time. I watched the same point being played over and over again, match after match. A lot of chipping and charging. A lot of lobs and a lot boredom. As soon as I saw the 20th slice forehand approach, I had to take my Internet travels elsewhere. The bottom line is this … yes, Rod Laver won all the major slams in one year, twice in his career. But, that was back in the 1700s. The game has evolved so much since then. Today, he would have problems making the starting lineup for some Division 1 college teams. If you think continued on page 8

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M Y O P I N I O N continued from page 7 otherwise, then you have no idea about anything involving our sport. I’m sorry, but Rod Laver isn’t the greatest tennis player to ever live! In fact, he’s far from it! Pete Sampras Every time commentators talk about the best, Pete Sampras always comes up. Pete won 14 Grand Slam titles throughout his career and made a ton of money in the process. He revolutionized tennis and impressed everyone when he first came onto the scene with his 120 mph serves. Even with all this said, you cannot say that Pete Sampras is the best of all time, because he never did anything on clay. He had about as much success on clay as I would have with a bar full of sober Playboy Playmates. So, with this simple fact alone, you cannot say that Pete is the greatest tennis player ever to live … I’m sorry. And just a short decade later, those 120 mph serves have become the norm with all professional players. Pretty much, every player now serves at those speeds and beyond. Even Venus Williams has been clocked around that speed. So, sorry Pete … it’s not you either, pal! Roger Federer Roger Federer is a great player. He wins a lot. Every casual tennis fan says that they

love the way he plays and he makes it all look so easy. Roger probably will one day overtake Pete Sampras’ record of 14 Grand Slam titles (he is tied with Pete at 14, as I am writing this). Who knows … he might even end up with 30 some day, when all is said and done. But it won’t matter … and here’s why. You cannot say that Roger Federer is the best player of all time when he gets owned by the same player over and over again. Raphael Nadal’s 13-7 record against Federer is absolute domination. It would cost a lot of money in Amsterdam to be dominated in this kind of fashion. It’s impossible to say that Roger Federer is the best of all time, when a guy, in his era, beats him in every big match. Although, I do find it somewhat entertaining watching Federer cry like a little girl at award ceremonies, while Nadal is there staring into the camera slightly cross-eyed, holding up a trophy. Federer is a special talent, but he isn’t the greatest of all time. And the winner is … Now, I know for a fact, who is the greatest player ever to play the sport of tennis. I have documented proof that this player is the greatest tennis talent to walk this green Earth. This man is not Federer, Sampras, Nadal, Borg, McEnroe, Connors, Lendl, or

even Laver (laughing to myself, again). He’s not any of these players. I’m surprised this player that I have chosen isn’t on everyone’s list when they talk about the greatest to ever live … the greatest to ever play … the greatest to ever pick up a racquet. Before I reveal this person to the world, let’s get back to that bar in New York City. As I sat in that dive bar, I waited to see how this old guy sitting next to me was going to respond after being told that Roger Federer wasn’t the best of all time. He said nothing. He probably thought this was another guy at a bar, who just didn’t want to be bothered. I went back to my pint and continued watching the TV. As time passed, I was hoping that he moved on to talking to other people sitting around us. But that wasn’t the case. As I gestured to the bartender that looked like Dirk Nowitzki in a tube top, I could hear this old man not letting what I said get away without some type of explanation. “So who is the greatest tennis player of all time?” He paused and followed his previous statement with, “If not Federer … then who?” As another Stella was placed on an already wet napkin in front of me, I turned my head so that I could look this poor guy in the eye. I knew he wouldn’t believe what I was continued on page 10

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

Daniel B. Dwyer, Managing Partner


SOLUTIONS TO CHOKING continued from page 4 his teammates. Since he used oxygen more efficiently, his heart beat slower, so that he retained more of his coordination, and therefore, made more shots. As a tennis player, the better your aerobic conditioning, the less you will choke. Conditioned practice Under conditions of external stress, your sympathetic nervous system kicks in with adrenaline. The response is that your heartbeat is more rapid, your respiration rises and blood goes from your digestive system to your brain. Additionally, your pupils dilate and you perspire to regulate temperature. You are ready for action or “fight or flight.” The cause of this response—whether physical, mental or emotional—is, in many ways, irrelevant. This is important because it means that if your heart rate is high because you are running hard or because the score is 5-5 in the third set, the body’s physical reaction is the same. Therefore, the way to overcome this problem is the same, train under stress and you will respond to stress. For example, to double fault less, do some sprints and then serve. By learning sound mechanics, you are less affected by stress. By improving fitness, you raise the threshold of what your body perceives as stressful. Finally, by training under stressful conditions, you learn to adapt favorably to conditions of stress and therefore, you will choke less. G Steven Kaplan has guided many touring professionals in the U.S. Open and Wimbledon, and has coached more than 350 nationally-ranked junior players. Steve’s background combines a rare blend of competitive and scholastic achievement. In 1979, Steve won the Big East Conference Singles Championship. In 1983, he received his Master’s Degree in Physiology. Steve develop the games of both Keith Kambourian and two-time NCAA Singles Champion Sandra Birch, from the 12-year olds through the pro tour. Most recently, Steve’s longtime student, Bryan Koniecko has achieved the number one ranking in Men’s NCAA tennis.

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M Y O P I N I O N continued from page 8 about to say, but I didn’t care. He had to know. I squinted my eyes and made my voice a little bit raspier, so I could sound a little bit cooler when I revealed this truth to him. The time was right, and he had to know. Without any more hesitation, I said the truth, “Oliver Rochus.” The old man stared at me for a while then responded with, “Who?” Oliver Rochus turned pro in 1999 at the age of 18, after growing up playing tennis in Belgium. He reached a career high singles ranking of number 24 in the world in 2005. Over his tennis career, he has wins over Marat Safin (former number one), Marcelo Rios (former number one), Carlos Moya (former number one), Rafael Nadal (current number one) and Novak Djokovic (current number three). In June 2006, he lost to Roger Federer 7-6, 6-7, 7-6 in Halle, Germany. Oliver had four match points in that match, but wasn’t able to convert any of them. A week later, Federer went on to dominate Wimbledon only to lose one set during the entire tournament. Rochus also proves his versatility to play on all surfaces. He has gotten to at least the third or fourth round of every major tournament. The old man takes this information in as I lectured him with my knowledge of the sport. He stirs his drink with a thin straw and speaks, “Who cares? These aren’t amazing results. Your guy had some good wins, but

there’s no way he’s the best ever to play.” “Yes he is,” I replied. “Because he’s five feet, five and a half inches tall!” This is the reason why Oliver Rochus is the greatest player to ever pick up a racquet. He is able to compete in an age where, if you want to be successful, you have to be at least six feet tall. If you are not at least six feet tall, there is no chance of making it in this sport as a professional. Marat Safin..................six feet, four inches Rafael Nadal....................six feet, one inch Novak Djokovic ..............six feet, one inch Roger Federer ................six feet, one inch Pete Sampras..................six feet, one inch The list goes on and on. The game has evolved so much with power and where the trajectory of the ball is coming from all over the court. And our friend Oliver, has been able to beat these players and make a great living in this sport, despite the fact that he’s sometimes a foot smaller then his opponents. Do you think Roger Federer would be getting these results if he were the same size as Oliver? Ha ha ha! I think not! Roger probably would have long quit tennis and would have a job today fixing Rolex’s in a watch shop somewhere in Zurich. Or what about the great Pete Sampras? How do you think Pete would have done if he were

five feet, five inches? How do you think those big serves would have been? Ha ha ha! Pete wouldn’t have had a chance! He’d be pushing a hot dog cart down 7th Avenue, if he wasn’t six feet, one inch! As I unloaded all this knowledge I had about Oliver Rochus on this old guy, I could tell he was zoning out. The only response he made was one of those exhaling breath laughs, after I was done educating him. But, I didn’t care. I knew I was right, and I didn’t have to get this guy’s approval. We stopped talking to each other and we both went back to our drinks. The bottom line is this … Oliver Rochus is the greatest, pound for pound, tennis player ever to hit a ball. He is the greatest of all time and people have to know. When the U.S. Open comes around every summer, I will be right there on the back courts watching his matches until he retires. I suggest all of you do the same. Forget about wasting your time, going into the stadium to watch Serena Williams play. If you have any brains in your head, you would watch Oliver work his magic on Court 8. This way, you will be able to tell your grandkids that you watched the greatest tennis player ever to live … in person. Don’t tell me I didn’t warn you! G Tennis Pro Eric Meditz may be reached by e-mail at meditzisfunny@yahoo.com.

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Final Wild Cards Announced for U.S. Open Taylor Dent will return to the U.S. Open for the first time since 2005 after receiving one of eight men’s wild cards. The 28-year-old Dent of Newport Beach, Calif. missed two full seasons because of three back operations. He was ranked a career-high number 21 in 2005, but is currently ranked 202nd. Dent has reached the fourth round at major championships on two occasions, at the U.S. Open in 2003 and at Wimbledon in 2005. Other American men given wild cards into this year’s U.S. Open include: Jesse Levine of Boca Raton, Fla.; NCAA champion Devin Britton of Jackson, Miss.; Chase Buchanan of New Albany, Ohio; Brendan Evans of Key Biscayne, Fla.; and Rajeev Ram of Carmel, Ind. Levine made it

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T

his year, Roger Federer has joined some exclusive clubs. After winning the French Open back in May, Federer became only the sixth player to win all four Grand Slam Championships. Then in July, he defeated Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon Finals to win his record 15th Grand Slam title. The win catapulted him ahead of previous record holder Pete Sampras who had 14 Grand Slam titles under his belt. So, does this make Roger Federer the best ever? Any argument on who is the best ever is far from airtight. Many have differing opinions including some of the greats themselves …

Rod Laver … “I don’t think you can compare eras. You can be the dominant performer of your time, but I don’t think anyone has the title of best ever.”

Andre Agassi … “What Laver did is godlike. To win all of them (the majors) in the same year twice … how do you argue with that? Roger Federer’s numbers are hard to disagree with.”

John McEnroe … “Yeah, I believe Federer is the best player ever.”

Roger Federer … “I don’t know if we’ll ever know who was the ‘greatest of all time’, but I’m definitely happy to be right up there, that’s for sure.”

Pete Sampras …

14

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009Tennis Magazine • March/April 2009 Long Island

Photo credit: Yann Caradec

“I didn’t think it would take seven years to tie it (his record).” Sampras contends that the French Open title win for Federer confirms him as the best ever.


While Federer has the Grand Slam trophies to back up the argument that he is the best, detractors are quick to point out the holes in that argument. The biggest knock on Federer is his perceived lack of competition. While Sampras battled the likes of Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg, and more, Federer’s opponents, through no fault of his own, have not been as challenging. Another opinion however, could be that Roger just makes them looks bad by handling them so easily. However, his main rival has been Rafael Nadal and Federer has not faired so well against the world’s number two-ranked player. Federer has dominated his era, however he is only 7-13 against his top foe Nadal. As Andre Agassi points out, “Roger’s numbers are hard to disagree with. And then you have a guy who’s beaten him almost twice as much. That sounds like an Achilles heel.” And as John McEnroe said, “Nadal has a winning record against him, so I guess there is a minor argument to be made that how can you be the best ever if you don’t have a winning record against every player (in your era). But the results of these matches may have been different had they played in different circumstances. There is also the “surface argument” when determining the best of all-time. Each surface hard, clay or grass play very differently and most players favor one over the others. At one time, three of the four majors were played on grass. Now two are played on hard courts with one each on clay and grass. Agassi pointed out that Federer’s consistency on all surfaces stands out in his greatness. Federer’s 20 consecutive appearances in Grand Slam finals is a testament to his all-around game on all surfaces, and is twice as long as the second best mark. Pete Sampras, is one player who would’ve greatly been assisted by playing more majors on grass, as it perfectly suits his game. Sampras’s former coach, Paul Annacone, said in reference to Pete’s grass court dominance: “How many majors would Pete have won if he were playing three out of four majors on grass?” Annacone

also made the argument that it should not always be about the majors when deciding who the top player is of all-time. He believes that Pete’s unprecedented six-year run of finishing the season number one in the world is more impressive than his 14 Grand Slam titles. Rule changes play an important role in determining the best ever as well. Rod Laver (The Rocket) would certainly have been in line for more major championships had he been eligible to play between 1963-1967. However, before 1968, only amateurs were eligible for the majors. This cost Laver, who turned pro in 1962, ample opportunities to win more titles. Clearly, there are many variables

that come into play when comparing eras and determining the best player ever. There is no right or wrong answer. The debate is good for the sports world and fun for tennis enthusiasts, but in the end, there are more questions than answers. The sport of tennis has many greats who have had tennis enthusiasts cheering for decades. While fans, media and the players themselves may never agree on a sole player as “the best ever,” one thing those players can agree on is that being mentioned in the same sentence together is a honor and us fans can agree that they have supplied us with many great tennis memories.

A closer look … Career major titles Number of titles ..................................................Player 15 ..............................................................Roger Federer 14 ..............................................................Pete Sampras 12 ................................................................Roy Emerson 11 ....................................................................Rod Laver 11 ....................................................................Bjorn Borg 10 ......................................................................Bill Tilden 8 ......................................................................Fred Perry 8..................................................................Ken Rosewall 8 ......................................................................Ivan Lendl 8 ..............................................................Jimmy Connors 8 ..................................................................Andre Agassi

Players who have won a career Grand Slam Andre Agassi Don Budge Roy Emerson Roger Federer Rod Laver Fred Perry Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

15


Special U.S. Open

Fashion Apparel

Section

By Emilie Katz

hen it comes to style, tennis has an advantage over other sports. The athletes are not hidden behind uniforms, helmets or padding. Instead, tennis players are given the freedom to wear whatever they like. At this year’s U.S. Open (Aug. 31-Sept. 13), Adidas will dress many of the top players in gear that combines state-of-the-art performance fabrics, along with unique cutting-edge style.

Ana Ivanovic Ivanovic

Ivanovic Ana Ivanovic will wear a lilac adilibria dress for her daytime matches and a dark purple version of the outfit when playing at night. This is the same dress she wore at Wimbledon, but this time, jazzed up with gorgeous color and a playful print on the back. The tiered ruffled layers are made of an easy-to-move-in mesh overlay that’s all ClimaCool comfort. The dress sells for $75. Complimenting the dress is the white with purple Barricade V adilibria, a perfect match with its scattered triangles print. This fashionable and feminine shoe is constructed with adiPRENE, forefront propulsion and a high impact cushion design. These sneakers can be purchased for $120.

Dinara Safina Current number one-ranked Dinara Safina will be wearing the adidas Competition Top with FORMOTION, which supports your 16

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

muscles and boosts your game. The breathable ClimaCool fabric features a little stretch for built-in support and a lovely graphic on the side. This feminine tank top is a great way to stand out on the court. It can be purchased for $60. The tennis skort she will be wearing reaches a new level of style. The adidas Competition Skort is designed with clean and simple lines, then enhanced with a lovely contrasting print on the flap. The breathable, all-over ClimaCool fabric adds comfort to a chic style. The skort will cost $45. To round out her outfit, Safina will wear ClimaCool Divine II footwear, which retails for $100. It is not easy to find fault with these stellar performance tennis shoes with breathable ClimaCool and adiWEAR for increased durability. Safina

W

Caroline Wozniacki Danish sensation Caroline Wozniacki will be making her debut in adidas by Stella McCartney (which retails for $130) at the U.S. Open. Caroline will be wearing the performance dress, which combines a fitted racer back tank and a flowing mesh layer top with a layered skirt. The dress features adidas ClimaLite technology to help sweep the sweat away from her skin. She will also be wearing the adidas by Stella McCartney skynde shoe in seed pearl, Wozniacki dark grape and white. The shoe is based on the renowned adidas barricade V tooling which provides the perfect mix of mid-foot stability, flexibility and cushioning for maximum comfort. The shoe runs for $175.


Novac Djokovic will be wearing the new for fall Men’s Edge Tee ($65), pure steel, with full mesh panels along the back and sides for optimal cooling and ventilation. You can see a glimpse of Djokovic’s signature falcon across his back and over his left shoulder which adds an interesting design element. He will be wearing Djokovic the Men’s Edge Bermuda shorts: ClimaCool Bermuda-style shorts (retailing for $55) with internal draw cord and side-seam pockets. A contrast print is shown on sides of shorts for increased design interest. His footwear of choice is the ClimaCool Genius. The adidas CC Genius tennis shoe is geared for allover ClimaCool ventilation and extremely durable to withstand his aggressive and dominating style of play. The ClimaCool Genius sneakers sell for $150.

Fernando Verdasco

fit, Fernando will be wearing the Men’s Edge Bermuda shorts ($55) and the adidas Barricade V sneakers. With superior cushioning , support and adiTUFF durability and grip, this tennis shoe is tough to beat and has a suggested retail price of $120.

Verdasco

Jo-Wilfred Tsonga Jo-Wilfred Tsonga will be sporting the Men’s Competition Theme Polo, a ClimaCool mock neck polo with ForMotion technology using seam placement for enhanced fit and performance while in motion. This shirt has a suggested retail price of $55. Tsonga will complete his outfit with the Men’s Competition Bermuda shorts ($45 suggested retail price) and Barricade V shoes which retail for $120. Tsonga

Novac Djokovic

Fernando Verdasco will be wearing the Men’s Edge zip front tee with clean front graphic and tonal burnout mesh along the back and underarms for optimum cooling and ventilation. The Men’s Edge zip front tee retails for $55. Rounding out his out-

At this year’s U.S. Open, it is clear that with the help of adidas, fashion will be taking center court!

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Core Fitness for Tennis By Laszlo Elek Tennis players have lots to think about when designing a training program. In addition to developing aerobic and anaerobic fitness, they also have to work to strengthen key joints like the ankles, knees, wrists, elbows and shoulders. Small wonder that many players forget to perform enough core work. However, the core muscles do so much more than simply give you a strong stomach or six-pack abs. The core is also essential for hip and shoulder stability—a key element of all tennis strokes. Having a strong core is what allows your limbs to move effectively and efficiently. A strong core allows for a smooth transfer of power out from the core through the limbs, with perfect coordination of

strength, stability, balance, power and flexibility. The result is that you can run at full speed and execute a perfectly placed passing shot. A weak core, on the other hand, leads to many injuries in other parts of the body, as the weak link at the center defers dynamic forces out through the limbs, causing problems in the ankles, knees, hips, low back, elbows or shoulders. It’s a well-established principle that every action has an equal and opposite reaction, and similarly, all muscles have an opposite and opposing muscle group that helps to balance out demands on the body. Weakness in any of these opposing areas can cause problems. Thus balanced core muscles are vital— however, a lot of core training focuses too

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

much on the abdominal muscles at the expense of the obliques (side muscles) and lower back. It’s therefore quite common to find athletes who have a strong, muscular six-pack, but experience lower back problems—their core is not balanced, and injuries occur as a result. The transverse abdominis: The body’s corset A strong core starts with a strong transverse abdominis. This is a deep lying muscle that wraps around your torso from front to back, from the ribs to the pelvis. The muscle fibers of the transverse abdominis run horizontally, forming a corset around the torso, much like a weight lifter’s belt. The transverse abdominis doesn’t actually help to move the spine or the pelvis; instead, it helps with breathing, compresses the internal organs and stabilizes the spine. Activating the transverse abdominis is simple—either standing or sitting, draw your belly button in towards your spine. Practice this feeling, as you want to be sure to engage the transverse abdominis at the start of any core exercise. Now you understand the importance of the core, let’s look at the best exercises to perform. The best abdominal exercises Research conducted at the Biomechanics Lab at San Diego State University analyzed continued on page 20


Training the Mind or the Muscle? By Carl Barnett It has recently been discovered that an un-swallowed taste of replacement drink versus placebo can spike the performance of one athlete over another. The anticipation of fuel can stimulate the areas of the brain which appear to have allowed their muscles to work even harder. Until recently, physiologists thought muscles fatigued because of biochemical reactions within them. It was thought that lack of oxygen and lactic acid build up caused muscles to stiffen and fail. Ross Tucker, a researcher at the Sports Science Institute of South Africa has extensively studied fatigue in athletes. “Biochemical changes alone causing muscle failure is impossible because these

changes are at their highest level at the end of exercise,” said Tucker. Tucker, along with many other physiologists, now believes that fatigue isn’t only taking place in the muscles, but also in the brain. “The brain asks for and gets constant feedback from the muscles and other systems, especially about body temperature,” said Carl Foster, a professor in the department of exercise and sports science at the University of Wisconsin in La Crosse. As the fuel drops and the body’s core temperature rises, the brain recognizes the danger. It then starts reducing “the firing frequency of motor neurons to the exercising muscle, leading to a loss of force production,” said Ed Chambers, a researcher at the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences at the University of Birmingham in England. Your legs and arms begin to feel

as though they are full of cement. This is where the importance of training comes into play. “We’ve developed a specific style of training which incorporates mind and muscles to optimize physical performance,” said Jonathan Landsman, head trainer at the Early Hit Training Center in Glen Head, N.Y. “Training is no longer simply an act of getting the muscles used to lactate,” said Tucker. “Once your brain recognizes that you’re not going to damage yourself,” said Foster, “it’ll be happy to let you go.” G Carl Barnett started the Early Hit Training Programs at Glen Head Racquet Club six years ago. He may be reached by phone at (516) 455-1225 or e-mail earlyhit@optonline.net.

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F I T N E S S A N D N U T R I T I O N continued from page 18 13 different abdominal exercises, from traditional crunches to more complicated movements and found significant differences in their effectiveness. They rated each exercise for the amount of muscle stimulation it produced in both the rectus abdominus (the muscle that runs along the front of the abdomen) and the internal and external obliques (the muscles that extend along the sides of the abdomen). They then used the traditional crunch as a baseline, giving it a score of 100, and ranked the other exercises as follows: Rectus abdominus activation: 1. Bicycle Maneuver ............................248 2. Captain’s Chair ................................212 3. Exercise Ball Crunch........................139 4. Vertical Leg Crunch ........................129 5. Torso Track ......................................127 6. Long Arm Crunch ............................119 7. Reverse Crunch ..............................109 8. Crunch with Heel Push ....................107 9. Ab Roller ..........................................105 10. Plank (Hover)..................................100 11. Traditional Crunch..........................100 12. Exercise Tubing Pull ........................92 13. Ab Rocker ........................................21

Internal and external obliques activation: 1. Captain’s Chair ................................310 2. Bicycle Maneuver ............................290 3. Reverse Crunch ..............................240 4. Plank (Hover)....................................230 5. Vertical Leg Crunch ........................216 6. Exercise Ball Crunch........................147 7. Torso Track ......................................145 8. Crunch With Heel Push....................126 9. Long Arm Crunch ............................118 10. Ab Roller ........................................101 11. Traditional Crunch..........................100 12. Exercise Tubing Pull ........................77 13. Ab Rocker ........................................74 If you look closely, you’ll notice that the leading exercises are two to three times more effective than the traditional crunch, and up to 10 times more effective than the worst! The ab rocker, popular in many gyms and health clubs, came in dead last in both tests! Overall, the most effective abdominal exercises are the bicycle maneuver, followed closely by the captain’s chair, with crunches on an exercise ball ranked third overall. However, it’s also worth noting that while crunches on an exercise ball scored lower than the top two exercises, they also generated significantly less activity in the rectus femoris—a hip stabilizer. This is important—many so-called abs exercises (such as old fashioned sit ups) generate a lot of activity in the rectus

femoris and hip flexors, reducing their effectiveness. The researchers therefore concluded that crunches on an exercise ball may in fact be the best overall abdominal exercise. When designing your own ab workout, you should therefore look to perform a combination of the following ab exercises: N N N N

Exercise Ball Crunches Captain’s Chair Bicycle Maneuvers Reverse Crunches

Lower back and oblique exercises As we discussed earlier, many core workouts emphasize abs exercises at the expense of the obliques and low back. In order to get the correct balance, you therefore have to combine the most effective abs exercises with those that work the obliques and lower back. The three most effective exercises for these areas are those that promote increased endurance in the core—they are thus static exercises: N The Plank N The Side Plank N The Bird Dog The key with these exercises is to hold the position for an increasing period of time. Aim for two minutes in the plank, one minute each side for the side plank and bird dog. Conclusion Performing a combination of ab exercises and obliques/lower back exercises at least three days per week will build a strong core, allowing your other skills to be performed more effectively. Laszlo Elek is a certified personal trainer (CFT) working out of Sportime-Syosset who runs tennis specific training programs. He can be reached by phone at (516) 3201463 or e-mail eleklaszlo@optonline.net to arrange your own tennis specific training program, and start to move your game to the next level.

20

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009


Visual Calisthenic Exercises for Tennis Players By Dr. Arnie Sherman, O.D. Three important visual skills that can be easily enhanced for tennis players are eye movement accuracy, dynamic visual acuity and eye-hand coordination. The following are a few exercises that I send home with my tennis-playing patients to help them keep these skills as sharp as possible. Skill #1: Eye movement accuracy Eye tracking in tennis is the ability to locate the ball precisely on your opponent’s racket and follow it to your racket as you return the shot. This should be done with as little head movement as possible. Head

and neck movement is inefficient, increases stress, uses extra energy, and causes the athlete to lose balance because of stimulation of the inner ear. The athlete should try to free their eyes, independent of head movement and use visual information in concentrating on the ball while controlling balance. It certainly is easier to move two eyes that weigh several ounces, instead of a head weighing 15 pounds! Take-home exercise Place an ink dot on the center of each thumbnail and stand comfortably with one arm loosely extended in front of you. Now, move your thumb continuously in a circle while keeping your eyes on the dot on your thumbnail. Do this 10 times clockwise and 10 times counterclockwise, then repeat using the other arm. Concentrate on keeping your head and neck muscles still while you are following the dot on the thumbnail. As you im-

prove, change the size of the circular pattern that you are making. After one week of daily practice, start taking small steps forward, sideways, backward, and diagonally while following the dot on the thumbnail. Increase your speed to simulate dynamic movements on the tennis court. Use this as a visual warm-up. Skill #2: Dynamic visual acuity The ability to see clearly while following a moving target is extremely important in sports such as tennis, baseball, hockey, racquetball, squash, football, and all other sports that require following a moving object while also moving your body. Take-home exercise You will need a children’s record player with speeds of 33, 45, and 78 RPM. Cut out various headline-size letters from a newspaper and continued on page 23

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Literary Corner

By Brent Shearer

“On This Day in Tennis History” By Randy Walker I have never been a fan of reading encyclopedias. So it was with some trepidation that I opened Randy Walker’s book On This Day in Tennis History. The thought of reading about things that happened in tennis from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 through the years sounded slightly, but only slightly, more fun than curling up with a set of the Encyclopedia Britannica. Boy, was I wrong. The format still seems kind of odd. Do you read it from January to December? Do you just look up whatever day it is, to see what cool things happened in tennis history that day? I’m a pretty obsessive tennis fan, but not quite that devoted. Or, you can just skip around in the book, trolling for the fascinating tidbits and stories that Walker has packed in. I recommend this diving in and out approach. But, however one overcomes their “what am I doing reading a reference book” prejudice, it is well worth the effort because Walker has written a fascinating portrait of the game and its many eccentric characters. I came away from the book with a ton of new insights that will make me an even more valuable conversational partner after a weekend doubles match at my club. Yes, there’s still the problem of my shaky second serve, but Walker doesn’t claim his book will work miracles on the court. 22

For example, does the average Long Island Tennis Magazine reader understand that Ivan Lendl dominated John McEnroe from the middle years of their rivalry on. The head-to-head record of the two men is 20-15 in favor of the Czech Lendl. Then there is the way that reading Walker’s book can balance the New York City metro area reader’s knowledge of odd little bits of the history of our international game that he might not be aware of. If something happens at a Grand Slam or in the U.S., we may read about it or see it. But if it’s in a non-Grand Slam event on the other side of the world, we might not have heard about it. A lot of tennis fans will grin knowingly if someone mentions the story about Marat Safin dropping his shorts at the French Open in May 2004. In a fourth round match against Spaniard Felix Mantilla, Safin celebrated a winning drop shot by pulling his shorts to his thighs while leaning over the net. He felt it was unfair that he was penalized a point for his gesture. The beauty of Walker’s book is that it puts Safin’s display into perspective by reporting that Jeff Tarango topped the Russian in on-court stripping and did it 10 years earlier. I can only think that Tarango’s performance didn’t get noticed because it happened in a nonGrand Slam event in Japan. The story Walker tells is that in the second round of the 1994 Seiko Championships in Tokyo, Tarango, in the words of Britain’s Daily Record, “pulled his shorts down, raised his arms, and waddled to his seat courtside with his shorts around his ankles and his underpants in full view.” He

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

earned a code violation and a $3,000 fine, but the important thing is that thanks to Walker’s book, the discerning tennis fan can see that Safin’s unveiling was not an isolated moment in tennis history. You could also conclude that if a player pulls down his shorts a little as Safin did, he can still win, though it was a two-day, five setter over Felix Mantilla. Throw in the waddling, as Tarango did, and it resulted in a loss as Tarango retired at 1-4 in the third after his walkabout giving opponent Michael Chang the win. Another story Walker tells is about the 1943 U.S. Nationals Championships final between Jack Kramer and Joe Hunt. On the last point, right after Kramer hit a forehand long, Hunt crumpled to the ground with cramps as he approached the net to shake hands. As recounted in the Bud Collins book, History of Tennis, Kramer said, “If I’d kept the ball in the court, I think I’d have been champ by default.” But Walker’s book isn’t only a collection of tennis trivia, there are important points made about serious moments in the game’s history, as well such as Arthur Ashe’s U.S. Open win in 1968 and Stan Smith’s outstanding performance in the U.S./Romania Davis Cup final in 1972. Smith clinched the Cup with his second singles win of the tie, beating Ion Tiriac 46, 6-2, 6-4, 2-6, 6-0 in Bucharest. In all, Walker converted me to an appreciation of his book’s structure and I can recommend it heartily to tennis fans whether for its moments of high drama or slapstick comedy. G Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.


FITNESS AND NUTRITION continued from page 21 tape them to various parts of a record. Turn on the record player at the 33 RPM speed, disengage the record arm, and read out the large letters as they turn. Pick one large letter in the center of the record and try to keep it in clear focus for five minutes. After one week of daily practice, change the letters, increase the speed to 45 RPM, and use smaller and smaller letters. Continue to 78 RPM, remembering to use only your eyes without moving your head. Skill #3: Eye-hand coordination Eye-hand coordination is the integration of eyes leading and directing hands in order to perform a task. This integration is of critical importance in tennis, as the two eyes tell the hand where the ball is, when it will be there, and they direct the swing for an accurate hit. It is a learned skill, highly dependent upon eye movement accuracy, dynamic eyesight, and the two eyes coordinating together. Take-home exercise Take off the cap of a pen and hold it directly in front of you, using your dominant or preferred hand for tennis. Close one eye and move the pen into the cap. Steer the pen with your eyes all the way into the cap. Repeat five times, moving the cap further and closer each time. Close the other eye and repeat five times. As you improve, move the cap to different positions (up, right, down, left, etc.), simulating the positions of hitting a tennis ball. After daily practice for one week and once improvement occurs, continue the exercise using smaller targets (such as a toothpick and a drinking straw). G Dr. Arnie Sherman, O.D. practices in Merrick, N.Y., and has served as director of the Elite Athletes Program to the United States Olympic Committee. He has also consulted with the U.S. Tennis Association Junior Development Program, the New York Knicks, Jets and Rangers, and the St. John’s University basketball and baseball teams. He is currently working with world-ranked junior and ATP professional tennis players, as well as NHL, NFL and MLB professional players. For more information, call (516) 868-2266 or e-mail arnevtod@aol.com.

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RockvilleTennis@optonline.net Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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he Long Island tennis community is blessed to have some of the best indoor facilities and best coaches in the world right here in our backyard. Recently, Long Island Tennis Magazine spoke with some of these top coaches to get insight into their coaching/training strategies, what they look for in a great player, views on important local tennis topics, and a background in how they got into coaching. Even the best coach can always learn an extra tip or two, and the following article will provide all players and coaches with a chance to learn from the best.

Stonar Coleman

Laurie Fehrs

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. 11542 www.rwtt.com (516) 759-0505 Stonar Coleman is the head pro at Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Glen Cove facility. Stonar is in his third year as director of Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Summer Camp, and currently coaches several top nationally-ranked junior players.

Eastern Athletic Club 100 Ruland Road Melville, N.Y. 11747 www.easternathleticclubs.com (631) 753-3696 Laurie Fehrs has been the director of tennis of the Melville Eastern Athletic Club for the past 18 years. During her playing career, she played in six Wimbledon Championships, seven U.S. Opens and has a win in both singles and doubles over tennis legend Martina Navratilova.

Carl Barnett

Dan Dwyer

Steven Kaplan

Point Set Indoor Racquet Club 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. 11572 www.pointsettennis.com (516) 536-2323 Dan Dwyer is the head professional at Oceanside, N.Y.-based Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was named USTA Man of the Year in 1997 and was inducted into the USTA Hall of Fame in 1998. His list of past students includes John McEnroe, four-time U.S. Open Champion and threetime Wimbledon Champion.

Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, N.Y. 11735 (516) 777-1358 Steven Kaplan has guided many touring professionals in the U.S. Open and Wimbledon, and has coached more than 350 nationally-ranked junior players. His background combines a rare blend of competitive and scholastic achievement. In 1979, Steve won the Big East Conference Singles Championship. In 1983, he received his Master’s Degree in Physiology. Steven developed the games of both Keith

T

Glen Head Racquet Club, Home of the Early Hit Training Center 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. 11545 (516) 455-1225 Carl Barnett taught tennis in the late 1980s with Dr. Henry Rabin, a movement expert. Carl founded the Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club in 2004. Their focus is on the connection between fitness training, movement and the accelerated learning of tennis. 24

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009


Kambourian and two-time NCAA Singles Champion Sandra Birch, from the 12-year olds through the pro tour. Most recently, Steven’s longtime student, Bryan Koniecko has achieved the number one ranking in Men’s NCAA tennis.

Lawrence Kleger Sportime Clubs of New York (516) 938-6076 www.sportimetfm.com Lawrence Kleger is nationally acclaimed as a unique talent in junior development. As the director of Sportime’s Excel Tennis Camps each summer and of the Elite development program each winter, Lawrence has trained hundreds of sectionally- and nationallyranked juniors. His knowledge, experience and keen “eye” help Lawrence to produce players who are fundamentally, technically and mechanically sound. His commitment to true sportsmanship and proper tennis etiquette has produced 13 USTA/Eastern year-end Sportsmanship Award winners. Lawrence is one of a select group of coaches invited to attend two levels of the USA High Performance Coaching Program. He was named the 2006 USTA/Eastern Section Long Island Section Tennis Professional of the Year. Lawrence’s campers have captured more than 70 USTA National Championships.

Pat Mosquera

Rockville Racquet Club 80 North Centre Avenue Rockville Centre, N.Y. 11570 (516) 764-5350 A tennis pro for 15 years at Rockville Racquet, Pat Mosquera is currently the junior tennis director for past three years at Rockville Racquet. For the past 16 years, Pat has served as the tennis director and head pro at Sun and Surf Tennis in Atlantic Beach, N.Y. He is also tennis director at Ocean Club Tennis in Atlantic Beach, USTA Team Tennis coach for Rockville Racquet

and the Sun and Surf Tennis Nassau Champions, and is a USPTA- and USPTRcertified professional.

Louis Vallejo Carefree Racquet Club 1414 Jerusalem Avenue Merrick, N.Y. 11566 (516) 489-9005 Louis Vallejo is the director of tennis at Carefree Racquet Club in Merrick, N.Y. He began competing at the age of 10, and has been ranked in the 12-, 16- and 18-and-Under East Coast Division. He began coaching an adult program in his fourth year at Florida International University (Miami). After graduation, he went to Harbour Point Yacht & Tennis Club and worked as a club pro, and eventually, became the head pro. “The pleasure of working with people who appreciate my tutelage is just priceless,” said Vallejo. How did you get into coaching? Stonar Coleman: I started out as a ballboy when I was 11-years-old in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. I gradually learned the game of tennis and became passionate about the sport. I wanted to pass down the knowledge that I learned to others. With that being said, as a young man in Jamaica, I also saw that tennis could create many opportunities for me. Laurie Fehrs: It kind of fell into my lap. Ever since I started as a tennis coach, I wanted to pass on all the tips from my past coaches, like Harry Hottman, Pancho Segura and Elwood Cook, and teach both girls and boys the greatest game of all, tennis. Steven Kaplan: I greatly admired my father and grandfather who were both inventors and entrepreneurs, and I think this was my motivation to have a business rather than a job. I love athletic competition and I love to teach. Coaching tennis has been a great way for me to express these passions. Lawrence Kleger: I was playing on the basketball team my freshman year in college, when the coach explained to me that a skinny 5’ 10”, 145 lb. kid from Long Island who couldn’t play defense worth a lick was not going to make it to the NBA. So, I started playing a lot of tennis. Fast-forward

to when I finished law school and was studying for the Bar Exam, I somehow convinced Dan Dwyer to give me a job teaching part-time. Even though I was the eighth pro in line at a seven-court facility, I loved every minute that I was on the court instructing. Three months later, I quit my job as a lawyer and started teaching fulltime. Even though my parents (and everyone else I knew) thought that I had lost my mind, I knew that it was the right decision for me. Pat Mosquera: As a junior, I trained and helped with the summer camp at the National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The head pro gave me an award for being great with the kids. A couple of years later, I was hired as teaching professional in a club in Queens. A few years later, my friend Kelvin Lastique brought me to Long Island and I have been here ever since. Louis Vallejo: When I was 14-years-old, my father’s good tennis buddy asked me to coach him. He gave me $200 for 10 lessons. That was definitely a sign. At 17years-old, I was asked to work for the New York Tennis League as the youngest coach on staff. At Florida International University, I was asked to coach the adult programs, which was a big success. People really boosted my ego with compliments which amazed me because I was only doing what I enjoy and do best: making people play better tennis! Well, the rest is history. Thirty years later, I still love coaching people into becoming better tennis players. Coaching tennis is not a 9 to 5 job. How do the long hours impact you socially and personally, both on and off the court? Laurie Fehrs: Yes, tennis isn’t a 9 to 5 job, but teaching is a great way to network socially. You meet people from all walks of life and it enhances your social and personal relationships, as well as creates new friends and clients. Pat Mosquera: A balance between your profession and your personal life can be achieved by devoting the free time that you have available to your family or loved ones to its fullest. Louis Vallejo: A director of tennis has longer hours due to his administrative responsibilities, in addition to teaching. A continued on page 26

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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R O U N D T A B L E D I S C U S S I O N continued from page 25 head pro or club pro is on the court more hours, but doesn’t need to worry about any consuming paperwork after teaching. In either case, coaches can have off during the day. I’ve found that effectively coordinating your time can allow you to balance work, social affairs, and your personal life. Have you ever felt a student should move on to a new coach? If so, why? Carl Barnett: Coaching changes are usually a parent’s decision. My tracking shows their production against higher ranked players falls off in most cases. Stonar Coleman: Yes, I think this is something most good coaches will experience at some point in their careers. I have had a situation where the personalities just didn’t click anymore, and I felt the student would be better off with a new coach! Louis Vallejo: No. I have found that help from my fellow tennis pros can be very beneficial. Every good coach has the knowledge and experience through training and competing to produce better-thanaverage tennis players. Every pro has different aptitudes, such as an eye for mechanics, strategy, mental toughness, world class competition, experience, etc. Pros working together to produce champions is a good thing, but if a coach has a positive relationship with their students, then why change? Would you recommend a top junior player compete in high school tennis, or do you think that it negatively impacts their game? Stonar Coleman: The answer depends both on the school and the individual. For some players, it can be a great opportunity and help their college application, and for others, it might not give them enough practice at their level. Carl Barnett: It’s different for every player, but I encourage it as long as the school coach doesn’t get involved with the student’s strokes. Players do so much on their own, both in training and going to tournaments. Playing on a school team gives 26

them a nice connection with their classmates. Dan Dwyer: I don’t think this question can be answered with a simple yes or no. Being part of a team can be a very positive factor in one’s tennis development. The Davis Cup is a classic case. I think this is a decision that has to be made by the junior after thoroughly discussing it with their coach and parents. Laurie Fehrs: I strongly believe that any player should play high school tennis. It builds personality as well as team spirit. More importantly, the team provides them a stronger sense of self-esteem. Consequently, the more matches a player plays, the better they get. Steven Kaplan: Yes, to both. I highly recommend that players make a commitment to competing at some point, to school tennis even if in the short run it could have a negative impact on their game. High school tennis is a healthy and valuable part of a positive, well-rounded junior tennis experience. The positive socialization benefits of participation should not be underestimated. Lawrence Kleger: This is a very loaded question and I only get four sentences! First, if any of my top juniors really wanted to play high school tennis, I would certainly let them. But I probably would discourage it. Here’s why: I have never had a top player come out of the high school tennis season playing better than when they entered it. Also, tennis players are not evaluated like football players are. It is the results from USTA-sanctioned tournaments that will determine a tennis player’s collegiate career, not high school matches versus local rivals. Finally, there are some high school coaches who will not let their top players miss practice, or an inconsequential match, to properly train for or compete in an extremely important USTA event. Therefore, for a high standing national player, that can become a deal breaker. If it seems that I am antihigh school tennis, just remember that among the New York State High School Champions I have coached is two-time champion Michelle Stracar … my stepdaughter!

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

Pat Mosquera: I strongly feel that varsity tennis is another piece to the puzzle in developing an all-around player in both sectional and national rankings. What are your thoughts on a junior player playing up and/or down in ability level and also playing up in USTA age level? Carl Barnett: It can be valuable, but players need to succeed in their own natural progression. Stonar Coleman: I think most good players do not mind playing up because they want the competition. The average player might want to play down to get a confidence booster and chase points. But one important point … it’s always good to win at your age group, as it will always give that player confidence. Dan Dwyer: Very frequently, juniors play to the highest level of their game when they are playing up. I believe this is due to the fact that they are not encumbered by others’ expectations of them or of their own expectations. It is sort of like having a built in excuse. Steven Kaplan: Playing up has its virtues, it is motivating and enlightening, but playing at or below your level is equivalently important. The bottom line is that the locus of control as to how you will improve is internal not external and that should be the message that wise and responsible adults teach. Coaches, parents and practice partners can facilitate to make it easier, but the best players know that they have the ultimate responsibility for their success. I have coached hundreds of top-ranked players and not one of them has ever cared nearly as much about playing up at 18 as they did at 12, and I don’t believe they have all gotten dumber with age. Not practicing up doesn’t seem to have hurt Roger Federer much lately either. Therefore, I believe that the enormous emphasis on playing above ability levels that players and parents advocate and coaches peddle is, in many ways misguided, ego-driven and undermining of success. continued on page 28


Athletic Mouth Guards Can Help Your Game

Your Upper Teeth Must Be Protected from Traumatic Injury, but an Unbalanced Bite Can Actually Physically Weaken Your Whole Body Could You Play Your Best with One Shoe Off? A mouth guard that properly fits over the upper teeth may, in fact, set your lower teeth up to hit the appliance with unequal forces. The uneven strain on muscles in the head and neck also affect the back, shoulders, arms, and legs. Just like from the feet up, the mouth down can impact the ability to function at peak performance.

What Can a Lopsided Bite Do? Interfere with hand-eye coordination, reflexes: Teeth supply information to many important cranial nerves. The brain interprets what your teeth bite on. Incompatible biting forces send inaccurate messages that have an impact on reactions to timing, focus, and concentration. Put strain on neck and back muscles or decrease strength, flexibility, and endurance: An athletic appliance that causes the mouth to over-open or clench on one side, or both, puts strain on the connecting muscles, nerves, bones, and blood supply making you more prone to injury and fatigue.

Prevent recovery from injury: Getting back in shape takes much longer when the body needs to overcome a structural imbalance. A mouthguard that does not take the bite into consideration prevents postural equilibrium, which can affect the body’s response to pain, retraining, and flexibility.

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R O U N D T A B L E D I S C U S S I O N continued from page 26 Lawrence Kleger: In terms of practice. I think it is critically important to play up, down and at one’s ability level. The notion that one can only get better by playing with and against better players is a crock. At the developmental levels, it is very difficult to develop and practice one’s tactics against better players. Against better players, you are scraping and scrapping just to hang in there with them, let alone implement new and not-yet-perfected tactics. Often, players who consistently play against better players get really good at one thing—losing! They find new and innovative ways to make it happen. When matches are close, these players have all of those “losing” images fresh in their mind to call on. As far as playing up an age group, that depends on the individual and the age group. When I have someone play up an age group, I make sure that I have a very valid reason for it. For instance, a player may be at the top of their age group with tactical skills on a par with the older age group. I never have a player play up an age group simply to take the pressure off the player that he or she experiences in their natural age group. Pat Mosquera: If a player has shown a top 10 ranking in their age division, he or she should always play up.

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What qualities do you look for in a junior player that separates them from the pack and makes them a top player? Dan Dwyer: Without question, the most important attribute is the ability to focus and stay on task. This inevitably is expressed with a happy, but serious, attitude that shows that the student is having fun working hard. How well the junior moves is probably the most important physical trait. His or her quickness of the first step and not giving up are good signs of future great players. Steven Kaplan: While physical talent gives players an initial advantage, and is the ultimate limiting factor at the highest level of performance, I look more to personal qualities to predict playing success, specifically optimism, perseverance and opportunism. I ask, does the player believe in themselves, will they do what it takes to succeed, and do they maximize the quality of each experience? In almost every study undertaken on achievement as well as from my own experience, these qualities are the pillars most highly correlated to achievement. Lawrence Kleger: I look for character and spirit. I think all great players have

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

both. Juniors with character are extremely coachable, embrace the challenge of the sport and are committed to excellence. Their “PROCESS” of trying to become the best players they can be is both enriching and fulfilling. They are athletes first and winners second. Juniors with spirit have a lot of positive energy, extremely high work ethic, and are intensely competitive without compromising sportsmanship. They never quit and never make excuses. They inspire everyone around them to work harder for them. To borrow a quote from a Supreme Court Justice: “Spirit is that inner quality that I have trouble defining, but I know it when I see it.” By the way, world-class athleticism doesn’t hurt. Louis Vallejo: Juniors who excel in tournaments have all the same attributes, including athletic ability, coaching, training, mental toughness and motivation. The most significant quality that constitutes a top player is an unwillingness to lose. Champions in any competitive situation refuse to fail. Connors, McEnroe and the William Sisters would sell their souls rather than accept defeat. We all saw the ice man Roger Federer shedding tears after his continued on page 30


The Girl Behind the Desk By Dana Blasucci I’m not well-known throughout the Long Island tennis world. In fact, I think it’s safe to say that I’m hardly known at all. Some tennis players who frequent Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick know me by name, but most know me simply as “the girl behind the desk.” As “the girl behind the desk,” I’ve watched many USTA seasons come and go. I’ve met countless pleasant people from different clubs throughout Long Island. I’ve watched teams share laughter, food, tennis advice and support, and not to mention, I’ve watched some great tennis matches. Yet, every season, there are always some nights which aren’t so fun and involve some not-so-pleasant people. I’ve

seen arguing, yelling, cheating accusations, crying and other behavior that makes me think, “Wow, could this USTA season be worse than the last?” During the day, I’m a nursing student and finishing up my senior year I feel as though I’ve seen it all. I’ve seen patients without the strength to lift an arm, lonely patients without visitors; I’ve seen war veterans whose lives are disturbed from painful memories and wounds that won’t heal. After spending a long day with these patients and coming to work and witnessing some players acting so hasty, is what inspired me to write this article. I’d like to use this as a means to voice my feelings to all those who have taken part in a “nasty USTA night” (as I call it). You all have so

much to be thankful for. You have your health and strength, you have a team of friends and supporters cheering you on. You have the ability to take part in a sport that you enjoy. If I can instill anything in you, I hope you remember all that you’re grateful for when you walk onto the court next season. And if I can offer any word of tennis advice as “the girl behind the desk,” it would be “don’t lose your cool.” Remember what really matters in life and just have fun. G Dana Blasucci is a Molloy College nursing student and part-time receptionist at Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, N.Y. She may be reached by e-mail at dblasucci07@molloy.edu.

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R O U N D T A B L E D I S C U S S I O N continued from page 28 loss to Nadal at Wimbledon. Need I say more? At what age (if ever) should a junior player give up other sports to focus on tennis? Dan Dwyer: I think the junior player, at some point (probably at 13-14 years of age), has to decide how they can best attain their goals in the sport of tennis. Time spent playing other sports would have to be limited if their aspirations are to be a college player. Again, it is important, both socially and physically, to participate on at least a social level in other sports. There is definitely a physical aspect achieved outside of tennis that is critical to all great players. Laurie Fehrs: This is a very difficult question, but I firmly believe that any student of the game should pursue what they love to do. Is it tough to balance many sports, but these sports give different athletic talents to enhance one’s game. Lawrence Kleger: I am tempted to say “at birth,” but seriously, I believe that each case is different and that the age is getting younger. If I had to pick an age, I would say that if a high-standing junior is playing other sports on an organized basis past the age of 10, I believe that it will be extremely difficult to reach his/her highest potential.

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Pat Mosquera: I would say the time is right when the junior player decides that tennis should be their primary focus. The decision should be left up to them. Louis Vallejo: I believe this is up to the individual. I’ve taught five-year-olds who began playing tennis as their first sport. I’ve witnessed these students win championships, receive sponsorships from companies and accept scholarships from well-known universities. I also have a friend, Andres Gomez, who has a number four world ranking. He played several other sports until the age of 14. Typically, an athlete should give up other sports and focus on only one by the age of 10, give or take a year. This may seem young to some, but a true champion matures earlier than others and can make this decision. After all, didn’t Andre Agassi make his choice at the age of six? What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a Long Islander at Nationals? Carl Barnett: The great advantage is to be at home and have the support from their family and coach when playing a National at the U.S. Tennis Center, which is in our own backyard. Stonar Coleman: Long Island kids play a lot of indoor tennis, compared to many

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

other places in the country. This can be both an advantage and a disadvantage. Since many national tournaments are outdoors, it’s hard for Long Island juniors to make the adjustment to the outdoor conditions. On the other hand, indoor tennis can really help you hit a perfect ball and have great technique. Laurie Fehrs: I don’t think there is a huge disadvantage or advantage either way, but if I were to say what is the biggest disadvantage was, it would be playability in a warm climate. The endurance factor in warmer degree weather could hurt a Long Islander’s chances at Nationals. Steven Kaplan: Long Islanders benefit from the positive economic demographics of the area, as well as the population density. They can tolerate the high cost of training and traveling perhaps better than in other regions of the country and have a wealth of great programs nearby. Longer Islanders also have a greater diversity of court surface options then in other areas, which encourages a well-rounded playing style. The inhospitable weather and emphasis on education here however, make practice opportunities difficult as compared to Florida, California and Texas, and this factor contributes to Long Islanders being at an overall disadvantage at nationals. Lawrence Kleger: I can cite a whole bunch of disadvantages that Long Island kids have at National Tournaments. Most would relate to playing indoors for the greater part of the year. Long Island kids, for the most part, are playing indoor tennis from the first week in September until well into May. Two of the biggest tournaments are played in December and March/April outdoors. Juniors from the warm weather states where they play outdoors 365 days a year have a huge advantage in these events over our kids that may get to prepare outdoors for a couple of days prior to the event. As for the advantages … I think that we have great coaches and excellent indoor facilities on Long Island. Plus, we’re New York-


ers! New Yorkers are high-achievers who are driven towards excellence. We don’t take “no” for an answer and don’t give up. What is your best memory as a coach? Carl Barnett: I know it’s simple, but hearing their voice replace mine when playing or sharing coaching with others. Stonar Coleman: My best memory as a coach is meeting Nick Bollettieri at a seminar at the USTA center in New York in 2000. He is, by far, the best motivator in tennis and has inspired my coaching career. Dan Dwyer: My greatest memories come from working with wheelchair players and students with Multiple Sclerosis. It is from them that I truly learned that we are the masters of our own fate. The positive attitude, the great sense of humor and the willingness to work hard for what they want, taught me that I could do and should do more as a tennis professional and as a person. Laurie Fehrs: I would have to say my best coaching memory would be coaching at The Chiquita Cup. I felt very honored to coach top players in the country in a tournament as prestigious as The Chiquita Cup.

Steven Kaplan: While I have some great memories in my almost 30 years as a coach, my most interesting experience coaching happened before my career even began. I was 18 and it was a Sunday afternoon, and I was hanging around Syosset Racket Club (which is now a supermarket) looking to find a game. One of the club owners was also part-owner of Westbury Music Fair, so their acts would sometimes come to play. Since I was the only other person there, the desk receptionist asked me to give a lesson to the people who were going to come down. It was Isaac Hayes of the movie “Shaft,” and later, of “South Park” fame; Diana Ross; and a new group, The Jackson Five. I really just fed some balls and no one cared much about playing. Isaac Hayes didn’t take his leather jacket off, just stood there with his racket and gave menacing looks. Diana Ross stayed in the corner and laughed, and Michael Jackson, who while my age, looked 12, spun around every time the ball came. It was memorable. Lawrence Kleger: When you have been doing this as long as I have, you have a number of great memories. Unfortunately, you can’t remember any of them! One that sticks out is three years ago, when three of my students finished first, second and third at a Girls 16-and-

under National Open in Minneapolis. And two of those girls won the doubles title! That is the only time in USTA National play that this has ever been accomplished. What made it extra special was that my stepdaughter, Nicky was the girl who won both the singles and the doubles titles. Pat Mosquera: I have been teaching for more than 20 years now, and my best memory as a coach was a couple of years ago seeing my son London hit his first forehand at the tender age of oneand-a-half. Louis Vallejo: I have countless great memories as a tennis coach, therefore, I’ll only mention a few. A young girl who wanted to learn tennis was brought to me by her parents, who noticed she had a lack of motor skills. A year later, she made her high school’s varsity tennis team as a singles player. I also recall offering strategy advice to a junior player who I’ve never met. I then watched him defeat a seeded player at Nationals as a result of my recommendations. His parents sent me thank you cards from California for many years after. In addition, I recall coaching the top ranked male and female juniors in the east for several years. Overall, the answer to this question resides mostly in the bond I’ve established with many of my students.

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Bogomolov Wins First Prize in Gotham Tennis Academy’s Hamptons 20-Ball Open

Alex Bogomolov (second from right) accepts a check in the amount of $10,000 from Gotham Tennis officials (from left to right) John Curtis, Warren Rand and Joel Kassan after winning the First Annual Hampton 20-Ball Open in July Alex Bogomolov of Long Branch, N.J. defeated Noam Okun of Israel 20-18, 17-20, 10-8 to win the $10,000 first prize at the First Annual Gotham Tennis Academy “Hamptons 20-Ball Open” at the Napeague Tennis Club, located at 2145 Montauk Highway in Amagansett, N.Y. The unique single day event featured first-to-20-point match formats beginning with a ground-stroke feed. “It feels great to win this tournament,” said Bogomolov, ranked No. 179 in the ATP singles rankings. “I love this format and I challenge anybody to play me in a groundstroke game.” Bogomolov has never been beaten in this unique competitive format. Last summer in Los Angeles, he won the only other known

professional “20-ball” tournament, defeating John Isner in the semifinals and Philip King in the final. Bogomolov used the Hamptons 20Ball as a preparation for his return to ATP tournament tennis. The bronze medalist for the United States at the 2003 Pan American Games team recently played in Newport, R.I. in his first ATP-level tournament since the 2008 Sony Ericsson Open and since he underwent surgery on his left wrist late last year. Since his surgery, Bogomolov, ranked as high as number 97 in 2003, has served as the touring professional for Gotham Tennis and worked with its officials to create the special formatted tournament for this summer at Napeague. Okun, a member of Israel’s Davis Cup team from 1999-2008, traveled to the Hamptons from Winnetka, Ill., where he competed in the Nielsen USTA Challenger, losing in the round of 16. “We both played really well and it was a great atmosphere and a great event here in the Hamptons,” said Okun, ranked number 309, but as high as 95th in 2002. “Alex was just too tough and too solid for me. This is the first time I have played a tournament in this format, and I enjoyed it. The Napeague Tennis Club is very nice. The courts here are great. They are so even, which is very unusual for a clubs with clay courts, where they have courts that have a lot of bad

Beginners, Advanced and Tournament Players looking to improve or perfect your tennis game, come and train with a USPTA Professional One, USTA High Performance Certified Coach. Carl is a former Davis Cup player who has also competed alongside Dmitry Tursunov, David Nalbandian, Guillermo Coria and many more.

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bounces, but not here.” The tournament was played simultaneously as the epic men’s singles final at Wimbledon, where Roger Federer won his record-breaking 15th major singles title, defeating Andy Roddick 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 3-6, 16-14. When not playing their matches, players were glued to the television watching the drama unfold at the All-England Lawn Tennis Club. “Andy was outplaying Roger for most of the match,” said Bogomolov, who beat Roddick to win the 1998 USTA National Boy’s 16 Championships in Kalamazoo, Mich. “The match is a different story if Andy wins one of those points at 6-2 in the second set tie-breaker and goes up two sets to love. I think losing that set from being up 6-2 made Andy uncertain about himself for the much of the rest of the match, even though he won the fourth set.” “It was a great match,” said Okun, who lost to Roddick 6-3, 6-3 in a round of 16 match in Indianapolis in 2005. “I feel really bad for Andy. He played unbelievable, but not well enough to beat Roger Federer. There are no words to describe Roger Federer. He is the best player ever. He is so great for tennis.” The one-day “20-Ball” event featured many fast-paced and entertaining matches featuring men and women who have represented their countries in Davis Cup, Fed Cup and Pan American Games competitions. Three women registered wins over men in the co-ed event. Former Slovenian Fed Cupper Petra Rampe, currently ranked number 375 in the WTA rankings, defeated Napeague member Rick Rudeman 20-12 in the first round, before losing to Felipe Meier of Sweden 20-16 in the second round. Former Ukrainian Fed Cupper Elena Jirnova of Kiev defeated Napeague member and film director Mark Levin 20-5 in the first round before falling to East Hampton junior standout Max Hirsh in the second round. Suzanne Sales of Boston defeated Scott Marden in the first round 20-1 before losing to Ytai Abougzir 20-6 in the second round. G For more information, visit www.gothamtennis.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009


Wimbledon ’09 Features a Match for the Ages Federer defeats Roddick in classic final as the Williams sisters steal the women’s spotlight

F

or the second consecutive year, the Wimbledon men’s final was a classic. The final between Roger Federer and Andy Roddick has been ruled as the most viewed of all men’s finals at the All-England Club in the past 10 years. According to NBC, an average of 5.71 million people tuned in to watch the epic battle between Federer and Roddick which resulted in Federer walking away with a record setting 15th Grand Slam title. This is the highest ratings number that has been achieved since Pete Sampras went head-to-head against Andre Agassi and won in the 1999 final, which managed to attract 5.85 million viewers during that showdown. The showdown between Federer and Roddick ended with a 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 3-6, 16-14 Federer victory that lasted for a stunning 4 hrs. and 16 min. The last set in the match, the fifth and final set,

secutive titles before losing to younger sister Serena in the final. In women’s doubles Serena Williams got her second title of the tournament by joining forces with sister Venus. The fourth-seeded Williams sisters defeated the third-seeded team of Samantha Stosur/Rennae Stubbs 7-6(4), 6-4 to repeat as Wimbledon doubles champs and win their fourth Wimbledon doubles title. In the men’s doubles final, there was another team of siblings, but they didn’t have the same success as the Williams sisters. The top-seeded Bryan Brothers (Mike and Bob) were upset by the second-seeded team of Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic in a tough four-set match by a score of 7-6, 6-7, 7-6, 6-3. G

lasted longer than any other set in major final history for tennis. Roddick played arguably the best match of his life, but still came up a bit short against Federer who advanced to 16-2 lifetime against Roddick. After the match, Roddick was noticeably emotional he still showed a great deal of class in his complimentary comments toward Federer. Federer, who did a memorable post-match interview with greats Rod Laver, John McEnroe and Pete Sampras celebrated becoming the greatest Grand Slam champion in tennis history, as he broke Sampras’s previous record of 14 Grand Slam titles. In women’s singles, it was an allWilliams final, as Serena Williams defeated big sister Venus Williams in straight sets 7-6, 6-2 to capture her third Wimbledon crown. Venus was the defending champion and had won two con-

For more information, visit www.wimbledon.org.

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ADULT LEAGUE WRAP-UP B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

2009 USTA Adult & Senior League Recap Long Island had 256 teams with more than 3,500 players participate this past USTA season. The winning teams advancing to sectionals are the following: Adult League N Women’s 2.5 • Eastern Athletic Blue Point (Therese Ebarb) N Women’s 3.0 • Eastern Athletic Blue Point (Maureen Casaburi) N Women’s 3.5 • Long Beach Tennis (Laura Bonacasa) N Women’s 4.0 • Sportime Lynbrook (Jackie Gaines) N Women’s 4.5 • Huntington Indoor (Christina Gottlieb) N Women’s 5.0 • World Gym Setauket (Gina Marie McNulty) N Men’s 3.0 • Sportime Massapequa (David John) N Men’s 3.5 • Rockville Racquet (Bruce Lindenman) N Men’s 4.0 • Carefree Racquet (Adam Kolenberg) N Men’s 4.5 • Rockville Racquet (Jonathan Klee) N Men’s 5.0 • World Gym Setauket (Joe Polestino) Senior League N Women’s 3.5 • Eastern Athletic Blue Point (Kathy Houghaling) All other senior divisions are playing their playoff matches as this issue went to press. Overall, it was a very successful year of league tennis with one major drawback that was more of a problem this year then in past years … forfeited matches. It is unacceptable when a team has a roster of 14-18 players, that they cannot get four players (two sin36

gles, one doubles to be a legitimate match for the adult league, and two doubles courts for the senior league) to show up for a match. When this happens, the team that is forfeiting can have all their matches become null and void if they have forfeited to a team in playoff contention. A team in contention cannot be handed the total number of points for that match to secure their position. It is a good rule, but one that has a down side. In making the matches null and void, it can have the reverse effect on an innocent team and knock them out of a playoff position. There are always going to be those people who want to manipulate the rules to try to give someone points (reason the rule was put there) or those who think they are making a point by showing the reverse effect the rule can have. The best way to avoid this from happening is to obviously not have full matches forfeited. Having a team in the USTA league is not a commitment to play only until you see that you are no longer in the running to advance. It is a commitment to play the entire season and to care enough about the other teams to see what your actions can cause, also known as good sportsmanship! We have been giving serious thought to having teams put up a $500 bond before the season starts. I know it sounds like a lot of money, but if you have 14 players on your team, it is $35 per person. The money will go into an escrow account, and if you play all your matches, you get it back at the end of the season. If you forfeit an entire match, you don’t get it back. It is our feeling that we have to protect the player who shows good sportsmanship, gets a team to all scheduled matches, and cares about the league running fairly

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

and smoothly. There are too many teams that consist of players who are not committed and it is those teams that are discouraging the ones we don’t want to lose. The Long Island Inter Club League Board meets in November and I would love to have some feedback on this. Please email your thoughts and comments to kathym65@aol.com. Next thing up is the Tri-Level League which will begin the end of September and run until the end of November. TriLevel is a three-court league with a match consisting of a court of 3.5 doubles, a court of 4.0 doubles and a court of 4.5 doubles. It gives teams the opportunity to form with people of different levels. Following the Tri-Level League, the Mixed Doubles League runs from November through May and organizing this league takes place in September. The Mixed League is a combination of the NTRP level of men’s and women’s, and runs at the 6.0 level (two 3.0 players or a 2.5 and a 3.5 player); 7.0 level (two 3.5 players or a 3.0 and 4.0 player); 8.0 level (two 4.0 players or a 3.5 and a 4.5 player), and 9.0 (two 4.5 players or a 4.0 and 5.0 player). Both the Tri-Level and Mixed Doubles leagues play on weekends with times varying based on club availability. If you are interested in either league, please e-mail me at kathym65@aol.com. I look forward to hearing from you and to future successful USTA League programs on Long Island! G Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.


Congratulations to the Women’s 4.0 team from Sportime Lynbrook who is going to Syracuse to represent Long Island in the Sectional Playoffs. The team is comprised of (back row, from left to right): Marcie Zeitlin, Jackie Fitzharris, YenBao So, Nicole Bove, Jackie Gaines (team captain), Misty Sombrotto, Hope Schwab and Jolie Weintraub, with (front row, kneeling from left to right): Linda Grisafi, Angela Castillo and Marsha Silverman. Not available for the team picture were Randi Segal, Laraine Gegerson, Jackie Clark, Melanie Seger, Genevieve Phillips and Donna Joseph.

The winning Men’s 4.0 team that represented Long Island at the Sectional Playoff in Syracuse the weekend of Aug. 14. Pictured here (back row, left to right): James Dell’Italia, Danny Calhoun, Bobby Block, Adam Kolenberg (captain), Chris Colesanti and Ignacio Areans, with (front row, from left to right): Paul Rothstein, R.J. Narcisco, Scott Simon and Russ Baier. Not available for the photo were Siim Vanaselja, Larry Tipmanee, Brian Yegidis, Rob Zolla, John Emmert, John Fellin and Ernie Biele.

The Men's 3.5 team of (seated, from left to right): Steven Mantell, Rene Andre, Bruce Lindenman (captain), and (left to right, back row): Bobby Callaghan, Tim Consiglio, Patricio Mera, Jodi Nainggolan, Luis Osorio, Rich Brown and DJ Fitzharris. Team members not in photo, include Martin Marmorale, Neil Berger, Joe Martines, Charles Schnier, Patrik Jutka, Stuart Kesner, David Weiner and Hamil Babb.

The USTA Men’s 3.0 team from Sportime Massapequa of (from left to right) Zafar Malik, Thomas Dominguez, Michael Pipitone, Robert Coben, Albert Miller, Peter Zaphiris, Charles MacPherson, Andre Sliwowski, George Henry, Steven Varriale, Sergio Casali, Artie Cipoletti and David E. John (captain) is headed to Syracuse for the Sectionals.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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A Look Back at Girlz 4 Girlz Tennis Camp July 9-12 in New Hyde Park, N.Y. Sponsored by

What we did … N We gave a four-day tennis camp for junior female tennis players in the Eastern Region. N We had life skill seminars focusing on time management, nutrition, the college search process and injury prevention. N We had alternate fitness sessions, including: Boot Camp Fitness, Yoga and Dance Fusion. N We taught the girls tennis strategy and worked on technical skills through drilling and competitive play. N We saw that there is a lack of female tennis coaches for young girls, and we wanted to help mentor and share what we have learned with the next generation and give them the opportunity to be coached by all-female tennis pros.

lives and they had to present it to the rest of the camp. N We also had an awards ceremony on the last day of camp where we hosted more than 50 people and gave medals and prizes to the “The Best Yogini,” “The Best Dancer,” “The Best Runner,” etc.

Highlights … N Every day, we had a different theme and focus. For instance, Saturday’s theme was “Time Management,” “Doubles Strategy” and “Boot Camp Fitness Day.” N We had the girls write their own mission statements for their

1:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m. ............Seminar: College Preparation and Colleges of Interest

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

A day in the life of … Friday, July 10 9:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. ............................Morning Tennis Session Warm-up, focus on doubles and the transition game (volleys, approach shots, poaching, communication and teamwork). 12:15 p.m.-1:00 p.m. ......................Subway Lunch & Free Time

1:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. ..........................Afternoon Tennis Session Serves, games, play out and points.


A Message From Scott Axler, USTA/Eastern Long Island Regional President The inaugural Long Island Tennis Expo is coming this fall … are you ready? Saturday, November 7, 2009 Farmingdale State College • Roosevelt Hall (Expo Room and Auditorium) 2350 Broadhollow Road (Route 110) • Farmingdale, NY 11735 I recently had the opportunity to chat with the folks over at Long Island Tennis Magazine regarding the upcoming Long Island Tennis Expo, set for Saturday, Nov. 7 at Farmingdale State College’s Roosevelt Hall. Considering this event is the first of what we hope to be many, I wanted to share some of my thoughts on what the events planners have in store for you, the Long Island tennis enthusiast, come this November. Members of the USTA/Long Island Region will be on hand to share their expertise and years of accumulated knowledge on the sport with all interested parties. Board members will share their experiences with presentations throughout the day and will be on hand in the exhibit hall to answer any questions you may have about the USTA and its programs. The site of the event, central Long Island, was strategically chosen as a convenience to residents of both Nassau and Suffolk Counties. Not too far east, not too far west, but centrally located to make it an easy trip for all who wish to attend. For starters, this event is FREE for everyone! Adults, children, junior players, collegiate players, parents … this event will look to serve all of your tennis needs. From the informative discussions, to the live demonstrations, to games and activities for the kids, the Long Island Tennis Expo will offer something for the tennis fan of all ages and interest levels. And did I mention the free raffles and door prizes? Thanks to the generosity of our exhibitors and sponsors, attendees will have the chance to walk away with some fabulous gifts and offers just by walking through the expo hall doors. Do you have children who are 10 years of age and under just starting out in the sport? Then stop by the QuickStart Tennis demonstration for a primer on the game of a lifetime? In fact, I suggest that you bring along some friends who are interested in the sport, so they too can experience all that the game of tennis has to offer. Are you the parent of a child seeking college tennis advice? There will be seminars presented by college tennis advisors,

tennis professionals and coaches and those who have been in your shoes will guide you down the right path, while making this everimportant life decision for your child’s higher education. In addition, representatives from several colleges and universities have been invited to discuss their schools’ academic environment and tennis program as you begin searching for schools. The invited advisors have years of experience in seeking out the ideal fit of academics and athletics for your child, and many of them have been in your shoes at one time or another in the search for that perfect school. Are you a seasoned veteran looking to further enhance your game? If so, we haven’t forgotten about you either! The Long Island Tennis Expo will feature top trainers and tennis pros who will be available to chat and provide the tips that will take your game to the next level. Have a nagging injury? Then stop by the booth of one of the many local experts in the field of sports medicine to consult with to rid yourself of your ailments and get back on the pain-free path to success. Looking for that “perfect” program to get involved with? Representatives from the area’s top tennis clubs will be on hand in the exhibit hall to explain what their club has to offer. Here you will have the opportunity to visit with some of Long Island’s top tennis clubs and training facilities and get the lowdown on rates, court times and get to know their respective staff of tennis pros. Seeking a warmer climate to mix your tennis game with a little rest and relaxation this winter? Then stop by and chat with one of the many travel companies that will be on hand for the Long Island Tennis Expo to get the inside scoop on your travel options for the winter and beyond, for locales where you can sun in the sand on the beach, and work on your forehand and backhand at the tennis courts of a tropical resort. These days of 90 degree weather will soon give way to the biting cold of another New York winter, so why not reward your-

self and your family with a tropical trip, and in the process, work on your tennis game? Want to know about the latest equipment set to hit the market in 2010? Manufacturers will be available to demonstrate their equipment and apparel as you begin to prepare for next season. From the latest in lightweight and ergonomically-designed equipment, to the hottest tennis fashion set to hit the courts in 2010, these manufacturers will exhibit their latest product offerings throughout the event. I hope you make plans to join us for this event, which we are hoping is the first of many for years to come. Never before has the Long Island tennis community gathered for an event like the Long Island Tennis Expo. We plan to bring everything the sport has to offer to you, under one roof, on Saturday, Nov. 7 at Farmingdale State College, conveniently located on Route 110, and easily accessed from both the Long Island Expressway, and the Northern and Southern State Parkways. I think I speak for the USTA/Long Island Region board when I say that I am truly looking forward to this event. The experienced team setting the agenda and planning the speakers look to present their knowledge of the sport so that you and your children can take it to the next level. What better way to arm yourself with the tips, techniques and expertise on the sport of tennis than by attending the inaugural Long Island Tennis Expo. Attendees can log on to www.LITennisMag.com/Expo to pre-register for free admission. Also, log on to www.LITennisMag.com/Expo to view the program of events and agenda of the Long Island Tennis Expo as the event is finalized. For more information on how to exhibit or demonstrate your products and become a part of this exciting event, call (516) 4094444 or e-mail info@litennismag.com or visit www.LITennisMag.com/Expo. See you in November! Scott Axler, President USTA/Eastern Long Island Regional

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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MSC Cruises Set Sail

MSC Cruises, the newest entrants into the USA cruise market, possesses the most modern fleet in the cruise industry. Who is MSC Cruises? A company which owns almost 400 shipping vessels ships around the world and is the second largest shipping company worldwide. People who remember the days of traditional cruising will love MSC Cruises. MSC is beautiful, passionate and Italian, with great activities, terrific food, fantastic entertainment and traditional European service. The MSC Poesia sails in the Caribbean for the first time in November 2009. Built in 2008, the MSC Poesia is one of the newest ships at sea and offers something for everyone. Tennis enthusiasts can practice their volleys onboard with a miniature-sized tennis court right on the sports deck. Play tennis in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. where perhaps you can get a set in before you depart out of Port Everglades. You can get off the ship in almost every port MSC Cruises sails in the Caribbean and find a court. Wouldn’t it be fun to play tennis in a different port almost every day without having to drive anywhere? Your ship acts as your hotel, where all food is included in one price and children sail free! For more information, visit www.msccruisesusa.com, see the MSC Cruises ad on page 54 or call your local travel agent.

Kids Hone Skills at Club Med’s Elite Tennis Academies All-inclusive junior summer camps launch at Club Med Sandpiper On June 27, Club Med Sandpiper in Port St. Lucie, Fla. began welcoming children 12 years and older to participate in a full-time Elite Tennis Academy. Geared towards junior players aspiring to play on the pro tour circuit or to receive a Division NCAA scholarship, the camps run in one and two week sessions. “The camps challenge players on a daily basis, preparing them to compete with other top-ranked juniors in national and international tournaments,” said Luis Miguel Nascimento, Club Med Jun40

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

ior Tennis program director. “But, after the players have met those challenges, Club Med encourages them to become kids again and participate in afternoon activities like sailing, flying trapeze, archery and rollerblading. This helps players achieve balance and become well-rounded adults.” The tennis programs run for eight weeks, from June through August, with coursework running Monday through Friday during the seven-night stay. Juniors must register in one of the four levels of instruction: beginner, intermediate, advanced and elite. Grand Slam Tennis Partners, a world class tennis management company, has assembled a team of international experts to coach the aspiring players. Coaching staff includes Manny Dominguez, coach of ATP player Nuno Marques and former tennis director at the Doral Country Club; Luis Miguel Nascimento, coach of Portuguese national champion Pedro Cordeiro; Boris Bosnjakovic, who worked with Jelena Jankovic in 2008; and Antonio van Grichen, private coach for Victoria Azarenka. For five hours daily, the players follow a comprehensive program that improves technique, endurance, competition, athletic performance, fitness and mental conditioning. Working with the same core group of coaches every day in a one-to-four instructor to student ratio, juniors will focus on improving all aspects of their game with consistency. Students also train with their peers and engage in ladder and practice games to gain experience competing against players of different levels and styles. After an early morning breakfast, players hone their skills in three hour morning sessions and two hour afternoon sessions. From the late afternoon until lights out, Club Med staff engages the juniors in a variety of on-site activities tailored to ‘tweens and teens. Professional camp counselors provide 24-hour supervision of the players and enforce a strict rules and regulations policy. For more information on Club Med’s seven-night, all-inclusive Elite Tennis Academies and Camps at Sandpiper, please contact one of the travel professionals listed in our advertisement in this publication (see page 17).


Coming in the November/December 2009 edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine …

Tennis Travel

DIRECTORY For more information on how you can become a part of Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Tennis Travel Directory, call us directly at (516) 409-4444.

The Ship is Leaving Port … Get on Board!!!

Scenes from the

Long Island Pro Tennis Leauge Sunday, July 19, 2009 at the Pine Hollow Country Club Photo credit: Franklyn Higgs

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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Tennis: Helping to Make ‘Healthy Nassau’ a Reality By Bill Mecca

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or the second year, the USTA Eastern Section and the U.S. Professional Tennis Association Eastern Division, partnered with Nassau County’s Parks Department to help make County Executive Tom Suozzi’s “Healthy Nassau” initiative a reality by bringing the many health benefits of tennis to Nassau’s children. This tennis blitz, known as QuickStart Tennis Day in the Parks, is the largest undertaking of its kind in the USA. Planned

and organized by Karen Beckhard Ravener from the Nassau County Parks Department and Bill Mecca from the USTA and USPTA, the blitz encompassed eight county parks and taught tennis to more than 1,100 children in a three-hour period. According to Mecca, more than 20 tennis professionals, 15 USTA staff and volunteers, 20 camps and children’s programs and their counselors, and Parks

Photo credits: David Sickmen and Franklyn Higgs

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

Department workers contributed to the program’s success. A new contributor this year was Tennis Rackets for Kids, which gave 150-plus donated rackets to kids who attended and were interested in continuing to play. G Bill Mecca is a USTA/Eastern tennis service representative for the Long Island Region. He may be reached by e-mail at mecca@eastern.usta.com.


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Always Think the Ball is Coming Back … Your Game Will Improve By Steve Hu

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any junior players have powerful strokes in practice, but they can hardly bring them out effectively in real matches. One common reason is that they tend to take a brief “mental and/or physical break” after a good shot. They wait to see whether the ball is coming back, where it is coming, then start running. That often leads little or no time to set up, thus unable to bring out the lethal shots they “would have owned” when the coach feeds the balls from the basket. A mental change can improve their games dramatically … always anticipate that ball is coming back! If you expect that ball is coming back, you would recover proactively before your opponent hits the ball. You would recover to the middle of your opponent’s attacking zone faster. You would have more time to setup for a good shot. A few nice things will happen if you play with this mental change: 1. You will make a better shot selection. For example, if you are way back off the court and your opponent is attacking at the net, you can choose a slow lob high and deep instead of a “risk it all” fast passing shot. That will buy you time to recover your position for the next shot. The faster the ball is going at him, the faster his volley will go to your open court (or a deadly drop near the

net). You don’t want to cut your own time for reaction, he does! Advanced players slide on clay, rather than running two more steps before changing direction to run back, for the same reason—buy yourself extra time. 2. You will stay low naturally. This happens because if you think that ball is always coming back, most likely to your open side of the court, you will automatically drop your center of gravity, bend your knees to gain more traction to the ground for a faster, more explosive start. You will become a Ferrari instead of a tractor bumping around. 3. Your leg and back muscles will develop stronger. This strength development in the legs and back will take place because you have a habit of staying low. You will experience soreness the first few times you change your play this way, but that’s a good thing as your muscles are adapting and growing. Your physical strength will grow after playing with this “mental change” for a couple of months. You will gain confidence after successfully returning some of those shots which previously you would have thought impossible in the past. That will put pressure on your opponent (many kids would react by hitting faster and with more of an angle, resulting in more errors), the momentum can change to your favor.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

4. Your “mental toughness” will be enhanced. You will be able to keep your energy level up for a longer period, in addition, will stay focused in a longer rally. You will eventually become a relentless fighter! 5. You will develop “Strategic Thinking” capabilities. This “thinking ahead for the next shot” practice will help your mind to develop “Strategic Thinking” capability, while pushing the lower level stroke production functions (eyes on the ball, early backswing, well-balanced setup, smooth stroke with full follow-through, etc.) to become part of your “subconscious habits.” It may not be easy at the beginning, and you may find it distracting to your stroke production a little bit, but once you have mastered it, you game will be taken to the next level. Think about how important the “thinking ahead” element is in a game of chess. 6. You’ll always be on your toes. Sometimes, you think you just made a “winner shot” and you were feeling great (admiring your own shot), but your opponent surprisingly run down the ball and returns a low quality shot barely passing the net. You did not expect that ball coming back, so you did not move up at all. You ended up losing that easy point. If you have had this mental change, you would have been prepared and moved to the correct spot to win that point. A point like that can be distracting and discourage your opponent, and even turn the game around. Don’t kick yourself for losing that easy point, get this mental change. G Steve Hu is a passionate tennis player who helps young players to develop their match play skills by playing matches with them, pointing out weakness areas and developing targeted improvement plans. He recently won a 32-draw “North Shore Memorial Open 2009” Men’s Singles Champion. He can be reached at masterhu@gmail.com.


Annual Suffolk Rally Day Held in Islip By Bill Mecca

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he USTA Eastern Section and the Long Island Region have again joined forces with the Town of Islip to introduce tennis to the town’s youngsters and others from local Community Tennis Associations (CTA). Joining kids from the Town of Islip’s Summer Tennis Program were those from CTAs Youth Enrichment Services (YES) and the Central Islip CTA. Held at the tennis courts in Casamento Park and organized by Regional Board Volunteers Terry Fontana and Steve Haar, Islip’s Nancy Howland, and supported by Sandy Hoffman from the USTA Eastern Section, over 110 youngsters learned the game of tennis, won t-shirts and prizes, ate pizza and discovered a new love for the sport of tennis—the sport of a lifetime. G

Bill Mecca is a USTA/Eastern tennis service representative for the Long Island Region. He may be reached by e-mail at mecca@eastern.usta.com. Photo credit: Franklyn Higgs

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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Top 10 Building Blocks to Bettering Your Game By Rob Glickman Rob Glickman presents his Top 10 tips to improving your on-court game … 1. Work hard Enjoy the process of learning and competing. 2. Keep your eye on the ball Try to focus on the ball as it enters your strings.

5. Maintain constant movement Hit and move … do not stand and watch. 6. Get the ball over the net and in the court If you should miss the shot, miss it long or wide, but never into the net (you have zero chance to win the point if the ball goes into the net). 7. Point of contact Freeze your eyes and head at the point of contact on every stroke.

3. Bend your knees on ground strokes You cannot be too low. Imagine that you are skiing or surfing.

8. Racket head speed Accelerate from slow to fast on ground strokes and serves.

4. Move your feet and take short steps The closer you are to the ball, the shorter the steps must be.

9. Never give up, play with good sportsmanship The match is not over until the final point is completed.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

10. Early preparation on ground strokes There is no substitute for being ready too quickly for the ball. Practice the “Four Cs of Tennis” Control, Consistency, Concentration and Confidence. If you work on the first three Cs, you will achieve the confidence to take your game to the next level. Have fun … tennis is a lifetime sport. G Rob Glickman is a USPTA Pro 1 on Long Island with over 30 years of tennis experience. He was a former varsity tennis player for Michigan State University and is presently the director of junior tennis at Crestwood Camp in Melville, N.Y. He may be reached by phone at (516) 576-0920.


Tennis “The Dark Side” … The Unfortunate Truth What has changed in the game of tennis since the tennis boom of the 60s and 70s? By Lonnie Mitchel I wrote in the last issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine that tennis is a gift for a lifetime, and that will be my battle cry for all parents who want to do something great for their kids. Tennis has evolved in many ways during the last 3040 years. Billie Jean King, for one thing, has made great strides over the years being our sport’s best ambassador and helping to evolve our game and bring tennis to the masses. Local tennis clubs and the USTA have embraced the new Tennis QuickStart program, which has introduced our young children to the game. However, I still question if most kids from middle class and working class families can afford it? Some may say yes, I say we have made progress, but have a long way to go. As our sport of choice, I am embarrassed to say that, in some ways, we remain an elitist sport. Let’s be realistic,

the cost of really improving our game is prohibitive for most. Whether you are an aspiring recreational player or a top-level junior or senior, there are quite a few hidden costs which, for most families on Long Island, are a reach. Let’s take a nostalgic trip back to the late 1960s and 70s and talk about this young phenom from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. who graced the Holiday Park Public Courts. Synonymous with the tennis boom, Chris Evert burst onto the scene as if she was tennis’s version of the high school prom queen. She was my sports idol at the time, along with Joe Namath of the New York Jets and the Miracle Mets of 1969. But, Chris Evert played the sport I played the most, and I celebrated her arrival on the scene by purchasing a 3 X 5 framed picture of her. There she stood with her distinct two-handed backhand pose with her classic wood racquet framed and nailed right onto my bedroom wall. She stayed on that wall until I moved out of my parent’s home. I admit

it, I was in love with Chrissie, and I have not forgiven Jimmy Connors for “stealing my girl.” At the time, I did not know why I loved her, I just did. So what was it that I loved about Chrissie? I have thought about it over time as I matured. She learned to play tennis on a public court from her father who toiled teaching tennis at Holiday Park in Ft. Lauderdale, seven days a week in the hot Florida sun. She came from a middle class background, and I saw her as a “commoner;” one of us, so to speak, who mastered the game of tennis with the help of her father as she became “America’s Sweetheart.” She is, and will always be, one of the great champions of our time. At the time, Jimmy Connors, who was in his prime, was too brash for me, and Rod Laver, who I also admired, was past his prime. So Chrissie was it for me with her super cool personality who showed no signs of aggression until she walked on the continued on page 53

• Blogs from featured tennis pro's editorial contributors and players like you! • Photos from USTA tournaments, interclub tournaments, USTA adult league, JTT, charity events, high school matches, special events and more. • Event calender covering all Long Island tennis events • Club Directory will give you quick access to the top Long Island tennis clubs • Camp Directory will help you find the right tennis camp for your child • Super Pro Shop featuring Long Island's top stores and trendy tennis apparel • Polls to make your opinions known and see other’s opinions on interesting tennis topics • News on professional tennis as well as local players • Access to Long Island Tennis Magazine latest issue and archives

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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COLLEGE TENNIS ADVICE Putting the “We” in “Win” By Clark D. Ruiz II

own, of course it’s certainly possible to get through college tennis the exact same way. However, that may not provide you with the best college experience you can have. When you decide to play college tennis, you are choosing to play on a team. This word is very rarely associated with the game of tennis, as the sport is played more individually on a professional level. Of course there are team competitions, but at the heart of professional tennis, success is most often achieved individually. However, in college, you are presented with the opportunity to be a part of a group of people, working towards the same goal. Playing on a team comes with certain dynamics that play a large part in the success of

In this column, I wanted to share the thoughts and words of a current NCAA Division I player whose college tennis experience will surely provide you with food for thought and guidance on the importance of team dynamics. When you make the decision to play collegiate tennis, you might not realize it, but for the next four years, the members of your team will be the ones that you share a large majority of your college experiences with. Now, coming from the world of junior tennis, you may not really view tennis as much of a “team sport.” I mean, if you were able to get through junior tennis and be successful on your

that team in their season. When you’re on a team, you have more to worry about than just your tennis game. You begin to forge relationships with your teammates, and how you interact with them on and off the court can often affect your performance on the court. I have played college tennis for two going on three years now. A large part of my decision to attend the school for which I am currently playing for, had to do with the people who were going to be on my tennis team. For me, it was very important that I found a team that I not only fit in with, but that I felt comfortable, and with whom I could see myself being very close. In my two years of college tennis, I have become friends with a group of individuals who have al-

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ways supported me on and off the court, in good times and in bad. At any given time, I have been able to rely on my teammates to encourage me during moments of triumph and keep me determined during moments of defeat. Until I became a member of my college tennis team, I never knew that having the unwavering support of seven other people could mean the difference between suffering a tough loss or pulling off a spectacular win. Is team success entirely dependent on those team dynamics? Not completely, but I have found that having the solid support of your team behind you, individuals who are going through exactly what you are going through on a daily basis, can mean a whole lot sometimes. This year, my team won our conference, and made it to the NCAA tournament for the first time in quite a few years. For a lot of teams, making the tournament is almost a given, but for a team from a smaller school like mine, it

is sometimes perceived as a little bit out of our league. Despite that view, we were collectively determined to prove our doubters wrong. I have to say, the bond my teammates and I share with one another had a lot to do with our victory. We played a team that we had suffered a heartbreaking loss to in our regular season. We were able to overcome that loss, and three out of our six singles matches were able to come back from at least a set down, to take the championship. Those of us playing, as well as those of us watching, were cheering relentlessly for each other, constantly making our teammates aware that they had the support of their team behind them the entire time. Again, it’s certainly not everything, but it makes such a difference to have a positive team dynamic fueling your determination to succeed. And it makes victory that much sweeter when you’re able to celebrate your success with great teammates who also happen to be your best friends.

The story above is just a very small sampling of the life and goals of a collegiate tennis player. The leap to the collegiate ranks marks a huge step in one’s life journey. You must be able to handle the pressures of collegiate life, balance your play on the court, and always remember to never lose sight of the major reason you are at a particular school, to advance your education. As the author did in sharing her experience, I too urge you to forge a strong bond with your collegiate teammates both on and off the court. Those same teammates are, or once were, in the same boat as you, and some of your veteran teammates could play the role of both mentor and friend as you further your collegiate tennis career. G Clark D. Ruiz II is founder of Advantage Tennis Strategies LLC. He may be reached by phone at (917) 9910088 or e-mail clark@advantagetennisstrategies.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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WTT Wraps Another Successful Year I

n the 34th season of Advanta World Team Tennis Pro League (WTT), the New York Sportimes treated New York tennis fans to a great season of tennis action and a very entertaining prelude to the upcoming U.S. Open. This season was the first year since 1978 that New York City has been home to a WTT franchise. The Sportimes were led by New York City tennis legend John McEnroe, and played at the spanking new, $16 million Sportime Tennis Center on Randall’s Island. It was a very successful season for the Sportimes, although they came up just a bit short of a championship, falling in the semifinals. The Sportimes won their division with a 10-4 match record, but lost to the Washington Kastles in a tight semifinal matchup played in Washington, D.C. The Kastles then went on to defeat the Springfield Lasers in the finals to win the 2009 WTT Championship. John McEnroe was the big draw playing for the Sportimes in selected home matches. In addition, several marquee players played on Randall’s Island this summer against the Sportimes. Serena Williams, the Bryan Brothers, and tennis legend Martina Navratilova all made visits to New York for WTT action this season. As part of WTT’s efforts to broaden the appeal of tennis, the Sportimes offered the opportunity for underprivileged children and their families to experience WTT professional tennis at a NY Sportimes match. In addition, prior to a match, Serena Williams presented a free clinic for children, each of whom received a free tennis racquet courtesy of the Sportimes, the Randall’s Island Sports Foundation and Advanta. It was a great inaugural season at Randall’s Island for the Sportimes, and here’s to looking forward to their triumphant return in 2010. 50

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

WTT 2009 Season Final Standings x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched number one seed for Conference Championship Western Conference Team 1. y-Springfield Lasers 2. x-Newport Beach Breakers 3. Sacramento Capitals 4. Kansas City Explorers 5. St. Louis Aces

MP 14 14 14 14 14

W 12 9 6 6 5

L 2 5 8 6 9

PCT .857 .643 .429 .429 .357

MB — 3 6 6 7

Eastern Conference Team 1. y-New York Sportimes 2. x-Washington Kastles 3. Boston Lobsters 4. Philadelphia Freedoms 5. New York Buzz

MP 14 14 14 14 14

W 10 7 7 4 4

L 4 7 7 10 10

PCT .714 .500 .500 .286 .286

MB — 3 3 6 6

Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Exclusive Chat With Tennis Legend John McEnroe Long Island’s own John McEnroe is a former world number one-ranked player. He has won seven Grand Slam titles, three at Wimbledon and four at the U.S. Open, nine Grand Slam men’s doubles titles and one Grand Slam mixed-doubles titles. This past season, John played for the New York Sportimes during the 2009 WTT


season. Long Island Tennis Magazine had a chance to chat with John prior to his midJuly match with the Sportimes at Randall’s Island against the Newport Beach Breakers. How do you like the new facility here on Randall’s Island? It looks great! It will look even better when they finish fixing up the surrounding area. But I really like it. What do you think the impact of World Team Tennis could be on the state of tennis in the New York area? It could be big! It’s a great place to play, and once people become more aware, it can do a lot of good for tennis in the area. What brings you back to the NY Sportimes and WTT each year? Billie Jean King! Billie Jean is the best and does so much for tennis. You just can’t say no to her. Do you feel that tennis on Long Island is going in the right direction? I can’t speak directly to tennis specifically on Long Island, but as for tennis in the east, it is very important to have successful training venues and show that players can be successful in a place where tennis is played indoors at least six months a year. You grew up on Long Island. What are your thoughts on parents sending kids away from the Island to train in warmer weather climates? I personally wouldn’t recommend doing that. I think that I am living proof that you don’t have to do that. Parents sometimes feel the need to have their kids train year round, but for the most part, I think moving them is unhealthy. Do you recommend high school tennis for top junior players? I recommend competition. When I played high school tennis, my matches were not always as tough as my tournament matches, but you still have to go out and perform. I don’t see any reason why kids shouldn’t play. Do you recommend college tennis for those looking to play professionally? College tennis seems to be like doubles … on life support. I don’t agree that the only way to succeed is by bypassing college. But recently, there are agencies looking for kids at 12-years-old and signing them at 14-years-old. I think we need to change the rules. Half the guys at Junior Wimbledon are pros. I wouldn’t allow that. This is a way in which agents are running the sport. I do not believe this is healthy for most of the players involved. Recently, Justin Gimelstob “Tweeted” during a match, and other athletes have discussed doing that during

competition. What are your thoughts on using Twitter as a social networking tool during a match? I have no opinion on that. If I spent more than two seconds thinking about something as stupid as Twitter, I’d have to consider myself an idiot. Who do you consider the best player of all-time? I believe Roger Federer is the best player. Rafael Nadal has a winning record against him though, so I guess there is a minor argument of how you can be considered the best if you don’t have a winning record against every player. But the results of those matches may have been different had they been played under different circumstances. What kind of advice can you give to the Long Island tennis player trying to be the next John McEnroe? Hopefully, you are doing it for the right reasons. They need to love the sport of tennis and give it their best, because regardless of expectations, you should always have a fallback. One of the reasons I succeeded is that I had a fallback, where other people put too much pressure on themselves.

Getting to Know: Claude Okin, Managing Partner of Sportime and the NY Sportimes Claude Okin, managing partner of Sportime and the New York Sportimes, addresses the media with Martina Navratilova prior to a recent WTT match

What do you believe will be the impact of the new Sportime at Randall’s Island on tennis in the New York area? I hope we are one of the major contributors to growing the game of tennis in New York. I grew up in New York, and I was a poor kid who played tennis in the parks. Nowadays, it is not as easy to do that as there are almost no courts in Manhattan. It is ironic that there is the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, home of the greatest tournament in the world, and then in the rest of the city, you have to scrap to play or pay a lot for court usage. This facility is a public/private partnership, and as a result, we have invested $16 million and have at least 20 years to stay here. Our pricing is affordable and we have a lot of no-cost programs for underprivileged kids. What level of tennis will this facility focus on? Our commitment is at every level of the sport. We hope to have a great impact, and so far, it looks like we will be very busy. We will host hundreds of USTA Tournaments as well as the New York Sportimes home matches. continued on page 52 Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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A N O T H E R S U C C E S S F U L Y E A R continued from page 51 What do you think this WTT season and the opening season of Sportime at Randall’s Island will bring? The New York Sportimes and the Randall’s Island Sports Foundation are thrilled to bring the fun and excitement of WTT action back to the New York. New York is the home of our star, the great John McEnroe. New York City is also the long-time home of WTT’s cofounder and inspiration, Billie Jean King. We cannot wait to make Billie Jean proud and to show New Yorkers what WTT is all about. We just need to get the word out more and emerge from the shadows of the U.S. Open. The U.S. Open is the best tournament in the world, but WTT is more intimate and more affordable than the Open. Do you feel tennis on Long Island is heading in the right direction? Tennis, in general, is going in the right direction. I think tennis is steadily growing. Junior tennis is very healthy. With adult tennis, we need more people in their 30s and 40s, and we are working on that. Here in New York, the U.S. Open is huge and the sport is strong amongst families.

What are your thoughts about tennis coverage in the media? The key for our sport is to become more of a national and international story that is covered by the mainstream media. We have less coverage as a sport in newspapers and we need to find a way to be seen more nationally. How do you feel about the importance of regional tennis publications to the world of tennis? I love reading Long Island Tennis Magazine because I get a sense of what people are doing. I know the pros giving tips. I know the club owners placing ads. We, of course, tend to advertise/promote in tennis publications, but to me, what’s important with the publications is that I want to not only speak to current players, but also to the person who has stopped playing or has yet to get started. Obviously, I love having Long Island Tennis Magazine. Everyone on Long Island reads it. It’s in every club and it’s become our Bible now!”

Scenes From the 2009 WTT New York Sportimes Season

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009


T H E U N F O R T U N A T E T R U T H continued from page 47 courts. Her classy style and consistent ground stroke earned her the nicknames, “The Ice Princess” and “The Ice Maiden,” are forever etched in my mind. Chris Evert came from the public courts of Ft. Lauderdale to eventually win all of those Grand Slam titles. I too learned the game of tennis on a public court, and my father and mother introduced the game to me just like Chris. I could relate to her like no other professional athlete. I had one wooden racquet with good strings that lasted forever, Stan Smith tennis sneakers that wore on and on, and one can of white tennis balls. All I did was just play the game, emulating her beautiful ground strokes, being successful with that approach throughout my high school and college career. Being consistent and mentally tough was the strategy that I would employ to help me win just like Chrissie. The fact that she was a woman

didn’t matter, she was a winner! However, the technology changed, the racquets got bigger and more powerful and my beautiful Chris Evert strokes died a slow death. No longer could I get away with my classic eastern forehand and backhand strokes. Heavy topspin and the power game became the norm, along with the “space age” material racquets that were being produced. My game had to change if I was to survive in the world of power tennis. Let’s continue to fast-forward to 2009 and talk about the changes. I will share several experiences, which some of you may also be experiencing. Over the past several years, I have both of my sons supplement their tennis with the team sport of baseball. I paid $90 with which the boys get uniforms, 15 games on a well-groomed baseball diamond, numerous practices and clinics at the local

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elementary school and coaches who graciously volunteer their time with outdoor practices. If a child does not have a baseball glove or bat, the league will supply the equipment. In addition, there are two coaches on every team and other parents who are willing to help in any way possible. In tennis, $90 gets you a moderately-priced racquet. For $90, you can get a tennis lesson or some court time … in the winter. The point is, if you want to make great strides, $90 will not get you too far. I am lucky, my sons have been exposed to tennis by my wife’s and my own efforts, and we have taken advantage of our tennis affiliations. However, if it were not for those advantages, we would not be able to afford the joys of the games and get our children to the level they aspire to be. continued on page 54

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T H E U N F O R T U N AT E T R U T H I entered my son in two USTA tournaments this month and spent $100 for the entry fees. Believe me, that $100 comes to us with a lot of hard work and if he loses in the first round of those two tournaments, $100 for two matches is what we invested. The parents who regularly spend this money for tournaments hand over this money and know it is a necessity to get to the level of play that our children aspire to reach. I ask you though, how many others have we scared off into another sport that is friendlier to the wallets? The financial challenges are endless for our game. New racquets exceeding $200 come out every year. Endless expenses for racquet stringing occur, because we taught our next generation to hit with heavy topspin with extreme semi-western and western grips. Tennis sneakers, clothing, court time, lessons are all becoming cost prohibitive. A local tennis chain called

continued from page 47

my house and wanted to sign my son up for winter 2009/2010 training, and for a “reasonable amount” of $4,000, you can get him into an intensive program. For $4,000, families who are serious will write the check and send their children on their way. Well the last time I checked, there is

“Where have you gone Chris Evert? A tennis nation turns its lonely eyes to you.” no tree of money growing in our yards. But I know something that other middle class families probably don’t know. “It is worth it because of the dividends it will pay in the mental and physical well-being of my children.” But $4,000, where can I come up with this money?

Many would say in order to get good at something, you need to practice and invest in training. There is truth to that and it can be said for any activity, whether it’s golf, playing an instrument or taking pitching lessons with the local baseball trainer. However, this article and magazine is about tennis, and I am just trying to bring to light that we can do more to help grow our game. I am not necessarily talking about every child playing USTA tournaments or taking private lessons. Pros or league players, can you volunteer your time at a school if asked? Tennis centers, can you offer discounted rates at non-peak times when the courts are generally empty to local elementary, middle and high schools (student rates)? We have the summer USTA Interclub Adult Team Leagues. What about in the winter, having Teens continued on page 57

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KIDS SAIL FREE

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Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas-Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller-Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Deer Park Indoor Tennis Club Afzal Ali-Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, NY 11729 631-667-3476 • Fax: 631-667-7179 Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones-Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 631-363-2882 easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson-Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-271-6616 easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones-Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 631-753-3696 easternathleticclubs.com Glen Head Racquet Club Heath Koch: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 earlyhit@optonline.net Point Set Indoor Tennis Dan Dwyer-Owner 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2323 www.pointsettennis.com matt@pointsettennis.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center Adrian Chirici-Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 516-676-9107 • www.rwtt.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ GLEN COVE Stephen Alcala-Business Manager 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 516-759-0505 • www.rwtt.com Rockville Racquet Club Susan Alvy-Manager 80 North Centre Avenue Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 rockvilletennis@optonline.net

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Smash Tennis Club Bob McKenna-Director of Tennis 575 Merrick Avenue Westbury, NY 11568 Business: 516-832-8010 Cell: 516-817-2455 SPORTIME at Amagansett Sue De Lara-Co General Manager Hana Sromova-Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com amagansett@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Bethpage Tennis Perry Aitchison-Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, NY 11714 516-933-8500 www.SportimeNY.com tdbethpageten@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie-General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike Bethpage, NY 11714 516-731-4432 www.SportimeNY.com bethpagemulti@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME of the Hamptons Mauricio Gattuso-Director of Tennis Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com tdhamptons@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Harbor Island Eric Fromm-General Manager, Director of Tennis In Harbor Island Park Mamaroneck, NY 10543 914-777-5050 www.SportimeNY.com efromm@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Kings Park Petr Perecinsky-Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com tdkingspark@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Lynbrook Chris Morales-Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com tdlynbrook@sportimetfm.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

SPORTIME at Massapequa Fayez Malik-Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com tdmassapequa@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at ProHealth Jay Karl-General Manager 3 Delaware Drive Lake Success, NY 11042 516-348-8463 www.SportimeNY.com jkarl@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Randall’s Island Ted Dimond-Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com randallsisland@SportimeTFM.com SPORTIME at Roslyn Jared Rada-Director of Tennis Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com tdroslyn@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Schenectady Philippe Ceas 2699 Curry Road Schenectady, NY 12303 518-356-0100 www.SportimeNY.com tdschenectady@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Karl Sommer/Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com SPORTIME at Syosset Fitness & Racquetball Joe Gazio-General Manager 10 Gordon Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-496-3100 www.SportimeNY.com jgazio@sportimetfm.com Wholistic Tennis Academy Happy Bhalla-Manager 44 Riverhead Road Westhampton Beach, NY 11978 631-288-6009 www.wholistictennis.com


T H E U N F O R T U N AT E T R U T H Winter Teams sponsored by USTA? Have a “Kids Week” at all tennis facilities. I do not have all the answers quite frankly. I am just saying that maybe the people who directly affect these decisions, whether it be the USTA or club owners, can do more. There is just not enough going on for those who cannot afford it with the infrastructure that is currently in place. The proof is that many of the public courts have plenty of availability and the schoolyard courts are predominantly empty. It makes you think, doesn’t it? The economy is soft and tennis clubs are being forced to be more proactive to attract players to their facilities. “Grow the game in other ways and the business will come.” The USTA has Kids Day before the U.S. Open at the National Tennis Center. But we on Long Island can do more! It has been a financial challenge to get my children some good tennis training. The lessons I personally can give them with the time I have is limited. I am not asking for help in any way. My wife and I do what we have to do to make improvements in our children’s tennis game. We make personal sacrifices for this important investment. However, I

continued from page 54

think I am representative of the Long Island middle class demographic that is experiencing a challenging economic recession. Most Long Island middle class families have to tweak their personal expenditures during this period, and therefore, tennis, for many, becomes out of reach. We, as a family living in East Meadow, will be making some financial sacrifices and our children’s tennis training will suffer as a result. However, I am acutely aware of the importance of tennis playing and the gift it offers for the rest of our lives. Therefore, some investment in tennis will always be included in our annual personal budget. Stop and think how many people have been scared away from the game because of the costs I described in the article. They will never know the joys that we know. If we call tennis “A Sport for a Lifetime,” let’s all be cognizant of the financial challenges and extend a hand in one way or another to help grow our game. The elitists should not have the monopoly on the growth of a champion. I am not naïve enough to think because I write a tennis article expressing frustration of some of the prohibitive costs of our game, that prices will sud-

denly drop. I am hoping though that the more people who are attracted to our game in other ways will help us all. There are other champions out there, whether it is the high school player, the local USTA champion or park tournament winner, who come from the public courts like Chrissie. Let’s find them. Where have you gone Chris Evert? A tennis nation turns its lonely eyes to you. G Lonnie Mitchel has been teaching tennis since 1985, mostly at Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, N.Y. and is a USPTA Level 1 certified tennis instructor. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College ) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). Lonnie has also worked in the travel and tourism industry as a regional sales manager for 25-plus years for such companies the Walt Disney Company and Royal Caribbean International. His wife, Harriet, is a club level tennis player and can often be found on the court. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

Do you aspire to play college tennis at a Division I, II or III level? Finding a school with the right tennis program and well balanced academics that fit your needs does not have to be an overwhelming experience. Let Advantage Tennis Strategies help. We will work with you to navigate through the college selection process both realistically and efficiently. ATS will help you make the right choice. The process of selecting a college is a huge step towards your future. Take that step with an advantage, Advantage Tennis Strategies.

Visit us at www.AdvantageTennisStrategies.com or call us at 917.991.0088 "The best four years of your life? Possibly. Friends for a lifetime? Definitely. Networking for your future? Absolutely. Your college experience should be wonderful and life preparing. Deciding what college you attend is a process. Many factors including location, finances, interests, environment, size, cultural attributions, academics and specific professors are involved. As a tennis player more variables are involved including coaches, teammates, conference and facility. You should know what you want from your college... you should pick a college that 'fits' you and your needs." Tom Clear USTA National Coach, Director, Brooklyn Tennis Academy, Clear/Adams Tennis Consulting

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Girls High School L

Tennis Preview

ast year’s Nassau County Championship saw Port Washington defeat Jericho by a 6-1 margin to win the Nassau County Title. In Suffolk County, it was Westhampton defeating Commack 5-2 to take home the Suffolk crown. In the battle of Long Island’s county champions, Port Washington defeated previously unbeaten Westhampton 5-2 to win their second consecutive Long Island Championship.

My best memories include spending time with the team at divisions and my friend Michelle Lazar … bringing chocolate-covered strawberries as the most interesting snack ever to be brought to a tennis match!

Returning players to watch Singles

What will you miss most about high school tennis after this season is done? I’ll definitely miss the support of Coach Messina, Athletic Director Joe Tasman and former coach Castellano, and of course, all the girls on the team.

Jennifer Kellner Senior, Hauppauge High School

Where you will be playing in college next year ? I will be playing tennis for Notre Dame in the fall of 2010.

against Westhampton’s Lindsay Kantor and Brooke Pottish. Caulfield has left to play at Mount St. Mary’s, but Lite returns for her senior season at Sayville. Lindsay Kantor and Brooke Pottish Seniors, Westhampton High School Lindsay Kantor and Brooke Pottish, Suffolk County Doubles Finalists, made their third trip to the state tournament and had their best result with a sixth-place finish. They also helped Westhampton to its second straight Suffolk County team championship. This duo will both return to Westhampton for their senior season.

The new class 12-year-old Mia Vecchio looks to make the cut with Herricks High School

What are you looking forward to most in your senior season? I look forward to competing, spending time with the team, making team shirts and maybe attending states for my last and final year. Jennifer Kellner, Long Island’s Player of the Year, won the state singles title last season as a junior after winning the state doubles championship as a sophomore. Kellner, who has 108 career varsity wins and has qualified for the state tournament every year since seventh grade, returns looking for the perfect ending to her high school career. Five questions with Jennifer Kellner What are your goals for your senior season? My goal is to compete to the best of my ability, while enjoying every minute of my sixth and final season. What is your best memory of high school tennis so far as you enter your senior season? 58

Doubles Jacqueline Raynor Junior, Garden City High School Last season, Jacqueline Raynor, along with her sister Kelsey, won the state doubles title after finishing second in 2007 and third in 2006. They also won the Nassau County Doubles Tournament for the second time. Jacqueline’s sister Kelsey has moved on to play college tennis at Marist, but Jacqueline returns for her junior season. Jordan Lite Senior, Sayville High School Jordan Lite, along with Kara Caufield, finished fifth in the state tournament after pairing to win their first Suffolk County Doubles crown with a straight-set win

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

While some of last year’s top players have graduated, each new season brings a fresh crop of players new to the high school ranks. This year, Manhasset’s Mia Vecchio, at the young age of 12, will attempt to make the jump to high school tennis, although she is only in the seventh grade. She will be trying out for the Herricks High School tennis team. We recently caught up with Mia at her workout with coach Alana Broderick and asked her how she felt going into tryouts and what she is expecting from her first high school experience on the courts.


Mia has already been told by the Herricks coach that her first requirement is to pass a fitness test just to be able to try out for the squad. Her fitness test consists of running a mile and a half in under 15 min., doing 30 sit ups and holding a chin-up for 10 sec. If she is able to do that (which she fully expects to), she will move on to the tennis part of the tryout where she will compete against the older girls in an attempt to make the team. Mia maintains that she is “not nervous” about being the youngest girl at tryouts. “I have played two 14s tournaments in USTA and have done very well, reaching

the semis in one and the finals of another, and I practice against older girls, so I think I’m ready,” said Vecchio. One part of high school tennis is being a member of a team. That is somewhat new to most players as tennis is generally an individual sport. Mia, however, is looking forward to being part of a team. This summer she will gain experience with team play when she plays at Zonals. “I’m hoping to become friends with the girls on the team,” said Mia. “I think Zonals will be good practice for being part of a team.” As far as her personal goals for the upcoming season are concerned, Mia is keeping her aims for her first high school team experience realistic. “Hopefully, I can make the team, and just have a successful season,” said Mia. “I don’t have a preference between singles or doubles, but I think I can do well, and the biggest thing is that I want to prove myself.”

Long Island Tennis Magazine will check back in with Mia after tryouts to see how things went.

Coach of the year Stan Makover of Port Washington High School Coach Stan Makover guided Port Washington to a 14-1 record and to its second consecutive Long Island Championship. The Vikings lost just one match during a tough Nassau Conference I schedule and topped previously undefeated Suffolk champion Westhampton in the Long Island title match. Port Washington’s top three singles players all went undefeated and its first doubles team suffered just one defeat. G Long Island Tennis Magazine will be out at the girls matches all season, and we are looking forward to covering another great season of girl’s tennis.

Coming In November Distribution scheduled for 11/01/09 This edition will feature: • US Open Recap • Long Island Tennis-A Year In Review • Best Places To Buy Tennis Apparel On Long Island • Holiday Tennis Gift Ideas

Don’t miss the advertising and editorial opportunities in the next edition of

Long Island Tennis Magazine November/December 2009. Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by October 1st. For more information, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com. Distribution across Long Island at: • indoor tennis clubs • country clubs • tennis camps • retail stores • supermarkets • gyms • and many more Also bonus distribution at: 1st Annual Long Island Tennis Expo, Nassau and Suffolk HS Girl County and State Championships

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

59


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 07/27/09)

BOYS Long Island Boys 10 Singles Rank Name ....................................City 1........Curran Varma ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 2........Arjun Mehrotra ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 3........Sean Patrick ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 4........Kyle Hudson Gower................Oceanside, N.Y. 5........Alan Delman ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 6........Patrick F. Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7........Gardner Howe........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 8........Eli Grossman ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 9........Thomas A. Korossy ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 10......Neel Raj ................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 11......Brian Shi................................Jericho, N.Y. 12......Colin Francis Sacco................Brightwaters, N.Y. 13......Rajan Jai Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 14......Amani Siddiqui ......................West Babylon, N.Y. 15......Ryan Goetz ............................Greenlawn, N.Y. 16......Pete Sizios ............................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 17......Cannon Kingsley ....................Northport, N.Y. 18......Aditya J. Dave........................Syosset, N.Y. 19......Brady Berman........................Glen Head, N.Y. 20......Ronald P. Hohmann................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 21......Justin Ilan Lempert ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 22......Austin Egna ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 23......Terrill Cole Barnard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 24......Michael Medvedev ................Oceanside, N.Y. 25......David Ammendola..................Massapequa, N.Y. 26......Daniel Eric Pellerito................Syosset, N.Y. 27......Ethan Nussdorf ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 28......Titus Syon Sung ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 29......Vincent Caracappa ................Smithtown, N.Y. 30......Steven M. Schneider..............Southampton, N.Y. 31......Blake Shaevitz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 32......Ian Bank ................................Old Westbury, N.Y. 33......James Kyrkanides..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 34......Max Egna ..............................Port Washington, N.Y. 35......Jacob Weiner ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 36......Jack Aaron Briamonte............Great Neck, N.Y. 37......Logan Beckerman..................East Norwich, N.Y. 38......Parker Appel ..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 39......Cody Bograd..........................Huntington, N.Y. 40......James Grad ..........................Westhampton, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Curran Varma ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 2........Garrett Malave ......................Laurel, N.Y. 3........Andrew J. Bentz ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 4........Jonathan C. Staudigel ............Northport, N.Y. 5........Alexander Pintille ..................Wainscott, N.Y. 6........Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y. 7........Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8........Daniel David Kafka ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 9........Daniel Shleimovich ................Merrick, N.Y. 10......Zane Siddiqui ........................West Babylon, N.Y. 11......Evan Kober ............................Wantagh, N.Y. 12......Bryant J. Born........................Manhasset, N.Y. 13......Alan Delman ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 14......Sean Patrick ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 15......Chirag Sharad Soni ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 16......Spencer Killen Swanson ........Remsenburg, N.Y. 17......Giuseppe Loduca ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 18......Nikhil Raj ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 19......Noah J. Reisch ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 20......Alex Brebenel ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 21......Jesse M. Levitin ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 22......Faran Nazir ............................Deer Park, N.Y. 23......Robert James Gavigan ..........Garden City, N.Y. 24......David Michael Jaslow ............Roslyn, N.Y. 25......Alexander Grossman..............Sands Point, N.Y. 26......Michael Schweitzer................Old Westbury, N.Y. 27......Arjun Mehrotra ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 28......Rajan Jai Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 29......Brian Hoffarth ........................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 30......Braddock Chow ....................Glen Cove, N.Y.

60

ISLAND

31......Vincent P. Thompson..............Massapequa, N.Y. 32......Daniel Khodosh......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 33......Christian Moyer Ardito............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 34......Tyler Dunn ............................Manhasset, N.Y. 35......Oliver Ridgley Green ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 36......Jack Ian Lindenman ..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 37......Colin Francis Sacco................Brightwaters, N.Y. 38......Ian Friedman..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 39......Michael L. Schumer ..............Syosset, N.Y. 40......Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Daniel Sliwowski ..................Islip, N.Y. 2........Ian Baranowski......................Syosset, N.Y. 3........Drew F. Feldman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 4........Marcell Rengifo......................Copaigue, N.Y. 5........Ethan Hayden Handa..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 6........Dylan Ander ..........................Hewlett, N.Y. 7........Connor Daniel Jeran ..............Islip, N.Y. 8........Benjamin Aaron Mermelstein Northport, N.Y. 9........Gabriel P. Lazar ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 10......Ty Stone ................................Centerport, N.Y. 11......Jesse Richheimer ..................Merrick, N.Y. 12......Gregory M. Abrahams ............Baldwin, N.Y. 13......Doron Saraf ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 14......Chris Casamassima ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 15......Nick Bauer ............................Great River, N.Y. 16......Dylan Hobbs Appel ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 17......Kyle Apler ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 18......Andrew J. Bentz ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 19......Michael A. Vera ......................Bethpage, N.Y. 20......Cole Lafitte ............................East Setauket, N.Y. 21......Douglas Notaris ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 22......Jamis Ross ............................Manorville, N.Y. 23......John C. Knight ......................East Northport, N.Y. 24......Erik Johann Lobben ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 25......Stone E. Mitchell....................Woodmere, N.Y. 26......Erik Ujvari ..............................Hauppauge, N.Y. 27......Andrew Reiley........................Manorville, N.Y. 28......Brandon T. Stone....................Melville, N.Y. 29......Michael Hakimi......................Great Neck, N.Y. 30......Samuel Hajibai ......................Kings Point, N.Y. 31......Zachary Krueger ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32......Aaron Nussdorf......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 33......Cooper Spector-Salwen ........Great Neck, N.Y. 34......Raymond Zhao ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 35......Michael Anthony Mcfelia ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 36......Daniel Grunberger..................Great Neck, N.Y. 37......Greg Linden ..........................Melville, N.Y. 38......Stephan Savin........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 39......Brandon Kay ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 40......Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Pasha Shapouri......................Albertson, N.Y. 2........Sloan Millman........................Woodmere, N.Y. 3........Eric Sumanaru ......................Middle Island, N.Y. 4........Sean Jagi Chhugani ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 5........Darren Reisch........................Floral Park, N.Y. 6........Stephen Peng ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 7........JT Esposito ............................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 8........Jacob Mishkin ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 9........Sander Brenner......................Port Washington, N.Y. 10......Ryan Gary Wennberg ............Huntington Station, N.Y. 11......Ryan Marcus..........................Merrick, N.Y. 12......Scott Johnson........................Northport, N.Y. 13......Ryan White ............................Wantagh, N.Y. 14......Benjamin Q. King ..................East Meadow, N.Y. 15......Seth Kornfield ........................Jericho, N.Y. 16......Henry D. Lee..........................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 17......Christian Thomas Thienel ......East Quogue, N.Y. 18......Matthew Granito ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 19......Solomon Ofir..........................Plainview, N.Y. 20......Michael Freilich ....................Lawrence, N.Y. 21......Jordan A. Zecher....................Woodbury, N.Y. 22......Adam Fishelberg....................Plainview, N.Y. 23......Jared Drzal ............................West Sayville, N.Y. 24......Trevor S. Mitchel....................East Meadow, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

RANKINGS

25......Brian Chalif............................Huntington, N.Y. 26......Nick Wong ............................Jericho, N.Y. 27......Chris Casamassima ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 28......Evan Ross Seidman ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 29......Jason A. Fruchter ..................Lawrence, N.Y. 30......Matthew Zuckerman..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 31......Kevin H. Kim ..........................South Setauket, N.Y. 32......Matthew Kline........................Roslyn, N.Y. 33......Gabriel P. Lazar ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 34......Ethan Hayden Handa..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 35......Zachary Daniel Krischer ........Pt. Jefferson Station, N.Y. 36......Luke Matthew Taylor..............Bay Shore, N.Y. 37......Douglas Notaris ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 38......Ali Zain ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 39......Michael Anthony Mcfelia ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 40......Jason Quintana......................Bethpage, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Benjamin Bogard ..................Lido Beach, N.Y. 2........Eric Dietsche ........................Bay Shore, N.Y. 3........Scott Johnson........................Northport, N.Y. 4........Sloan Millman........................Woodmere, N.Y. 5........Darren Reisch........................Floral Park, N.Y. 6........Richard A. Ferguson ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 7........Michael T. Puntillo..................Sands Point, N.Y. 8........Jason Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 9........Eric Sumanaru ......................Middle Island, N.Y. 10......Evan Pincus ..........................East Meadow, N.Y. 11......Robert James Buda ..............Northport, N.Y. 12......Derek J. Wells........................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 13......Justin Ziccardi ......................Islip, N.Y. 14......Dylan Matthew Roberts..........Holtsville, N.Y. 15......Dylan Marsh ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 16......Brain Hui................................East Meadow, N.Y. 17......Stephen Peng ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 18......James Nandalal Prasad ........Lindenhurst, N.Y. 19......Solomon Ofir..........................Plainview, N.Y. 20......Pasha Shapouri......................Albertson, N.Y. 21......Matthew R. Johnson ..............Huntington, N.Y. 22......Alex Bessarabov ....................Lindenhurst, N.Y. 23......Christopher Sica ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 24......Herman Singh........................Syosset, N.Y. 25......Jeremy Pomerantz ................Sayville, N.Y. 26......JT Esposito ............................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 27......Jeffery H. Kornhauser ............Wantagh, N.Y. 28......Thomas Fischl ......................Huntington, N.Y. 29......Shane B. Liebenthal ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 30......Andrew Joseph Freedman ....Great Neck, N.Y. 31......Matthew J. Celentano ............Islip, N.Y. 32......Jack Keenan..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 33......Peter C. Colgan ......................Nesconset, N.Y. 34......Steven Ferrantello..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 35......Sahil S. Ishar..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 36......Brandon Burns ......................Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 37......Jaewon Kim ..........................East Northport, N.Y. 38......Jesse Liebenthal....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 39......Kevin A. Burgess....................Freeport, N.Y. 40......Matthew Imbo........................Islip, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 10 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 2........Claire Handa ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 3........Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 4........Celeste Rose Matute..............Amityville, N.Y. 5........Vista Grinde ..........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 6........Lea Ma ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 7........Caitlin M. Cosme....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 8........Amanda Allison Foo................Manhasset, N.Y. 9........Devika Kedia..........................East Norwich, N.Y. 10......Emily Kate Shutman ..............Huntington, N.Y. 11......Hannah Rosalie Dayton ..........East Hampton, N.Y. 12......Emily Austin ..........................Hewlett, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Cameron Leigh Moskol ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 2........Shanice Nadia Arthur ............Glen Head, N.Y.

3........Vanessa Scott ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4........Brittany Burke........................Garden City, N.Y. 5........Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ......Bayville, N.Y. 6........Nicole Koskovolis ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 7........Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y. 8........Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 9........Julia Ciardullo........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 10......Campbell Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 11......Courtney A. Digia ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 12......Bridget Elaine Harding ..........Northport, N.Y. 13......Michelle Vancura ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 14......Michele Shelia Lehat..............Great Neck, N.Y. 15......Madison Courtney Appel ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 16......Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 17......Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 18......Taylor S. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 19......Michelle Haykin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 20......Nicole Damaghi ....................Kings Point, N.Y. 21......Rhea Malhotra ......................Syosset, N.Y. 22......Annelise Meyding ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 23......Claudia M. Ruiz......................Glen Head, N.Y. 24......Katie Jean Cirella ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 25......Celeste Rose Matute..............Amityville, N.Y. 26......Marissa Luchs ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 27......Victoria Macchia ....................Seaford, N.Y. 28......Sabrina Ferretti......................Setauket, N.Y. 29......Caitlin M. Cosme....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 30......Caroline Keating ....................Huntington, N.Y. 31......Ashley Bespechny..................Hewlett, N.Y. 32......Emily K. Morgenbesser ..........Bayport, N.Y. 33......Kelsey Shields ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 34......Tyler P. Hartmeyer..................Great Neck, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Ruth Freilich ..........................Lawrence, N.Y. 2........Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 3........Veronica Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4........Aimee N. Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 5........Jennifer Glukhman ................Syosset, N.Y. 6........Alexa P. Sternschein ..............Syosset, N.Y. 7........Cameron Leigh Moskol ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 8........Jennifer C. Ferguson..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 9........Kathryn Herburger ................Manhasset, N.Y. 10......Campbell Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 11......Mary C. Harding ....................Northport, N.Y. 12......Amanda R. Nowak ................Huntington, N.Y. 13......Megan M. Tamborrino ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 14......Emma Brezel ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 15......Ola Mally ..............................Franklin Square, N.Y. 16......Emily Bentley ........................East Islip, N.Y. 17......Sarah Dionisio ......................Shirley, N.Y. 18......Davianna Brynn Romer ..........Hampton Bays, N.Y. 19......Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y. 20......Erica Bundrick ......................Mattituck, N.Y. 21......Anna Posluny ........................Centerport, N.Y. 22......Amanda Marie Gaimaro ........Lynbrook, N.Y. 23......Karishma Ramesh Tank..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 24......Olivia Bahou ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 25......Taylor Rose Anderson ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 26......Shanice Nadia Arthur ............Glen Head, N.Y. 27......Rachel Murillo........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 28......Harley Nicole Kaiserman ........Setauket, N.Y. 29......Angelika Rothberg ................Centerport, N.Y. 30......Amanda Edelman ..................Southampton, N.Y. 31......Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 32......Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 33......Leah Green ............................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 34......Christine Elizabeth Apicella ....Massapequa Park, N.Y. 35......Amanda Bishop......................Woodbury, N.Y. 36......Holly Hubsher ........................Sands Point, N.Y. 37......Kristen Bomkamp ................Northport, N.Y. 38......Carli Feldman ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 39......Alison Jamie Flum ................Syosset, N.Y. 40......Allie N. Rothstein....................Plainview, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Amy Ginny Naula ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 2........Jessica Sickles ......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 3........Veronica Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y.


LONG 4........Brett A. Lieb ..........................Cutchogue, N.Y. 5........Ruth Freilich ..........................Lawrence, N.Y. 6........Robin R. Mehta ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 7........Amanda L. Seeley ..................Sound Beach, N.Y. 8........Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 9........Courtney Sokol ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 10......Ashley Sandler ......................Jericho, N.Y. 11......Andrea Arreguin ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 12......Amanda Kristine Marano........Hampton Bays, N.Y. 13......Jessica Nowak ......................Huntington, N.Y. 14......Briel G. Smith ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 15......Hannah Hinchcliffe ................Mineola, N.Y. 16......Rithika D. Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 17......Lauren Skolnick ....................Sayville, N.Y. 18......Elan King ..............................Baldwin, N.Y. 19......Elizabeth Caroline Rossi ........Flanders, N.Y. 20......Erica Bundrick ......................Mattituck, N.Y. 21......Christine Bender ....................Amityville, N.Y. 22......Kelly Marie Benini ..................Northport, N.Y. 23......Paige J. Mintz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 24......Jamie Hann ..........................Westhampton, N.Y. 25......Molly O. Nolan ......................Montauk, N.Y. 26......Emily Bennett ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 27......Deana Davoudiasi..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 28......Casey L. Nicoletti ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 29......Abbott M. Brant......................Shoreham, N.Y. 30......Michelle Graziosi....................East Northport, N.Y. 31......Alexandra L. Bentz ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 32......Ludmila Yamus ......................Melville, N.Y. 33......Courtney Keating ..................Huntington, N.Y. 34......Devlin-Ann Ammendola..........Massapequa, N.Y. 35......Jennifer Glukhman ................Syosset, N.Y. 36......Rachel Shenker ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 37......Brinti Ann Hinderhofer............Oceanside, N.Y. 38......Samantha G. Smith ................Farmingdale, N.Y. 39......Ola Mally ..............................Franklin Square, N.Y. 40......Alexandra Gerin ....................Glen Cove, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Eliza J. Budd..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 2........Jessica Nowak ......................Huntington, N.Y. 3........Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4........Andrea Arreguin ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 5........Christine Bender ....................Amityville, N.Y. 6........Aylin Mehter ..........................Massapequa, N.Y. 7........Gabrielle Dicroce ..................East Meadow, N.Y. 8........Elan King ..............................Baldwin, N.Y. 9........Molly O. Nolan ......................Montauk, N.Y. 10......Brooke Pottish ......................East Quogue, N.Y. 11......Courtney Sokol ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 12......Taylor A. Diffley ......................Hampton Bays, N.Y. 13......Cassie Bender........................Amityville, N.Y. 14......Sarin Siriamonthep ................Greenvale, N.Y. 15......Elizabeth Caroline Rossi ........Flanders, N.Y. 16......Alexandra F. Esposito ............Bellmore, N.Y. 17......Robin R. Mehta ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 18......Shelby Goldman ....................West Hempstead, N.Y. 19......Robin Romanoff ....................Centereach, N.Y. 20......Stephanie Loutsenko ............Bellmore, N.Y. 21......Lauren Johnson ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 22......Arina Zanin ............................Oceanside, N.Y. 23......Alexandra Rengifo..................Copiague, N.Y. 24......Deana Davoudiasi..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 25......Allie Reisch............................Floral Park, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 07/27/09)

Sectional Boys 10 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 2........Keegan James Morris ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 5........Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 7........Rajan Jai Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 9........Terrill Cole Bernard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 13......Kyle Hudson Gower................Oceanside, N.Y. 14......Giancarlo Cavallero................West Hempstead, N.Y. 15......Zane Siddiqui ........................West Babylon, N.Y.

ISLAND

18......Alan Delman ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 23......Brian Shi................................Jericho, N.Y. 24......Daniel Shleimovich ................Merrick, N.Y 29......Ryan Goetz ............................Greenlawn, N.Y. 32......Brady Berman........................Glen Head, N.Y. 35......Eli Grossman ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 36......Patrick F. Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 39......Sean Patrick ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 44......Gardner Howe........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 52......Thomas A. Korossy ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 53......Neel Raj ................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 64......Titus Syon Sung ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 67......Michael Medvedev ................Oceanside, N.Y. 68......Amani Siddiqui ......................West Babylon, N.Y. 69......Ronald P. Hohmann................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 75......Pete Siozios ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 78......Peter Lohrbach ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 83......Cannon Kingsley ....................Northport, N.Y. 84......Adita J. Dave ........................Syosset, N.Y. 96......Blake Shaevitz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 98......Justin Ilan Lempert ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 99......Austin Egna ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 101....David Ammendola..................Massapequa, N.Y. 103....Daniel Eric Pellerito................Syosset, N.Y. 104....Alexander Reiley ....................Manorville, N.Y. 110....Parker Appel ..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 111....Steven M. Schneider..............Southampton, N.Y. 112....Michael Thomas Jaklitsch......Islip, N.Y. 116....James Kyrkanides..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 119....Max Egna ..............................Port Washington, N.Y. 130....Jacob Weiner ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 131....William Dzanoucakis..............Hampton Bays, N.Y. 136....Cody Bogard..........................Huntington, N.Y. 137....Matthew Franklin Porges ......Sands Point, N.Y. 139....Kyle C. Yuan ..........................Sands Point, N.Y. 143....Carl Grant ..............................Water Mill, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 6........Alexander Lebedev ................Island Park, N.Y. 7........Lubomir T. Cuba ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 9........Brenden Andrew Volk ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 16......Eric Wagner ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34......Daniel Grunberger..................Great Neck, N.Y. 35......Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y. 43......Palmer T. Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 50......Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 53......Rajan Jai Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 56......Jordan Michael Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 58......Andrew Walsh........................St. James, N.Y. 59......Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 66......Athell Patrick Bennett ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 71......Nikhil Raj ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 72......Andy Zhou ............................Commack, N.Y. 77......Faran Nazir ............................Deer Park, N.Y. 79......Joshua Williams Gordon ........Hicksville, N.Y. 80......Curran Varma ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 81......Noah J. Reisch ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 82......Chris Kuhnle ..........................Shoreham, N.Y. 83......Christopher Moyer Ardito ......Rockville Centre, N.Y. 84......Sean M. Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 88......Giancarlo Cavallero................West Hempstead, N.Y. 98......Daniel Shleimovich ................Merrick, N.Y. 99......Zane Siddiqui ........................West Babylon, N.Y. 112....Garrett Malave ......................Laurel, N.Y. 117....Alexander Pintille ..................Wainscott, N.Y. 124....Sean Patrick ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 129....Giuseppe Loduca ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 136....Jonathan Staudigel ................Northport, N.Y. 138....Alex Brebenel ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 142....Christopher White ..................Garden City, N.Y. 143....Evan Kober ............................Wantagh, N.Y. 148....Jesse M. Levitin ....................Manhasset, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 2........Noah Rubin............................Merrick, N.Y. 4........Vihar Shah ............................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

RANKINGS

5........Samuel Lam ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 6........Aidan Talcott ..........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 7........Ethan Bogard ........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 16......Michael Paul ..........................Baldwin, N.Y. 17......Philip Daniel Antohi................Glen Head, N.Y. 21......Zain Ali ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 25......Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ............Greenvale, N.Y. 28......Lamar Remy ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 29......Douglas Notaris ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 30......Richard Mitchell ....................Franklin Square, N.Y. 37......Josh Silverstein ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 46......Dylan Hobbs Appel ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 52......Conor Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 54......Zachary A. Lessen..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 55......Benjamin Pleat ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 58......Matthew R. Demichiel............Hewlett, N.Y. 59......Tyler J. Hoffman ....................Sayville, N.Y. 62......Brandon T. Stone....................Melville, N.Y. 65......John P. D’Alessandro..............Northport, N.Y. 71......Gabriel P. Lazar ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 72......Sander Brenner......................Port Washington, N.Y. 76......Conor Dauer ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 81......Brian W. Slivonik ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 86......Ethan Hayden Handa..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 88......Alex C. Sacher ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 90......Josh Young ............................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 94......Benjamin Q. King ..................East Meadow, N.Y. 96......Gonzalo E. Mocorrea ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 100....Michael A. Vera ......................Bethpage, N.Y. 101....Daniel Sliwowski ..................Islip, N.Y. 107....Jared R. Halstrom ..................Bellmore, N.Y. 112....Drew F. Feldman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 117....Ian Baranowski......................Syosset, N.Y. 119....Stephan Savin........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 122....Raymond Zhao ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 128....Kyle Alper ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 133....Lubomir Cuba ........................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 138....Aaron Nussdorf......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 140....Doron Saraf ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 142....Joshua Williams Gordon ........Hicksville, N.Y. 144....Jeremy Dubin ........................Southampton, N.Y. 145....Marcell Rengifo......................Copiague, N.Y. 148....Jonathan Paris ......................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 149....Benjamin Rosen ....................Port Washington, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 5........Bert Vancura ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7........Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 9........Alexander Friedlich ................Great Neck, N.Y. 13......Oliver Loutsenko....................Bellmore, N.Y. 15......Eric Rubin ..............................Lido Beach, N.Y. 16......Howard Weiss........................Great Neck, N.Y. 22......Matthew O. Barry ..................Long Beach, N.Y. 26......Josh Levine ..........................Syosset, N.Y. 28......Jensen Reiter ........................Syosset, N.Y. 29......Zachary Morris ......................Garden City, N.Y. 30......Andrew Yaraghi......................Mill Neck, N.Y. 35......Eric Ambrosio ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 40......Jonathan DeFrancesch ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 43......Jonahiby Tauil........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 45......Alex Tropiano ........................Syosset, N.Y. 46......Jason Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 47......Alan S. Pleat ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 50......Austin Blau ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 57......David Greenbaum ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 59......Harrison Digia........................Manhasset, N.Y. 70......Brendan Henry ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 72......Douglas Hoch ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 74......Ignacio Casali ........................Farmingdale, N.Y. 75......Kevin Katz..............................Woodbury, N.Y. 76......Zachary Mintz........................Roslyn, N.Y. 77......Richard Sipala ......................Quogue, N.Y. 81......Paul Abrudescu......................Great Neck, N.Y. 86......Michael Paul ..........................Baldwin, N.Y. 89......Noah Rubin............................Merrick, N.Y. 92......Brian Hui................................East Meadow, N.Y. 100....Michael T. Puntillo..................Sands Point, N.Y. 106....Aidan Talcott ..........................Sea Cliff, N.Y.

108....Patrick Brosnan ....................Garden City, N.Y. 111....Adam S. Gottlieb ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 113....Ethan Bogard ........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 119....Sloan Millman........................Woodmere, N.Y. 120....Matthew J. Richards ..............Bayport, N.Y. 128....Christian Thomas Thienel ......East Quogue, N.Y. 131....Darren Reisch........................Floral Park, N.Y. 132....Matthew Lam ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 133....Scott Rabinowitz....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 134....Ofir Solomon..........................Plainview, N.Y. 136....Jacob Mishkin ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 139....Stephen Peng ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 142....Pasha Shapouri......................Albertson, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 4........Daniel Kreyman ....................Long Beach, N.Y. 7........Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 27......Corey Morgenstern ................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 28......Shane Giannetti ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 29......Joseph Agler..........................North Bellmore, N.Y. 31......Zachary Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 32......Jason Simon..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 41......Oliver Loutsenko....................Bellmore, N.Y. 42......Dennis Zlobinsky ..................Greenvale, N.Y. 45......Morgan Dauer........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 53......Eric Ambrosio ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 69......Steven Milo............................Woodbury, N.Y. 70......Bruce Grant ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 72......Brett Byron ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 74......Nolan Gelman ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 81......Ryan Fitzgerald......................East Williston, N.Y. 84......Zachary Morris ......................Garden City, N.Y. 85......Joshua Katten........................Plainview, N.Y. 88......Alexander Friedlich ................Great Neck, N.Y. 89......Ignacio Casali ........................Farmingdale, N.Y. 92......Jonathan Defrancesch ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 99......Eric Shyu ..............................Great Neck, N.Y. 102....Brandon Burns ......................Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 113....Zachary A. Dean ....................Commack, N.Y. 118....Benjamin Bogard ..................Lido Beach, N.Y. 119....Dylan Matthew Roberts..........Holtsville, N.Y. 121....Jason Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 125....Constantinos L. Papavasiliou..Roslyn, N.Y. 126....Matthew O. Barry ..................Lido Beach, N.Y. 133....Michael T. Puntillo..................Sands Point, N.Y. 137....Brendan Ruddock ..................Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 146....Peter C. Colgan ......................Nesconset, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 10 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 8........Claire Handa ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 14......Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 18......Stephanie Chikvashvili ..........Syosset, N.Y. 23......Caitlin Cosme ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 26......Dominique Woinarowski ........Syosset, N.Y. 29......Lea Ma ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 32......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 53......Amanda Alison Foo ................Manhasset, N.Y. 54......Emily Kate Shutman ..............Huntington, N.Y. 56......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ..........Manorville, N.Y. 74......Hannah Rosalie Dayton ..........East Hampton, N.Y. 75......Emma Alexis Weinberg ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 79......Emily Austin ..........................Hewlett, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 12 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 5........Isabella Pascucci ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7........Madison Battaglia..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 8........Mia Vecchio ..........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 20......Morgan Kelly Herrmann ........Garden City, N.Y. 22......Samantha Perri......................Floral Park, N.Y. 24......Danielle Giannetti ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26......Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 33......Alexandra Lipps ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 36......Madison Courtney Appel ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 39......Olivia Funk ............................Hicksville, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

61


LONG 40......Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y. 48......Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 62......Taylor S. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 63......Marissa Luchs ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 66......Nicole Giannetti ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 70......Shanice Nadia Arthur ............Glen Head, N.Y. 71......Aimee Manfredo ....................Shoreham, N.Y. 78......Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 82......Sarah Paul ............................Baldwin, N.Y. 87......Celeste Rose Matute..............Amityville, N.Y. 89......Vanessa Scott ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 92......Julia Ciardullo........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 94......Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ......Bayville, N.Y. 95......Nicole Koskovolis ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 106....Michelle Vancura ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 109....Michele Sheila Lehat..............Great Neck, N.Y. 110....Stacy Denbaum ....................Syosset, N.Y. 123....Caitlin M. Cosme....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 126....Michelle Haykin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 127....Katie Jane Cirella ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 132....Nicole Damaghi ....................Kings Point, N.Y. 137....Rhea Malhotra ......................Syosset, N.Y. 139....Caroline Keating ....................Huntington, N.Y. 140....Claire Handa ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 142....Annelise Meyding ..................Port Washington, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 10......Vivian Cheng..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 14......Sophie R. Barnard..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 16......Claudia Li ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 19......Nadia Smergut ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 28......Sara R. Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y. 30......Lauren Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 38......Gabriella Nicole Leon ............Woodmere, N.Y. 42......Paulina Tafler ........................Oceanside, N.Y. 44......Bianca Posa ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 51......Sunaina Vohra........................Glen Head, N.Y. 54......Isabella Pascucci ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 58......Maria Korshunova..................Oceanside, N.Y. 60......Rithika D. Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 69......Madison Battaglia..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 85......Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 86......Ola Mally ..............................Franklin Square, N.Y. 87......Ruth Freilich ..........................Lawrence, N.Y. 88......Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 91......Cameron Leigh Moskol ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 93......Claudia M. Ruiz......................Glen Head, N.Y. 94......Laura Torsiello ......................Bayport, N.Y. 97......Veronika Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 98......Megan M. Tamborrino ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 102....Mia Vecchio ..........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 109....Courtney Keating ..................Huntington, N.Y. 111....Aimee N. Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 114....Jennifer Ferguson..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 115....Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 125....Karishma Ramesh Tank..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 134....Amanda Nowak ....................Huntington, N.Y. 139....Alexa P. Sternschein ..............Syosset, N.Y. 148....Kathryn Herburger ................Manhasset, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 3........Katherine Yau ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 5........Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7........Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 9........Hannah L. Camhi ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 11......Jacqueline Raynor ................Garden City, N.Y. 26......Samantha B. Gann ................Massapequa, N.Y. 27......Devlin-Ann Ammendola..........Massapequa, N.Y. 29......Stephanie Loutsenko ............Bellmore, N.Y. 39......Diana Vamvakitis ..................Quogue, N.Y. 45......Missy Edelblum ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 46......Deana Davoudias ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 58......Sophie R. Barnard..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 62......Morgan C. Feldman................Glen Head, N.Y. 68......Taylor A. Diffley ......................Hampton Bays, N.Y. 70......Samantha Rosca-Sipot ..........Malverne, N.Y.

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ISLAND

73......Samantha Elgort ....................Melville, N.Y. 75......Paige J. Mintz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 78......Jamie Hann ..........................Westhampton, N.Y. 85......Carly Siegel ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 93......Vivian Cheng..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 94......Robin R. Mehta ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 97......Lauren Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 100....Melissa Carlay ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 103....Ludmila Yamus ......................Melville, N.Y. 106....Jessica Sickles ......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 110....Elizabeth Caroline Rossi ........Flanders, N.Y. 117....Emma Brenner ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 120....Nadia Smergut ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 122....Amy Ginny Naula ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 131....Jessica Nowak ......................Huntington, N.Y. 132....Veronika Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 144....Hannah Hinchcliffe ................Mineola, N.Y. 146....Courtney Sokol ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 147....Lila Martz ..............................Long Beach, N.Y. 148....Sara R. Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y. 150....Brett A. Lieb ..........................Cutchogue, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 3........Jennifer Kellner ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 4........Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8........Mollie Anderson ....................Melville, N.Y. 10......Olivia Pascucci ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 15......Aylin Mehter ..........................Massapequa, N.Y. 16......Nicolle Stracar ......................Jericho, N.Y. 19......Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 20......Blair Seideman ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 21......Kelsey Raynor........................Garden City, N.Y. 23......Jessica Podlofsky ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 29......Shelby Bates..........................Jericho, N.Y. 35......Jennifer Fridman....................Port Washington, N.Y. 39......Ashley T. Harel ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 40......Robyn Romanoff ....................Centereach, N.Y. 43......Kristin Norton ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 57......Jordana Kono ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 68......Andrea Samlin ......................Merrick, N.Y. 82......Andrea Arreguin ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 86......Hannah L. Camhi ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 96......Eliza J. Budd..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 97......Stephanie Loutsenko ............Bellmore, N.Y. 101....Deana Davoudiasl..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 103....Amanda B. Halstrom ..............Bellmore, N.Y. 108....Cassie Bender........................Amityville, N.Y. 109....Brooke Pottish ......................East Quogue, N.Y. 124....Samantha Gann ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 130....Allie Reisch............................Floral Park, N.Y. 132....Marissa D. Lazar....................Hewlett, N.Y. 138....Christine Bender ....................Amityville, N.Y. 143....Lindsay V. Kantor....................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 146....Kara E. Caulfield ....................Sayville, N.Y. 148....Katherine Hanson ..................Smithtown, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 07/27/09)

National Boys 12 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 57......Alexander Lebedev ................Island Park, N.Y. 67......Lubomir Cuba ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 89......Eric Wagner ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 137....Brenden Andrew Volk ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 642....Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 758....Jordan Michael Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 783....Rajan Jai Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 800....Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y. 818....Palmer T. Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 842....Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 988....Sean Mullins..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

RANKINGS

National Boys 14 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 31......Noah Rubin............................Merrick, N.Y. 47......Aidan Talcott ..........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 53......Ethan Bogard ........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 55......Samuel Lam ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 66......Vihar Shah ............................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 179....Michael Paul ..........................Baldwin, N.Y. 273....Lamar Remy ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 372....Philip Daniel Antohi................Glen Head, N.Y. 385....Zain Ali ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 468....Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ............Greenvale, N.Y. 529....Dylan Hobbs Appel ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 535....Richard Mitchell ....................Franklin Square, N.Y. 573....Zachary A. Lessen..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 583....Josh Silverstein ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 599....Douglas Notaris ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 626....John P. D’Allesandro ..............Northport, N.Y. 731....Benjamin Pleat ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 747....Tyler J. Hoffman ....................Sayville, N.Y. 820....Conor A. Dauer ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 892....Mark Daniel Temporal ............Carle Place, N.Y. 1000..Conor Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 25......Bert Vancura ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 29......Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 113....Alexander Friedlich ................Great Neck, N.Y. 131....Oliver Loutsenko....................Bellmore, N.Y. 164....Howie Weiss ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 227....Jonathan DeFrancesch ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 228....Josh Levine ..........................Syosset, N.Y. 243....Andrew Yaraghi......................Mill Neck, N.Y. 244....Eric Rubin ..............................Lido Beach, N.Y. 245....Jensen Reiter ........................Syosset, N.Y. 258....Matthew O. Barry ..................Lido Beach, N.Y. 295....Eric Ambrosio ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 380....David Greenbaum ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 420....Alan S. Pleat ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 482....Alex Tropiano ........................Syosset, N.Y. 520....Austin Blau ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 523....Jason Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 581....Zachary Morris ......................Garden City, N.Y. 689....Jonahiby Tauil........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 810....Samuel Lam ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 860....Kevin A. Katz..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 926....Harrison R. Digia....................Manhasset, N.Y. 976....Douglas Hoch ........................Glen Head, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 31......Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 65......Daniel Kreyman ....................Long Beach, N.Y. 330....Zachary Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 366....Joseph Agler..........................North Bellmore, N.Y. 370....Shane Gianetti ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 523....Jason A. Simon ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 587....Dennis Zlobinsky ..................Greenvale, N.Y. 634....Oliver Loutsenko....................Bellmore, N.Y. 673....Morgan Dauer........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 678....Corey Morgenstern ................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 690....Eric Shyu ..............................Great Neck, N.Y. 952....Eric Ambrosio ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

National Girls 12 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 77......Isabella Pascucci ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 100....Madison Battaglia..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 108....Mia Vecchio ..........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 232....Morgan Kelly Herrmann ........Garden City, N.Y. 269....Samantha Perri......................Floral Park, N.Y. 300....Danielle Giannetti ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 429....Madison Courtney Appel ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 508....Alexandra Lipps ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 594....Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y.

605....Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y. 680....Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 681....Nicole Giannetti ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 808....Sarah Paul ............................Baldwin, N.Y. 878....Taylor S. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 117....Vivian Cheng..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 146....Claudia Li ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 156....Sophie Barnard......................Mill Neck, N.Y. 300....Lauren Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 534....Sara R. Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y. 636....Gabriella Nicole Leon ............Woodmere, N.Y. 771....Rithika D. Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 799....Isabella Pascucci ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 841....Paulina Tafler ........................Oceanside, N.Y. 950....Sunaina Vohra........................Glen Head, N.Y. 991....Maria Korshunova..................Oceanside, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 56......Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 90......Katherine Yau ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 111....Hannah L. Camhi ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 112....Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 271....Jacqueline Raynor ................Garden City, N.Y. 445....Samantha B. Gann ................Massapequa, N.Y. 457....Stephanie Loutsenko ............Bellmore, N.Y. 531....Devlin-Ann Ammendola..........Massapequa, N.Y. 645....Morgan C. Feldman................Glen Head, N.Y. 707....Lauren Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 726....Missy Edelbaum ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 737....Sophie R. Barnard..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 833....Diana Vamvakitis ..................Quogue, N.Y. 881....Paige J. Mintz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 949....Deana Davoudiasl..................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 18......Blair Seideman ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 41......Jennifer Kellner ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 137....Olivia Pascucci ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 138....Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 155....Kristin Norton ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 169....Mollie Anderson ....................Melville, N.Y. 224....Nicolle Stracar ......................Jericho, N.Y. 315....Aylin Mehter ..........................Massapequa, N.Y. 318....Jordana Kono ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 344....Jessica Podlofsky ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 465....Jennifer Fridman....................Port Washington, N.Y. 526....Shelby Bates..........................Jericho, N.Y. 530....Kelsey Raynor........................Garden City, N.Y. 550....Ashley T. Harel ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 627....Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 634....Robyn Romanoff ....................Centereach, N.Y.


USTA/Long Island Region 2009

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. SEPTEMBER 2009 Wednesday-Friday, September 2-4 USTA National Senior & Super Senior FS Grass Court Championships Piping Rock Club • Piping Rock Road, PO Box 415 • Locust Valley, N.Y. Divisions: RF (0)d, FS (SS)d Surface Type: Grass Entry Fee:$99.49 per player, $199.988 per team (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 14 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 674-2408.

Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 L3 Deer Park Eastern UPS Championships Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Unranked BG (10-18)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 667-3476. Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 L1B Atlantic Beach Challenger Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza • Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (10-16)sd, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $38.13 per player, $23 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388.

Thursday-Monday, September 3-7 The Labor Day Championships Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: BG (12-18)s, FIC; BG (12-18)d, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $102.63 per player (entries closed Thursday, Aug. 6) Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Men’s Open & M25 Singles Huntington Indoor Tennis Friday-Sunday, September 4-6 100 Broadway Street L20 Atlantic Beach Championships Huntington Station, N.Y. Atlantic Beach Tennis Center Divisions: M (Op, 25)s 60 The Plaza • Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Surface Type: Unknown Divisions: Ranked BG (16-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for Surface Type: Clay entries is Friday, Sept. 4 at 11:59 p.m.) Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for enFor more information, call (631) 421-0040. tries is Wednesday, Sept. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Saturday-Sunday, September 12-13 Long Island Corporate League Challenger CP Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 & Hicksville Community Tennis Association September 18-20 40 Willoughby Avenue • Hicksville, N.Y. Sparkling September Divisions: MW (Op)sd, TC The Tennis King • 25 The Tulips • Roslyn, N.Y. Surface Type: Unknown Divisions: Ranked M (30,45,55,65)sd; Entry Fee: $400 (deadline for entries is M (75)sd, FMLC Thursday, Sept. 10) Surface Type: Clay For more information, call (516) 822-8711. Entry Fee: $60 for singles, $60 for doubles, add $8 for late fee (entries open Tuesday, Sept. 1) Monday-Sunday, September 14-20 For more information, call (516) 239-2800. USTA National Men’s 55 & 60 Grass Court Championships Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 & The Rockaway Hunting Club September 18-20 615 Ocean Avenue • Lawrence, N.Y. L1B Westhampton Challenger Divisions: M (55-60)sd Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club Surface Type: Grass 86 Depot Road • Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Entry Fee: First event is $102.63 per player, Divisions: Ranked BG (12-16)s, SE the second event is $54.25, you can only Surface Type: Unknown enter two events (deadline for entries is FriEntry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for day, Sept. 4 at 11:59 p.m.) entries is Friday, Aug. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 569-0600, For more information, call (631) 288-6060. ext. 132.

Friday-Sunday, September 18-20 & Friday, September 25 L1 Point Set Championships Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG(18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323. Sunday, September 20 L3 Huntington Eastern UPS Championships Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: BG (10-18)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Friday-Sunday, September 25-27 & October 2-4 Fall Foliage Seniors The Tennis King 25 The Tulips Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: M (25, 45, 55, 65-70)sd, FMLC Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $60 for singles, $60 for doubles, add $8 for late fee (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 21) For more information, call (516) 239-2800. Friday-Sunday, September 25-27 L1B Long Beach Fall Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (16-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for singles (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Tuesday-Friday, September 29-October 2 End of Summer Senior Women’s Celebration at the Tulips The Tennis King 25 The Tulips Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: W (35, 45, 55, 65, 75)sd Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 for singles, $25 per doubles player (entries open Tuesday, Sept. 22) For more information, call (516) 239-2800. OCTOBER 2009 Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Syosset Championships Sportime at Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (10-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 & FridayMonday, October 9-12 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked B (16)s, FIC; B (16)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player for singles, $28 per player for doubles, an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 & FridayMonday, October 9-12 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (16)s, FIC; G (16)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw, $28 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 883-6425.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

63


USTA/Long Island Region 2009

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 & FridayMonday, October 9-12 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Robbie Wagner Training 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G(18)s, FIC; G (18)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.50 for singles, $28 for doubles per player with an additional $20 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 & FridayMonday, October 9-12 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Sportime at Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked B(12)s, FIC; B (12)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 per player for doubles with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Thursday, Sept. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 & FridayMonday, October 9-12 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (12)s, FIC; G (12)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 for singles, $25 per player for doubles with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Thursday, Sept. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 L2R East End Doubles Championship Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: BG (12-16)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060.

64

Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 L1B LBTC FALL Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (14)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for singles, $28 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, October 16-18 L2O LBTC Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (10-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1 L1B Long Beach Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (12-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 L3 LBTC Eastern UPS Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Unranked: BG (10-16)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Oct. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Saturday, October 16-17 & Friday-Sunday, October 23-25 Halloween Happiness Jericho Westbury Tennis 44 Jericho Turnpike Jericho, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (30, 40, 50, 60, 75)sd, FMLC Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $60 for singles players, $60 for doubles players, late registrations must add $8 (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 20) For more information, call (516) 997-4060.

Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1 & November 6-8 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championship Level 5 FIC Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: G (16)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Thursday, Oct. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Monday, October 9-12 L2R Long Island Regional Deer Park Championships Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: B (10-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 667-3476.

Friday-Saturday, October 16-17 & Friday-Sunday, October 23-25 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 5 SE Robbie Wagner Training 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 & Divisions: Ranked BG (12)sd, SE October 16-18 Surface Type: Unknown L1 Huntington Indoor Championships Entry Fee: $70.38 for singles, $35.50 per Huntington Indoor Tennis player for doubles (deadline for entries is Fri100 Broadway Street • Huntington Station, N.Y. day, Oct. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) Divisions: BG (10)s, SE For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for Friday-Sunday, October 23-25 entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) L1B Long Beach Challenger For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 & Long Beach, N.Y. October 16-18 Divisions: Ranked BG (16-18)s, SE L2R Long Island Regional Hempstead Surface Type: Unknown Championships Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis entries is Friday, Oct. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) 525 Eagle Avenue For more information, call (516) 432-6060. West Hempstead, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (10-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25) For more information, call (516) 984-3711.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2009

Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1 & November 6-8 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championship Level 5 FIC Robbie Wagner Training 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked B (16)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1 & November 6-8 +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championship Level 5 FIC Robbie Wagner Training 142 Glenwood Road Glenwood Landing, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked B (12)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player with an additional $20 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505


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Long Island Tennis Magazine - September / October 2009  

Cover story: Roger Federer The Best Ever?

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