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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


July/August 2009 Volume 1, Number 4

Cover story 16 Open Season Long Island Tennis Magazine takes a look at the 2009 U.S. Open in nearby Flushing Meadows, N.Y. through the eyes of past participants; America’s best chances at taking home the men’s, women’s and double’s crowns; the full 2009 U.S. Open Schedule; a retrospective by Bruce Forrest on his experience as a ball boy; and tips from autograph and memorabilia dealer Brad Shafran on seeking out the stars of the 2009 U.S. Open.

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Cover photo credit: USTA

Staff David Sickmen National Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 david@litennismag.com Emilie Katz Marketing and Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 emilie@litennismag.com

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Welcome to Lagos By Alanna Broderick

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The Importance of Tennis-Specific Training By Carl Barnett Carl Barnett examines various types of training techniques.

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Taking a Step Back and Examining the True Meaning of Junior Tennis By Steven Kaplan

Columns

Steven Kaplan examines why we play the game and the impressions tennis can leave beginning at a young age.

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Tennis: A Parent’s Gift That Lasts a Lifetime

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What Are Custom-Made Foot Orthodics By Dr. David Scheiner Dr. David Scheiner discusses the benefits of foot orthodics.

Karen Krizman Senior Account Executive

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A recap of the 19th Annual USTA/Long Island Region Awards Dinner By Daniel Burgess

Beatrice Marcus Office Manager

Advertising

Daniel Burgess looks back at the 19th Annual USTA/Long Island Region Awards Dinner at the Crest Hollow Country Club and recognizes outstanding achievements by the local tennis community, with full-page photo gallery.

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Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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Joe Arias explains how utilizing a strong shot selection strategy can take your game to the next level.

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USTA/Long Island Adult League Coordinator Kathy Miller provides an update on the adult tennis scene.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine profiles Mike Kossoff.

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Fitness and Nutrition: Flexibility and Stretchi8ng Exercises to Avoid Repetitive Stress Injuries Laszlo Elek takes a look at strengthening commonly-used muscles.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Junior Player Profiles Mia Vecchio from Manhasset Hills and Howie Weiss from Great Neck.

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Long Island Rankings

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USTA/Long Island Region 2009 Tournament Schedule

2009 Winter Junior Team Tennis Playoffs: A Look Back

News Briefs 8

The QuickStart Program at Hempstead Public Schools

Tennis Practice Tips From Boomer, the Interactive Ball Machine

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USTA Pro Takes His Game to the Islands

A look at how breaking your practice routine into thirds can improve your match preparation.

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2009 New York Sportimes Home Schedule

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Smash Tennis Names McKenna Director of Tennis

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USTA Tournament Photo Gallery

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Deer Park Tennis SCOREs With Community Service

Photos by Franklyn Higgs from the L1 LBTC Championship in Long Beach and the +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championship USTA L3 FIC in Lynbrook.

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USTA/Eastern Section Donates Rackets to Hempstead Girl’s Team

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A Photo Gallery of Bethpage Park Tennis Center

Beach Tennis Offers Something for Everyone

What is Holistic Sports Dentistry By Dr. Len Fazio Dr. Len Fazio discusses the connection between the body and the tooth.

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The 10-Point Super (“Stupid”) Tie-Break By Jim Dileo

Photos by Franklyn Higgs

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Tennis Greats to Participate in Alan King Pro-Am

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USTA Tournament Photo Gallery

Photos by Franklyn Higgs from the +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championships, USTA L3 FIC in Oceanside and the L1 Sportime Kings Park Summer Championship in Kings Park.

Jim Dileo gives his opinion of the super tie-break system.

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Coaching Spotlight: The Life of a Coach

Wheelchair Tennis … Then and Now By Dan Dwyer

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Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller

Long Island Tennis Club Directory

A look at local beach tennis star Nadia Johnston from Oceanside, N.Y. and how the sport is thriving locally, with a photo recap of the May 2324 Beach Tennis USA Long Island Tournament in Long Beach.

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2009 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Tips From the Tennis Pro: Using Directionals to Make Tennis a Game of Shots and Decisions By Joe Arias

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By Eric Dietsche Eric Dietsche looks at the SCORE (Students Caring Offers Recreational Excel-lence) program out of the Deer Park Indoor Tennis Club and how it has enriched the lives of physically- and mentally-handicapped young men.

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College Tennis Advice: Getting Beyond the “Wow”

Happy Bhalla takes a closer look at positivity and its role in the sport of tennis.

By Steve Abbondondelo Steve Abbondondelo looks back at the 2009 Winter Junior Team Tennis season and honors the tops in the league.

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A Letter to the Editor

By Clark D. Ruiz II Clark D. Ruiz II provides his advice on searching for the correct Division 1, 2 or 3 school to suit your child as the search for higher education begins.

The Problems With Positive Thinking By Happy Bhalla

Dan Dwyer discusses the start of wheelchair tennis on Long Island.

Subscriptions

2009 High School Boys Recap

Jonathan Klee fires back and gives his opinion on self-rating.

Rally Day Double-Header Announced for Nassau and Suffolk Counties By Steve Haar Steve Haar reports on the upcoming Rally Days.

40 To receive subscription information, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@longislandtennismag.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600.

Nancy McShea Wins the Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award Nancy McShea looks back and thanks all those who have contributed to her success over the years in the Long Island tennis community.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@litennismag.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

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By Lonnie Mitchel Lonnie Mitchel details the impact the game of tennis can have on a child.

Domenica Trafficanda Managing Art Director

To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@longislandtennismag.com.

My Opinion: What’s the Story With the Popularity of Professional Tennis in the U.S.? By Eric Meditz Eric Meditz’s looks at the TV ratings of tennis and what can be done for a ratings boost.

Alanna Broderick discusses her trip to Lagos, Nigeria in the hunt for pro points.

Andrew T. Berman Vice President/Sales Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief

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Features

The North Shore Memorial Open by Maverick Tennis

By Stephen Sombrotto Stephen Sombrotto recaps the 2nd Annual North Shore Memorial Open.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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French Open Wraps Up With Federer and Kuznetsova Taking Top Honors


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tepping out of the airport alone, I am filled with anxiety and nervousness wondering whether or not there will be someone from the tournament there to pick me up. Here I am, all by myself, in an African country and wondering how in the world my parents agreed to send me here. I was excited at first about the idea that this new independence would conjure up the strength needed to start pulling out the tough matches I was losing so closely in the third set. It was the first time I had travelled without a coach, friend or parent, and it was an adventure I thought I was ready for. But, after a nine-hour flight to London, then another four-hour leg to Lagos in Nigeria, I asked myself, “Is this really worth it?” Did I really travel halfway around the world to chase after “easy” points. The tough thing about tennis is that you are always running … no, make that chasing … after points. People will travel 50 weeks out of the year to accumulate these invisible points. I could not quite understand that even if I had a great year, as soon as the following year came around, it seemed as if I was starting back at zero because I had to defend the points I had made the previous year or all that hard work would be for naught. So, there I sat, waiting for my bags to arrive in the baggage claim area, and I prayed that my bags would actually make it on to what seemed the 1010 B.C.-made baggage carousel. I saw a couple of other tennis players trickle in behind me, and I was grateful to see foreigners that shared the same predicament as myself. It was here I realized that there were many other tennis players travelling far and beyond to

get these life or death points. It was also here that I realized that these points were not going to be quite so easy after all. There were athletes from Russia, Germany, Croatia, Australia, India, the United States, Italy, Spain, and of course, Africa. It was like a mini-Olympics in Lagos, Nigeria. I look up and smile with relief because I see my huge Prince bag roll gingerly into sight, and I also smile because I see a male friend from the Bahamas whom I have not seen since juniors. I felt at ease for a second because I now had a friend with me on this adventure, but that serenity quickly disappeared when I saw the dilapidated bus they had arranged to transport us to the hotel. Did I mention it was 4:00 a.m.? We all loaded our belongings on to this sad excuse for a bus and are rushed to sit down by our escort, Valentine. Valentine shouts at the top of his lungs in a strong African accent, “Welcome to Nigeria!” I have seen movies based in Africa and I had

SPORTIME

an image in my mind of what to expect, but nothing could prepare me for what we saw during my time in Nigeria.

To describe the poverty is a difficult task. I grew up in a third world country, but to see the magnitude of beggary and displacement of people in Nigeria was a very depressing experience. We arrived at our hotel, which was located literally in the middle of a flea market. This market was not like the markets you see in New York City on a sunny day. There were thousands continued on page 14

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A Letter to the Editor From Jonathan Klee, Long Island Representative on the USTA Eastern Grievance Committee I was very disappointed to read Jim Dileo’s article, “USTA Team Tennis: Increasing Your Chances to Play for a National Title” in the May/June 2009 edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine. Mr. Dileo takes the approach that, in order to be competitive and win, you need to “game” the system when self-rating players. His article is an attempt to show the flaws in the self-rate process and how to exploit a “loophole” in order to gain a coveted spot for a team at Nationals. Speaking from experience, nothing can be further from the truth. Attempts to “game” the system have not only failed miserably, but they have led to multiple captains, as well as players, being suspended, placed on probation and rerated. Countless matches have been reversed due to disqualifications for abuses in the self-rating process and many teams who saw Sectional Championships within their reach have seen their teams go from playoff contenders to also-rans at the stroke of a computer key. The unfortunate aftermath is all of the innocent players on these teams who are just trying to go out and play with their friends and have a good time. Truth be told, whether you are a fan of the old system of verifiers or the new self-rate

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system, attempts of abuse in both systems were and are prevalent. Under the old system, many times players would show up at a verification clinic and obtain a lower rating than they deserved. Stories of players showing up at Sectional Championships and being disqualified during the warm-ups for being out of level were folklore. Interpretation of verification standards in one section/region differed from verification standards in another section/region. This article will attempt to explain the myths of self-rating and the role of the Eastern Grievance Committee in the self-rating process. Most importantly, how you can follow the rules and self-rate successfully, while avoiding being suspended, placed on probation or re-rated. The Section Grievance Committee is made up of six members representing each of the regions in the Eastern Section. Members of the committee are players, captains and coordinators just like yourself. None of the members of the committee work for USTA Eastern. The members are all volunteers who do not receive remuneration for their participation. Whereas, many of the grievances involve the self-rate process, some also include administrative grievances as to interpretation

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

of rules or player conduct. Our goal is to provide a detailed explanation as to the rationale in each and every one of our decisions. Our decisions usually involve multiple pages of explanations, and are written after numerous e-mails back and forth between committee members, and sometimes, involve conference calls depending on the complexity of the issue. Our decisions are reviewable by the Sectional Grievance Appeals Committee. When looking at a Self-Rate Grievance that contains supporting documentation, we initially review how the player filled out the Self-Rate Profile. This, of course, begs the question, “What are we looking for?” The answer to this question is easy. We are simply looking for you to tell the truth. Tennis is a game built on sportsmanship and rules. All of us must follow the rules as written so that there is consistency in ratings. When filling out the Self-Rate Profile in order to obtain your self-rating, answer “Yes” if you were ranked as a junior, or played in college or high school. Be upfront about your tennis background. Don’t attempt to deceive. Once you have obtained your rating by answering the questions truthfully, you will then be given an opportunity to appeal your self-rating by manually filling out a USTA Player Background Form. On this form, you can then explain your playing history and provide an explanation as to why you should have your self-rating lowered. On many occasions, players who have fully disclosed their player backgrounds have had their self-ratings adjusted. On the other hand, many players who have attempted to “game” the system by failing to fill out the Self-Rate Profile correctly, or worse yet, have compounded their deception by failing to answer the USTA Player Background Form truthfully, have not seen their ratings lowered. In many cases, these ratings are adjusted to a much higher level than if they had answered the questions truthfully. In short, players who tell the truth are given the continued on page 6


COLLEGE TENNIS ADVICE Getting Beyond the “Wow” By Clark D. Ruiz II A major component of the search process— the search for the perfect school—is the “official visit.” Each prospective collegiate player is only afforded five (Division 1, Division 2) visits, so you have to make them count. These should be relegated to your “short list” of schools, the handful of schools that you would be happy to go to, wherever you end up. If you take the financial package being offered out of the equation, a player’s official visits should clearly uncover the best school for you. However, that clarity will only happen when a family and the prospective player have gotten beyond what I call the “wow” factors. If this is your first child to play at the collegiate level, then the idea of playing at that

level is an example of a “wow.” When you first see the size and beauty of campus and their tennis facility, that’s another “wow.” The thought of going away, for some the first time, that too is a “wow” moment. By now, you get the picture. The secret to making the right choice will always be having the ability to get beyond those “wows” so that you can put yourself in the right frame of mind to intelligently ask and seek the key information that will make your decision easier. My suggestion would be, when possible, visit the schools on your short list on your own, unofficially and unannounced. Get the experience of seeing the campus, the facilities and the imagery out of the way so that when you officially visit, your focus can be on asking the probing questions needed to make a

good solid choice. All too often, the official visit is nothing more than a meet and greet, squandering an excellent opportunity to find out what the policies of the coach really are, what the players think of the coach and if the other players could be seen as an extended family for you. While on official visits, the player needs to become a private-eye of sorts. During the course of the weekend, a player should attempt to get answers to questions like: N Is the coach genuinely interested in you or is he/she simply going through the motions? N How long has the coach been coaching at a collegiate level? How long at that school? continued on page 8

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A L E T T E R T O T H E E D I T O R continued from page 4 benefit of the doubt and players who attempt to deceive are not. Many players have come before our committee on Self-Rate Grievances who have failed to disclose their true tennis backgrounds. In each and every case, they have attempted to “fly under the radar” and are shocked that their true identities have been revealed. In today’s computer age, it’s very easy to identify a self-rated player. Just Google their name and it will reveal a wealth of information about their tennis background. Many self-rated players have misspelled their names, used married names or have changed their names altogether in order to hide their true identities. In many of these cases, their attempts have failed. Someone knows someone who knows that player’s true tennis background. Whether a first-time player is playing third doubles or first singles, I can almost guarantee someone is watching their match re-

sults. Attempts to play sparingly and play close matches or take losses do not factor into many of our decisions. A player’s background history, especially if there is deception when self-rating, will always take precedence over match results. The Grievance Committee has granted grievances and re-adjusted ratings on players who have played one match at third doubles and have lost if it has been revealed that their player profile was answered inaccurately. Per the Eastern Director of Adult Leagues in the last 10 months, more than 280 players who have self-rated honestly have had their ratings manually re-adjusted to a lower level given to them by the computer. Whereas, they may not have been lowered to the level requested by the player, they nonetheless have been lowered taking into account outside factors such as age, tennis history and medical. Less then 20 players have been

The Importance of Tennis-Specific Training By Carl Barnett Through my years as a tennis professional, I have found a bounty of benefits in pairing a student’s private lessons and group work with tennis specific physical training. After what we’ve seen over the last decade in professional tennis, its effectiveness should come as no surprise. Anyone who watched this year’s French Open listened while the commentators reviewed the changes in the training regimens of Dinara Safina, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Andy Murray and yes, Roger Federer. This all goes back to Ivan Lendl and Martina Navratilova adding training to gain dominance over their contemporaries. There are many benefits in this type of training for juniors. Training sessions mirror points, games and sets in their duration. A group focus is achieved which makes the work easier and clears the mind. Players experience improved focus after these training sessions. Maintaining focus and controlling one’s temper are so often deciding factors at the end of a long match. Mastery of focus and emotion is only achieved through vigorous training and play which tests a player in challenging conditions. In a majority of matches, the more physically fit player wins, both at the junior and professional level, so this training is vital. Interestingly, beginners learn the game more quickly. They find the changing tempo of the game more easily and focus far better in this critical time where good habits are established. Lastly, parents are often reporting that their children are more productive at school, more active after school and are less moody at home after training under this style. G Carl Barnett started the Early Hit Training Programs at Glen Head Racquet Club six years ago. He may be reached by phone at (516) 455-1225 or e-mail earlyhit@optonline.net. 6

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

denied to have their initial self-ratings lowered. National has made it quite clear that visual verification of a player’s level is not going to come back to league tennis. First off, there is a shortage of people willing to do the training necessary to accurately verify players. As stated above, there is no consistency in visual verification across the country and the unfortunate reality is that there is no budget to pay for it. Ideas such as increasing registration fees to pay teaching pros to watch matches are economically not feasible and would be a logistical nightmare. Providing captains with challenges is a novel idea, but one that would be abused and burden local league coordinators who already have too much on their plate. In the Eastern Section alone, approximately 23,000 players participate in leagues each and every year, of which around 2,000 of those players advance to Section Championships. Long Island alone has more than 4,000 players who have registered to play league tennis. Even taking into account some players who play on multiple teams the individual number of players is still very large. Many of them who are playing for the first time and have self-rated accurately. We can all agree that no rating system is perfect. The National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP) was designed as a “self-rate” system to provide compatible play and allow for quick easy participation. Let’s not lose sight that the goal of league tennis is to socialize with friends, promote the sport, and play some good competitive matches. Sure, all of us would love to play at a Section Championship or attend a National Championship, but at what cost? One thing is for sure, “gaming” the system is not the answer. G Jonathan Klee is a partner at the Law Firm of Klee & Woolf LLP. He is the Long Island representative on the Eastern Grievance Committee, and currently serves as chair. He has played in league tennis since 2000, and has captained and played on many teams on Long Island. As of the writing of this article, none of his teams have made it to Nationals …a goal he and his friends are still striving to obtain.


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Tennis Champions for Children Benefit featuring Special Legends Matchup with John McEnroe!

Anna Kournikova – July 7

Martina Navratilova – July 15

Bob & Mike Bryan – July 17

Season opens July 7 at the new Sportime at Randall’s Island Tennis Center! Tickets on sale now at 212.792.8500 or at www.Tix.com For complete home schedule and ticket pricing visit www.nysportimes.com

A Team for Betterment The NY Sportimes 2009 season benefits the Randall’s Island Sports Foundation and the children of New York City

Photo: Camerawork USA, Fred and Susan Mullane

WTT IS BACK IN NYC ON RANDALL’S ISLAND!


C O L L E G E T E N N I S A D V I C E continued from page 5 N What kind of rapport does the coach have with the administration of the school, those responsible for admissions and scholarships? N What kind of rapport does the coach have with his/her players? N Does the coach have a clear process of how spots on the team are earned and won? N Where does the coach see you playing on the team? N If the coach is recruiting a number of prospective players, where do you rank amongst the group? N Can the coach help improve your game? N Are the current players on the team a group that you want to spend as much as three years with?

The

N Do the players like the coach? N Do they have any complaints about the coach and/or the program? N What kind of support system does the program have (trainers, academic advisors, assistant coaches, etc.)? I think you get my drift. Work your way through the fluff or “wow” portion of the process, and you will put yourself in a position to truly uncover the essence of the program you are considering. Trust me, its hard work. Official visits are not meant to be mini-vacations. They should be investigative and uncovering in nature. You should be interviewing the program, the coach and the current players the same way they are interviewing you. Also, if you are like most prospective players, you will

QuickStart

get to the point that your head will be spinning from the number of schools you have visited, so make sure to take clear and concise notes on each school right after you have visited, while the facts are fresh in your mind. You may even want to set up a standard list of questions you want to ask at each school. This will make it easier to compare one program from another, side by side. When approached in this manner, believe me, the four years spent playing collegiate tennis will be extremely gratifying and rewarding, with many meaningful “wows” along the way. G Clark D. Ruiz II is founder of Advantage Tennis Strategies LLC. He may be reached by phone at (917) 991-0088 or e-mail clark@advantagetennisstrategies.com.

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at Hempstead Public Schools April 24 in Hempstead, N.Y.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


Join the Summer League in Long Beach Team Beach Tennis, the Official Leagues of Beach Tennis USA, is running a Thursday night summer league on the beach at Grand Blvd. in Long Beach. The league is open to players 18 and older and everyone is invited to join, regardless of skill level. Participants will be eligible to compete at BTUSA’s National Championship on Labor Day Weekend in Long Beach. For more information, please contact Lisa Goldberg at 516-317-3189. Come on out and give it a try!

Try Beach Tennis for FREE! Sign Up Now! Men’s, Women’s and Mixed Doubles Play This event is sanctioned by

Head and Penn are official equipment suppliers of Beach Tennis USA

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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Using Directionals to Make Tennis a Game of Shots and Decisions By Joe Arias Today’s tennis equipment makes it possible to make shots never thought of years ago. Regardless of playing style, the modern tennis player can harness the power of today’s racquets and strings to make a tennis ball do things never thought possible, while keeping the ball consistently on the court. There is a difference between hitting a ball and playing a ball. How many players say they can hit the ball all sorts of ways, but don’t know what to do with it? This creates the need to learn the nearly endless variations of tennis strategies and tactics. Because of the constantly changing circumstances in a tennis point, applying these strategies can be difficult. The “Directionals” is a decision-based system of play where every shot has a tactical purpose or aim hitting biomechanically sound shots. The result is fewer errors, more winning points, instinctive reaction and most importantly, focus on the ball. This system is commonly known as “Wardlaw Directional’s,” named after Brown University Coach Paul Wardlaw, who refined the technique and made it into a teachable system that provides a basis for decision-making. The Directional’s is a shot selection strategy allowing a player to understand when the best time is to change or not change the direction of the ball. Because decisions are based on the ball crossing or not crossing the body, this system easily helps you decide whether it is a good idea, or not, to change the direction of the play. Many players—including good players—make mistakes by trying to change the direction of the ball when it is too good a shot from their opponent and the ball is not in their comfort zone. 10

If there is any possibility that you will be unable to control the ball that is coming to you, and then the obvious hit is back to where it came from, this technique will allow a certain margin for error as the return is a right angle hit. There are some changes of direction that are natural and allow the natural rotation of the hips and shoulders. What makes this even more sensible is that Directional’s focuses on the relationship between the ball and the player, not the ball and the court or the opponent. This helps keep your focus on the ball and how best to control it. I use Directional’s whenever I play and coach, and I’ve made this remarkable sys-

tem a basis for teaching and training players personally and Suffolk County Junior Tennis League training programs. This fantastic system has changed the way I look at playing and coaching tennis, and I’m sure it can do the same for you. Joe Arias is the director of tennis and head tennis professional of the Port Jefferson Country Club, founder and executive director of Suffolk County Junior Tennis, and is a certified USPTA Pro 1 and USTA High Performance Coach. He may be reached by phone at (631) 360-8047, by e-mail at atc@ariastennis.com or visit www.ariastennis.com.

It’s for the youth! Come and support UWANTGAME We are holding our 2nd Annual Fundraiser in July at the infamous “Pink Elephant” Night Club in New York City Wednesday, July 15 • 7:30 p.m. UWANTGAME (UWG) is a non-profit organization dedicated to building the personal and professional life skills of at-risk high school student-athletes. Through our program, former collegiate student-athletes serve as mentors for high school studentathletes. UWG provides a well-rounded three-year enrichment program, during which each participant is taught the value of building and connecting the powers of the mind, body and spirit on the playing field and in the game of life.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Come have fun in one of the most exclusive clubs in Manhattan: The Pink Elephant Network, mingle and dance, all while giving back to our New York High School Student-Athletes 527 West 27th Street • New York, NY 10001 To learn more and to make online donations, please visit www.uwantgame.org.

We’re building the game, behind the game!


 





SUMMER CAMP July 7 - August 28

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The Early Hit Training Center is pleased to announce our 6th annual Junior Summer Tennis Camp. Our comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his/her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our complete program. We begin each session with a nutritionally complete and balanced shake from Court 7 our on-premise restaurant and smoothie bar. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke WYVK\J[PVUKYPSSPUNHUKWO`ZPJHSÄ[ULZZ[YHPUPUNILMVYLIYLHRPUNMVYHOLHS[O`S\UJO>L[OLUTV]LVU[VWSH`PUN dynamics and strategy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A thorough cool-down and stretching session completes a world-class day of tennis for your child. With our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, experienced physical conditioning trainers, movement experts and on-site chef, the Early Hit Training Center offers a unique and total tennis experience.

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JUNIOR “ALPS” PROGRAM The Early Hit Training Center is pleased to announce our 4th season of group training. This comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his/her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our complete program. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production and drilling. We then move onto playing dynamics and strategy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A session starts or ÄUPZOLZ^P[OHUOV\YVMJVUKP[PVUPUN Come experience our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, conditioning trainers and movement experts.

September 2009 - January 2010

Saturday 8:00am - 10:30am Sunday 8:00am - 10:30am 3:30pm - 6:00pm

Monday 6:00pm - 8:30pm 7:30pm - 10:00pm Tuesday 8:30pm - 10:00pm (adult group training)

“ALPS” Is a program for High Aptitude Learners.


ADULT LEAGUE WRAP-UP B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

e are now in our third week of the league season with matches well underway. Just a reminder to all captains that scorecards have to be entered into the United States Tennis Association (USTA) Web site within 24 hours of the match and also have to be mailed so the standings section of the site can be kept up to date. The standings section of the Web site can be found at www.litennisscores.com. Please note the following important dates:

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Long Island Regionals All Regionals will be played at Carefree Racquet Club N Men’s 3.5 plays Friday, July 31 at 8:00 p.m. N Women’s 2.5 plays Saturday, Aug. 1 at 9:00 a.m. N Women’s 3.0 plays Saturday, Aug. 1 at 11:00 a.m. N Women’s 3.5 plays Saturday, Aug. 1 at 1:00 p.m.

N Women’s 4.0 plays Saturday, Aug. 1 at 3:00 p.m. N Senior Women 3.5 plays on Saturday, Aug. 1 at 9:00 a.m. Sectionals N Men’s & Women’s 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 play Friday-Sunday, Aug. 7-9 N Men’s and Women’s 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 play Friday-Sunday, Aug. 14-16 Adult Sectionals will be held in Syracuse, N.Y. All Senior Sectionals will be held Friday-Sunday, Sept. 25-27 and will be held in Schenectady, N.Y. Super Senior Sectionals are set for Friday-Sunday, Oct. 2-4 and are being held in Flushing Meadow, N.Y. Dates and locations for national events can be found on the USTA Web site. Tri-Level League The next program, the Tri-Level League, will be starting in August. The format is

USPTA Pro Takes His Game to the Islands Robert Glickman, a USPTA pro for the last 30 years on Long Island, recently visited the Sans Souci Resort in Jamaica. In April, in exchange for a stay at the Sans Souci Resort, Glickman taught tennis to guests of the resort. “It was a wonderful experience, and I look forward to other exciting guest pro visitations,” said Glickman. Pictured here, Robert Glickman with Sans Souci Resort resident pro Radcliff Watkis on the Sans Souci court in Jamaica. G

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

three courts of doubles, with one court consisting of 3.5 players, a court of 4.0 players and the third court of 4.5 players. This gives friends at different levels the opportunity to enjoy the team format together. Teams can put up to four players at each level on their team. There will be a round-robin and then the men’s winning team, along with the women’s winning team, will advance to a sectional playoff in February 2010. Winning teams from the sectional playoff advance to a national event in Indian Wells, Calif. during the pro event held there in March 2010. You not only get to play, but you get to watch the pros play as well! If you have a team or are interested in joining a team, please contact Kathy Miller at kathym65@aol.com. Mixed Doubles USTA League The Mixed Doubles USTA League will start play the end of October 2009 and will run until the beginning of May 2010. The mixed doubles is based on combined ratings. Long Island has 6.0 (two 3.0 players or a 2.5 and 3.5), 7.0 (two 3.5 players or a 3.0 and 4.0), 8.0 (two 4.0 players or a 3.5 and 4.5), 9.0 (two 4.5 players or a 4.0 and 5.0), and we would love to get a 10.0 division started for the first time. In addition to the mixed doubles, there is also a Senior Mixed Doubles League which we have not had on Long Island, but would love to get started this year. The Senior Mixed is based on the same level format as the Mixed Doubles League. Organizing for both the mixed and senior mixed takes place in September and you can contact Kathy Miller at kathym65@aol.com if you have a team or would to be placed on one. G Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.


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W E L C O M E T O L A G O S continued from page 3 and thousands of people selling live chickens, fruits, vegetables, garments and any thing under the sun. I have never seen this many people in my life. Interestingly enough, this wonderful landmark seemed normal to me by the time I left Nigeria. And when our bus arrived, the local’s eyes widened and filled with excitement in the hopes of making many sales. Our hotel was called “The Palace,” this was an oxymoron if ever there was one. The first thing I saw in my room was my mountainous bed which had curves and valleys so deep that every morning I had to do an extra half-an-hour of stretching just to feel relatively normal again.

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I was scheduled to be in Nigeria for a four-week tour. There were four WTA challengers in a row, but at this point, I could not fathom lasting more than a week. We loaded our bus the next morning to go to the tournament site to get in some practice. My first task was to find someone to practice with, but as all the girls in the tournament either came with a friend or coach, and there didn’t seem to be anybody available. I thought if worst came to worst, I could just take a run and do some footwork drills. As we drove to the site, we passed slums and a multitude of children who ran to our bus begging for any form of charity. It was a sad sight to see and comprehend. I realized how unfair life seemed and how blessed I truly was. The basic necessities that we take for granted, such as clean water, food and

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

shelter, was an every day struggle for the majority of the people in Nigeria. Do not get me wrong, there were some nice places and privileged areas in Lagos, but those were not the areas that struck a chord with me. Arriving at the tennis courts, expecting that they would resemble the bed at my hotel, I was pleasantly surprised to see a magnificent stadium with newly resurfaced courts and beautiful facilities. It did not seem right or possible, but what a revelation and testament to the beauty of sport. In a country where children have to fight for food and struggle for an education, there were some youngsters from Nigeria who got to experience the same sport I grew up playing on the other side


of the world. It was something we had in common. Then Valentine, our memorable guide, came out of the locker room and asked me, “If I wanted to hit a few balls,” and I answered with extreme relief, “Sure, I would love to.” You might ask what does all of this have to do with tennis, but this is one of the many wonderful experiences that the journey of this sport has afforded me. I ended up staying in Nigeria for the full four weeks and the “easy” points turned out to be more difficult than expected. I had great success in the doubles draws, winning three out of the four weeks, and I left with a sense of accomplishment that I had survived my first trip alone on tour. Although I did not have my mom or coach cheering for me, I had my new friends from Lagos who apparently

adopted me as one of their own. I will never forget the chants of “Jamaica, Jamaica” when I would win a point. To play in a packed stadium and see the kids that I had just seen outside the gates asking for money, come up to me and tell me how excited they were to have watched me play and because of me they wanted to start playing tennis was one of the most unforgettable moments in my life. I left every single piece of tennis clothing and four of my five racquets with those kids so that they might have the chance to travel to a distant country one day and experience another side of the world as well. As I finally boarded my plane back to America after hugging Valentine goodbye, I felt blessed and grateful for the experience I just had. The points which I could only think about before I got there seemed so unimportant now. To

say that I lived in Lagos, Nigeria for four weeks seemed a much more impressive achievement and an experience I can say truly changed my perspective on life. The life and death attitude of hitting a tennis ball did not seem quite so important after all. I learned to be grateful for the things that I have and to be aware of what I needed, not just what I wanted, and to take joy in life itself and treasure the moments that make up this interesting journey. Onto to the next tournament … got to get those points! G Alanna Broderick is an independent tennis pro on Long Island and the director of Girls 4 Girlz Tennis Camps. She competed on the pro tour after graduating from the University of Miami, where she received her BBA in marketing and Spanish. She is a USPTA certified coach and can be reached at g4gtennis@hotmail.com.

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T

he 128th U.S. Open Tennis Championship will be held from Aug. 31 to Sept. 13 at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Tennis fans from all over the world will be packing the luxurious Arthur Ashe Stadium and surrounding courts to see the greatest players in the world compete for the fourth and final Grand Slam of the year. Through the years, many of our local Long Island tennis greats have lived a dream and had the honor of competing at the U.S. Open. Some have played in the Junior Open draw, while others have played in the main draw. After years of hard work, practice, travel, sacrifice, tournament play, and finally making it to the U.S. Open, we wanted to hear straight from the players about their experiences on one of the biggest tennis stages in the world. Here are quotes from some of the talented local players who got to “live their dreams.” They share their personal experiences, as well as give guidance and ideas, on how to one day wind up playing at the Open yourself.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Paul Annacone My fondest memory as a player was beating McEnroe on center court. As a coach, my fondest memory was probably in 2002 with Agassi vs. Sampras. I had a few with Pete Sampras, but to watch him climb the last mountain and then stop when he reached that peak, with another U.S. Open title, was pretty memorable. I loved playing in front of home crowd. I grew up watching the U.S. Open at Forest Hills, so to be able to play in the Open was pretty amazing … it was a dream come true. And that fact was magnified because my family and friends could come and watch. How to get there is tough! Consistency is the key. You need lots of practice, discipline, sacrifice and focus. If you put that together with a lot of drive, determination and some good fortune, you have a recipe that may work. Obviously, you need a good big picture mentality and take it one day at a time along the way. It is a huge challenge, but a great dream to be able to achieve.


Sandra Birch Krusos I have had the privilege of playing in the U.S. Open three times, once in the juniors and twice at the professional level. I was a finalist in the 1987 Junior Open, losing to Natalia Zverva. I played the professional level Open in 1989 and 1991 as the NCAA Division I Champion wild-card entrant from Stanford University. In both years, I lost to the 10th seed, to Wimbledon champion Conchita Martinez in 1989, and in 1991, to Manuela Maleeva-Fragniere. My fondest memory of these U.S. Open experiences was the pleasure of playing in front of a vocal home crowd. The moment that stands out the most was a hard-fought, come-from-behind, three-set victory in the quarterfinals of the 1987 Junior Open against an Italian player named Laura Lappi. We were playing on one of the outer courts and the viewing area was packed solid with a sea of familiar faces, not just my ever-supportive parents and long-time coach, Steve Kaplan, but also high school friends and members of my local summer club in Lloyd Neck. I was exhausted and losing big, but their collective cheers and heartfelt words of encouragement willed me to victory. To this day, I look back on that match as one of my favorite tennis memories. I will be forever grateful to the home crowd for urging me to victory, and, more importantly, for giving me the memory of a lifetime. Howard Endelbaum Playing the U.S. Open in 1988 was a lifelong dream come true for me. I had grown up on Long Island and always attended the Open. My doubles partner was Peter Palandjian, who was the captain and attending Harvard when I was a captain at Columbia. Peter and I had been rivals, but were always friends. We played Joakim Nystrom and Mikael Pernfors, two Swedish guys, in the first round. Although Nystrom had won Wimbledon in doubles and Pernfors had reached the French Open Finals in singles, neither guy was a traditional doubles player. We were very happy with our draw and thought we had a good chance to pull an upset. We played the last match of the day session on Court 3, right below the Stadium. John McEnroe was playing Mark Woodforde in the Stadium at the same time. The Swedish guys were tough. They beat us 6-2, 6-4. Although we were disappointed by the result, we had fulfilled our

dream of playing in the U.S. Open! I ended up qualifying in singles the next year, losing to British player Mark Petchey. I loved every minute of the experience both years! Peter Fishback In 1968, the first year professionals were allowed to compete at the U.S. Open (prior to that, only amateurs were able to play in the United States national championship), my opponent was Pierre Barthes, one of the top professionals in the world. We played for well over three hours, and I lost a pretty competitive match 14-12, 6-2, 9-7 (tie breakers had not yet been invented). Though I was still an amateur at that time, I was able to collect prize money to help defray the cost of traveling to and from other tournaments. This year, a first round loser will receive close to $20,000, plus a generous hotel allowance. I received $300 for my effort, and couldn’t believe how much money a tournament had just paid me for playing a match! How times have changed. Justin Gimelstob I have many fond memories from the 13 U.S. Opens I played as a professional. I am most proud of my 5-0 fifth set record there. In regard to individual matches, my first round win in 1995 as an amateur, which was one of the biggest upsets in regards to ranking discrepancies in U.S. Open history, was very memorable. I beat David Prinosil 6-3 in the final set, and I can remember hitting a service winner up the T on match point. I ran into the crowd and hugged my father and coach Tom Fontana, and to this day, the picture hangs prominently in my office and constantly reminds me of one of the great experiences in my tennis life. Playing in front of my hometown crowd was an amazing experience. Growing up in New Jersey and coming to the U.S. Open since I was eight-years-old, and to actually be a part of the tournament, was a dream come true. When I would play at the U.S. Open, it was one of the few times my friends and family could watch me play live, and I always got tremendous support. I would often look into the stands and see people

who had played instrumental parts in my life and it would give me an added boost of energy and adrenaline. Some advice I would give junior tennis players would be to develop good technique early on and then work hard to build muscle memory. Also, tennis is becoming more and more athletic, so it is integral to work on becoming an all-around athlete, not just a tennis player. However, beyond all of that, having fun, learning and loving the sport will give you the best chance to be successful. Kyle Kliegerman I played at the U.S. Open in the Junior Doubles in 1995 when I was 16. My partner and I beat the number four seeds, Kevin Kim and Ryan Walters in the first round, before losing in the second round. It was definitely an exhilarating feeling to be out there playing in a tournament that I had been going to since I was a little kid. It was even more satisfying playing such a great match in front of all my friends and family. Unfortunately, it was my one and only chance to play there, but it is definitely a great memory for me. Hanging out in the player’s lounge with Agassi and Sampras was not too shabby either. Scott Lipsky It is such a surreal experience to play at the U.S. Open. As a child, I went to the U.S. Open every year and dreamed of one day being one of the players on-court. It is so much fun playing in front of my friends and family, and I just love the New York atmosphere. There is truly nothing else like it at any other tournament. Jordan Richmond Playing at the U.S. Open in junior doubles in 1989 was easily the highlight of my junior tennis career. Having grown up in Flushing, and then actually being able to play in the most prestigious American tournament that day in front of family and friends, was to experience (albeit briefly) the dream I had since I was a little boy.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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American Hopefuls at the 2009 U.S. Open I

n the past, the U.S. Open has been dominated by Americans. Legends of the game, including Pete Sampras, John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors on the men’s side, and Chris Evert and Tracy Austin on the women’s side, have all left Flushing Meadows victorious on more than one occasion. Hopefully, this year some of the American hopefuls will make a run at the championship. Here are the best American hopes for a shot at walking away with the U.S. Open crown in Flushing Meadows.

Men’s singles In recent years, the men’s draw has been dominated by Roger Federer of Switzerland. He has claimed the men’s singles title as his own, as he has won the last five U.S. Open titles.

Andy Roddick The 2003 U.S. Open champ and crowd favorite, Andy Roddick is the last American man to win a U.S. Open title. He started 2009 strong, opening the year 26-5. He is currently ranked number six in the world and will be looking to better last year’s loss to Novak Djokovic in the quarterfinals.

James Blake James Blake has struggled a bit in 2009 and his ranking has dropped to 16th in the world. He has started 2009 by going 15-11. Last year at the Open, he lost to fellow American Mardy Fish in the third round. With the help of the “JBlock” and the partisan American crowd, hopefully Blake can make an exciting run this year. 18

Mardy Fish The year 2008 was Mardy Fish’s best result at the U.S. Open, as he reached the quarterfinals before falling to Rafael Nadal. This year, he is 16-12 and his ranking has improved to 25th in the world. Fish is looking to build on last year’s run and take another step forward.

Women’s singles On the women’s side, Serena Williams is the latest American power and has taken three championships, including last’s year’s U.S. Open title, when she defeated Jelena Jankovic in the finals. This year, Serena will enter as the defending champion and leads the list of American hopefuls on the women’s side.

Venus Williams The two-time U.S. Open champ is looking to get back to the top. She has had disappointing results in both majors this year, but is currently ranked number three in the world, and remains one of the favorites to win the Open. Last year, she was defeated by sister Serena in a thrilling quarterfinal 76, 7-6 and will be looking for revenge should the sister vs. sister matchup once again come to fruition.

Men’s doubles The best hope for a U.S. title winner may be in men’s doubles. The defending champion Bryan Brothers (Bob and Mike) will return to defend their title.

Bob and Mike Bryan

Serena Williams Defending champion Serena Williams comes in currently ranked as the number two player in the world. She has won the U.S. Open title in 1999, 2002 and 2008. Serena already has one Grand Slam this year, having won the Australian Open, but will be hungry to repeat last year’s performance in front of the home crowd.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Bob and Mike Bryan come into the 2009 U.S. Open as the defending champs and the number one-ranked doubles team in the world. They will come in as the favorites and will be looking to capture their third U.S. Open title.


2009 U.S. Open Schedule • Gates open for Day Session at 10:00 a.m. Matches begin at 11:00 a.m. • Gates open for Evening Session at 6:00 p.m. Matches begin at 7:00 p.m. • All event times are Eastern Standard Time. • Schedule is subject to change. Tuesday, August 25 ..............................Qualifying Tournament Wednesday, August 26 ........................Qualifying Tournament

Sunday, September 6........Men’s 3rd Round/Women’s Round of 16 (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s 3rd Round/Women’s Round of 16 (7:00 p.m. Evening Session)

Thursday, August 27 ............................Qualifying Tournament Friday, August 28..................................Qualifying Tournament

Monday, September 7 ................Men’s/Women’s Round of 16 (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s/Women’s Round of 16 (7:00 p.m. Evening Session)

Saturday, August 29 ......................2009 Arthur Ashe Kids Day Sunday, August 30 ..............................................Open Practice Monday, August 31 ........................Men’s/Women’s 1st Round (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s/Women’s 1st Round (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Tuesday, September 1 ..................Men’s/Women’s 1st Round (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s/Women’s 1st Round (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Wednesday, September 2 ............Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Thursday, September 3 ................Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Friday, September 4 ..Men’s 2nd Round/Women’s 3rd Round (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s 2nd Round/Women’s 3rd Round (7:00 p.m. Evening Session)

Tuesday, September 8................Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinals (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinals (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Wednesday, September 9 ........Men’s/Women’s Quarterfinals (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s/Women’s Quarterfinals (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Thursday, September 10 ..Men’s Quarterfinal/Mixed Doubles Final (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s Quarterfinal (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Friday, September 11 ..Women’s Semi-Finals/Men’s Doubles Final (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • No Evening Session Saturday, September 12..............................Men’s Semi-Finals (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Women’s Final (7:00 p.m. Evening Session) Sunday, September 13 ..Men’s Final/Women’s Doubles Final (11:00 a.m. Day Session)

Saturday, September 5 ................Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round (11:00 a.m. Day Session) • Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round (7:00 p.m. Evening Session)

For more information, visit www.usopen.org. Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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My Memories as a U.S. Open Ball Boy By Bruce Forrest It was 1978, and the U.S. Open was coming to Flushing Meadows. My friend was a ball boy the previous year at Forest Hills and said, “Why don’t you try out this year.” I said, “Sign me up!” The next thing I know, I’m standing at the net watching two guys hit the ball and waiting for them to hit it into the net. I was a fast kid, so when they did make an error, I sprinted, picked up the ball and threw it to the ball person in the back court. A few days later, I was given a Fred Perry outfit and was officially a U.S. Open ball boy. I’m writing this article, not just to reminisce about my childhood, but to encourage all tennis juniors to look into trying out to be a ball person for this year’s U.S. Open. A ball person is the lowest on the totem poll. They are the ones who grab a player’s towel, run down to the stringer’s room, to pick up new rackets, and sometimes, holds an umbrella over a player’s head. Their primary function is to remain invisible and pick up balls. They are on their feet all day and have very little rest. With all this said, it was one of the most

memorable childhood experiences I ever had. The ball persons sit on the steps between Louis Armstrong Stadium and the grandstand. It’s not a bad seat as you can watch both courts. One morning, I was there early and was able to watch Jimmy Connors warm up. He had a match later in the day. He hit crosscourt forehands for 20 min., crosscourt backhands for 20 min., and then worked on his volley and overhead for 20 min. It was incredible how clean he hit the ball. That’s what I loved about being a ball boy. You got to watch your childhood heroes play up close. You were part of the action. You got to hang out in the locker room, occasionally deliver a message to Bud Collins, and most importantly, helped all the matches run smoothly. As a ball person, you are always on the court. They’ll be friends waiving to you, yelling to get your attention and rooting you on to do a good job. Once your match is complete, you feel a sense of achievement and look forward to the next match. I served as a ball boy for several great players. I had the privilege to run down balls for Jimmy Connors, John McEnroe, Martina Navratilova, Roscoe Tanner, Virginia Wade

and Ilie Nastase. It was amazing to learn about their personalities and habits on the court. I could see how Nastase got his nickname “Nasty.” He was a maniac on the court, yelling at the line judges every chance he got. He was very nice to the ball persons, though. Every time I would give him his towel, he would say, “Thanks kid.” McEnroe was pretty cool too. He is always complimentary to the ball persons when he is on the air covering the U.S. Open. I always smile when a player thanks the ball persons. Some players don’t realize that without the ball persons, they would chasing their own tennis balls. The ball persons are a true value to the ATP and WTA tours. It’s been 30 years since I’ve been on those steps and the wonderful experiences will stay with me forever. If you enjoy being part of the action and watching great tennis, look into being a ball person at this year’s U.S. Open. It will be an experience of a lifetime. Good luck at the tryouts. Bruce Forrest is a former nationally-ranked junior player, a member of Piquet Lane and currently plays in the North Shore Tennis League. He may be reached by e-mail at bforr@optonline.net.

• Blogs from featured tennis pro's editorial contributors and players like you! • Photos from USTA tournaments, interclub tournaments, USTA adult league, JTT, charity events, high school matches, special events and more. • Event calender covering all Long Island tennis events • Club Directory will give you quick access to the top Long Island tennis clubs • Camp Directory will help you find the right tennis camp for your child • Super Pro Shop featuring Long Island's top stores and trendy tennis apparel • Polls to make your opinions known and see other’s opinions on interesting tennis topics • News on professional tennis as well as local players • Access to Long Island Tennis Magazine latest issue and archives

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


Seeking Out the Stars Tips for autograph hunters at the U.S. Open By Brad Shafran When walking around the Flushing Meadows grounds during the U.S. Open, oversized yellow tennis balls are almost as ubiquitous as great forehands and flashy backhands. Nearly every kid in attendance (and even some adults) carries these large tennis balls, hoping to have the players adorn their signatures to its felt. As I learned at a young age, an autograph provides a tangible connection between the fan and the player, freezing a moment in time forever. As a full-time autograph dealer, I am fortunate to handle items signed by names as varied as George Washington to Marilyn Monroe to Roger Federer. Whether a Civil War commission for a Union soldier signed by Abraham Lincoln or a baseball signed by Derek Jeter passes my desk, each autograph tells a story and allows me a personal connection to the signer. I keep a cherished 3 X 5 index card signed by my tennis idol Mikael Pernfors on my desk, a signature I obtained at the 1986 U.S. Open and carried in my tennis bag throughout my junior and collegiate playing days. While I stopped running around the U.S. Open grounds seeking autographs many years ago as I now purchase sports autographs from reputable sources who hold private autograph sessions, it’s still a joy to see all the fans lined up on the sides of the show courts as each match concludes. Nearly all the (winning) players are kind enough to take a few moments to scribble their signatures for as many fans as possible—even a few losing players will take a moment or two to do the same. Creative fans who are willing to get a little wet, might grab a match-used wrist band or towel after a match as well. Here are a few tips for those seeking the signatures of our game’s greats:

Rafa, Roger or Serena autograph. N Unless you have a ticket in the expensive seats near the court, it’s difficult to get autographs at Arthur Ashe Stadium. However, nearly every other court is accessible, especially the smaller side courts like Court 7 and Court 11, where seeded players are regularly scheduled. N Be prepared. There is nothing worse than seeing a tennis great walk past you and you have nothing to have them sign, or sign with. As a kid, I carried 3 X 5 index cards with me and got legends, such as Ivan Lendl, Martina Navratilova and even Wilt Chamberlain, simply walking around the grounds. N Don’t be pushy or overbearing. Remem-

ber, these players have a job to do—play tennis and prepare for their matches— and understand if they decline to sign or only sign for a few people. Getting to watch the world’s best tennis players in our backyard every summer is a treat on its own, but walking away with signatures of some of the game’s best can also provide a lifetime of memories and inspiration. Brad Shafran is a full-time autograph dealer and part-time tennis pro at Bethpage Park Tennis Center. He can be reached by phone at (516) 978-0094, email brad@shafrancollectibles.com or visit www.shafrancollectibles.com.

N The qualifying rounds are a great opportunity to get signatures of future stars or former top-ranked players who are on the decline. It also serves as practice time for those already in the main draw so it might be your best chance at a Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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Taking a Step Back and Examining the True Meaning of Junior Tennis n the 30-plus years since I first began coaching tennis, society has seen many changes in the way people communicate and interact. Technology has not, however, altered basic human nature, and in this example, the inevitability of self-serving, immediate gratification-seeking behavior of junior players, coaches and parents. Many aspects of the system of junior tennis seem to encourage short-sighted behavior. Tennis is a highly competitive and clearly defining individual sport. There is much to be gained by winning, and losing is, well, “for losers.” I don’t blame the system, however. The world is a competitive place and the tennis world reflects this reality. Competitive adapting is the backbone of evolution, and while I’d like to say, this is my original idea, Charles Darwin beat me to it. Rather than knock the tournament world, perhaps what is needed is a re-evaluation of how this experience is inter-

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rupted. Specifically, parents and coaches should assume responsibility for the leadership of players in critical areas of conduct and values. Players are ultimately responsible for their behavior of course, but the experience of being young is to emphasize immediate gain. Parents and coaches can balance and temper inexperience. Several examples follow:

to this reverse cheating as the defense mechanism known as “rationalization.” The tennis world is less kind and just calls it “hooking,” and no matter how high a player’s ranking or how great their accomplishments, the first thing that will come to people’s lips when your name is mentioned is that you are a cheater. At least Machiavelli would be proud of you.

Cheating In elementary school, my teachers used to say, “When you are cheating, you are only cheating yourself.” I didn’t understand that advice then, but I do now, and it applies to tennis. First, let me preface by saying that very few players, and parents and coaches for that matter, believe they cheat. Rather, they believe that everyone else cheats and they are fair. By “fair” they mean that they only get “even” after receiving bad calls. My introduction to psychology text refers

Obnoxious behavior Tennis is an interactive game in that one player is not solely responsible for determining the outcome of a point. This seemingly obvious fact is often not recognized by the player who obnoxiously demonstrates disapproval over losing a point, every point. It is demeaning and insulting behavior to shout “you suck” to yourself, because it is a pretense to believe that this is self-directed behavior. continued on page 24

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


Tennis: A Parent’s Gift That Lasts a Lifetime By Lonnie Mitchel

T

he article in the May/June 2009 issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine entitled, “College Tennis Advice” by Clark D. Ruiz II, was terrific advice for a young tennis enthusiast who wants to play in college and us crazy tennis parents who have high aspirations for our sons and daughters. I recently traveled on a similar journey with my own son who now plays on a Division 3 college team (Muhlenberg College). My younger son also participates in the Long Island Junior Tennis Tournaments, however, we do not have the means to travel all over the United States and stay in hotels and pay for all those junior tournaments, not to mention the prohibitive costs of training. As a USPTA-certified tennis instructor, I am acutely aware of the sacrifices needed to maybe just maybe get a tennis scholarship to a Division I college. Forget about getting a sniff at the professional tennis circuit, it was out of reach for my son as it is for many highly ranked juniors. In our case, we found the ticket for our son was to stress academics with a tennis minor so to speak. “Good grades, a well-rounded education and tennis for a lifetime,” was the message. We used tennis as simply a means to perhaps put him over the edge at a highly academically ranked college. He plays on a tennis team, travels and gets the experience of being involved in NCAA college athletics. The lesson here is an underlying one … I believe, as tennis parents, we need to give our children the gift that never stops giving, “The Joy of Playing Tennis,” and the ripple effect that comes with it. I see firsthand what a “tennis education” gives to our younger generation. Here on Long Island, there are many tennis clubs and public courts to help develop the skills for the young tennis player for both in tennis and life. Let’s not forget ... for us adults who still want to advance our game, the choices here on Long Island are endless. But let’s stick with the juniors for a moment and I will get back to us big kids in a bit. I ask you; for

those parents who love tennis or just being introduced to the game; where would you want your son or daughter to be hanging out on a Friday Night or Saturday afternoon? Yes, the local tennis center! I teach tennis part-time at Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, and when a child enrolls in the program, in addition to the weekly group lesson, he or she is entitled to come to weekend practice sessions with other juniors. They are not staying home sitting on the couch playing XBOX or in front of a computer doing the Facebook thing. They are out socializing with good kids from good families and running around hitting tennis balls in a supervised environment. Many of these kids do not play on the USTA Junior Circuit, but find much joy in challenging each other to be the club junior champion. Maybe they just aspire to make their local junior high or high school team. Perhaps they are using tennis to just be in a wholesome surrounding with kids of similar interest. To this, I say “wow” and a great job by the parents for introducing tennis as the sport for a lifetime! My son was so involved with the tennis program as a junior, that every now and then, he was even able to fill in as a fourth in an adult doubles tennis game. During those times, he was out on the tennis court in a

healthy environment, the light bulb finally went off in my head. We read every day as active Long Island tennis participants about the many highly ranked juniors we have here giving them the accolades they so richly deserve. However, we forget about the kids who play tennis more for recreation with lower aspirations and do not give them the credit they deserve. Many of these kids will be the tennis playing adults and instructors of the future. They are the ones who will frequent our clubs and parks, and keep tennis alive in the long-term. These are the ones who will captain and play on our 2.5 and 3.0 teams. These are the kids who will grow up and develop business and social networks through tennis and grow our game. These are the kids who will marry and have children who will also play tennis in the years ahead. To our schools throughout Long Island where, in most places, the tennis team operates under the radar screen behind the glory, tradition, notoriety and accolades of the football, baseball and basketball teams … I say embrace the boys and girls tennis team and let the student body know that education doesn’t only take place in the classroom. Tennis is truly a sport that will help you prepare you for life after the classroom. I love football continued on page 25

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T A K I N G A S T E P B A C K continued from page 22 When a behavior such as this one is externalized, it is directed at an opponent as well. Even more disturbing are the parents and coaches who enable and promote this behavior with obnoxious clapping and shouting provided under the guise of “encouragement.” I couldn’t even begin to describe all of the “clap contests” that I have seen in my life. How can parents and coaches expect players to “just shut up and play” when we are unwilling to just shut up and watch? Trying to buy success Since I am in the business of selling tennis lessons, I believe I have credibility when I say that the single highest correlation to individual tournament tennis success is not how many lessons you take, but how many tournament matches you play. Matches provide the reference points by which the most learning can take place and the lessons become rele-

vant. Too many parents tell their children to believe in themselves because they are “special” and therefore entitled to succeed. Too many coaches seize this behavior as an opportunity to sell the concept that, if they facilitate you to hit with a great player, somehow their talent will magically transmute to you. The reality is that these attitudes do not instill confidence in players. Rather, they are disempowering because they would have a player believe that they are highly dependent on others for success. In contrast, if a player believes that confidence is drawn from effort and preparation then they can self-empower, while parents and coaches try to find ego boasting elsewhere. Shortcuts to tennis success rarely work. Focus on improvement and learning that draws upon your own experience as well as the wisdom of others with more

experience always works. There are many sacrifices that players, parents and coaches need to make in order to perform their job best. Integrity is not one of those sacrifices. G Steven Kaplan has guided many touring professionals in the U.S. Open and Wimbledon, and has coached more than 350 nationally-ranked junior players. Steve’s background combines a rare blend of competitive and scholastic achievement. In 1979, Steve won the Big East Conference Singles Championship. In 1983, he received his Master’s Degree in Physiology. Steve develop the games of both Keith Kambourian and two-time NCAA Singles Champion Sandra Birch, from the 12-year olds through the pro tour. Most recently, Steve’s longtime student, Bryan Koniecko has achieved the number one ranking in Men’s NCAA tennis.

The Alan King Pro-Am Tennis Tournament

ring Featu Slam Grand pions Cham

Feat Granduring Cham Slam pions

benefitting the Wheelchair Sports Federation Sunday, August 30, 2009 beginning at 10:00 a.m. Wildwood Pool and Tennis Club • 935 Middle Neck Rd. • Great Neck (Rain location will be Port Washington Tennis Academy) Aaron Krickstein

Bob Lutz

Gene Mayer

Guillermo Vilas

Peter Fleming

Gigi Fernandez

Virginia Wade

Australian Semi’s ‘95, US Open Semi’s ‘89

US Open Champ ‘68, ‘74, ‘78, ‘80 Australian Open Champ ‘70

French Open Champ ‘78, ‘79

French & US Open Champ ‘77 Australian Open Champ ‘78, ‘79

Wimbledon Champ ‘79, ‘81, ‘83, ‘84 US Open Champ ‘79, ‘81, ‘83

Grand Slam Titles at US, French, Wimbledon & Australian Open

US Open Singles ‘68, Australian Champ ‘72, Wimbledon Champ ‘77 4 Doubles Grand Slams

nds is Lege er Tenn Play h t O s Plu ar & to Appe

Hosted by: Morris S. Levy Tournament Chairman: Peter Fishbach Tournament Director: Russell Heier

2008 Picture Participants d Contact Above Will Be ed For 2 009

To play or sponsor, please call Peter Fishbach at 516.428.3333 For spectator information or day of event details, please contact Russell Heier at 516.946.0864

Special Thanks to Donna Bernstein and Kenny Hankinson 24

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


A PA R E N T ’ S G I F T and baseball and certainly do not want to undermine these great team sports. But let’s be honest, when high school is over, most of the student’s careers in those sports are coming to an end. As for tennis, well, it is just the beginning. The gym teachers can help to promote our great game and its importance on the popularity scale. Not just because it is a physical activity and gym teachers do promote physical education, but because tennis can enrich a child’s life in ways that even us parents sometimes do not realize. Like many of my esteemed colleagues who teach tennis throughout Long Island and help to enhance a forehand, backhand, serve and volley which serves as a livelihood … remember, we could be building a young person’s self esteem, the roots of a social network which leads to endless paths and adventures in their lives. They could very well benefit from this in business, education and in social environments. We can remember that tennis teaches many of the skills we want our children to learn in life, including perseverance, determination and concentration, as well as having to deal with adversity. These are all life skills … are they not? The gifts will come back in a way that cannot be measured by just dollars. My father, who was in education for over 20 years, once said to me when I took up teaching tennis, “You will learn more from your students and they will challenge you in many ways. If you were up to the challenge you will be equally rewarded.” So, I close by sharing two different firsthand teacher/student stories and those same students who “I” owe some gratitude to. To a teenage tennis student who did not have the talent or the skill set to play collegiate tennis, but opened up a social network by starting a college tennis club and is reaping many rewards. An adult student and a big kid who was, shall we say, not a typical tennis player (he was an amateur boxer for many years). He got “talked into” the sport of tennis by his girlfriend and thought it was a sissy sport. After a few lessons, he realized that concentration, footwork, perseverance goes hand-in-hand with boxing and that tennis was just like boxing only he did not have to get hit in the face. He said, “What a wonderful thing, I should have taken tennis up as a kid.” I am reminded by

continued from page 23

these and other discoveries every day, and I know tennis parents and tennis pros can offer more than just a tennis lesson. Finally, I thank my father and mother who, on a chilly spring Sunday morning in the 1960s, made me get out of bed early and go to the park and hit tennis balls. I hid with my head under the blanket and said, “Tennis is a sissy game and I’m not going.” Thank God they did not take no for answer. Stamping and screaming, I went. They gave me the gift of a lifetime. Parents … don’t take “no” for an answer, get them away from the XBOX and out onto the tennis court. G Lonnie Mitchel has been teaching tennis since 1985, mostly at Carefree Racquet

Club in North Merrick, N.Y. and is a USPTA Level 1 certified tennis instructor. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College ) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). Lonnie has also worked in the travel and tourism industry as a regional sales manager for 25-plus years for such companies the Walt Disney Company and Royal Caribbean International. His wife, Harriet, is a club level tennis player and can often be found on the court. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

What Are Custom-Made Foot Orthotics? By Dr. David Scheiner Dr. David Scheiner has been a foot specialist for almost 20 years and has found great success in designing custom-made foot orthodics when used inside shoes. Orthodics (arch supports) provide proper foot alignment, as well as better balance and height, when walking or playing sports. Orhtodics make your feet feel more comfortable, less fatigued and relieve foot and back pain by stabilizing the foot when standing or moving. Orthodics are especially great for people who have flat feet, high arches, experience heel pain, as well as deformities of the foot. Athletes who wear orthodics are satisfied with the results. Call the “Sports Doctor” Dr. David Scheiner for a free consultation at (516) 223-0148.

Beginners, Advanced and Tournament Players looking to improve or perfect your tennis game, come and train with a USPTA Professional One, USTA High Performance Certified Coach. Carl is a former Davis Cup player who has also competed alongside Dmitry Tursunov, David Nalbandian, Guillermo Coria and many more.

Results and improvements are guaranteed!!

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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A Recap of the 19th Annual USTA/Long Island Region Awards Dinner By Daniel Burgess

T

he 19th Annual USTA/Long Island Region Awards Dinner, held May 6 at the Crest Hollow Country Club was the culmination of six months of planning, numerous brainstorming meetings, endless hours of phone calls, messages, e-mails (lots of them, over 50 a day and on some days, more) … yes, text messages (can’t give an exact count), but there were many. More meetings with vendors, mailing list, programs/certificates (Sunny Fishkind/Steve Haar/Mike Pavlides), trophies and plaques (Scott Axler/Roberta Feldman)…rankings (Ed Wolfarth), leagues (Kathy Miller). Oops … I forgot something, must call Marian Morris (she did a great job on decoration/center pieces/balloons and more). Scott Axler commissioned the Awards Dinner Committee, including committee members Steve Haar, Roberta Feldman, Sunny Fishkind, Eileen Leonard, Terry Fontana, Herb Harris, Ed Wolfarth, Mike Pavlides, Marian Morris (the event planner), and myself. Together, they envisioned an event that would celebrate the outstanding accomplishments of those in our Long Island tennis community with a gala that would show our appreciation. The Long Island Award Dinner Committee recognized a total of 51 individuals for their outstanding achievements and contributions to the 26

Long Island tennis community. Awardees included top performers from our local high schools; ranked USTA Junior and Adults tournament players; USTA league teams that advanced to the national levels; local merchants, such as Adam Monomarco from Advantage Tennis; teaching and playing professionals; as well as local club owners were also honored. Mrs. Nancy McShea received the Lifetime Achievement Award for her 30-plus years of service to the USTA/Eastern Section and for Long Island as a writer/editor/photographer for several tennis publications including Tennis Week and Tennis Magazine. Dick Zausner of the Port Washington Tennis Academy was honored with The Vitas Gerulitis Award for his never-ending dedication and “love” of the game of tennis, providing scholarships, tennis training and tournament fees for those in need. Jason Harewood was the proud recipient of The Arthur Ashe Award for community service and an ambassador of the game of tennis. Jill Levine turned the tragic loss of her son into a nationally-recognized campaign to equip baseball fields and tennis facilities with EAD devices that will hopefully save lives.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Also recognized at the event was Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice for her work with local elementary schools in the “Stop Violence” program. And Dan Dwyer was honored for his dedication to teaching tennis to individuals afflicted with Multiple Sclerosis. The evening started with a musicfilled cocktail hour, courtesy of musicians Barbara and Rafeal Picon, and ended with a savory dinner, a raffle of more than 50 items, and an auction that featured the opportunity to play on Center Court at the U.S. Open. Six-months of preparation had come to an impressive culmination, thanks to the hard work and dedication of your USTA/Long Island Regional Board. Long Island Regional Vice President Scott Axler and the Regional Board would like to thank USTA/Eastern President Tim Heath and USTA/Eastern Section COO D.A. Abrams for their support. Teamwork and collaboration contributed to the success of this event. Kudos to all who participated … G Daniel Burgess is the vice president of USTA/Long Island and a tennis pro at Point Set Indoor Tennis in Oceanside, N.Y. He may be reached by e-mail at ameritwist@aim.com.


Scenes From the 19th Annual USTA/Long Island Region Awards Dinner May 6 at the Crest Hollow Country Club Photo credit: Franklyn Higgs

Aisha Hall with Jared Rada of Sportime/Roslyn, winner of the Nassau County Tennis Club of the Year Award

USTA/Long Island Regional Vice President Scott Axler presents Brendan Ruddock with a plaque of recognition on winning the Suffolk County Boy’s Championship

Dan Dwyer (right) accepts the Innovative Tennis Program Introducing Those Afflicted With Multiple Sclerosis to Tennis Award from Scott Axler (left)

Scott Axler with Claudia Ruiz, the number one-ranked Eastern Section/Long Island Girl’s 12-Year-Old

Daniel Burgess, vice president of USTA/Long Island, addresses the Annual Awards Dinner audience

Scott Axler (left) and D.A. Abrams (right) honor Bill Mecca (center), Long Island Tennis Service Representative, with the USTA/Long Island Press Service Award (Top row): Craig Levine; Ron Dyson, president of the USPTA; Tim Heath, president of the USTA/Eastern Section; Scott Axler; D.A. Abrams; Bill Mecca and Daniel Burgess, with (bottom row): Jill Levine, winner of the Charles Karp Memorial Award; Nassau County DA Kathleen Rice; Nancy McShea, winner of the Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award and the Honorable Judge Cynthia Baker of Freeport

Scott Axler (far left) and USTA/Eastern Region Executive Director D.A. Abrams (far right) with the Talcott family, winners of the USTA/Long Island Tennis Family of the Year Award

Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice takes the podium during the Annual Awards Dinner

A great time was had by all at the 19th Annual USTA/Long Island Region Awards Dinner

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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Nancy McShea Wins Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award at USTA/Long Island Annual Awards Dinner T

he following is the acceptance speech from Nancy McShea from the recent USTA/Long Island 19th Annual Awards Dinner, held at the Crest Hollow Country Club. Nancy was honored by USTA/Long Island with the Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award for dedication and service to the Long Island Tennis community. The award is presented in honor of Hy Zausner, who passed away in 1992 and founded the Port Washington Tennis Academy in 1965, a facility that saw players such as John McEnroe and Vitas Gerulaitis pass through its doors. Long Island Tennis Magazine would like to congratulate Nancy and the rest of the award winners on their accomplishments, recognition and dedication to growing the sport of tennis on Long Island. Thank you for this honor. Tennis is fascinating because, to me, the game is really a study of people … of trying to figure out what makes them unique. I’ve resigned a few times from the stress of meeting constant deadlines and dealing with competitive people, but it’s been my privilege to try and give the reader some insight into the Who’s Who of Eastern tennis, especially on Long Island. Kids evolve in the game through the standard progression of skill levels. I evolved through the adult progression in Long Island’s grassroots. I grew up in Long Beach, N.Y., playing baseball and basketball, but my husband, Jerry, took me to Forest Hills in the 1960s and we played tennis in local parks. In the early 1970s, I coached in Rockville Centre’s Junior Team Tennis program and later ferried my daughter Colette around the Island to junior tournaments. Colette trained with Danny Dwyer at Point Set (where I first played indoor tennis), Viorel Marcu at the Port Washington Tennis Academy, Mark Harrison and Bruce Funk (who said I rushed the net like a freight train) at Rockville Racquet, Lawrence Kleger at 28

Cedarhurst (who loved the term “babying out”), Walter Staritsky at Hempstead Indoor, Louis Vallejo and the late Stu Becker at Baldwin and Tower Tennis. Colette played tournaments at Carefree, where I twice watched McEnroe and Connors play the U.S. Open semis on television and Colette won her first tournament title. I once ran onto the court at Jericho Westbury to tell Colette and her opponent to start over ‘cause the score was wrong and the other parent yelled at me.

Colette McShea and Nancy McShea smile for a photo at the U.S. Open The pros we knew taught future worldclass players during the 1970s-80s tennis boom, and we observed them in action. Eastern’s top juniors played at Lawrence Kleger’s summer camp in Cedarhurst. We had front row seats to watch Borg practice with Viorel at Port Washington, to see Tracy Austin beat Pam Shriver in the Winter Classic girl’s 14 final and nine-year-old Jennifer Capriati win the Rolex girl’s 12 event with her Cabbage Patch Doll in tow. I had taught 9th grade English in Long Beach during the 1960s, and returned to teaching in 1977 at St. Mary’s High School in Manhasset, N.Y. I also coached the tennis team there during Long Island’s tennis heyday. By 1977, Sandy Mayer of Woodmere and Vitas Gerulaitis of Howard Beach had already won in doubles at Wimbledon.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

In ’77, Gerulaitis won the Australian and Italian Open singles crowns and ranked third in the U.S., while Dick Stockton of Garden City ranked fifth. Mary Carillo and John McEnroe of Douglaston won the ‘77 French mixed title and McEnroe was a surprise semifinalist at Wimbledon. It was awesome. We watched McEnroe play the U.S. Open at Forest Hills that summer. It was cool that he was a New Yorker. Our St. Mary’s team once defeated St. Francis Prep at the national tennis center to win the Catholic League Championship. Thom Doshna coached Prep and Scott Aitchison was my assistant coach. Kids from both teams lived in Douglaston, including Gina Carillo, who played for us, and Prep’s Erin Callan, recently the chief financial officer of Lehman Brothers, whom the media labeled the most powerful woman on Wall Street. In 1984, World Tennis magazine bought an article I wrote about the perils of junior tennis. During the U.S. Open that summer, I discussed the issue on ABC’s Nightline with Ted Koppel, Nick Bollettieri and a psychologist. Then I began writing Eastern news stories in magazines and created the first full-sized yearbook. I earned $100 a week. In my first major story in Tennis USA magazine, I featured the junior class of 1985, focused on future touring pros Jennifer Fuchs (Dix Hills) and John Sullivan (Rockville Centre) and their Long Island mentors: Dwyer, Kleger, Gene Mayer, Robbie Wagner, Dick Zausner and the late Madeline Fischbach. I spotlighted the junior careers of Sandra Birch (Huntington Bay), a singles finalist at the junior Open and later a two-time NCAA singles champ at Stanford; and Georgia star Chris Garner (Bay Shore), a star at Georgia who reached the Australian round of 16. The stories of Long Island touring pros are intriguing. Think Paul Annacone (East Hampton and Tennessee and a U.S. Open doubles finalist), Bea Bielik (Valley Stream, 3rd round U.S. Open), Molly Van Nostrand


(Brightwaters, Wimbledon quarterfinalist), Carol Watson (St. Albans, USTA national coach), Larry Scott and Scott Lipsky (Merrick, Harvard and Stanford All-American and both New York State high school champs), Hemel Meghani Cosme (Forest Hills, now managing Alley Pond). Some junior/collegiate standouts were: Kerri Reiter (Woodbury, Easter Bowl champ, ranked 1st in the country), Keith Kambourian (Manhasset, Duke standout), Randy Vigmostad (Greenlawn, Arizona), Robin Deitch (East Rockaway, whose father called me one night at 11:00 p.m. to tell me I stated incorrectly that she had lost a high school match), Ricky Becker (Roslyn, U.S. Open juniors and quarterfinalist and Stanford All-American), and college champs Cory Parr (Jericho, Wake Forest) and Bryan Koniecko (Westbury, Ohio State). I’ve also met hundreds of terrific Long Island volunteers, among them, Lois Prince, Kathy Miller, Roberta Feldman, Perry Aitchison and Dick Zausner, who always liked the kids. At our 40th wedding anniversary, our son Jeremy pointed to a picture of me and said to the guests, “Here’s my mother before she stressed out over 25 years of tennis deadlines.” That would include over 2,000 magazine feature stories and news articles. Thank you. G

Rally Day Double-Header Announced for Nassau and Suffolk Counties By Steve Haar In a departure from previous years and an acknowledgement of the popularity of the Rally Day format, this year will see both a Suffolk County and a Nassau County Rally Day event. N Suffolk County’s Rally Day will take place on Friday, July 17 at Casamento Park in East Islip, N.Y. from 9:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. N Nassau County’s Rally Day will take place Friday Aug. 14 at Tully Park in New Hyde Park, N.Y. from 9:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. The hosts for the two events will be Nancy Howland, the Town of Islip, recreation program coordinator for the Suffolk Rally Day and Bill Mecca, Long Island Tennis Associates president, for the Nassau Rally Day. Rally Day affords youths belonging to approved National Junior Tennis League (NJTL) chapters, Community Tennis Associations (CTAs), and boys and girls clubs the opportunity to have an active and fun tennis day at a local park. For kids 10 and under, a QuickStart program with games and other activities will be provided. For older children, team formats like Rally Ball, intergroup matches and a “carnival” will be held. Volunteers will supervise all activities. Lunch will be provided for all attendees and every child will go home with a prize, a new t-shirt. Approximately 200 children are expected for each day, so volunteers are needed. If you can spare some time on those days and want to have some fun, please contact Steve Haar by e-mail at steveoncourt@aol.com or Terry Fontana by e-mail at terry196@optonline.net. If you would like to be a corporate sponsor for some of the items, including water, pizza, balloons, tables, chairs, music, ball hoppers, etc., please contact Terry or myself. G Steven Haar is a member of the United States Tennis Association/Long Island Region Board. He may be reached by e-mail at steveoncourt@aol.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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The Life of a Coach A closer look inside the tennis coaching life of Mike Kossoff For those who think being a tennis coach is easy … think again! Being a tennis coach is a full-time job in which, on top of the obvious time spent practicing, there are countless additional hours spent with parents and college coaches. Then, of course, there’s also the tournaments and travel. One coach who takes these responsibilities very seriously is Mike Kossoff. Mike grew up in Syosset, N.Y. and went through the rigors of junior tennis, playing in the Eastern Tennis Association (ETA) from the age of 10 through 18. He went on to be an All-MAC selection at Bowling Green. Now as a coach to some of the best juniors on Long Island, Mike works out of Sportime. He has coached one top 800 player in the

world, as well as having coached eight kids to D-1 scholarships and four kids who have won at nationals over his seven years as a coach. What Mike brings to the court every day is a lot of energy. When others are getting tired, he is just getting started. He instills this in the kids he coaches. His motto of “You will not lose by being outworked” is something he shows by example as he takes part in all of the fitness training with the kids. This is one of the things that allows Mike to have a great connection with his students. He treats them with respect, and in turn, they trust him. They know that if he is hard on them, it is only for their own good. Kossoff also truly cares about his players. This was evident a few years ago at a National Clay Court Championship match

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

when his player Corey Parr (currently playing at Wake Forest) had a match against current professional and 45thranked Sam Querrey. The night before the match, while Corey slept, Mike was a nervous wreck who couldn’t sleep at all. Despite the nerves that Mike may have behind the scenes, in front of his players, he always shows great calm. He tells them, “There’s always a way to win, you just have to find it,” and they believe him and work to find it. Every day, tennis coaches make sacrifices for their players. For Mike, sometimes those sacrifices can be traveling to places such as Dubai or Venice for tournaments and leaving his wife at home for portions of 18 to 24 weeks a year, and sometimes, those sacrifices go even further and become a bit more comical. “One sacrifice I had to make for my player was in the middle of the Florida Open,” said Mike. “The weather was close to 100 degrees and my player just looked like he jumped into the pool with the amount of sweat that was on his clothing. He eventually started to cramp up as the match went on. Of course there was no trainer on-site, so as the coach, I was allowed to go over and help him out during an injury timeout. He asked me to change clothes with him because he ran out of shirts. So on a hot sticky July summer day, I had to switch clothes with him just so he could continue. At that time, I realized putting on my player’s sweatsoaked shirt was about to be added to my job description.” Mike’s job description continued to


expand at another tournament a few months later. “As players move on later in the tournaments, more and more college coaches start to come and watch matches. I never knew that ‘stylist’ would end up being part of my job description, but every morning, I had a normal looking tennis outfit laid out on my player’s bed instead of the wrinkled, dirty and stained outfit that he was planning on using that day.” All in a days work for a tennis coach. Mike has been fortunate enough to be able to work with great players through his seven years as a tennis coach .He has learned from other great coaches, more recently, from Lawrence Kleger at Sportime, and as a junior player, Keith Kambourian at Bethpage Park. So far, it has been a developing player who has left possibly the largest impression on him. When asked for his coaching highlights, one that quickly came to mind was that of a 10-year-old who was about to quit the sport. Mike wasn’t about to let that happen, and he convinced him not only to continue, but to strive to be the best tennis player he could be. That player is now ranked in the top 60 in the country in the boy’s 12 and-under division and is as a better person for the lesson that was learned in not quitting. The letter Mike received from that child’s mother let him know how important his job really was, aside from just how good a player someone becomes. Mike does a fantastic job of helping his players develop as people, not just as players. Mike is well-respected by college coaches and by his students. He gives his all each day and that is what he requires from his players in return. He balances a coach/friend relationship during the many hours of training and travel. Mike and his students both put in a lot of hard work. In the end when he gets that call from a student who has moved on to college and is playing at his/her school seeking advice before their college matches, they both know all the hard work was well worth it. G Tennis pro Mike Kossoff may be reached by phone at Sportime Bethpage at (516) 9338500 or e-mail mkoss22@aol.com. Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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Flexibility and Stretching Exercises to Avoid Repetitive Stress Injuries two of the most common lower leg injuries:

By Laszlo Elek Injuries are a part of tennis … it is a fast moving game with lots of stopping and starting, sharp lateral movements, accelerations and stretches. As you get older, your chance of repetitive stress injuries increases. So, should you just accept that injuries happen or is there something you can do to reduce the risk of injury? If you look at the top pros—for example Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal—you will notice that, despite the huge volume of games they play at an incredibly intense level, they are rarely injured. How is that possible? Their secret lies in the work they do to strengthen and increase the flexibility of the key areas, those most susceptible to injury in tennis players. Let’s start by looking at

N Calf muscle strain N Ankle sprain Calf muscle strain Also known as tennis leg, a calf muscle strain occurs when there is a sudden contraction of the calf muscles, often during a sprint or sudden change of direction. This injury is very common in players over the age of 35. The main symptom is a sudden, sharp, burning pain in the lower leg. If you feel a sharp pain in this area, you should immediately stop playing, and get ice onto the injured area as soon as possible. This injury will take anywhere up to six weeks to heal. The sooner you get ice on it, the quicker the recovery. Once the acute pain has reduced (24 to 48 hours), you can begin gentle stretching.

Smash Indoor Tennis (formerly Mid Island Tennis)

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Upper calf Using a wall or counter for support, take your injured leg backwards and straighten the leg. Press your heel to the floor, and feel the stretch in the upper calf and the back of the knee. Hold for 30 sec., then relax. Repeat twice for each leg. Lower calf Stand with both feet flat on the floor, pointing forward, half a stride apart. Keeping your back straight, gently bend your knees and rest your bodyweight on the rear foot. You should feel the stretch in the lower calf and Achilles tendon area. Strengthening the area Rehabilitating any injury requires a combination of flexibility work and strength work. Strengthening this area should start with some easy exercises:

Smash Indoor Tennis Club is pleased to announce Robert McKenna, USPTA Pro 1 Professional, as its new Director of Tennis effective June 1, 2009. Robert McKenna, 13-time National Tennis Champion & 2008 USTA Eastern Pro of the Year heads a professional staff available both days, nights and weekends for Private lessons, Pee Wee, Junior & Adult Group lessons as well as League and Ladder programs.

N Foot alphabets: Sit on a chair and write the alphabet in the air with the foot of the injured leg.

Winner of the Prestiqious "Vitas Gerulatis - For The Love of Tennis " award from the USTA Long Island Region, Robert targets all levels of beginner, intermediate and advanced programs. Dedicated to developing hand/eye coordination and nurturing a child’s love of tennis to developing proper technique for team and group play, Smash provides every opportunity to develop skills and acquire a broad knowledge of tennis no matter your current level.

N Towel scrunches: Roll up a towel by grasping it with the toes of the injured leg. Repeat 10 times.

For information, contact: BOB McKENNA, at 516-832-8010 or mtennisbob@aol.com 575 Merrick Ave., Westbury, NY 11568 32

Stretches to perform With all stretches, you should stretch to the point of tightness, not pain. Hold when you feel tightness, breathing deeply and relax.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

N Calf raises: This is a key exercise. Stand with the front of your foot on a stair or step, the heel off the edge. Slowly rise continued on page 34


The Problems With Positive Thinking By Happy Bhalla Conventional wisdom amongst many coaches and players suggests that the key to mental “toughness” is to talk and think positively at all times; especially when it comes to match play. While this seems to make sense at first glance, let us examine and explore a little beneath the surface. The truth is that when a player steps out onto the court to contest a match, there are only two possible outcomes. To deny that reality in one’s own mind does not change that truth. So, why do it? Somehow, there seems to have emerged this consensus that it is a sign of weakness if one acknowledges the fact that one may lose, thereby increasing the chances of that eventually happening. Conversely, it is

believed that if one repeats positive thoughts like “I will win” or “I know I am better than my opponent,” then somehow one’s chances of success become greater. How can this be true? The outcome of a match will surely be decided by whoever performs better on that particular day, and not by anyone’s thoughts, words, rankings, expectations, beliefs or opinions. It is easy to understand why coaches and players have fallen into this trap. To think positive thoughts seems like sound advice to give to individuals who are fearful and nervous; there is so much negativity and complaining happening during the competition, none of which helps performance. However, to simply think or talk positively does not make someone really and truly be positive from the inside at their core and that’s what really counts. “Fake it until

you make it” simply does not work. The truth is that one who is making an effort to think and be positive is doing so because doubt, tension and fear are already a reality for them and no amount of empty words can make these deep-rooted emotions disappear. They can only be suppressed and relegated to the subconscious mind, from where they will be much harder to eliminate. An individual who is truly confident and comfortable with him or herself will not be feeling negative and will therefore not feel the need to mask those feeling with positive self-talk. But how can we get to this state of being where there is no doubt or fear? In my opinion, it is by facing the fears or any other emotions that arise head on continued on page 38

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F I T N E S S A N D N U T R I T I O N continued from page 32 onto your toes, pause, then slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. As you get stronger, you can start to do this one leg at a time. N Plyometrics: Plyometrics are explosive movements and are great practice for the movements you will perform during a game. Do not perform these exercises until the injury is completely healed. N Bunny hops: Using an imaginary line, do 20 two-footed sideways hops back and forth. Ankle sprain A very common tennis injury, this is usually caused by landing on the outside of the foot, which turns the foot too far inwards. In addition to the stretches described above, do the following exercises to strengthen this area: N Ankle circles: Sit in a chair. Lift the in-

jured foot and slowly circle the ankle 10 to 20 times in each direction.

for 30 seconds, then switch feet. Now try it with your eyes closed—this is much harder! Finally, standing on one foot, throw and catch a ball, either against the floor or against a wall.

N Outside of foot pulls: Sit in a chair with your feet on the floor, one end of an elastic tube attached to the chair, the other end of the tube under the middle of the injured foot. Move the foot outwards against the resistance of the elastic tubing, keeping the outer side of the foot facing up. Repeat 10 times.

Regularly performing these exercises will increase both strength and flexibility, and reduce the chances of future injuries. Finally, be sure to always warm up and cool down thoroughly before and after a match. G

N Heel walks and toe walks: Walk on your heels, keeping the rest of the foot off the ground. Then walk on your toes. Finally, walk on the inside of your feet, the big toe kept firmly against the ground. N Balance exercises: Stand on one foot

Laszlo Elek is a certified personal trainer (CFT) working out of Sportime-Syosset who runs tennis specific training programs. He can be reached by phone at (516) 3201463 or e-mail eleklaszlo@optonline.net to arrange your own tennis specific training program, and start to move your game to the next level.

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37


POSITIVE THINKING rather than denying them. By facing and exploring our reality, not the way we wish it to be, but the way it is and exploring every aspect of this reality both existentially and intellectually we can transcend these emotions. There is nothing wrong with facing the truth of the statement: “I may win or I may lose and I can live with either outcome. Now I can place both things to one side and simply focus on playing freely to the best of my ability.” It is, however, easier to say these words then it is to absorb the truth held within these words into our consciousness. To acknowledge and understand that defeat is a possibility is accepting reality and by accepting reality we avoid false bravado which simply hides our fear from others but not from ourselves. If we feel fear, we will operate from fear and fear will be at the core of all that we do. Peak performance will not be sustainable through fear-based motivation. Not only is there nothing wrong with facing this truth, but it is an extremely freeing experience and healthy attitude and ultimately, the only way out of this quagmire. If there is fear and doubt within a player (and what player does not feel these emotions to some extent), it is far better to raise these emotions to the surface and cut them at their very root through acknowl-

continued from page 33

edgement, acceptance and awareness rather than to try and suppress them, from where they will continue to return at the most inopportune times. Suppression never works in the long run because it requires effort and for how long can you continuously make this effort. Eventually, you will let your guard down and then the subconscious mind will reveal itself in uncontrolled action. On another level, it is important to understand that the mind works in duality: The seeming opposites are not really opposites, but they are two sides of the same coin. In other words, to have day without night is impossible; or light without darkness or beauty without ugliness. One opposite implies the other; you could even say one creates or defines the other. In fact, the very existence of one is only possible because of its polar opposite. Consequently, to try and be just positive will always fail because the negative will always show up, albeit through the back door. Obviously, we know that negative selftalk is destructive and hampers performance, but what is not so clear, but nonetheless true, is that positive self-talk is not the way out. Positive self-talk will necessarily lead to negativity and will keep players stuck in an emotional roller-coaster from which there is absolutely no escape. The irony is that both negative self-talk and positive self-talk are fear-based. On the

outer level, they appear very different, but the inner cause of each is the same, fear! Positive energy becomes negative energy in the time it takes to miss a backhand or a few shots or to lose a few games. This is the emotional roller-coaster that most players are on and many coaches are perpetuating. The only way out is a transcendence; to reach a state of being where there is no positive or negative. This transcendence happens through acceptance. If you are not feeling negative, there will be no need to try and be positive. There will just be a silence and you will simply play and be so absorbed in the playing that no thoughts about the result are possible. And if no thoughts are present, fear will be impossible. And when fear is absent our natural state of being is allowed to shine through; a calm, relaxed, centeredness from which you will be able to play the best tennis you are capable of. Simply put, the mind is creating stories and all stories are fiction. The only reality is what is and acceptance of what is happens when there is no story. So the goal is not to replace negative stories with positive ones, regardless of how logical that seems to sound, but to drop all stories and when all stories are dropped there is silence and in that silence we are in the present moment and there is an acceptance of all that is … this is the mental state that allows us to play to our full athletic potential. G Happy Bhalla has a master’s degree in philosophy and religion and began instructing tennis 35 years ago. He has written two books and several articles over the past 15 years on the role of the mind in both the learning process and in the competitive experience. He is a regular contributor to the tennis instructional Web site, www.tennisone.com. He is currently in the Hamptons, N.Y. where he runs the Wholistic Tennis Academy at Le Club during the summer months and gives workshops, coaches or finds a quiet place to recharge his batteries the rest of the year in warmer climates. He may be reached by email at wholistictennis@gmail.com or visit his Web site www.wholistictennis.com.

38

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


Wheelchair Tennis … Then and Now By Dan Dwyer In the early 1980s, I received a phone call while in the middle of a staff meeting. The caller was requesting to enter a men’s tournament. Being rather busy at the moment, I told him that I would transfer his call to the tournament director. He interrupted by saying that he had a potential problem. I asked what the problem was and he told me that he was in a wheelchair. I must admit that I was a little taken aback and told him that I didn’t have time right then to discuss it with him, but that if he liked, I would hit some balls with him the next day as long as he understood that I would be very honest and upfront about what I thought the possibility of someone playing in a wheelchair was. He agreed and we met the next morning at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. John

Johnson showed up on time in an unusual wheelchair and we went on to the court. After five minutes, I knew that John was correct on the phone about there being a potential problem. He would probably be able to beat 85 percent of the players in my club. We played for about 30 minutes and then had a serious discussion which began my education into the world of wheelchair tennis. John told me upfront that he didn’t really expect to play in the tournament, but was interested in promoting wheelchair tennis and wanted to know how I felt about it. He told me that there was an organization of players in chairs, the Wheelchair Tennis Players Association (WTPA), in California and that a gentleman by the name of Brad Parks was the founder. I got in touch with Brad, put together some financial backers, and in a very short time, founded the National Tennis Association for

the Disabled and arranged a wheelchair exhibition in Madison Square Garden (MSG) during what was then The Masters, run by Gene Scott. Gene Mayer, the number fourranked player in the world and a lifetime friend, agreed to serve as our Honorary Chairman of the event, and from there, things just started to happen. The exhibition at MSG was quite unusual. As we entered the court, the noise was so loud that there could be no communication between the four of us (Suzanne Lippe, Brad, myself and an amputee in a chair), but after four balls of the first rally, you could hear a pin drop in MSG. People were just as amazed as I was with John and particularly impressed with Brad who was then the top wheelchair player in the country and probably the world at that point and was much stronger than John. continued on page 41

OUI LOVE TENNIS! Moussa Drame Tennis is serving up a lot of fun on the newly resurfaced NovaGrass tennis courts at the Pridwin Hotel, just off the beach. Our philosophy encourages every player to be the best player he or she can be, through small classes or private instructions from seasoned teachers who offer plenty of positive reinforcement. Adults All skill levels. Private or group lessons. Ladies clinic 5 days a week. Junior Camp All skill levels, ages 7-18. 3 sessions: 8 a.m.11a.m., 11a.m.-2p.m., 2p.m.-5p.m. Contact information: moussadrametennis@yahoo.com Phone numbers: 917-209-6615 • 631-749-0799

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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2009 Winter Junior Team Tennis Playoffs: A Look Back By Steve Abbondondelo

T

he 2009 Long Island Winter Junior Team Tennis (JTT) season ended with an exciting playoff schedule held at Robbie Wagner Tournament Training in Glen Cove on May 2 and at Rockville Racquet on May 9. Twenty-three teams competed in three divisions for the right to represent Long Island at the Eastern Sectional, held June 20-21 at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center site of the U.S. Open in Flushing. The Rockville Racquet One and Two Teams dominated the 18-and-Under Divi-

sion, winning both flights. The Rockville Racket One Team won the flight playoff to advance. In the 14-and-Under Division, the Huntington Indoor Racquets were defeated in the finals by the Rockville Racquet One Team. Two Saturday afternoons of rain forced the 12-and-Under Division to be moved indoors. Six teams competed in a roundrobin to decide the champion. The competition was very close, with the winner being decided in the final round. The Eastern Athletic Dix Hills Smashes playing in their first JTT playoff prevailed. The

Rockville Racquet One Team finished second with Glen Head Racquet Early Hit finishing a close third. Congratulations to all coaches, captains, parents and players for helping to make the 2009 USTA JTT Winter Season a success! The summer season began June 22. Good luck to our advancing teams at the June Sectional. G Steve Abbondondelo is a Junior Team Tennis Coordinator. For questions or inquiries about the USTA JTT program, e-mail Steve at steveabby@optonline.net.

Scenes from the 2009 Winter Junior Team Tennis Playoffs

The Rockville Racquets 14-and-Under team, USTA Team Tennis Long Island Regional Champions

Congratulations to the 18-and-Under Rockville Racquet team, winners of the USTA Team Tennis Long Island Region Championship

Smash Tennis Names McKenna Director of Tennis

The Eastern Athletic Dix Hills 12and-Under team was crowned USTA Team Tennis Long Island Regional champs

Smash Indoor Tennis of Westbury, N.Y. has announced the appointment of Bob McKenna as the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new director of tennis. Bob brings a wealth of knowledge to the position, including experience as a 12time national champion. Bob as also the winner of the 2008 Vitas Gerulaitis Award and Eastern Professional of the Year. For more information, contact Bob McKenna of Smash Indoor Tennis at (516) 832-8010. 40

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009

The Rockville Racquets 12-and-Under team, USTA Team Tennis Long Island Regional finalists


W H E E L C H A I R T E N N I S continued from page 39 The spectators were in a state of awe and the silence in the arena was awesome â&#x20AC;Ś everyone was mesmerized. Following the exhibition, I was interviewed on most, if not all, the major networks. After the initial shock of watching the video I presented of Brad and Randy Snow, the interviewers would always ask for our address and phone number so that people could send money. I always replied the same way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am not here to raise money, but rather to show all those sitting at home in wheelchairs that wheelchair tennis is real. It is truly a competitive sport played at the highest levels and with only two basic rule differences from able-bodied tennis: 1. Wheelchair players are allowed two bounces. In reality, the second bounce is rarely used and the rule exists primarily to prevent a drop shot followed by a lob.

2. The player must have one buttock in the chair when he/she strikes the ball. Some wheelchair players have the ability to stand for limited periods of time and obviously this would be a huge advantage that had to be prevented. At this time, the USTA had a Special Populations Committee that intermingled peoples of all disabilities (mental and physical) and quite frankly the wheelchair players were unhappy with the situation as was I. After a two-year period, we got Wheelchair Tennis Sub-Committee status, but without specific funding allocated just to wheelchair tennis. About six years after that, then-President Les Synder appointed Standing Committee Status to Wheelchair Tennis, and I was appointed its first chairperson. Shortly thereafter, the International Tennis Federation (ITF) also formed a Wheelchair Tennis Committee (prior to that time, there was an International Wheelchair

Foundation that was supported by the ITF), and I was appointed the first American to serve on that Committee. The USTA Wheelchair Committee had three basic goals at its inception: 1. To do all in our power to put ourselves out of a job by increasing awareness of the need for much more research, and thereby, someday be in the situation that there would be no more people in wheelchairs and therefore no more need for our committee. 2. Have what was to become know as up and down competitions, intermingling able-bodied and wheelchair players. 3. Have a U.S. Open Wheelchair Division at Flushing Meadows, the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Sadly, we have not achieved our first goal, but I do believe that remarkable continued on page 44

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009

41


USTA TOURNAMENT photo

gallery

Scenes From the L1 LBTC Championship May 8-10 at Long Beach Tennis Center Photo Credit: Franklyn Higgs

Scenes From the +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championship, USTA L3 FIC May 15-17 and May 22-55 at Sportime Tennis Lynbrook Photo Credit: Franklyn Higgs

42

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009


Athletic Mouth Guards Can Help Your Game

Your Upper Teeth Must Be Protected from Traumatic Injury, but an Unbalanced Bite Can Actually Physically Weaken Your Whole Body Could You Play Your Best with One Shoe Off? A mouth guard that properly fits over the upper teeth may, in fact, set your lower teeth up to hit the appliance with unequal forces. The uneven strain on muscles in the head and neck also affect the back, shoulders, arms, and legs. Just like from the feet up, the mouth down can impact the ability to function at peak performance.

What Can a Lopsided Bite Do? Interfere with hand-eye coordination, reflexes: Teeth supply information to many important cranial nerves. The brain interprets what your teeth bite on. Incompatible biting forces send inaccurate messages that have an impact on reactions to timing, focus, and concentration. Put strain on neck and back muscles or decrease strength, flexibility, and endurance: An athletic appliance that causes the mouth to over-open or clench on one side, or both, puts strain on the connecting muscles, nerves, bones, and blood supply making you more prone to injury and fatigue.

Prevent recovery from injury: Getting back in shape takes much longer when the body needs to overcome a structural imbalance. A mouthguard that does not take the bite into consideration prevents postural equilibrium, which can affect the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response to pain, retraining, and flexibility.

Level the Playing Field in Your Mouth Whether you buy an appliance from the store, on-line, or even from your dentist, you must still determine the fit for your body. If you suffer from allergies, painful areas, headaches, fatigue, sleeping disturbances, or any number of health conditions, your bite may be out of balance with the rest of your body. You may, in fact, find that a balancing lower appliance made to keep your bite level with the horizon, will help restore equilibrium to distant muscles.

How do you know if Your Appliance is Right? Kinesiology muscle testing is one way determine imbalances in the body. A dentist trained in muscle testing can use this technique, along with others, to help verify if your appliance is right for you.

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W H E E L C H A I R T E N N I S continued from page 41 progress has been made, and that someday, possibly in my lifetime but certainly in my children’s lifetimes, spinal cord injuries resulting in paralysis will be a thing of the past. Quite happily, the second and third goals have been realized even though just about everyone at the time said that it could not be done. The same John Johnson mentioned earlier in this article was runnerup with his able-bodied doubles partner in the USTA 3.5 Men’s National League three years ago and John is a teaching pro in Florida instructing able-bodied players. Congrats John! There is a U.S. Open National Wheel-

chair Tennis Championships held during the U.S. Open. Because of scheduling conflicts with the Para Olympics, it is not held in years that there is an Olympics. In 2009, the event will take place during the second week of the Open (most likely Sept. 10-13, 2009). Exact dates cannot be determined at this time, as rain delays, length of previous matches, etc. only allow for one day’s notice. There are four separate divisions: 1. Men’s Open, featuring the top seven ITF males and one wild card. 2. Women’s Open, featuring the top seven ITF females and one wild card.

Tennis Practice Tips From Boomer, the interactive ball machine

Using The 1/3 Rule for drilling and competing Competition allows you to work on shot selection, tenacity and focus. Drilling allows you to concentrate on pure execution of a particular skill (volley, serve, approach shot, etc.). Both drilling and competing are necessary to improve your game. Competition time can be further improved using “The 1/3 Rule.” This rule dictates to: Play weaker players 1/3 of the time to learn how to win; play stronger players 1/3 of the time to raise your game; and play equal opponents 1/3 of the time to put it all together. This theory also applies to drilling. Spend 1/3 of your time on easy shots grooving fundamentals; 1/3 of your time with hard shots improving your footwork and “scrambling;” and 1/3 of your time on consolidating these skills on medium shots. Set Boomer to accommodate The1/3 Rule Boomer is a unique, interactive ball machine, using a camera, audio system and computer to literally “see” the position and speed of every shot, and then react appropriately when firing the next ball. Use The 1/3 Rule drilling against Boomer, by adjusting Boomer’s level below, above or equal to your own. Then, switch Boomer for real-life games and matches, also at varying skill levels, and have fun while improving your game! G For more information, call Dave Jordan at (888) 8BOOMER or e-mail info@tennisrobot.com (ask about the special Long Island summer rental offer). 44

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

3. Quads, featuring the top four ITF quads. 4. Juniors, featuring the top four ITF juniors. The wheelchair matches are usually played on viewer-friendly Courts 7 & 11, but again, this is subject to change depending on the myriad problems that exist with scheduling such a huge event. Remember, the U.S. Open is the largest sporting event in the world and it is held right here in good old New York. The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center is very wheelchair-friendly, and there is ample seating specifically designed for wheelchair and disabled spectators. The Arthur Ashe seats are expensive, but they are some of the best seats in the house. I urge all of you who read this to let all of your challenged friends know that seats and day passes are still available for this year. Did you know that the USTA is the only governing body in the United States to be appointed by an Act of Congress as a governing body and as such is totally responsible for the selection of all of our International and Paralympics Teams? Finally, there are several wheelchair programs available throughout New York City and Long Island. Most of them offer full scholarships for those in need. If you or anyone you know needs information about these programs, you can contact the ETA offices or contact me directly at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club in Oceanside, N.Y. at (516) 536-2323. Each of them could use volunteers to help out with clinics, paperwork, sponsorships, transportation, etc. So all TABS (Temporarily-Able Bodied) are welcome and appreciated. You can make a difference and what a difference that is. G Dan Dwyer is the head professional at Oceanside, N.Y.-based Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was named USTA Man of the Year in 1997 and was inducted into the USTA Hall of Fame in 1998. His list of past students includes John McEnroe, four-time U.S. Open Champion and threetime Wimbledon Champion. He may be reached at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail dbdntad@aol.com.


Deer Park Tennis SCOREs With Community Service By Eric Dietsche

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laying tennis at Deer Park Indoor Tennis Club has had more than one meaning for me. It was more than just ladder matches and group lessons. It has become about the Sundays that I have spent playing tennis with the SCORE (Student Caring Offers Recreational Excel-lence) guys, who come from a group home in East Northport, N.Y. At this juncture in my life, when I am about to head off to college in the fall, it is with great pride that I tell you about the great things that are happening at the Deer Park Indoor Tennis Club. I would also like to extend my immense gratitude to Afzal Ali for giving me the opportunity to take part in these activities. The SCORE program has been running at Deer Park for the past five years. It has been under the leadership of three highly motivated high school boys: Matt Levine, Mark Broomfield and me. The program was started five years ago by Matt Levine, who saw an opportunity to brighten the day of several mentally- and physicallyhandicapped young men.

Since 2007, I have taken the responsi- lege in the fall, I had the responsibility of bility as the head volunteer and the man- finding someone to take over my role in ager of the SCORE program. I learned the the program. I wanted to make sure that ropes my first year, under the direction of Mark Broomfield, and have since taken over the past two years. I work to make sure that there is court time available, which is made possible through the generosity of Deer Park Tennis and Afzal Ali, who set aside an hour of court time every week. I also arrange Eric Dietsche (far right) with volunteers and members of the SCORE (Stufor a certain number dent Caring Offers Recreational Excel-lence) program gather for a photo of other volunteers at the Deer Park Indoor Tennis Club to come every week so that the program can run smoothly. We I chose a responsible individual who have a number of great volunteers who would be as committed to the program have worked with me to make this pro- as I was to ensure that the young men gram the success that it is today. have the opportunity to play every week. continued on page 48 This year, since I will be going to col-

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Beach Tennis Offers Something for Everyone Intense pro competition and fun recreational play

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hen Oceanside, N.Y. resident Nadia Johnston played beach tennis for the first time, she realized she had an opportunity that most professional athletes rarely get—a second chance. The Australian-born Johnston was a rising tennis star in the late 90s, attaining WTA rankings of 314 for singles and 245 for doubles, and competing in the 2001 Australian Open. Throughout her seven-year run as a touring pro, Johnston’s future looked bright, until a wrist injury in the summer of 2001 changed everything. “Tennis was my life. So when I realized that I couldn’t compete at the top level anymore, I was devastated,” said Johnston. In 2003, Johnston relocated to Long Island where she

Nadia Johnston and her new partner Nicole Melch after their win at the 2009 Beach Tennis USA Fort Lauderdale Open in May

began to pick up the pieces—teaching private tennis lessons. Two years later, she was introduced by a group of friends to a new sport called beach tennis. “From the first day I played beach tennis, I was hooked,” Nadia Johnston returning a volley during a beach tennis match said Johnston. “Not only was it a great workout and way to get ing diligently for her inventible rematch back into pro competition, but it was just with the Maloney Sisters at this year’s National Championship set for Labor Day plain fun.” Johnston went on to dominate the weekend. While Johnston continues to help spearWomen’s Pro Division of the Beach Tennis USA National Tour for three straight head the growth of professional beach tenseasons, winning the National Champi- nis, some Long Islanders are perfectly onship. She was undefeated in pro com- content to play the sport in a relaxed sopetition until the 2009 National cial atmosphere. Lisa Goldberg of Long Championship, in Long Beach, N.Y., Beach is one such beach tennis enthusiwhere she and new partner, Elena Jirnova, ast. Goldberg is helping to coordinate reglost to the Maloney Sisters, Lisa and ular weekly league play at the permanent beach tennis courts at Grand Boulevard in Laura, from San Diego, Calif. Now, midway through the BTUSA 2009 Long Beach. “The beauty of this sport is that anybody National Tour, Nadia Johnston finds herself back on top. With her new partner, Nicole can play it,” said Jim Lorenzo, president of Melch from Long Beach, N.Y., she’s won Beach Tennis USA and a resident of Long three out of four tournaments and is train- Beach. “The sand is a very forgiving surface for weekend athletes and seniors. The learning curve is really short. Even beginners can pick up beach tennis in a few hours. This is why it’s so perfectly suited for recreational leagues.” Beach Tennis USA has developed a patented net system it makes available on its Web site, along with beach tennis balls, sand socks, and a full line of Beach Tennis USA shirts, hats and other apparel. You can also get deep discounts on all event registrations by becoming a BTUSA member. To learn more, visit www.beachtennisusa.net. G To learn how you can play some fun social beach tennis in Long Beach this summer, contact Lisa Goldberg by phone at (516) 317-3189 or e-mail morgenroth@mac.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


Scenes From the Beach Tennis USA Long Island Tournament May 23-24 in Long Beach, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009

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C O M M U N I T Y S E R V I C E continued from page 45 I wanted to find someone who was young enough that they would be able to spend a good couple of years bonding with the participants as I had. I also wanted someone who was kind, caring and hard-working. I would only be able to feel comfortable leaving if I could find someone who met my criteria. Luckily, I was able to find two people who met my criteria: Brett and Eric Teplitz, two brothers who are also part of the junior development program at Deer Park. They will be the people who will carry this worthwhile program into the future, teaching the great game of tennis to the people who really appreciate it. I will sorely miss all of the relationships that I have built through this program over the years. I remember almost every week from when I started, including the first time that Ryan, our most active participant, hit a backhand in a rally, and his reaction to this progress. When he is happy, everyone is happy because his smile and his good humor are contagious.

I will always remember the time that Darin would spend chasing me around the court, pretending to be a ghost. Brian, and his obsession with being in control of the ball cart, is yet another unforgettable experience. However, probably most of all, I will never forget the supreme effort that our other Brian, the only one with a physical handicap, put into playing every week. His face lights up every time he makes contact, then he looks to us for another opportunity to hit the ball. All of these experiences will forever remain in my heart. I truly believe that I have learned more from our participants in this program about life than I could have ever taught them about tennis, and I have Afzal Ali, the head pro at the Deer Park Indoor Tennis Club, to thank for that. They approach everything with a positive attitude and a smile. They teach me every week just how lucky I am, and that none of us really have anything to complain about at all, even when life seems to be at its most overwhelming.

Although I am extremely sad to be leaving Deer Park and everything that it has offered me, including the SCORE program, I am confident that I will be leaving the program in good hands. Afzal has done so much already, but I don’t think that he will have to worry, since the Teplitz brothers will be in charge. I am extremely grateful to Afzal for giving me the opportunity to participate in this life-changing experience. I have become a different person through it. G Eric Dietsche is a senior and valedictorian of the Class of 2009 at St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School in West Babylon, N.Y. As a five-time varsity letter winner in tennis, he is also a two-time All-League Player. He also won the title of Most Valuable Player in the New York Catholic High School Athletic Association in 2009. He plans to attend Williams College in Massachusetts in the fall where he’ll play tennis. He may be reached by e-mail at edietsche@gmail.com.

USTA/Eastern Section Donates Rackets to Hempstead Girl’s Team Twenty-two members of the Hempstead High School Girl’s Tennis Team were given tennis rackets through the United States Tennis Association (USTA)/Eastern Section’s used racket donation program. Each of the 22 teammates received a used, but very playable, racket and a can of balls (which were provided courtesy of the U.S. Professional Tennis Association/Eastern Division). The rackets had been donated by generous Long Islanders and collected in selected clubs throughout the area. If anyone has used rackets to donate, please see your local club or contact the USTA/Long Island staff members to arrange for a pick-up. G For more information, visit www.eastern.usta.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Dr. Bob Cincotta, (far left) Hempstead physical education director, and Bill Mecca, USTA/Long Island representative, present the Hempstead High School Girl’s Tennis Team with rackets


Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Junior Player Profiles

Mia Vecchio

Howie Weiss

Mia Vecchio was born on Jan. 3, 1997 in Manhasset Hills, N.Y. and is 12-years-old. Mia started playing tennis at the age of five at Cunningham Park, Long Island, N.Y. She tried soccer, gymnastics and ballet, but nothing compared to her love of banging a tennis ball. At this young age, Mia wanted to be just like Jennifer Capriati. Ever since, she has not looked back. Through disciplined training and hard work, Mia has made a huge jump in ranking within a year. She was ranked 65th last year, and is now ranked ninth in the Girl’s-12-and-Under Division in the east. In recent months, Mia reached the finals of the Binghamton Sectional on April 24 and placed fifth in the last sectional on Memorial Day Weekend in West Caldwell, N.J. She also won doubles with her partner, Samantha Perri. Mia hopes to turn pro one day and has the full support of her parents. She has a younger brother Rudy, who is Autistic. It is because of her brother that Mia wants to be an advocate for Autistic children one day and wants to use tennis as her platform. For more information on Mia Vecchio, visit www.miavecchio.com.

Howie Weiss was born on March 15, 1994 and is 15-years-old. He started playing tennis around the age of six, and he is currently ranked 16th in the Eastern Rankings and 159th in the National Rankings. His goal is to be the best he can and go as far as that will take him. Last year, he entered the Boy’s-14-and-Under rankings at number one in the east and at the end of the year, he was ranked 25th in the nation. Howie also has won a 14-and-Under National Open and four 14-and-Under Eastern Sectionals. Howie’s favorites Music artist: Red Hot Chili Peppers Color: Red Vacation spot: The Bahamas (specifically the beach) Last book read: Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell Favorite movie: The Italian Job

Mia’s favorites Music artist: Rihanna Color: Blue Vacation spot: Florida Last book read: Twilight by Stephenie Meyer Favorite movie: The Chipmunks

Point Set – “Where Our Service Is Your Advantage” Point Set Indoor Racquet 2009-2010 Fall/Winter Season • Starting Date September 14, 2009 Junior Development Tennis Program • Long Island's Finest Professional Tennis Teaching Staff Point Set Welcomes Daniel Burgess-Director of Tennis over 30 years of teaching experience USPTA National Head Tester, Certified USPTA/USTA High Performance Coach Tonny Van dePeterman- Director of High Performance Training-coach of some of the highest ranked juniors on Long Island including Danny Kreyman who won the NY State High School Championships Brett Nissenson-Long Island's top rated teaching professional

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Nadia Johnston-former world ranked WTA player

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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Do you get tight or nervous during matches? Is anger and frustration preventing you from playing your best tennis?

Would you like to learn how to play the natural and easy way? Would you like to be able to play in competition without fear or tension?

Now you can!

Wholistic Tennis Academy Tennis Director: Happy Bhalla Email: wholistictennis@gmail.com www.wholistictennis.com tel: 631-288-6009 Online and telephone consultation also available Mental awareness specialists to help you fulfill your athletic potential 50

What is Holistic Sports Dentistry? By Dr. Len Fazio Traditionally, sport dentistry has served to treat and prevent oral-facial athletic injuries and related diseases and manifestations. However, this injury/diseasefocused treatment may be limited in its ability to allow the athlete to fully realize his or her healthy potential. The holistic sports dentist is concerned not only with injury prevention and treatment, but is also aware of the direct or indirect impact that routine dental materials and procedures have on the athlete’s mental and physical states. The tooth/body connection Holistic dentistry provides an integrative approach which takes into account many different considerations when determining a proper course of action. Holistic, or biological dentists, employ a health-focused philosophy which acknowledges and respects the oral-systemic, or tooth-body, connection. This relationship is significant in that injury and treatment of specific teeth, can, and do, have a direct impact on overall health and well-being. Proper diagnosis and corrective treatment is essential to both the short-term and long-term health of the teeth and the body. Additionally, the holistic sports dentist will consider and evaluate jawbone/bite imbalances, which can have an impact on the entire cranio-sacral/skeletal complex. Also considered are the potential toxic effects that some commonly-used dental materials can have on the athlete’s immune and musculo-skeletal systems. These include, but are not limited to, mercury exposure from “silver” amalgam fillings (which are actually 40-50 percent mercury), nickel-based metal alloys used in crown and bridges, excessive fluoride exposure, root-canal treated teeth, poorly-healed extraction sites (cavitations ), periodontal gum infections, and tooth cavities.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Biocompatible dentistry When injuries are severe enough and treatment plans include dental procedures like root canal therapy, posts and crowns, implants, bridges, or even tooth bonding, my extensive knowledge and experience in biocompatible biological dentistry can provide treatment options that maximize healing, recovery, function and esthetics. The goal here is to minimize the potential negative impact on the body’s immune system that may occur as a result of commonly-used dental materials and procedures. This is where the oral-systemic, tooth-body relationship comes in. Similar to acupuncture, in which life energy, called “chi,” travels throughout the body along pathways called “meridians,” holistic dentists acknowledge that each tooth in the mouth is located on a specific meridian corresponding to other areas in the body. Taking this into account, decisions regarding treatment and long-term management of dental injuries must be made with care, as the repercussions can be profound. Holistic Health Alliance Aside from traumatic injuries to teeth, other areas that sports dentists are concerned with include: Increased incidence of cavities due to consumption of acidic-high sugar sports drinks, smokeless tobacco, and signs and symptoms of anorexia and bulimia. Eating disorders are more common than one might think in female athletes, and erosion patterns on teeth caused by gastric acids often help in the differential diagnosis of eating disorders. Referral to the proper healthcare professional shall be provided. I have formed an alliance with healthcare practitioners in the fields of alternative/integrative medicine, acupuncture, naturopathy, osteopathy-cranio-sacral medicine, physical therapy, orthopedic medicine, family medicine, and sports psychology. In many cases, athletes can continued on page 53


The 10-Point Super (“Stupid”) Tie-Break By Jim Dileo The views and opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect those of the Long Island Tennis Magazine, USTA or USTA/Long Island Region. You have just finished two great sets in a United States Tennis Association (USTA) league match. You won the first set 7-5 and your opponent came back to take second set by an identical score. It doesn’t get much closer than that. Great play, excellent shots, fair calls … everything you could ask for in a competitive match. Now what? A chance for a third set to identify the winner? See who is in shape to play out this tough match? None of the above. What happens next is, what many consider, a far less than optimal solution to decide this match. Enter the tennis twilight zone of the 10point super (“stupid”) tie-break. The USTA’s attempt to fit matches into ever tighter time schedules has resulted in a solution originally put in place to make non-major tournament professional doubles play address television’s request for a more predictable time frame for those matches. For the pros, they have also included no-ad scoring, as well, in each of the first two sets. Supposedly, after playing the non-major professional doubles matches in this manner for a while, and then analyzing the results, the higher seeded doubles teams tend to win more matches than the lower seeded teams. I have not seen any data on this, but accepting for the moment that the statistics bear this out, we are clearly not professionals, so I don’t think one can accurately extrapolate their results to ours. We are not on television, we do not have to deal with corporate sponsors, and we do not have to make our games fit into clean manageable breaks for commercials; all of these are great reasons for the professionals to play a 10point super tie-break in lieu of a third set,

but not for us. To have a match come down to the 10point super tie-break for the deciding “set” takes away from the foundation of the game as it has existed for many years and it can result in the lesser player/team winning a match due purely to being lucky. A ball that hits the net cord and drops in (or out), a bad call (either way), a single unforced error … any or all of these single items can affect the outcome of a hardfought match. These items can also affect an individual game within a set, but when they happen in the 10-point super tie-break, their importance is magnified to the point of potentially making the previous split sets seem almost irrelevant and therein lies the problem. Yet another quirk exists in the 10-point super tie-break that we play in USTA league play on Long Island. If the 10point super tie-break is in process when the time limit for the match is reached, the team ahead at that point gets one extra game. So, it is possible that one team has served, won that point to go up 1-0, time ends the match, and that team gets the additional game. The other team never even gets the chance to serve to even out that point. If the

teams were tied in games won over the first two sets, the team that won this single point on their serve now wins the match based solely on that one point. Just like any other point that can determine the outcome for the entire match, that point could be the result of a net cord shot that drops in (or out). So what is the USTA trying to accomplish for the amateur players in their leagues? Are they trying it to keep matches to a specific time limit given a lack of courts or their cost? We can all understand that. Are they trying to prevent injuries or illness by keeping the matches shorter? While some of us can understand this, many others, including me, would argue that fitness is a component of one’s arsenal. So, if there is a need to address the rationale noted above, are there other more attractive options to consider to replace the 10-point super tie-break? How about just playing a regular third set, and if it is not completed due to time constraints, just count up the number of games won in total for all the games completed up to that point on that court across the two-plus sets played. In a regular USTA match on Long Island, if the time ends and only one full set is comcontinued on page 54

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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The North Shore Memorial Open by Maverick Tennis By Stephen Sombrotto The 2nd Annual North Shore Memorial Open was held May 23-25 at New York Institute of Technology and C.W. Post in Old Brookville, N.Y. This year’s tournament was bigger and better then ever. A singles draw of 21 players and a doubles draw of 12 teams saw some of the best USTA players in the Long Island/metropolitan New York area battle it out over three days. When the dust cleared, Chris Colesanti stood out as a dominant force, winning the doubles title with his partner Scott Simon, and making it to the singles finals. It was there that only a “master” could take him down, as Steve Hu capped off his improbable run to the title.

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There was some spectacular tennis played all weekend long in both singles and doubles. The women held a threeteam round-robin which, of course, was so close that it came down to a tie-breaker of “Least Sets Lost,” which was won by the team of Laura Bonacasa and Tricia Jaeger. Congratulations to all the winners, it was a wonderful way to start the summer tennis season. There is a possibility that Maverick Tennis will be holding a Labor Day tournament, so stayed tuned throughout the summer. G

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

For more information, or if you are interested in playing in the next Maverick Tennis Tournament, contact Stephen Sombrotto by e-mail at ssombrotto@optonline.net.


HOLISTIC SPORTS DENTISTRY continued from page 50 benefit from this multi-disciplinary approach to their care. Benefits for athletes Properly diagnosing and correcting dental stressors to the body can provide for more predictable athletic gains, like increased physical strength, flexibility, speed and balance, improved hand-eye coordination and timing, more efficient oxygen-carrying capabilities (vO2 max), decreased performance anxieties, and enhanced recovery from injury or surgery. Preseason screenings and examinations are essential in preventing injuries. Examinations should include medical health histories, at-risk dental conditions, upper/lower jaw relationships, orthodontics, loose teeth, crowns and bridgework, and the need for the extraction of wisdom teeth. Extractions, specifically, should be done many months before the sports season begins to allow for complete healing. Not doing so could put the jaw at risk of fracture during competition. Determination of the need for a sport-specific type and design of custom mouthguard should also be made at this time. As more research is being conducted, it is becoming more apparent that conditions affecting any part of the oral-dental complex can, and do, have an impact on an individual’s physical health. Comprehensive, multi-disciplinary strategies may provide the best solutions for establishing sound minds and bodies, which will allow any athlete to achieve their highest potential, both on and off the field of play. G Dr. Len Fazio graduated the NYU College of Dentistry in 1988 and has been practicing metal-free, mercury-safe, holistic dentistry since 1993. Dr. Fazio operates his practice, PowerPlay Holistic Sports Dentistry, out of Port Jefferson, N.Y, and serves as the official team dentist of the Long Island Lizards of Major League Lacrosse. He may be reached by phone at (631) 4747477 or visit www.powerplaydental.com.

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T H E 1 0 - P O I N T S U P E R T I E - B R E A K continued from page 51 pleted while the second set is in progress, we count the total number of completed games won by each opponent to determine the winner on that court. If the total number of completed games won on that court is the same for each opponent, the court is split evenly. How about playing the third set, if required in a match, with no ad scoring? We did this for a number of years on Long Island and, while not perfect, it at least kept the impact of a single “lucky bounce” to an individual game, not the entire match. If those solutions are not sufficient to address the facility or time constraints, how about playing all sets with no ad scoring? Many high schools follow this

format since most do not have enough courts to play all matches simultaneously (seven courts are needed in total; consisting of three singles and four doubles courts). There are probably other solutions, but the key is to address the facility and time constraints for the match, while insuring that “luck” is not the overriding determinant of who wins and loses. Granted, in a given match, three or four points can be critical to the outcome, and any of those can be decided by a “lucky bounce,” but the probability of this influencing the outcome of a match increases dramatically when using the 10-point super tie-break in lieu of a third set.

What do you think? Do you have any suggestions to replace the 10-point super tiebreak? Do you even think it’s a problem? Please e-mail your comments to me at jimdileo@optonline.net. Jim Dileo and his wife, Fran, own a real estate investment and management company. Jim also volunteers his time for and is co-president of the North BellmoreNorth Merrick Youth Basketball League. He has captained USTA teams since 2001 and currently captains 10 teams annually, including men’s, seniors and mixed doubles out of Carefree Racquet Club in Merrick, N.Y. He may be reached at jimdileo@optonline.net.

Bethpage Park Tennis Center

photo gallery

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Photo credit: Franklyn Higgs


Tennis Greats to Participate in Alan King Pro-Am T

he beautiful Wildwood Pool and Tennis Club, located at 935 Middle Neck Road in Great Neck, N.Y., will play host to the annual Alan King Pro-Am Tennis Tournament on Sunday, Aug. 30 beginning at 10:00 a.m. Some of the most famous names in the history of the sport will team up with local amateurs for an exciting day of tennis, all in support of local charities. While this year’s field is in the process of being completed, last year’s professionals included such Grand Slam champions as Guillermo Vilas, Roy Emerson, and the always entertaining Jensen brothers. Many of Long Island’s best amateurs will partner with the pros, and a high level of play is expected. Spectators can look forward to spending an enjoyable day at the Wildwood Pool

and Tennis Club. In addition to watching up-close, entertaining tennis and meeting the pros, the club will have lunch available in a relaxed atmosphere. A nominal entrance fee will be donated to the Wheelchair Sports Federation, and a silent auction of tennis memorabilia will also help raise money for the Wheelchair Sports Federation. Host Morris Levy has been the driving force behind this event for a number of years. Originally held in Deal, N.J., Long Island is fortunate that Morris has chosen to keep this exciting event in our area for the second year in a row. The competition will have the benefit of Tournament Chairman Peter Fishback’s many years of experience in running major

WTA Tour and ATP Tour events. While tournament chairman of the WTA Tour event in Philadelphia, players such as Venus and Serena Williams, Lindsay Davenport and Maria Sharapova were regular participants. Running the event will be the responsibility of Russell Heier. His vast experience in organizing numerous tennis events will ensure that spectators and players alike will have most enjoyable and entertaining day. G For anyone interested in participating as an amateur player or in helping to sponsor the event, please contact Peter Fishback by phone at (516) 428-3333 or e-mail p.fishback@yahoo.com. For spectator information, to volunteer, or for day of event details, please contact Russell Heier by phone at (516) 946-0864.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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USTA TOURNAMENT photo

gallery

Scenes from the +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Championship, USTA L3 FIC May 15-17 and May 22-25 at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club in Oceanside Photo Credit: Franklyn Higgs

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Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009

Scenes from the L1 Sportime Kings Park Summer Championship May 29-31 at Sportime Kings Park Photo Credit: Franklyn Higgs


my opinion BY ERIC MEDITZ

What’s the Story With the Popularity of Professional Tennis in the U.S.? I’m upset. And it’s not because I just dropped and cracked the screen of my four-day old iPhone. It’s not even because I impulsively spent $30 on a lifetime supply of ShamWows. I’m upset for other reasons altogether. Now, being upset and angry is something that I rarely am. Usually, I’m a very happy and optimistic person … but not today. Not after what I just saw! Today, my “glass half-full” demeanor was shattered into millions of pieces, and here’s why. Last night, I was having problems sleeping, and instead of staring at the ceiling of my dark bedroom, I decided to get up and go on the Internet. Somewhere along the line of my wireless travels, I came across

something that caught my eye. On the screen in front of me was a downward spiraling chart. At first glance, I thought it was a portfolio of every stock I’ve ever invested in, but it wasn’t. After my eyes focused a little more on the screen, it confirmed exactly what I have been predicting for a very long time. I’ve had many conversations in the past with my friends about this exact thing, and now, it was staring me right in the face. My past instincts were unfortunately correct, and now the documented proof directly in front of me, made it as clear as day! What I did have in front of me wasn’t my future earning potential, but a graph of the television ratings for the U.S. Open

from 1987-2008. It was a shock to the system seeing the actual ratings numbers that tennis on television has earned over the years. Everyone knew professional tennis wasn’t popular in America, but I didn’t know it was this bad. On the left side of the chart were the millions of television viewers in the United States. On the bottom, were the years 1987-2008. Overall, this is what it read. U.S. Open viewership reached it’s peak, with 5.5 million people watching, in 1991. That’s no surprise, because if you remember, that was the year Jimmy Connors was making his epic run to the semifinals at the age of 39. Ever since then, the line on the graph continued on page 58

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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M Y O P I N I O N continued from page 57 has been gradually going down. In 2008, the U.S. Open topped out with 2.2 million television viewers. Nearly half from where it was about two decades ago. Unfortunately, this is information we all knew for a long time. You don’t have to be a genius to figure out that professional tennis doesn’t have the popularity in America that it once had. When I watch SportsCenter in the morning, tennis highlights are usually shown at the very end of the show … if at all. When I listen to sports talk radio in the car, tennis is never discussed. The bottom line is that the vast majority of the American public doesn’t watch tennis. But why? It’s a sport that is anything but boring. The sport of tennis has, quite possibly, the greatest athletes in the world competing in it. The sport has non-stop action from start to finish. There’s no clock! There are no substitutions! Why do so many Americans watch other sports and refuse to watch tennis? At this point last night, I was totally awake and there was no way of me possibly going back to sleep. So I continued on with my research and clicked on the Nielsen television ratings for the Master’s Golf Tournament from 1977-2008. And what I found was an embarrassment to the sport I devoted much of my life to. In 1997, the Masters had 15.8 million viewers in the U.S. They were watching the emergence of Tiger Woods onto the golfing scene. And they finished with 11 million viewers watch-

ing in 2008. The ratings of the two sports aren’t even comparable! Tennis is getting spanked by golf, like a five-year-old making a scene at Toys “R” Us. A sport that you can play, and smoke a cigar at the same time, gets almost five times better ratings then tennis. What the hell? A lot of the true tennis fans will take this information and could care less how many people watch the sport. They love it and they will watch it no matter what. But, I say to them that these numbers do matter! Tennis needs to get the recognition it deserves. There is no other sport on the planet that requires more skill and endurance to play at a professional level than tennis. The amount of time and effort the top 128 players in the world have put into their craft over their lifetime is far beyond anything that any other professional athletes in competing sports have. If the ratings continue to fall, who’s to say that a television executive won’t decide to cut back or pull the plug entirely on tennis coverage for that year? Can you diehards guarantee me that this wouldn’t happen? I don’t think so. Look at soccer. It’s the most popular sport in the world outside of the U.S. How much is professional soccer aired on television in America? Not often at all! I’ve heard in the past, that people who don’t watch tennis complain that racquet technology is making the game boring

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

with these big un-returnable serves. Some suggest that they go back to wooden racquets, because that will make the game slower and have more appeal to the casual fan. A couple of years ago, they tested a slightly larger ball, to see if that would slow down the game as well. And that was the last I heard of that. Critics of the sport say that the game needs to be changed for it to be accepted by the masses in the U.S. Personally, I think that it’s such a stupid concept, and to even suggest such a dumb thing is silly. In my opinion, the game right now is at its peak of excitement! Last night, I walked around my small apartment in Queens, talking to myself about some type of solution that can save tennis in America. If someone were watching me through the window, they would immediately have assumed that I was John Nash talking to my imaginary roommate. All I could think about for the next couple of hours was, “What could tennis do to attract more ratings, without changing the sport?” What will make that average baseball fan stop changing the channel during a tennis match? What can tennis do to be the talk of the town? What can make people at work meet at a water cooler and talk about a tennis match they saw last night instead of Monday Night Football? With all of this thinking (and four Advils later), I’d finally came up with an answer. This answer wouldn’t change the actual game at all. If implemented, it could save tennis and increase the ratings and the attention it gets by the general American public by leaps and bounds. It’s so simple; I can’t believe it wasn’t thought up years ago. I know the suspense is killing all of you, so I will get to the point! Here it is (drum roll please) … have the players call their own lines. Now before you laugh to yourself and turn the page to “Tips From a Tennis Pro,” hear me out. Tennis was at its peak of popularity in the late 1970s and early 80s. Everyone was watching and learning how to play at that time. The reason was simple. You had guys like John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors and Ilie Nastase playing. The matches that they played just didn’t have great tennis, but


great drama. Line judges would make calls that the players didn’t agree with, and then the viewing audience got to see not only the player’s tennis abilities, but also their personality when they argued a call with the chair umpire. Think about it. How many people at that time were talking about John McEnroe and his antics. Everyone! And then you had Jimmy Connors in 1991 get a bad call made against him in his epic match with Aaron Krickstein. Jimmy responded by going nuts on the chair umpire, and the crowd and people watching at home ate it up. These players ended up retiring, and then all of a sudden in the 1990s and early 2000s, tennis started to get polite, with quiet champions like Stephan Edberg, Pete Sampras, and now, Roger Federer. And on cue, the television ratings in America have been dropping. In recent years, the ATP came up with a device called Shot-Spot. It’s a technology that can show, on a digital screen, if the ball was in or out. Players are allowed a certain amount of challenges throughout the match to use this device when they think a bad call was made by a line judge. In my opinion, this is one of the worst decisions the ATP could make at this time of popularity in America. This device takes the whole human error aspect out of the game. There are no longer any disputes over bad line calls. There are no longer any

arguments. No longer will anyone be stating their case to the chair umpire, the crowd and the people watching at home. So now, the average “sports fan” sees tennis players as just mindless, bland zombies, strolling around playing the 1970s video game, PONG! If by some miracle, I were made the commissioner of the ATP tomorrow, I would immediately eliminate the use of line judges and the Shot-Spot technology by the players. There would still be a chair umpire calling out the score and having the power to overrule any calls made. The players would be forced to call all their own lines! It would be exactly like how it is in junior and college tennis. And anyone who has been associated with junior tennis in the past, knows how the most meaningless match between two players, could all of a sudden have more drama then an episode of ER, when a questionable call is made. Professional matches would now be personal and the viewing public will see which players are the good sports and play out balls, and which players make questionable calls. Arguments will, without a doubt, happen and the crowd might really get behind one player who they think might have gotten a bad call made against them. In the process, the television ratings would pile up! I would still implement the Shot-Spot technology to be used only by the view-

ing television audience. This way, only the people at home would be able to see if a player made a bad call or not. And for those people who ask … what if nobody makes bad calls? Ha ha ha ha … Throughout a match, bad calls will be made. It’s unavoidable. Sometimes bad calls happen on purpose, sometimes they happen by mistake, but either way, they are going to happen and some type of dispute will ensue. What people have to remember is that professional tennis is a business. The goal for everyone involved is to make as much money as they can. From the sponsors, to the advertisers, to the players, to the tennis instructors, and all the way down to the guy who strings racquets for a pro shop. Everyone involved some way in tennis, would benefit with this slight change of the professional game. Having players call their own lines would revolutionize what the American public thinks of our sport. Tennis would finally get the ratings and attention it should have all along! Wouldn’t it be great if people actually listened to me? Unfortunately, no one ever does. That’s the story of my life. Forget it! I’m tired now, with all of this rambling. I’m going back to bed! G Tennis Pro Eric Meditz may be reached by e-mail at meditzisfunny@yahoo.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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2009

High School Boys Recap Nassau County (Section VIII) Tennis Boys Varsity 2009 Final Records Conference 1 Cold Spring Harbor Roslyn Jericho Long Beach Great Neck South Syosset Great Neck North Hewlett

13-1 10-4 9-5 9-5 5-8 5-8 3-11 1-13

Conference 2A Port Washington Wheatley Friends Academy Plainview J.F.K. Bellmore J.F.K. Herricks Manhasset Oyster Bay

12-2 12-2 11-3 9-5 4-10 4-10 4-10 0-14

Conference 2B South Side Lynbrook Garden City Oceanside Wantagh East Meadow Farmingdale

12-0 8-4 7-5 7-5 4-8 3-9 2-10

Conference 3A Clarke Locust Valley North Shore Hicksville Carle Place Sewanhaka/Carey Malverne/East Rockaway

10-2 10-2 10-2 6-6 4-8 0-10 0-11

Conference 3B Mepham Baldwin Calhoun Massapequa Lawrence

12-0 10-2 7-5 7-5 3-9

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Conference 3B (continued) Bethpage Freeport

2-10 1-11

Conference 4A New Hyde Park Valley Stream Central Valley Stream South Glen Cove MacArthur Division Plainedge

12-0 9-3 7-5 5-7 5-7 1-7 0-10

Conference 4B Valley Stream North Westbury Uniondale West Hempstead Hempstead Roosevelt

8-0 6-2 1-2 0-3 0-4 No team

Conference 3 First round Baldwin 5—Calhoun 2 Locust Valley 4—North Shore 3 Semifinals Baldwin 5—Clarke 2 Mepham 6—Locust Valley 1 Championship Mepham 4—Baldwin 3 Conference 4A Semifinals Valley Stream South 4—Valley Stream Central 3 New Hyde Park 5—McArthur 2 Championship New Hyde Park 6—Valley Stream South 1 Conference 4B Valley Stream North (Champion)

Nassau County Tennis Boys Varsity 2009 Playoffs *Conference Champion noted in bold Conference 1 Semifinals Roslyn 6—Long Beach 1 Cold Spring Harbor 5—Roslyn 2 Championship Cold Spring Harbor 5—Roslyn 2 Conference 2 First round Garden City 4—Lynbrook 3 Wheatley 6—Friends Academy 1 Semifinals Wheatley 5—South Side 2 Port Washington 5—Garden City 2 Championship Port Washington 5—Wheatley 2

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Nassau County Tennis Boys Varsity 2009 County Championships Singles 1. Daniel Kreyman (Long Beach) 2. Zach Morris (Garden City) 3. Jason Simon (Roslyn) 4. Eric Ambrosio (Cold Spring Harbor) Doubles 1. Steven Milo & Ricky Wang (Syosset) 2. Corey Morganstern & Josh Katten (Plainview) 3. Andrew Yaraghi & Jon DeFrancesch (Friends Academy) 4. Bryan Kallenberg & Dan Schure (Port Washington)


Nassau County Tennis Boys Varsity:

A Visual Recap

Zach Morris from Garden City, the number two-ranked Nassau County Boys Singles player, in action

Jason Simon from Roslyn during match play

The top four Nassau County Boys finishers: Fourth place finisher Eric Ambrosio from Cold Spring Harbor, first place finisher Daniel Kreyman from Long Beach, second place finisher Zach Morris from Garden City and third place finisher Jason Simon from Roslyn

The top Nassau County Boys Tennis Doubles teams in 2009: Bryan Kallenberg & Dan Schure from Port Washington, Jon DeFrancesch & Andrew Yaraghi from Friends Academy, Josh Katten & Corey Morganstern from Plainview, and Ricky Wang & Steven Milo from Syosset

The team of Josh Katten and Corey Morganstern from Plainview in action

Ricky Wang of Syosset, one half of the 2009 Nassau County Doubles Championship team, returns a volley

Jon DeFrancesch of Friends Academy, one half of the third place Nassau County Boys Doubles team, returns a serve

Nassau County Singles Champ Daniel Kreyman of Long Beach warms up Andrew Yaraghi from Friends Academy, one half of the third place Nassau County Boys Doubles team

Steven Milo of Syosset, one half of the 2009 Nassau County Doubles Championship team Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009

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Suffolk County (Section XI) Tennis Boys Varsity 2009 Season Championships Suffolk 2008 Varsity Boys Season recap This year’s Section XI Singles Champion is senior Brett Gordon from Commack High School. Brett is currently undefeated with a 170 record and had a truly magnificent sectional tournament. Finishing second to Gordon is senior Brendan Ruddock from Connetquot High School who boasts an impressive 29-1 record on the year coming into the New York State Championships. Finishing third in the Section XI tournament is senior Adam Mernit from Walt Whitman High School, making his first trip to the New York State Championships. This year’s Boys Doubles Section XI Champions are seniors Bryan Roberts and Zach Dean from Commack High School. Both of these players have been to this tournament before as singles players and are undefeated as a doubles team this year. Runner-up to

Roberts and Dean is junior Nolan Gelman and senior Matt Stevens from Half Hollow Hills West High School. Gelman has been an AllState player for the past two years and looks to make his mark in doubles this year with Matt Stevens. Hailing from Islip High School, senior Matt Celentano returns to the state tournament again this year competing in doubles play with new partner, senior Matt Imbo. This year’s Section XI tournament was highly competitive with excellent tennis at both the singles and doubles levels. We are looking for a good showing in the state tournament. Section XI is led by Section XI tennis chair John Valente.

Suffolk 2008 Varsity Boys Season Champions League I ................Half Hollow Hills East League II..........................Smithtown East

League III ....................................East Islip League IV ..........................North Babylon League V ............................Ward Melville League VI ....................................Mt. Sinai League VII ..............Westhampton Beach League VIII ..........Eastport/South Manor Section XI Champion ..Commack High School Long Island Champion ..Cold Spring Harbor Singles 1. Brett Gordon (Commack) 2. Brendan Ruddock (Connetquot) 3. Adam Mernit (Walt Whitman) Doubles 1. Bryan Roberts & Zach Dean (Commack) 2. Nolan Gelman & Matt Stevens (Half Hollow Hills West) 3. Matt Celentano & Matt Imbo (Islip)

Suffolk County Tennis Boys Varsity:

A Visual Recap

Section XI 2009 Boys Doubles Champions: The team of Bryan Roberts & Zach Dean from Commack High School

Section XI 2009 Boys Varsity Singles Champion Brett Gordon from Commack High School smiles for a photo 62

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Section XI 2009 Doubles third place team of Nolan Gelman & Matt Stevens from Half Hollow Hills West High School

The Section XI 2009 Boys Varsity Singles All-State representatives gather for a photo


Catholic High School Athletic Association 2009 Boys Tennis Recap Chaminade High School takes third consecutive Nassau Suffolk CHSAA Title During its 2009 spring season, the Chaminade High School tennis team won its third consecutive league title and its record 25th tennis title in the Nassau Suffolk Catholic High School Athletic Association (CHSAA) league. For the past 37 years, Coach Jim Quinn has been at the helm for the Chaminade Flyers, and has guided his teams to 25 league championships. This past season, senior Peter Colgan played first singles for Chaminade, and 16-year-old twin brothers and juniors, Patrick and Christopher Brosnan, played second singles and third singles. All three players went undefeated for the Flyers during the NSCHSAA regular season. Additionally, in each round of the post-season playoffs, including the finals against St. John the Baptist High School of West Islip, Pat and Chris won their respective singles matches, helping Chaminade capture the championship on May 14 at Hofstra University. But, the Chaminade singles trio wasn’t done yet! Going into the post-season NSCHSAA Individual Championships the next day at Hofstra, the top four seeds consisted of the four first singles players from Chaminade, St. John the Baptist, St. Anthony’s and Kellenberg Memorial. Peter Colgan earned the number one seed, while Pat Brosnan was seeded number five and Chris Brosnan was unseeded. After winning their first, second and quarterfinal round matches, each of the Brosnan brothers advanced to the semifinals, as did Colgan. In one semi-final match, Pat Brosnan faced off against Chaminade teammate, Peter Colgan. In a grueling three-set match of high quality tennis, Colgan emerged with a 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 victory, handing Pat Brosnan his first and only loss of his NSCHSAA season. In the other semifinal match, unseeded Chris Brosnan was doing battle on the adjacent court against St. John the Baptist senior and number two seed, Eric Dietsche. Play-

ing nearly flawless tennis, Chris Brosnan served and volleyed his way to a 6-1, 6-0 victory, setting the stage for an all-Chaminade final the next day between the unseeded Chris Brosnan and the number one-seeded Colgan. On May 19, in a close and hard-fought finals match in which Brosnan attacked the net and made few mistakes, Chris Brosnan defeated Peter Colgan 7-6 (7-4), 6-4, to capture the NSCHSAA 2009 Singles Championship. According to Chaminade coach and League Chairman Jim Quinn, Brosnan is the first unseeded player to win the Individual Championships in NSCHSAA league history. As a result, Chris Brosnan was the only player in the NSCHSAA league to have a perfect record during the 2009 season, winning each of his matches during the regular season, the team playoffs and the

Individual Championships. In the third place match, number five-seeded Pat Brosnan defeated number two-seeded Eric Dietsche. This was only the third time in NSCHSAA history that the first, second and third place singles players (the Brosnan brothers, and Peter Colgan) were from the same high school, with the previous two trios also being from Chaminade during Coach Quinn’s tenure. In addition to playing in USTA Junior Tennis tournaments, the Brosnan twins are avid platform tennis players during the fall and winter months, and compete as doubles partners in the American Platform Tennis Association’s Junior Tournaments throughout the Northeast. They finished the 2008-2009 platform tennis season ranked number three nationally by the APTA in the Boys-18-and-Under Division.

The Chaminade Boys Varsity Tennis team gathers for a team photo

NSCHSAA 2009 Singles Champion Chris Brosnan, finalist Peter Colgan and third place winner Pat Brosnan from Chaminade High School smile for a pic at Hofstra University

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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NEW YORK STATE HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Flushing Meadows, New York 28th-30th May 2009

Singles Matt Kandath

(Albany Academy)

Kandath Matt Izant

(Fayetteville-Manlius HS)

Matt Miller

Kandath

(Orchard Park)

Finklestein Doug Finkelstein

(Goshen HS)

Kandath Brett Gordon

(Commack HS)

Zach Morris

(Garden City HS)

Morris Court Jeremy Court

(New Rochelle)

Court Alex Tsai Jason Tahir

(Binghamton)

Simon

Kandath

(Harley-Allendale-Columbia)

Simon Jason Simon

(Roslyn HS)

Simon Pablo Ordonez

(Cheektowaga)

Crawford Jacob Crawford

(Clinton HS)

Raude Jon Raude

(Cardozo HS)

Raude Dennis Sult

(Newburgh Free Academy)

Raude Kyle Berman

(Byram Hills)

Berman Adam Shearer

(Beekmantown HS)

Kreyman (NYS Champ) Dan Freeman

(Notre Dame HS)

Fauchet Sebastien Fauchet

Simon 4th Place Final Ruddock

(Harley-Allendale)

Fauchet Adam Mernit

(Walt Whitman HS)

Fanshel Elliott Fanshel

(Kingston HS)

Wei-Cheng Lin

(Cardozo HS)

4th Place Simon

*3rd Place Fauchet

Lin Chris LaPort

(Corcoran)

Lin Ryan Schmitz

(Scotia Glenville)

Silverman Cameron Silverman Brenden Ruddock

(Fox Lane)

Kreyman

(Connetquot HS)

Ruddock Daniel Kandinov

1 2 3 4 5-8 5-8 5-8 5-8

(Bayside HS)

Ruddock Riley Lorenz

(Oneonta)

Yovanoff Dave Yovanoff

(Hamburg)

Michael Amico

(Bethlehem)

Kreyman Amico Sean Dennin

(Lake Placid HS)

Matt Kandath Daniel Kreyman Cameron Silverman Jason Tahir Jon Raude Elliot Fanshel Dave Yovanoff Brett Gordon

Kreyman Ryan McCormick

Plattsburgh High School

(West Irondequiot)

Kreyman Daniel Kreyman

(Long Beach HS)

Hayden Freshette

(Plattsburgh HS)

Dan Freeman

(Elmira Notre)

Dan Freeman

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NEW YORK STATE HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Flushing Meadows, New York 28th-30th May 2009

Doubles Milo/Wang

(Syossett HS)

Goldberg/Gorobetz Goldberg/Gorobetz

(Scarsdale)

Frederick/Wilda

Goldberg/Gorobetz

(Horseheads)

Frederick/Wilda Hamm/Kot

(Baldwinsville HS)

Kane/Kane

(Hamburg)

Goldberg/Gorobetz Kane/Kane Bush/Dordick

(Guiderland)

Kane/Kane Medvinskiy/Borak Levine/Crill

(Brookyn Tech HS)

Medvinskiy/Borak (Monroe-Woodbury HS)

Roberts/Dean Roberts/Dean

(Commack HS)

Wrede/Kuhar

(Albany Academy)

Roberts/Dean Roberts/Dean Warchocki/Cromer

(Newark Valley)

Morque/DeBease Morque/DeBease

(Rye)

Guzick/Benjamin

(Harley-Allendale)

Roberts/Dean Guzick/Benjamin Nayar/Nayar

(Fayetteville-Manlius)

Guzick/Benjamin Yu/Su

(Stuyvesant HS)

Batchelder/Gaudreau (Northeast Clinton)

Yu/Su Roberts/Dean (NYS Champs)

Larios/Denvir

(Kingston HS)

Gelman/Stevens Gelman/Stevens

(Half Hollow Hills West)

Gelman/Stevens Johnson/Matthews Mulligan/Nardella Barrett/Fatehchand

(Orchard Park)

Goldberg/Gorobetz 3rd/4th Place Yaraghi/DeFransesch

3rd Place Yaraghi/DeFransesch

Johnson/Matthews (C.B.A. HS)

Yaraghi/DeFransesch

(Pittsford Mendon)

Rosen/Kaufman Rosen/Kaufman

(Byram Hills)

Yaraghi/DeFransesch Yaraghi/DeFransesch

(Friends Academy)

Yaraghi/DeFransesch John/Georgiou

(Cardozo HS)

Frost/Chow Ditullio/Smist

(Lockport)

Natale/Reimer Natale/Reimer

(Greece Athena)

Greene/Wilson

(Minisink Valley HS)

Natale/Reimer Schwab/Evelyn Schwab/Evelyn

(Ithaca)

Frost/Chow Morgenstern/Katten

(Plainview JFK)

Morganstern/Katten Walsh/Barnes

(Beekmantown HS)

Frost/Chow Celentano/Imbo

Plattsburgh High School

(Islip HS)

Frost/Chow Frost/Chow

(Niskayuna)

Chien/Mitsoglou

(Plattsburgh HS)

Larios/Denvir Larios/Denvir

(Kingston HS)

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009

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Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas-Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 bptcenter@aol.com

Rockville Racquet Club Susan Alvy-Manager 80 North Centre Avenue Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 rockvilletennis@optonline.net

SPORTIME at Lynbrook Chris Morales-Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com tdlynbrook@sportimetfm.com

Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller-Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 carefreetennis@aol.com

Smash Tennis Club Bob McKenna-Director of Tennis 575 Merrick Avenue Westbury, NY 11568 Business: 516-832-8010 Cell: 516-817-2455

SPORTIME at Massapequa Fayez Malik-Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com tdmassapequa@sportimetfm.com

Deer Park Indoor Tennis Club Afzal Ali-Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, NY 11729 631-667-3476 Fax: 631-667-7179 Glen Head Racquet Club Heath Koch: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Huntington Indoor Tennis Club Rich Rottkamp-Director of Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-421-0040

SPORTIME at Amagansett Sue De Lara-Co General Manager Hana Sromova-Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com amagansett@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Bethpage Tennis Perry Aitchison-Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 516-933-8500 www.SportimeNY.com tdbethpageten@sportimetfm.com

Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, NY 11561 516-432-6060 Fax: 516-897-0097 www.longbeachtenniscenter.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Dan Dwyer-Owner 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2655 www.pointsettennis.com matt@pointsettennis.com

SPORTIME at Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie-General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike Bethpage, NY 11714 516-731-4432 www.SportimeNY.com bethpagemulti@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME of the Hamptons Mauricio Gattuso-Director of Tennis Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com tdhamptons@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME at ProHealth Jay Karl-General Manager 3 Delaware Drive Lake Success, NY 11042 516-348-8463 www.SportimeNY.com jkarl@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Randall’s Island Ted Dimond-Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com randallsisland@SportimeTFM.com SPORTIME at Roslyn Jared Rada-Director of Tennis Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com tdroslyn@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Schenectady Philippe Ceas 2699 Curry Road Schenectady, NY 12303 518-356-0100 www.SportimeNY.com tdschenectady@sportimetfm.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center Adrian Chirici-Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 516-676-9107 www.rwtt.com

SPORTIME at Harbor Island Eric Fromm-General Manager, Director of Tennis In Harbor Island Park Mamaroneck, NY 10543 914-777-5050 www.SportimeNY.com efromm@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME at Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Karl Sommer/Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ GLEN COVE Stephen Alcala-Business Manager 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 516-759-0505 www.rwtt.com

SPORTIME at Kings Park Petr Perecinsky-Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com tdkingspark@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME at Syosset Fitness & Racquetball Joe Gazio-General Manager 10 Gordon Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 516-496-3100 www.SportimeNY.com jgazio@sportimetfm.com

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009


French Open Wraps Up With Federer and Kuznetsova Taking Top Honors Roger Federer overcame an unlikely opponent, a fan who leaped onto the court and inclement weather, to finally win a French Open and complete his career Grand Slam. Roger Federer Federer bested Robin Soderling, a 23rd seed and surprise finalist, by a score of 6-1, 7-6 (1), 6-4 to win his 14th singles title, matching a record set by Pete Sampras. “It’s maybe my greatest victory, or certainly the one that removes the most pressure off my shoulders,” said Federer after his victory, which capped his fourth bid at a Grand Slam in Paris. “Now the question is: Am I the greatest of all time? We don’t

know, but I definitely have many things going for me because I’ve finally won all four Grand Slams, and I’m particularly happy reaching Pete’s 14.” On the women’s side, the question before the start of the finals match was: “Who’s going to win?” and the answer was, “It’s anyone’s guess.” Dinara Safina and Svetlana Kuznetsova had met eight times on clay and the head-to-head record was knotted up at four. World number oneranked, Safina looked nervous throughout the match and had too many unforced errors. Kuznetsova took adSvetlana Kuznetsova vantage of Safina’s mis-

takes and won a hard-fought match 6-4 6-2. This is the second year in a row that the Russian (Safina) fell at the last hurdle. She lost to Ana Ivanovic in last year’s French Open finals. Kuznetsova took the first set 6-4 in 39 min. The second set was easier as her opponent’s game completely unraveled. She took the final set 6-2. Safina double-faulted on the serve to hand Kuznetsova her second Grand Slam Title (she also won the 2004 U.S. Open) and Safina will head to Wimbledon still in pursuit of her first Grand Slam Title. G For more information on the 2009 French Open, visit www.rolandgarros.com.

Coming In September

FALL TENNIS PREVIEW Distribution scheduled for 09/01/09 This edition will also feature: • US Open Coverage • Adult USTA Summer League Recap • Long Island’s Top Coaches Sound Off • Back To School Tennis Fashion

Don’t miss the advertising and editorial opportunities in the next edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine September/October 2009. Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by August 1st. For more information, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com. Distribution across Long Island at: • indoor tennis clubs • country clubs • tennis camps • retail stores • supermarkets • gyms • and many more Also bonus distribution this month at: Beach Tennis National Championships and Nassau and Suffolk HS Girl County and State Championships Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

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LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 06/01/09)

BOYS Long Island Boys 10 Singles Rank Name ....................................City 1 ......Curran Varma ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 2 ......Kyle Hudson Gower ................Oceanside, N.Y. 3 ......Sean Patrick ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 4 ......Eli Grossman..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 5 ......Alan Delman ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 6 ......Thomas A. Korossy ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7 ......Gardner Howe ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 8 ......Brian Shi ................................Jericho, N.Y. 9 ......Colin Francis Sacco................Brightwaters, N.Y. 10 ....Arjun Mehrotra ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 11 ....Rajan Jai Vohra ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 12 ....Patrick F. Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 13 ....Noah Reisch ..........................Floral Park, N.Y. 14 ....Ryan Goetz ............................Greenlawn, N.Y. 15 ....Zane Siddiqui ........................West Babylon, N.Y. 16 ....Amani Siddiqui ......................West Babylon, N.Y. 17 ....Terrill Cole Barnard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 18 ....Adita J. Dave..........................Syosset, N.Y. 19 ....Brady Berman ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 20 ....Titus Syon Sung ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 21 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 22 ....Neel Raj ................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23 ....Michael Medvedev ................Oceanside, N.Y. 24 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito ................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ....Ethan Nussdorf ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 26 ....Vincent Caracappa ................Smithtown, N.Y. 27 ....Pete Sizios ............................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 28 ....Cannon Kingsley ....................Northport, N.Y. 29 ....David Ammendola ..................Massapequa, N.Y. 30 ....Blake Shaevitz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 31 ....Steven M. Schneider ..............Southampton, N.Y. 32 ....Ian Bank ................................Old Westbury, N.Y. 33 ....James Kyrkanides..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 34 ....Jacob Weiner ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 35 ....Jack Aaron Briamonte ............Great Neck, N.Y. 36 ....Logan Beckerman ..................East Norwich, N.Y. 37 ....Justin Ilan Lempert ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 38 ....Parker Appel ..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 39 ....Joey Austin ............................Hewlett, N.Y. 40 ....Cody Bograd ..........................Huntington, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1 ......Curran Varma ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 2 ......Garrett Malave ......................Laurel, N.Y. 3 ......Andrew J. Bentz ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 4 ......Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y. 5 ......Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 6 ......Daniel David Kafka ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 7 ......Daniel Shleimovich ................Merrick, N.Y. 8 ......Evan Kober ............................Wantagh, N.Y. 9 ......Bryant J. Born ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 10 ....Nikhil Raj ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 11 ....Alex Brebenel ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 12 ....Chirag Sharad Soni ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 13 ....Jonathan C. Staudigel ............Northport, N.Y. 14 ....Robert James Gavigan ..........Garden City, N.Y. 15 ....Alexander Pintille ..................Wainscott, N.Y. 16 ....Giuseppe Loduca....................Great Neck, N.Y. 17 ....Noah J. Reisch ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 18 ....Jesse M. Levitin ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 19 ....Michael Schweitzer................Old Westbury, N.Y. 20 ....Christopher White ..................Garden City, N.Y. 21 ....Zane Siddiqui ........................West Babylon, N.Y. 22 ....Spencer Killen Swanson ........Remsenburg, N.Y. 23 ....Arjun Mehrotra ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 24 ....Rajan Jai Vohra ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 25 ....Daniel Grunberger..................Great Neck, N.Y. 26 ....Vincent P. Thompson ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 27 ....Daniel Khodosh ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 28 ....Christian Moyer Ardito............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 29 ....Alan Delman ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 30 ....Tyler Dunn..............................Manhasset, N.Y. 31 ....Sean Patrick ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 32 ....Oliver Ridgley Green ..............Locust Valley, N.Y.

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ISLAND

33 ....Jacob Frisch ..........................Sagaponack, N.Y. 34 ....Jack Ian Lindenman ..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 35 ....Colin Francis Sacco................Brightwaters, N.Y. 36 ....Ian Friedman..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 37 ....Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 38 ....Terrill Cole Barnard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 39 ....Michael L. Schumer ..............Syosset, N.Y. 40 ....Faran Nazir ............................Deer Park, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Daniel Sliwowski....................Islip, N.Y. 2 ......Drew F. Feldman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 3 ......Sander Brenner......................Port Washington, N.Y. 4 ......Dylan Ander ..........................Hewlett, N.Y. 5 ......Marcell Rengifo......................Copaigue, N.Y. 6 ......Ian Baranowski ......................Syosset, N.Y. 7 ......Connor Daniel Jeran ..............Islip, N.Y. 8 ......Benjamin Aaron Mermelstein..Northport, N.Y. 9 ......Gabriel P. Lazar ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 10 ....Dylan Hobbs Appel ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 11 ....Ty Stone ................................Centerport, N.Y. 12 ....Jesse Richheimer ..................Merrick, N.Y. 13 ....Gregory M. Abrahams ............Baldwin, N.Y. 14 ....Chris Casamassima................Franklin Square, N.Y. 15 ....Ethan Hayden Handa..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 16 ....Nick Bauer ............................Great River, N.Y. 17 ....Kyle Apler ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 18 ....Andrew J. Bentz ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 19 ....Michael A. Vera ......................Bethpage, N.Y. 20 ....Cole Lafitte ............................East Setauket, N.Y. 21 ....Douglas Notaris......................Wantagh, N.Y. 22 ....Jamis Ross ............................Manorville, N.Y. 23 ....John C. Knight........................East Northport, N.Y. 24 ....Erik Johann Lobben................Glen Head, N.Y. 25 ....Stone E. Mitchell ....................Woodmere, N.Y. 26 ....Erik Ujvari ..............................Hauppauge, N.Y. 27 ....Matthew R. Demichiel ............Hewlett, N.Y. 28 ....Andrew Reiley ........................Manorville, N.Y. 29 ....Brandon T. Stone ....................Melville, N.Y. 30 ....Samuel Hajibai ......................Kings Point, N.Y. 31 ....Zachary Krueger ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32 ....Zachary E. Blank ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 33 ....Aaron Nussdorf ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 34 ....Cooper Spector-Salwen..........Great Neck, N.Y. 35 ....Raymond Zhao ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 36 ....Doron Saraf............................Great Neck, N.Y. 37 ....Daniel Grunberger..................Great Neck, N.Y. 38 ....Stephan Savin........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 39 ....Brandon Kay ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 40 ....Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Pasha Shapouri ......................Albertson, N.Y. 2 ......Darren Reisch ........................Floral Park, N.Y. 3 ......Sloan Millman ........................Woodmere, N.Y. 4 ......Sean Jagi Chhugani ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 5 ......Stephen Peng ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 6 ......Eric Sumanaru ......................Middle Island, N.Y. 7 ......JT Esposito ............................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 8 ......Jacob Mishkin........................Woodbury, N.Y. 9 ......Sander Brenner......................Port Washington, N.Y. 10 ....Ryan Gary Wennberg..............Huntington Station, N.Y. 11 ....Ryan Marcus..........................Merrick, N.Y. 12 ....Scott Johnson ........................Northport, N.Y. 13 ....Jason A. Fruchter ..................Lawrence, N.Y. 14 ....Ryan White ............................Wantagh, N.Y. 15 ....Seth Kornfield ........................Jericho, N.Y. 16 ....Solomon Ofir ..........................Plainview, N.Y. 17 ....Jordan A. Zecher ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 18 ....Michael Granito......................Wantagh, N.Y. 19 ....Christian Thomas Thienel ......East Quogue, N.Y. 20 ....Brian Chalif ............................Huntington, N.Y. 21 ....Nick Wong..............................Jericho, N.Y. 22 ....Chris Casamassima................Franklin Square, N.Y. 23 ....Evan Ross Seidman................Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ....Dylan Marsh ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 25 ....Adam Fishelberg ....................Plainview, N.Y. 26 ....Matthew Zuckerman ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 27 ....Benjamin Q. King....................East Meadow, N.Y. 28 ....Kevin H. Kim ..........................South Setauket, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ July/August 2009

RANKINGS

29 ....Matthew Kline........................Roslyn, N.Y. 30 ....Gabriel P. Lazar ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 31 ....Michael Freilich......................Lawrence, N.Y. 32 ....Henry D. Lee ..........................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 33 ....Ethan Hayden Handa..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 34 ....Zachary Daniel Krischer ........Pt. Jefferson Station, N.Y. 35 ....Luke Matthew Taylor ..............Bay Shore, N.Y. 36 ....Jared Drzal ............................West Sayville, N.Y. 37 ....Douglas Notaris......................Wantagh, N.Y. 38 ....Ali Zain ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 39 ....Jason Quintana ......................Bethpage, N.Y. 40 ....Christopher DeSimone ..........Centerport, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Benjamin Bogard....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 2 ......Eric Dietsche..........................Bay Shore, N.Y. 3 ......Jason Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 4 ......Scott Johnson ........................Northport, N.Y. 5 ......Sloan Millman ........................Woodmere, N.Y. 6 ......Darren Reisch ........................Floral Park, N.Y. 7 ......Richard A. Ferguson ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 8 ......Evan Pincus ..........................East Meadow, N.Y. 9 ......Michael T. Puntillo ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 10 ....Robert James Buda................Northport, N.Y. 11 ....Derek J. Wells ........................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 12 ....Justin Ziccardi........................Islip, N.Y. 13 ....Dylan Matthew Roberts ..........Holtsville, N.Y. 14 ....Christopher Sica ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 15 ....Dylan Marsh ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 16 ....Stephen Peng ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 17 ....Brain Hui................................East Meadow, N.Y. 18 ....James Nandalal Prasad..........Lindenhurst, N.Y. 19 ....Eric Sumanaru ......................Middle Island, N.Y. 20 ....Pasha Shapouri ......................Albertson, N.Y. 21 ....Solomon Ofir ..........................Plainview, N.Y. 22 ....Alex Bessarabov ....................Lindenhurst, N.Y. 23 ....Matthew R. Johnson ..............Huntington, N.Y. 24 ....Herman Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ....Jeremy Pomerantz ................Sayville, N.Y. 26 ....Jeffery H. Kornhauser ............Wantagh, N.Y. 27 ....JT Esposito ............................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 28 ....Thomas Fischl........................Huntington, N.Y. 29 ....Shane B. Liebenthal ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 30 ....Andrew Joseph Freedman......Great Neck, N.Y. 31 ....Matthew J. Celentano ............Islip, N.Y. 32 ....Jack Keenan ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 33 ....Steven Ferrantello ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 34 ....Peter C. Colgan ......................Nesconset, N.Y. 35 ....Eric Rubin ..............................Lido Beach, N.Y. 36 ....Brandon Burns ......................Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 37 ....Sahil S. Ishar..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 38 ....Jaewon Kim ..........................East Northport, N.Y. 39 ....Jesse Liebenthal ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 40 ....Kevin A. Burgess ....................Freeport, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 10 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 2 ......Claire Handa ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 3 ......Celeste Rose Matute ..............Amityville, N.Y. 4 ......Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 5 ......Vista Grinde............................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 6 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 7 ......Caitlin M. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 8 ......Ashley Bespechny ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 9 ......Lea Ma ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 10 ....Devika Kedia ..........................East Norwich, N.Y. 11 ....Emily Kate Shutman ..............Huntington, N.Y. 12 ....Amanda Allison Foo................Manhasset, N.Y. 13 ....Hannah Rosalie Dayton ..........East Hampton, N.Y. 14 ....Emily Austin ..........................Hewlett, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Aimee N. Manfredo ..............Shoreham, N.Y. 2 ......Brittany Burke ........................Garden City, N.Y. 3 ......Cameron Leigh Moskol ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 4 ......Shanice Nadia Arthur..............Glen Head, N.Y. 5 ......Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ......Bayville, N.Y. 6 ......Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y.

7 ......Vanessa Scott ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 8 ......Julia Ciardullo ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 9 ......Courtney A. Digia....................Manhasset, N.Y. 10 ....Bridget Elaine Harding............Northport, N.Y. 11 ....Michelle Vancura....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 12 ....Madison Courtney Appel ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 13 ....Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 14 ....Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 15 ....Campbell Howe......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 16 ....Taylor S. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 17 ....Katie Jean Cirella ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 18 ....Nicole Koskovolis ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 19 ....Nicole Damaghi......................Kings Point, N.Y. 20 ....Rhea Malhotra........................Syosset, N.Y. 21 ....Claudia M. Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 22 ....Michele Shelia Lehat..............Great Neck, N.Y. 23 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..............Amityville, N.Y. 24 ....Annelise Meyding ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 25 ....Marissa Luchs........................Roslyn, N.Y. 26 ....Lauren Ann Livingston............Sands Point, N.Y. 27 ....Michelle Haykin......................Great Neck, N.Y. 28 ....Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 29 ....Victoria Macchia ....................Seaford, N.Y. 30 ....Sabrina Ferretti ......................Setauket, N.Y. 31 ....Caitlin M. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 32 ....Emily K. Morgenbesser ..........Bayport, N.Y. 33 ....Ashley Bespechny ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 34 ....Caroline Keating ....................Huntington, N.Y. 35 ....Morgan Kelly Herrmann..........Garden City, N.Y. 36 ....Rachel L. Mintz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 37 ....Kelsey Shields........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 38 ....Tyler P. Hartmeyer ..................Great Neck, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Veronica Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 3 ......Aimee N. Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 4 ......Ruth Freilich ..........................Lawrence, N.Y. 5 ......Alexa P. Sternschein ..............Syosset, N.Y. 6 ......Jennifer C. Ferguson ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 7 ......Kathryn Herburger..................Manhasset, N.Y. 8 ......Mary C. Harding ....................Northport, N.Y. 9 ......Jennifer Glukhman ................Syosset, N.Y. 10 ....Cameron Leigh Moskol ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 11 ....Amanda R. Nowak..................Huntington, N.Y. 12 ....Rithika D. Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ....Megan M. Tamborrino ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 14 ....Emma Brezel..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 15 ....Emily Bentley ........................East Islip, N.Y. 16 ....Sarah Dionisio........................Shirley, N.Y. 17 ....Campbell Howe......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 18 ....Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y. 19 ....Olivia Bahou ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 20 ....Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 21 ....Amanda Marie Gaimaro..........Lynbrook, N.Y. 22 ....Betty Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 23 ....Karishma Ramesh Tank..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 24 ....Ola Mally................................Franklin Square, N.Y. 25 ....Rachel Murillo ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 26 ....Harley Nicole Kaiserman ........Setauket, N.Y. 27 ....Courtney Keating....................Huntington, N.Y. 28 ....Amanda Edelman ..................Southampton, N.Y. 29 ....Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 30 ....Angelika Rothberg..................Centerport, N.Y. 31 ....Erica Bundrick........................Mattituck, N.Y. 32 ....Leah Green ............................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 33 ....Christine Elizabeth Apicella ....Massapequa Park, N.Y. 34 ....Zoe B. Lesperance..................Southampton, N.Y. 35 ....Holly Hubsher ........................Sands Point, N.Y. 36 ....Davianna Brynn Romer ..........Hampton Bays, N.Y. 37 ....Alison Jamie Flum..................Syosset, N.Y. 38 ....Carli Feldman ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 39 ....Allie N. Rothstein....................Plainview, N.Y. 40 ....Lauren Ann Livingston............Sands Point, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1........Amy Ginny Naula ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 2 ......Jessica Sickles ......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 3 ......Veronica Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4 ......Brett A. Lieb ..........................Cutchogue, N.Y.


LONG 5 ......Robin R. Mehta ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 6 ......Amanda L. Seeley ..................Sound Beach, N.Y. 7 ......Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 8 ......Ashley Sandler ......................Jericho, N.Y. 9 ......Andrea Arreguin ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 10 ....Jessica Nowak ......................Huntington, N.Y. 11 ....Courtney Sokol ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 12 ....Hannah Hinchcliffe ................Mineola, N.Y. 13 ....Amanda Kristine Marano ........Hampton Bays, N.Y. 14 ....Elizabeth Caroline Rossi ........Flanders, N.Y. 15 ....Rithika D. Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 16 ....Lauren Skolnick ....................Sayville, N.Y. 17 ....Elan King................................Baldwin, N.Y. 18 ....Ruth Freilich ..........................Lawrence, N.Y. 19 ....Kelly Marie Benini ..................Northport, N.Y. 20 ....Paige J. Mintz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 21 ....Molly O. Nolan........................Montauk, N.Y. 22 ....Abbott M. Brant......................Shoreham, N.Y. 23 ....Emily Bennett ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 24 ....Deana Davoudiasi ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 25 ....Casey L. Nicoletti....................East Hampton, N.Y. 26 ....Michelle Graziosi....................East Northport, N.Y. 27 ....Alexandra L. Bentz ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 28 ....Courtney Keating....................Huntington, N.Y. 29 ....Ludmila Yamus ......................Melville, N.Y. 30 ....Erica Bundrick........................Mattituck, N.Y. 31 ....Devlin-Ann Ammendola..........Massapequa, N.Y. 32 ....Marissa D. Lazar ....................Hewlett, N.Y. 33 ....Brinti Ann Hinderhofer ............Oceanside, N.Y. 34 ....Christine Bender ....................Amityville, N.Y. 35 ....Rachel Shenker......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 36 ....Briel G. Smith ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 37 ....Samantha G. Smith ................Farmingdale, N.Y. 38 ....Ola Mally................................Franklin Square, N.Y. 39 ....Alexandra Gerin......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 40 ....Sarah Dionisio........................Shirley, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Eliza J. Budd ..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 2 ......Cassie Bender........................Amityville, N.Y. 3 ......Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ......Jessica Nowak ......................Huntington, N.Y. 5 ......Andrea Arreguin ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 6 ......Aylin Mehter ..........................Massapequa, N.Y. 7 ......Gabrielle Dicroce....................East Meadow, N.Y. 8 ......Elan King................................Baldwin, N.Y. 9 ......Taylor A. Diffley ......................Hampton Bays, N.Y. 10 ....Brooke Pottish........................East Quogue, N.Y. 11 ....Molly O. Nolan........................Montauk, N.Y. 12 ....Courtney Sokol ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 13 ....Sarin Siriamonthep ................Greenvale, N.Y. 14 ....Christine Bender ....................Amityville, N.Y. 15 ....Elizabeth Caroline Rossi ........Flanders, N.Y. 16 ....Lauren Johnson ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ....Alexandra F. Esposito..............Bellmore, N.Y. 18 ....Robin Romanoff ....................Centereach, N.Y. 19 ....Robin R. Mehta ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 20 ....Stephanie Loutsenko..............Bellmore, N.Y. 21 ....Shelby Goldman ....................West Hempstead, N.Y. 22 ....Arina Zanin ............................Oceanside, N.Y. 23 ....Alexandra Rengifo ..................Copiague, N.Y. 24 ....Deana Davoudiasi ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 25 ....Allie Reisch ............................Floral Park, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 06/01/09)

Sectional Boys 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 3 ......Keegan James Morris ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 4 ......Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 7 ......Logan Beckerman ..................East Norwich, N.Y. 8 ......Giancarlo Cavallero ................West Hempstead, N.Y. 9 ......Rajan Jai Vohra ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 11 ....Terrill Cole Bernard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 13 ....Daniel Shleimovich ................Merrick, N.Y. 15 ....Zane Siddiqui ........................West Babylon, N.Y. 17 ....Alan Delman ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 22 ....Kyle Hudson Gower ................Oceanside, N.Y.

ISLAND

25 ....Brian Shi ................................Jericho, N.Y. 28 ....Brady Berman ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 34 ....Eli Grossman..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 40 ....Thomas A. Korossy ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 41 ....Sean Patrick ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 44 ....Ian Bank ................................Old Westbury, N.Y. 49 ....Arjun Mehrotra ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 53 ....Titus Syon Sung ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 54 ....Patrick F. Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 57 ....Ryan Goetz ............................Greenlawn, N.Y. 58 ....Gardner Howe ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 63 ....Neel Raj ................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 64 ....Michael Medvedev ................Oceanside, N.Y. 67 ....Amani Siddiqui ......................West Babylon, N.Y. 68 ....Peter Lohrbach ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 70 ....Blake Shaevitz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 73 ....Adita J. Dave..........................Syosset, N.Y. 80 ....Alexander Reiley ....................Manorville, N.Y. 82 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 90 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito ................Syosset, N.Y. 94 ....Pete Siozios ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 95 ....Cannon Kingsley ....................Northport, N.Y. 101 ..Parker Appel ..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 104 ..Steven M. Schneider ..............Southampton, N.Y. 109 ..James Kyrkanides..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 114 ..William Dzanoucakis ..............Hampton Bays, N.Y. 117 ..Jacob Weiner ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 119 ..Justin Ilan Lempert ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 120 ..Joey Austin ............................Hewlett, N.Y. 128 ..Cody Bogard ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 129 ..Matthew Franklin Porges........Sands Point, N.Y. 137 ..Carl Grant ..............................Water Mill, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 8 ......Lubomir T. Cuba ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 9 ......Alexander Lebedev ................Island Park, N.Y. 10 ....Brenden Andrew Volk ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 16 ....Eric Wagner............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 38 ....Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y. 44 ....Palmer T. Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 45 ....Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 48 ....Daniel Grunberger..................Great Neck, N.Y. 53 ....Rajan Jai Vohra ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 54 ....Andrew Walsh ........................St. James, N.Y. 63 ....Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 65 ....Chris Kuhnle ..........................Shoreham, N.Y. 66 ....Jordan Michael Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 70 ....Dennis Uspensky....................Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 74 ....Joshua Williams Gordon ........Hicksville, N.Y. 75 ....Faran Nazir ............................Deer Park, N.Y. 77 ....Curran Varma ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 78 ....Nikhil Raj ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 79 ....Athell Patrick Bennett ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 80 ....Christopher Moyer Ardito........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 87 ....Andy Zhou..............................Commack, N.Y. 88 ....Sean M. Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 94 ....Christopher White ..................Garden City, N.Y. 95 ....Giancarlo Cavallero ................West Hempstead, N.Y. 99 ....Zane Siddiqui ........................West Babylon, N.Y. 100 ..Daniel Shleimovich ................Merrick, N.Y. 108 ..Garrett Malave ......................Laurel, N.Y. 113 ..Giuseppe Loduca....................Great Neck, N.Y. 115 ..Daniel David Kafka ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 118 ..Hunter Lee ............................Great Neck, N.Y. 121 ..Alex Brebenel ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 122 ..Noah J. Reisch ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 131 ..Evan Kober ............................Wantagh, N.Y. 137 ..Jesse M. Levitin ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 144 ..Vincent P. Thompson ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 147 ..Bryant J. Born ........................Manhasset, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 3 ......Noah Rubin ............................Merrick, N.Y. 5 ......Samuel Lam ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 6 ......Vihar Shah ............................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7 ......Aidan Talcott ..........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 9 ......Ethan Bogard ........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 17 ....Michael Paul ..........................Baldwin, N.Y.

RANKINGS

20 ....Zain Ali ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 25 ....Philip Daniel Antohi ................Glen Head, N.Y. 28 ....Richard Mitchell ....................Franklin Square, N.Y. 29 ....Douglas Notaris......................Wantagh, N.Y. 30 ....Lamar Remy ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 33 ....Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ............Greenvale, N.Y. 37 ....Josh Silverstein......................Great Neck, N.Y. 45 ....Dylan Hobbs Appel ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 49 ....Benjamin Pleat ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 55 ....Matthew R. Demichiel ............Hewlett, N.Y. 56 ....Mark Daniel Temporal ............Carle Place, N.Y. 57 ....Brandon T. Stone ....................Melville, N.Y. 60 ....Conor Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 61 ....John P. D’Alessandro..............Northport, N.Y. 68 ....Ethan Hayden Handa..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 71 ....Sander Brenner......................Port Washington, N.Y. 74 ....Gabriel P. Lazar ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 75 ....Tyler J. Hoffman ....................Sayville, N.Y. 79 ....Brian W. Slivonik ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 80 ....Zachary A. Lessen ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 85 ....Conor Dauer ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 86 ....Alex C. Sacher........................Glen Head, N.Y. 96 ....Stephan Savin........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 97 ....Benjamin Q. King....................East Meadow, N.Y. 99 ....Nick Bauer ............................Great River, N.Y. 101 ..Jared R. Halstrom ..................Bellmore, N.Y. 104 ..Josh Young ............................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 113 ..Drew F. Feldman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 115 ..Jeremy Dubin ........................Southampton, N.Y. 116 ..Gonzalo E. Mocorrea ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 119 ..Aaron Nussdorf ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 125 ..Daniel Sliwowski....................Islip, N.Y. 128 ..Benjamin Rosen ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 129 ..Guanlongrichard Chen............Northport, N.Y. 130 ..Kyle Alper ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 134 ..Michael A. Vera ......................Bethpage, N.Y. 135 ..Dylan Ander ..........................Hewlett, N.Y. 137 ..Marcell Rengifo......................Copiague, N.Y. 138 ..Joshua Williams Gordon ........Hicksville, N.Y. 144 ..Jonathan Paris ......................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 4 ......Bert Vancura ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 6 ......Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 10 ....Alexander Friedlich ................Great Neck, N.Y. 14 ....Oliver Loutsenko ....................Bellmore, N.Y. 16 ....Howard Weiss ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 20 ....Eric Rubin ..............................Lido Beach, N.Y. 24 ....Matthew O. Barry ..................Long Beach, N.Y. 28 ....Josh Levine............................Syosset, N.Y. 30 ....Jensen Reiter ........................Syosset, N.Y. 32 ....Eric Ambrosio ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 34 ....Zachary Morris ......................Garden City, N.Y. 41 ....Andrew Yaraghi ......................Mill Neck, N.Y. 42 ....Jonathan DeFrancesch ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 44 ....Jonahiby Tauil ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 45 ....Jason Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 48 ....Alex Tropiano..........................Syosset, N.Y. 49 ....Alan S. Pleat ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 51 ....Austin Blau ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 57 ....David Greenbaum ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 60 ....Harrison Digia ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 69 ....Zachary Mintz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 71 ....Douglas Hoch ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 78 ....Richard Sipala........................Quogue, N.Y. 80 ....Ignacio Casali ........................Farmingdale, N.Y. 81 ....Paul Abrudescu ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 84 ....Brian Hui................................East Meadow, N.Y. 86 ....Michael Paul ..........................Baldwin, N.Y. 97 ....Noah Rubin ............................Merrick, N.Y. 98 ....Scott Rabinowitz ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 101 ..Kevin Katz..............................Woodbury, N.Y. 105 ..Adam S. Gottlieb ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 116 ..Matthew J. Richards ..............Bayport, N.Y. 118 ..Christian Thomas Thienel ......East Quogue, N.Y. 119 ..Brendan Henry ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 120 ..Aidan Talcott ..........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 121 ..Matthew Lam ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 125 ..Michael T. Puntillo ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 126 ..Stephen Peng ........................Woodbury, N.Y.

127 ..Darren Reisch ........................Floral Park, N.Y. 129 ..Sloan Millman ........................Woodmere, N.Y. 135 ..Patrick Brosnan......................Garden City, N.Y. 137 ..Pasha Shapouri ......................Albertson, N.Y. 138 ..Sean Jagi Chhugani ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 140 ..JT Esposito ............................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 143 ..Ethan Bogard ........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 144 ..Daniel R. Grinshteyn ..............Hewlett, N.Y. 145 ..Alex S. Werman......................Roslyn, N.Y. 150 ..Jacob Mishkin........................Woodbury, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 2 ......Daniel Kreyman......................Long Beach, N.Y. 6 ......Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 20 ....Bryan Roberts ........................Commack, N.Y. 28 ....Joseph Agler ..........................North Bellmore, N.Y. 30 ....Corey Morgenstern ................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 31 ....Zachary Weiss........................Great Neck, N.Y. 35 ....Shane Giannetti......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 37 ....Jason Simon ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 42 ....Oliver Loutsenko ....................Bellmore, N.Y. 44 ....Morgan Dauer ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 45 ....Dennis Zlobinsky....................Greenvale, N.Y. 63 ....Steven Milo ............................Woodbury, N.Y. 65 ....Brett Byron ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 70 ....Bruce Grant............................Glen Head, N.Y. 72 ....Ryan Fitzgerald ......................East Williston, N.Y. 80 ....Joshua Katten ........................Plainview, N.Y. 82 ....Alexander Friedlich ................Great Neck, N.Y. 86 ....Eric Shyu................................Great Neck, N.Y. 96 ....Brandon Burns ......................Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 102 ..Nolan Gelman ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 105 ..Joseph Michalisin ..................Melville, N.Y. 108 ..Zachary A. Dean ....................Commack, N.Y. 118 ..Ignacio Casali ........................Farmingdale, N.Y. 120 ..Dylan Matthew Roberts ..........Holtsville, N.Y. 125 ..Brendan Ruddock ..................Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 126 ..Eric Ambrosio ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 130 ..Benjamin Bogard....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 135 ..Adam D. Mernit ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 139 ..Brian Hui................................East Meadow, N.Y. 142 ..Zachary Morris ......................Garden City, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 4 ......Celeste Rose Matute ..............Amityville, N.Y. 7 ......Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 10 ....Claire Handa ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 15 ....Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 19 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili ..........Syosset, N.Y. 23 ....Caitlin Cosme ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 26 ....Dominique Woinarowski ........Syosset, N.Y. 43 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 49 ....Emily Kate Shutman ..............Huntington, N.Y. 51 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ..........Manorville, N.Y. 55 ....Lea Ma ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 56 ....Devika Kedia ..........................East Norwich, N.Y. 68 ....Amanda Alison Foo ................Manhasset, N.Y. 70 ....Hannah Rosalie Dayton ..........East Hampton, N.Y. 71 ....Emma Alexis Weinberg ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 75 ....Emily Austin ..........................Hewlett, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 6 ......Isabella Pascucci....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7 ......Madison Battaglia ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 9 ......Mia Vecchio............................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 21 ....Samantha Perri ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 22 ....Morgan Kelly Herrmann..........Garden City, N.Y. 24 ....Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 28 ....Danielle Giannetti ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 29 ....Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 38 ....Madison Courtney Appel ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 42 ....Alexandra Lipps ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 43 ....Olivia Funk ............................Hicksville, N.Y. 46 ....Nicole Giannetti......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 49 ....Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 51 ....Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

69


LONG 67 ....Taylor S. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 77 ....Aimee Manfredo ....................Shoreham, N.Y. 79 ....Sarah Paul ............................Baldwin, N.Y. 83 ....Marissa Luchs........................Roslyn, N.Y. 84 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..............Amityville, N.Y. 90 ....Julia Ciardullo ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 92 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur..............Glen Head, N.Y. 95 ....Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ......Bayville, N.Y. 97 ....Courtney Kowalsky ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 99 ....Vanessa Scott ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 101 ..Courtney Digia ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 104 ..Bridget Elaine Harding............Northport, N.Y. 105 ..Michelle Vancura....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 112 ..Katie Jane Cirella ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 117 ..Caitlin M. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 122 ..Nicole Koskovolis ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 126 ..Stacy Denbaum......................Syosset, N.Y. 127 ..Nicole Damaghi......................Kings Point, N.Y. 129 ..Michele Sheila Lehat..............Great Neck, N.Y. 134 ..Rhea Malhotra........................Syosset, N.Y. 136 ..Caroline Keating ....................Huntington, N.Y. 150 ..Annelise Meyding ..................Port Washington, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 7 ......Hannah L. Camhi....................Woodbury, N.Y. 9 ......Vivian Cheng ..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 14 ....Claudia Li ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 15 ....Sophie R. Barnard ..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 21 ....Nadia Smergut ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 31 ....Lauren Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 33 ....Sara R. Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y. 38 ....Gabriella Nicole Leon ............Woodmere, N.Y. 49 ....Bianca Posa ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 50 ....Paulina Tafler ........................Oceanside, N.Y. 54 ....Sunaina Vohra ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 61 ....Rithika D. Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 70 ....Maria Korshunova ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 81 ....Laura Torsiello........................Bayport, N.Y. 83 ....Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 89 ....Cameron Leigh Moskol ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 90 ....Courtney Keating....................Huntington, N.Y. 91 ....Veronika Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 92 ....Ruth Freilich ..........................Lawrence, N.Y. 94 ....Megan M. Tamborrino ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 102 ..Jennifer Ferguson ..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 109 ..Claudia M. Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 110 ..Zenat Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 119 ..Karishma Ramesh Tank..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 126 ..Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 128 ..Amanda Nowak......................Huntington, N.Y. 132 ..Julia Zhuang ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 133 ..Aimee N. Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 135 ..Alexa P. Sternschein ..............Syosset, N.Y. 142 ..Kathryn Herburger..................Manhasset, N.Y. 144 ..Ola Mally................................Franklin Square, N.Y. 147 ..Jennifer Glukhman ................Syosset, N.Y. 150 ..Madison Battaglia ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 3 ......Katherine Yau ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 5 ......Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7 ......Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 10 ....Hannah L. Camhi....................Woodbury, N.Y. 12 ....Jacqueline Raynor..................Garden City, N.Y. 28 ....Devlin-Ann Ammendola..........Massapequa, N.Y. 31 ....Stephanie Loutsenko..............Bellmore, N.Y. 32 ....Samantha B. Gann ................Massapequa, N.Y. 34 ....Ashley T. Harel........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 45 ....Diana Vamvakitis....................Quogue, N.Y. 53 ....Sophie R. Barnard ..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 57 ....Deana Davoudias ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 63 ....Missy Edelblum......................Roslyn, N.Y. 64 ....Taylor A. Diffley ......................Hampton Bays, N.Y. 69 ....Paige J. Mintz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 70 ....Samantha Rosca-Sipot ..........Malverne, N.Y. 73 ....Morgan C. Feldman ................Glen Head, N.Y. 78 ....Samantha Elgort ....................Melville, N.Y. 79 ....Jamie Hann............................Westhampton, N.Y.

70

ISLAND

94 ....Emma Brenner ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 100 ..Robin R. Mehta ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 101 ..Carly Siegel............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 103 ..Vivian Cheng ..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 106 ..Melissa Carlay........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 108 ..Jessica Sickles ......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 109 ..Elizabeth Caroline Rossi ........Flanders, N.Y. 110 ..Ludmila Yamus ......................Melville, N.Y. 116 ..Tarrin Joslin ..........................Hampton Bays, N.Y. 120 ..Lauren Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 121 ..Amy Ginny Naula....................East Hampton, N.Y. 124 ..Amanda Seeley ......................Sound Beach, N.Y. 129 ..Veronika Paikin ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 143 ..Hannah Hinchcliffe ................Mineola, N.Y. 145 ..Elan King................................Baldwin, N.Y. 146 ..Brett A. Lieb ..........................Cutchogue, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ................................City 3 ......Jennifer Kellner......................Smithtown, N.Y. 5 ......Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8 ......Mollie Anderson ....................Melville, N.Y. 11 ....Kristin Norton ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 12 ....Olivia Pascucci ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 16 ....Aylin Mehter ..........................Massapequa, N.Y. 17 ....Nicolle Stracar........................Jericho, N.Y. 19 ....Blair Seideman ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 20 ....Kelsey Raynor ........................Garden City, N.Y. 22 ....Jessica Podlofsky ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 24 ....Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 30 ....Shelby Bates..........................Jericho, N.Y. 37 ....Jennifer Fridman....................Port Washington, N.Y. 41 ....Robyn Romanoff ....................Centereach, N.Y. 42 ....Ashley T. Harel........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 49 ....Andrea Samlin........................Merrick, N.Y. 60 ....Jordana Kono ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 82 ....Holly Reich ............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 84 ....Katherine Hanson ..................Smithtown, N.Y. 92 ....Amanda B. Halstrom ..............Bellmore, N.Y. 96 ....Stephanie Loutsenko..............Bellmore, N.Y. 99 ....Andrea Arreguin ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 103 ..Cassie Bender........................Amityville, N.Y. 108 ..Kara E. Caulfield ....................Sayville, N.Y. 109 ..Brooke Pottish........................East Quogue, N.Y. 110 ..Marissa D. Lazar ....................Hewlett, N.Y. 112 ..Eliza J. Budd ..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 131 ..Hannah L. Camhi....................Woodbury, N.Y. 141 ..Allie Reisch ............................Floral Park, N.Y. 143 ..Lindsay V. Kantor....................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 150 ..Rachel Marc ..........................Woodmere, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 06/01/09)

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 64 ....Alexander Lebedev ................Island Park, N.Y. 79 ....Lubomir Cuba ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 96 ....Eric Wagner............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 137 ..Brenden Andrew Volk ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 282 ..Jared Halstrom ......................Bellmore, N.Y. 609 ..Finbar Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 748 ..Rajan Jai Vohra ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 768 ..Justin Park ............................Huntington, N.Y. 786 ..Palmer T. Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 814 ..Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 940 ..Sean Mullins ..........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 986 ..Dennis Uspensky....................Atlantic Beach, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 29 ....Noah Rubin ............................Merrick, N.Y. 60 ....Ethan Bogard ........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 66 ....Aidan Talcott ..........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 67 ....Samuel Lam ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 76 ....Vihar Shah ............................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 178 ..Michael Paul ..........................Baldwin, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

RANKINGS

375 ..Zain Ali ..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 379 ..Lamar Remy ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 395 ..Philip Daniel Antohi ................Glen Head, N.Y. 491 ..Richard Mitchell ....................Franklin Square, N.Y. 492 ..Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ............Greenvale, N.Y. 507 ..Benjamin Pleat ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 582 ..Dylan Hobbs Appel ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 586 ..Douglas Notaris......................Wantagh, N.Y. 613 ..Josh Silverstein......................Great Neck, N.Y. 682 ..Austin Davidow ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 729 ..John P. D’Allesandro ..............Northport, N.Y. 973 ..Conor Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 15 ....Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 44 ....Bert Vancura ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 94 ....Alexander Friedlich ................Great Neck, N.Y. 113 ..Oliver Loutsenko ....................Bellmore, N.Y. 163 ..Howie Weiss ..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 165 ..Dennis Zlobinsky....................Greenvale, N.Y. 206 ..Shane Giannetti......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 232 ..Jonathan DeFrancesch ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 260 ..Andrew Yaraghi ......................Mill Neck, N.Y. 266 ..Josh Levine............................Syosset, N.Y. 282 ..Eric Ambrosio ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 284 ..Jensen Reiter ........................Syosset, N.Y. 302 ..Matthew O. Barry ..................Lido Beach, N.Y. 317 ..Eric Rubin ..............................Lido Beach, N.Y. 499 ..David Greenbaum ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 554 ..Jason Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 558 ..Zachary Weiss........................Great Neck, N.Y. 579 ..Alan S. Pleat ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 663 ..Jonahiby Tauil ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 670 ..Brandon Li ............................Jericho, N.Y. 741 ..Austin Blau ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 820 ..Douglas Hoch ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 834 ..Alex Tropiano..........................Syosset, N.Y. 945 ..Zachary H. Mintz ....................Roslyn, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 44 ....Shaun Bernstein ....................Plainview, N.Y. 68 ....Daniel Kreyman......................Long Beach, N.Y. 224 ..Bryan Roberts ........................Commack, N.Y. 254 ..Joseph Agler ..........................North Bellmore, N.Y. 274 ..Zachary Weiss........................Great Neck, N.Y. 476 ..Eric Shyu................................Great Neck, N.Y. 513 ..Shane Gianetti........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 581 ..Morgan Dauer ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 595 ..Jason A. Simon ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 618 ..Oliver Loutsenko ....................Bellmore, N.Y. 721 ..Joseph Michalisin ..................Melville, N.Y. 743 ..Corey Morgenstern ................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 756 ..Dennis Zlobinsky....................Greenvale, N.Y. 814 ..Brett Fitzgerald ......................East Williston, N.Y.

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 84 ....Isabella Pascucci....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 105 ..Madison Battaglia ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 113 ..Mia Vecchio............................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 176 ..Rachel Gastaldo ....................Syosset, N.Y. 222 ..Morgan Kelly Herrmann..........Garden City, N.Y. 255 ..Samantha Perri ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 271 ..Danielle Giannetti ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 425 ..Madison Courtney Appel ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 539 ..Alexandra Lipps ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 554 ..Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 619 ..Nicole Giannetti......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 642 ..Jeannie Lozowski ..................Amityville, N.Y. 710 ..Alexa Graham ........................Garden City, N.Y. 760 ..Sarah Paul ............................Baldwin, N.Y. 815 ..Taylor S. Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 983 ..Lauren Ann Livingston............Sands Point, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 4 ......Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 62 ....Hannah Camhi ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 110 ..Claudia Li ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 113 ..Vivian Cheng ..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 134 ..Morgan Feldman ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 171 ..Sophie Barnard ......................Mill Neck, N.Y. 230 ..Lauren Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 293 ..Nadia Smergut ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 502 ..Sara R. Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y. 655 ..Gabriella Nicole Leon ............Woodmere, N.Y. 741 ..Rithika D. Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 920 ..Sunaina Vohra ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 934 ..Paulina Tafler ........................Oceanside, N.Y. 990 ..Karen A. Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 73 ....Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 121 ..Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 126 ..Katherine Yau ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 141 ..Hannah L. Camhi....................Woodbury, N.Y. 264 ..Jacqueline Raynor..................Garden City, N.Y. 370 ..Ashley T. Harel........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 427 ..Samantha B. Gann ................Massapequa, N.Y. 468 ..Stephanie Loutsenko..............Bellmore, N.Y. 608 ..Devlin-Ann Ammendola..........Massapequa, N.Y. 726 ..Sophie R. Barnard ..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 814 ..Diana Vamvakitis....................Quogue, N.Y. 821 ..Paige J. Mintz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 932 ..Deana Davoudias ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 973 ..Morgan C. Feldman ................Glen Head, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ................................City 10 ....Blair Seideman ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 34 ....Kristin Norton ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 38 ....Jennifer Kellner......................Smithtown, N.Y. 135 ..Jordana Kono ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 147 ..Olivia Pascucci ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 163 ..Nicolle Stracar........................Jericho, N.Y. 175 ..Mollie Anderson ....................Melville, N.Y. 191 ..Julia Elbaba ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 327 ..Jessica Podlofsky ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 337 ..Aylin Mehter ..........................Massapequa, N.Y. 410 ..Shelby Bates..........................Jericho, N.Y. 460 ..Jennifer Fridman....................Port Washington, N.Y. 538 ..Kelsey Raynor ........................Garden City, N.Y. 598 ..Ashley T. Harel........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 619 ..Shelby Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 672 ..Robyn Romanoff ....................Centereach, N.Y. 980 ..Amanda B. Halstrom ..............Bellmore, N.Y. 988 ..Katherine Hanson ..................Smithtown, N.Y.


USTA/Long Island Region 2009

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. JULY 2009 Friday-Sunday, July 3-5 L3 Sportime Bethpage UPS Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10-14)s, RR Entry Fee: 43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Monday, July 3-6 L20 Atlantic Beach Challenger Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (10-16)s, SE Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, June 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Monday-Friday, July 6-10 L20 Sportime Amagansett Summer Open Sportime at Amagansett 320 Abraham’s Path Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked B (10-16)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, June 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 267-3460. Friday-Sunday, July 10-12 L2R Long Island Regional Long Beach Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: BG (10-16)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for singles/$28 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, July 10-12 L2R Long Island Regional Westhampton Championship Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (12-16)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060.

Friday-Sunday, July 10-12 Westhampton Senior Championship Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club 86 Depot Road • Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: M (65, 75)sd Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, July 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060. Friday-Monday, July 10-13 & July 17-9 Eastern Masters Sectionals The Tennis King 25 The Tulips • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (25, 35, 45, 55, 65)s, M(25, 35-45, 55, 65)d, FMLC, FS(0)d, FMLC, Entry Fee: $60 for singles, $60 for doubles, add $8 for late fee (deadline for entries is Monday, July 6 at 10:00 a.m.) For more information, call (516) 551-4389. Monday, July 13 & Saturday, July 18 L1B Nick Brebenel Challenger Nick Brebenel Tournament Training Center 32 Oak Lane • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (16-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, June 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 852-0591. Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L20 Hamptons Eastern Championship Sportime of the Hamptons PO Box 965 • Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (10-16)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 653-6767. Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L20 Long Beach Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: BG (10-14)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L1 Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L1B Sportime Kings Park Challenger Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (12-14)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 269-6300. Saturday-Monday, July 18-20 L20 Atlantic Beach Championship Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (16-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 13 at midnight) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 & July 31-August 2 Prestige Tennis Championship Prestige Tennis Inc. 433 Main Street Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (35-50)sd Entry Fee: $60 per single player/$30 per doubles player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 17 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (917) 846-7477. Friday-Tuesday, July 24-28 L1 2009 Port Washington Summer Classic— Dana DeCarlo Commemorative Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (12-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 883-6425.

Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 Long Beach Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: M (25-40, 50)sd Entry Fee: $54.25 doubles fee/$48.88 per player/$97.76 per team (deadline for entries is Monday, July 20 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Saturday-Sunday, July 25-August 2 Sportime Master’s Circuit at Sportime Amagansett Sportime at Amagansett 320 Abraham’s Path Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: M (Op, 45, 60), W (Op)s Entry Fee: $75 per singles player/$50 per doubles player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 24) For more information, call (631) 267-3460. Monday-Friday, July 27-31 L3 Huntington Eastern UPS Championship Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Unranked BG (10-18)s, RR Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Tuesday-Thursday, July 28-30 L1 LBTC Doubles Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (10-18)d, SE Entry Fee: $28 per player for one event (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 9 LBTC NTRP Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: NMW (2.5-4.0)sd, SE Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 27 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

71


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USTA/Long Island Region 2009

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for one event/$51 for two events/additional fees may apply for three or more events (deadline for entries is Friday, July 17 at 3:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L3 Sportime Lynbrook Eastern UPS Championship Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Unranked BG (10-16)s, RR Entry Fee: $43.50 per player for singles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. AUGUST 2009 Sunday, August 2 L3 Nick Brebenel Eastern UPS Championship Nick Brebenel Tournament Training Center 32 Oak Lane Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (16-18)s, RR Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 852-0591. Thursday-Sunday, August 6-9 Summer Championship II Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (Op, 55, 65)s Entry Fee: $59.63 per singles player, $33 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 31 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060. Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L3 Westhampton Beach Eastern UPS Championship Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Unranked BG (12-16)s, RR Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 24 at 11:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060.

72

Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L1B Sportime Amagansett Challenger Sportime at Amagansett 320 Abraham’s Path Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked B (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 267-3460.

Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L20 Atlantic Beach Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: B (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, August 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L20 Long Beach Summer Open Long Beach Racket Club 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (10-18)d, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for one event (deadline for entries is Friday, July 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Saturday-Sunday, August 15-23 Sportime Master Circuit at Quogue Sportime of the Hamptons PO Box 965 Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (Op, 45, 60)s, W (op)s Entry Fee: All combined tournament prize money will be $1,500 for each division and top eight players in each division combined in all four tournaments will play for prize money. All participants must be current USTA members (deadline for entries is Wednesday, August 12 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 653-6767.

Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L20 Atlantic Beach August Championship Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked B (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, August 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 & August 14-16 Arresting August The Tennis King 25 The Tulips Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (25, 35, 50, 60, 70)sd, FMLC, FS(0)d, FMLC, FMLC Entry Fee: $60 for singles, $60 for doubles, add $8 for late fee For more information, call (516) 551-4389. Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L20 Atlantic Beach Open Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked G (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, August 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2009

Thursday-Sunday, August 20-23 L20 Sportime Amagansett Championship Sportime at Amagansett 320 Abraham’s Path Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (10-12, 18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, August 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 267-3460. Friday-Sunday, August 21-23 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, August 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Sunday, August 23 L3 Nick Brebenel Eastern UPS Championship Nick Brebenel Tournament Training Center 32 Oak Lane Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (12-14)s, RR Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, August 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 852-0591.

Tuesday-Tuesday, August 25September 1 L1 Point Set Championship Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, August 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323. Tuesday-Sunday, August 27-30 L1 LBTC Doubles Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: BG (10-18)d, SE Entry Fee: $28 per player for one event/$31 per player for two events (deadline for entries is Thursday, August 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, August 28-30 L3 Atlantic Beach Open Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked BG (10-14)s, SE Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, August 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Friday-Sunday, August 28-30 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10-18)s, SE Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, August 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Long Island Tennis Magazine - July/August 2009  

Page 16 Open Season (US Open), Page 3 Welcome to Lagos By Alanna Broderick, Page 6 The Importance of Tennis-Specific Training By Carl Barnet...

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