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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

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By Luke Jensen For any tennis player in the United States, the U.S. Open is the Mac Daddy of everything tennis … it is the biggest tournament in the world. This event has the biggest monetary prize to win; it is played in the biggest tennis stadium in the world and it is played in the greatest city in the world … New York City! The fan who attends the U.S. Open is very special to the game of tennis. The Open attracts more sports fans than traditional tennis fans and that makes playing the U.S. Open extremely unique. The sports fan loves the drama that is sport … the turmoil of the athletic contest. You will find fans like this at other tournaments around the world, but in New York, the fan wants to get involved in the action. There were so many times where I would be in some tough match at the Open and I would be getting advice from these random people from the sidelines. Pizza Joe was the favorite of all my New York coaches. Now, they were not coaches at all, I’m pretty sure they didn’t even play tennis, and I know Pizza Joe was about 150 pounds over anything athletic when I met him. Pizza Joe had three amazing lines he would use—two the entire match, and one that I will never forget. If I was winning, he would say, “Jensen, you got’em … he can’t hang with you!” Now if I was losing, Pizza Joe would let me have it, “Yo Jensen, I can miss that shot too … pick it up! His best line was if I was losing badly, he would say over and over, “Jensen, I PAID to see this?” No matter what my result was, Pizza Joe would be there to see me when I walked off the court. He was so nice after the match no matter what the result was. It was more about the effort put into the contest that New York fans respect the most. To me, that’s what makes the U.S. Open so very special. The fans want you to

give your heart and soul in the fight for victory. It’s not easy playing the Open with planes, trains and the smell of burgers coming from the food court as some common distractions. There is nothing like the smell of a greasy burger when you are deep into a five-set singles match. The best way to cruise the Open is to bounce. Bouncing is going from close match to close match and wedging yourself into an area to watch the drama. More players tap out and go nuts at the Open than at any other major, as the year has been long and the nerves begin to wear thin. Just the drive from the city every day in traffic can freak out any player on game day. The Open is ENERGY and tons of it. Day matches and night matches with tie-breakers in the final set … for any player or fan, the U.S. Open is the best tennis experience in the world. Other events like Wimbledon have tradition. The French Open is all about fashion and the Aussie is about fun. The U.S. Open is the final major of the year, the final test for all the players searching for Grand Slam glory! The Open

is bold and brash. The logo is a tennis ball flying through the air on flames … just like Americans like the game played. Going for the lines! For all fans, and especially the ones like Pizza Joe, thanks for making the U.S. Open an amazing experience! Enjoy the Open!  Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen is head coach of the Syracuse University Women’s Tennis Team. Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lbjensen@syr.edu.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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September/October 2011 Volume 3, Number 5

Cover story Cover photo credit: USTA National

2011 U.S. Open Preview: Stars Collide at the Open

Long Island Tennis Magazine

Everything you wanted to know about the 2011 U.S. Open all bundled into one neat package … from the contenders, to the pretenders, to the best places to eat, to where to get autographs of the stars as the final Grand Slam of 2011 sets to take over the New York area.

1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Andrew T. Berman Vice President/Sales (516) 409-4444, ext. 333 • andrew@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Jon Blake Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • jonb@usptennis.com Michael Sarro Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 • michael@usptennis.com Anthony Pastecchi Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • anthony@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Marketing Coordinator Tara Cook Billing Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Brent Shearer Editorial Contributor

Monica Gorny Editorial Contributor

David Drucker Editorial Contributor

Jenna Poczik Intern

Rachel Silverman Intern

Ken Goldberg Photographer

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@usptennis.com.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or email david@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Features 5 Agassi Inducted Into International Tennis Hall of Fame

Champions of Tomorrow By Steve Kaplan

Andre Agassi is immortalized as a legend of the sport with his 2011 induction into Newport, R.I.’s International Tennis Hall of Fame.

Author Steve Kaplan discusses the synergistic relationship between skill development and physical development in a junior tennis player’s career.

14 Successful Season for the Sportimes Falls a Bit Short A look back at highlights of the New York Sportimes during the 2011 World TeamTennis season.

22 NJTL Hosts Successful Kid’s Day at Tully Park By Bill Mecca Bill Mecca recaps a day of tennis fun at Tully Park.

40 Foot for Thought By Daniel Kresh Daniel Kresh looks at mastering proper on-court footwork and how your game can improve through this mastery.

Author Roman Prokes takes a look at some tips and remedies to repair and diagnose some common ailments of your racquet.

By Tonny van de Pieterman Tonny van de Pieterman provides some strategies on returning serves.

19 The Sand Pit A look back at the weekend of July 10-11 as the city of Chicago hosted the firstever Beach tennis USA U.S. National Championships.

20 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Junior Player Spotlight on Matt Zeifman: Long Island’s Youngest Tennis Phenom Getting to know local tennis product, five-year-old Matt Zeifman, and the coaches who are helping him pave the path to his tennis dreams.

23 Dr. Tom on the Problem of Learning to Celebrate 44 The Reverse Forehand: Don’t Try It! By Miguel Cervantes III Miguel Cervantes III breaks down the proper technique behind pulling off the reverse forehand shot.

48 The State of U.S. Tennis: Is It Really That Bad?

By Dr. Tom Ferraro Dr. Tom Ferraro takes a look at building self-esteem both on and off the court and what you can do to attain your goals.

38 Fitness and Nutrition: Finding the Proper Fluid/Electrolyte

By Lonnie Mitchel

Balance By Irene Belfer-Lehat

Lonnie Mitchel looks at the current state of the sport in the U.S. and the abundance of courts and training facilities in our nation as compared to others.

Irene Belfer-Lehat provides tips on avoiding dehydration and finding one’s proper hydration zone during athletic activities.

50 Dreams Really Do Come True By Monica Gorny Monica Gorny recaps the work of the Garden of Dreams Foundation and their recent trip to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

46 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Literary Corner By Brent Shearer Brent Shearer takes a look at the book, On the Line by Serena Williams with Daniel Paisner.

Columns

49 Off the Court Directory

1 The Jensen Zone By Luke Jensen

51 Long Island Tennis Club Directory

Current Syracuse Women’s Tennis Coach and tennis great Luke Jensen looks back at his experiences on one of the grandest stages the sport has to offer, the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center at the U.S. Open.

52 Long Island Ranking, Sponsored by Denny’s

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3 Get “Outta Your Mind” and Into the Zone

55 USTA/Long Island Region 2011 Tournament Schedule

By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC

Rob Polishook discusses separating the physical and mental aspects of the game.

6 Adult League Recap By Kathy Miller

Kathy Miller takes a look back at the local Adult League Regional Championships and looks forward to this fall’s upcoming Tri-Level League.

News Briefs

5 Congrats to Our Locals …

41 Tennis Blitz in the Parks Brings Free Tennis Lessons to Nassau County

8 Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz

A look at the off-the-court lives of the sport’s top stars.

10 College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … You Really Can See What College Path Your Junior Ranking Might Take You at Any Age By Ricky Becker

12 USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region

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18 Tips From the Tennis Pro: Return Serves Like the Pros!

By David Drucker

42 Frequently Asked Racquet Fixes By Roman Prokes

Ricky Becker discusses what college tennis programs are looking for in a junior tennis player’s ranking and what these schools have to offer to ranked players at various levels.

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2011 United Sports Publications Ltd.

16 Good to Great: A Model for Safely Building the Tennis

By David Drucker

The latest happenings with the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region, from national success by local eight-year-old Rachel Arbitman, free USTA memberships for kids 10 and under, USTA Serves awarding Christopher Hunter with at $10,000 scholarship, the East School receiving a USTA grant, and an Eastern-Long Island Region AED/CPR training session.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


Get “Outta Your Mind” and Into the Zone It’s the only way to compete!

By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC e have all heard people say, “She played out of her mind!” referring to someone who played exceptionally well and beyond expectations. As an athlete, have you ever performed out of your mind? Either pitching to perfection, running like the wind or serving lights out? Maybe there is more to this “out of your mind” concept than meets the eye. The idea is ultimately a metaphor for playing within yourself, where everything is effortless, where little thought occurs and optimal performance just happens. In this article, I will discuss how literally getting “out of your mind” is the best way to reach optimal personal peak performance in competitive sports. When an athlete plays “in their mind,” they are not playing from instinct. They are usually overanalyzing, their thoughts are cluttered and disorganized, and they are unable to get out of their own way. Further, their thoughts are in the past and future, tied to expectations, ego, excitement and fears. Essentially, their thoughts are weighing them

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down—athletes describe it as playing with an imaginary weight around their waist and trying to run, jump, hit and concentrate while their mind is over-thinking every move. Specifically, they hold onto past points or games, think about uncontrollable past and future situations, focus on expectations, or deride themselves for not living up to the preconceived standard they expected. We all know what happens when this kind of mentality creeps in—the dreaded spiral where a player loses control! Physically and mentally, it looks like this: An initial loss of focus, fear about what might be or what is occurring, tightened muscles, heavy breathing and loss of feeling. Then, the poor play follows, usually ending in disappointment and defeat. The only way to optimize performance is to play in the moment (present), to respond to situations with calm awareness—as opposed to reacting out of ego, fear and anxiety. I call this the “Eye of the Hurricane,” calm on the inside, yet aware and active on the outside. The key to staying in the moment is within

all of us … the secret lies in our own bodies. Our body is always in the present moment. When an athlete becomes aware of his or her body, such as the rhythm in their hips when they swing a bat, racket or a club, they simplify things and enter a place of curiosity where they are simply noticing their present actions. This heightened awareness shift moves them away from the distracting ego, fear, and anxiety-driven thoughts. In fact, all of the “what ifs,” “shoulda” or “coulda” thoughts are no longer in the way because the focus is on observations, rather than judgment. Essentially, by getting “out of your mind,” you get “out of your way” and simply allow the technique you have practiced and your performance to happen or flow in the present. If an adjustment is necessary, it can then be made without judgment. How can a player shift their focus “outta their mind” (thoughts, past, future and judgments) and into their body (present)? It starts with a keen awareness; when they become aware of being submerged in over-thinking, fear or that recognizable negative spiral, the

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idea is to simplify things and shift their attention to something in the present. For example, the athlete may focus on their breathing or a place in the body they feel calm and centered. This refocus of “out of your mind” and “into your body” serves as a reconnection to the present—a place of calm and observation. From this place, the athlete can play by observing and noticing, instead of judging their technique or performance. Ultimately, by the start of the match, game or performance, the athlete has the skills necessary to compete at their personal highest level. The competition is not the time to analyze technique—it is the opportunity to simply play, by getting “out of your mind” and allowing the body to do what it has been trained to do. It is easy to let your mind creep toward the result, get caught up in expectations, question whether others are judging your performance, or think about the missed opportunity of a previous exchange. Yet, the aforementioned tools can help the player to keep their attention out of the mind and in the present, able to respond to the moment. Athletes love those times when they feel immersed in competition, competing with great effort for sustained periods of time, and ultimately, playing inside the zone. Shawn Green, in his book The Way of Baseball, talks about how he used the batting tee and focus on his breathing to get out of his mind and reconnect with his natural swing. Billie Jean King, in her book Pressure is a Privilege, also talks about how she uses her breath to limit distraction and stay inside the zone. So, at your next competition, shift your focus “outta your mind” away from fears or judgments and “inside the zone” to your breath and body, and begin on the path to unlocking your potential.  Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach he works with athletes and teams of all levels. His work focuses on helping athletes gain the mental edge and letting go of blocks which get in the way of peak performance. He is a USTA Zonal Coach and has spoken and been published for the USTA, USPTA and ITA. Additionally, he has conducted workshops nationally and internationally in India and Israel. He may be reached by phone at (973) 7230314, e-mail rob@insidethezone or visit www.insidethezone.com. 4

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


Photo credit: Kate Whitney Lucey

Agassi INDUCTED INTO

INTERNATIONAL TENNIS HALL OF FAME B Y D AV I D D R U C K E R

here simply isn’t enough time in the day to describe all of the wonderful things about Andre Agassi. From the moment he stepped onto the professional courts of the ATP tour, he turned the sport of tennis upside down. Who could forget those long blonde locks and denim shorts? Agassi has provided tennis fans and sports fans alike with a number of precious moments throughout his career. From his rivalry with fellow American Pete Sampras, to the low points of his career plummeting in the rankings, to his final run as a pro in 2006 at the U.S. Open. In early July, Andre Agassi was officially immortalized in Newport, R.I. when he was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. I am proud to admit, that I was always an Agassi guy, not a Sampras guy. When someone asks you who you root for, the Mets or Yankees, tennis’ equivalent was, who do you root for, Sampras or Agassi? Agassi always had the charisma and energy that Pete never had. Mind you, Pete Sampras has provided us with some of the most memorable matches ever. With Agassi, it’s different. If you read his autobiography Open, you would have read how much Agassi loathes tennis. Being pushed by his father his entire childhood to play and to play well is the reason we have Andre Agassi. Andre has publicly made it known that the relationship he had with his father was not a great one. His father was always telling his son what to do. During his Hall of Fame induction speech in Newport, he thanked his father in sincere fashion, “Dad, when I was five, you told me to win Wimbledon. When I was seven, you told me to win all four Grand Slams. And more times than I can remember, you told me to

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get into the Hall of Fame. And when I was 29, you told me to marry Steffi Graf ... best advice you ever gave me. So dad, please don’t ever stop telling me what to do.” Agassi’s wife Steffi Graf and their two children, Jaden and Jazz, looked on as the American legend thanked the game of tennis time after time for all it has given him. Trying to hold back the tears, Agassi reminisced what he had done with his charity work, most notably, his “Agassi Prep Academy” in Las Vegas. As Agassi wept, it brought back memories of his last match at the U.S. Open in 2006. When he spoke to the fans at Arthur Ashe Stadium after his loss, I, along with others in attendance and I’m sure at home, couldn’t help but shed a tear as well. That’s sort of what we sport fans do with our favorite athletes. We laugh when they laugh, smile when they smile, and cry when they cry. For all that Andre Agassi has given to the world, an induction into the Tennis Hall of Fame was mandatory.

Agassi’s storied career includes 60 titles, the number one ranking, an 870-274 career match record, more than $30 million amassed in prize money, eight Grand Slam titles, and an Olympic gold medal. These achievements that Agassi has accomplished aren’t what the people will remember most. They will remember the story that Agassi wrote throughout his playing career. The drama that he brought to the court, whether it was a fashion statement, a hairpiece or a rivalry, Agassi provided sports fans with memories that will never be forgotten. “I fell in love with tennis far too late in my life. But the reason I have everything I hold dear is because tennis has loved me back,” Agassi said.  David Drucker of Long Island Tennis Magazine is a member of the Nichols College Men’s Tennis team. He may be reached by e-mail at davidd@usptennis.com.

Congrats to Our Locals … Congratulations to our local Long Island junior players who took home honors at the National Opens that took place throughout the month of July. Allenwood, N.J.  Boys 16s Singles Finalist—Josh Silverstein (Great Neck, N.Y.) Aston, Pa.  Boys 18s Singles Champion—Noah Rubin (Merrick, N.Y.) Denver  Girls 18s Doubles Champions—Leighann Sahagun (Queens Village, N.Y.) & Hannah Camhi (Woodbury, N.Y.) Midland, Mich.  Boys 14s Doubles Finalist—Brenden Volk (Dix Hills, N.Y.) LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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By Kathy Miller

t the time this issue went to print, the Adult League just finished the Regional Championships and the seniors are finishing up before playoff week begins. The adult teams headed to the Sectionals include:

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 Women’s 2.5 ....Carefree/Marilyn Shimon  Women’s 3.0 ....Carefree/Evelyn Franklin  Women’s 3.5 ....Blue Point/Michele Colondona  Women’s 4.0 ....Carefree/Virginia Harnisch  Women’s 4.5 ....Carefree/Jenn Miller & Sally Disabato  Women’s 5.0 ....Sportime Lynbrook/Tina Buschi  Men’s 3.0 ..........Sportime Massapequa/Zafar Malik  Men’s 3.5 ..........Sportime Roslyn/Robert Gray  Men’s 4.0 ..........Hempstead Lake/Adam Moramarco  Men’s 4.5 ..........Sportime Roslyn/Art Kornblit  Men’s 5.0 ..........Carefree/Eric Chaffer & Scott Chesney

Good luck to all of the teams at the Sectionals in Syracuse, N.Y.! Next up will be the Tri-Level League which will start the end of September. The Tri-Level League will be based on the “early start ratings.” If you are not participating in the Tri-Level, please do not go by these ratings. They are not final and can change. The Tri-Level is three courts of doubles, one court at the 3.5 Level, one at 4.0 and one at 4.5. We will also try to have a 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 Tri-Level League run at the same time. If you are interested, please e-mail me at kathym65@aol.com for more information. The Mixed-Doubles League will begin in January and will be based on the final rating which will be available at the end of November. For this league, please contact me in November if you are having a team or are looking to play on a team. Thank you to all of the league participants for making this such a successful program, and I especially thank all of the team captains … your hard work and effort is appreciated.  Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


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By Emilie Katz Twitter’s top 100 SportsIllustrated.com released its Twitter top 100 list. Appearing on the list are three professional Serbian tennis players: Novak Djokovic (@djokernole), Andrea Petkovic (@andreapetkovic) and Janko Tipsarevic (@tipsarevicjanko). And the ESPY goes to Rafael Nadal and Serena Williams won ESPY Awards for the Best Male and Female Tennis Player at the recent ESPN awards show.

“Planking” anyone? Team USA engaged in some planking before their loss in the Davis Cup. You can find the photos online but here are the highlights of the “plank war:”  Mardy Fish started things off by planking in the arms of teammates after the Davis Cup tie’s announcement.  Andy Roddick countered that by planking up an escalator.  Mardy Fish returned the favor by planking from an ice cooler. That’s two to one in favor of Fish, but Roddick’s plank was probably the best so we’ll call it even. 8

To play or not to play Venus Williams left doubt as to her Olympic future and the idea that she will indeed play mixed-doubles with Bob Bryan at the 2012 London Olympics. She said, “You know, I’ve been known not to commit to relationships,” she said with a laugh. “So I’ll be waiting until the last minute to see what’s best, you know? I’m always a ‘grass is greener’ kind of girl. It’s a bad habit that has followed over to tennis.” It was a confusing answer from Venus, who had previously said she’d partner with Bob in hopes of Olympic glory. Also her sister, Serena Williams and Andy Roddick made a commitment to play the Olympic Games together. When asked by Long Island Tennis Magazine recently if she was still on course to partner up with Roddick, Serena said, “We will see. I’m not sure who I will be playing with. I love all the American players.” So it remains to be seen if either Venus or Serena will be playing mixed-doubles at the Olympics and if so, who they will be playing with. Let’s play the Feud John McEnroe recently inferred that the timing of Andy Roddick’s marriage to model/actress Brooklyn Decker has coincided with a slide in the quality of A-Rod’s on-court results. “I know Andy as well as anyone, and I

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

think the marriage is one of the reasons he’s still playing,” said Mardy Fish. “I think what’s been said is completely unwarranted. It’s not a great comment to talk about wives.” Fish and Roddick are close friends, and Fish himself is also married to a model, Stacey Gardner. Roddick and McEnroe also shared another exchange recently when Johnny Mac asserted that, “The unknown is what we want, something unpredictable—watching the players trade practice shots takes away from that,” McEnroe told The London Evening Standard. “They should go out there like boxers, to huge applause and announcements, have a coin toss and then, boom, first serve.” Roddick had the following retort: “I think it’s easy to not have the warm-up when you’re the one not doing it anymore.” Also, about waiting out rain delays and long matches, “I’ve been sitting around for fourand-a half hours, and he [McEnroe] wants me to go out there and serve 145mph? That’s irresponsible is what it is.” Here comes the bride on ice Elena Dementieva, who retired at the end of 2010 without ever claiming a Grand Slam title, has still added another worthy trophy to her collection, and it’s the most important of all … the love and affection of her hockey-player husband, Maxim Afinogenov. The pair


married on July 16th on the roof of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Moscow. Another bride-to-be, Gisela Dulko, reportedly missed Argentina’s 4-0 Fed Cup loss against Japan because she was preparing for her own wedding.

Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): What does the REM stand for in the band REM?

Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): I think I have insomnia or “I’m so tired I can’t sleep!”

The Biggest Loser Anna Kournikova was a no-show for the 2011 World TeamTennis season this summer and the reason is that she has joined the cast of the hit NBC extreme weight-loss show, The Biggest Loser. Kournikova will be replacing trainer Jillian Michaels, who is leaving the series to pursue whatever celebrity trainers end up pursuing after a successful run on a reality TV series. Executive Producer Todd Lubin told New York magazine’s Vulture that the show is “Getting slightly away from just the tape measure, and getting into overall well-being and health.” Congrats are in order World number one doubles player Bob Bryan has announced via his Twitter account that he and his wife, Michelle, are going to have a child. He got the buzz going by tweeting out, “Boom! 10 hours of sleep and 10 days until the next shindig. Finally a little break. Oh, and I’ve got some news for you …” He then revealed, “This little baby could be your 2034 Wimby champ!” Tennis tweets of late What is on your favorite tennis players mind and what are they are up to? We learned this through the wonderful world of Twitter: Caroline Wozniacki (@ c a ro w o z n i acki): Had a good day in London, photo shoot went well and now I am on my way back to Monaco, practice starts tomorrow :)

Justin Gimelstob (@ justingimelstob): Zurich is a beautiful city. I’m a few hours away from doing my extensive interview with Roger Federer.

Sania Mirza-Malik (@mirzasania): Finally a day off after eight days … looking forward to doing NOTHING for a change except one photo shoot for a cou-

Justin Gimelstob (@ justingimelstob): Not a great feeling showing up at Zurich airport at 5: 45a.m. for a flight to Atlanta and realizing I forgot my passport in my hotel room! Andy Murray (@andy_murray): Having a little game of backgammon with the dog …

Caroline Wozniacki (@carowozniacki): Running and tennis in the morning, had a small nap and now the gym and tennis at five. Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): My baby sis is gonna have a boy!

ple of hours! Amer Delic (@amerdelic): Just finished re-watching season seven of Entourage.

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For more information or questions, please call Maurice Trail at 516-302-5613 We aren’t a factory - we develop players here! LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Mythbusters: You Really Can See What College Path Your Junior Ranking Might Take You at Any Age By Ricky Becker here is no doubt that junior rankings for kids change, and I feel strongly that the kids who are best served are the ones who don’t focus on rankings too much at a young age, but focus more on development. Statistics from ninth grade through 12th grade may surprise you though. In 2009, only one boy who was in the top 75 in the country his senior year of high school was outside the top 200 nationally in his freshman year of high school, according to tennisrecruiting.net, the premier college tennis recruiting site in the country. This means that only one boy outside the top 200 as a freshman in the whole United States cracked the top 75 by the time he was a senior. And the girls only had six who did this! I have numerous examples of the lack of ranking movement at all levels.

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What this means is that once your child is in high school, you could at least start taking a look at where your child’s college tennis path is taking him/her. Use this generic guide to see how far your child’s tennis can take her/him collegiately. Top 25  Division 1: Girls can usually get a full scholarship to highly-desired schools. Boys can get a partial scholarship to the most-desired schools or a full scholarship to a major conference. All Ivy League schools are very interested.

25-100  Division 1: Full scholarships for girls to many schools in a major conferences. For boys, there are plenty of “partials” out there and with some digging, full scholarships are available. Ivy League schools are interested in getting people in early.  Division 2: Full scholarships are available, although only one or two kids per year at this level take one.

 Division 2: Full scholarships are available, but rarely if ever taken.

 Division 3: There is a huge bump for admission, but only one or two boys at this level go to D3 schools per year … even less for girls.

 Division 3: Huge bump for admission, but I cannot recall anyone this high going to a D3 school.

100-200  Division 1: Partial scholarships are available to some schools. A full scholarship

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


can possibly be found with a lot of digging. Ivy League schools are often interested, but it is contingent upon who they get or don’t get with a better ranking.

that have tough academics that don’t give major admissions bumps to athletes. Maybe guaranteed roster spot with general admission.

 Division 2: Full scholarships to D2 schools are often available.

 Division 2: Some scholarship money is available and many starting spots are available outside of the ranked national D2 teams.

 Division 3: There is a big academic bump for admission. Pretty much all D3 colleges are very interested in players within this ranking range. Players in this range will start on most, if not all, D3 teams. 200-350  Division 1: There are occasional bench spots for teams in major conferences and starting spots are available for smaller teams. It’s hard to find much tennis money at the D1 level though. Very little help with Ivy League admissions.  Division 2: There is some scholarship money available and many starting spots are available outside of the top national D2 teams.  Division 3: Definite academic bump to most Division 3 schools. This level of player will compete for a starting spot on a nationally-ranked D3 team and start for most non-ranked D3 teams. 350-525  Division 1: Starting spots are available on least competitive teams or schools

 Division 3: Academic bump to nonranked Division 3 teams. Would get onto most ranked rosters with a “general” admission … that is admittance without the “recommendation” of the college coach. 525+  Division 1: Roster spots, and even some starting spots, are available for least competitive teams. An academic bump is pretty minimal. A player at this level would have to tryout for many teams once enrolled.  Division 2: Many roster and starting spots are available at non-scholarship schools. Finding athletic scholarship money is possible, but also extremely difficult.  Division 3: Starting spots and academic bumps are available on the lesser competitive teams. Also, opportunities are available at schools that have tough academics that do not give major admissions bumps to athletes.

Unranked nationally  Division 1: Starting spots and roster spots are available, on less competitive teams. Most, but not all, teams are outside of this region. Not much if any of an academic bump and no tennis scholarships. May need to tryout once enrolled.  Division 2: Starting spots and roster spots are available, on less competitive teams. Most, but not all, teams are outside of this region. Not much, if anything, in the way of an academic bump and/or scholarship. May need to tryout once enrolled.  Division 3: Starting spots and roster spots are available on many non-ranked teams. Not much if any of an academic bump. Will probably need to try out for the team once enrolled in school. Please note, use this guide only as a template. Other factors, such as rapport with a college coach, doubles ability, perceived upside, etc. can play a role into the equation. The extra tennis scholarships allotted to women’s tennis makes scholarships more readily available. Ricky Becker is founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, which offers off-court college guidance services to junior tennis players. He is also co-director of tennis at Sportime Syosset and Sportime Bethpage. He can be reached by e-mail at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region

Local girl goes to national tournament The USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region congratulates eight-year-old Rachel Arbitman who made it to the finals in the national “Little Mo” tournament in Chicago in May. Rachel, who trains at Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis with coach Yan Vulitsky, is a rising star in the 10-and-Under set. “Little Mo” tournaments are the premier challenge for youngsters across the nation to compete against others who are the same age at the Sectional, Regional, National and International Levels. The program is named for Maureen Connelly, who, in 1953, was the first woman to win the Grand Slam of tennis. At 18 years old, she won the Australian Championships, the French Championships, Wimbledon and the United States Championships.

Free one-year USTA 10-and-Under Junior Membership Now, it’s easier than ever for kids to get in the game. Until Dec. 31, 2011, kids 10 and under, new to the USTA, can receive a free Junior Membership, a $19 value. Kids can participate in the USTA’s QuickStart Tennis program, which offers new rules, kid-sized racquets and slower, lower-bouncing balls. QuickStart doesn’t even

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require a tennis court, so kids can play anywhere, anytime and at any level. USTA membership includes:  An annual subscription to the Bounce Newsletter  Access to play USTA Junior Tournaments  Access to play USTA Junior Team Tennis For information on becoming a USTA member, visit TRYUSTA.com/KIDS or call (800) 990-8782 and mention source code “NEWGAME.”

Local student wins USTA scholarship Christopher Hunter, a student at Half Hollow Hills High School in Melville, N.Y., has received a $10,000 Dwight Mosley Scholarship from USTA Serves, the National Charitable Foundation of the USTA. The mission of USTA Serves is to support, monitor and promote programs that enhance the lives of at-risk children and individuals with disabilities through the integration of tennis and education. Donations to USTA Serves have helped the organization to give more than:  $3 million in college scholarships and player incentive awards to middle school students and high school seniors.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region

 $10 million to fund 196 programs in more than 150 cities in 43 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.  18 million hours of mentoring, tutoring and nutritional guidance to more than 170,000 children.  $427,650 to 17 tennis programs serving people with disabilities in 10 states, plus Puerto Rico.

2011 USTA/Eastern-Long Island Regional Board Daniel Burgess

USTA/Eastern/Long Island Region President

Scott Axler

Region Past President/Boys Ranking Chair/Junior Competition

Long Beach School’s PTA Receives Grant The East School in Long Beach, N.Y. recently received a grant from the USTA Eastern Section to help prepare its facility so that the QuickStart format could be added to the school’s physical education program. This grant allows for some blacktop repair and the drawing of lines for QuckStart Courts. Pictured above and holding the grant check is Beth Mercante (right), an East School parent and the driving force behind bringing QuickStart Tennis to the children, and Sid Siddiqui (left), the chief executive officer of Long Beach Tennis Center, which will be providing pros to the East School for their program.

Mike Pavlides

Region Vice President

Craig Fligstein

Secretary/Treasurer

Kathy Miller

League Coordinator

Bob Coburn

Membership/Marketing

Roberta Feldman

Girls Ranking Chair

Sunny Fishkind

Nassau District Delegate

Joe Arias

Suffolk County District Delegate

Terry Fontana

Rally Day Chair/Cooperate Challenge Chair

Eastern-Long Island Region offers free AED/CPR training and certification The USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region recently hosted its club owners and member organizations at an AED/CPR training and certification course. This program was provided by Forever 9-The Robbie Levine Foundation. All participants ages 14 and over received their AED/CPR two-year certification following the program. Defibrillators and CPR used by trained individuals can help avert a tragedy. Maddie Binder places AED pads on instructor Kevin O’Hara

Steve Haar

Rally Day Chair/Web site Committee

Herb Harris

Volunteer Chair/Grant Committee Chair

Annelies Karp Jr.

Competition Chair

Eileen Leonard

Competition Training Chair

Emily Moore

Multicultural Committee Chair

Brenda White

Scholastic Representative Chair

Ed Wolfarth

Grievance Committee Chair

Marian Morris

Events Planner/Nominating Committee Chair

Jackie Binder

Public Relations

Rachel Leiner and Maddie Binder practice CPR chest compressions during the AED/CPR Training Program provided by Forever 9-The Robbie Levine Foundation

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Successful Season for the Sportimes Falls a Bit Short he New York Sportimes completed another successful season of World TeamTennis (WTT) action this summer. Home matches were played at both Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island (five matches) and the SEFCU Arena in Albany, N.Y. (two matches). Attendance was up this year, as fans have started to realize how much fun these matches can be. A noisy atmosphere between points is encouraged and WTT is a great chance to see some of the stars of the game up close and personal in an intimate atmosphere. The Sportimes season on the court did end up a little disappointing as they failed to make the 2011 WTT Playoffs, coming off the 2010 season where they won the Eastern Conference. This season, the Eastern Conference was dominated by the Washington Kastles who went wire-to-wire with a perfect 16-0 record. The Sportimes wound up in a tie for second place with the Boston Lobsters as both teams finished the season with identical 7-7 records. Since the teams split their head-to-head series, the tie-breaker came down to most total games won in the head-to-head matchups, where Boston came out ahead

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Credit all photos to Kenneth B. Goldberg

In addition to Borg and Serena, the Sportimes (pictured above) hosted the number one doubles team in the world, The Bryan Brothers as well Martina Hingis competed in all of the Sportimes’ matches this summer and John McEnroe made two home appearances

John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg renewed their epic rivalry as they played in front of a sold-out crowd at Sportime at Randall’s Island

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

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Former world number one ranked players Serena Williams and Martina Hingis competed in front of another soldout crowd at Sportime at Randallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Island

and advanced to the WTT Playoffs. In the playoffs, the Kastles continued their domination, defeating the Boston Lobsters and the St Louis Aces en route to the 2011 WTT Championship. While it would have been nice to make the playoffs again in 2011, the Sportimes season still provided a number of highlights for New York fans:

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Chris Evert was a special guest at the Sportimes home match against the St. Louis Aces, as she came oncourt to play a mixed-doubles exhibition with students from the John McEnroe Academy

Two concerts were held at Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island … one prior to the home opener featuring local pop singer Tiffany Giardina (pictured above), and the second following John McEnroe’s match with Bjorn Borg featuring John McEnroe and his Johnny Smyth Band Top doubles specialists Leander Paes (pictured in action above) & Liezel Huber, and young stars Beatrice Capra and Coco Vandeweghe made stops in NY to face the Sportimes

Dunlop Championship Tennis Ball Sale $1.95 a can (in store pick up only, while supplies last)

The WTT season was also a great lead-in for the launch of New York Tennis Magazine. A free copy of our inaugural edition was distributed to all fans in attendance at all home matches. Also, our professional photographer was on hand for all home matches as well. You can check out photos from the season on our Facebook page or our Web site LongIslandTennisMagazine.com. All in all, this WTT season was a great prelude to the sport’s stars coming in for the 2011 U.S. Open, and with New York currently not a host site of either an ATP or WTA tournament, this chance to see the stars in WTT action should be appreciated by tennis fans throughout the area. Tweets from the stars of World TeamTennis Katie O’Brien (@katiejobrien): I’m still pinching myself that I was on the same team as McEnroe & Hingis … both absolute legends. The Bryan Brothers (@bryanbrothers): Sneaking in a few winks on the journey to the next city. Sleep is a valuable commodity during WTT! Murphy Jensen (@murphyjensen): 14-0 Washington KASTLES!!!! I love this team! Love it!

Katie O’Brien (@katiejobrien): Incredible team effort by the Sportimes tonight to beat Kansas City feat. Bryan Bros & Peschke (current world number ones & Wimby champs). AWESOME! The Bryan Brothers (@bryanbrothers): Playing the Philly Freedoms tonight in the last of a six-match and eight-day WTT run across the U.S. Hoping to finish strong and get KC playoff bound! Lindsey Davenport: (@LDavenport76): Woohoo! RT @stlouisaces: THE ACES ARE GOING TO THE WTT FINALS!!! The team beat Kansas City to clinch the top seed in the Western Conference! Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): 4 days, 7 different cities … man! A new one today!!

Katie O’Brien (@katiejobrien): I’m leaving with lifelasting memories from both on and off the court. Big thanks to my awesome teammates and the @NYSportimes crew. I love you all!

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Good to Great:

A Model for Safely Building the Tennis Champions of Tomorrow

By Steve Kaplan By Steve Kaplan The long-term growth and development of competitive young tennis athletes is best accomplished by working in concert with their biological and psychological development factors. The principals of applied functional science dictate that while the protocols of training are specific, the timetables and parameters of movement development are a function of the individual. Simply stated, athletes must earn their progressions to develop seamlessly and safely. While the body responds to the demands placed on it, young athletes must be physiologically and psychologically prepared to respond with an appropriate

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adaptation. As Charles Darwin, “The Father of Evolutionary Science,” explains, “It’s not the strongest who survive it’s the most adaptable.” In order to develop a young tennis player from good to great, it is essential to first evaluate and understand the physical system in which the player operates. A poor stroke pattern, for example, could be a movement dysfunction or inefficiency, or it may be a correcting compensation. If it is an adaptation to an underlying weakness or imbalance, then correcting the stroke first might do more harm, than good. Remember, great players are great problem solvers and adaptive correcting compensations are performed by great players all the time. We must first assess to progress. A distinction should be made between

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

testing and evaluating. Testing players in vertical leap, short sprints and the shuttle run can help give context to setting general group performance parameters; however, it gives no useful insight into the development of a performance plan to improve the individual athlete. Every high performance player should be assessed with a Functional Movement Screen (FMS) as a starting point. It is a simple, accessible and valuable tool to establishing a baseline of movement, strength and limitation. The data is overwhelming that the screening of athletes at every age is highly correlated to avoiding injury and safe performance development. The current mantra of training high performance players is that greater racket acceleration equals better performance. The


USTA High Performance Program has embraced this idea and with a good reason, it is a necessity to successfully compete at the highest levels in today’s power-driven game. Conflict exists, however, when this concept is applied to young and immature players. Greater racket acceleration begins with greater body deceleration or load and progresses to body acceleration or explosion. We are playing with fire here, since greater forces demand greater mobility and stability management. Raise the racket head of a young player on the forehand side and you create greater potential energy, drop it and you have greater kinetic force. Ask a developing player with limited thoracic mobility and posterior shoulder instability (a common condition in young players) to perform this movement and you will often get a biceps tendon strain starting at C6 and working through an over-stressed thoracic outlet or worse still, lumbar spine instability issues, as the athlete compensates to manage greater forces. QuickStart Tennis was developed by the USTA with the idea that “Children shouldn’t have to play like adults.” If we expand

that concept, it is clear that children shouldn’t have to progress to perform like adults until they are developmentally ready. Psychologically, athletes must be ready to embrace change in order to grow. Neural changes are best managed by players prepared and ready for change. Self-conscience behavior, precipitated by change, is great for learning but it undermines performance. Young tennis players should be readied emotionally to endure the learning curve adaptation of a grip change to evolve the technique, seamlessly. In tennis, power is speed and speed is relaxation. If you put players in a fun, rewarding and positive environment then they relax and move fast. Tension makes you slow. As Thomas Myers, author of Anatomy Trains and Training, explains, “The age of conformity, repletion and the isolation of individual parts to achieve development of the whole is an outdated paradigm.” We cannot, as coaches, just drill success into aspiring players with a ball basket. The great basketball coach John Wooden said, “Activity is not achievement.” Kinesthetic awareness, literacy and development are

the goals, and that goal is achieved by providing players with the physical and emotional tools to mange the mini crises that occur every point. The current parameters of today’s champions were outside the grid of acceptable technique 20 years ago. While environments change constantly, the qualities that great players consistently display are originality and adaptability. As coaches looking to build the tennis champions of tomorrow, we must encourage the individual’s unique qualities, not inhibit them.  Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 33 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 14 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

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Tennis Membership offers access to a newly built Fitness Center and a Swimming Pool overlooking the Long Island Sound, Spike Gurney, Director of Tennis

Call us at 516-676-0500 to schedule a tour or visit us at www.nsccli.com LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Return Serves Like the Pros! By Tonny van de Pieterman

biggest serves, I always envisioned being a goalie ready to â&#x20AC;&#x153;diveâ&#x20AC;? into the corner.

Growing up, I was a big fan of Jimmy Connors. His return of a serve was considered the best in the world for a long time (before Andre Agassi came along). Connors seemed to take great pride in returning some of the fastest serves in the game. It also became my favorite shot in tennis. Most of the principles I learned from watching Jimmy still hold true today.

Shorten your swing When you are returning first serves, all you should be thinking is to use the pace of the ball. By shortening your backswing, you give yourself a better chance to meet the ball in the desired contact zone. If you normally have a loopy swing in your baseline play, you might want to straighten out your swing path on the return of the serve. This will enable you to make solid contact more often and your confidence will grow.

Move forward before your split step When your opponent tosses the ball, move forward a step or two. Try to time your split step with his contact and react to the direction of the ball. By moving forward, you will cut off the angles somewhat and your lateral movement will be more explosive. When returning some of the

Go against the grain To give yourself the best chance of returning big serves, let your natural body rotation tell you where you should aim the ball. For a righthanded player on the deuce court, that means you will be aiming your forehand cross-court and your backhand straight ahead. And on the ad court, you will be aiming your forehand straight ahead and your backhand cross-court. By just focusing on the timing of the contact

and on your body rotation, this should make a lot of sense. An added bonus is that balls that are caught â&#x20AC;&#x153;lateâ&#x20AC;? will still safely land in the playing area and will give you a fighting chance. Change your return position When you feel you are returning well, but you are still not winning many points, think about changing your position on the court. You can decide to move right up to the service line to take the balls earlier, or do the opposite and stand way back behind the baseline. Just like it is effective to mix up your serves to keep your opponent off balance, it is just as important to change your return position. It will change the timing on your opponentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first shot and might be the key to changing your luck!  Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail tonny@pointsettennis.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ September/October 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ LITennisMag.com


The Sand Pit The Windy City Hosts First Ever U.S. Beach Tennis National Championships

n the weekend of July 10-11, the fastgrowing sport of beach tennis held its first-ever U.S. National Championships, as the sport’s top players converged on Chicago to compete for $3,000 in prize money and to vie to see who is the best of the best in American beach tennis. Top players from the East Coast to the West Coast teamed up for this first-ever national showdown amongst the Americans. The sun was out, the beach was crowded, the music was playing and the players were ready, as the scene was set for the 2011 National Championships. Players knew they were going to have to brave the 90-degree temperatures—in addition to stiff competition—to win on this day. In the Men’s Pro draw, the top seeds based on ITF World Ranking Points were David “The Iceman” Sickmen & Devin “The Wonder” Wakeford. Sickmen & Wakeford came in as the top seeds, but also with a question mark as they had never teamed up before and now had to quickly find teamwork against top competition. Play got underway with two separate pools, with the top four teams from each pool advancing to the quarterfinals. After pool play and the quarterfinals were complete, the top four overall seeds were still alive and ready to square off in the semifinals. In one semifinal match, the top team from California of Marty Salokas & Donny Young, who are veterans of the BTUSA tour and long-time successful beach tennis partners, wasted no time in moving on to the finals as they quickly disposed of Javier Llanos & Ernesto Faisal of Chicago,

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6-0, 6-2 in straight sets. They would now await the winner of the other semifinal match, where the top seeds Sickmen & Wakeford went up against Chicago’s Matt Garavaglia & Buffalo, N.Y.’s Stephen Sayoc in what was later described as “The match of the tournament” by those in attendance. As play got underway, fellow players and beachgoers quickly made their way over to this match, as the points were played at a very high level. Long rallies and a deft touch were common in this match, as Sickmen & Wakeford got out to an early 5-1 lead, but Garavaglia & Sayoc responded and the first set would up in a tie-break. Sickmen & Wakeford pulled out the breaker 10-8, after fighting off two set points and used that momentum in the second set in finishing the match off and claiming a 7-6, 6-3 straight-set victory. This set up a finals match between the top two teams and an intriguing one, as it pitted the East Coast New Yorkers Sickmen & Wakeford against the West Coast Californians, Salokas & Young. In the finals, the level of play was as high as expected, and each point was earned. Both teams made difficult shots look easy and displayed the on-court skill that made them finalists. Over the course of the match, Salokas & Young, with their longtime teamwork evident, used an array of touch mixed with power to wear down a tired team and secure a victory. The win made Salokas & Young the first ever BTUSA National Champs. In the Women’s Pro Doubles bracket, who the top seed was awarded to came as no surprise, as Nadia Johnston & Nicole

Melch, who have dominated the women’s circuit in the U.S. over the past few years, made the trip to the Windy City. They were the heavy favorites going in, but that didn’t mean the other teams were going to back down. In the semifinals, Johnston & Melch took on Marina Ohlmuller & Suzanne Lemery and they showed why they were the favorites as they won convincingly 6-1, 6-1. The other semi-final was a battle between Leanne Baker & Corina Kealy, taking on Elisa Ryan & Nana Liu. Baker & Kealy marched on to the finals with a 6-3, 6-3 straight set win. They were now set to try and pull the upset in the final. There was going to be no upset on this day though as Johnston & Melch showed they weren’t about to give up their top U.S. ranking or this first National Championship opportunity. They finished off the tournament with a 6-0, 6-1 win over Leanne Baker & Corina Kealy to take home the championship. While the competition was fierce throughout the event, beach tennis players, more than in most sports, have a way of coming together afterwards. Maybe it is the good sportsmanship exhibited during play, or the atmosphere that surrounds a competition complete with music and food or that play take place at the beach, but regardless, the players know how to have some fun. Before and after play, the players enjoyed the sights and sounds of Chicago at dinners, boat tours and player parties. Let’s hope the 2011 Beach Tennis National Championship is just the first of many. 

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Matt Zeifman: Long Island’s Youngest Tennis Phenom By David Drucker f you’ve never heard of a boy named Matt Zeifman, you surely will in the next few years. Through the years Long Island has had more than a few tennis greats who have made it to top-level colleges and even scored success on the professional level, but it is not an easy path and the earlier you can start the better. After meeting with Matt Zeifman and witnessing the tennis he plays, it is clear that if he keeps up his desire to succeed and strong work ethic, his potential is limitless. After that first paragraph, you’re probably wondering just how old Matt is? Well, Matt Zeifman just turned five-years-old; however, his play on the court reaches far beyond his age or the experience one would expect. Watching him handle an adult-sized racket, hitting forehands, backhands and serves over the net and inbounds on a consistent basis, was startling. Most importantly, the energy and excitement Matt possesses while on the court is what will take him to the next level in tennis. Matt began playing at the age of three, with Karl Sommer, co-director of tennis at Sportime Syosset. It was Sommer who jumpstarted Matt’s young tennis career, training him to hit shots usually not in the realm of possibility for a three-year-old. Now, Matt plays tennis every day with a

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variety of coaches who all bring different styles to his overall game. One of his current coaches is Sandra Nunez from Sportime Syosset. Matt and Sandra share a bond that you don’t normally see between player and coach. “Matt loves tennis, so it’s easy for me to keep him focused during lessons,” said Nunez when asked how she keeps such a young player consistently motivated. “He loves the attention, which makes him play and try even harder. His talent is unbelievable.” Nunez employs a number of tactics to maintain a high level of interest in Matt

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

throughout his lessons. “We create these fictional characters when we play,” said Nunez. “If Matt plays well, they will send him special packages. These (fictional) people watch Matt to see if he is paying attention, is focusing and is trying hard. If he does well, he is rewarded.” Asked what type of games they play, Sandra mentioned that, while they do play games, it is important for Matt to understand both winning and losing. “Matt comes up with new games all the time … he’s one of the smartest kids I know,” said Nunez. “We actually e-mail each other between lessons. It’s as if the ‘lesson’ takes place off the court as well.” When you’re playing tennis every day and are only five-years-old, you surely have to have your loved ones by your side to pave the way for you. Mitch Zeifman, Matt’s father, is one of the most dedicated tennis fathers you will ever meet. Mitch will do anything and everything to ensure that Matt is getting the best coaching, lessons, treatment and equipment. “I stopped playing tennis when I was 14years-old,” said Mitch. “I played most of my childhood and I wanted to get really good, but unfortunately, did not have the


resources. Now, I am able to provide those resources for my son.” “This is an all-day, every day job for me,” continued Mitch. “Between driving to facilities to see one coach or another, you have to be 100 percent committed, no question. I stay there while Matt plays to watch what’s going on, making sure he’s getting the proper coaching. It helps both he and I to understand the differences between each of his coaches.” Asked about the future of Matt’s tennis game, Mitch replied, “I want him to be playing 12-and-Under tournaments when he’s seven or eight-years-old.” Beyond that, the aspirations of both child and parent are much larger. “I want him to be number one in the world,” said Mitch. “It’s all tennis, all the way, even Matt says it himself constantly … he wants to be the number one player in the world.” Chatting with a five-year-old is usually a difficult task, but with Matt, he answered as if he were in the middle of a media frenzy at a major press conference. When asked what his favorite thing about tennis

is, Matt nonchalantly answered, “I like the games because when I do well, people send me packages.” If you think a fiveyear-old wouldn’t know the professionals in their favorite sport, guess again. Asked who his favorite player is, he answered “Roger Federer,” with Rafael Nadal a close second. “I love Roger Federer, I love the slice that he hits,” noted Matt. Matt’s three current coaches Nunez, Nick Brebenel and Solomon Levy Bromet have all brought something different to Matt’s game in order to take him to the next level. A few years from now, you can surely expect to see him bringing home trophies from tournaments. For Matt

Zeifman, time is on his side and let’s hope that one day, we see him reach his goal on the grandest of all stages at the U.S. Open.  David Drucker of Long Island Tennis Magazine is a member of the Nichols College Men’s Tennis team. He may be reached by e-mail at davidd@usptennis.com.

Moussa Dramé Tennis Moussa Dramé Tennis at the Shelter Island Tennis Club has three locations on Shelter Island, with clay, hardcourt, and artificial turf surfaces. We specialize in sending tennis pros to your courts anywhere in the Hamptons. We have nationally ranked collegiate tennis pros as well as experienced instructors with years of experience teaching children and adults. Our pros speak a variety of languages, including French and Russian.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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NJTL Hosts Successful Kid’s Day at Tully Park By Bill Mecca ach year, the USTA Eastern Division and the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region sponsor two National Junior Tennis & Learning (NJTL) Kid’s Days on Long Island. These events offer free lessons to local registered NJTL organizations. In addition to the tennis lessons, the children are provided with free t-shirts, pizza, drinks and prizes. The NJTL network is a nationwide group of USTA-registered community tennis organizations seeking to develop the character of young people through tennis and education. Chaired by Volunteer Steve Haar and co-chaired by Terry Fontana, this year’s NJTLs in attendance included Hicksville Community Tennis Association, Long Island Tennis, Hempstead Boys and Girls Club, and Advantage Tennis of Roosevelt. Additionally, all the boys and girls from the

E

Oasis Camp of the North Shore joined in. In total, more than 325 children, ranging in age from five through 17, received free ageappropriate tennis lessons. 

Bill Mecca is the Tennis Service Representative on Long Island for the USTA Eastern Section. He may be reached by e-mail at mecca@eastern.usta.com.

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By Tom Ferraro, Ph.D. patient of mine recently asked me a very simple question: ”How do I go about building self-esteem?” We spent the session trying to answer this question and trying to connect it with the ability to win on the courts. Here is what we concluded.

A

 People win when they feel they deserve to win;  They can only feel deserving if they have some self-esteem; and  They can only get self-esteem by knowing how to recognize their small victories and celebrating them.

grounds. This is called criterion-based practice and it builds in a sense of effectiveness or what we call self-efficacy. Businessmen can set a goal of making three calls in the evening before going home.  Also at the end of every day, take five minutes aside to be alone and write down your accomplishments for the day. Keep this in a notepad next to your bed. Do this every night and make it your nighttime ritual prayer.

Do these two things daily for a month, and I guarantee you will build self-esteem and selfefficacy. Celebrating and thinking about your victories is a very healthy and wise thing to do, and it will help you play to your full potential in tennis (special thanks to G.D.).  For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

It’s almost like one of those syllogisms you learn how to do in high school. Winning equals deserving to win, plus self-esteem, plus celebration. Whether you are a tennis player, golfer, businessman or a mother, you must try to learn how to celebrate your daily accomplishments. If you want to build self-esteem, and thereby function better, do these two things:  When you practice, do not leave the court until you match a certain goal you set. Maybe that’s hitting 20 serves into the corner. In golf, it could be to hole out three bunker shots before you leave the LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Stars Collide at the Open 2011 U.S. Open Arrives in New York

he sport’s top stars are set to make New York their home away from home from Aug. 29-Sept. 11, and this article will serve as your guide in and around the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center as the Open takes place. From trendy places to eat, to where to go to possibly meet and greet the stars of today and the stars of tomorrow, this article looks to provide you with those little extra tidbits of information on this year’s U.S. Open.

T

See the stars of tomorrow today The 2011 U.S. Open qualifying rounds will take place Tuesday-Friday, Aug. 23-26 beginning at 11:00 a.m. each day (gates open at 10:00 a.m.). Admission to these qualifying rounds is free, so why not stop by and see the stars of tomorrow leaving it all on the line for a spot in the 2011 Open. 2011 Arthur Ashe Kids Day U.S. Open Champions Rafael Nadal and Kim Clijsters, world number one ranked Novak Djokovic, former U.S. Open Champion Andy Roddick and the 2010 U.S. Open Wheelchair Champion David Wagner will team up with actor Bradley Cooper, New York Knicks All-Star Carmelo Anthony, and pop star Cody Simpson at the 16th Annual Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day presented by Hess Saturday, Aug. 27 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y., from 24

9:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Hosted by TV personalities La La Anthony and Quddus, the show will feature more musical guests and tennis stars set to be announced in coming weeks. The popular full-day tennis and music festival for children and adults alike includes interactive games, musical entertainment and tennis activities. It will also feature performances from up-andcoming stars including Girls Nite Out, Action Item, Jacob Latimore and Nickelodeon’s The Fresh Beat Band. Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day Presented by Hess will kick off the 2011 U.S. Open, which runs from Aug. 29-Sept. 11. From 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., kids and their families can experience an exciting schedule of free tennis games, live music and attractions taking place throughout the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Inside Arthur Ashe Stadium from 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., the live tennis and music show will feature fun exhibition matches and skills competitions with Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Kim Clijsters, Andy Roddick, David Wagner and other top players and celebrities with musical performances by Cody Simpson and more. General admission promenade tickets cost $10 and loge tickets are $20. Arthur Ashe Kids Day will be broadcast nationally by CBS on Sunday, Aug. 28, from noon1:30 p.m. (ET). Kids 12-and-under with stadium show tickets will receive a free Arthur Ashe Kids Day hat from the USTA and Hess on a first-come, first-served basis.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Open practice day On Sun, Aug. 28, take advantage of this rare opportunity to see the stars of the sport of tennis take to the practice courts for their final tune-up prior to the 2011 U.S. Open. Get a rare glimpse into the habits and drills the stars use in their warm-up routine, and who knows, maybe you could pick up some pointers from the pros in the process. Where the stars sign Want to get photos and autographs of your favorite tennis pros? The best spot for both is what has been dubbed “Autograph Alley,” which runs alongside Courts P1-P5. Be sure to come prepared with a Sharpie marker, photos or balls for the players to sign. There are no guarantees that you’ll be able to meet the stars, but if you do, you can file it away as a memory forever! U.S. Open Wheelchair Competition The 2011 U.S. Open Wheelchair Competition, now in its sixth year, will be held Sept. 8-11, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The competition will feature 20 of the top wheelchair tennis athletes from around the globe. The competition will feature a Men’s, Women’s and Quad Division, and will include six events: Men’s Singles, Men’s Doubles, Women’s Singles, Women’s Doubles, Quad Singles and Quad Doubles.


U.S. Open Base Prize Money Reaches the $23.7 Million Mark The 2011 U.S. Open purse has increased by more than $1 million to reach a record $23.7 million. In addition to the base purse of $23.7 million, the top three men’s and top three women’s finishers in the Olympus U.S. Open Series may earn up to an additional $2.6 million in bonus prize money at the U.S. Open, providing a potential total payout of $26.3 million. Both the men’s and women’s U.S. Open singles champions will earn a record $1.8 million with the ability to earn an additional $1 million in bonus prize money (for a total $2.8 million potential

payout) based on their performances in the Olympus U.S. Open Series. The Olympus U.S. Open Series Bonus Challenge rewards the top three men’s and top three women’s finishers each year with bonus prize money at the U.S. Open and has resulted in the largest paychecks in tennis history for men (2007–Roger Federer, $2.4 million) and women (2005–Kim Clijsters, $2.2 million).

Places to eat at the Open Aces ceilings, vibrant colors and a casual but elegant wine and sushi bar combine with superlative seafood offerings, making Aces the ultimate dining experience. You can also enjoy Aces’ flavorful and sumptuous cuisine in your suite with the Aces Platinum Package Series. For lunch, dinner or after the matches. Champions Bar & Grill A contemporary setting with classic leather and

wood accents, Champions Bar & Grill is a modern take on the traditional clubhouse atmosphere. The Grill offers premium steaks, fresh seafood, salads and a wide variety of wines. This year, delicious new items highlight the menu, featuring the finest cuts of meat and more. Bring your friends and come for lunch, dinner or after the matches … you won’t miss a minute of the action, with live matches and other sporting events on Champions’ many TVs. U.S. Open Club The U.S. Open Club is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium. The Club is available to all Subscription Series ticket holders for the duration of the tournament for a nominal entrance fee, and is included for Silver Loge Box seat holders. The U.S. Open Club is famous for the Chef’s Table and seasonal selections of eclectic American cuisine. Mojito Restaurant & Bar Mojito, is a Cuban-inspired restaurant that transports visitors to a dramatic

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Entertain Book your next event at the home of the US Open – where the excitement never ends. The facility is available for corporate and private events and birthday parties.

For more information call 718.760.6200 (ext. 0) or visit ntc.usta.com USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Flushing Meadows - Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11368

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© 2011 USTA. All rights reserved.

Wheelchair tennis follows the same rules as able-bodied tennis, except that the ball can bounce twice. This is the first time that the world’s top seven ranked men’s and women’s wheelchair players (according to the July 18 ITF Rankings) will all enter the tournament. The top three ranked quad players also will all compete (world number three Johan Andersson recently retired). Additionally, one wild card was selected on both the men’s, women’s, and quad sides. The total purse for the event will be $120,000, a $20,000 increase in prize money over last year. The U.S. will be represented in singles and doubles by the two-time Paralympic Quad doubles gold medalists David Wagner of Hillsboro, Ore. and Nick Taylor of Wichita, Kan. Wagner is the defending U.S. Open Quad singles champion and looking to win his third consecutive Grand Slam Quad singles title. Other Americans include 21-year-old Emmy Kaiser of Fort Mitchell, Ky., the topranked American woman player, who will compete in the women’s singles and doubles events, and 39-year-old former world number one Stephen Welch of Southlake, Texas, is a four-time Paralympian and 1996 doubles gold medalist, who will compete in the men’s singles and doubles. Welch, Kaiser, and Taylor all received wild cards into the tournament.

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setting in a tropical oasis reminiscent of 1950s Havana. Experience Mojito’s luscious flavors with Latin specialties and cool cocktails, either inside or outdoors in Mojito’s whimsical garden. Mojito is available to all ticket holders. Mojito is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium next to the Patio Café. Patio Café & Bar Soak up the beautiful s u r r o u n dings of the U.S. Open grounds at this expanded charming outdoor café and bar located outside the U.S. Open Club. Enjoy fresh selections of seasonal sandwiches and salads, paired with summer specialty cocktails. The Patio Café & Bar is available for all ticket holders. Heineken Red Star Café Located in the South Plaza near Court 7, the Heineken Red Star Café has a sports bar atmosphere complete with TVs covering the action on all of

the featured courts, light snacks, specialty beers featuring Heineken and Heineken Light, frozen cocktails and a full bar … all set outdoors in the middle of the action. The Heineken Red Star Café is available to all ticket holders throughout the day and evening. Rejuvenate by the Fountains! Visit our refreshing food destinations by the fountains including the South Plaza Café, Carnegie Deli, Cuppa Spotta and Ben & Jerry’s. Baseline Cocktails Come quench your thirst with a full service bar that includes premium wine upgrades. Wine Bar Food Serving Mediterranean flavors with wines to match located in the South Plaza by Fountains. U.S. Open Food Village Enjoy regional cuisine and specialty items at the U.S. Open Food Village including a Honey Deuce Cocktail at the Grey Goose Bar! Featured vendors include: Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Shop, Carnegie Deli, Classic Burger, Cuppa Spotta, Franks and Fries, Fresca Mexicana, Fulton Seafood, Glatt Kosher Cart, Grey Goose Bar, New Delhi Spice, Pizza/Pasta, Southern Bar-

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beque, Stonyfield Café, and Sweet & Savory Crepes.

U.S. Open attractions Fountain Desk Plaza ESPN and CBS will be broadcasting live during select sessions from the Fountain Plaza Desk in the South Plaza. You won’t want to miss interviews with today’s tennis stars! SmashZone Located in the Chase Center, SmashZone has something for the whole family to enjoy, including QuickStart Tennis courts, a rally wall challenge and interactive photos and games. Pick up a drawsheet for a list of special guests, autograph sessions and player demonstrations. International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum Gallery Be sure to visit the U.S. Open Gallery, located inside the Chase Center, where this year’s champions will be commemorated. Family Day The U.S. Open is holding its third annual Family Day on Tuesday, Aug. 30. Parents accompanied by children 14-and-under can sit together in reserved seating in Louis Armstrong Stadium. An exclusive family breakfast, located in the Corporate Hospitality Pavilion in the Chase Center, is also available as a ticket package for purchase and includes early access to SmashZone and an exclusive gift bag. 12th Annual BNP Paribas Taste of Tennis Event The world’s top tennis players and chefs will serve-up a kickoff to the U.S. Open on Thursday, Aug. 25 from 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. at the W New York in midtown Manhattan at the 12th Annual BNP Paribas Taste of Tennis event, to benefit the New York Junior Tennis League. One of summer’s most anticipated New York nightlife events, BNP Paribas Taste of


Tennis gives guests the opportunity to mingle with their favorite tennis stars and chefs, while sampling an eclectic mix of specially-designed dishes that earn rave reviews each year. This year’s lineup includes former U.S. Open and Davis Cup Champion Andy Roddick, Wimbledon Semifinalist Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, along with top 10 players Mardy Fish and Tomas Berdych. On the women’s side, the BNP Paribas Taste of Tennis field is stacked with three of the top 10-ranked players in the world, including Li Na, Francesca Schiavone and Victoria Azarenka. These stars will cook alongside notable chefs from many of the nation’s premiere restaurants, including James Beard award winner Michelle Bernstein from Miami’s Sra. Martinez, Anita Lo of Annisa, Buddakan’s Brian Ray and Humberto Leon & Ashley Palma of STK, among many others.

The State of American Tennis: The Men’s Side

Does anybody remember the last time an American won a Grand Slam? That would be in 2003 where up and coming star Andy Roddick defeated Spain’s Juan Carlos Ferrero at the U.S. Open. Shortly thereafter, we were introduced to the era of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. These two champions have simply dominated the sport since 2004, winning 25 of 31 Grand Slams, starting with the 2004 Australian Open. Out of those 31 Grand Slams, only five have featured American finalists. Roddick was a finalist in 2004, 2005 and 2009 at Wimbledon, as well as the 2006 U.S. Open. Andre Agassi was a finalist in the 2005 U.S. Open. All five finals losses came at the hands of Roger Federer. Going into this year’s U.S. Open, there are no Americans who would be considered favorites to win the title, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have contenders with a shot. So, which American has the best chance to win our nation’s Grand Slam? Let’s first begin with tier one or the “top” Americans to look out for: Mardy Fish

By David Drucker Another year brings another U.S. Open, and the question on the mind of many Americans is who can step up for the host country this year and make an exciting run to the title?

Ever since losing a significant amount of weight thanks to a healthy diet, Mardy Fish has seemed to resurrect his career.

Fish has recently overtaken the number one American ranking from his buddy Andy Roddick, who had been carrying the U.S. on his shoulders for more than six years now. Fish is coming off his best career performance at Wimbledon, reaching the quarterfinals before losing to Rafael Nadal. Sadly though, Fish’s best result in a Grand Slam during his entire career has been a trip to the quarterfinals. Sorry “Fish Heads,” as Mardy likes to refer to his fans, don’t look for anything better then a quarterfinals appearance in this Slam. Andy Roddick For Andy Roddick, it must feel like a century ago since he won the 2003 U.S. Open. Since then, Roddick failed to live up to expectations, losing in each of the four Slam finals he’s reached since 2003. Andy was shocked in the second round by Feliciano Lopez at this year’s Wimbledon, which is why Andy will be my American favorite at this year’s Open. Roddick, who has been embarrassed in his recent Grand Slam performances is seeking redemption and looking to make one last splash in a Grand Slam before he calls it a career. Pending Roddick’s draw, I pick him as the top American hopeful at the U.S. Open.

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In tier number two, I think there’s only one American who fits that category. That American would be John Isner. John Isner The 6 ft.-9 in. John Isner, who is coming off his second career ATP title in Newport, R.I., will hope to slay a few opponents and surpass his 2010 performance, when he lost in the third round. When on his game, Isner is a dangerous opponent and top players would prefer not to see him in their draw. However, Isner’s serve simply cannot carry him to a Grand Slam title. Tier number three is a group of Americans who have slipped in the rankings, perhaps ones you’ve forgotten about. Without a fantastic draw, these Americans will have a tough road to glory: Sam Querrey We haven’t seen Sam Querrey since the AEGON Championships, a tune up tournament for Wimbledon. Querrey eventually withdrew from

Wimbledon, citing an arm injury. Should Querrey even be healthy enough to compete at this year’s U.S. Open, he is no threat to anyone. Sam has won only one match in three Grand Slams this year, and lacks any major wins. His best win in 2011 was defeating Spain’s Fernando Verdasco. Don’t bank on Querrey making it past the second round should he play in the Open. James Blake Yes folks, James Blake is still playing tennis, and no … he is not retired. James has simply fallen in the rankings hence why you barely see him at the major tournaments. Currently ranked 91st in the world, Blake has struggled with his game in recent years, but is looking to make one more major run like he did when he reached the quarterfinals of the Open in 2005 and 2006. As much as I like Blake, I don’t see positive results for the “J-Block” at this year’s Open. Lastly, who will be the American long shots to possibly make a name for

themselves. At this year’s U.S. Open: Ryan Harrison Rookie American Ryan Harrison does have game and will look to put his game on display should he make the main draw of the U.S. Open, which he should. In 2010, he made the second round after upsetting former top five player Ivan Ljubicic in the first round. Harrison, though young, can still win a few matches in Flushing Meadows. Let’s hope for a good draw and a nice Cinderella story here. Donald Young Year after year, we wait for Donald Young to do something big. This year, Young upended Andy Murray for the biggest win of his life at Indian Wells. However, what we would like to see is Donald show us some game in the Grand Slams. Unfortunately, we haven’t seen that at all from the young American in his already seven-year career. Based on past experiences, don’t expect anything beyond the second round at best for Young.

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Alex Bogomolov Jr. Most fans aren’t too familiar with Alex Bogomolov Jr. as he’s never done well in the rankings. His career-high ranking in singles is where he currently strands in the rankings, 63rd in the world. However, Bogomolov Jr. has just come off his best Grand Slam performances at this year’s Wimbledon, making it to the third round before falling to Tomas Berdych. Unfortunately, the American hasn’t made it past the first round of the U.S. Open. This is the year I believe Bogomolov Jr. can make it out of round one and possibly equal his Wimbledon performance, if not better, pending his draw. Realistically, Bogomolov Jr. won’t make it out of week one, but he will be entertaining to watch with the way he’s been playing of late.

Contenders and Pretenders for the 2011 U.S. Open: The Men’s Side Going into the U.S. Open, there will be players looking to continue to dominate, looking to repeat, and looking to break out. More than likely, a top 20 player will win the title as that’s the trend that has existed over the last 10 years. This year’s U.S. Open will be no different in my eyes. Let’s break down this year’s players to watch into three categories. The no-brainers Rafael Nadal is the defending champion at Flushing Meadows, and you can bet that he’ll be looking for revenge against Wimbledon champ Novak Djokovic whom he lost to in four sets in the Wimbledon final, which cost him his number one world ranking. Nadal, who defeated Djokovic in the finals of last year’s U.S. Open, has a great shot to repeat this year. Expect nothing less than a semifinals appearance from the now world number two.

Novak Djokovic, who is the new number one in the rankings, the hottest player on tour, and easily having the best year in his career, is an obvious pick for the later rounds of the Open. Already winning two of the three Grand Slams this year, Djokovic will be looking to capitalize at this year’s U.S. Open where he’s made the finals twice in his career, losing to Federer and Nadal. The number one-ranked Serbian should be seeded first at this year’s Open, therefore he should find himself in a great position to make a run at the championship. Roger Federer is suffering the biggest Grand Slam drought of his career, failing to win a major since the 2010 Australian Open. Since then, he’s reached only one Slam final, this year’s French Open where he lost to Nadal yet again. For Federer, it looks like the door may be starting to close with the emergence of Djokovic. However, I do not rule the Swiss maestro out, as he has always faired well at the U.S. Open. Each time he has lost on the hard courts of Flushing Meadows, he had his chances to win, but

was simply outplayed in the end. Look for the five-time champion to make it to at least the semifinals. Andy Murray, believe it or not, has made the semifinals or farther each Grand Slam in 2011. Murray faltered in the finals of the Australian Open to Djokovic, and the semifinals of the French Open and Wimbledon to Nadal. Out of the four no-brainers, Murray is the one I have the least confidence to go deep in the Open. It seems as if he just cannot break through on the big stage. Though he’s been extremely consistent in Grand Slams this year, I don’t see Murray making it past the semifinals should he make it there. The contenders Andy Roddick, the 2003 U.S. Open champion has always mentioned how much he enjoys playing on the hard courts of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Though his recent results in Grand Slams have been considered embarrassing for Roddick, I believe he is

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ready to redeem himself at this year’s Open. Roddick has won this Slam in the past, and has been to the finals in 2006. He knows what it takes. Though he’s slipped a bit in the rankings, the shot at redemption is what I’m banking on that will take Roddick into week number two. Juan Martin del Potro, for those of you who don’t remember, won the U.S. Open in 2009 when he stunned Roger Federer in five sets. Since then, del Potro has struggled with injuries that have sidelined him for nearly a year. After looking to be fully recovered, del Potro is a big threat with his heavy strokes and massive presence. Look for the Argentinean to make it into the second week as well, possibly clashing with a big name like Nadal or Federer in the quarters. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga has been flying under the radar this year, but at this year’s Wimbledon, he did something that caught the eyes of every tennis fan in the world. Tsonga became the first player ever to beat Federer when down two sets to none in a Grand Slam. For this reason, along with his

huge serve and forehand, Tsonga is a contender at this year’s Open. The fast hard courts suit his game well; therefore, Tsonga should find himself in week two as well. Tomas Berdych is a player who can catch fire with every aspect of his game at any moment. Take, for example, last year’s Wimbledon where he dismissed the defending champion at the time, Roger Federer, with ease. Berdych painted lines every point hitting winner after winner. Should Berdych start hitting his spots, he will be extremely dangerous and difficult to beat. Berdych was embarrassed in the first round of last year’s Open, but this year should be different for the big hitting Czech. The pretenders Robin Soderling, similar to Berdych, is another big hitter. If he catches fire, watch out. His example of that type of hitting was evident at the 2009 French Open where he ran defending champion Rafael Nadal ragged. Soderling and Berdych could go either way, but in this case, I feel Sodeling is a pretender because he lacks the all-around game that Berdych

has. If this were the French Open, then I would reverse the positions as I believe Soderling moves better on clay, but the U.S. Open is played on a hard court. The tall Swede will struggle. David Ferrer will always be one to give you everything he has in the tank when playing a match. Unfortunately for Ferrer, he lacks the knockout punch in his arsenal to do any damage. The only thing he can do which can and has worked in the past, is run his opponents off the court. However, when Ferrer makes it into the later rounds of a Grand Slam, he is usually met by someone who possesses that killer shot, or the knockout blow. That’s why I don’t see the Spanish warrior making it past the quarterfinals of the Open. Gael Monfils may be the most entertaining out of all the players listed thus far, no-brainers and contenders included. The young Frenchman is quite the show on-court, with his cat-like speed and heavy strokes. To go along with those weapons, he loves getting the crowd involved after the big points to help fuel his

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fire. The problem that Monfils runs into is that he lacks the ability to sustain his highquality level of play for a best of five set match with the top players of the world; therefore, he is no threat to win a Grand Slam at this time. Mardy Fish is now the topranked American in the world, surpassing Andy Roddick who was the topranked American for a number of years. Fish has been playing the best tennis of his life as of late. Reaching the quarterfinals of Wimbledon was his best performance ever at the grass court Slam. Coming into this year’s U.S. Open, I feel he can only carry that momentum so far before succumbing to defeat. David Drucker of Long Island Tennis Magazine is a member of the Nichols College Men’s Tennis team. He may be reached by e-mail at davidd@usptennis.com.

The Women’s Side: American Hopefuls for the 2011 U.S. Open Crown By Monica Gorny American youngster Christina McHale is moving up the ra n k i n g s and making steady progress in her young professional career. She comes into the 2011 U.S. Open with a WTA ranking of 65, and hopes to make it further than her U.S. Open-best showing of making it to the second round in 2009. McHale has often been described as one of the most ambitious young players on tour, and chances are that she will look to prove herself on home soil at the 2011 U.S. Open.

Currently ranked number 88 on the WTA Tour, Vania King is another American hopeful at this year’s U.S. Open. King has had most of her career successes in the doubles field, where she is currently ranked number seven. Her best result in the U.S. Open singles draw is a third round appearance in 2009. Will King pleasantly surprise the American public in this year’s tournament? Coco Vandeweghe stormed into the U.S. Open limelight in 2008, where she won the girl’s singles title, and is currently ranked 99th on the WTA Tour. In her two showings at the Open, she did not manage to pass the first round. However, the New York native will be hungry to show her potential on her home turf and could cause some upsets along the way. American sweetheart Melanie Oudin had a terrific run at the U.S. Open in 2009 when she reached the quarterfinals. However, Oudin has not had a successful season thus far and has not managed to pass the first round at any of the previous Grand Slams. Will the 2011 U.S. Open serve to reignite her young career?

Top Picks for the 2011 U.S. Open Women’s Title The no-brainers Kim Clijsters, comes into the 2011 U.S. Open as the defending champion. The Belgian is currently in second place in the WTA rankings and has won the U.S. Open championship three times before. Clijsters was forced to withdraw from this year’s Wimbledon due to a foot injury; however, a speedy recovery is underway and indications are that the Belgian will be ready to defend her crown at this year’s Open, making her a real threat in the women’s draw. American hopes for the 2011 U.S. Open crown will rest on the shoulders of Serena Williams, who is making a comeback to the tennis world after a difficult year of injuries, including a pulmonary embolism. Williams is a three-time U.S. Open champion, with her last victory on home soil coming in 2008. Due to her difficult season, Williams did not compete in last year’s tournament. A powerful serve and fiery groundstrokes, coupled with a home court advantage, makes Serena a notable favorite to hoist the tournament trophy.

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The “old” Maria Sharapova is back and looks more determined than ever to make her presence felt once again on the WTA Tour. After suffering from shoulder injuries for the past two seasons, Sharapova made a startling comeback at this year’s Wimbledon where she reached the finals. The Russian is currently ranked number five in the world, but has been ranked as high as number one in the past. Her performance at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center is highlighted by her U.S. Open victory in 2006. Will Sharapova be able to continue her stellar play and add another Grand Slam title to her record? Czech young gun Petra Kvitova took the world by storm when she recently defeated a string of top-ranked players to take the Wimbledon crown. The Czech is currently ranked number seven on the WTA Tour, with her best result at the U.S. Open coming in 2009 when she reached the fourth round. With her aggression and ability to stay composed, Kvitova is a hot favorite to win this year’s Open championship.

Rounding out the favorites for the 2011 U.S. Open is Venus Williams who has won the tournament twice before. Like her sister Serena, Venus has not played much this season due to injuries. However, the American’s powerful serve and aggressive groundstrokes are perfectly suited for the hard courts, making her an undeniable threat and possible victor of the tournament. Contenders The current world number one, Caroline Wozniacki has yet to win a Grand Slam title. However, her performance at the USTA Billie Jean National Tennis Center has been her strength in Grand Slam showings. The Dane reached the finals of the Open in 2009 and reached the semifinals last year. Is this the much-awaited year for a Wozniacki victory in the finals? After reaching last year’s final on the U.S. Open courts, Vera Zvonareva will look to repeat her successes at this year’s Open, and hopefully, one-up her 2010 performance. The

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number three-ranked Russian is one of the feistiest players on the WTA Tour and could pose a threat to the usual favorites in the women’s draw. Na Li’s performance has been at its peak during the clay court seasons of the past two years. The Chinese woman had her career highlight when she won this year’s French Open. At the U.S. Open, Li’s best run came in 2009 when she reached the quarterfinals. The current world number six has the game to takedown anyone on the tour, making her a strong contender at this year’s Open. Germany’s Sabine Lisicki has proven to be one of the world’s best with her performance throughout the grass court season this year. After winning the AEGON Classic, Lisicki went on to reach the semifinals of Wimbledon with her wildcard status. Her U.S. Open career has not been as impressive, with a second round showing being her best result. However, the German should not be taken lightly, as she has shown that she has the true heart of a champion. The pretenders It’s hard to believe that Serbia’s Jelena Jankovic was ever ranked number one in the world with her performance over the past year. She failed to pass the fourth round at any of the Grand Slams of the 2011 season, and has not reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open for the last two years. It is doubtful that the current world number 15 will make a strong showing at this year’s Open.


“I love New York and I love the atmosphere here. It’s very intense. To play on center court with 23,000 people watching you, especially during the night session, that’s an amazing feeling. That’s what you train for.” —Caroline Wozniacki

Aussie doubles specialist Samantha Stosur has made tremendous progress in her singles career over the past few years. Last year can be considered the peak year of her career where she reached a career-high ranking of number six and was a finalist at the French Open. Stosur’s successes have mainly come on the slower clay, and her 2011 season has not been as promising thus far. Chances are that the Aussie will not fair well at this year’s Open. Not so long ago, the tennis world marveled at the steady progress that Serbia’s Ana Ivanovic exhibited on the WTA Tour. Within only one year, Ivanovic went from being ranked outside the top 20, to number one on the tour. However, Ivanovic’s 2009 season was nothing short of disastrous, as her ranking plummeted to outside the top 20 once again. Any hopes for an Ivanovic comeback at Wimbledon 2011 were dashed with her elimination in the third round. Clearly, the 2011 Open will not be the Serb’s time to shine. Despite being ranked in t h e t o p 2 0 , Poland’s Agnieszka Radwanska has not had much success on the Grand Slam scene. Her greatest successes over the years have come on the grass courts of Wimbledon where she reached the quarterfinals twice. The U.S. Open has never been her strong point, and thus her prospects for a first U.S. Open title look gloomy. Monica Gorny of Long Island Tennis Magazine is a member of the Duke University Women’s Tennis team.

So You Think You Know Everything About the U.S. Open?  The U.S. Open originated in 1881 in Newport, R.I.  A USTA competition ball must bounce 53 inches when dropped from 100 inches in order to be used in the tournament.  70,000 balls get used during the course of a U.S. Open tournament.  $22,668,000 in total prize monies were awarded during the 2010 U.S. Open. Approximately $100,000 in total prize money was awarded in 1968.  In 1977, transsexual Renee Richards, who first played in the U.S. Open as Richard Raskin in 1960, was allowed to compete. “She” reaches the semifinals of women’s doubles.  Last year’s clip of a fight in the stands in the upper deck of Arthur Ashe Stadium Court at the U.S. Open drew 1,320,719 views on You Tube.  1927 was the first tournament to use seedings.  1950 was the first Grand Slam to allow a black woman to play (Althea Gibson).  The fastest serve in U.S. Open history was 147mph by American Taylor Dent.

 When Andy Roddick and Ernest Gullbis played in 2008, their night match ended at 1:34 a.m. At that time, they were each celebrating their birthday.  The U.S. Open is played on hard court known as “Deco Turf.“  The U.S. Open began using instant replay in 2006.  U.S. Open Champions with most career titles: Connors (109), Lendl (94), McEnroe (77), Sampras (64), Agassi (60), Federer (45 and counting) and Ashe (33).  The latest a men’s match at U.S. Open finished: Mats Wilander defeated Mikael Pernfors, 7-6(3), 3-6, 1-6, 7-6(6), 6-4 at 2:26 a.m.  The latest women’s match at U.S. Open finished: Sam Stosur defeated Elena Dementieva, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6(2) at 1:35 a.m.  The youngest man to win at the U.S. Open was Pete Sampras at 19-years-old in 1990.  The youngest woman to win the U.S. Open was Tracey Austin at 16-years-old in 1979.  In the longest U.S. Open match ever, Stefan Edberg defeated Michael Chang, 6-7(3), 7-5, 7-6(3), 5-7, 6-4. Total match time was five hrs. and 24 min.  Most aces in a U.S. Open match: Richard Krajicek (49).  Most consecutive wins at the U.S. Open: Roger Federer (40).

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What if the kids had a shot at the Open? With the U.S. Open on the horizon, we recently asked some local junior players the following question: What would it feel like if you got to play in the U.S. Open on Arthur Ashe Stadium Court? “It would be a dream come true for me because its one thing I’ve always dreamed of. My tennis idols, like Serena Williams, have played there, so it would really be a dream come true.”—Andrea Hernandez, 10 “It would be amazing, because then I could play on the same court as Roger Federer.”—Matt Zeifman, 5

bly freak out, good thing it’s not going to happen to me for a few more years.” —Madison Battaglia, 13 “Great because everyone would be watching me play tennis, I would like to be number one in the world.”—Ronnie Hohmann, 9 “I’d feel proud because I worked so hard to get there.”—Vanessa Scott, 14

“Pretty amazing … hard work pays off!” —Michelle Lehat, 14

“Amazing, I’d feel famous.”—Peter Bukary, 9

“I can show the world just how big my forehand is!”—Patrick Maloney, 11

“I would feel awesome, in power.” —Jason Yu, 10

“Very important part of my life, a snapshot moment, breathtaking, an honor, really cool to play with experienced players.” —Christopher Grisham, 11

“Nervous … a lot of pressure, and everyone is watching.”—Kat Changtroralekely, 14

“Exhilarating … a good experience to play against professionals, nervous because a lot of people are watching, I would proba-

“It’s just a great feeling coming back to New York. Honestly, I liked it from day one. It was one of those tournaments I fell in love with right away … just the buzz and energy over there. Sure, it was a bit overwhelming at first. I kind of always liked to play there. Difficult with the wind, humidity, the city behind it, the whole deal. Having to deal with that was quite interesting. Every time the U.S. Open rolls around, I’m very, very excited.” —Roger Federer

“An overwhelming moment … awesome! I’d feel unbelievable.”—Jonathan Ochoa, 16 “I would feel amazing, accomplished and proud.”—Sophie Barnard, 16

“Very proud, psyched to play with true pros.”—Vanessa Pavia, 16 “I would be excited because the U.S. Open is one of the biggest tournaments in the world.”—Samantha Civil, 8 “I would be very proud that I would have made it that far to be able to play in the U.S. Open.”—Julia Misciagna, 10 “I would feel nervous, but I’d also feel good, because I know Rafael Nadal played there.”—Anthony Giraci, 10 “I would be happy, and maybe I could play with my dad on the court and get signatures from the other pros.”—Joshua Baron, 6 “It would be a great experience to be seen by other people and to show my talent.” —Andre Gillespie, 10 “Amazing if I could get that far.” —Louie Kotler, 10 “Awesome just being there … cool seeing all the people.”—Jordyn Berry, 13 “I’d feel more excited, I wouldn’t care how I did because I’d just be so happy to be there.“—Claire Handa, 12 “I would try to make it as far as I could. It would be amazing to improve and play against good players.”—Steven Sun, 10

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


2011 U.S. Open Schedule (Subject to change) Date

Session

Time

Featured Matches

Date

Session

Time

Featured Matches

Monday, August 29

1 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s/Women’s 1st Round 2 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Monday, September 5 15 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s/Women’s Round of 16 16 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Tuesday, August 30

3 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s/Women’s 1st Round 4 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Tuesday, September 6 17 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinal 18 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinal

Wednesday, August 31

5 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s 1st Round/Women’s 2nd Round 6 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Wednesday, September 7 19 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s and/or Women’s Quarterfinal 20 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s and/or Women’s Quarterfinal

Thursday, September 1 7 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round 8 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round Friday, September 2

9 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s 2nd Round/Women’s 3rd Round 10 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s 2nd Round/Women’s 3rd Round

Saturday, September 3 11 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round 12 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round

Thursday, September 8

Friday, September 9

21 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s Quarterfinal/Mixed-Doubles Final 22 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s Quarterfinal/Women’s Doubles Semifinals 23 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s Doubles Final/Women’s Semifinals

Saturday, September 10 24 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s Semifinals 25 Evening 7:00 p.m. Women’s Final/Pre-Match Ceremony

Sunday, September 4 13 Day 11:00 a.m. Men’s 3rd Round/Women’s Round of 16 14 Evening 7:00 p.m. Men’s 3rd Round/Women’s Round of 16 Sunday, September 11 26 Day

Noon Women’s Doubles Final/Men’s Final

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Finding the Proper Fluid/Electrolyte Balance By Irene Belfer-Lehat taying balanced with fluids and electrolytes is a key concern to every competitive athlete. Very common complaints, such as fatigue and cramps, could be easily avoided if properly hydrated, especially during the hot and humid summer months. Water is the number one ingredient every cell and tissue in your body needs to survive. The fluids that circulate throughout your body dissolve minerals known as electrolytes. Electrolytes help properly regulate fluid levels inside and between cells, and they are vital for the proper functioning of your cells, tissues and muscles. It is very important for a tennis player to know how much to drink before, during and after a match. Dehydration can force your heart to work harder, your core body temperature to rise,

S

and as a result, your performance will fall drastically. Overhydration is another extreme that can decrease your athletic performance. Too much fluid will cause the electrolyte concentration in the body to become overly diluted, thus compromising athletic performance. Finding your fluid/electrolyte balance is key to sustaining long and multiple matches. Your hydration zone is the perfect level at which you perform your best. Here are some tips on how to maintain your fluid/electrolyte:  Check your weight before and after playing tennis. Two percent of body weight loss after a prolonged game is normal, but proper rehydration must be followed in order to replenish that supply.  Monitor your hydration status by checking your urine color. A light-yel-

low color is considered adequate hydration. A darker urine (the color of an apple juice), suggests that more fluids are needed.  Water is the best choice of drink, but if you play for more than two hours, a sports drink will be necessary. A sports drink provides carbohydrates to help sustain your blood glucose level. Electrolytes, such as sodium, help to retain the fluids you are drinking. A registered dietitian, specializing in sports nutrition, can help you calculate the exact amount and type of fluids needed for optimum athletic performance.  Irene Belfer-Lehat is a New York State-licensed dietician and certified dietician-nutritionist. She may be reached by phone at (917) 769-8031 or e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com.

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Foot for Thought By Daniel Kresh hough tennis may have more private lessons then most other sports, in the heat of a match, players are often left to their own devices. One-on-one work with a coach is crucial for building a technical and tactical arsenal, but ultimately, the player must understand what to do in matches, and most importantly, must be able to pick up on cues to improve their performance when things are not going as planned. A private coach is great for preparing a player for matches and helping a player sort out what happened after a match, but can rarely interact with players during a match. Though tennis is very complex, players of almost every level make the majority of errors stemming from one problem—poor footwork. I have often seen players miss a shot, perhaps their go-to shot, and then stand off to the side, shadowing the swing as if their technique has abandoned them. More often than not, though their swing might have gone awry, the genesis of their mistake stems from improper positioning. When a player is not in position for a shot, their balance will be compromised and the stroke will

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usually break down. It may feel as though it was the swing that was awkward, and it was, but its awkwardness was necessitated by court position relative to the ball. In order to hit an ideal shot, a player must first position themselves the correct distance away from the ball and ensure that they are balanced throughout the swing, transferring their weight into the shot. Everyone has a strike zone in tennis and, unlike baseball, it is a player’s job to ensure that their footing allows contact in a com-

“If a player has a day where their shots feel off, the first thing they should check is their footwork.” fortable strike zone for each shot … the luxury of “waiting for your pitch” does not exist in the sport of tennis. A tennis strike zone is three dimensional—it has a height, a width and depth to it. An ideal shot is not hit too high, too low or too far in front or behind a player. An ideal shot is also the proper distance to the side of the player’s body. Any variations in this ideal contact point will necessitate modifying the swing in order to compensate for the less-than-ideal posi-

tioning as this often leads to errors. If a player has a day where their shots feel off, the first thing they should check is their footwork. Once someone has developed reliable ground strokes, the most frequent reason for a mishit shot is a product of poor positioning which throws off their balance and then the shot. If a player makes a conscious effort to keep their feet more active and make sure that extra attention is paid to spacing then their consistency will improve and they will give away less free points. This can be crucial in turning around a match, and though it may seem pretty obvious, it can oftentimes be overlooked. A good player should never give up and never be defeated by their own feet.  Daniel Kresh is a USPTA-certified tennis professional working out of Sportime in Kings Park, N.Y. where he is also the tennis concierge. He graduated from Binghamton University in May of 2009 with a bachelor of arts degree in English. While at Binghamton, he was the captain of the Club Tennis Team and was the undefeated three-time champion of the school’s biannual Intra-Club Tournament. His was also a rookie ballperson at the 2010 U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at dankreshtennis@gmail.com.

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Tennis Blitz in the Parks Brings Free Tennis Lessons to Nassau County he 4th Annual Tennis Blitz in the Parks was held in late July, as nearly 1,000 children received free tennis lessons in eight different Nassau County parks. Conceived and organized by Bill Mecca, the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region Representative and Karen Beckhard-Ravener from Nassau County’s Parks and Recreation Department, the Blitz in the Parks benefits Nassau’s children by teaching them the basics of tennis—the healthy sport they can play for a lifetime. According to Mecca, this effort is probably the largest and most ambitious such undertaking in the country, with more than 3,500 children having benefitted from this endeavor to date. Many of the lessons in the parks utilized the USTA’s QuickStart Tennis format which is designed to provide children 10 and under with an easier way to learn and master methodology of the sport. In addition, the USTA provided applications for free USTA Memberships to all of Nassau County’s 10 and under campers. In order to make this effort a success, many organizations needed to join together to provide the dozens of volunteers, 14 tennis pros and required financial support. Special thanks to Nassau County, the USTA Eastern Section, the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region, the Eastern Division of the

T

@ross TENNIS

Campers at Cantiague Park pose for a photo after receiving their free tennis lessons

Kids at Cantiague Park in Hicksville receive tennis instruction as part of the 4th Annual Tennis Blitz in the Parks

Many thanks to USTA Eastern for their free tennis instruction at Wantagh Park Instructors and kids pause for a photo at Wantagh Park during the Annual Tennis Blitz in the Parks

United States Professional Tennis Association’s Tennis Across America and Tennis for the Health Of It programs, Long Beach Ten-

nis Center, Racquets for Kids, the Hicksville CTA, and others for their support of the 4th Annual Tennis Blitz in the Parks. 

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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?

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Frequently Asked By Roman Prokes

The longer you play this sport, the more problems you come across. After servicing racquets for decades, we have learned some great remedies to the everyday problems that players come across. Here are some tips to help diagnose and fix some common problems. Loose butt cap

Tennis players tend to hold a racquet as low as possible. It allows for a higher range of motion and maneuverability. It’s not un-

common to see players even have a pinky hanging below the bottom of the grip. This puts a tremendous amount of stress on the racquet, which can ultimately loosen the butt cap. When this cap starts to wiggle, you should remove all grip layers until you get to the mold or pallet. Fasten the cap to the end of the racquet and apply staples from a high pressure staple gun. Applying too many staples can damage the handle beneath. If you get down to the pallet or mold and find the handle is corroded or severely damaged, you can have it remolded or have the pallet replaced. Rattling inside the racquet Nothing beats the sound of a forehand cracking off the strings or an overhead smash echoing through a building, but this isn’t always the case. Tapping the frame of your racquet can reveal some unwanted noises. This is the result of small particles of the racquet breaking off and falling inside the frame through normal wear. It could be chips of the frame, bits of grommet, granulated clay or other things. What

you would need to do is create an opening for the piece to exit. The biggest hole to access is through the butt cap (or trap door on the butt cap). Tilt and tip the racquet until you get the piece to move through the frame and exit. If the piece does not make it through the handle hole, you can take out the grommets and use the string holes as another option. The grip is too small Players often get a racquet in which the grip isn’t perfect for them, as stress to the elbow becomes painful for some. Ninetynine percent of players will add one or more layers of overgrip to the handle. This is a horrible way to fix the problem! Adding overgrips in this manner will severely round out the racquet. The purposeful octagonal handle becomes a round cylinder where switching grips and controlling racquet torque is near impossible. The quick fix is to remove the grips and add a heat sleeve which shrinks to the size of the handle with applied heat to increase the grip one to two sizes. The better fix is to remold or change

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


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Racquet Fixes the pallets to the size of your liking, which gives a professional and factory finished product. The grip is too big The opposite can happen as well. Adding to a racquet is typically easier than taking away, and this is no exception. The evolution of the game is favoring smaller grips for added spin and racquet head speed. An oversized grip has to be per-

fectly shaved down panel by panel exactly even on all eight sides. It’s practically impossible to properly sand this down by hand. At RPNY, we use an industrial machine which is calibrated to

the thousandth of a millimeter to evenly shave down all sides flawlessly. Some racquets have handles which cannot be altered this way and others even have pallets, a shell-like plastic grip casing, which can be changed. Bad string breaks Players hope they break strings in the sweet spot due to repeated clean hits in the middle of the racquet. However, the string can break almost anywhere on the racquet. Breaks near the outside can be due to poor stringing, string shearing, old string and damaged grommets. When the grommets are damaged, they can cut into the string and damage it, instead of their normal role of adding a layer of buffer between the string and sharp edges of the racquet frame. Players should change entire grommet strips regularly or replace single grommets when one is defective. A knowledgeable stringer will know when to add pads, tubing, pick the correct gauge or other methods to promote proper string life.

Blisters Blisters are common side effects to excessive play. They can also occur if grips are not installed correctly. Check to make sure your grip is smooth from top to bottom without severe grooves. Fingers slide into the groves with added contact to the skin for unnecessary friction. Also, check to see that your grip goes from the very edge of the butt cap to the top of the handle. Exposed plastic on the butt cap quickly blisters the palm. The proper wrapping of the grip with the use of some finger tape can go a long way to keeping you on the court.

Roman Prokes has perfected his art of gripping by traveling with the most finicky players like Agassi, Haas, Sharapova, Berdych, etc. He has traveled the world over not only to string rackets, but to also put on customized grips. He has produced several grips which are world-renowned, like RPNY Artificial Leather, RPNY Tacky and RPNY Cushion Perforated. For more information, call (516) 759-5200, or visit www.facebook.com/RPNYtennis or www.RPNYtennis.com.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

43


The Reverse Forehand: Don’t Try It! By Miguel Cervantes III As of late, the reverse forehand has gained in popularity due to players such as Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Andy Roddick, and even Maria Sharapova using it. Although the shot has its applications, in my humble opinion if you are going out of your way to use it, then you’re not using it correctly. Everyone, at one point or another, performs the reverse forehand, but if used incorrectly, can cause you to lose a point or even worse, cause injury. The reverse forehand occurs when our racket follows through opposite to the direction of the ball’s path (most often over your head or the same shoulder as opposed to the opposite shoulder) when hitting a forehand. There are two occasions when the shot has an actual place. The first is if you are hitting with a grip in the western family. Both the semi-western and western forehand grips can, at times, follow through over your head due to the mechanics of the swing. In this scenario, the reverse forehand is natural and not forced, and is therefore acceptable. The second occasion occurs when a player is on the run and in trouble. When a player reacts late to a ball, or when a ball is struck well by our opponents and it cannot be reached as easily, we will often strike the ball late and follow through over our head. Our natural instincts are to begin our follow through after

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making contact with the ball. If the ball is struck well—meaning in front of our body—our racket will follow through over the opposite shoulder. If the ball is struck late—meaning even with our body or behind our body—our follow through will be shorter by about a foot, meaning it will go over our heads or over the same shoulder. In this scenario, the reverse forehand is a product of the situation as well, and therefore is acceptable to use. Times when the reverse forehand should not occur are times when are you making a conscious effort to follow through over your head. Players will consciously follow through over their heads in an attempt to put extra spin on the ball, create a better angle, or hit the ball deeper. The fact is that there are far more effective means of achieving your goals than following through over your head. It is easier to hit under the ball to get the depth desired, than it is to follow through over your head. Hitting over your head has more of an upward motion than an outward motion and will more often than not cause the ball to fall short. Following through over your head cannot create angles any better than moving around the ball. The reverse forehand was arguably best used by Pete Sampras who used it on the run to hit a ball down the line (often done by Nadal as well). This happens because the contact point is late and so it can be applied to down the line shots very well. Hitting cross-court and creating angles can be achieved far better by moving

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

around the ball or hitting the ball earlier rather than later. Finally, more spin can be achieved just as easily via various methods. Whether you change your grip, string your racket with textured string, or use a windshield wiper motion, you can achieve spin in safer ways than a reverse forehand. Whether your balls fall short, causing you to lose the point to an approach shot or whether you hit yourself in the face because of your follow through, there are easier ways to improve your game. Everyone can and does perform the reverse forehand from time to time, but going out of your way to follow through over your head can have negative results. Have fun and play safe.  Formerly with Daniel Burgess at Freeport Tennis, Miguel Cervantes III now teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.


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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Literary Corner

By Brent Shearer

On the Line By Serena Williams with Daniel Paisner think many of us in the tennis world, understandably, take the Williams Sisters and their accomplishments for granted. But just because they have been mainstays on the women’s tour for more than 10 years, it is instructive to take another look because Venus and Serena are quite a story. One way to review their accomplishments with fresh eyes is by reading On the Line, Serena’s memoir written with Daniel Paisner. The book covers Serena’s career up through the 2008 U.S. Open, so you won’t find any reaction to Serena’s verbal attack on the lineswoman that was a big story on the women’s side of the 2010 U.S. Open. That’s just as well since everyone has, I think, absorbed that incident and has adjusted their opinion of Serena as a result. For all of the ink that has been spilled about Serena’s default, I think one unremarked-upon aspect of Serena’s meltdown is the way that courtside reporter Mary Joe Fernandez froze and was too terrified of an enraged Serena to interview her as she stormed off the court against Kim Clijsters following her default. Fernandez was Fed Cup Captain at the time and was afraid to confront her own potential team member. But even Patrick McEnroe gave a lot of thought to how to broach the subject of the default later that weekend after Serena and Venus won the doubles title. You have to love the conflicts of interest in our game. On the Line does devote a chapter to an

I

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earlier controversy in the Williams’ career. Playing at Indian Wells in 2001, Venus defaulted due to an injury in the semis, allowing Serena to advance to the final against Kim Clijsters. It’s funny how Clijsters is always there when the Williams Sisters run into controversy. The crowd of 14,000 booed Serena on the court and Richard and Venus in the stands. Since then, the Williams have boycotted the event. No doubt it was an ugly scene and I’d support the Williams’ family decision to boycott, although in On the Line, Serena gives in to the temptation to cast the boycott as a moral crusade. But what makes On the Line a compelling read for the tennis fan is its portrait of the early years of the Williams Sisters. Serena talks about how, for years, all of the attention from the outside world of coaches, potential sponsors and the press was totally focused on Venus. Within the family, everyone agreed that Serena’s time would come, but rarely has birth order played such a role as it did for Serena as she waited for some of the spotlight to move from her big sister to her. Even a casual tennis fan will be intrigued by Serena’s story of the girls’ upbringing and the way that their father created two champions out of his five daughters. One way to look at the Williams Sisters’ story is that their father is the most successful junior development coach the world has ever seen. Two out of five kids make it to number one … not bad. I’ve always thought the explanation for the way the Williams Sisters can drop in and out of the WTA Tour and be successful is that they just serve better than any of their competitors. You can also say that they are better athletes, but while I think that is true, you see the strength of their serves frequently bailing them out when they come back from an injury or have been off the tour for other reasons.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

So, here’s a note to teaching pros, parents and players. One thing Richard Williams did with Serena and Venus to improve their serves was to have them throw American footballs back and forth across the net. Serena relates how the girls started tossing the ball from a few feet away from the net, then moved to the service line, and eventually to the baseline. The next time you watch that bag check feature on the Tennis Channel, don’t be surprised if more women players are packing footballs with their jump-ropes and other gear. Because the Richard Williams football drill and, no doubt, many other serving drills, created the two best hitters of the game’s most important shot in women’s tennis history. Richard Williams made Serena and Venus the pros they have become. He may get credit for having a master plan now, but as Serena writes in On the Line of one of his famous decisions, to not let his girls play junior tennis, he was making it up as he went along. Serena quotes her dad explaining this decision by saying, “Meeka, I don’t see why you and your sister should travel all over just to beat up on these other little girls.” With the Williams, family and their Jehovah’s Witness religion was the foundation for everything they accomplished. What comes across in On the Line is the sweetness Richard Williams nurtured in his family for tennis. I don’t think most players, with Andre Agassi as an exception perhaps, become champions without coming to love the sounds and rhythms of the game. Richard instilled this in his girls, even the three who didn’t become champs and the result has forever changed the history of tennis.  Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.


LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The State of U.S. Tennis: Is It Really That Bad? By Lonnie Mitchel hile watching Wimbledon at the beginning of the summer, the announcers would talk about the bad state of American tennis. During the French Open a few weeks earlier, I heard the same comments several times during the course of the tournament. Come to think of it, I can remember the same comments made periodically over the years while watching many Grand Slam tournaments. As I have listened to the same rhetoric over the years, I asked myself … “Really, is the state of American tennis that bad?” Come on, let’s be realistic here … nothing is perfect and everything can be scrutinized and improved, but is American tennis really that bad? If this statement is based on Americans winning Grand Slam titles since 1994, three American males and three American women have won the U.S. Open title (18 percent of the time, an American player wins). Wimbledon had three American women and one American male win the title (18 percent of the time, an American woman won and that one American male who won all of those Wimbledon Titles was Pete Sampras). Maybe the USTA thinks an American should win every year, but should I really care that much if an American wins a Grand

W

Slam? I am patriotic and want to see an American win all the time, but when they don’t, American tennis does not exactly go into the toilet now does it? Right now, there are two Americans in the ATP top 20 (Mardy Fish and Andy Roddick representing 10 percent of the top 20 of the ATP Tour). I am proud to say that Americans do indeed have great success on the ATP Tour. Now, here is what I really care about. Tennis in the United States is more accessible than in any other country in the world. We have more tennis courts per person in this country than anywhere else in the world. Tennis can be played for free at most junior high and high school courts. Tennis can also be played at an endless choice of parks throughout the country. Tennis is accessible at a variety of clubs and facilities, both indoor and outdoor. Men and women can easily find games at any park and a network of tennis players can be found at most clubs. Want to take a tennis lesson here in the U.S.? No problem, affordable group lessons are available at most clubs. Want some private lessons? Great instructors can easily be found at most facilities. I lived in Switzerland approximately 20 years ago. During that period of living abroad, I wanted to play tennis, but found that there were no public tennis courts at

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

“I am patriotic and want to see an American win all the time, but when they don’t, American tennis does not exactly go into the toilet now does it?”



any park. You had to “join” a club, and in many cases, also had monthly dues or an extra supplement just to play. Schools had lovely soccer fields, but no tennis courts. You could find an opponent to play in a match if you looked hard enough, but it was no where near the level of accessibility as it is here in the U.S. This illustration is pretty representative of tennis in Europe and in Asia. The further east you went in Europe, the less opportunity there was. So the state of American tennis means something else to me. You can play anywhere at anytime in the United States. If the USTA wants a U.S. citizen to win major titles, I will leave it to them to figure that out. However, for the average American club player, go play tennis and have fun, there are plenty of courts available.  Lonnie Mitchel has been teaching tennis since 1985, mostly at Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, N.Y. and is a USPTA Level 1 certified tennis instructor. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). Lonnie has also worked in the travel and tourism industry as a regional sales manager for 25-plus years for such companies the Walt Disney Company and Royal Caribbean International. Lonnie is now the national account manager for Sandals and Beaches Resorts. His wife, Harriet, is a club level tennis player and can often be found on the court. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.


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Dreams Really Do Come True Credit all photos to Avi Gerver/MSG Photos

By Monica Gorny elping make dreams come true for children facing life obstacles is the primary goal of the Garden of Dreams Foundation (GDF). The GDF works closely with all areas of Madison Square Garden to provide children with once-in-a-lifetime experiences. From July 6-12, 40 children were lucky enough to realize their aspirations by taking part in the GDF’s “Dream Week” summer program. On July 12, children from the SCO Family of Services, a partner of the GDF, were given the opportunity to tour the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and take part in a session with USTA teaching professionals to learn the basics of tennis. The tour commenced with a visit to the Arthur Ashe bronze statue located just outside the center. The tour leader stressed the

H

significance of the statue by explaining that it not only commemorates Ashe as a great tennis player, but as an inspiring humanitarian who left behind a legacy that still lives on. Following this, the tour covered much of the inside and outside areas, giving the children an idea of the size of the facility. The conclusion and the highlight of the tour came with the much-awaited visit to Center Court of Arthur Ashe Stadium. This had a profound impact on the children, as they realized that many of the sport’s legends played on this court. Following this, the children were led to Louis Armstrong Stadium for their own opportunity to try out the sport. After the children received complimen-

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tary waters, hats and rackets, the USTA teaching professionals started the session off with a warm-up routine of side shuffles and knee-high skips. The purpose of this was to show the importance of an adequate warm-up to prevent injuries. The children were then fed a series of forehands and backhands, while teaching professionals corrected their grips and techniques. Activities came to an end once they had covered all of the basic tennis strokes to give everyone an overall feel for the sport. The day’s scorching heat which bordered on 100 degrees was not enough to ruin the jubilant atmosphere amongst the children. Everyone seemed pleased with what they learned and experienced at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, thus concluding another very successful “Dream Week” for the Garden of Dreams Foundation. Monica Gorny of Long Island Tennis Magazine is a member of the Duke University Women’s Tennis team.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones—Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 631-363-2882 • easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-271-6616 • easternathleticclubs.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 516-676-9107 • www.rwtt.com Rockville Racquet Club Susan Alvy—Manager 80 North Centre Avenue • Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 • rockvilletennis@optonline.net Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, NY 11937 631-907-5162 www.ross.org/tennis • hli@Ross.org

SPORTIME Lynbrook Mohamed Shabir—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com/Lynbrook tdlynbrook@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Massapequa Fayez Malik—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com/Massapequa fmalik@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Randall’s Island Ted Dimond—Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com/Manhattan randallsisland@sportimeny.com

Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones—Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 631-753-3696 • easternathleticclubs.com

SPORTIME Amagansett Sue De Lara—Co-General Manager Hana Sromova—Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com/Amagansett amagansett@sportimetfm.com

Glen Head Racquet Club Heath Koch: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 earlyhit@optonline.net

SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Mike Kosoff—Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 516-933-8500 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Tennis tdbethpageten@sportimetfm.com

Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis Daniel Burgess—Director of Tennis 525 Eagle Avenue • West Hempstead, NY 11552-3723 516-486-2165 • amertwist@aim.com www.hempsteadlakeindoortennis.com

SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike • Bethpage, NY 11714 516-731-4432 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Multi-Sport bethpagemulti@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Schenectady Philippe Ceas—Director of Tennis 2699 Curry Road Schenectady, NY 12303 518-356-0100 www.SportimeNY.com/Schenectady tdschenectady@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Quogue Will Van Rensburg—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead, Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com/Quogue tdhamptons@sportimeny.com

SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Karl Sommer—Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Tennis tdsyossetten@sportimeny.com

SPORTIME at Harbor Island Eric Fromm—General Manager, Director of Tennis In Harbor Island Park • Mamaroneck, NY 10543 914-777-5050 www.SportimeNY.com/Harbor-Island efromm@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Syosset Fitness & Racquetball Jay Karl—General Manager 10 Gordon Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-496-3100 www.SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Fitness jkarl@sportimeny.com

Long Beach Tennis Center Chuck Russell—Director of Tennis 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, NY 11561 516-432-6060 • www.longbeachtenniscenter.com info@longbeachtenniscenter.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2323 www.pointsettennis.com • tonny@pointsettennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 516-883-6425 • www.pwta.com • tennis@pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, NY 11542 516-759-0505 • www.rwtt.com

SPORTIME Kings Park Darrin Cohen—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com/Kings-Park tdkingspark@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Roslyn Adam Mandell—Director of Tennis Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com/Roslyn tdroslyn@sportimetfm.com

USTA National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 718-760-6200 • www.usta.com

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

51


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 07/19/11)

BOYS

Long Island Boys 10 Singles Rank..Name............................City 1 ........Steven Well Sun ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 2 ........Abhinav Raj Srivastava ..Melville, N.Y. 3 ........Jeffrey McDonnell ........Glen Cove, N.Y. 4 ........Robert Steven Bellino ....Huntington, N.Y. 5 ........Billy G. Suarez ..............Huntington, N.Y. 6 ........Maxwell Moadel ............Brookville, N.Y. 7 ........Niles Ghaffar ................Massapequa, N.Y. 8 ........Oliver Worth ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 9 ........Kabir Rajpal ..................Syosset, N.Y. 10 ......Karan K. Amin................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 11 ......Zachary Reid Berlin ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 12 ......Sujay Sharma................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 13 ......Spencer Brachman........Commack, N.Y. 14 ......Alec Hunter Barres ........Old Westbury, N.Y. 15 ......Arjun K. Sharma ............Glen Head, N.Y. 16 ......Hunter Fromm ..............Amagansett, N.Y. 17 ......Sohrob Yavari ................Syosset, N.Y. 18 ......Trevor Lanigan ..............North Babylon, N.Y. 19 ......Wiktor Marek Figiel ......Sea Cliff, N.Y. 20 ......Bradford J. Lin ..............Kings Point, N.Y. 21 ......Evan Brady....................Glen Head, N.Y. 22 ......William G. McCreery ......Albertson, N.Y. 23 ......Luke Torel Karniewich ..Glen Head, N.Y. 24 ......Michael Bruck ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 25 ......Jared M. Phillips............Plainview, N.Y. 26 ......Jonathan DeGroot ........Southampton, N.Y. 27 ......JohnChristian Matute ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 28 ......Jacob Rusinek ..............East Hills, N.Y. 29 ......Daniel Chikvashvili ........Melville, N.Y. 30 ......Sam Levine ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 31 ......Tyler Joseph Milner ......Jericho, N.Y. 32 ......Alexander Karman ........Port Washington, N.Y. 33 ......Anton de Lesseps ..........Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 34 ......Grant A. Cantone ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 35 ......Peter Bukary ................Jericho, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank..Name............................City 1 ........Thomas A. Korossy ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 2 ........Mark Julian Baker ........North Baldwin, N.Y. 3 ........Steven Well Sun ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 4 ........Amani Siddiqui ..............West Babylon, N.Y. 5 ........Alexander Reiley............Manorville, N.Y. 6 ........George Kaslow ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 7 ........Matthew Porges ............Sands Point, N.Y. 8 ........Timothy Serignese ........Port Washington, N.Y. 9 ........Lucas DeSantos ............Southampton, N.Y. 10 ......Gardner Howe ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 11 ......Matthew Roberts ..........Setauket, N.Y. 12 ......Ben Snow......................Water Mill, N.Y. 13 ......Daniel Meinster ............South Setauket, N.Y. 14 ......Billy G. Suarez ..............Huntington, N.Y. 15 ......Austin Egna ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 16 ......Jackson Weisbrot ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ......Jake Grossman ............Sands Point, N.Y. 18 ......Ronald P. Hohmann........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 19 ......Kyle C. Yaun ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 20 ......Carl Grant......................Water Mill, N.Y. 21 ......Adam Stein ..................Melville, N.Y. 22 ......Eric Li............................Old Westbury N.Y. 23 ......Tyler Spencer Bloch ......Jericho, N.Y. 24 ......Daniel Weitz ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 25 ......Zachary Ian Khazzam ....Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 26 ......Nicholas Tyler Decker ....East Setauket, N.Y. 27 ......Brady Berman ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 28 ......Eli Grossman ................Woodbury, N.Y. 29 ......Arjun Mehrotra ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 30 ......Michael Jaklitsch ..........Islip, N.Y. 31 ......Alex Joseph Amadio ......Smithtown, N.Y. 32 ......Matthew Lee Catton ......Woodbury, N.Y.

52

ISLAND

33 ......Evan Kirsh ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 34 ......Jonas Feuerring ............Sagaponack, N.Y. 35 ......Benjamin Grossman ......Sands Point, N.Y. 36 ......Austin Pomerantz ..........Old Westbury, N.Y. 37 ......Yuval Solomon ..............Plainview, N.Y. 38 ......Jeffrey M. McDonnell ....Glen Cove, N.Y. 39 ......Adam Bradley Wilck ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 40 ......Michael Stuart Petersen Bridgehampton, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank..Name............................City 1 ........Brandon Eric Remer ......Hewlett, N.Y. 2 ........Dylan Granat ................Woodbury, N.Y. 3 ........Cory Seltman ................Smithtown, N.Y. 4 ........Evan Kober....................Wantagh, N.Y. 5 ........Michael DeNigris ..........Islip, N.Y. 6 ........Curran Varma ................Manhasset, N.Y. 7 ........Braddock Chow ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 8 ........Raizada Bhavin Vaid ......Old Westbury, N.Y. 9 ........Thomas Dacosta ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 10 ......Arnav Raj Srivastava......Melville, N.Y. 11 ......Bryant J. Born ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 12 ......Ethan Susser ................Old Westbury, N.Y. 13 ......Andrew Muran ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 14 ......Spencer Bozsik ............Sag Harbor, N.Y. 15 ......Del Schunk....................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 16 ......Jacob Lacks ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 17 ......Derek Zadrozny ............Huntington Station, N.Y. 18 ......Nicholas Kevin Fox ........Commack, N.Y. 19 ......Cameron Posillico..........Bayville, N.Y. 20 ......Faran Nazir....................Deer Park, N.Y. 21 ......Simon Adler ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 22 ......Garrett Malave ..............Laurel, N.Y. 23 ......Matthew Holweger ........Manhasset, N.Y. 24 ......David Binler ..................East Northport, N.Y. 25 ......Kevin Alec Kowalsky......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ......Mitchell Reid Berger ......Lake Grove, N.Y. 27 ......Vincent Chen ................Hauppaugh, N.Y. 28 ......Zane Siddiqui ................West Babylon, N.Y. 29 ......Joseph D’Orazio ............St. James, N.Y. 30 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ....Massapequa, N.Y. 31 ......Daniel Khodosh ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32 ......Spencer Lowitt ..............Syosset, N.Y. 33 ......Derek Menker ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 34 ......Nick John Stamatos ......Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 35 ......Benjamin Tenner ..........Roslyn, N.Y. 36 ......Florimond Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 37 ......David Henry Reinharz ....Rockville Centre, N.Y. 38 ......Brian Hoffarth................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 39 ......JohnThomas Sepanski ..Huntington, N.Y. 40 ......Justin Scott Feder ........Bellmore, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1........Richard Mitchell ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 2........Cole Laffitte ..................East Setauket, N.Y. 3........Erik Johann Lobben ......Glen Head, N.Y. 4........Dylan Ander ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 5........Brett Titcomb ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 6........Jeffrey Cherkin ..............Melville, N.Y. 7........Zachary Chang ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 8........Gregory Rosenthal ........Syosset, N.Y. 9........Ian Combemale..............Bridgehampton, N.Y. 10......Troy Michael Haas..........Huntington Station, N.Y. 11......Connor J. Gehrke ..........Miller Place, N.Y. 12......Jack Vissicchio ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 13......Joshua Fried ..................Plainview, N.Y. 14......Erik Ujvari ......................Hauppauge, N.Y. 15......Andrew Reiley................Manorville, N.Y. 16......Samuel Hajibai ..............Kings Point, N.Y. 17......Michael Nelson ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 18......Caleb Van Loon ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 19......Jesse Richheimer ..........Merrick, N.Y. 20......Richard DeGregoris........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 21......Samuel Johnson ............Huntington, N.Y. 22......Cooper Lacetera ............Speonk, N.Y. 23......Alec Tuckey....................Melville, N.Y.

RANKINGS

24......Steven Marzagalli ..........Patchogue, N.Y. 25......Jeremy Grossman..........Woodbury, N.Y. 26......Brian Heinze ..................Garden City, N.Y. 27......Sai Senthilkumar ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 28......Roshun Patel..................Syosset, N.Y. 29......Michael Hakimi ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 30......Derek Esposito ..............Stony Brook, N.Y. 31......Benjamin Mermelstein ..Northport, N.Y. 32......David Binler ..................East Northport, N.Y. 33......Daniel Sliwowski............Islip, N.Y. 34......Daniel Lee ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 35......Stone E. Mitchell ............Woodmere, N.Y. 36......Austin Spencer Ash........Syosset, N.Y. 37......Matthew Kantor ............Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 38......Will Pratt-Stephen..........Northport, N.Y. 39......Michael A. Vera ..............Bethpage, N.Y. 40......Craig L. Cusano ............Bellmore, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1........Andrew O’Connell ..........Medford, N.Y. 2........Jared Drzal ....................West Sayville, N.Y. 3........Jacob Mishkin ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 4........Sloan Millman................Woodmere, N.Y. 5........Erik Johann Lobben ......Glen Head, N.Y. 6........Richard Mitchell ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 7........Chris Casamassima ......Franklin Square, N.Y. 8........Matthew Zuckerman......Valley Stream, N.Y. 9........Ian Combemale..............Bridgehampton, N.Y. 10......Christopher DeSimone ..Centerport, N.Y. 11......Steven Ferrantello..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 12......Michael Freilich ............Lawrence, N.Y. 13......Ryan Zuckerman............Valley Stream, N.Y. 14......Seth Kornfield ................Jericho, N.Y. 15......Zachary Aboody ............Roslyn, N.Y. 16......Jonathan Sanders..........Holbrook, N.Y. 17......Roger Young ..................Brookhaven, N.Y. 18......Jeffrey Cherkin ..............Melville, N.Y. 19......Jason Fruchter ..............Lawrence, N.Y. 20......Jason Fiderer ................Oceanside, N.Y. 21......Jordan Reiley ................Manorville, N.Y. 22......Clark D. Ruiz ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 23......Dennis Uspensky ..........Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 24......Ignacio Casali ................Farmingdale, N.Y. 25......Kevin H. Kim ..................South Setauket, N.Y. 26......Zachary H. Mintz............Roslyn, N.Y. 27......Darren Resich ................Floral Park, N.Y. 28......Anton Averin ..................South Setauket, N.Y. 29......William Speranza ..........Hicksville, N.Y. 30......Richard DeGregoris........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 31......Erik Ujvari ......................Hauppauge, N.Y. 32......Zach Cooper ..................Holbrook, N.Y. 33......Daniel Park ....................East Northport, N.Y. 34......Kesar Virendra Shah ......Great Neck, N.Y. 35......Will Pratt-Stephen..........Northport, N.Y. 36......Felipe Magalhaaes Reis East Hampton, N.Y. 37......Joseph M. Falcetta ........Deer Park, N.Y. 38......Nick Wong ....................Jericho, N.Y. 39......Justin Paul Masure ........East Rockaway, N.Y. 40......Daniel Wright ................Babylon, N.Y.

GIRLS

Long Island Girls 10 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1........Alexa Lynn Bracco ........Freeport, N.Y. 2........Rachel Arbitman ............Hewlett, N.Y. 3........Marisa L. Menist ............Great Neck, N.Y. 4........Allison Cooney ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 5........Alexandra Chirinkin........Woodbury, N.Y. 6........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ..Albertson, N.Y. 7........Kira Rose Giordano ........Massapequa Park, N.Y. 8........Madison Li ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 9........Rebecca E. Suarez ........Huntington, N.Y. 10......Morena Devito ..............Syosset, N.Y. 11......Gabriella Sciarrotta ........Woodmere, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com

12......Jade Fixon-Owoo ..........Lynbrook, N.Y. 13......Amy Delman ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 14......Sarah Williams ..............New Hyde Park, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name............................City 1 ........Olivia Rose Scordo ........Glen Head, N.Y. 2 ........Brynn Maris April ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 3 ........Trinity Chow ..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 4 ........Francesca Karman ........Port Washington, N.Y. 5 ........Hannah Rosalie Dayton..East Hampton, N.Y. 6 ........Marisa L. Menist............Great Neck, N.Y. 7 ........Ashley Debra Yevdosin ..Hewlett, N.Y. 8 ........Devika Kedia ................East Norwich, N.Y. 9 ........Courtney B. Kowalsky ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 10 ......Nicole Kielan ................Valley Stream, N.Y. 11 ......Dasha Dlin ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 12 ......Celeste Wang Traub ......Jericho, N.Y. 13 ......Merri Kelly ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 14 ......Marina Bracken Hilbert..Locust Valley, N.Y. 15 ......Morgan A. Wilkins..........Syosset, N.Y. 16 ......Abigail Carrie Okin ........Amagansett, N.Y. 17 ......Katelyn Walker ..............Sands Point, N.Y. 18 ......Amanda Allison Foo ......Manhasset, N.Y. 19 ......Julia Sherwood Dudley ..Southampton, N.Y. 20 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 21 ......Morgan Voulo ................East Setauket, N.Y. 22 ......Melissa Cooney ............Manhasset, N.Y. 23 ......Risha Malhotra ..............Syosset, N.Y. 24 ......Adele Sukhov ................Westbury, N.Y. 25 ......Julia Kielan....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 26 ......Rachel Arbitman ............Hewlett, N.Y. 27 ......Victoria Anna Bialczak ..New Hyde Park, N.Y. 28 ......Alexa Lynn Bracco ........Freeport, N.Y. 29 ......Danah Han ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 30 ......Steaphanie Petras ........Manhasset, N.Y. 31 ......Josephine Winters ........Elmont, N.Y. 32 ......Elena Vlamakis ..............Garden City, N.Y. 33 ......Maryam Ahmad ............Albertson, N.Y. 34 ......Rory Gallaher ................East Hampton, N.Y. 35 ......Allison Coben ................Massapequa, N.Y. 36 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ............Oceanside, N.Y. 37 ......Angela Chi ....................Kings Park, N.Y. 38 ......Alexa Susan Goetz ........Greenlawn, N.Y. 39 ......Kerri Leah Goldfuss ......Westbury, N.Y. 40 ......Amanda Mintz ..............Sag Harbor, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name............................City 1 ........Lauren Livingston..........Sands Point, N.Y. 2 ........Nikaylah Williams ..........Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 3 ........Julia Khan ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 4 ........Julia Ciardullo ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 5 ........Elena Nastasi ................Bayville, N.Y. 6 ........Vanessa L. Scott............Dix Hills, N.Y. 7 ........Lexee Taylor Shapiro ....Syosset, N.Y. 8 ........Michele Sheila Lehat ....Great Neck, N.Y. 9 ........Aidan Owens ................Manhasset, N.Y. 10 ......Michelle Haykin ............Great Neck, N.Y. 11 ......Sarah Seeman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 12 ......Brittany Burke ..............Garden City, N.Y. 13 ......Sophie Grace Wilson......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 14 ......Brynn Maris April ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ......Danielle Mirabella..........Wantagh, N.Y. 16 ......Rosa LaCorte ................Merrick, N.Y. 17 ......Michelle N. Carnovale....Massapequa, N.Y. 18 ......Courtney B. Kowalsky ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 19 ......Ariel Natalie Eisenberg ..Valley Stream, N.Y. 20 ......Eva Rosalia Petersen ....Bridgehampton, N.Y. 21 ......Laura Jean Halsey ........Westhampton, N.Y. 22 ......Ellen Nicole Huhulea......Rockville Centre, N.Y. 23 ......Lauren B. Dolowich ......Jericho, N.Y. 24 ......Alana Weitz ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 25 ......Ryann Moelis ................Hewlett, N.Y. 26 ......Kaysha Forbes ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 27 ......Celeste Rose Matute......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 28 ......Ayesha Jagi Chhugani ..Roslyn, N.Y.


LONG 29 ......Shannon Marie Mullins ..Oceanside, N.Y. 30 ......Courtney A. Digia ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 31 ......Cecilia Combemale........Bridgehampton, N.Y. 32 ......Tracey Rosenlicht ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 33 ......Mallie Feldman..............Woodbury, N.Y. 34 ......Emily Kate Shutman ......Huntington, N.Y. 35 ......Nicole Damaghi ............Kings Point, N.Y. 36 ......Nicole Vassalle ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 37 ......Stacy Denbaum ............Syosset, N.Y. 38 ......Denise Vollmer ..............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 39 ......Sofiya Tumanova ..........Middle Island, N.Y. 40 ......Celeste Wang Traub ......Jericho, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name............................City 1 ........Lauren Ann Livingston ..Sands Point, N.Y. 2 ........Hannah Goldman ..........West Hempstead, N.Y. 3 ........Nicholle Torres ..............North Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Bridget Elaine Harding ..Northport, N.Y. 5 ........Emma R. Brezel ............Port Washington, N.Y. 6 ........Aimee N. Manfredo........Shoreham, N.Y. 7 ........Kristen Bomkamp..........Northport, N.Y. 8 ........Erica Bundrick ..............Mattituck, N.Y. 9 ........Rhea Malhotra ..............Syosset, N.Y. 10 ......Lara Fishbane................Commack, N.Y. 11 ......Julia Ciardullo ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 12 ......Mary C. Harding ............Northport, N.Y. 13 ......Katharine Brandow........East Northport, N.Y. 14 ......Alexa Graham................Garden City, N.Y. 15 ......Michele Sheila Lehat ....Great Neck, N.Y. 16 ......Emilie Rees ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 17 ......Brittany Burke ..............Garden City, N.Y. 18 ......Jennifer Glukhman ........Syosset, N.Y. 19 ......Danielle Lapierre ..........Hicksville, N.Y. 20 ......Olivia Marie Ammirati ....Halesite, N.Y. 21 ......Angelika Rothberg ........Centerport, N.Y. 22 ......Ruth Freilich ..................Lawrence, N.Y. 23 ......Holly Hubsher................Sands Point, N.Y. 24 ......Taylor Brent ..................Shoreham, N.Y. 25 ......Rachel Gastaldo ............Syosset, N.Y. 26 ......Stefanie Ebo..................Sayville, N.Y. 27 ......Rithika Reddy ................Syosset, N.Y. 28 ......Laura Torsiello ..............Bayport, N.Y. 29 ......Lauren Difazio ..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 30 ......Morgan Herrmann ........Garden City, N.Y. 31 ......Stephanie Nakash ........Great Neck, N.Y. 32 ......Shannon Marie Mullins ..Oceanside, N.Y. 33 ......Alexandra Linde ............Melville, N.Y. 34 ......Karishma Tank ..............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 35 ......Alexandra Linder ..........Sands Point, N.Y. 36 ......Nikaylah Williams ..........Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 37 ......Hannah Finger ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 38 ......Brianna Biancardi ..........Merrick, N.Y. 39 ......Amanda Luper ..............Melville, N.Y. 40 ......Catherine Bartlett ..........Wainscott, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name............................City 1 ........Veronika Paikin..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ........Hannah Goldman ..........West Hempstead, N.Y. 3 ........Erica Bundrick ..............Mattituck, N.Y. 4 ........Nicholle Torres ..............North Hills, N.Y. 5 ........Jennifer C. Ferguson......Franklin Square, N.Y. 6 ........Carly Siegel ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 7 ........Alyssa D. Rosello ..........Garden City, N.Y. 8 ........Courtney Sokol ..............Floral Park, N.Y. 9 ........Jaclyn Mary Cartwright..Deer Park, N.Y. 10 ......Yuliya V. Astapova ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 11 ......Cameron Moskol ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 12 ......Claudia M. Ruiz ............Glen Head, N.Y. 13 ......Kate C. Weidenman ......Syosset, N.Y. 14 ......Mary C. Harding ............Northport, N.Y. 15 ......Taylor Wilkins ................Syosset, N.Y. 16 ......Robin Mehta..................Manhasset, N.Y. 17 ......Amy Ginny Naula ..........East Hampton, N.Y. 18 ......Rachel Gastaldo ............Syosset, N.Y.

ISLAND

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 07/27/11)

BOYS

Sectional Boys 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 7 ........Niles Ghaffar ................Massapequa, N.Y. 8 ........Cannon Kingsley............Northport, N.Y. 10 ......Neel Raj ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12 ......Sujay Sharma................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 16 ......Steven Well Sun ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 18 ......Billy Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 19 ......Spencer Brachman........Commack, N.Y. 23 ......Benjamin Grossman ......Sands Point, N.Y. 25 ......Oliver Worth ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 28 ......Abhinay Raj Srivstava ....Melville, N.Y. 31 ......Maxwell Moadel ............Brookville, N.Y. 36 ......Jeffrey McDonnell ........Glen Cove, N.Y. 50 ......Robert Steven Bellino ....Huntington, N.Y. 55 ......Wiktor Marek Figiel ......Sea Cliff, N.Y. 64 ......Zachary Reid Berlin ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 82 ......Kabir Rajpal ..................Syosset, N.Y. 84 ......Karan K. Amin................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 91 ......Alec Hunter Barres ........Old Westbury, N.Y. 99 ......Alexander Karman ........Port Washington, N.Y. 104 ....Daniel Chikvashvili ........Syosset, N.Y. 105 ....Arjun Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 108 ....Sohrob Yavari ................Syosset, N.Y. 112 ....Trevor Lanigan ..............North Babylon, N.Y. 123 ....Bradford J. Lin ..............Kings Point, N.Y. 124 ....Evan Brady....................Glen Head, N.Y. 126 ....William McCreery ..........Albertson, N.Y. 129 ....Torin Suner Bograd........Huntington, N.Y. 133 ....Luke Torel Karniewich ..Glen Head, N.Y. 134 ....Michael Bruck ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 137 ....Jonathan DeGroot..........Southampton, N.Y. 139 ....Jaerd M. Phillips............Plainview, N.Y. 141 ....Omar Matute ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 144 ....Jacob Rusinek ..............East Hills, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 3 ........Finbar Talcott ................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 6 ........Alan Delman..................Great Neck, N.Y. 8 ........Ryan Goetz....................Greenlawn, N.Y. 9 ........Sean Patrick..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 10 ......Keegan James Morris....Franklin Square, N.Y. 12 ......Daniel Shleimovich........Merrick, N.Y. 20 ......Brian Shi ......................Jericho, N.Y. 23 ......Patrick F. Maloney ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ......Yuval Solomon ..............Plainview, N.Y. 29 ......Rajan Jai Vohra..............Glen Head, N.Y. 35 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito ......Syosset, N.Y. 43 ......Ronald P. Hohmann........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 46 ......Michael Medvedev ........Oceanside, N.Y. 51 ......Neel Raj ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 66 ......Pete Siozios ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 68 ......Thomas Korossy............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 71 ......Cannon Kingsley............Northport, N.Y. 73 ......Benjamin Grossman ......Sands Point, N.Y. 74 ......James Kyrkanides ........Stony Brook, N.Y. 78 ......Daniel Weitz ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 80 ......Mark Julian Baker ........North Baldwin, N.Y. 83 ......Billy G. Suarez ..............Huntington, N.Y. 88 ......Tyler Spencer Bloch ......Jericho, N.Y. 89 ......Gardner Howe ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 90 ......Steven Well Sun ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 96 ......Eli Grossman ................Woodbury, N.Y. 101 ....Titus Syon Sung ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 103 ....Amani Siddiqui ..............West Babylon, N.Y. 117 ....Austin Egna ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 118 ....Alexander Reiley............Manorville, N.Y. 119 ....Lucas Larese DeSanto ..Southampton, N.Y. 124 ....Timothy Serignese ........Port Washington, N.Y. 125 ....Jake Grossman ............Sands Point, N.Y.

RANKINGS

126 ....Brady Berman ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 127 ....Michael Jaklitsch ..........South Setauket, N.Y. 129 ....Ben Snow......................Water Mill, N.Y. 131 ....Max Egna ......................Port Washington, N.Y. 133 ....Matthew Porges ............Sands Point, N.Y. 137 ....Nicolas Demaria ............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 139 ....Justin Ilan Lempert........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 143 ....George Kaslow ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 144 ....Sujay Sharma................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 3 ........Brenden Andrew Volk ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Alexander Lebedev ........Island Park, N.Y. 9 ........Daniel Grunberger ........Great Neck, N.Y. 17 ......Lubomir T. Cuba ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 26 ......Eric Wagner ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 29 ......Bryant J. Born ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 41 ......Colin Francis Sacco ......Brightwaters, N.Y. 42 ......Palmer T. Clare ..............North Bellmore, N.Y. 43 ......Athell Patrick Bennett ....Valley Stream, N.Y. 47 ......Stephen Gruppuso ........Bayport, N.Y. 55 ......Zacarias Imperial ..........Garden City Park, N.Y. 59 ......Cory Seltman ................Smithtown, N.Y. 60 ......Chris Kuhnle..................Shoreham, N.Y. 61 ......William Scribner Bader ..Water Mill, N.Y. 65 ......Travis Leaf ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 66 ......Sean Mullins ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 68 ......Joshua Gordon ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 78 ......Jordan Bennett..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 83 ......Brian Hoffarth................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 87 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ....Massapequa, N.Y. 89 ......Brandon Eric Remer ......Hewlett, N.Y. 97 ......Andy Zhou ....................Commack, N.Y. 99 ......Finbar Talcott ................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 107 ....Nicholas Kevin Fox ........Commack, N.Y. 108 ....Nikhil Raj ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 112 ....Raizada Bhavin Vaid ......Old Westbury, N.Y. 113 ....Justin Park ....................Huntington, N.Y. 122 ....Sean Patrick..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 125 ....David Binler ..................East Northport, N.Y. 126 ....Evan Kober ....................Wantagh, N.Y. 127 ....Alex Grossman ..............Sands Point, N.Y. 132 ....Dylan Granat ................Woodbury, N.Y. 134 ....Dennis Uspensky ..........Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 137 ....Braddock Chow ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 142 ....Joseph D’orazio ............Saint James, N.Y. 144 ....Michael DeNigris ..........Islip, N.Y. 147 ....Kevin Alec Kowalsky......Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 1 ........Noah B. Rubin ..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 5 ........Aidan Talcott..................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 6 ........Samuel Lam..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 7 ........Philip Daniel Antohi........Glen Head, N.Y. 8 ........Josh Silverstein ............Great Neck, N.Y. 10 ......Vihar Shah ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 14 ......Ethan Bogard ................Lido Beach, N.Y. 17 ......Douglas Notaris ............Wantagh, N.Y. 21 ......Conor Dauer ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 29 ......Daniel Grunberger ........Great Neck, N.Y. 30 ......Brandon T. Stone ..........Melville, N.Y. 35 ......Jeremy Dubin................Southampton, N.Y. 36 ......Zachary A. Lessen ........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 42 ......Alex Sacher ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 47 ......Tyler J. Hoffman ............Sayville, N.Y. 52 ......Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ....Greenvale, N.Y. 54 ......Zain Ali ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 55 ......John P. D’Alessandro ....Northport, N.Y. 58 ......Matthew R. Demichiel ..Hewlett, N.Y. 60 ......Conor Mullins ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 64 ......Lamar Remy..................Roslyn, N.Y. 70 ......Alexander Lebedev ........Island Park, N.Y. 71 ......Jared R. Halstrom..........Bellmore, N.Y. 72 ......Jonathan Paris ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

75 ......Mark Temporal ..............Carle Place, N.Y. 87 ......Joshua Gordon ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 108 ....Daniel Wong ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 109 ....Brian W. Slivonik............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 114 ....Ian Baranowski..............Syosset, N.Y. 120 ....Erik Ujvari......................Hauppauge, N.Y. 121 ....Kyle Alper ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 124 ....Jeffrey Cherkin..............Melville, N.Y. 127 ....Ian Combemale ............Bridgehampton, N.Y. 135 ....Brett Edelblum ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 136 ....Benjamin Mermelstein ....Northport, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 2 ........Josh M. Levine ..............Syosset, N.Y. 4 ........Andrew Yaraghi ............Mill Neck, N.Y. 5 ........Bert Vancura..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7 ........Eric Rubin......................Lido Beach, N.Y. 10 ......Matthew O. Barry ..........Lido Beach, N.Y. 15 ......Noah B. Rubin ..............Merrick, N.Y. 18 ......Jensen H. Reiter ............Syosset, N.Y. 23 ......Howard J. Weiss............Great Neck, N.Y. 31 ......Samuel Lam..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 32 ......Brendan Henry ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 35 ......Ofir Solomon ................Plainview, N.Y. 39 ......Alexander Schidlovsky ....Sea Cliff, N.Y. 44 ......Jonahiby Tauil ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 46 ......Alex Tropiano ................Laurel Hollow, N.Y. 47 ......Kevin A. Katz ................Woodbury, N.Y. 53 ......Alan S. Pleat..................Roslyn, N.Y. 57 ......Eric Ambrosio ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 60 ......David Greenbaum..........Great Neck, N.Y. 66 ......Austin Davidow ............Glen Head, N.Y. 70 ......Eric Sumanaru ..............Middle Island, N.Y. 74 ......Aidan Talcott..................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 79 ......Tyler J. Hoffman ............Sayville, N.Y. 81 ......Sean Jagi Chhugani ......Roslyn, N.Y. 84 ......Zachary Morris ..............Garden City, N.Y. 94 ......Conor A. Dauer ..............Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 97 ......Doron Saraf ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 100 ....Paul Abrudescu ............Great Neck, N.Y. 111 ....Clark D. Ruiz..................Glen Head, N.Y. 117 ....Jacob Mishkin ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 119 ....Jason Hubsher ..............Sands Point, N.Y. 122 ....Darren Reisch................Floral Park, N.Y. 123 ....J. T. Esposito ................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 125 ....Henry D. Lee ................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 138 ....Erik Johann Lobben ......Glen Head, N.Y. 141 ....Jared Drzal....................West Sayville, N.Y. 143 ....Pasha Shapouri ............Albertson, N.Y. 144 ....Andrew O’Connell..........Medford, N.Y. 149 ....Chris Casamassima ......Franklin Square, N.Y.

GIRLS

Sectional Girls 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 2 ........Lea Ma..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 3 ........Francesca Karman ........Port Washington, N.Y. 20 ......Julia Kielan....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 22 ......Merri Kelly ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23 ......Maryam Beshir Ahmad ..Albertson, N.Y. 24 ......Rachel Arbitman ............Hewlett, N.Y. 26 ......Alexa Susan Goetz ........Greenlawn, N.Y. 36 ......Amy Delman..................Great Neck, N.Y. 39 ......Alexa Lynn Bracco ........Freeport, N.Y. 61 ......Allison Cooney ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 69 ......Kira Rose Giordano........Massapequa Park, N.Y. 74 ......Rebecca Suarez ............Huntington, N.Y. 76 ......Madison Li ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 81 ......Morena DeVito ..............Syosset, N.Y. 84 ......Gabriela Sciarrotta ........Woodmere, N.Y. 87 ......Jade Fixon-Owoo ..........Lynbrook, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

53


LONG Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 6 ........Claire Handa..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 12 ......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ..Manorville, N.Y. 19 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ......Glen Head, N.Y. 26 ......Lea Ma..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 28 ......Stephanie Chikvashvili ..Syosset, N.Y. 34 ......Ashley Lessen ..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 36 ......Courtney Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 44 ......Josephine Winters ........Elmont, N.Y. 52 ......Francesca Karman ........Port Washington, N.Y. 57 ......Nicole Kielan ................Valley Stream, N.Y. 58 ......Celeste Wang Traub ......Jericho, N.Y. 62 ......Olivia Rose Scordo ........Glen Head, N.Y. 64 ......Trinity Chow ..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 70 ......Katelyn Walker ..............Sands Point, N.Y. 73 ......Merri Kelly ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 77 ......Abigail Carrie Okin ........Amagansett, N.Y. 84 ......Julia Kielan....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 85 ......Hannah Rosalie Dayton..East Hampton, N.Y. 87 ......Morgan Wilkins..............Syosset, N.Y. 91 ......Emily Kate Shutman ......Huntington, N.Y. 93 ......Theodora Brebenel ........Glen Head, N.Y. 108 ....Ashley Debra Yevdosin ..Hewlett, N.Y. 113 ....Marisa Menist ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 114 ....Alexa Susan Goetz ........Greenlawn, N.Y. 117 ....Marina Hilbert................Locust Valley, N.Y. 122 ....Victoria Anna Bialczak ..New Hyde Park, N.Y. 136 ....Nicole Rezak ................Merrick, N.Y. 140 ....Dasha Dlin ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 145 ....Isabella Rose Smith ......Roslyn, N.Y. 150 ....Elena Vlamakis ..............Garden City, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 4 ........Madison Battaglia..........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 12 ......Alexa Graham................Garden City, N.Y. 13 ......Isabella Pascucci ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 14 ......Shanice Nadia Arthur ....Glen Head, N.Y. 20 ......Morgan Hermann ..........Garden City, N.Y. 27 ......Taylor S. Cosme ............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 35 ......Mia M. Vecchio ..............Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 50 ......Esther Chikvashvili ........Syosset, N.Y. 51 ......Karen A. Serina..............Islip Terrace, N.Y. 62 ......Michele Sheila Lehat ....Great Neck, N.Y. 63 ......Dominique Woinarowski ..Syosset, N.Y. 66 ......Alexandra Lipps ............Roslyn, N.Y. 75 ......Elena Nastasi ................Bayville, N.Y. 82 ......Stephanie Chikvashvili ..Melville, N.Y. 94 ......Vanessa L. Scott............Dix Hills, N.Y. 96 ......Julia Ciardullo ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 98 ......Nikaylah Williams ..........Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 110 ....Rhea Malhotra ..............Syosset, N.Y. 111 ....Celeste Rose Matute......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 126 ....Claire Handa..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 131 ....Lexee Taylor Shapiro ....Syosset, N.Y. 132 ....Julia Khan ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 136 ....Courtney B. Kowalsky ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 140 ....Katie Jane Cirella ..........Woodbury, N.Y. 144 ....Brynn Maris April ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 148 ....Sophie Grace Wilson......Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 13 ......Sophie R. Barnard..........Mill Neck, N.Y. 20 ......Ola Mally ......................Franklin Square, N.Y. 26 ......Vivian Cheng ................Woodbury, N.Y. 37 ......Nicholle Torres ..............North Hills, N.Y. 43 ......Paulina Tafler ................Oceanside, N.Y. 53 ......Alison Wang ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 54 ......Claudia M. Ruiz ............Glen Head, N.Y. 55 ......Sunaina Vohra ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 58 ......Sara Finger....................St. James, N.Y. 59 ......Rachel Gastaldo ............Syosset, N.Y.

54

ISLAND

RANKINGS

62 ......Rithika D. Reddy............Syosset, N.Y. 64 ......Mia M. Vecchio ..............Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 70 ......Cameron Leigh Moskol..Wantagh, N.Y. 73 ......Zenat Rashidzada..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 74 ......Yuliya V. Astapova ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 75 ......Olivia C. Funk ................Hicksville, N.Y. 80 ......Aimee N. Manfredo........Shoreham, N.Y. 86 ......Gabriella Nicole Leon ....Woodmere, N.Y. 90 ......Jennifer C. Ferguson......Franklin Square, N.Y. 94 ......Bridget Elaine Harding ..Northport, N.Y. 97 ......Bianca Posa ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 99 ......Madison Battaglia..........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 104 ....Emma R. Brezel ............Port Washington, N.Y. 106 ....Julia Zhuang ................Great Neck, N.Y. 107 ....Ruth Freilich ..................Lawrence, N.Y. 119 ....Brittany Burke ..............Garden City, N.Y. 122 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur ....Glen Head, N.Y. 138 ....Alexa Graham................Garden City, N.Y. 139 ....Isabella Pascucci ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 144 ....Karen A. Serina..............Islip Terrace, N.Y.

809 ....Neel Raj ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 882 ....Yuval Solomon ..............Plainview, N.Y. 971 ....Pete Siozios ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

GIRLS

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

Rank Name............................City 94 ......Claire Handa..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 284 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi ......Glen Head, N.Y. 353 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ..Manorville, N.Y. 431 ....Courtney B. Kowalsky ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 443 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili ..Syosset, N.Y. 470 ....Lea Ma..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 484 ....Ashley Lessen ..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 556 ....Francesca Karman ........Port Washington, N.Y. 558 ....Merri Kelly ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 619 ....Celeste Wang Traub ......Jericho, N.Y. 684 ....Josephine Winters ........Elmont, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

Rank Name............................City 6 ........Katherine Yau ................Manhasset, N.Y. 7 ........Hannah L. Camhi ..........Woodbury, N.Y. 11 ......Shelby Talcott................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 28 ......Morgan Feldman ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 29 ......Sophie Barnard..............Mill neck, N.Y. 37 ......Stephanie Loutsenko ....Bellmore, N.Y. 43 ......Vivian Cheng ................Woodbury, N.Y. 47 ......Julia Elbaba ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 53 ......Theresa Smith ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 56 ......Taylor A. Diffley..............Hampton Bays, N.Y. 58 ......Missy Edelblum ............Roslyn, N.Y. 62 ......Nicholle Torres ..............North Hills, N.Y. 67 ......Ludmila Yamus ..............Melville, N.Y. 75 ......Alison Wang ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 78 ......Melissa Carlay ..............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 80 ......Claudia M. Ruiz ............Glen Head, N.Y. 85 ......Ola Mally ......................Franklin Square, N.Y. 92........Samantha Rosca-Sipot ....Malverne, N.Y. 95 ......Carly Siegel ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 100 ....Ashley Sandler ..............Jericho, N.Y. 104 ....Erica Bundrick ..............Mattituck, N.Y. 106 ....Lila B. Martz ..................Long Beach, N.Y. 109 ....Sunaina Vohra ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 111 ....Mia M. Vecchio ..............Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 117 ....Jessica Nowak ..............Huntington, N.Y. 138 ....Jacqueline Raynor ........Garden City, N.Y. 140 ....Devlin-Ann Ammendola....Massapequa, N.Y. 147 ....Veronika Paikin..............Valley Stream, N.Y.

Rank Name............................City 2 ........Noah B. Rubin ..............Merrick, N.Y. 42 ......Aidan Talcott..................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 50 ......Samuel Lam..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 76 ......Vihar Shah ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 93 ......Josh Silverstein ............Great Neck, N.Y. 115 ....Philip Daniel Antohi........Glen Head, N.Y. 192 ....Ethan Bogard ................Lido Beach, N.Y. 228 ....Douglas Notaris ............Wantagh, N.Y. 275 ....Conor A. Dauer ..............Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 333 ....Alex C. Sacher ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 351 ....Brandon T. Stone ..........Melville, N.Y. 377 ....Zachary A. Lessen ........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 522 ....Daniel Grunberger ........Great Neck, N.Y. 554 ....Lamar Remy..................Roslyn, N.Y. 645 ....Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ....Greenvale, N.Y. 659 ....Conor Mullins ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 734 ....Tyler J. Hoffman ............Sayville, N.Y. 794 ....John P. D’Allesandro ......Northport, N.Y. 847 ....Stanislav Korshunov ......Oceanside, N.Y. 884 ....Joshua Gordon ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 938 ....Jared R. Halstrom..........Bellmore, N.Y. 987 ....Jeremy Dubin................Southampton, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 08/03/11)

BOYS

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 101 ....Sean Patrick..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 102 ....Ryan Goetz....................Greenlawn, N.Y. 109 ....Finbar Talcott ................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 128 ....Alan Delman..................Great Neck, N.Y. 195 ....Daniel Shleimovich........Merrick, N.Y. 207 ....Brian Shi ......................Jericho, N.Y. 209 ....Rajan Jai Vohra..............Glen Head, N.Y. 251 ....Keegan James Morris....Franklin Square, N.Y. 320 ....Patrick Maloney ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 402 ....Ronald P. Hohmann........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 416 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito ......Syosset, N.Y. 423 ....Michael Medvedev ........Oceanside, N.Y. 664 ....Daniel Weitz ..................Roslyn, N.Y.

Rank Name............................City 36 ......Brenden Andrew Volk ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 52 ......Alexander Lebedev ........Island Park, N.Y. 68 ......Daniel Grunberger ........Great Neck, N.Y. 186 ....Lubomir T. Cuba ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 250 ....Bryant J. Born ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 301 ....Eric Wagner ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 483 ....Dennis Uspensky ..........Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 500 ....Colin Francis Sacco ......Brightwaters, N.Y. 528 ....Palmer T. Clare ..............North Bellmore, N.Y. 645 ....Athell Patrick Bennett ....Valley Stream, N.Y. 809 ....Brian Hoffarth................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 931 ....Finbar Talcott ................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 977 ....Travis Leaf ....................Dix Hills, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 49 ......Josh M. Levine ..............Syosset, N.Y. 92 ......Matthew O. Barry ..........Lido Beach, N.Y. 104 ....Andrew S. Yaraghi ........Mill Neck, N.Y. 108 ....Eric Rubin......................Lido Beach, N.Y. 125 ....Bert Vancura..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 175 ....Jensen Reiter ................Syosset, N.Y. 188 ....Noah B. Rubin ..............Merrick, N.Y. 211 ....Howard J. Weiss............Great Neck, N.Y. 453 ....Samuel Lam..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 580 ....Zachary Morris ..............Garden City, N.Y. 595 ....Eric Ambrosio ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 613 ....Alex Tropiano ................Laurel Hollow, N.Y. 636 ....Alexander Schidlovsky ..Sea Cliff, N.Y. 664 ....Aidan Talcott..................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 670 ....Jonahiby Tauil ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 739 ....Brendan Henry ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 750 ....Kevin Katz ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 937 ....Lamar Remy..................Roslyn, N.Y.

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 123 ....Madison Battaglia..........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 184 ....Isabella Pascucci ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 211 ....Alexa Graham................Garden City, N.Y. 302 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur ....Glen Head, N.Y. 331 ....Taylor Cosme ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 442 ....Morgan Herrmann ........Garden City, N.Y. 549 ....Mia M. Vecchio ..............Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 755 ....Karen A. Serina..............Islip Terrace, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 133 ....Sophie R. Barnard..........Mill Neck, N.Y. 247 ....Vivian Cheng ................Woodbury, N.Y. 327 ....Ola Mally ......................Franklin Square, N.Y. 702 ....Sunaina Vohra ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 782 ....Paulina Tafler ................Oceanside, N.Y. 963 ....Alison Wang ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 988 ....Nicholle Torres ..............North Hills, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 70 ......Julia Elbaba ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 84 ......Hannah L. Camhi ..........Woodbury, N.Y. 106 ....Katherine Yau ................Manhasset, N.Y. 182 ....Shelby Talcott................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 353 ....Morgan Feldman ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 493 ....Stephanie Loutsenko ....Bellmore, N.Y. 664 ....Theresa Smith ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 812 ....Samantha Rosca-Sipot ..Malverne, N.Y. 828 ....Vivan Cheng ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 926 ....Ludmila Yamus ..............Deer Park, N.Y. 978 ....Jacqueline Raynor ........Garden City, N.Y. 979 ....Taylor A. Diffley..............Hampton Bays , N.Y.

Long Island Rankings Sponsored by

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


USTA/Long Island Region 2011

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. SEPTEMBER 2011 Friday-Sunday, September 2-4 L1B Long Beach Tennis Center Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (14-12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles; $27.38 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Saturday-Monday, September 3-5 USTA Regional Tournament Segment (Glen Cove) Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: BG (14-12)s, FIC BG (14-12)d, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $102.63 per player for one event, $103.13 for two events, additional fees apply for three or more (deadline for entries is Thursday, Aug. 4) For more information, call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, September 9-11 L3 Sportime Lynbrook “UPS” Championships Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Unranked BG (12-10)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (646) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, September 16-18 L1B Sportime Syosset Championships Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (12-10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, September 9-11 & 16-18 L1B Westhampton Challenger Westhampton Beach Tennis and Sport 86 Depot Road • Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (16-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 727-6066.

Friday-Sunday, September 16-18 Eastern Athletic Club Mixed-Doubles Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A • Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: X (Op)d, FRLC Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $45.65 (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 2 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 & Friday-Saturday, September 30-October 1 L1 RWTTC Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Robbie Wagner Training 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G (18)s, FIC; G (18)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.50 for singles, $28 for doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 & Friday-Saturday, September 30-October 1 L1 Point Set Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix B (16)s, FIC; B (16)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles; $28 per player doubles (additional $25 for qualifying or those accepted to main draw. Deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323.

Friday-Sunday, September 16-18 L3 Huntington Eastern UPS Championships Monday, September 5 Huntington Indoor Tennis L3 Eastern Athletic Club Labor Day Round Robin 100 Broadway Street • Huntington Station, N.Y. Eastern Athletic Clubs Divisions: Novice BG (18-10)s, RR 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A • Blue Point, N.Y. Surface Type: Unknown Divisions: Novice, BG (14-12)s, RR Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Fri- Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 Surface Type: Hard Indoor day, Sept. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) & Friday-Sunday, September 30- October 2 Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is For more information, call (631) 421-0040. L1 PWTA Eastern Designated Closed Championships Monday, Aug. 22 at 9:00 p.m.) Level 4 FIC Friday-Sunday, September 16-18 For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, September 9-1 Port Washington Tennis Academy L1B Long Beach Fall Challenger L1B Long Beach Tennis Center Championships 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, N.Y. Friday-Sunday, September 9-11 Long Beach Tennis Center Long Beach Tennis Center Divisions: Grand Prix G (16)s, FIC; G (16)d, SE L1 Muttontown Fall Championships 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Surface Type: Unknown Charles Wang Campus Athletic Fields Tennis Courts Divisions: Challenger BG (18-16)sd, SE Divisions: Challenger BG (10)s, SE Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles; $28 per player dou6140 Northern Boulevard • Muttontown, N.Y. Surface Type: Unknown Surface Type: Unknown Divisions: Championships BG (18, 14)s, SE Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles, $28 per player dou- bles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, bles (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 883-6425. Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Fri- Aug. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 For more information, call (516) 432-6060. day, Aug. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) & Friday-Saturday, September 30-October 1 Friday-Sunday, September 16-18 For more information, call (917) 991-0088. L1 Sportime Lynbrook Eastern Designated Closed Friday-Sunday, September 9-11 L1B Atlantic Beach Grand Challenger Championships Level 4 FIC Huntington Men’s Open & M25 Singles Atlantic Beach Tennis Center Friday-Sunday, September 9-11 Sportime Tennis Lynbrook Huntington Indoor Tennis 60 The Plaza • Atlantic Beach, N.Y. L2R Sportime Syosset Championships 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. 100 Broadway Street • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (14)s, SE Sportime Syosset Divisions: Grand Prix G (12)s, FIC; G (12)d, SE Divisions: Ranked M (Op, 25)s Surface Type: Clay 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Surface Type: Unknown Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is FriDivisions: Intermediate BG (14-12)s, SE Entry Fee: $50 per player singles, $25 per player doubles Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Fri- day, Sept. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) Surface Type: Unknown (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) day, Sept. 2 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, For more information, call (646) 852-2283. For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Aug. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 For more information, call (516) 364-2727. & Friday-Sunday, September 30-October 2 Saturday-Monday, September 10-12 Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 L1 Sportime Bethpage Eastern Designated Closed L20 Atlantic Beach Mayor’s Cup & Friday-Sunday, September 30- October 2 Friday-Sunday, September 9-11 Championships, Level 4 FIC Atlantic Beach Tennis Center L1 Point Set Championships L1 Eastern Athletic Club Championships Sportime Tennis Bethpage 60 The Plaza • Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Point Set Indoor Racquet Eastern Athletic Clubs 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (14-12)sd, SE 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A • Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix B (12)s, FIC; B (12)d, SE Surface Type: Clay Divisions: Championships BG (18)s, SE Divisions: Challenger BG (18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles, $27.38 per Surface Type: Unknown Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.50 per player (deadline for entries is Fri- player doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 29 Entry Fee: $54.25 for singles, $28 for doubles (deadline Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Frifor entries is Monday, Sept. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) at 1:00 p.m.) day, Sept. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) day, Sept. 2 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. For more information, call (516) 239-3388. For more information, call (516) 536-2323. For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, September 9-11 L3 Deer Park Eastern UPS Championships Deer Park Tennis Center Inc. 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (18-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 667-3476.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

55


USTA/Long Island Region 2011

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 L20 Atlantic Beach Championships Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (16)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Friday-Sunday, September 23-25 L3 LBTC Eastern UPS Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG (18-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, September 30 -October 2, 2011 L2O Atlantic Beach Mayor’s Cup Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (12)sd, SE; BG (16-12)d, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $45 per player singles, $25 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 16 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388. Friday-Sunday, September 30-October 2 L2O Eastern Athletic Club BP Championships Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (16-14)s, FRLC Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.50 (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, September 30-October 2 L1B Sportime at Roslyn Championships Sportime Roslyn P.O. Box 1 Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger B (14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

56

OCTOBER 2011 Saturday-Sunday, October 1-2 L3 Sportime Syosset Eastern UPS Championships Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (14-12)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Sept. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, October 7-9 Long Beach Tennis Center Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (Op)sd, SE; NM (3.0-4.0)sd, SE; NW (3.0-3.5)s, SE; NW (3.0-4.0)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles, $27.38 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 3 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, October 7-9 L2R East End Westhampton B&T Doubles Championships Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (16-12)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $27.38 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060. Friday-Sunday, October 7-9 & 14-16 L1 Huntington Indoor Championships Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Friday-Sunday, October 7-9 L3 Long Beach TC Eastern UPS Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (18-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Saturday, October 8 L3 Eastern Athletic Club Round Robin Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG (12-10)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Sept. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Saturday-Sunday, October 22-23 QuickStart 8 & U and 10 & U Sportime Bethpage Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue. Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start: BG (10-8)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, October 14-16 L2R Long Island Regional LBTC Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate G (18-10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 383-2692.

Friday-Sunday, October 28-30 L2 Eastern Athletic Blue Point Boys Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B (16-12)s, FRLC Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, October 14-16 L2R Long Island Region Deer Park Tennis Deer Park Tennis Center Inc. 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B (18-10)s Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 667-3476.

Friday-Sunday, October 28-30 L1B Long Beach Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG (14-12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles; $27.38 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, October 21-23 L2 Eastern Athletic Club Blue Point Girls Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate G (16-12)s, FRLC Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, October 21-23 L1B Long Beach Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG (18-16)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles; $27.38 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2011 • LITennisMag.com


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Long Island Tennis Magazine - September/October 2011  

Long Island Tennis Magazine - September/October 2011

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