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LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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By Luke Jensen Long Island! Spring is here and nothing says spring to a tennis player more than playing in the mud … tennis slang for playing on clay, and with the French Open around the corner, I thought it would be good to catch up on our clay court play book. There is a ton of clay on Long Island, so watching the French Open and those firstclass mud rollers play serious dirt ball can make us all better. The first thing I need you to think about before you play on the clay this season is your equipment. Make sure you have some seriously good treads on those sneakers to grip this slippery surface. Those worn down, hard court shoes may feel fine, but if you take them on the clay court, you will look like Roadrunner spinning out of control. Go into the pro shop and have your sticks restrung about five to seven lbs. looser. The heavier conditions will demand more pop and performance from your stick. Fast courts need a tighter and more controlled string job, while slower courts need a more loosely strung frame for more power. Now the mental side of playing in the mud ... I love clay because it is a game of thought and a game of will over your opponent. On faster surfaces, one big shot can be the difference. On clay, a series of well-placed shots is what is needed to win points. A clay court player is a steady and smart player. Use a combination of power and finesse play to win on the slow surface. When you watch the French Open, watch how the European and South American players slide into their shots, while the U.S. players slide after they hit their shots. This is

the main reason Americans have struggled at the French Open. Tennis is a game of movement, but also a game of recovery after the shot is hit. The international players grow up on clay and learn how to move to and recover from shots on red clay at a very young age. Our green clay is a fast cousin of the slower red clay, but not the same. Use the great TV coverage of the French Open to learn how to play and move in the mud! Here’s a secret I have never told anyone before … my brother Murphy and I won the French Open Doubles Title in 1993, and with Patrick McEnroe, I won a French Open Junior Doubles Title in 1984. I had the same movement issues all U.S. players have … the secret was that I wore my Wimbledon Grass Court shoes with nubs on the bottom for traction and that gave me a huge edge. Today, grasscourt shoes are not allowed on clay, but I was long

gone off the tour when the officials got wise to what I was doing!!! Until next time … winners go for winners, and I want you going for the lines! G Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen is head coach of the Syracuse University Women’s Tennis Team. Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or email lbjensen@syr.edu.

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LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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May/June 2011 Volume 3, Number 3

Cover story New York Sportimes Look to Build Off Successful 2010 Season and Gear Up for a Summer of World TeamTennis in New York

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

The New York Sportimes are coming off a successful 2010 season where they made it to the 2010 World TeamTennis finals as they look forward to a summer of action featuring the sport’s marquee stars at Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island.

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 david@litennismag.com Emilie Katz Marketing and Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 emilie@litennismag.com Andrew T. Berman Vice President/Sales (516) 409-4444, ext. 333 andrew@litennismag.com

Photo Credit: New York Sportimes

72 Are We Having Fun Yet? By Edward Wolfarth

Features 3 Seven Questions That Will Change Your Game By Rob Polishook Author Rob Polishook discusses what you can take away from a tennis lesson and how to apply it as you increase your skill set.

5 Classic Rivalries Provide Nostalgic Entertainment at MSG By Michael Sarro A look back at the night of tennis legends at Madison Square Garden as Ivan Lendl faced off against John McEnroe and Pete Sampras faced Andre Agassi in the BNP Paribas Showdown.

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 eric@litennismag.com

8 ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES: Keeping Me in the Game By Jeffrey A. Greene

Domenica Trafficanda Managing Art Director

14 It’s May … Here Comes the Outdoor Tennis Leagues on Long Island

Karen Krizman Senior Account Executive (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 karen@litennismag.com Jon Blake Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 jonb@litennismag.com Tara Cook Billing Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Eric Meditz Editorial Contributor

Anthony Pastecchi Intern

Brent Shearer Editorial Contributor

Michael Sarro Intern

Jenna Poczik Intern

Gary Simeone Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@litennismag.com.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or email david@litennismag.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@longislandtennismag.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

Author Jeffrey A. Greene explains how his playing career has continued and has been revitalized after discovering ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES tennis.

By Jonathan Klee Jonathan Klee discusses the 2011 outdoor league as another season is upon us.

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Columns 3 The Jensen Zone By Luke Jensen Current Syracuse Women’s Tennis Coach and tennis great, Luke Jensen discusses playing tennis on a clay court on the eve of the 2011 French Open.

12 The Sand Pit As the summer draws near, so does local beach tennis action as Long Beach, N.Y. preps for another season of beach tennis.

22 Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller Kathy Miller discusses the upcoming Adult, Senior and Super Senior Leagues with some important rule changes.

25 USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region Highlights from recent USTA/Eastern-Long Island events.

16 2011 French Open Preview By Michael Sarro A look at the field of contenders for the 2011 French Open at Roland Garros.

18 The Tennis Community Comes Out in Droves for the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo Nearly 1,500 attendees visited nearly 40 exhibitors as Long Island Tennis Magazine presented its 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo at Farmingdale State College.

20 A Star is Born By Alan Fleischman Alan Fleischman discusses the rise of Merrick, N.Y. native, Scott Lipsky, from his start at Bellmore JFK High School to rise in the pro ranks.

29 Self-Reliance By Steven Kaplan Steven Kaplan takes a look at processing the bombardment of information you receive as a player in order to better your game.

30 The Battle of the Grips By Roman Prokes Racket technician Roman Prokes discusses finding the ideal grip for your tennis racket.

34 A Guide to Long Island’s Top Tennis Apparel Stores A look at some of the area’s top tennis apparel providers, including: Grand Slam Tennis, MD Tennis, Solow Sports and Topspin Tennis & Fitness.

38 Proper Injury Prevention for an Athlete By Dr. Steve Jonas Dr. Steve Jonas takes a look at properly preparing your body for the rigors of physical activity.

43 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Video Game Review: Top Spin 4

33 Dr. Tom on the Problem of Quitting or Giving Up Easy By Dr. Tom Ferraro Sports Psychologist Dr. Tom Ferraro differentiates those who are winners and those who wave the white flag of defeat.

42 Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Emilie Katz delves into the off-court lives of the sport’s top stars.

62 College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … College Advisors Agree on Everything (Part II) By Ricky Becker In Part II of his series, Ricky Becker chats with former Brown Men’s Tennis Coach Jay Harris of Sportime as the two chat about making the jump to the collegiate ranks.

64 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Literary Corner By Brent Shearer Brent Shearer takes a look at the book, The Tennis Handsome, a novel by Barry Harris.

65 Tips From the Tennis Pro: A Mental Game? By Nicole Melch Nicole Melch takes a closer look at the mental side to the sport of tennis in this month’s “Tips From the Tennis Pro” column.

71 Off the Court Directory 74 Long Island Tennis Club Directory 76 Long Island Rankings Sponsored by Denny’s 79 USTA/Long Island Region 2010 Tournament Schedule

By Michael Sarro Michael Sarro looks at 2K Sports’ latest on-court entry, Top Spin 4.

44 Underrated Players: A Complete Analysis By Miguel Cervantes III 50 How to Stay Motivated By Jay Karl

Jay Karl takes a look at some things that can get you motivated to get off the couch and into a fitness regimen.

51 21st Annual USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region Awards Dinner Program

News Briefs 4 Chris Evert and ESPN’s Mike Greenberg Denied by Locals of

toc

Miguel Cervantes III looks at the controversial and ethical concerns over the USTA’s self-rating system.

Celebrate the accomplishments of the area’s top players over the past year at the 21st Annual USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region Awards Dinner, set for Wednesday, May 11 at the Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y.

67 Chasing the Impossible Dream By Brad Shafran Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2011 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Edward Wolfarth discusses the ideal tennis lesson, mixing in fun with learning the skills of the sport.

Author Brad Shafran discusses his opportunity to play with Hannah Camhi in the U.S. Open National Playoffs for a wild card spot in the main draw of the 2011 U.S. Open.

68 Just for the Love of the Game … It’s All About Me By Lonnie Mitchel

Lonnie Mitchell takes a closer look back at his playing days and a few regrets he may has had.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Wild Card Entry Into the 2011 U.S. Open

29 North Shore Country Club Names Spike Gurney Director of Tennis 36 Sony to Present Wimbledon Finals in 3D

49 Long Island Team of Cohen & Bielik Just Four Wins Away From U.S. Open Main Draw

50 Noah Rubin of Merrick Captures Boys 16s USTA International Spring Championship

70 Longines Hosts Junior Tennis Event at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center


Seven Questions That Will Change Your Game By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC How many of you take lesson after lesson, hoping to learn the latest technique that will give you the edge? And how many of you read all the key tennis publications, looking to glean one or two valuable instructional tips? Most probably answered “yes” to these questions, but what if you could improve your game by simply asking yourself—and thoughtfully answering—a few questions? Would that be worth it to you? In the book Mental Warfare in Tennis— Lessons from a Master by Brad Gilbert and Steve Jamison, Gilbert speaks about the value of identifying your strengths and ensuring that you make them the backbone of your game. With that goal in mind, I have provided below seven questions that will help you to emphasize the posi-

tive, while highlighting areas for development in a purposeful, growth-oriented way. Ask yourself: 1. What am I doing in my game that is working? 2. What is behind my overall success? 3. If I could imagine the ideal game—a situation for which I would strive—what would it look like? 4. What is the difference between where my game is and where I want it to be? 5. What steps do I need to take to address these issues? 6. What resources are available to help me take positive action? 7. When can I start taking action? There are always areas in which both individual players and teams are doing well. By identifying these areas, you can use them as

the foundation on which to build a solid improvement plan. Additionally, by starting with a positive scenario, you are more likely to make changes, and it becomes easier to identify what is missing from the ideal picture. G Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach he works with athletes and teams of all levels. His work focuses on helping athletes gain the mental edge and letting go of blocks which get in the way of peak performance. He is a USTA Zonal Coach and has spoken and been published for the USTA, USPTA and ITA. Additionally, he has conducted workshops nationally and internationally in India and Israel. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail rob@insidethezone or visit www.insidethezone.com.

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Chris Evert and ESPN’s Mike Greenberg Denied by Locals of Wild Card Entry Into the 2011 U.S. Open Credit all photos to Kenneth B. Goldberg Six-time U.S. Open champion Chris Evert and ESPN’s Mike Greenberg came up short in their bid for a wild card into the 2011 U.S. Open, losing their mixed-doubles second round match at the U.S. Open

National Playoffs USTA Eastern Sectional Qualifying Tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Evert and Greenberg lost to a pair of local teaching pros, Bea Bielik, 2002 NCAA singles champion, and Darrin Cohen, former standout at the University of Virginia, 6-1, 6-4. “It has always been Mike’s dream to play in the U.S. Open and I was happy to help him with his dream,” said Evert, who admitted that her partner exceeded her expectations. Evert and Greenberg were eight matches away from reaching the main draw of the 2011 U.S. Open. ESPN’s Mike Greenberg and mixed-doubles partner “Also, I’m impossibly charming,” Chris Evert, pause for a photo with their opponents, said Greenberg to Evert’s point. “You Bea Bielik & Darrin Cohen at the U.S. Open National know, she was my first love, Chris Playoffs/Mixed-Doubles Sectional Qualifying event Evert. I’ll come back every year and

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ESPN’s Mike Greenberg returns a shot in his U.S. Open Qualifying match at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center play in this event, provided I get to team with her. We had a great time.” After dropping the first set 1-6, Greenberg & Evert fought back valiantly in the second set before finally succumbing to the younger duo in straight sets by a 6-1, 6-4 final. “I didn’t realize we’d be facing such tough competition,” said Greenberg. “When I signed up, I thought we’d be taking on maybe Ryan Seacrest & Martina Navratilova or something like that … not a former third round U.S. Open player like Bea and a college standout like Darrin.” And while it is possible that Seacrest plays tennis, he likely does not have the serving power of Bielik or the volleying skills of Cohen. Both players utilized their strengths to move onto the quarterfinals of the tournament that they eventually won. “It was an exciting event,” said Bielik. “I mean Chrissy is obviously one of the greatest players of all-time and Mike is a


Mike Greenberg & Chris Evert, down 1-4 in the second set, played some of their best tennis of the match to cut into Cohen & Bielik’s lead

Chris Evert serves in her U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles Qualifying match

staple on ESPN. We had no expectations The U.S. Open National Playoffs USTA and just went out and played solid ten- Eastern Sectional Qualifying Tournament nis. It did get a little close in the end there is the second of 16 Sectional Qualifying though.” Tournaments taking place nationwide Down 1-4 in the second set, Greenberg through June. The winners of each of the & Evert played some of their best tennis 16 sectional qualifiers advance to the of the match to cut into the lead. They U.S. Open National Playoffs–Men’s, gave all they could and got the score Women’s and Mixed-Doubles Champiback to 4-5, 30-40 before Bielik ended onships held during the New Haven the match by hitting a service winner to Open at Yale, an Olympus U.S. Open Seseal the victory. ries women’s event, in August. The U.S. Maybe Greenberg’s volleys would have Open National Playoffs mixed-doubles been up to par if ex-tennis great Justin champions receive a main draw wild Gimbelstob would have returned his card into the 2011 U.S. Open. The U.S. phone calls. Open National Playoffs men’s and “When this event and my participation women’s singles champions again earn was first announced, Justin told me he a wild card into the U.S. Open Qualifying was going to coach me and get me ready Tournament, held the week prior to the for this match,” said Greenberg. “I called U.S. Open. G him a few weeks ago to take him up on his offer. I was waiting by the phone but he never got back to me … my message to him is ... where the hell were you!?” Will Greenberg return to play in next year’s event? “I’ll come back every year and play in this event, provided I get to team with Chris Evert. I had a great experience, but I’d like to play a terrible team next year because I want to win. It was nice having the experience of playing Chris Evert (center) pauses for a post-match photo with against good people, don’t get me USTA Eastern Metro Region Second Vice President Jackie wrong, but a 72-year-old would be Clark (left) and USTA Eastern Metro Region Vice the optimal opponent for me.” President Carl Summerlin (right)

Parents who know what’s going on work with Maurice Trail. He has seen it, done it all, and most importantly, will be with you every step of the way.

Come and have some competitive fun! The mixed-doubles team of Bea Bielik & Darrin Cohen advanced at the U.S. Open Qualifiers with a 6-1, 6-4 win over Mike Greenberg & Chris Evert

For more information or questions, please call Maurice Trail at 516-302-5613 LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Classic Rivalries Provide Nostalgic Entertainment at MSG BNP Paribas Showdown brings back the stars of the 80s and 90s to New York City By Michael Sarro or one night at Madison Square Garden, The World’s Most Famous Arena, four tennis legends took to the court to settle past rivalries. The first match pitted John McEnroe against Ivan Lendl and the nightcap featured rival Americans Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi. This is the third year that BNP Paribas has put on the event at MSG to a sold-out crowd of New York tennis fans. In the first match of the night, McEnroe was leading Lendl 6-3 in what was scheduled to be an eight-game pro-set match, but unfortunately, McEnroe was forced to retire due to an ankle injury he sustained earlier in the day while warming up with Sampras. As McEnroe talked on-court with his younger brother Patrick McEnroe, a broadcaster for ESPN, he expressed his sincere disappointment about having to retire from a match he was looking

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forward to playing in his own hometown. He then proceeded to remove the shorts he was wearing to reveal another pair (the short ones from the 80s). As the crowd cheered McEnroe’s antics he said, “This meant so much to me to come play here. I was so psyched. I was hitting the ball clean in practice with Pete, I tried to do everything I could to get ready. I am so bummed right now, but at least I showed you I can still fit into my shorts circa 1985.” McEnroe was leading the match and was playing with his patented finesse style while noticeably limping between points. As the match progressed, Lendl’s play picked up and McEnroe realized he had to retire despite leading. “It is unfortunate John was hurt,” Lendl said. “When he got his racquet on it, he was putting it away. It was great to play

here again at Madison Square Garden. I just hope it is not another 20 years before we play on this court again.” In the main event of the night, Pete Sampras defeated Andre Agassi, 6-3, 7-5. After their many past encounters, this one was slightly different than all the previous ones. “It is a little different day and age now. Tonight was about creating a little nostalgia,” said Agassi, 40. “1989 was the last time I was here at Madison Square Garden. When people ask me what I miss about the game, I sim-


ply say New York. I had three goals tonight … to stay healthy was my first goal and my second goal was to at least break Pete once. The third, and most important, was to come back to the people I love and say hello.” He accomplished all three goals despite losing to Sampras. Sampras used his classic serve-and-volley style and never faced a break point in the first set. The second set was more closely matched and Agassi got his first break with a passing shot to even the set at

2-2. The set progressed on serve until Sampras broke Agassi in the 11th game. Sampras then completed the break for a 6-5 advantage and served out the win in the next game. Sampras echoed Agassi’s sentiments about playing in New York and at Madison Square Garden. “It was good tennis tonight, I thought we played pretty well for some old guys,” said the 39-year-old Sampras. “I had a lot of good times here in New York. It was a great

night to play in front of 17,000 New Yorkers. I had a great time and I certainly hope to come back. We wanted to put on a good show. I felt the level of tennis was quite high and the people enjoyed it.” And that they did as the four legends played their hearts out for their beloved fans. Michael Sarro may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 or e-mail michael@litennismag.com. Photo credit: Derek Hsiang

John McEnroe acknowledges the MSG crowd before retiring from his exhibition match against Ivan Lendl Photo credit: Longines

Andre Agassi serves in his match at MSG against Pete Sampras

Photo credit: Derek Hsiang

John McEnroe gets his injured ankle worked on by the trainer during his match against Ivan Lendl in New York City

Photo credit: Derek Hsiang

Ivan Lendl returns a shot from John McEnroe before McEnroe was forced to retire due to injury

Photo credit: Derek Hsiang

Pete Sampras serves to Andre Agassi at the BNP Paribas Showdown in New York City

Photo credit: Longines

Andre Agassi returns a forehand against Pete Sampras at MSG


ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES: Keeping Me in the Game By Jeffrey A. Greene One of my very astute tennis buddies once said about me that I love everything about being in tennis tournaments except for playing the matches. Maybe ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES is finally getting me over that last hurdle, learning to enjoy the competition without being overwhelmed by all of the other stuff that accompanies it. As a matter of fact, four of my last six tournaments have been ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES events, so I guess that based on my recent track record, I’ve become a ONE-ON-ONE specialist. This wasn’t by design. I enjoy the individual hard-fought battle of an evenly-matched and fairly-contested singles match, and I’ve always loved playing high-quality, fast-paced, spectacular shotmaking doubles, but quite possibly, ONEON-ONE DOUBLES is where I’ve finally found my niche in the modern era of tennis. Besides being far more challenging than it looks, both tactically along with the necessary and precise execution of shots required, ONE-ON-ONE clearly exposes

shortcomings in your game quite emphatically. With a weak second serve … lots of luck on your first volley! A weak inconsistent return of serve won’t enable you to break anyone. Finally, if you can’t angle off volleys or put away overheads with confidence and conviction, you’re in for a cold hard reality check. The matches are short, with a pre-requisite of coming out of the blocks strong, as a high degree of intensity is an absolute necessity, and if you think that covering half a court is a piece of cake, I beg to differ. If you have strong doubles skills, it bodes well for you figuring out ONEON-ONE DOUBLES, but it’s not a definitive correlation or a given that you’ll be all over this game instantaneously. If you can serve and volley reasonably effectively, put a lot of returns in play, maybe even “chip ‘n’ charge” occasionally, find a way to make the net player handle a lot of volleys, and work the ball short and low as well as high and deep, I think that you’ll eventually become halfway decent at ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES. Of course, it wouldn’t hurt to be big, fast and strong

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with quick hands and an non-returnable serve, superb conditioning to compliment mental tenacity along with a match-hardened background attained from years of competitive tennis. But why am I playing ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES more and more ... that is the question? After having played USTAsanctioned tournament tennis since 1969, how has it come to where I am now playing and enjoying these unique tournaments in this one-night three to four hour shootout format more than any of my other recent competitive events? Competing is competing, right, so it’s all the same thing, or so you may think so. But somehow, it’s not quite the same thing, even if the quality of the competition is still quite impressive and the matches are being played at a very high level by very strong players with the added incentive of prize money. But something is palpably different. Not necessarily my results, because they’re about the same … you win some, you lose some. Even after a very good win over a very fine player in my last ONEON-ONE tournament, I sense something else is at work here at these events. I don’t get as happy over the wins, but I don’t get as upset over the losses. The whole thing is over before you know it. I’m certainly trying, I’m competing, I’m playing ball, but I just don’t seem to get as tense, regardless of what happens out there. I’m telling you, it’s high-level match play with strong and experienced players, prize money, egos and bragging rights, but somehow it just feels different. I’m sure that the music helps a lot, and with two matches often taking place simultaneously on the same court, it requires a little cooperation and sharing of the same space with others who you’re not even playing against. It’s these ascontinued on page 10


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pects, plus a combination of many other factors, that makes the whole atmosphere surrounding ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES events feel significantly different. It appears that at this juncture, for all intents and purposes, ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES tournaments have temporarily replaced my competitive efforts in singles or doubles. I wouldn’t necessarily say it has eliminated my interest or desire to play either one, or mixed-doubles, if you want to define that as a separate category. I’m satisfied to work out drilling and hitting balls for a couple of hours without playing games or a practice set, and I’m more than content to hit against a wall or a backboard for an hour or so if my stamina and concentration will allow me, and I’ll even on occasion hit a couple of baskets of serves too. However, in the sport of tennis, one must eventually test their mettle in the true litmus test of where your game stands at this point in time … a tournament setting. Some people would argue this point, but little will be debated as far as to the fact that entering and playing in a tournament is basically putting it on the line in a legitimate, organized competitive format. Whether that is singles at the professional level, doubles at the club level, or ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES at my level,

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it’s still a match where you keep score with someone eventually winning and someone unfortunately losing. Whether tournaments are the ultimate crucible to determine who you are as a player may be a bit harsh, but usually, this is where you make your bones as a player. In these rough, unchartered shark-infested waters of tournament tennis, invariably you define yourself as a match-hardened competitor even though in fact, we are all still works in progress. Having played USTA tournaments from the tender age of 13 until the not so tender age of 54, it’s possible that I’ve played somewhere between 500-750 matches, give or take a few, over the course of my journeyman-like career. Even with a sevenyear hiatus away from sanctioned tournaments in my mid 20s, I suppose that I have fallen into the inevitable trap of defining myself by my tournament results (if not necessarily by my rankings). Playing high school and college tennis along with having represented my hometown, New Rochelle, N.Y. in the pre-USTA/NTRP days, I’d learn from my losses like everyone else and went for years before becoming a player who played over 0.500 tennis in sanctioned tournaments or had a sectional ranking.

“… in the sport of tennis, one must eventually test their mettle in the true litmus test of where your game stands at this point in time … a tournament setting.” Bill Parcells once said, “You are what your record says you are.” And even though it was said about football, it more than likely has just as strong implications when it comes to tennis. Your record is a compilation of your match results, the sum total of which contribute to your growth and development as a player. But just as when they do longitudinal studies in psychology, tracking people’s lives over the course of their lifetime, maybe ONEON-ONE DOUBLES is the necessary stage of my own evolution as a player at this juncture of my growth and development, hard as that is to believe. As many matches as I might’ve played and as many world-class players who I might’ve come up against over my lengthy tournament history, I probably never quite came to grips with some of my shortcomings on the court. I suppose that I shouldn’t feel so bad about this since tennis is so de-

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18 GOODFRIEND DR E A S T H A M P TO N , N Y


manding and unforgiving on so many levels if one is serious about attempting to become a player, I’m sure that I’m in good company. Nevertheless, if one is to grow as a player, you need to come to grips with some of these weaknesses that you exhibit in the heat of battle if you want to improve, unless, of course, you are delusional, which is another common malady amongst tennis players. While you may never actually totally conquer your demons on the tennis court, you must eventually confront them. In the case of ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES, from a shot-production perspective, the game really exposes glaring flaws in one’s mid-court game (quick volleys, low volleys, half-volleys, etc.). However, due to the nature of the quick points, short matches, multiple matches and the party-like aura surrounding the event, I just don’t seem to get as nervous when I play. You still need to play hard and possess the specific skills necessary to be effective in this unique game which are relatively sophisticated, so even good players may struggle initially with ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES. But for me at this stage, it’s a wonderful thing that I still can go out there in this setting and be relatively cool and calm, yet still remain competitive and combative as ever. It’s an unusual tennis environment that allows you to blend these disparate elements together into a functioning formula, at least as far as I’m concerned. I haven’t abandoned singles matches entirely, and I’d play doubles in a nice, fun-filled game in a heartbeat. And if you know a sexy, athletic, good-looking girl with a sense of humor who likes to come to the net, I’d play mixed-doubles with her in a heartbeat too. But lo and behold, as far as my long and winding journey keeps me going in tennis, for the time being at least, ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES is where it’s at in my estimation. To be truthful, anything that keeps you out there playing ball at any reasonably competitive level is a good thing without a doubt. G Jeffrey A. Greene is currently entering his 12th year as the tennis director at Camp Pemigawasett in Wentworth, N.H. He played his college tennis at Vanderbilt and he received his masters in sports administration from USC. Jeff is currently ranked fourth in the Eastern ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES Rankings in the Men’s 35s Division.

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The Sand Pit Beach Tennis USA to heat up the summer in New York People often ask what is there to love about beach tennis. The response is always the same … What’s not to love? You get to spend the day outside in the sun on the beach. You get to socialize with the other players and develop new friendships. You get great exercise on a forgiving surface that isn’t too tough on the body. It’s great competition, with prizes and money for the winners of tournaments. And you get a nice tan. It’s just a great way to spend a day! Beach tennis around the world continues to strive, and this year, the sport has made great strides to bring in more players and has made the move closer to becoming an Olympic sport in the near future. Now, as the 2011 Beach Tennis Summer Season is approaching, this edition of “The Sandpit” will let you know all you need to know about how to get involved with beach tennis in the New York area and nationwide.

• Women’s Pro check-in at 11:00 a.m. and play begins at noon • Men’s and Women’s Amateur Singles check-in is at 2:00 p.m. and play begins at 3:00 p.m.

Tournament dates The pro draws of these tournaments will all be ITF Grade III tournaments for ITF World Ranking points and BTUSA American Ranking points. The dates for the event are as follows: N N N N N

Saturday-Sunday, June 4-5 Saturday-Sunday, June 25-26 Saturday-Sunday, July 16-17 Saturday-Sunday, August 6-7 Saturday-Sunday, September 17-18

N Sundays: Pro Singles and Amateur Doubles N Sundays: Mixed-Doubles N Sundays: Junior Doubles (ages 14 and Under) • Men’s and Women’s Amateurs 11:00 a.m. check-in 11:30 start for the first, third and fifth tournaments, and a 3:00 p.m. check-in with a 3:30 p.m. start for the second and fourth tournaments. • Pro Singles check-in at 11:00 a.m. and play begins at noon. • Open Mixed-Doubles check-in at 3:00 p.m. and play begins at 4:00 p.m. • Juniors (14 and under) check-in at 11:00 a.m. with play beginning at noon.

Pro draws $1,000 in prize money for each men’s doubles draw (a minimum 16 teams) and $500 in prize money for each women’s doubles draw (a minimum of eight teams). Both the Pro and Amateur Draws will have various sponsors donating prizes and trophies as well.

Long Island Tennis Magazine Challenge This summer, Long Island Tennis Magazine will sponsor five Beach Tennis USA tournaments in Long Beach, N.Y. These weekends are highly competitive, but also great fun. There are tournaments for singles and doubles, as well as for amateurs and pros. (Something for everyone!) Each event will take place in Long Beach, N.Y. on the beach at the Allegria Hotel— National Boulevard and the Boardwalk. There will be courts available for Open Play even on tournament weekends, and paddles will be available at all times for rental if needed. Tournaments may be added for other Long Island locations as well so check with www.beachtennisusa.net and www.longislandtennismagazine.com for more details. 12

“The beauty of this sport is that anybody can play it. The sand is a very forgiving surface for weekend athletes and seniors. The learning curve is really short. Even beginners can pick up beach tennis in a few hours. This is why it’s so perfectly suited for recreational leagues. This game can also be played in your backyard on the grass.” —Jim Lorenzo, president of Beach Tennis USA and a resident of Long Beach, N.Y.

Entry fees for tournaments N Men’s & Women’s Pros: $35 per player N Men’s & Women’s Pro Singles: $20 per player N Men’s & Women’s Amateurs: $20 per player N Men’s & Women’s Amateur Singles: $10 per player N Juniors: $10 per player N Open Mixed-Doubles: $20 per player Note: Mixed-Doubles is open to players of all ages and skill levels. You can play MixedDoubles for free if you register for any of the other divisions (Pros, Amateurs or Juniors).

Schedule of play for each tournament

Beach Tennis World Championships

N Saturdays: Pro Doubles and Amateur Singles • Men’s Pro check-in at 9:00 a.m. and play begins at 10:00 a.m.

The best players from all over the world will participate in the Beach Tennis World Championships, set for Thursday-Sunday, Aug. 18-21 in Long Beach, N.Y. on the beach at

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


the Allegria Hotel—National Boulevard and the Boardwalk. Countries represented will include Aruba, Belgium, Bermuda, Brazil, Czech Republic, France, Holland, Japan, Italy, St. Marteen, etc. Every night, there will be activities during and after play and the tournament concludes on Sunday with a huge player party. This is a can’t miss event! This is an ITF Grade I Tournament with $10,000 in prize money for Pro Tournament/Prizes for Amateur Tournament. N Thursday, August 18 • Singles Tournament (Pro and Amateur Levels) N Friday, August 19 • Nation’s Cup Tournament (Team play as countries face off for bragging rights) N Saturday, August 20 • Doubles Tournament Pool Play (Pro and Amateur Levels) N Sunday August 21 • Doubles Tournament Quarters/Semis/Finals and Mixed Doubles Tournament (all levels)

tennis players. Interested parties may sign up by contacting Lindsay LiMauro at llimauro@beachtennisusa.net or by calling (516) 328-0000.

N On-site paddle rentals. N Free beach passes: If you are playing a tournament at any level of competition, access to the beach at Long Beach, N.Y. will be free of charge.

What is beach tennis? Open play Players will be getting together both on weekends and on weeknights. There will be four beach tennis courts at the Allegria Hotel—National Boulevard and the Boardwalk in Long Beach, N.Y. set up seven days per week. To be put on an e-mail blast about specific organized open play times, you may contact Lindsay LiMauro at llimauro@beachtennisusa.net or by calling (516) 328-0000. Groups do get together regularly for organized open play and it’s free!

—Murphy Jensen, French Open Doubles Champion League play Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights will be beach tennis nights at the Allegria Hotel—National Boulevard and the Boardwalk in Long Beach, N.Y. The league fee for an eight-week season will be $40. Leagues will begin in June. Interested parties may sign up by contacting Lindsay LiMauro at llimauro@beachtennisusa.net or by calling (516) 328-0000.

Introducing the hottest sport on sand: Beach tennis! Take the fun and fast-paced sport of tennis … combine it with the sun, sea and sand of the beach … and you have beach tennis, the most electrifying new sport to hit the U.S. Beach tennis merges the worlds of tennis and beach volleyball into one exciting sport. It can be played both competitively and recreationally, and because it’s so simple to play, it appeals to athletes and non-athletes of all ages.

Rules Paddle rentals and sales

“ The X Games of tennis has arrived! I loved it from the very first second I saw it. The beach way of life is the only way of life.”

for those coming in from the city, this new location of permanent courts is close to the Long Beach Train Station.

BTUSA’s retail store for paddles, net systems and all beach tennis merchandise is located at 1099 Tulip Avenue in Franklin Square, N.Y., and they may be reached by phone at (516) 328-0000. Also, onsite at the court area in Long Beach, N.Y. will be a mini-store with paddles available for rental and purchase. Paddles will be available for a $5 rental (if you decide to purchase a paddle, the $5 will be credited toward your purchase).

New this summer

Beach tennis clinics

N Singles Play: Singles Tournaments are becoming bigger around the world, and here in the U.S., we are about to begin the movement as well. Singles matches are played with all the same rules, except the court size is 5m x 16m.

Beach tennis clinic will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights at the Allegria Hotel—National Boulevard and the Boardwalk in Long Beach, N.Y. and will be taught by licensed beach

N A new location and permanent courts: With the courts now at the Allegria Hotel, attracting more players and spectators should be much easier. Also,

The rules of beach tennis are similar to those of regular tennis: N Scoring is 15-30-40 with no advantage; at 40-40 (deuce) next point wins N In Mixed-Doubles, men serve underhand N Lets are in play

Tournaments around the country BTUSA will be holding tournaments in cities around the U.S. including, Long Beach, N.Y.; Miami, Fla.; McKinney, Texas; Buffalo, N.Y.; Chicago, Ill.; San Diego, Calif.; Hermosa Beach, Calif.; Santa Barbara, Calif.; Santa Cruz, Calif.; and Honolulu, Hawaii. U.S. National Championships will be held in Chicago on July 11. The top 16 teams in the country will be taking part.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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It’s May … Here Comes the Outdoor Tennis Leagues on the Island By Jonathan Klee As the snow melts and the weather gets warmer, outdoor tennis makes its way back to Long Island. From the schools, to the parks, to the clubs, nothing can make you feel more like a beginner than hitting that first ball outside in a swirling wind after playing indoors all winter. Whereas the USTA Adult Leagues will mainly continue their indoor play, a well-established “niche” of outdoor leagues will begin. This independent circuit made up of hundreds of players who play at country clubs, tennis clubs and parks all over Long Island and they have written rules, grievance procedures and presidents. They are as organized as the USTA, have trophies and dinners for the winners and the level of play is just as competitive. Whereas many of these rosters may have players who overlap with USTA leagues, for many of these players, it will be their only competitive tennis of the summer. Better known as the “North Shore

Leagues” because many of the clubs are located on the North Shore of Long Island or the “Country Club Leagues” because many of the matches are played at private clubs, these independent leagues, including a Senior League, are split up by the days of the week. There is a Tuesday night league, Wednesday night league and a Thursday night league. Some nights have more than one league. Starting the first or second week in May, matches will begin and run each week on the specified day of the week until the end of August when a winner will be crowned. League matches start between 5:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m. and are made up of five Har-Tru doubles courts. There is no singles or hard court play. The only difference between the leagues are the clubs who participate, age requirements, scoring formats and the level of play. The most competitive of the leagues are the Tuesday and Wednesday Night Leagues.

The Tuesday Night League or North Shore Men’s Tennis League (NSMTL) has 10 teams with rosters sizes of up to 30 players per team. The league is made up of three country clubs (Inwood, Engineers and Old Westbury), two tennis and pool clubs (Shelter Rock with two teams and Piquet Lane), one Park (Great Neck Park) and three traveling teams (Country Estates, South Shore and Woodbury). The NSMTL has a nine-match schedule with an eight-team playoff structure. Started in the mid-1980s, the Tuesday Night League has become a staple of summer tennis on the Island. Steve Abbondondelo, who has been part of the league since its inception and president of the league since 1990, feels that the league, “Showcases high quality levels of players without taking away the spirit of recreational club tennis.” Limited to players 35 years of age and

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over (each team is allowed one player over 30 to play at one time), the teams are also limited to playing one teaching professional over the age of 50 and one USTAranked 5.0 player at a time. The level of play ranges from 5.0-4.5 on Court One, to 4.0-3.5 on Court Five. Mitch Kessler, who is captain of last year’s winning team, South Shore, has been playing in the league on Tuesday nights for 18 years and is impressed with the organization of the league and the opportunities it provides his players. “As a traveling team, many of our players play our summer tennis indoors for USTA or outdoors at parks and schools,” said Kessler. “The NSMTL allows us to play a high level of tennis as guests on beautiful club courts for a nominal price.” Started in the mid-1970s, the Wednesday Night League, which is formally called the Long Island Men’s Tennis League (LIMTL), is limited to players 35 years or older and is made up mostly of 5.0 and 4.5 Level players. This league differs from the

NSMTL in that there is no limit on the amount of 5.0 players or teaching professionals over the age of 50. It is not uncommon to see many of the top courts on Tuesday overlap into the Wednesday league. “The Wednesday Night League (LIMTL) is the original true elite league on Long Island, and we are still going strong with a high level of play,” said Randy Coffee, who has been president of the LIMTL for more than 10 years. Consisting of seven teams all with home courts, the rosters are loaded with the top teaching pros and amateurs coming from all parts of Long Island and New York City. The teams are Inwood Country Club (the only club from the South Shore), Shelter Rock, Piquet Lane, Great Neck Park, Cold Spring Valley, Bethpage (who plays their home matches at North Shore Towers) and Woodbury (who played their home matches last year at Crest Hollow Country Club). Lionel Goldberg who has played in both leagues for more than 13

years and is captain of the Inwood Country Club team on Wednesday nights, may have said it best when asked what makes the weeknight leagues so alluring. “Unlike the USTA where matches start late, the start time of 6:00 p.m. allows for great camaraderie and dinners after the matches,” said Goldberg. “Sometimes, the dinners are more fun then the matches.” The Wednesday League, which has its own Web site with standings, match scores and rosters, can be found at www.limtl.com. G Jonathan Klee is a partner at the Law Firm of Klee & Woolf LLP. He is the Long Island representative on the Eastern Adult League Grievance Committee where he currently serves as chair. He also served on the USTA National Adult League Committee which passed the above mentioned rule changes. He is also Captain of the Tuesday Night Inwood Country Club team and plays on their Wednesday night team. He may be reached by e-mail at jkleelaw@aol.com.

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LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

15


2011 French Open PREVIEW By Michael Sarro ast year’s men’s final at the French Open saw Rafael Nadal breeze to his fifth French Open title, defeating Robin Soderling, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4, in just over two hours of match play. On the women’s side, history was made as Francesca Schiavone became the first Italian woman ever to win a Grand Slam title with a 6-4, 7-6 (2) victory over Samantha Stosur. From May 17-June 5, the 110th edition of the tournament will be held at Roland Garros in Paris, France with both defending champs trying to hold off a field of eager and hungry competitors. On the women’s side, the defending champion Schiavone comes into the tournament with the world’s number five ranking. In the 2010 Australian Open, despite having her best result at that Grand Slam event, she lost in the quarterfinals to world number one-ranked Caroline Wozniacki in a thrilling five hour match. Schiavone is still playing the best tennis of her career and seems poised to defend her title. Trying to dethrone her is a long list of women, including Wozniacki, the always dangerous Maria Sharapova, and past

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French Open winners Svetlana Kuznetsova and Ana Ivanovic. Also expected to return to the court after nursing various injuries over the past few months are Venus and Serena Williams. It’ll be a test though for the Williams Sisters as they will have to quickly shake off the rust in what will be a wide open and tough draw. U.S. Open champion Kim Clijsters, who was taking time off to nurse a few injuries of her own, was slated to be included in the women’s field, however a recent injury to her right ankle at a family wedding will likely keep her out of Roland Garros. Summer Day Camp Half or Full Days

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On the men’s side, the main issue for Rafael Nadal has been his penchant for injury, especially with his knees. The good news for “The King of Clay” is that this tournament is played on his favorite surface, which also happens to be easier on the body than a hard court surface. Nadal seems to be healthy heading into the clay season. The bad news is that there is someone by the name of Novak Djokovic looming, who many consider to be the best player in the world right now. Djokovic has never faired too well at Roland Garros, or on clay in general throughout his career, but he has made strides every year, advancing a little further each time. He is playing at the top of his game right now which is apparent after his recent victories over Nadal at Indian Wells and again at the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Fla. Despite Djokovic’s recent success against Nadal, a healthy Nadal would still be the slight favorite due to the surface. Two other favorites capable of hoisting the Muskateer’s Cup are Robin Soderling and Tomas Berdych. Last year, Soderling lost in the finals and Berdych lost in the semis. Both are very strong clay court players and it wouldn’t surprise many to see either one in the finals or even possibly winning the title. Are we forgetting anyone? Oh right, that other guy, Roger Federer. At this point in his career, Roger will no longer be a favorite to win this tournament. Clay has been his most challenging surface and due to his age, and the fact that many players specialize on this surface, not many people are expecting him to make a deep run this year. However, Federer is still playing at a high level, can beat anyone on a given day and usually finds ways to prove people wrong. G Michael Sarro may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 or e-mail michael@litennismag.com.


The Tennis Community Comes Out in Droves for the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo n Sunday, March 6, Long Island Tennis Magazine hosted the very successful 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo at Farmingdale State College. More than 1,500 attendees were on hand for the day-long event, as families came in droves all day long to take part in the informative seminars, visit with reps from the area’s top clubs and facilities, and shop for the latest tennis apparel from local retailers and manufacturers. A great time was had by all in the Expo Hall, featuring nearly 40 exhibitors and sponsors, and kids and adults alike enjoyed the Center Court activity area where they tested the speed of their serve, took part in QuickStart Tennis instruction, and got a taste of the summer with a beach tennis demo

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area, while also playing video games in the Dave & Busters Kids Activity Zone. Raffles and prizes were given out all day long as everything from U.S. Open tickets, to sports memorabilia, to the latest tennis apparel. This event was completely free to the public and served as a great way to grow tennis, while also bringing together the tennis community for a common cause. The success of the Expo will hopefully springboard to continued success throughout the spring and summer for tennis on Long Island. Many thanks to all of the attendees for taking time out of their weekend to come on down and show their support at the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo, and a special thanks to the following exhibitors and sponsors for their generous support:

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Scenes From the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo March 6 at Farmingdale State College Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg Attendees enter the Expo Hall at Farmingdale State College during the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo

Steven Kaplan discusses college tennis

Kids get a taste of beach tennis during the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo Hannah Camhi, Ashley Sandler, Samantha Elgort, Josh Levine and Alex Tropiano took part in the panel discussion on college tennis Attendees playing video games in the Dave & Busters Kids Activity Zone

Darrin Cohen, Joe Arias, Bea Bielik and Whitney Kraft, panelists in the discussion on collegiate tennis

Approximately 1,500 attendees were on hand for the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo

Past President Scott Axler, Nassau District Delegate Sunny Fishkind and Grievance Committee Chair Ed Wolfarth represent the USTA/EasternLong Island Region at the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo

Ed Krass explains what college coaches are looking for in juniors during the panel discussion

Jay Wass of Sportime (right) assists an attendee at the speed serve booth during the Long Island Tennis Expo A great time was had by all at the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo

Megan Graceffo of AgeFocus chats with an attendee on the expo floor

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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A Star is Born By Alan Fleischman sually, when I sit down to write, I follow two simple rules: Write what you know (suggested by a pretty good writer, Ernest Hemmingway) and “Never marry your first date or your first draft” (source unknown, but good advice on both accounts). This is different. This is difficult. John Lennon once said that “Life is what happens while you are making other plans.” It has been 15 years since I met Scott Lipsky. During this time, we have traveled two very different, but intertwined paths. It is astounding to me how quickly the years have passed, and how a boy became a man and a coach became a friend. I write this with a mixture of pride, nostalgia and wonder. John Lennon was right. Fifteen years ago, I was a high school coach at John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore, N.Y. One day, a player came out and, like Moses at the Red Sea, “parted the waters.” “Put him on the first court,” the kids

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said. “Why? He’s a freshman.” I said. “He’s ranked nationally and internationally,” the kids shot back. “Oh, well, someone has to challenge him for the first court,” I said. “I will,” said Sean Worth, a talented player and a great personality. Afterward, I asked how he did. “If you added up all my points,” Worth said, “I did not get a game” I had met Scott Lipsky. Tennis, largely a solo sport, can create oversized egos. Everyone is the next Williams, Sampras, Lendl or Connors— choose your hero. Scott’s family were wellgrounded and realistic people. His mother, Gail, said to me that it wasn’t about Scott’s ability. She wanted him to have a “normal” high school experience. After all, he did not have a cape with a giant “S” hidden under his tennis shirt. Along with all that talent, there was a 15-year-old adolescent, with the same anxieties that anyone has at that age. There were exceptions—I would excuse Scott from practice because he was

Scott L

ipsky

taking lessons from people who had the ability to improve his game. Later on, when people would say “YOU coached Scott Lipsky?” I would say, “No, I opened the can of balls so he would not cut his finger before playing.” I didn’t realize that I was coaching, but in a different arena. My parents had taught me, sometimes at the school of hard knocks, that it was important to be authentic, to do the right thing, to admit your mistakes and to be proud of your achievements. In this respect, I was reinforcing exactly what Mark and Gail Lipsky taught Scott. I was proud of his victories, suffered through his matches, (though not as much as his mom), and before you knew it, I was writing letters of recommendation for college applications. During this time, Scott had won the New York State Doubles Championships, was a

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


finalist in the State Singles Championship and spent much of his junior year playing in tournaments. He sent his homework to school through the Internet and met his academic obligations, as well as his athletic responsibilities. He was rising in the ranks of the tennis community, at the same time, maturing into someone we were all proud of. When he attended Stanford, it was a special accolade, because it was a perfect fit. He was a scholar athlete. I used to tease him and say that we made a good team, I never shut up and he was stingy with words. I retired from teaching and followed his career on the Internet. We corresponded occasionally. No life is immune to tragedy. Scott lost his father in his freshman year of college. When I was growing up, my uncle played a crucial role; he was the adult I could talk to when I could not deal with my father. I would be there for Scott if he needed someone to talk to. After all, he had been there for me. Scott came out for tennis in his senior year. It was so unusual for an athlete of his stature to do so that Newsday wrote a story about it. Scott was a stand up guy. We drove to Athens, Ga. to see him in the NCAAs. No longer a teenager, he was a young man. After a very successful collegiate career, Scott and his doubles partner, David Martin, turned professional. Tennis is brutal on selfesteem. You are out there alone, wearing short pants and facing people with as much desire, skill and as many dreams as you have had since you have been eight-years-old. Your record is only as good as your next forehand. You are only as good as your second serve, your first volley and someone in “whoknows-where” Eastern Europe is practicing against a backboard right now. What happens if he is not a success? I knew the feeling, but for me it was the music business, not sports. In college, I was in a group that had landed a recording contract, appeared in the “showcase” clubs in Manhattan, and thought that every morning would bring stardom, or at least an appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. It never happened. When one door closes, another opens, and becoming a history teacher more than fulfilled my life. Scott started out in the trenches, playing the “Futures” circuit. After a victory, we drove him to the airport. In his 20s, he was already learning to hate airplanes. He was learning his trade.

The next level was the Challengers. This is the equivalent of AAA ball in the Major Leagues. It is not glamorous. You are not Roger Federer, the accommodations are minimal, and the best thing about it, if you get past it, is the stories you can tell your friends. Rooms that have insects the size of ponies, line calls that would make a blind person blush, and all the while, you hope for a break through and an ATP match. I kept track of the scores, e-mailed encouragement, and all the while, reminded him that while his tennis was great, his character was greater. All of his admirers, his family and friends, all respected him for who he was, not what he did. I was as proud as an honorary uncle could be. When he won his first title, we all were ecstatic he had made it. No more what ifs, only how many mores. As a testament to Scott’s character, the Bryan Brothers were in Boca Raton, Fla. playing an exhibition match. Afterwards, I spoke with Bob Bryan, saying that we knew someone in common. “You know Lips?” he said. “Here, let me sign your cap.” The years rolled by, with increasing speed. There were victories and defeats and sushi dinners when he was in town. In the blink of an eye, we received an invitation to Scott’s wedding.

I met Marie when Scott was playing at the U.S. Open. “This is my girlfriend,” Scott said. He is the master of understatement. We flew to California this past summer for the ceremony. When we arrived, I left a message for Gail that we were here. She called back and said, “When the usher escorts you and Joan to be seated, tell him you are family and that you are sitting with us.” There will never be a more moving moment in my life, if I live to be a hundred. A month ago, Scott and his doubles partner, Rajeev Ram, played in the ATP tournament at Delray Beach, Fla. They made it to the finals and several longtime family friends were there to cheer him on. When they won, we all cheered as if it was the most important match that had ever been played, and, as far as we were concerned, it was. If you live long enough, your life becomes a story. This has been one of the better stories in mine. G Alan Fleischman has been a devoted fan of tennis since 1969. He won the Town of Hempstead tennis tournament at Newbridge Road Park in 1972 and was runnerup in 1974. He worked as an assistant to the tennis professional in the summer program at Lutheran High School in the early 1970s. While teaching social studies at John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore, N.Y., he was fortunate to have coached some talented players, but more importantly, some wonderful young men and women during his last seven years at the school. He may be reached by e-mail at gamesetmatch76@aol.com.

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(631) 898-0200 • 1-866-TENNIS2 LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

21


By Kathy Miller

As the Mixed-Doubles League is winding down with playoffs about to begin, we are gearing up for the summer Adult, Senior and Super Senior Leagues which begin Monday, May 16 with a record 286 teams this year. Captains can add players to their teams until Wednesday, June 15, so if anyone is looking for a team, it’s not too late! E-mail me at kathym65@aol.com with your level and location, and we will do our best to get you placed on a team. It’s very important that all captains keep the following new rules in mind: N Eastern Regulation III.

PLAYER PARTICIPATION (C) A minimum of fifty percent (50%) of the players on a team roster must reside in (using the address registered in Tennis-

Link) or work in (designated work location for tax purposes) the area being represented by the team. A waiver of these requirements may be granted subject to a vote of the Adult League Committee. All matches played by an ineligible player will be scored as a default. An ineligible player will be determined by his/her registration date and is the last out-of-area player to register on the roster. N Eastern Regulation III.

PLAYER PARTICIPATION (G) Players who play on two or more teams at the same NTRP level in different areas (districts and/or regions) in the Eastern Section must declare which team they will represent prior to the start of any local league playoff or any area, district,

regional or section championship playoff should more than one team qualify to advance. The declaration should be made by (1) filing a Player Intent Form with the Eastern Section Office prior to the playing of the teams last local league match or (2) will be made once the player plays a local league playoff or area, district, regional or section championship playoff match and will remain in effect for as long as that team advances. If a player declares for a team and that team is eliminated, the player is then eligible to re-select and play for a different team as long as they meet eligibility requirements for that team. They will continue with that team as long as that team advances. All matches played continued on page 24

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


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A D U LT L E A G U E W R A P - U P by an ineligible player will be scored as a default. An ineligible player is a player who has declared for a team and then plays a match for a different team prior to their original team being eliminated. However, a player who plays local league playoff matches in a region with multiple districts/areas at the same level with different league ending dates will declare the region they will represent at the time of local league playoffs. Once a player plays a local league playoff match in one region s/he may not play a playoff match in a different region until the team they played a local playoff match for has been eliminated.

league will play weeknights during the month of August and will be three courts of mixed-doubles. In September, once we have the early start ratings, we will run the Tri-Level League, which will play from the beginning of October to mid-December. The Tri-Level League consists of three courts of women’s or men’s doubles. One court is at the 3.5 Level, one at the 4.0 Level and the final court at the 4.5 Level. There is a Section Championship in January with the winning team advancing to the National Championship at Indian Wells, Calif. at the end of March during the pro tournament. The Tri-Level League is a great way for friends of differing levels to be able to share the “team” experience. Lastly is the Mixed-Doubles League which is based on the final computer ratings that are available the end of Novem-

ber. The Mixed League runs from January to May with the Section Championship in June and the National Championship the following fall. If you are interested in any of the above programs, please e-mail kathym65@aol.com and we will either help you get your own team started or help find you a spot on an existing team. I am looking forward to the mixed-doubles playoffs during the next couple of weeks and wish our winning teams luck at the Section Championships in Albany, N.Y. the weekend of June 3. I am also looking forward to a successful summer of league tennis and everyone remembering to show sportsmanship and fairness to all opponents! G Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

PLAY COLLEGE T TE ENNIS !

We are planning on a pilot program in August for mixed-doubles. Instead of combinations of 6.0, 7.0, etc, it will be combinations of 6.5 (a 3.5 & 3.0); 7.5 (a 4.0 & 3.5); 8.5 (a 4.5 & 4.0); and 9.5 (a 5.0 & 4.5). The

continued from page 22

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region

Win great prizes New this year, the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region is offering readers of Long Island Tennis Magazine the opportunity to bid on great prizes, which will be raffled off at the Region’s 21st Annual Awards Dinner on May 11 at the Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y. Whether you plan on attending the dinner or not, you can still bid on three amazing prizes that will be offered during the auction portion of the evening: A Day at the U.S. Open in the USTA Box, courtesy of the USTA; A Day at the U.S. Open, courtesy of Tennis Magazine; and a New York Yankees package featuring game tickets, clubhouse passes and a tour of Monument Park, courtesy of Modell’s Sporting Goods. Visit www.longisland.usta.com to register your bids now.

Your child … a future tennis star? America is searching for that next big tennis star and it could be your child! With the growing popularity of QuickStart Tennis for young children, the USTA encourages children 10 years of age and under to pick up a racket and get out on the court in 2011. Visit www.10andundertennis.com to find out how to have your child join the thousands of others who are learning to play tennis the right way. Then, visit www.longisland.usta.org, click on “Places to Learn Tennis on Long Island,” and call your local pro and ask about QuickStart or 10-and-Under Tennis programs.

Tennis robot experiences wheelchair tennis Sixth grade Girl Scout Lego Robotics Team “Merrick Masters J” visited Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis in West Hempstead with their robot, Tobor, to experience wheelchair tennis. USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region President Daniel Burgess, director of tennis at Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis, ran the program, which was part of the First Lego League (FLL) challenge preparation. The girls are part of a Lego robotics project sponsored by the Girl Scouts of Nassau County. This year’s FLL theme for the competition is the world of biomedical engineering. The team is working to design a concept design for adaptive tennis equipment for those who have limited abilities with their hands. Daniel provided the girls with an introduction to wheelchair tennis and the things to consider in order to turn a disability into an ability and improve the quality of life through recreational tennis. As part of their research, the team also video chatted through Skype with Marie Vanasse, a biomedical engineer graduate, prosthetic engineer and tennis pro who works with First Volley, an organization created for amputees, orthosis wearers and those with

physical challenges who wish to enjoy the game of tennis, but choose not to sit in a wheelchair to do so. First Volley organizes tennis clinics through the OPAF Organization (Orthotic and Prosthetic Assistance Fund Inc.) to provide a sense of accomplishment, pride and enjoyment for those who participate. The team hopes to use their research to develop a tennis racket for someone who uses a prosthetic device or has limited or no grip strength in their hand so they can enjoy the game of tennis.

Lego team wins competition and grant A team of third graders from Old Mill Road School and Camp Avenue School, both in Merrick, N.Y., recently competed at the Junior First Lego League. The team, named Merrick Connection, won the Reviewer’s Award for overall excellence in their project and model. Merrick Connection created an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) solely out of Legos. The team also won a grant from the USTA to encourage and support tennis clubs to maintain an AED on-site to help save lives.

Club owners learn marketing techniques The USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region has launched a series of club owner workshops in February with a session focusing on cooperative advertising initiatives and search engine optimization (SEO). Called LITE, or the “Long Island Tennis Exchange,” the workshop series brings together Nassau and Suffolk club owners to help them improve their businesses by working together towards common goals. “The program was extremely informative and well-run,” said Kathy Miller, manager of Carefree Racquet and Health Club in Merrick, N.Y. and USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region adult league coordinator. “Advertising and being seen on the Internet is a whole new concept for me. I was happy when I left the meeting since I felt that I really learned something and have since tried implementing what I learned.” The second meeting, scheduled in April, focused on cooperative advertising. Both meetings were hosted by the United Way of Long Island. Meetings are scheduled for two hours and include lunch. “We created LITE as an added-value benefit to our club owner members and look forward to providing dynamic speakers and informational sessions that will help expand the game of tennis on Long Island,” said Daniel Burgess, president of the USTA/EasternLong Island Region. “The purpose of these meetings is to come together as a collective group to leverage our relationships to grow tennis through several new and exciting capacity-building initiatives.” For more information on LITE, contact Daniel Burgess by e-mail at amertwist@aim.com or call (516) 343-3597.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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oming off an outstanding 2010 campaign in which they advanced to the World TeamTennis Finals, the New York Sportimes have announced their 2011 schedule, with seven home matches in July, including five at Sportime Randall’s Island Tennis Center in Manhattan and two at SEFCU Arena at the University of Albany. Sportimes Marquee Players John McEnroe, Martina Hingis and Kim Clijsters will compete in several matches, while visiting teams’ stars who will visit the Big Apple this summer will include Anna Kournikova, Jimmy Connors, Lindsay Davenport, and Bob & Mike Bryan. Hingis, who competed last year for the Albany, N.Y.-based New York Buzz, is scheduled for all seven home dates, beginning with the Sportimes’ home opener against Boston on Randall’s Island on Wednesday, July 6. McEnroe will play in home matches on Thursday, July 14 versus Philadelphia, and Friday, July 15 versus Springfield, both at Sportime Stadium, while Clijsters will play on Tuesday, July 19 against Washington in Albany, and Wednesday, July 20 versus Washington at Sportime Stadium. The schedule also includes a home date at Sportime Stadium versus St. Louis on Monday, July 11, which features Hingis playing for the Sportimes, and both Kournikova and Davenport playing for the Aces, as well as a match with Kansas City on Monday, July 18, featuring the Bryan Brothers in Albany. On July 14 at Sportime Stadium, a battle of legends will take place when Jimmy Connors comes to Randall’s Island to face John McEnroe. Home matches at Sportime Stadium begin at 7:00 p.m., with the exception of the Friday July 15 match, which will begin at 4:00 p.m., while first serve for the events in Albany, N.Y. is 7:30 p.m. “Our schedule is outstanding as it will feature a season of number ones,” said Sportimes General Manager John Dato. “McEnroe, Clijsters and Hingis have been number one in the world, as well as visiting players Davenport, Connors, Kournikova (in doubles with Hingis) and the Bryan Brothers. With at least one marquee player– and often more–on each date, we know that Sportimes fans are looking forward to another great season.” The Sportimes won the WTT Eastern Conference title last year with a 9-5 record and won their semifinal match against Boston

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before falling in the 2010 WTT Finals to Kansas City. Long Island Tennis Magazine will be at all home matches supporting the Sportimes and we hope the Long Island community will take advantage of this rare look at the stars up close. Tickets for SPORTIME matches are available by calling (888) WTT-NYC1 or by visiting www.nysportimes.com.

New York Sportimes 2011 Roster Kim Clijsters This season, the current number two-ranked women’s player in the world Kim Clijsters will don a New York Sportimes jersey. The reigning U.S. Open Champion became the first mother to win a Grand Slam in over 25 years in 2009. In addition to her brilliant singles career, Kim has also has won doubles titles at the French Open and Wimbledon. Martina Hingis The Sportimes boast three former number one players, John McEnroe, Kim Clijsters and Martina Hingis. Hingis returns to the Sportimes in 2011 after winning the WTT Championship with them in 2005. Hingis has won five Grand Slam singles titles and nine doubles titles. In 1998, she became the fourth woman in tennis history to win all four Grand Slams in the same calendar year. She is also one of only five players in WTA history to simultaneously be ranked number one in singles and doubles. Robert Kendrick The year 2011 will be Robert Kendrick’s fifth season playing for the Sportimes. He was a member of the Sportimes 2005 WTT Championship team. His career high singles ranking is 69. Kendrick has wins over many of the world’s top players, and is a former All-American at both the University of Washington and Pepperdine University.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


2011 WTT rosters

John McEnroe Long Island’s own John McEnroe will be back with the Sportimes this summer. This will be Johnnie Mac’s 10th season with his hometown team the Sportimes. John won seven Grand Slam singles titles and 10 doubles titles in his career. After a long and stellar career, he was inducted into the ITF Hall of Fame in 1999. Katie O’Brien This season will mark the first WTT season for Katie O’Brien, a young, up and coming player from Beverly, England. She is a former British number one-ranked singles player and has a career high ranking of 84th. Since turning pro in 2004, Katie has four ITF singles and two ITF doubles titles in her career.

Boston Lobsters Coach: Bud Schultz James Blake, John Isner, Coco Vandeweghe, Jan-Michael Gambill, Eric Butorac and Mashona Washington Kansas City Explorers Coach: Brent Haygarth Bob Bryan, Mike Bryan, Alex Kuznetsov, Kveta Peschke, Ricardo Mello and Madison Brengle

Newport Beach Breakers Coach: Trevor Kronemann Pete Sampras, Anne Keothavong, Lester Cook, Travis Rettenmeier and Marie-Eve Pelletier

Jesse Witten Participating in his fifth season with the New York Sportimes, Jesse Witten is now a seasoned veteran of World TeamTennis. His career high singles ranking is 163rd and his best performance in a Grand Slam came in 2009 where he lost to Novak Djokovic in the third round. Last year, he qualified for both Wimbledon and the French Open. Jesse is a former All-American with the University of Kentucky.

Sacramento Capitals Coach: Wayne Bryan Mardy Fish, Vania King, Mark Knowles, Dusan Vemic and Yasmin Schnack

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Philadelphia Freedoms Coach: Pascal Collard Melanie Oudin, Lisa Raymond, Beatrice Capra, Brendan Evans and Nathan Healey

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LITennisMag.com â&#x20AC;˘ May/June 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Springfield Lasers Coach: John-Laffnie de Jager Carly Gullickson, Lilia Osterloh, Paul Hanley and Rik de Voest

Washington Kastles Coach: Murphy Jensen Serena Williams, Venus Williams, Sam Querrey, Arina Rodionova, Leander Paes, Bobby Reynolds and Rennae Stubbs

St. Louis Aces Coach: Rick Leach Lindsay Davenport, Anna Kournikova, Mark Philippoussis, Liezel Huber, Jean-Julien Rojer and Roman Borvanov

2011 New York Sportimes schedule Call (888) WTT-NYC1 for information on New York Sportimes tickets or visit www.NYSportimes.com. Marquee players subject to change. Date Wednesday, July 06

Opponent Boston Lobsters

Marquee Players Martina Hingis (Sportimes)

Court Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island

Monday, July 11

St. Louis Aces

Anna Kournikova & Lindsay Davenport (Lasers) and Martina Hingis (Sportimes)

Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island

Thursday, July 14

Philadelphia Freedoms

Jimmy Connors (Freedoms) and John McEnroe & Martina Hingis (Sportimes)

Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island

Friday, July 15

Springfield Lasers

John McEnroe & Martina Hingis (Sportimes)

Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island

Monday, July 18

Kansas City Explorers

Bob & Mike Bryan (Explorers) and Martina Hingis (Sportimes)

SEFCU Arena at University of Albany

Tuesday, July 19

Washington Kastles

Kim Clijsters & Martina Hingis (Sportimes)

SEFCU Arena at University of Albany

Wednesday, July 20

Washington Kastles

Kim Clijsters & Martina Hingis (Sportimes)

Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


Self-Reliance

By Steve Kaplan “The greatest homage we can pay to truth is to use it.” —Emerson (Ralph Waldo not Roy) The net height on the center of a tennis court is three feet from the ground and slightly higher near the sideline. Cross-court shots are therefore safer because the net is lower in the middle, right? Not so fast. While the net is lower in the center, it is also further away than the sideline net as anyone who was awake in high school geometry knows. The further distance that the ball travels to reach the cross-court net offsets its lower height to create a near identical acceptance angle as down the line. If the net were a

consistent height, then cross-court shots would actually need to be hit higher and steeper than the down the lines in order to clear the net. Cross-court shots are safer than down the lines for a different reason; the court is longer. Do not take my word for it, do some research and find out for yourself. It is important to recognize that players are bombarded with conflicting information all the time about stroke mechanics, tactics, mental preparedness and physical training. The management of which information to accept or reject is each players’ responsibility. I suggest students listen carefully to what is said and observe critically, what is seen in the following way: N First, consider the logic of the information to evaluate if it makes sense and

North Shore Country Club Names Spike Gurney Director of Tennis Glen Head, N.Y.-based North Shore Country Club has announced the hiring of Spike Gurney as director of tennis. Gurney comes to North Shore with impressive credentials, having served as director of tennis at Palm Beach Country Club in Palm Beach, Fla. for the past 17 years and has also worked at Brae Burn Country Club in Purchase, N.Y. for many years. Gurney has held sectional and national rankings in singles and doubles with more than 70 doubles titles. He received national recognition as National USPTA Pro of the Year, but is best known for his teaching of the game of tennis. North Shore Country Club has always been known as a “Golf Club With Tennis.” Donald Zucker, owner of North Shore Country Club, believes that tennis, along with fitness and the pool memberships, offer the surrounding community a great opportunity for active families to enjoy the sport of tennis in a country club atmosphere. North Shore has six clay courts and a fully-stocked tennis pro shop. “We plan to emphasize membership services, cardio tennis, social events and extensive lesson program for ladies, men and juniors,” said Gurney. Ladies and men’s teams will be participating in informal inter-club league matches. Tennis is a popular sport in Nassau County and Gurney believes that with a renewed commitment to tennis, it will enhance the overall activity of North Shore Country Club. For more information, call (516) 676-0500 or visit www.nsccli.com.

reinforces or conflicts with what you know of the world. N Next, analyze the top players in the world. Slow motion and stop-action videos are readily available on the Internet. Players can use this tool as a learning resource to compare the consistency of their instruction with the mainstream fundamentals of the best players. N Finally, evaluate the suitability of information as it applies to your game. Unconventional information might uniquely work for you. Caution and patience need to be applied here, however. If the advice doesn’t hold up under the scrutiny of the first two tests, it is probably unsound even if it appears to work now. There will always be many opinions in any area and everyone is entitled to hold their own. All opinions, however, are not formed from the same expertise and experience and do not hold the equivalent usefulness. Since we have a limited capacity for information, it is important to filter wisely in order to make sound choices. Tennis players need to participate in their learning process to learn self-reliance on and off the tennis court. G Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 33 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 14 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Battle of the Grips By Roman Prokes We all know that matching the correct equipment with the correct player is crucial in a technical sport like tennis. You can walk down the aisle of a sports store and see hundreds of rackets on one side and only four different basketballs on the other. It seems excessive, but there is a reason for every variety of tennis racket. With such a massive selection, which will win the battle and be the best suited for you? Here are some tips for picking a grip, which is a fundamental piece of equipment that is often overlooked.

longer durability, the weight adds a distinctive feel which some players appreciate, and the material tends to be more absorbent, thus prolonging the time before it becomes slippery. Cushion grips were introduced later on as a softer alternative. There is more cushioning, as the name obviously states, so one gets a softer feel that is more forgiving. This also reduces shock and vibrations passed to the elbow, as well as lessening blisters. There is a huge array in this style with different colors, textures, thicknesses, etc. Like cars, the choice in racket grips becomes a preference of comfort versus performance.

Round 1: Leather vs. cushion Leather grips were the only grips used on tennis rackets for many years, and although not much has progressed on this technology, there are benefits to using leather grips. Leather is stronger, heavier and natural in composition. Accordingly, you can feel the shape with all the bevels (panels) becoming very pronounced to find your grip easily. The strength creates

Round 2: Tacky overgrips vs. absorbing overgrips Overgrips are very thin grips placed on top of a racket’s existing grip. They are easier to change, cheaper to buy, but are less durable. When the torque of shots causes the racket to twist and turn in your hand, you can quickly add and/or switch overgrips to fix this issue.

Tacky overgrips are for players with drier hands where the grip’s stickiness adds traction. Absorbing overgrips are for players who have sweaty palms. These players require a spongy material to counter their sweat and maintain their grip. Some players even use tacky overgrips when indoors, and change to absorbing overgrips when playing in hot and humid conditions.

Round 3: Self-installation vs. pro installation This is more of a no-contest when it comes to grips because most players are not seasoned enough to install a grip. Sure, anyone can throw a grip over the handle, but a grip technician can make it perform for you. I personally invite all of you to come feel the difference. When a grip is properly installed you get several benefits. First, the grip goes completely to the bottom to reduce blisters and calluses. Brand new rackets that are factory continued on page 32

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B AT T L E O F T H E G R I P S gripped do not do this. Second, you get a smoother surface that doesn’t have grooves (unless you specifically request it), holes, etc. Those very imperfections reduce friction and are a nuisance. Third, the grip is appropriately finished at the top. I constantly see nightmare grip jobs where players continue the grip all the way up the throat without trimming it to size. Fourth, most tennis shops don’t even charge to professionally install grips, so you have nothing to lose!

continued from page 30

“Sure, anyone can throw a grip over the handle, but a grip technician can make it perform for you.” for a lefty. There is even a way to grip for a one-handed backhand or two-handed backhand.

Round 5: Small vs. large Round 4: Lefty vs. righty Did you know that you must grip a racket differently for a right-handed player and a left-handed player? Whether a grip wraps clockwise or counter-clockwise affects how your hand and fingers fit with the tread of the grip. Most rackets are manufactured righty, but can be adjusted

The game of tennis is constantly evolving and the grip of a racket is no different. As players evolve from continental to eastern to western; grip size aids technique for those very grips. Generally, the smaller the grip size, the more the player can hit topspin and have extreme grips. If you like to flatten out your shots, move

to a larger grip size. A bigger grip can also ease tennis elbow. So what is the winning combination for you? There is no exact answer, but being knowledgeable and picking appropriately makes a colossal difference. Don’t just get your equipment online and lose out on catering your equipment to you. Get a grip on your game and feel the difference. G Roman Prokes has perfected his art of gripping by traveling with the most finicky players like Agassi, Haas, Sharapova, Berdych, etc. He has traveled the world over not only to string rackets, but to also put on customized grips. He has produced several grips which are world-renowned, like RPNY Artificial Leather, RPNY Tacky and RPNY Cushion Perforated. For more information, call (516) 759-5200 or visit www.RPNYtennis.com.

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Dr. Tom on the Problem of Quitting or Giving Up Easy Winners Versus Quitters

By Tom Ferraro, Ph.D. The spoiled child will always grow into the athlete who gives up and throws in the towel at the first sign of pressure or adversity. Here is why. A child who is given everything he or she asks for never learns the important psychologi-

cal skills of patience, perseverance and determination. Since they never learned delay of gratification, when faced with pressure, they will fold right away. But don’t blame the child since they simply do not have the skill set to stay focused and strong. This is usually the point when they are brought to the sport psycholo-

gist’s office where we face the daunting task of teaching “the will to win.”

Teaching the “will to win” When your child asks for something, get into the habit of saying “no.” You must teach them that they must earn what they want. If they want a new jacket, say “Okay, but you must take out the garbage every week for three months to get it.” Or, if they are younger and want a new racket say “Okay, but you need to get all A’s or B’s this semester in school.” It is never too early to train them that they must earn what they want. Do that and you will begin to teach them all about the will to win at tennis and at life. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

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Visit the SCJTL eTennis Center: www.scjtl.org E-mail: scjtl@ariastennis.com or Call: 631-590-5019 LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Guide to Long Island’s

TOP TENNIS APPAREL STORES Grand Slam Tennis 214 Commack Road • Commack, N.Y. (631) 499-6444 What are specialty stores? Specialty stores are a place to go and receive extensive, dedicated and welcoming services that do not include the click of a mouse. Jim Donnelly has been a proud owner and operator of Tennis Emporium & Grand Slam Tennis for more than 34 years. Grand Slam Tennis opened in 1986, after the birth of Jim’s youngest son Chase, who currently manages the store. Jim and his three sons (Jes, Ian and Chase) have worked the business for the past 15 years and have reached out to service Long Island and the tennis community. With the help of Jim’s son Chase managing Grand Slam, Jim has had the opportunity to reach out and expand his interest in growing the game by creating the Suffolk County District USTA in conjunction with Joe Arias and the Suffolk County Junior Tennis League (SCJTL). Grand Slam Tennis is not just a tennis specialty store; it is a welcoming environment to any tennis player, whether you’re a recreational, club or tournament level player. Their services provide an array of different possibilities: tennis racquet, badminton, squash and racquetball restringing, tennis attire (women’s, men’s and children’s), tennis tutor ball machines (sales, services and trials), tennis nets, ball hoppers, tennis bags, tennis racquet sales, tennis sneakers (Nike, Babolat, Adidas, Head, Prince), accessories, and a whole lot more. Grand Slam Tennis 34

is 1,800-sq.-ft. of tennis equipment, with one side dedicated to tennis attire, and the other to tennis racquets, sneakers, and five stringing machines. Your experience at Grand Slam Tennis is guaranteed to be different from any other store. The staff is very experienced, knowledgeable and willing to help. When looking to buy a tennis racquet or ball machine, you are able to demo the equipment through the Grand Slam demo program. The demo program is geared toward the player, and is based on your feedback; therefore, you can be guided in the right direction in purchasing the right racquet for you. At the point of purchase, all of your information (name, phone number, address, racquet, grip size, string and tension) is stored in the computer database for future reference. See you on the court!

MD Tennis 122 Main Street • Westhampton Beach, N.Y. (631) 898-0200 • mdtennisandgolf@aol.com MD Tennis, located at 122 Main Street in the beautiful village of Westhampton Beach, N.Y., is open year-round with extended hours in the summer to accommodate people who might not get out to the Hamptons until later in the day. MD Tennis offers 24hour stringing, with one-hour service also available. MD Tennis carries a wide selection of clothing and sneakers from Boast, Babolat, Bolle, Duc, Head, FILA, K-Swiss, Prince and Yonex, among others. MD Tennis also offers a delivery service! For more information, contact Marcus Donohue by phone at (631) 898-0200 or e-mail mdtennisandgolf@aol.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


Solow Sports 10 W Neck Road • Huntington, N.Y. (631) 629-4940 • www.solowsports.com In 2005, Derek Hsiang watched 35-year-old Andre Agassi miraculously grind through his U.S. Open draw and push Roger Federer to the limit for the first three sets of the final. Immediately, Derek caught the tennis bug, and over the next year-and-a-half, he committed to ditching corporate life to pursue his passion project: Opening up a tennis retail business. Along the way, Derek partnered with Doris Maffia, general manager of Tennisport in Long Island City. In June 2007, they launched The Tennis Store, an online tennis specialty retail site. Derek ran all the online operations from his bedroom, and Doris processed orders from Tennisport’s pro shop. Things went well until July 2009, when Tennisport’s land was taken through eminent domain. With The Tennis Store stranded, Derek and Doris scrambled to find a new home for the business. Within two months, the Tennis Store was reincarnated as Solow Sports at its new location in Huntington Village, N.Y. Why Solow Sports? Although it’s primarily a tennis store, Derek and Doris are gradually expanding it to carry an assortment of non-team, or “solo” sports, all at prices “so low” that you’ll have to see them for yourself. To this day, Derek’s tennis obsession still runs strong. He loves to meet new customers and plays tennis with them whenever he gets a chance. Doris brings 30 years of experience and connections in the tennis industry. Her daughter, Doris Rose Piazza brings a high level of enthusiasm and energy that rubs off on everyone that walks into the store. And Doris’s sister, Marilu Vega, is the resident stringer on the premises. Solow Sports, open MondaySaturday from 9:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. and Sunday from 11:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., offers a full line of tennis racquets, paddles, bags, accessories, apparel and footwear from all the major brands. And they’re all available online at www.solowsports.com. Additionally, they offer the following services: N Tennis, racquetball and squash racquet re-stringing with sameday turnaround N Demo service with more than 100 tennis racquets and platform tennis paddles to choose from N Free re-gripping with the purchase of a grip or overgrip N Racquet customization N Grommet replacement

Topspin Tennis & Fitness 218 Jericho Turnpike (516) 364-9470 www.TopSpinTennisLI.com Topspin Tennis & Fitness is Nassau County’s top tennis specialty shop. Topspin moved to its new state-of-the-art location two years ago, now centrally located at 218 Jericho Turnpike in Syosset, N.Y. directly across from Syosset Hospital. Known as the home of “Clothes for the Pros,” Topspin has been serving Long Island tennis pros and players with equipment and the top fashion in the sport for more than 30 years. Topspin’s staff is known for its expertise and highquality service. You will find all the premier tennis brands of equipment, apparel and shoes at Topspin for the whole family, including Nike, Adidas, K-Swiss, Asics, Babolat, Wilson, Head, Prince and many more. Top spin carries the actual outfits and footwear worn at the U.S. Open and other major events by Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer. Topspin carries a full line of fitness and workout apparel, and running shoes, so you can go from the court to the gym in style. Their racket wall contains a large selection of frames, bags and accessories at great prices. Your racket can be strung while you wait by Topspin’s professional staff. Ask any tennis enthusiast on Long Island and odds are they will be familiar with Topspin Tennis & Fitness. Topspin is a great destination for tennis and Father’s Day gifts as well. Topspin’s staff will ensure that, with the right equipment, you will reach your highest potential as a player and just as importantly, with the right fashion, will look great too!

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Sony to Present Wimbledon Finals in 3D or the first time ever, the finals of Wimbledon will this year be filmed in 3D and screened live in High Definition 3D to 3D capable cinemas around the world. The live 3D production, in partnership with the Wimbledon host broadcaster the BBC, will also be offered to interested global broadcasters. Sony and The All England Lawn Tennis Club have announced their official supplier partnership to bring Wimbledon in 3D to suitably equipped cinemas around the world, offering the perfect opportunity for fans to experience the Championships like never before in a completely new environment, while retaining all the excitement and atmosphere of the famous Centre Court. “Wimbledon is renowned for its heritage and sense of tradition. At the same time we are always looking for ways to improve the presentation of The Championships by successfully blending that tra-

F

dition with innovation,” said Ian Ritchie, chief executive of The All England Lawn Tennis Club. “We are delighted that our 3D partnership with Sony will not only guarantee we are at the cutting edge of live sporting television, but also deliver a compelling new viewing experience for our global audiences, especially amongst our younger supporters.” Sony will produce the men’s semifinals, finals and women’s finals in High Definition 3D as the official supplier of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships. To bring the excitement of 3D tennis to interested 3D cinema chains worldwide, Sony will work with SuperVision Media, their theatrical distribution partners. The 3D production will also be offered to interested global broadcasters seeking unique and compelling content for their 3D channels. The two parties will also seek further possibilities to deliver 3D tennis to a much wider audience over time.

Photo credit: Stockbyte

Sony is uniquely placed to capture and broadcast the finals of the Wimbledon Championships in Live 3D, bringing the exhilaration and atmosphere of Wimbledon to a larger audience than ever before, with every forehand, smash and volley yours to appreciate in 3D. “We are delighted to be working with the All England Lawn and Tennis Club to bring such a high profile sporting event to consumers around the world in 3D,” said Fujio Nishida, president of Sony Europe. “Watching tennis in High Definition 3D is a stunning experience, bringing the speed of the action and the emotions of the occasion to life; it is as close to the atmosphere and excitement of Centre Court as actually being there. With the Live 3D Wimbledon experience available in 3D cinemas across the world, many more people will be able to enjoy one of the world’s most iconic sporting events as though they were actually at Wimbledon.”

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


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Proper Injury Prevention for an Athlete By Dr. Steven Jonas ost of us begin our athletic endeavors without much thought of injury prevention. We go about whatever sport we choose with minimal preparation and no specific plan. As a result, many athletes find themselves injured on a regular basis. Having a plan with pre- and post-activity injury prevention measures is the key. First and foremost, every athlete should have a standard examination by a physician and obtain proper medical clearance

M

before beginning any cardiovascular activity. After that, going through a Functional Movement Screen is the next most important thing to do. The Functional Movement Screen consists of a series of tests that pinpoint poor movement patterns. By looking at movement patterns, and not just one muscle group or joint, weak links can be identified. Once a weak pattern is identified by the Functional Movement Screen, corrective exercises can be prescribed to alleviate the imbalance or weak movement patterns. Pre-existent poor movement pat-

terns are often the underlying cause of a specific symptom or performance problem, since they cause the body to compensate and possibly become injured. Proper movement preparation is very important for assuring that the muscles, ligaments and tendons in your body are ready for dynamic motion. All forms of exercise involve movement, and preparing for it is essential so that all of your body’s muscles are warmed up and firing. There are neuromuscular connections which need to be turned on properly, and there

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


are specific movement preparatory exercises that should be done for running, biking, swimming, strength and conditioning. Generally, five to 10 min. should be all that is needed. Spending this time on a regular basis will certainly prevent injury.

“Workouts put repetitive stress on the body, and its ability to adapt to that stress leads to improvement. Proper rest and recovery allows the body to adapt properly.” Training in the proper heart rate zone will also increase the chances of minimizing injury. Many athletes unknowingly increase their injury risk by training at too high of an intensity on a regularly basis. Consulting a health professional and/or taking a VO2 test, which monitors your oxygen use, is the best way to ascertain your heart rate zones. By knowing

your heart rate zones, which are determined by a percentage of your own ventillary threshold, you can have a plan of base training, building, peaking and active recovery. A training plan that includes proper aerobic training and recovery is essential for injury prevention. Active recovery and regeneration are very important in allowing your body to heal itself and avoid injury. It is important to plan time in your training schedule for recovery, which means workouts of less intensity and duration. Incorporating a weekly rest day into your schedule is of paramount importance. Workouts put repetitive stress on the body, and its ability to adapt to that stress leads to improvement. Proper rest and recovery allows the body to adapt properly. Regeneration is equally important. For instance, yoga, other proper rehabilitative stretches, massages and ball rolling are excellent options. Time spent each week resting and rehabilitating will pay back tenfold. A proper diet is essential for your body during training. Having a diet with the

proper proportions of protein, carbohydrates and fats is important. Understanding your individual nutritional needs is necessary to assuring good performance and injury prevention. Also, knowing if your metabolism is slow or fast can help you dial in your caloric needs. Finally, eating the right amount of meals a day and proper hydration will help your body perform and heal better, and most importantly, avoid injury. G Dr. Steven Jonas is a graduate of New York Chiropractic College. He continued his post graduate work becoming certified in Activator, Cox and Active Release Techniques. He is one of the founders of the New York Chiropractic Council, as well as a past president. In 1992, he was named New York State Chiropractor of the Year. Being in practice for over 30 years, Dr. Jonas specializes in the treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of injuries to the spine and extremities. For more information, call (516) 921-1295, e-mail dr.steve@jonaschiropractic.com or visit http://jonaschiropractic.com.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


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Programs vary at each SPORTIME Summer Camp location. LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine 41 2941_LITM


By Emilie Katz Wedding bliss? Photo credit: Jeffrey Hamilton

The marriage between Paradorn Srichaphan and former Miss Universe Natalie Glebova has ended after only three years. This announcement comes on the heels of Stanislas Wawrinka’s recent split from his wife of less than a year. Tennis players usually have a pretty good marriage track record. Here are some couples still going strong: N Rod Laver and Mary Bensen: 45 years N Evonne Goolagong-Cawley and Richard Cawley: 36 years N Jimmy Connors and Patti McGuire: 32 years N Mats Wilander and Sonya Mulholland: 25 years N Ivan Lendl and Samantha Frankel: 22 years N Stefan Edberg and Annette Olsen: 19 years N John McEnroe and Patty Smyth: 14 years N Mary Jo Fernandez and Tony Godsick: 11 years N Pete Sampras and Bridgette Wilson: 11 years N Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf: 10 years N Pat Rafter and Lara Feltham: 7 years N Michael Chang and Amber Liu: 3 years N Roger Federer and Mirka Vavrinec: 2 years N Andy Roddick and Brooklyn Decker: 2 years

Another strange mishap for a WTA star Kim Clijsters cracked her ankle at a wedding party last weekend, likely forcing the 42

U.S. and Australian Open winner out of Roland Garros. Her mishap brings back memories of the accident that sidelined Serena Williams immediately after her Wimbledon victory last year. She stepped on broken glass at a restaurant. Williams’ misery was compounded by a series of health concerns and she has not played since. When the French Open starts on May 22, tennis might have to do without the winners of the last three Grand Slam tournaments. Clijsters was wearing high heels when she stepped on someone’s foot at the wedding of her cousin Tim. In tennis shoes, it might have been bad, but the heels compounded the freak accident. The complicated injury—where ligaments were stretched on top of a torn ankle joint capsule and tendon sheath—will force her to keep her right ankle immobilized for several days and will leave her on crutches. “Kim faces a recovery of at least four to six weeks,” a statement on her Web site announced. “Since the French Open begins near the end of that stretch, Kim’s presence in Paris is very uncertain.”

WTA gets in on the reality TV game The WTA announced the six players who are going to be featured in the new Sony Ericsson-sponsored reality show “Xperia Hot Shots,” Dominika Cibulkova, Sorana Cirstea, Alize Cornet, Sabine

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Lisicki, Bethanie Mattek-Sands and Heather Watson. According to the press release, Watson said she screamed when she found out she “got the part.”

Tennis tweets of late What is on your favorite tennis players mind and what are they up to? We learned this through the wonderful world of Twitter: Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Where is the sun when I want it? Need to get rid of those tan lines! Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): Ugh, I’m singing karaoke again. Ugh #ineedhelp seriously guys … Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76): Love him! RT @mepucin: Teemu Selanne, 40 years old, gets hat trick tonight and Ducks fans are chanting “One more year.” Why not? RajeevRam (@RajeevRam): Also the Butler Dawgs went down last night so ended up being a tough sports Monday … hopefully I can turn it around today in the dubs. Victoria Azarenka (@vika7): With my coach … he had like two double espressos with a comment, “Coffee is sooo good in Europe, LOL!”


Andy Roddick (@andyroddick): USTA sold out member presale tix which is 80 percent of the venue for Davis Cup vs. Spain in July in an hour and 45 min. Giddyup! Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Will head for an easy run and then the pool and the beach to relax a bit. Justin Gimelstob (@justingimelstob): At Lakers/Utah game with my buddy Ian. Utah upsets the Lakers in a sloppy game. Gordon Hayward is the real deal.

Victoria Azarenka (@vika7): Damn it! I really need a Spanish teacher … I keep embarrassing myself trying to show off speaking Spanish LOL! The Bryan Brothers (@bryanbros): Packing up. About to head to Europe for three months. Mom, dad, friends: We’re going in. See ya when we see ya!

Amer Delic (@amerdelic): Last four golf majors won by a non-American. How many more before U.S. golf media follows U.S. tennis media’s steps and hits the panic button? Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76): My hub’s alarm goes off at 4:30 a.m. during week, so its never a good thing when I’m up before him!

Justin Gimelstob (@justingimelstob): Seven mile run to start the day, pondering participation in 2011 NYC Marathon for all 64 minutes! Should I run?

Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Video Game Review

Top Spin 4 By Michael Sarro

I wouldn’t go as far as calling myself a true “gamer,” but when it comes to sports video games, I am highly experienced. Yet, I have rarely played tennis games in the past few years, especially on nextgeneration consoles (Microsoft’s XBOX 360, PlayStation 3 or Nintendo’s Wii). I am not sure if this is due to the lack of good games available on the market , or my love for other sports games, but Top Spin 4 from 2K Sports is not only worth the time, it is worth the buy. My favorite mode of play in any sport game is the career mode. I have the most fun playing against the computer on the highest level of difficulty and improving with a player or team for years to come. In this day and age, many people play online against others around the world in online or live modes. Top Spin 4 allows you to do both. You can play online in the “World Tour Mode” which lets you play against other people with either their own created player or one of the many past and present tennis stars in the game. Or, you could create a character from scratch and bring that character up from the bottom of the rankings and your career progresses. The Career Mode is where the game really excels. It is very in-depth and you can even create a player to look almost identical to yourself with advanced facial and body modulations. After spending about 30 min., trying to get my charac-

ter to look like me, I started my tennis career. Like any impatient gamer, I skipped the tutorials and went straight to game play after briefing over the control manual. At first, the game was slightly frustrating, as I was having trouble aiming and my shots were lacking “umph.” But, I quickly caught on and the game play picked up quite a bit. The graphics and overall game play were good. The crowd’s ooh’s and aah’s add to the atmosphere, as does the player’s emotions after good or bad shots. All of the major courts and stadiums are available with the exception of Wimbledon, but there still is a grass major called the Dublin Open which you are to assume is Wimbledon. After not playing a tennis video game for several years, I thoroughly enjoyed playing Top Spin 4 by 2K Sports and will continue to advance my character’s career in the game, hoping to play in the major tournaments soon. The only complaint I have with the game is that there is not much of a soundtrack and the music in the game becomes repetitive. Other than that, it was hard to find a flaw. Tennis video games have come a long way since the original “Pong” came out and there is no better example of this than with Top Spin 4. If you are a fan of tennis and video games, then this game is a definite buy. G Michael Sarro may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 or e-mail michael@litennismag.com.

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Underrated Players: A Complete Analysis By Miguel Cervantes III In any competitive endeavor, the ability to compete with others who are of equivalent or similar skill is imperative for success. You would expect to see neither a professional Major League Baseball (MLB) player in a little league game, nor a National Basketball Association (NBA) player hitting the hardwood with Baldwin High School … the difference in skill is too great to allow for fair play. Because the skill level is so different, the competition loses its value. The reason to play sports is to see whose skills are better. We go into the fray, time after time, with the expectation that the work we have put into our common arena is greater than that of our opponent. We expect that our desire to win is

greater than our opponent’s. We enter into a competitive agreement that we shall abide by the rules that both parties have agreed to play under and let nothing else determine the outcome. When this unspoken competitive agreement is broken, the integrity of our collective endeavor is undervalued, disrespected and undermined. Although underrated players is not an all-pervasive problem in USTA league play, it is a thorn that has always and will always be there. It is constantly talked about from an emotional point of view, but the issue deserves to be looked at with a critical eye.

What is underrating? Underrating a player means that a player has a rating that does not accurately reflect their skill level. More specifically, it means

that a player is better than what their rating suggests.

How does underrating happen? Before our current ratings system, players would go to a club to be rated by a teaching pro who observed them play for a little under a half-hour. After play ended, each player would be assigned a rating. This presents a number of problems. The opinions of one tennis pro might be different from another. While Pro A might rate someone a 3.5, Pro B might rate that same individual a 4.0, and Pro C might rate them a 3.0. Opinions as to what each level should look like are different. Using benchmarks confuses the problem even further. If someone were to be agreed upon as a benchmark 3.5 player, anyone losing to them might

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be suggested to be a 3.0, anyone who beats this benchmark might be considered a 4.0. This doesn’t account for an off-day for the benchmark. What of all the variables? What happens if our benchmark has a bad day, got fired from work, lost their pet, or felt ill? This system has it’s flaws, but it functioned well or some time. In the opinion of one long standing captain, the old system was far more accurate than the new system of self-rating. It could be suggested that our current system improves on the old, removing the human element at least by one degree. No longer does a player have to be observed in play to be rated. Each new player to USTA completes a series of questions and is then given a minimum rating allowed. Have you played tennis in high school? You are a minimum of 3.5. Have you played for a college/university? Congratulations, you are a 4.5. This system has its flaws as well. How can it account for someone who played for a college with a bad team or someone who played in college 20 years ago and cannot play at the 4.5 Level anymore? Again, the issue is with the multiple variables that can affect rating outcomes. No system is perfect though, and so while our current system is not perfect, can it improve on the old? The current system is heavily reliant on the honor

code. We expect that everyone answering the survey will be honest. We expect that new players will disclose everything and not answer questions in order to obtain a desired rating, as opposed to an appropriate rating. Underrating can happen here though when new players (or the person answering the questions) are dishonest.

Why underrate? Underrating is done for several reasons, but the two most common are: N To be more competitive in a league; and N To avoid losing. While the second is usually purely an issue of ego, the first is of much more interest and consequence. It may sound cynical to say that the teams that go to playoffs and sectionals most are the ones with the most underrated players, but there is some truth to it. By definition, the teams going to the playoffs and sectionals are the best in the league and thus represent the best the section has to offer in 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, etc. Because they are the best in their respective leagues, the players still in it at the end of the season, although they might not necessarily be underrated, are closer to being underrated than the rest of the league. This suggests then that the team

with players closer to the tipping point of the next league up (more underrated than the others) is the team that will have the most success. This is not always the case, but mathematically, we would certainly place our bets on this line. This fact makes it extremely tempting for teams to underrate players on purpose in order to be more competitive, and here is where the slippery slope begins. It is one thing to have the best 4.0 players in a league all on one team; it is another to have 4.0 players on a team that should be 4.5 just so that you can win the league. This represents something dishonest and degrades the value of our sport and our competition. How can we account for players who never played high school tennis (no college tennis), but plays at a 4.5 Level? How can we account for the players who played in a foreign country and can answer the questionnaire with complete honesty and be given a minimum rating of 3.0? It is these players who can be seen as most valuable since they represent a way to gain an unfair advantage on your team that cannot under the current system be contested. They can answer the questionnaire with reasonable honesty and attain a rating not representative of their true skill level. This is only the best case scenario of dishoncontinued on page 46

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U N D E R R AT E D P L AY E R S esty. The worst case scenario is one where someone answers the questions with complete disregard for honesty. The issue is exacerbated by the fact that as few as two to three underrated players can turn the course of a match in the favor of the less honest team. In mixeddoubles and tri-level only, three courts are played. If you have two to three underrated players spread out, you increase your chances of winning significantly. In the regular summer season, the first singles and first doubles courts are more valuable than the other courts. With two to three underrated players on these courts, a match can swing heavily in favor of the less honest team.

Who gets hurt by underrated players? The answer is all of us; all of us and the sport collectively are injured in this bit of dishonesty, but none more than the lower levels of play (our 2.5, 3.0 and 3.5 players/leagues). Mathematically, as league skill level increases, there will be a lower number of people available. This is true for any sport. There are far fewer people who have the skill to play in the NBA than there are casual basketball players. In

continued from page 45

USTA, it is not uncommon for a higher level to play less courts for just this reason. Because the pyramid of skill works out this way, the players who are really affected are the lower levels. These players are your casual players, the men and women that do it for fun, they do it because they want to enjoy the game, because they have a passion for something they grew up with or they found along the paths of their lives. These people play because their friends are playing or because, after working their nine to five, they need to blow off some steam. Everyone has an expectation when they play tennis, but I doubt that anyone expects to play an opponent who is going to blow them away. Most people enter USTA league play at the lower levels and it is an introduction to competitive tennis play. If we are being honest in our responses to the new player questionnaire, anyone with competitive tennis play will not receive a rating less than 3.5, therefore, the new players entering in at (though not limited to) 2.5 and 3.0 are the ones who are most likely to encounter underrated players. Imagine for a second that someone who has never played competitive tennis has to play their first match against

someone who has twice the amount of on-court experience as they have? They get demolished and demoralized in their match. Does that person want to return for a second match? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a considerably frustrating experience and one that we shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t desire to occur. As tennis players, we represent our sport as well as ourselves. We should want to grow our sport and share what we found in our sport with others. Whatever our reasons for playing, it stands to reason that others might find tennis attractive for the same reason. This is just from a players perspective; from USTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective, we can deduce that they would desire more new players to take to the courts, but because underrated players effect our new players more than our journeymen â&#x20AC;Ś itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an issue that goes beyond just the individual.

What do we do? When encountering an underrated player, most of us will react emotionally, venting our frustrations either at the alleged player or at our teammates. Some of us may go so far as to file a grievance; this will do little for us, unless the personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continued on page 48

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U N D E R R AT E D P L AY E R S name comes up in a search of their tennis history that directly contradicts their responses to the questionnaire. We will usually demonize that player and place a great deal of negative energy on them. At times, this anger is misplaced since it is not the player’s fault at all, but the fault of their captain. Many players have legitimately never played competitively. Their captains will sign them up and fill out the questionnaire for them knowing that although the questions have been answered accurately, the outcome will not represent their player’s skill. At best, we can hope that in a full season, their rating will be bumped to what is appropriate, but at worst, their captain will have them play down in order to sustain their underrate. Many players do not actually know their skill level, and a less than scrupulous captain will take full advantage of this. Should our anger then be placed on the captain? Our anger is still misplaced in focusing our energy on the captain. At best, we can give them the benefit of the doubt and say that the captain is just trying to make their team competitive within the rules of USTA. At worst, we can say that the captain is acting in a dishonest way to gain an advantage, but again still inside the rules of USTA.

continued from page 46

What should we do? In any environment, be it sport, work or otherwise, we have rules that are both spoken and unspoken, written and unwritten. The rules of any environment are in place so that chaos does not ensue; the rules are in place so that there is a common understanding of how we want our environment to run. In USTA, we have “The Code,” in government we have our Constitution. Our Constitution has amendments though, amendments that allow for a degree of flexibility so that if our rules are not working in the way we wanted them to work they can be changed. This flexibility is part of what makes our Constitution great. With our Constitution, we have the ability to say, “This is not working as intended; let’s change it!” Although some would argue that the current system for rating new players is an improvement over our old system I am of the opinion that it allows for too much of what we did not intend and what we do not want. There are several scenarios where players can be underrated with complete impunity. Although it is dishonest, it is dishonesty within the rules which we have set, rules which we as a community have made. If the rules under

which we play allow for dishonesty and we have a problem with it, our negative energies are misplaced on individuals. If the problem is significant enough that it warrants copious amounts of negative energy we should strongly consider a change in our rules. If it is not significant enough of a problem to warrant examination, then we should continue to play in our leagues, but we cannot in good conscious complain if we feel we played someone we should not have because they are underrated. I am not the type of person that believes that a system can be fairly criticized without proposing an alternative to this system. This article has run on long enough and for those of you magnanimous enough to devote your time to my thoughts on a subject we all deal with I thank you sincerely and hope you will indulge me a bit further at a later time. Online at LITennisMag.com, you will find a parallel article on an alternate system of rating new players. G Formerly with Daniel Burgess at Freeport Tennis, Miguel Cervantes III now teaches at the Long Beach Tennis Center and Carefree Racquet Club. He may be reached by e-mail at UnderstandingTennis@gmail.com.

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Long Island Team of Cohen & Bielik Just Four Wins Away From U.S. Open Main Draw wo local Long Islanders won the U.S. Open National Playoffs/Mixed-Doubles Sectional Qualifying Tournament, played at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The team of Darrin Cohen & Bea Bielik was rarely tested throughout the tournament and did not drop a set in five wins. In the finals, they defeated Magda Okruashvili & Tsimafey Senkevich, 6-2, 6-2. Next up for Cohen & Bielik will be a tournament comprised of the winners from each of the USTA’s 16 Sections. The winner of that tournament, which will be played in New Haven, Conn. in August, during the WTA’s Pilot Penn event, will advance straight into the main draw of the 2011 U.S. Open. “Most of the players in this tournament were younger than us, and we used that to our advantage,” said Bielik. “I think we only spent about 15 min. playing as a doubles team before this tournament, but we have a lot of tennis experience between the two of us.” Cohen is a former standout collegiate player at the University of Virginia, and Bielik is a former National Champion at Wake Forest who also spent some time on the WTA Tour. She reached the third round of the U.S. Open in 2005 where she lost to Justine Henin. Cohen is currently the head tennis pro at Sportime Kings Park, while Bielik is the director of tennis at Sportime Lynbrook. The team was put together and coached for this tournament by mutual friend and colleague Jason Wass, who figured they would be a formidable team and he was certainly correct. “The team showed great poise throughout the tournament and used their teamwork and experience to defeat all challengers despite only playing together in two practice matches before the tournament,” said Wass. Bielik and Cohen said that they did not know what to expect from this tournament coming in, but their goal was to “simply enjoy themselves.” After playing for the last five days straight, the pair is now looking forward to some rest and relaxation. “The experience was great and a lot of fun,” said Cohen. “I am looking forward to continuing on to the next step, but first, I look forward to resting.”

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With five wins in the books and four remaining for their big shot to face the pros at the U.S. Open, the next four months prior to the New Haven qualifier will be a tough waiting period for the Long Island duo. While Bielik has been in the main draw of a Grand Slam before, she would certainly embrace a return trip and

this is a brand new experience for Cohen. After asking him what it would mean to him to be part of the main draw at the 2011 U.S. Open, he replied, “A dream come true, honestly.” If the team of Cohen & Bielik has four more wins in them, then that dream will become a realization!

Darrin Cohen & Bea Bielik en route to their 6-2, 6-2 win over Magda Okruashvili & Tsimafey Senkevich U.S. Open National Playoffs/Mixed-Doubles Sectional Qualifying Champs Darrin Cohen (second from left) & Bea Bielik (far right) with coach Jason Wass (far left) of Sportime and Jeff Crowne (second from right), chief operating officer of Sportime Darrin Cohen (left) and Bea Bielik (right) are presented their winning trophies by Whitney Kraft (center), director of tennis for the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

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How to Stay Motivated By Jay Karl oes it feel like winter has dragged on endlessly and spring will never arrive? Do you find it difficult to get out of bed in the morning and get yourself to the club? Are you making up excuses on your way home from work to avoid stopping at the gym? Rest assured, spring is here and summer is sure to follow. However, even the most dedicated exercisers occasionally get bored with their routine. Waning motivation, short cuts and lack of enthusiasm, are signs of a stale exercise regimen, but that doesn’t mean you can’t re-energize your routine. Here are a few tips for staying motivated to keep active:

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1. Vary your routine. A new variation on your favorite activity—such as Zumba or cardiokick boxing instead of “Step” aerobics, or yoga or even a different kind of cardio workout may be enough to reinvigorate a stale routine.

2. Try something entirely new, especially something you never thought you’d do. If you’ve always stuck to solitary pursuits, sign up for a team sport, such as basketball. Or tackle something you’ve shied away from, such as a “cardio blast” class.

6. Keep an exercise log to track your progress. Unsure if you’re making progress toward your goals? Then keep a workout log, which allows you to keep track of your goals, monitor your progress and adjust your routine as necessary.

3. Find a workout buddy. Exercise companions add a social element to any routine. Ask a friend to be your workout partner—you’ll be less likely to skip a workout if someone is waiting for you.

7. Don’t berate yourself if you miss a workout. Life is full of obstacles and unexpected appointments, illness and setbacks are bound to happen sooner or later. Don’t let a few missed workouts turn into a month of unfulfilled resolutions.

4. Set a new goal. Working out to stay in shape is fine, but setting a goal, such as finishing a 5K race or completing a bike -a-thon, will give your daily workouts more meaning. 5. Treat yourself to a workout gadget or accessory. Heart-rate monitors and other exercise gadgets can make your workout more fun and challenging.

Noah Rubin of Merrick Captures Boys 16s USTA International Spring Championship Photo credits: Cynthia Lum

In the Boys 16s finals of the USTA International Spring Championships at the USTA Training Center West, Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif., 14th-seeded Noah Rubin of Merrick, N.Y., overcame a 4-1 deficit in the third-set tie-breaker to defeat the number six seed, Nikko Madregallejo from Duarte, Calif., 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (5). “When I got behind, all I kept thinking was that I’ve been out here way to long so I’d better get the trophy I want,” said the 15-year-old Rubin, who will also play in the 16s Division at the Easter Bowl in Rancho Mirage and Palm Desert, Calif. “He’s a tough player and he kept coming back. I couldn’t believe it when that last forehand went long. Rubin built 4-1 leads in the second and third sets, but couldn’t close his opponent out. Madregallejo broke to tie the second set 5-5, took a 6-5 lead on a forehand crosscourt winner and evened the match when Rubin hit a backhand wide. In the third set, Rubin broke to take a 6-5 lead, but was broken right back, forcing a decisive tie-breaker when Rubin finally prevailed to win the championship. 50

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

8. Reward yourself. Reaching a fitness goal or milestone is a great excuse to treat yourself to something new. A massage, an evening out, or other “indulgence” may be the key to staying motivated. 9. Focus on how good exercise makes you look and feel. You know that incredibly satisfied and healthy feeling you get immediately after a workout? Remember it! And use it to motivate yourself the next time you’re thinking about blowing off your workout. 10. If all else fails, take a break from exercise. Sometimes a lack of motivation is your body’s way of telling you to rest. If anything hurts, or if your energy is running low, take a hiatus for a few days before resuming your workouts. A little “R & R” may be just what your body needs to renew your motivation. Spring has sprung! G Jay Karl is executive director of sales for Sportime Clubs. Jay has more than 30 years of experience in the fitness industry, specializing in sales and marketing. He supervises and mentors membership personnel and functions as executive director of sales for Sportime, and also serves as general manager of the Sportime at Syosset Fitness location. He may be reached by phone at (516) 496-3100 or e-mail jkarl@sportimeny.com.


USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region Board Daniel Burgess ....................President, USTA Eastern-Long Island Region ........................................................................amertwist@aim.com Scott Axler ............................Region Past President/Boys Ranking Chair/Junior Competition ............................................superscoot@aol.com Mike Pavlides........................Region Vice President ..................................................................................................mpavlides@msd.k12.ny.us Craig Fligstein ......................Secretary/Treasurer ............................................................................................................craigfligstein@aol.com Kathy Miller ..........................League Coordinator ................................................................................................................kathym65@aol.com Bob Coburn ..........................Membership/Marketing ............................................................................................bobcoburnsales@yahoo.com Roberta Feldman..................Girls Ranking Chair........................................................................................................................rlf1020@aol.com Sunny Fishkind......................Nassau District Delegate ......................................................................................................sunny28@verizon.net Joe Arias ..............................Suffolk County District Delegate ........................................................................................jarias@ariastennis.com Terry Fontana ......................Rally Day Chair/Corporate Challenge Chair ........................................................................terry196@optonline.net Steve Haar............................Rally Day Chair/Web Site Committee ................................................................................steveoncourt@aol.com Herb Harris ..........................Volunteer Chair/Grant Committee Chair ....................................................................................tfgl@optonline.net Anneleis Karp ......................President Emeritus ......................................................................................................akatennislady@verizon.net Eileen Leonard......................Competition Training Chair ................................................................................................cocoaviii@optonline.net Emily Moore..........................Multicultural Committee Chair ........................................................................................tennispro137@yahoo.com Brenda White........................Scholastic Representative Chair, Nassau ....................................................................bwhite@malverne.k12.ny.us Open ....................................Scholastic Representative Chair, Suffolk Ed Wolfarth ..........................Grievance Committee Chair ..................................................................................................wolfarthe@msn.com Marian Morris ......................Events Planner/Nominating Committee Chair ....................................................................mmincourt@gmail.com Jacki Binder ..........................Public Relations Chair ........................................................................................................jacki.binder@gmail.com Jay Binder ............................Legal Counsel ..................................................................................................................bincohllp@optonline.net Open ....................................Junior Liaison Open ....................................League Liaison Robert Fernandez ................Community Development Chair, Nassau ........................................................................robertbucheli@gmail.com Open ....................................Community Development Chair, Suffolk

USTA/Eastern/Long Island Region Staff Bill Mecca ............................Tennis Service Representative ......................................................................................mecca@eastern.usta.com Jocelyn Cruz ........................Community Outreach Specialist........................................................................................jcruz@eastern.usta.com

A Message From USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region President Daniel Burgess On behalf of the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region, I am thrilled to welcome so many tennis enthusiasts from across the region to our 21st Annual Awards Dinner and to congratulate all of our award winners. This evening is “A Celebration of Today’s Long Island Tennis Champions” and it is so exciting to have so many outstanding adult and junior athletes here and to be able to recognize their achievements both on and off the court. Awards are being given to deserving tennis players in more than 20 categories. Some will be honored for their excellence on the court. Others will be recognized for their contributions towards growing the game of tennis in communities across Long Island. Every one of them distinguished himself or herself in 2010, and I am confident that each will continue to in his or her efforts in the future. Thank you to the members of the board of the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region for their continuing support and enthusiasm for the game of tennis, be it in schools, at parks, in private clubs or public community centers. A special thank you to Marian Morris, our hard-working events planner, whose tireless efforts have made tonight such a success. I would also like to thank the broader tennis community of Nassau and Suffolk Counties for helping to make the Long Island Region strong. Judging from tonight’s award winners, we have a great deal of achievement across Long Island. The combined efforts of our Region Board members and the Long Island tennis community have served to make our Region a showpiece. We can all be proud that our Annual Awards Dinner serves as a model for similar events around the country. I would also like to recognize and thank the Eastern Section representatives who

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are here tonight, including Section President Jeff Williams, and Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer D.A. Abrams, for their continued support, as well as the representatives of the other regions in the Eastern Section who are represented here. This evening’s keynote speaker is a homegrown success story herself, both on and off the court. Currently vice president of community relations and field marketing/fan development for MSG Sports Teams (Knicks, Rangers and Liberty), Karin Buchholz grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. playing tennis. She graduated magna cum laude with a degree in finance from the University of Arizona, where she was a scholarship tennis player. She spent three years playing on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, achieving a world ranking in both singles and doubles. Since her playing days, Karin has worked for the USTA and led a national industry initiative to grow the game of tennis by exposing it to new audiences. She also served as the executive director and head tennis professional for the Harlem Junior Tennis Program. Under her direction, the program was honored as one of President George H.W. Bush’s 1,000 Daily Points of Light. Karin has more than 20 years of experience in sports management, marketing, communications and community sports development. Before she began her tenure at MSG, she worked at the National Basketball Association (NBA) offices in New York, was director of fan development for the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA), and spent five years with the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) in Colorado Springs, Colo. We welcome Karin and offer our congratulations to all of tonight’s honorees. Daniel Burgess, President USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


Office of the Nassau County Executive 1550 Franklin Avenue Mineola, N.Y. 11501

Edward P. Mangano Nassau County Executive

Dear Friends: I am pleased to join all of you who have gathered to celebrate the success of the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region on the occasion of its 21st Annual Awards Dinner at the Crest Hollow Country Club. Tennis has evolved into an exemplary sporting event, providing the athletes who participate an opportunity to develop their skills and to enjoy the excitement, camaraderie and lasting friendships inherent in sports. This wonderful organization is to be commended for its charitable involvements, quality leadership and selfless service which have made a permanent and positive impact on us all. Please accept my best wishes and allow me to extend hearty congratulations to The USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region for its exemplary leadership and dedicated community service, and to all of you who work toward forwarding the goals of this fine organization throughout the year. On behalf of the residents of Nassau County, I wish to extend best wishes for an exciting and memorable event. Sincerely,

Edward P. Mangano Nassau County Executive

Office of the Suffolk County Executive H. Lee Dennison Building 100 Veterans Memorial Highway â&#x20AC;˘ PO Box 6100 Hauppauge, N.Y. 11788-0099

Steve Levy Suffolk County Executive

Dear Friends: On behalf of the thousands of tennis enthusiasts who make their homes in Suffolk County, I would like to congratulate members and friends of the USTA/EasternLong Island Region on the occasion of its 21st Annual Awards Dinner. I would also like to recognize the deserving tennis players who are honored in over twenty categories for their excellence on the court and tireless efforts to promote the game of tennis across Long Island. For their exceptional contributions, outstanding achievements and talent, all are most certainly worthy of our praise. The USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region is committed to the promotion and growth of tennis for people of all ages and abilities to play and enjoy the game. Support of amateur and professional competitions and tournaments serves to elevate competitive play to the highest levels in our region and contributes to increasing the quality of life for our residents. My sincere best wishes to all for an exciting and successful event this year. Very truly yours,

Steve Levy Suffolk County Executive


USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region 21st Annual Awards Dinner Keynote Speaker Bio Karin J. Buckholz Karin J. Buckholz is the vice president of community relations and field marketing/fan development for MSG Sports Teams (Knicks, Rangers and Liberty). She has more than 20 years of experience in sports management, marketing, communications and community sports development. In her current position, Buchholz is responsible for the strategic planning, marketing, promotion and execution of all Knicks, Rangers and Liberty programs and events outside the arena. These community-based and field marketing initiatives include the utilization of MSG’s sports field staff to drive ticket sales and other revenue for the organization, the fulfillment of the Garden of Dreams Foundation’s mission to help kids in crisis and the execution of educational programs across all three teams. Previously, Buchholz worked at the National Basketball Association (NBA) office in New York and served as director of fan development for the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA), where she oversaw the league’s ticket sales and promotional initiatives that helped WNBA teams develop and increase their fan base at the local level. Prior to that, she spent five years with the United States Olympic Committee in (USOC) Colorado Springs, Colo., working in a number of key capacities including director of foreign and cultural affairs in international relations, where she served as the USOC’s

staff liaison to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Pan American Sports Organization. She also served as director of athlete development for all Olympic sports, creating and implementing a national program that directly increased the number of athletes on U.S. National and Olympic teams. Buchholz graduated magna cum laude with a degree in finance from the University of Arizona, where she was a scholarship tennis player. She spent three years playing on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, achieving a world ranking in singles and doubles. Since her playing days, Buchholz has worked for the USTA and led a national industry initiative to grow the game of tennis by exposing it to new audiences. She also served as executive director and head tennis professional for the Harlem Junior Tennis Program; under her direction, the program was honored as one of President George H.W. Bush’s 1000 Daily Points of Light. She currently serves on the Make a Wish Foundation of the Hudson Valley’s board of directors. Buchholz began serving a first two-year term as a director-atlarge on the USTA board of directors in January 2009. She is board liaison to the Community Tennis Council–Red Group and is a member of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Master Plan Study Group. She resides in Nyack, N.Y., and is a member of the USTA Eastern Section.

21st Annual Awards Dinner Corporate Sponsors Advantage Tennis Carefree Racquet Club Churchill’s Bar and Grill Costco Gamma Sports Golfsmith Grand Slam Tennis Head/Penn Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis Hicksville Community Tennis Association IHOP Joel Dinoffer—On court/Offcourt Jonathan Klee, Esq. Junior Tennis Foundation LEK Securities Long Beach Tennis Center Long Island Tennis Magazine Mill Creek Tavern Modell’s Sporting Goods New York Sportimes 54

Pilot Pen Tennis Professional Tennis Registry, PTR Point Set Racquet Club Port Washington Tennis Academy Robbie Wagner Tennis Academy Roger Wootton Tennis Academy Starbuck’s Stop & Shop Supermarkets Tennis Industry Association Tennis Week The Bayou Restaurant The Golden Reef Diner Top Spin Tennis and Fitness UBS Financial Services USPTA Eastern Division USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Home of the U.S. Open USTA Eastern Section USTA National QuickStart Program Volkl Wildfish Restaurant

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


21st Annual Awards Dinner Program of Events 5:30 p.m. ..............................................................................................................................................Registration & Photos 6:00 p.m.......................................................................................................................................Cocktails & Hors d’Oeuvres 6:30 p.m. ....................................................................................................................................................Awards Ceremony 7:30 p.m. ............................................................................................................................................Dinner, Music & Raffles N Welcome and Opening Remarks From Scott Axler, Region Past President/Boys Ranking Chair/Junior Competition N Introductions by D.A. Abrams, USTA Eastern CEO N Keynote Speaker Karin Buckholz N Award Presentations N Prestigious Award Presentations N Closing Remarks From Daniel Burgess, USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region President *Raffle drawings to be held throughout the evening.

21st Annual Award Winners Prestigious Awards Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award ..................................................................................................John H. Dunn (St. James, N.Y.) Vitas Gerulaitis “For the Love of Tennis” Award ........................................................................Renee Lemmerman (Port Jefferson, N.Y.) Charles Karp Memorial Award for Overcoming Adversity Award..................................................................Mo Schneider (Bayside, N.Y.) Innovative Tennis Program of the Year ..............................................Sandra Mahoney (Suffolk County), Vice President for Education, United Way of Long Island and Ken Walker (Nassau), Special Olympics Outdoor Site of the Year (Nassau County) ..........................................................................Michael J. Tully Park (New Hyde Park, N.Y.) Private Club of the Year ............................................................................................Cold Spring Valley Racquet Club (Woodbury, N.Y.) Tennis Professional of the Year ..........................................................................Tonny van de Pieterman (Point Set in Oceanside, N.Y.) Tournament Director of the Year ....................................................................................Gerry Ashley (Roslyn Sportime in Roslyn, N.Y.) Tennis Club of the Year Award (Nassau County) ............................................Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis (West Hempstead, N.Y.) Tennis Club of the Year Award (Suffolk County)........................................................................Sportime Kings Park (Kings Park, N.Y.) Corporate Award of the Year ............................................................................................................................Modell’s Sporting Goods Tennis Family of the Year Award ............................................................................................Keith & Kathy Houghtaling (Bayport, N.Y.) Adult Volunteers of the Year Award ........................................Donna Healy (Freeport, N.Y.) & Charles Nanton (West Hempstead, N.Y.) Junior Volunteer of the Year Award ................................................................................................Anthony Pastecchi (Hicksville, N.Y.) Junior Team Tennis Award ..........................................................................Pat Mosquera (Rockville Racquet in Rockville Centre, N.Y.) Anuj Agarwal Sportsmanship Award ..................................................................................................Austin Davidow (Glen Head, N.Y.) Jennifer Sherry Sportsmanship Award ........................................................................................................April Pun (Glen Head, N.Y.) Press Service Award ....................................................................................Mike Greenberg (Mike & Mike in the Morning, ESPN Radio) Special Community Service Award..................................................................................................Margaret Campise (West Islip, N.Y.) Retail Facility Of The Year ..............................................................................................................Grand Slam Tennis (Commack, N.Y.) Rose Buck Scalamandre Participating Family of the Year Award ..................................................Mullins Family (Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.) Good Samaritan Award ..............................................................................................................................Jay Fagin (Long Beach, N.Y.) LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Regional Awards Father/Son of the Year #1 Alexander Snow & Jeffrey S. Snow (Glen Cove, N.Y.) Father/Son of the Year #2 Alex G. Johns & Mark Johns (Great Neck, N.Y.) Men’s 3.0 Singles of the Year #1 Joseph Esposito (Rockville Centre, N.Y.) Men’s 3.0 Singles of the Year #2 Andre Sliwowski (Islip, N.Y.) Men’s 3.5 Singles of the Year #1 Shlomi Gutman (Hewlett, N.Y.) Men’s 3.5 Singles of the Year #2 Gary Spitz (Long Beach, N.Y.) Men’s 4.0 Singles of the Year #1 Shlomi Gutman (Hewlett, N.Y.) Men’s 4.0 Singles of the Year #2 Jack Eichler (Roslyn Heights, N.Y.) Men’s 4.0 Doubles of the Year #1 Abdellah Bahou (Long Beach, N.Y.) & James N. Bernstein (Oceanside, N.Y.)

Women’s 4.0 Singles of the Year #2 Lori M. D’Antonio (Merrick, N.Y.) Men’s 5.0 Team of the Year Advanced to Nationals David Grossman, Captain (Woodbury, N.Y.) Women’s 2.5 Team Advanced to Nationals Carrie Alfano, Captain (Rockville Centre, N.Y.) Super Senior Men’s 7.0 Team Chet Singer, Captain (Syosset, N.Y.) Super Senior Women’s 6.0 Team Joyce Tomaino (Boynton Beach, Fla.)

Scholastic Awards Scholastic Coach of the Year (Nassau County) Tara Preston (Patchogue, N.Y.)—MacArthur High School Scholastic Coach of the Year (Suffolk County) Kim Langendorfer (Northport, N.Y.)—Half Hollow Hills West Singles Champion (Suffolk County Boys) Nolan Gelman (Commack, N.Y.)—Half Hollow Hills East High School

Men’s 4.0 Doubles of the Year #2 Martin T. Bowen (Levittown, N.Y.) & Vincent Bellafiore (Lynbrook, N.Y.)

Singles Champion (Nassau County Boys) Zach Morris (Garden City, N.Y.)—Garden City High School

Women’s 3.0 Singles of the Year #1 Evelyn L. Wilkins (Syosset, N.Y.)

Doubles Champion (Nassau County Boys) Matt Barry (Lido Beach, N.Y.) & Eric Rubin (Lido Beach, N.Y.)— Long Beach High School

Women’s 3.0 Singles of the Year #2 Ellen June Schreiber (Long Beach, N.Y.) Women’s 3.0 Doubles of the Year #1 Ellen June Schreiber (Long Beach, N.Y.) & Andrea Beller (Merrick, N.Y.) Women’s 3.0 Doubles of the Year #2 Ellen June Schreiber (Long Beach, N.Y.) & Veronica Treston (Hasting on Hudson, N.Y.) Women’s 3.5 Singles of the Year #1 Maritoni C. Carlos (Dix Hills, N.Y.) Women’s 3.5 Singles of the Year #2 Stephanie Fein (Merrick, N.Y.) Women’s 4.0 Singles of the Year #1 Cristina Camacho (Long Beach, N.Y.) 56 56

Doubles Champion (Suffolk County Boys) Eric Bertuglia (Commack, N.Y.) & Chris Hunter (Commack, N.Y.)— Half Hollow Hills East High School Singles Champion (Nassau County Girls) Jacqueline Raynor (Garden City, N.Y.)—Garden City High School Doubles Champion (Nassau County Girls) Deana Davoudiasl (Rockville Centre, N.Y.) & Rachel Shenkar (Rockville Centre, N.Y.)—South Side High School Singles Champion (Suffolk County Girls) Nadia Smergut (East Hampton, N.Y.)—Ross School Doubles Champion (Suffolk County Girls) Diana Vamvakitis (Quogue, N.Y.) & Jamie Hann (Westhampton Beach, N.Y.)—Westhampton High School

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011


MEN’S #1 Singles of the Year 25s Alex G. Johns (Great Neck, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Doubles of the Year 55s Barry Brahver (Lawrence, N.Y.) & Mark M. Harrison (East Rockaway, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 25s Viral Pandya (Massapequa Park, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 60s Richie Bustamante (East Norwich, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 30s Viral Pandya (Massapequa Park, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 60s Alan E. Chaskin (East Patchogue, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 30s Rodolfo F. Novello (Lawrence, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Doubles of the Year 60s Richard Bates (Jericho, N.Y.) & Ronald Kahn (Great Neck, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Doubles of the Year 30s Laszlo Katona (Glen Head, N.Y.) & Mitch Klein (Glen Cove, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 65s Bob Hoffman (West Hempstead, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 35s Adrian Chirici (Huntington, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 65s Stephen Siegal (Hauppaugue, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 35s Jason C. Hand (Brightwaters, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 70s Pete Bostwick (Glen Cove, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 40s Adrian Chirici (Huntington, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 70s William L. Rivers (Hempstead, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 40s Vincent Horcasitas (East Hampton, N.Y.)

Men’s #1 Doubles of the Year 70s Anthony Bruce Swanwick (Port Washington, N.Y.) & Stephen J. Halpern (Hastings on Hudson, N.Y.)

Adult Awards

Men’s #1 Doubles of the Year 40s Ed Weis (Glen Cove, N.Y.) & Jeffrey S. Snow (Glen Cove, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 50s Fred F. Coglietta (St. James, N.Y.) Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 50s John W. Titcomb (Huntington, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Doubles of the Year 50s Barry Brahver (Lawrence, N.Y.) & Joseph L. Ferreira (Brooklyn, N.Y.) Men’s #2 Doubles of the Year 50s Laszio Katona (Glen Head, N.Y.) & Mitch Klein (Glen Cove, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 55s Steven C. Brill (Great Neck, N.Y.) Men’s #2 Singles of the Year 55s John W. Titcomb (Huntington, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Doubles of the Year 55s David J. Brent (Woodmere, N.Y.) & Mark M. Harrison (East Rockaway, N.Y.)

Men’s #2 Doubles of the Year 70s Anthony Bruce Swanwick (Port Washington, N.Y.) & Carl J. Abraham (Great Neck, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 75s Pete Bostwick (Glen Cove, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Singles of the Year 80s John M. May (Southold, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Open Singles of the Year John Garo Derderian (Manhasset, N.Y.) Men’s #2 Open Singles of the Year Thomas Murphy (Garden City, N.Y.) Men’s #1 Open Doubles of the Year Carlo J. Sciara (Babylon, N.Y.) & John T. Sciara (Babylon, N.Y.) Men’s #2 Open Doubles of the Year Anton Mavrin (Huntington, N.Y.) & Salifu Mohammed (Bronx, N.Y.) Women’s Open #1 Singles of the Year Joan Manfredi-Carter (Glen Head, N.Y.)

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Women’s Open #2 Singles of the Year Julia Browne (Glen Head, N.Y.)

Girls #1 of the Year 16s Emma R. Brezel (Port Washington, N.Y.)

Women’s #1 Singles of the Year 35s Joan Manfredi-Carter (Glen Head, N.Y.)

Girls #2 of the Year 16s Ruth Freilich (Lawrence, N.Y.)

Women’s #1 Singles of the Year 40s Ellen G. Kerr (Port Washington, N.Y.)

Boys #1 of the Year 16s Dylan Ander (Hewlett, N.Y.)

Women’s #2 Singles of the Year 40s Valerie Yardeni (Glen Head, N.Y.)

Boys #2 of the Year 16s Richard Mitchell (Franklin Square, N.Y.)

Women’s #1 Singles of the Year 45s Agatha Nadel (Glen Head, N.Y.)

Girls #1 of the Year 14s Lauren Ann Livingston (Sands Point, N.Y.)

Women’s #2 Singles of the Year 45s Rosemary Cosentino (Manhasset, N.Y.)

Girls #2 of the Year 14s Katharine Brandow (East Northport, N.Y.)

Women’s #1 Doubles of the Year 45s Agatha Nadel (Glen Head, N.Y.) & Lydia S. Eitel (Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.)

Boys #1 of the Year 14s Cole Laffitte (East Setauket, N.Y.)

Women’s #1 Singles of the Year 50s Eileen Walker (Cutchogue, N.Y.)

Boys #2 of the Year 14s Andrew J. Bentz (Massapequa Park, N.Y.)

Women’s #2 Singles of the Year 50s Lydia S. Eitel (Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.)

Girls #1 of the Year 12s Brynn Maris April (Dix Hills, N.Y.) Nicole Kielan (Valley Stream, N.Y.) Lexee Taylor Shapiro (Syosset, N.Y.)

Women’s #1 Doubles of the Year 50s Barbara M. Freeman (New Hyde Park, N.Y.) & Rosemary Cosentino (Manhasset, N.Y.) Women’s #1 Singles of the Year 60s Sandy Cooper (East Northport, N.Y.) Women’s #2 Singles of the Year 60s Peggy Gluck (Syosset, N.Y.) Women’s #1 Singles of the Year 70s Vanda Vebeliunas (Locust Valley, N.Y.)

Junior Awards

Girls #1 of the Year 18s Carly Siegel (Dix Hills, N.Y.) Girls #2 of the Year 18s Alyssa D. Rosello (Garden City, N.Y.)

Boys #1 of the Year 12s Yuval Solomon (Plainview, N.Y.) Boys #2 of the Year 12s Thomas A. Korossy (Oyster Bay, N.Y.) Girls #1 of the Year 10s Olivia Rose Scordo (Glen Head, N.Y.) Girls #2 of the Year 10s Francesca Karman (Port Washington, N.Y.) Boys #1 of the Year 10s Zachary Ian Khazzam (Roslyn Heights, N.Y.) Boys #2 of the Year 12s Benjamin Cole Grossman (Sands Point, N.Y.)

Boys #1 of the Year 18s Jacob Mishkin (Woodbury, N.Y.) Boys #2 of the Year 18s Jared Drzal (West Sayville, N.Y.) 58

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011


Congratulations to all awards winners! Congratulations John M. May Number One Singles Player Men’s 80 Division Cheers to our Chairman of the Peconic Landing Board of Trustees BMW of Oyster Bay Congratulations to our salesman, Mitch Klein, and his partner, Laszlo Katona on their 2010 USTA Eastern Doubles rankings. #1 (30’s), #1 (45’s), #2 (50’s) Congratulations to Steven Brill and the 21st Annual Awards Winners Clear Point Advisors, Inc.

Congratulations Ken A true partner to the Long Island Special Olympics tennis program Arlene and Richard Morse

Congratulations To All Awards Winners James E. Flood

Congratulations Ken Walker. Your dedication and hard work make Special Olympics Tennis what it is today. The athletes & volunteers are blessed to have you leading the team!!

Congratulations Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis on winning LI Tennis Club of the Year! Dedicated Hempstead Lake Staff Congrats to Toni Carlos Our #1 Singles Player Love, SB, Jer & Ry

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CONGRATULATIONS TO POINT SET’S HONOREES: Dan Dwyer Visionary, Mentor, Friend A Lifetime of Devotion and Distinguished Service to Growing the Game of Tennis Award

Tonny van de Pieterman Creative, Positive, Inspiring Tennis Professional of the Year Award

Congratulations to all award winners from the USTA Long Island Regional Board

Scenes From LI Tennis 2010 The winning team of the Third Annual Corporate Challenge from Locust Valley, N.Y.

Approximately 1,500 attendees were on hand for the 2nd Annual Long Island Tennis Expo The second place team, the Hicksville Smash, in the 18 & Under Intermediate Division at the Eastern Summer Sectional Championship

Boys 12’s winners, Brendan Volk from Dix Hills, N.Y.; Mwendwa Mbithi from Succasunna, N.J. and Justin Lee from Cos Cob, Conn. are congratulated by Tim Heath, president of USTA Eastern (far left); Annelies Karp, head of Junior Competition Scheduling and Sanctioning for USTA Eastern (second from left) and D.A. Abrams, executive director of USTA Eastern (far right) 60

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Kids and volunteers enjoying the sport of tennis at Centennial Park in Roosevelt, N.Y.

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Mythbusters: College Advisors Agree on Everything An Interview With Former Brown Men’s Tennis Coach and Current Sportime Manager Jay Harris (Part II) By Ricky Becker Former Brown Coach and current manager of Sportime Syosset/Bethpage Jay Harris has been a great source of information for me. Although we constantly debate how much kids actually improve in college, he is generally “spot on” with his take on things. This is the second installment of my interview with Jay. From your experience, how much do colleges “relax” their academic standards for junior players who will make a major contribution to a team? Jay Harris: This is the million dollar ques-

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tion … especially in the Ivy League. Across the country, athletes are often given a bit of a “break” with academic standards when it comes to admission. In the Ivy League especially, this has also been a subject of great debate. When I get involved in this debate I often think of two things: N First, I believe that if schools use extracurricular activities, such as clubs, etc., and/or musical talents to add merit to an application, then they should obviously use athletic talent to add merit as well. I am always amazed that tennis playing students, especially players at top

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

schools, can compete academically with the non-athletes. N Second, if the collective GPAs of student-athletes at almost every school in the country are compared to non-athletes, it will be found that, amazingly enough, the averages for the studentathletes are actually significantly higher. This may surprise a lot of people. At Brown, not only were the student-athletes averaging better grades, they also seemed to get some nice advantages when it came to job selection post-graduation. Many company recruiters would say, “Well who wouldn’t want an athlete who has been a part of a successful team and lived the


last four years with the utmost discipline and highest work ethic?” They all would! Did your correspondence with prospective student-athletes sway your interest in them? What did recruits do or say to turn you off to them or on to them? JH: Of course! A quick way to sway a coach the wrong way is to address an email/letter to the wrong name. There were a few times, for instance, I would get emails addressed to other coaches. A huge way to make a great impression is really show a true interest in the school. I would often ask players what they knew about our program at Brown. Most of the time, I would get a “not much” response, but the guys who knew a lot about our program showed me that they were serious and professional in regards to the recruiting process, and of course, that they were truly interested in being a part of our family. Do college coaches and their respective admissions departments care about

non-tennis extra-curricular activities? JH: I think I already answered that one. Admissions departments do look at nontennis extra-curricular activities, but I doubt that those actually have much to do with the final decisions. Do college coaches care if someone played high school tennis? JH: As a coach, I actually really liked if a player not only played on a high school tennis team, but also if they had some experience on another team (even if it was not tennis). One of my favorite and most successful players played on his high school hockey, soccer and basketball teams. Because of his experience as a leader on all those teams, he quickly became a leader on our team and was the team’s captain as a sophomore! Now that you are spending extended time on the junior tournament scene, what do you see as the biggest differ-

ence between coaching junior players and coaching college players? JH: College coaches often know about every aspect of each player’s life, and thus, it is much easier to not only know what the players need, but also to evaluate growth along the way in comparison to a junior coach. However, being involved at Sportime working with many top junior players has been extremely gratifying. At Brown, we sort of had the fifth- or sixth-round draft picks on the recruiting scene (Harvard, Yale and Princeton sort of dominated the opening rounds!), but now I am working with a bunch of first-tier players! G Ricky Becker is founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, which offers off-court college guidance services to junior tennis players. He is also co-director of tennis at Sportime Syosset and Sportime Bethpage. He can be reached by e-mail at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via juniortennisconsulting.com.

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Literary Corner

By Brent Shearer The Tennis Handsome By Barry Hannah In the novel The Tennis Handsome, Barry Hannah launches his main character, French Edward, the tennis handsome of the title, onto the tennis circuit. French has a powerful game and his exploits on the tour include matches with tennis greats like Rod Laver and Arthur Ashe, but he has one small problem, he’s brain dead. But Hannah takes care of this slight defect in this rollicking, hilarious parody of life on the tennis circuit by creating the “Baby” Levaster character, who serves as the mind to French Edward’s magnificent body. Hannah was an award-winning writer noted for his Southern Gothic style. The main characters in The Tennis Handsome hail from Vicksburg, Miss. and no matter how far afield their tennis adven-

tures take them, a sense of the Southern penchant for tall tales informs their adventures. The problem for French Edward is that he nearly drowned in a fall from the Mississippi Bridge in Vicksburg, Miss., while trying to save his tennis coach Doctor Word from committing suicide. He did save him, but not before both men nearly drowned and neither emerged with all their marbles. For French Edward, this means he has to hook himself up to truck batteries every now and then to get the charge he needs to continue to compete at a high level. Despite all the hand-wringing about the competitiveness of U.S. tennis, this training method probably won’t be adopted by the USTA high performance training program. “French’s arms and hands were flung out to the clamps of the battery cables. His ears and nose were bleeding nicely. The smell of burning hair was laying about. Also, a leg was jerking around some.”

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To point out that this isn’t a realistic novel may unnecessary by now, but enjoying it does require the reader to suspend disbelief and swallow some of Hannah’s more outrageous inventions wholesale. Levaster and French Edward travel the tennis circuit, working as a mind-body team, never winning the biggest titles, but performing respectably in smaller events. Levaster has a curious pastime of wandering about in places where he might get mugged with a shotgun pistol loaded with popcorn that he uses to get rid of potential attackers. Another feature of Hannah’s book that won’t likely be adopted on the ATP tour is French Edward’s practice of taking the umpire’s mic before his match starts and dedicating it. One such speech in the book dedicates the match he is about to play to his deceased infant son. Other matches are dedicated to the numerous women that pop up in the traveling life of French Edward and Levaster, who’s official function is Edward’s trainer. You have to like an author who describes Bud Collins as wearing a “voodoo dashiki” and typing like a maniac. Levaster praises Collins for his sympatric treatment of French Edward in his columns, which leads Levaster to believe that “maybe there was a place in his heart and ear for an aging, handsome moron of the tennis world.” Between the outrageous shenanigans of Levaster and the contributions of another character, the crazed Vietnam veteran Bob Smith, The Tennis Handsome is a romp of a book with a touch of the gonzo craziness of author Hunter Thompson dressed up in tennis whites. G Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.


A Mental Game? By Nicole Melch As we all know, no matter our level of skill, tennis is a “mental game” and often won in the head. Anyone who has ever picked up this wonderful, yet sometimes unbelievably frustrating, game will know exactly what I’m talking about. Learning a specific stroke or technique and mastering it to its fullest in practice is one thing, going out in a match or a competitive situation is another thing entirely. This is when the psychological aspect of tennis comes into play and what separates the true champions from the rest of the crowd. You might ask yourself now how to achieve such a state of “mental calm” in order to rise to the next level of play and accomplish victories you never thought you could pull off. Let me talk about a few simple techniques that have proven to be very helpful in certain stressful situations on the court.

The moment we feel nervous when playing key points, games or matches, our muscles tighten up and make it even harder for us to function properly. Therefore, it is essential to counter those feelings, thoughts and hormones appropriately or not even allow them to arise in the first place. I find it extremely helpful to create and maintain a good routine or certain rituals. This can be an order of doing things at the change over, a routine of picking up a few balls between points, wiping your face on your towel, adjusting your strings, fixing your shirt or loosening up your legs while waiting for the next point by jumping around a bit. Another good technique is to tell yourself to play one point at a time, to remind yourself of your game plan or reinforce a specific strategy in your mind, talk positively if you just lost a point or messed up a play to shake off negativity and tension.

Most importantly, keep telling yourself to focus on the next point, that “You can do it” and to stay active and aggressive on key plays because your body will automatically tense up and you will need to be in charge and counter those hormones. It is a fact that the player who stays more active and composed will win most key plays and it’s only a matter of keeping your mind occupied in the right ways and at the right time. G Nicole Melch was born and raised in Vienna, Austria. She has won multiple national and international junior, as well as adult tournaments, turning pro in 1997. She was recruited for the Austrian Fed Cup team in 2001 and reached a WTA career high of 280th in the singles ranking and 220th in doubles. She has been a USPTA Pro 1-certified trainer since 2002 and teaches full-time at Little Silver Tennis Club in Little Silver, N.J. She may be reached by e-mail at abonic@hotmail.com.

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Chasing the Impossible Dream Taking a shot at qualifying as a wild card for the U.S. Open By Brad Shafran hen the USTA announced that the mixeddoubles winner of the U.S. Open National Playoffs would get a wild card into the main draw of the 2011 U.S. Open, I knew I had to at least give it a shot and play in the Eastern Sectional Tournament. Although I took about a 10-year break from competitive tennis, within the last two years, I started playing in a few USTA leagues and in a weekly game with some great local players. For this important tournament, I went straight for the best player I could think of—Hannah Camhi of Syosset High School who is a top-ranked Girls 18s player and a student at Bethpage Park Tennis Center, where I teach a few days a week. We were only able to practice together a couple of times before the tournament, but I knew I had a good partner on the court with me. Our first round was against a team comprised of two USTA employees. With inclement weather and threatening skies, the match was moved to the indoor facility at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. While it would have been nice to play on the actual U.S. Open outdoor courts, Hannah and I got the tournament off to a promising start with a 6-1, 6-0 victory. Not accustomed to playing on back-toback days anymore, we returned the next day to play a formidable team of former professionals (and top-10 world ranked doubles player) Katrina Adams and her partner, Jaycen Murphy. Again forced indoors due to the weather, Hannah and I played a near-perfect match, racing out to a 5-2 lead. Knowing Adams would never give up, we had trouble closing out the first set and had to battle to hold on and take the set 7-5. The second set

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stayed on serve until late in the set when we got a break and I served it out for a 63 victory. It was one of the most pleasing victories I can remember and a match that was truly an honor to play in, and in some ways, it was my own personal U.S. Open experience. Sore and a bit battered, the semifinals started early the next morning. When the draw was first published, I knew Bea Bielik & Darrin Cohen were the team to beat in the tournament. I have known Bea for many years and watched her develop into an NCAA champion some years ago. They were fortunate to have the privilege of playing Chris Evert & ESPN’s Mike Greenberg in an early round of the tournament. Hoping to play outdoors to help combat their overwhelming pace, the weather was again overcast and the match was played indoors. Hannah and I got off to a bumpy start and faced a 4-0 deficit within minutes. Fortunately, we fought our way into the match and al-

though the 6-2, 6-4 loss ended our little run, it was satisfying to compete with the team that would win the title the next day in easy fashion. Although my “impossible dream” didn’t come to fruition, I had an amazing experience. The pace and power that the younger players hit with today makes it a different game from my playing days, at 35 years of age, I was definitely among the older competitors in the later rounds of the mixed-doubles draw. I was so proud of my partner and her ability to compete with several former WTA-ranked players and hope Hannah answers my call for next year’s tournament so that we can make another run at chasing the impossible dream! G Brad Shafran is a full-time autograph dealer and part-time tennis pro at Bethpage Park Tennis Center. He can be reached by phone at (516) 978-0094, e-mail brad@shafrancollectibles.com or visit www.shafrancollectibles.com.

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Just for the Love of the Game … It’s All About Me By Lonnie Mitchel I just cannot stop loving the game of tennis. It just amazes me how fantastic our game is and the many benefits that can be derived from playing it. If you have been reading my articles in Long Island Tennis Magazine, you know that some of my articles have been written about tennis being the “Sport of a Lifetime. “Well that comment is not ingenious by any stretch of the imagination, but I am finding out just how true that statement is first-hand. I have been writing about junior tennis, and how there should be more accolades for others than just the top juniors, grassroots tennis and the marketing of our game. Along the way, I might have offended a few people, but I do it because I love the game and like to take a different approach. In this issue, I decided to talk about “Me,” and this article it is going to be all about “Me.”

Many years ago, I learned that just because I was a tennis instructor, it did not mean I could not learn new ways of teaching. Well, here is one for you … how about new ways of playing for myself? You see, in the last 23-plus years, I got married, had two children, continue to enjoy a full-time career in the travel and hospitality industry, and spend additional time coaching and instructing tennis … not much time for “me” that’s for sure. I had played lots of competitive and social tennis on a pretty high level in my teens and throughout my 20s and that is how I remembered and how I visualized myself as that player over the years. The fact of the matter is that “me as a player” has not existed in more than two decades. I have not competed in years, and as much as I am an advocate for this great game, I did not devote any time to my own tennis game. It was my family, career, my children’s tennis, and my student’s tennis in that order. In that previous state-

ment, it was not written anywhere about “my tennis.” Well, what about “my tennis?” Where does that fit in? Well my children are grown and have become independent and the days of taking them to tennis, baseball, soccer and watching them participate are just a memory now. I like to think that my wife and I have a good marriage, but she certainly does not want to spend all of her leisure time with me. I think she would get sick of me pretty fast if she was around me 24/7. Sometimes, the most obvious thing to do is not always the first thing you think of. But the bell went off in my head. On a recent weekend afternoon, I picked up my freshly strung tennis rackets and headed off to Eisenhower Park without an arranged game on a beautiful spring day. When I was in my 20s, you could find me there almost every single day playing tennis. It was like my own country club, good tennis players around and plenty of people to hit with. There was nothing like playing ten-

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nis outside at the park with the sun above, the smell of the grass and picnic barbeques nearby. However, in my 20s, I was also immature and a tennis snob. I would only play with certain players and if you were not quite on my level, I would not play. How shortsighted I was and limiting in the friends I could make. When winter came, I ventured off to my favorite indoor racket club and played with the same people over and over. Fast-forward two decades later and I get to the park and saw some old familiar faces that also have aged 20-plus years and many new ones. I picked up a game in a matter of minutes and found myself again in one my happiest places … a tennis court. This time, I was playing for me and not my children, wife or students. My skills have eroded, but not to the point where they could not be resurrected. My serve was much slower, my footwork and groundstrokes were a shell of what I remembered from my 20s. I was not unhappy about it or even dis-

appointed in that situation, but rather, I was enjoying the surroundings and the mere act of having my racquet make contact with the ball. However, I just learned a lesson in this sport for a lifetime. I would have to adjust my game to my age, think more strategically and I got rid of my tennis snobbery. The experience was fantastic, and I felt enjoyment to the core. I did not care about anything except enjoying myself on the court. I played with players of varying ability levels, and I dare say each player gave me a different challenge in different ways. I also now have another experience to share with my own students. The tennis will come back to you in ways that you cannot even imagine. I have said that in articles written in the past, but I just lived it and experienced it in the past few weeks. I can now prove first-hand that to all parents of juniors who I have instructed, that tennis will enrich their children’s lives in ways that you just cannot measure. If you want to play tennis with me this spring and summer, I will be down at Eisenhower Park or at Carefree

Racquet Club where I have my tennis teaching affiliation with. I am living proof … tennis will always be there for you. G Lonnie Mitchel has been teaching tennis since 1985, mostly at Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, N.Y. and is a USPTA Level 1 certified tennis instructor. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College ) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). Lonnie has also worked in the travel and tourism industry as a regional sales manager for 25-plus years for such companies the Walt Disney Company and Royal Caribbean International. Lonnie is now the national account manager for Sandals and Beaches Resorts. His wife, Harriet, is a club level tennis player and can often be found on the court. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or email lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

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Longines Hosts Junior Tennis Event at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center On April 9, 16 boys, ages 12 and under, took the courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center to compete in the Longines Future Tennis Aces event. They were all playing for the chance to win an all-expenses paid trip to the French Open to meet and play against tennis greats, Andre Agassi and Jim Courier at Roland Garros. Twelve-year-old Michael Chen Zhao of Princeton Junction, N.J. won the United States’ 2011 Longines Future Tennis Aces Tournament. Zhao defeated Aleksandar Kovacevic of New York, N.Y., 6-2, 6-1 in the championship match and will represent the United States as he competes against fellow finalists from 15 countries around the world at the global event at Roland Garros during the final weekend of the French Open. “I had a lot of fun competing here at the Longines Future Tennis Aces tournament and am really excited to represent the U.S. in Paris and play on the red clay at Roland Garros,” said Zhao. The runner-up, Kovacevic, earned two courtside tickets to this year’s U.S Open.

The boys who were the top players in their sections; USTA Eastern, Middle States, New England and Harlem Junior Tennis League were selected on two main criteria: athletic performance and philanthropic work in their community. Each player had to submit a 300-word essay on how they would give back to their community. Essays were reviewed by a panel of judges from Longines, Tennis Magazine and Andre Agassi who has been a brand ambassador since 2007. At the event the boys also got the opportunity to hit with 1993 French Open doubles champion Luke Jensen. “It’s a unique environment and a good event for all of these kids because it gives them their very first taste of the big time,” said Jensen. “Just being able to play at the U.S. Open makes them all winners today.” Jensen, who won 10 ATP doubles titles, is currently the head coach of the Syracuse University tennis team. “This really is a once in a lifetime opportunity for these boys,” said Jensen. “In a 16-player draw, they had to bring their very best tennis from

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the very first point, to win the chance to go to one of the biggest tournaments in the world.” One of the participants, Athell Patrick Bennett of Valley Stream, N.Y. said that he enjoyed the whole experience. “I’ve played Nationals, so I’m used to the intensity of these kinds of tournaments. I was nervous at first but once I got out there I loosened up a bit and started to relax.” He said the best part was getting to hit with Jensen. “He hits the ball really hard and accurate. It was really fun playing with him.” Other Long Island participants included Finbar Talcott of Sea Cliff, N.Y. and Alan Delman of Great Neck, N.Y. “Congratulations to Michael Chen Zhao and all of the remarkable young men and athletes here at the Longines Future Tennis Aces tournament today,” said Jennifer Judkins, Longines U.S. Brand President. “We are proud to support the future of tennis and look forward to watching Michael represent the U.S. at Roland Garros. As the official timekeeper of the French Open, Longines continues its support of the sport of tennis, the development of children and its work with Longines Brand Ambassadors Andre Agassi and Stefanie Graff’s important charities, the Andre Agassi Foundation and Children for Tomorrow.”


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Are We Having Fun Yet? By EDWARD WOLFARTH ello, it’s been a while since we “spoke.” So, I’m giving a lesson the other day and on the adjacent court is another pro (unnamed to protect the guilty) going through the motions … you know what I mean. His charge was a 10-year-old with little handeye skills, but even less enthusiasm! This exercise in “babysitting” was painful to witness. The complaint that I have is that neither party was having any fun. I mean the “meter” was running, so to speak, and I’m sure this half-hour seemed infinitely longer. So who’s to blame? I’ve had the great fortune and opportunity to train prospective physical education teachers at both Hofstra University and Queens College over the past nine years. As the racket sports specialist at both institutions, we have a mantra that I’ve passed on to all my students: FASA— keep it FUN, keep it ACTIVE, make sure

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you have a SAFE environment and insure your lesson is APPROPRIATE skill-wise and age-wise.

Keep it Fun! If your tennis lesson isn’t fun, or if your charge is not experiencing a moderate degree of success, you have failed as a teacher. A dictionary definition of fun is, “A source of enjoyment or pleasure. Excited, noisy activity.” This was not evident on the adjacent court. In order to make your lessons fun, a certain amount of planning is inherently necessary. Games, drills, challenges and targets can be used to illicit the objective, whatever that objective might be. The teacher or tennis pro simply needs to think it out. Walt Disney once said, “I prefer to entertain people in the hope that they learn, rather than teach people in the hope that are entertained.” Think about that for a second. Fun first, and perhaps learning follows. In the very least, they’ll come back for more.

Keep it Active! This should not be a problem for private or semi-private lessons, but could be problematic for larger groups. Physical education teachers, almost always, have to teach large groups. Too often, I see pros or teachers putting groups in lines. I detest lines! While I’m sure this is done to provide a safer environment, it in fact often does just the opposite. While safety is always a concern, it must be balanced with enough activity to keep everyone interested and “entertained.” This is not impossible. Again, a well-thought-out lesson, drill or game can accomplish this. Younger children, standing in lines waiting to hit one or two balls at a time is not the prescribed teaching methodology. Surely, we as pros and teachers can think of a better way. If kids are actively involved in the learning process in a safe environment, something good will result.

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Keep it Safe! Four children, standing in a line, wielding rackets, waiting for their chance to hit a few balls, is a disaster waiting to happen! Even the command to “hug your rackets” can fall on deaf ears. I cannot tell you how many times I’ve observed student teachers giving a lesson where students were throwing tennis balls at each other. They were not actively engaged, except for their horse play. While I sometimes have a problem with parents getting too involved in their children’s lessons, they can certainly be on the alert for some of these unfortunate practices. The advent of appropriate equipment, for younger children, has certainly helped in this regard.

Keep it Appropriate! While it stands to reason that it might not be a good idea to teach certain skills, such as spin serves and swinging volleys to five-year-olds, it becomes less obvious when teaching more skilled players. Ten-

“Walt Disney once said, ‘I prefer to entertain people in the hope that they learn, rather than teach people in the hope that are entertained.’” nis is a classic “open skill.” By that, I mean the player is constantly adjusting to the environment in order to hit a ball. The game is more reactive than pro-active. Except for the serve, little can be gained by repetitive learning. If you recall a previous article, there are two types of learning, conceptual and habitual. The latter being the more inferior. While a serve may benefit from habitual drills, hitting forehands and backhands, with perfectly fed balls by the pro, may not. How many times have you heard, “I always play well with you, but I cannot seem to do as well in my regular game.” Duh! Figure it out.

We want you, the learner, to be successful so we (tennis pros) hit with little spin, at the perfect speed and height so you can feel successful. While this may satisfy some criteria, it’s also doing the learner a disservice. They’re not getting better, with their peers. So what do we have here? Remember FASA, and most of all, remember what Walt Disney said … until next time! G Edward Wolfarth is a professor of physical education and sports sciences at Hofstra University. In addition to his class load, Edward finds time to coach high school tennis at Jericho High School. He’s an active member of the United States Professional Tennis Association and currently serves on the executive board of the United States Tennis Association-Long Island Region. He still plays competitively and is a highly ranked senior player. He may be reached at (516) 626-9005 or e-mail wolfarthe@msn.com.

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Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones—Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 631-363-2882 • easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-271-6616 • easternathleticclubs.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 516-676-9107 • www.rwtt.com Rockville Racquet Club Susan Alvy—Manager 80 North Centre Avenue • Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 • rockvilletennis@optonline.net Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, NY 11937 631-907-5162 www.ross.org/tennis • hli@Ross.org

SPORTIME Lynbrook Mohamed Shabir—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com/Lynbrook tdlynbrook@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Massapequa Fayez Malik—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com/Massapequa fmalik@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Randall’s Island Ted Dimond—Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com/Manhattan randallsisland@sportimeny.com

Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones—Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 631-753-3696 • easternathleticclubs.com

SPORTIME Amagansett Sue De Lara—Co-General Manager Hana Sromova—Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com/Amagansett amagansett@sportimetfm.com

Glen Head Racquet Club Heath Koch: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 earlyhit@optonline.net

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SPORTIME Schenectady Philippe Ceas—Director of Tennis 2699 Curry Road Schenectady, NY 12303 518-356-0100 www.SportimeNY.com/Schenectady tdschenectady@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Quogue Will Van Rensburg—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead, Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com/Quogue tdhamptons@sportimeny.com

SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Karl Sommer—Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Tennis tdsyossetten@sportimeny.com

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Long Beach Tennis Center Chuck Russell—Director of Tennis 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, NY 11561 516-432-6060 • www.longbeachtenniscenter.com info@longbeachtenniscenter.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2323 www.pointsettennis.com • tonny@pointsettennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 516-883-6425 • www.pwta.com • tennis@pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, NY 11542 516-759-0505 • www.rwtt.com

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SPORTIME Kings Park Darrin Cohen—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com/Kings-Park tdkingspark@sportimetfm.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

SPORTIME Roslyn Adam Mandell—Director of Tennis Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com/Roslyn tdroslyn@sportimetfm.com

USTA National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 718-760-6200 • www.usta.com


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LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG

ISLAND

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings Rank ..Name ............................City (as of 04/15/11)

BOYS

Long Island Boys 10 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 2..........Jeffrey McDonnell ..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 3..........Benjamin Cole Grossman ..Sands Point, N.Y. 4..........Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 5..........Zachary Ian Khazzam ........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 6..........Billy G. Suarez....................Huntington, N.Y. 7..........Niles Ghaffar ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 8..........Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 9..........Robert Steven Bellino ........Huntington, N.Y. 10........Alec Hunter Barres ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 11........Michael Wexler ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 12........Sujay Sharma ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 13........Zachary Reid Berlin............Dix Hills, N.Y. 14........Wiktor Marek Figiel ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 15........Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 16........Daniel Chikvashvili ............Syosset, N.Y. 17........Brandon T. Cohen ..............Westhampton, N.Y. 18........Abhinav Raj Srivastava ......Melville, N.Y. 19........Michael Bruck....................Roslyn, N.Y. 20........Henry Bilicic ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 21........Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 22........JohnChristian Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23........Dylan E. Spilko ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 24........Jacob Rusinek ..................East Hills, N.Y. 25........Gregory Han ......................Melville, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Thomas A. Korossy ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 2..........Yuval Solomon....................Plainview, N.Y. 3..........Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 4..........Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 5..........Austin Egna........................Port Washington, N.Y. 6..........Timothy Serignese ............Port Washington, N.Y. 7..........Amani Siddiqui ..................West Babylon, N.Y. 8..........Matthew Franklin Porges....Sands Point, N.Y. 9..........George Kaslow ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 10........Joonho Ko..........................Huntington, N.Y. 11........Arjun Mehrotra ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 12........Tyler Spencer Bloch ..........Jericho, N.Y. 13........Daniel Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 14........Michael Thomas Jaklitsch ..Islip, N.Y. 15........Lucas Larese DeSantos......Southampton, N.Y. 16........Jake Spencer Bozsik..........Sag Harbor, N.Y. 17........Carl Grant ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 18........Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 19........Aaron Askowitz ..................Great Neck N.Y. 20........Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 21........Kyle C. Yaun ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 22........Billy G. Suarez....................Huntington, N.Y. 23........Benjamin Cole Grossman ..Sands Point, N.Y. 24........Brady Berman ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 25........Eli Grossman......................Woodbury, N.Y. 26........Alex Joseph Amadio ..........Smithtown, N.Y. 27........Jackson Weisbrot ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 28........Ian Bank ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 29........Alexander Reiley ................Manorville, N.Y. 30........Austin Pomerantz ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 31........Justin Ilan Lempert ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32........Adam Stein ........................Melville, N.Y. 33........James Kyrkanides..............Stony Brook, N.Y. 34........Max Egna ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 35........Michael Stuart Petersen ....Bridgehampton, N.Y. 36........Matthew Roberts................Setauket, N.Y. 37........Matthew Lee Catton ..........Woodbury, N.Y. 38........Neel Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 39........Daniel Aaron Lobo ..............Melville, N.Y. 40........Jonas Feuerring ................Sagaponack, N.Y.

76

1..........Brandon Eric Remer ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 2..........Cory Seltman ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 3..........Michael James DeNigris ....Islip, N.Y. 4..........Evan Kober ........................Wantagh, N.Y. 5..........Dylan Granat ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 6..........Andrew J. Bentz ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 7..........Raizada Bhavin Vaid ..........Old Westbury, N.Y. 8..........Curran Varma ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 9..........Thomas Michael Dacosta ..Massapequa, N.Y. 10........Andrew Muran ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 11........Braddock Chow..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 12........Bryant J. Born ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 13........Garrett Malave ..................Laurel, N.Y. 14........Ethan Susser......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 15........Nicholas Kevin Fox ............Commack, N.Y. 16........Joseph James D’Orazio......St. James, N.Y. 17........Erik Joshua Klug ................Sands Point, N.Y. 18........Samuel Federman..............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 19........Faran Nazir ........................Deer Park, N.Y. 20........Michael L. Schumer ..........Syosset, N.Y. 21........Varun Mehta ......................Hauppauge, N.Y. 22........Spencer George Bozsik ......Sag Harbor, N.Y. 23........Nasser Abdel Ghaffar..........Massapequa, N.Y. 24........Benjamin Tenner ................Roslyn, N.Y. 25........Mitchell Reid Berger ..........Lake Grove, N.Y. 26........David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 27........Ronald Hohmann................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 28........Justin Scott Feder ..............Bellmore, N.Y. 29........Jacob Lacks ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 30........Michael Liebman................Roslyn, N.Y. 31........Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 32........Zane Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 33........Jack Ian Lindenman ..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34........Conner Dove ......................Baldwin, N.Y. 35........Del Schunk ........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 36........Christian Esposito ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 37........Cameron Posillico ..............Bayville, N.Y. 38........Kavi Bhatia ........................Jericho, N.Y. 39........Daniel Lucian Okin ............Amagansett, N.Y. 40........Daniel Shleimovich ............Merrick, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Richard Mitchell ................Franklin Square, N.Y. 2..........Dylan Ander ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 3..........Ian Combemale..................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 4..........Daniel Sliwowski................Islip, N.Y. 5..........Samuel Hajibai ..................Kings Point, N.Y. 6..........Zachary Chang ..................Massapequa, N.Y. 7..........Brett Titcomb ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 8..........Ian Baranowski ..................Syosset, N.Y. 9..........Jesse Richheimer ..............Merrick, N.Y. 10........Jack Vissicchio ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 11........Erik Ujvari ..........................Hauppauge, N.Y. 12........Erik Johann Lobben ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 13........Jeffrey Cherkin ..................Melville, N.Y. 14........Michael Nelson ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 15........Caleb Van Loon ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 16........Connor J. Gehrke ..............Miller Place, N.Y. 17........Troy Michael Haas..............Huntington Station, N.Y. 18........Joshua Williams Gordon ....Hicksville, N.Y. 19........Richard William Liell ..........Nesconset, N.Y. 20........Michael Hakimi ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 21........Julian Koby Adler ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 22........Michael A. Vera ..................Bethpage, N.Y. 23........Gregory Rosenthal..............Syosset, N.Y. 24........Dylan Hobbs Appel ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 25........Benjamin Mermelstein ......Northport, N.Y. 26........Joshua Fried ......................Plainview, N.Y. 27........Roshun Patel......................Syosset, N.Y. 28........Steven Marzagalli ..............Patchogue, N.Y. 29........Jeremy Grossman ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 30........Brian Heinze ......................garden City, N.Y. 31........Brett Edelblum ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 32........Richard DeGregoris ............Rockville Centre, N.Y.

RANKINGS

33........James Edward Heaney ......Locust Valley, N.Y. 34........Daniel Wong ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 35........Matthew Edison Orlich ......Valley Stream, N.Y. 36........Cole Laffitte ......................East Setauket, N.Y. 37........Daniel Christopher Lee ......Port Washington, N.Y. 38........Jake Horowitz ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 39........David Saxman....................Plainview, N.Y. 40........Derek Thomas Esposito......Stony Brook, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Jared Drzal ........................West Sayville, N.Y. 2..........Jacob Mishkin....................Woodbury, N.Y. 3..........Sloan Millman ....................Woodmere, N.Y. 4..........Andrew Steven O’Connell ..Medford, N.Y. 5..........Jason Fruchter ..................Lawrence, N.Y. 6..........Ian Combemale..................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 7..........Christopher DeSimone ......Centerport, N.Y. 8..........Zach Cooper ......................Holbrook, N.Y. 9..........Kesar Virendra Shah ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 10........Steven Ferrantello ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 11........Matthew Zuckerman ..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 12........Michael Freilich..................Lawrence, N.Y. 13........Anton Averin ......................South Setauket, N.Y. 14........Chris Casamassima............Franklin Square, N.Y. 15........Ryan Zuckerman................Valley Stream, N.Y. 16........Seth Kornfield ....................Jericho, N.Y. 17........William Speranza ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 18........Zachary Aboody ................Roslyn, N.Y. 19........Jonathan Sanders ..............Holbrook, N.Y. 20........Matthew Ryan Basile..........Smithtown, N.Y. 21........Sean Jagi Chhugani ..........Roslyn, N.Y. 22........Austin P. Davidow ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 23........Jordan Lindenmam ............Commack, N.Y. 24........Roger Young ......................Brookhaven, N.Y. 25........Clark D. Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 26........Darren Reisch ....................Floral Park, N.Y. 27........Ignacio Casali ....................Farmingdale, N.Y. 28........Zachary H. Mintz ................Roslyn, N.Y. 29........Jason Fiderer ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 30........Dennis Uspensky................Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 31........Richard Mitchell ................Franklin Square, N.Y. 32........Brandon Lum ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 33........Gregory B. Gittler................Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 34........Felipe Magalhaaes Reis......East Hampton, N.Y. 35........Joseph M. Falcetta ............Deer Park, N.Y. 36........Nick Wong..........................Jericho, N.Y. 37........Daniel Wong ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 38........Daniel Wright ....................Babylon, N.Y. 39........Anil Nandkumar ................East Northport, N.Y. 40........Erik Johann Lobben ..........Glen Head, N.Y.

GIRLS

Long Island Girls 10 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 2..........Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 3..........Marisa L. Menist ................Great Neck, N.Y. 4..........Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 5..........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 6..........Allison Cooney ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 7..........Merri Kelly ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8..........Kira Rose Giordano ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 9..........Emily Austin ......................Woodmere, N.Y. 10........Gabriella Sciarrotta ............Woodmere, N.Y. 11........Rebecca E. Suarez ............Huntington, N.Y. 12........Alexa Lynn Bracco..............Freeport, N.Y. 13........Amy Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 14........Alexandra Chirinkin ............Woodbury, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Lexee Taylor Shapiro ..........Syosset, N.Y. 2..........Brynn Maris April................Dix Hills, N.Y. 3..........Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 4..........Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

5..........Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 6..........Trinity Chow ......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 7..........Marisa L. Menist ................Great Neck, N.Y. 8..........Ashley Debra Yevdosin ......Hewlett, N.Y. 9..........Abigail Carrie Okin ............Amagansett, N.Y. 10........Devika Kedia......................East Norwich, N.Y. 11..........Cecelia Thomas Combemale ..Bridgehampton, N.Y. 12........Brooke Emily Digia ............Manhasset, N.Y. 13........Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Syosset, N.Y. 14........Hannah Rosalie Dayton ......East Hampton, N.Y. 15........Katelyn Walker ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 16........Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 17........Celeste Wang Traub............Jericho, N.Y. 18........Emily Kate Shutman ..........Huntington, N.Y. 19........Dasha Dlin ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 20........Amanda Alison Foo ............Manhasset, N.Y. 21........Julia Sherwood Dudley ......Southampton, N.Y. 22........Kaitlyn Byrnes ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 23........Marina Bracken Hilbert ......Locust Valley, N.Y. 24........Adele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 25........Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 26........Merri Kelly ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 27........Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 28........Victoria Anna Bialczak ........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 29........Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 30........Josephine Winters..............Elmont, N.Y. 31........Stephanie Anne Petras ......Manhasset, N.Y. 32........Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y. 33........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 34........Alison Coben......................Massapequa, N.Y. 35........Alexa Susan Goetz ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 36........Risha Malhotra ..................Syosset, N.Y. 37........Erica Forrest ......................Jericho, N.Y. 38........Kerri Leah Goldfuss............Westbury, N.Y. 39........Katia Sabrina Idiri ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 40........Amanda Mintz....................Sag Harbor, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Lauren Ann Livingston........Sands Point, N.Y. 2..........Katharine Brandow ............East Northport, N.Y. 3..........Brittany Burke ....................Garden City, N.Y. 4..........Bridget Elaine Harding........Northport, N.Y. 5..........Rhea Malhotra....................Syosset, N.Y. 6..........Julia Khan..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 7..........Michele Sheila Lehat..........Great Neck, N.Y. 8..........Julia Ciardullo ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 9..........Lexee Taylor Shapiro ..........Syosset, N.Y. 10........Nikaylah Imani Williams ....Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 11........Aidan Owens......................Manhasset, N.Y. 12........Michelle Haykin..................Great Neck, N.Y. 13........Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ..Bayville, N.Y. 14........Cameron Leigh Moskol ......Wantagh, N.Y. 15........Sophie Grace Wilson ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 16........Ryann Moelis ....................Hewlett, N.Y. 17........Danielle Mirabella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 18........Taylor S. Cosme ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 19........Vanessa L. Scott ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 20........Laura Jean Halsey..............Westhampton, N.Y. 21........Eva Rosalia Petersen..........Bridgehampton, N.Y. 22........Sarah Seeman ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 23........Brynn Maris April................Dix Hills, N.Y. 24........Brianna Biancardi ..............Merrick, N.Y. 25........Rosa LaCorte ....................Merrick, N.Y. 26........Katie Jane Cirella ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 27........Sofiya Tumanova................Middle Island, N.Y. 28........Lauren B. Dolowich ............Jericho, N.Y. 29........Alana Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 30........Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 31........Claire Handa ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 32........Eudice Wong Chong ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 33........Morgan Hermann ..............Garden City, N.Y. 34........Olivia C. Funk ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 35........Caroline Keating ................Huntington, N.Y. 36........Elizabeth K. Kallenberg ......Port Washington, N.Y. 37........Tracey Nicole Rosenlicht ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 38........Emily Kate Shutman ..........Huntington, N.Y.


LONG 39........Mallie Feldman ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 40........Denise Vollmer ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Lara Fishbane ....................Commack, N.Y. 2..........Bridget Elaine Harding........Northport, N.Y. 3..........Ruth Freilich ......................Lawrence, N.Y. 4..........Emma R. Brezel..................Port Washington, N.Y. 5..........Hannah Goldman................West Hempstead, N.Y. 6..........Danielle Byrnes ..................Massapequa, N.Y. 7..........Jennifer C. Ferguson ..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 8..........Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 9..........Mary C. Harding ................Northport, N.Y. 10........Aimee N. Manfredo ............Shoreham, N.Y. 11........Erica Bundrick....................Mattituck, N.Y. 12........Rhea Malhotra....................Syosset, N.Y. 13........Jennifer Carnovale ............Massapequa, N.Y. 14........Julia Ciardullo ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 15........Kristen Bomkamp ..............Northport, N.Y. 16........Michele Sheila Lehat..........Great Neck, N.Y. 17........Brittany Burke ....................Garden City, N.Y. 18........Jennifer Glukhman ............Syosset, N.Y. 19........Lauren Ann Livingston........Sands Point, N.Y. 20........Danielle Lapierre................Hicksville, N.Y. 21........Cameron Leigh Moskol ......Wantagh, N.Y. 22........Holly Hubsher ....................Sands Point, N.Y. 23........Rachel Gastaldo ................Syosset, N.Y. 24........Amanda Luper ..................Melville, N.Y. 25........Katharine Brandow ............East Northport, N.Y. 26........Amanda Nowak..................Huntington, N.Y. 27........Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 28........Rithika Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 29........Claudia M. Ruiz ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 30........Zenat Rashidzada ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 31........Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 32........Taylor Rose Anderson ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 33........Alexandra Linder ................Sands Point, N.Y. 34........Karishma Ramesh Tank......New Hyde Park, N.Y. 35........Hannah Morgan Finger ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 36........Bianca Posa ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 37........Brianna Biancardi ..............Merrick, N.Y. 38........Elianne Michelle Gabbay ....Jericho, N.Y. 39........Alexa P. Sternschein ..........Syosset, N.Y. 40........April Pun ............................Glen Head, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Hannah Goldman................West Hempstead, N.Y. 2..........Erica Bundrick....................Mattituck, N.Y. 3..........Carly Siegel........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4..........Alyssa D. Rosello................Garden City, N.Y. 5..........Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 6..........Jennifer C. Ferguson ..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 7..........Amanda Seeley ..................Sound Beach, N.Y. 8..........Mary Harding ....................Northport, N.Y. 9..........Courtney Sokol ..................Floral Park, N.Y. 10........Jaclyn Mary Cartwright ......Deer Park, N.Y. 11........Veronika Paikin ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 12........Alison Wang ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 13........Yuliya V. Astapova ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 14........Jessica Nowak ..................Huntington, N.Y. 15........Cameron Leigh Moskol ......Wantagh, N.Y. 16........Kate C. Weidenman ............Syosset, N.Y. 17........Jessica Sickles ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 18........Taylor Wilkins ....................Syosset, N.Y. 19........Ashley Sandler ..................Jericho, N.Y. 20........Robin Mehta ......................Manhasset, N.Y.

ISLAND

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 04/11/11)

RANKINGS

138......Carl Grant ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 139......Austin Egna........................Port Washington, N.Y. 146......Daniel Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region

BOYS Sectional Boys 10 Singles— Long Island Region

Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Brenden Andrew Volk ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 5..........Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 8..........Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 15........Daniel Grunberger..............Great Neck, N.Y. 23........Lubomir T. Cuba ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 31........Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 35........Jared R. Halstrom ..............Bellmore, N.Y. 39........Bryant J. Born ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 44........Palmer T. Clare ..................North Bellmore, N.Y. 45........Conor Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 52........Alex Brebenel ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 66........Kevin Cino..........................East Quogue, N.Y. 79........Colin Francis Sacco............Brightwaters, N.Y. 84........Zacarias Imperial ..............Garden City Park, N.Y. 85........Cory Seltman ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 89........William Scribner Bader ......Water Mill, N.Y. 93........Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 94........Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 97........Joshua Williams Gordon ....Hicksville, N.Y. 98........Athell Patrick Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 100......Travis Leaf ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 107......Chris Kuhnle ......................Shoreham, N.Y. 108......Brandon Eric Remer ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 115......Benjamin Rosen ................Port Washington, N.Y. 117......Jordan Michael Bennett ....Valley Stream, N.Y. 119......Andy Zhou..........................Commack, N.Y. 120......Nikhil Raj ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 126......Brian Hoffarth ....................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 128......Dennis Uspensky................Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 130......Evan Kober ........................Wantagh, N.Y. 142......Faran Nazir ........................Deer Park, N 149......Raizada Bhavin Vaid ..........Old Westbury, N.Y.

Rank ..Name ............................City 6..........Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 9..........Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 11........Neel Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 13........Michael Medvedev ............Oceanside, N.Y. 15........Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 16........Billy Suarez........................Huntington, N.Y. 17........Sujay Sharma ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 19........Benjamin Cole Grossman ..Sands Point, N.Y. 20........Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 24........Amani Siddiqui ..................West Babylon, N.Y. 33........Jeffrey McDonnell ..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 38........Niles Ghaffar ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 62........Robert Steven Bellino ........Huntington, N.Y. 68........Philip Yunjae Chang............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 77........Michael Wexler ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 78........Wiktor Marek Figiel ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 82........Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 83........Daniel Chikvashvili ............Syosset, N.Y. 85........Alec Hunter Barres ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 95........Zachary Reid Berlin............Dix Hills, N.Y. 116......Torin Suner Bograd ............Huntington, N.Y. 122......Abhinay Raj Srivstava ........Melville, N.Y. 126......Michael Bruck....................Roslyn, N.Y. 129......Henry Bilicic ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 131......JohnChristian Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 132......Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 133......Jacob Rusinek ..................East Hills, N.Y. 150......Tyler Joseph Milner............Jericho, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ............................City 5..........Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 8..........Sean M. Mullins ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 9..........Athell Patrick Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 10........Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12........Alan Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 15........Colin Francis Sacco............Brightwaters, N.Y. 18........Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 21........Daniel Shleimovich ............Merrick, N.Y. 22........Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 23........Jordan Michael Bennett ....Valley Stream, N.Y. 31........Rajan Jai Vohra ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 38........Patrick F. Maloney ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 40........Brian Shi ............................Jericho, N.Y. 48........Daniel Eric Pellerito ............Syosset, N.Y. 52........Yuval Solomon....................Plainview, N.Y. 53........Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 54........Kyle Hudson Gower ............Oceanside, N.Y. 55........Michael Medvedev ............Oceanside, N.Y. 66........Neel Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 69........Logan Beckerman ..............East Norwich, N.Y. 72........Andy Zhou..........................Commack, N.Y. 76........Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 77........Ian Bank ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 82........James Kyrkanides..............Stony Brook, N.Y. 85........Giancarlo Cavallero ............West Hempstead, N.Y. 88........Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 93........Titus Syon Sung ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 98........Eli Grossman......................Woodbury, N.Y. 101......Thomas Korossy ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 103......Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 110......Justin Ilan Lempert ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 111......Benjamin Cole Grossman ..Sands Point, N.Y. 113......Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 115......Brady Berman ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 122......Amani Siddiqui ..................West Babylon, N.Y. 125......Tyler Spencer Bloch ..........Jericho, N.Y. 134......Michael Thomas Jaklitsch ..South Setauket, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ............................City 1..........Noah B. Rubin ....................Merrick, N.Y. 4..........Aidan Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 8..........Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 10........Vihar Shah ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 12........Philip Daniel Antohi ............Glen Head, N.Y. 15........Ethan Bogard ....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 18........Alexander Schidlovsky ......Sea Cliff, N.Y. 20........Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 22........Douglas Notaris..................Wantagh, N.Y. 39........Conor Dauer ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 40........Brandon T. Stone ................Melville, N.Y. 45........Alex Sacher........................Glen Head, N.Y. 49........Lamar Remy ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 50........Jeremy Dubin ....................Southampton, N.Y. 56........Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ........Greenvale, N.Y. 57........Austin Davidow ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 61........Tyler J. Hoffman ................Sayville, N.Y. 68........Ali Zain ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 76........Matthew R. Demichiel ........Hewlett, N.Y. 77........John P. D’Alessandro..........Northport, N.Y. 80........Conor Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 81........Zachary A. Lessen..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 90........Mark Daniel Temporal ........Carle Place, N.Y. 92........Daniel Wong ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 101......Doron Saraf........................Great Neck, N.Y. 102......Daniel Grunberger..............Great Neck, N.Y. 108......Brian W. Slivonik ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 111......Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 117......Erik Ujvari ..........................Hauppauge, N.Y. 122......Dylan Hobbs Appel ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 124......Benjamin Q. King................East Meadow, N.Y. 129......Joshua Williams Gordon ....Hicksville, N.Y. 131......Jared R. Halstom................Bellmore, N.Y. 135......Jonathan Paris ....................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

138......Jeffrey Cherkin ..................Melville, N.Y. 140......Kyle Alper ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 142......Benjamin Mermelstein ......Northport, N.Y. 148......Gonzalo E. Mocorrea ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 149......Ian Combemale..................Bridgehampton, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ............................City 2..........Josh M. Levine ..................Syosset, N.Y. 3..........Andrew Yaraghi ..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 4..........Bert Vancura ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 5..........Eric Rubin ..........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 14........Matthew O. Barry ..............Lido Beach, N.Y. 27........Howard J. Weiss ................Great Neck, N.Y. 30........Noah B. Rubin ....................Merrick, N.Y. 32........Jensen H. Reiter ................Syosset, N.Y. 34........Brendan Henry ..................Massapequa, N.Y. 37........Alex Tropiano ....................Laurel Hollow, N.Y. 38........Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 39........Eric Ambrosio ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 42........Jonahiby Tauil ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 46........Alexander Schidlovsky ......Sea Cliff, N.Y. 50........Zachary Morris ..................Garden City, N.Y. 53........Jonathan Defrancesch ......Manhasset, N.Y. 58........Kevin A. Katz ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 63........David Greenbaum ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 64........Shaun Bernstein ................Plainview, N.Y. 66........Alan S. Pleat ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 68........Adam S. Gottlieb ................Great Neck, N.Y. 70........Eric Sumanaru ..................Middle Island, N.Y. 73........Jason Hubsher ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 77........Ofir Solomon ......................Plainview, N.Y. 85........Austin Davidow ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 91........Sean Jagi Chhugani ..........Roslyn, N.Y. 97........Harrison R. Digia ................Manhasset, N.Y. 105......Conor A. Dauer ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 106......Michael T. Puntillo ..............Sands Point, N.Y. 108......Paul Abrudescu ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 114......Clark D. Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 115......Matthew J. Richards ..........Bayport, N.Y. 118......Austin Blau ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 120......Henry D. Lee ......................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 130......Jacob Mishkin....................Woodbury, N.Y. 131......Sloan Millman ....................Woodmere, N.Y. 133......Daniel R. Grinshteyn ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 135......Darren Reisch ....................Floral Park, N.Y. 137......Jared Drzal ........................West Sayville, N.Y. 142......Jason A. Fruchter ..............Lawrence, N.Y. 148......Pasha Shapouri..................Albertson, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ............................City 3..........Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4..........Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 13........Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 20........Alexa Susan Goetz ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 23........Merri Kelly ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 25........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 29........Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 34........Marisa Menist ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 36........Amy Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 44........Emily Austin ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 52........Allison Cooney ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 69........Kira Rose Giordano ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 75........Gabriela Sciarrotta ............Woodmere, N.Y. 78........Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 79........Alexa Lynn Bracco..............Freeport, N.Y. 87........Alexandra Chirinkin ............Woodbury, N.Y.

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LONG Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ............................City 3..........Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 8..........Celeste Rose Matute ..........Amityville, N.Y. 9..........Claire Handa ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 20........Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 21........Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Syosset, N.Y. 35........Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 42........Courtney Kowalsky ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 51........Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 52........Dominique Woinarowski ....Syosset, N.Y. 57........Amanda Allison Foo............Manhasset, N.Y. 64........Ashley Lessen....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 67........Abigail Carrie Okin ............Amagansett, N.Y. 68........Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 70........Emily Kate Shutman ..........Huntington, N.Y. 73........Josephine Winters..............Elmont, N.Y. 76........Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 79........Morgan Wilkins ..................Syosset, N.Y. 82........Brynn Maris April................Dix Hills, N.Y. 86........Theodora Brebenel ............Glen Head, N.Y. 90........Trinity Chow ......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 92........Lexee Taylor Shapiro ..........Syosset, N.Y. 96........Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 102......Ashley Debra Yevdosin ......Hewlett, N.Y. 107......Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y. 109......Marisa Menist ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 110......Alexa Susan Goetz ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 111......Devika Kedia......................East Norwich, N.Y. 115......Merri Kelly ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 117......Katelyn Walker ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 118......Nicole Kyrkanides ..............Stony Brook, N.Y. 123......Hannah Rosalie Dayton ......East Hampton, N.Y. 124......Cecilia Thomas CombemaleBridgehampton, N.Y. 132......Marina Bracken Hilbert ......Locust Valley, N.Y. 150......Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ............................City 8..........Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 13........Isabella Pascucci................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 14........Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 20........Morgan Hermann ..............Garden City, N.Y. 21........Shanice Nadia Arthur..........Glen Head, N.Y. 28........Taylor S. Cosme ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 29........Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 47........Karen A. Serina ..................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 48........Bridget Elaine Harding........Northport, N.Y. 53........Rachel Gastaldo ................Syosset, N.Y. 54........Aimee N. Manfredo ............Shoreham, N.Y. 66........Lauren Ann Livingston........Sands Point, N.Y. 71........Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ..Bayville, N.Y. 73........Brittany Burke ....................Garden City, N.Y. 74........Michele Sheila Lehat..........Great Neck, N.Y. 79........Olivia C. Funk ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 85........Esther Chikvashvili ............Syosset, N.Y. 96........Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 97........Julia Ciardullo ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 104......Rhea Malhotra....................Syosset, N.Y. 107......Vanessa L. Scott ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 120......Nikaylah Imani Williams ....Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 123......Katie Jean Cirella ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 132......Julia Khan..........................Port Washington, N.Y.

ISLAND

40........Paulina Tafler ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 48........Stephanie Loutsenko..........Bellmore, N.Y. 53........Alison Wang ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 57........Claudia M. Ruiz ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 60........Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 61........Sunaina Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 66........Sara Finger ........................St. James, N.Y. 68........Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 69........Rithika D. Reddy ................Syosset, N.Y. 70........Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 92........Gabriella Nicole Leon ........Woodmere, N.Y. 93........Julia Zhuang ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 99........Zenat Rashidzada ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 100......Rachel Gastaldo ................Syosset, N.Y. 103......Yuliya V. Astapova ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 104......Aimee N. Manfredo ............Shoreham, N.Y. 106......Erica Bundrick....................Mattituck, N.Y. 107......Bianca Posa ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 109......Jennifer Ferguson ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 113......Emma R. Brezel..................Port Washington, N.Y. 118......Cameron Leigh Moskol ......Wantagh, N.Y. 121......Brittany Burke ....................Garden City, N.Y. 124......Laura Torsiello....................Bayport, N.Y. 126......Mary C. Harding ................Northport, N.Y. 132......Olivia C. Funk ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 134......Ruth Freilich ......................Lawrence, N.Y. 135......Bridget Elaine Harding........Northport, N.Y. 137......Isabella Pascucci................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 145......Shanice Nadia Arthur..........Glen Head, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ............................City 6..........Katherine Yau ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 7..........Hannah L. Camhi................Woodbury, N.Y. 14........Shelby Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 23........Theresa Smith....................Port Washington, N.Y. 36........Jacqueline Raynor..............Garden City, N.Y. 38........Morgan Feldman ................Glen Head, N.Y. 42........Stephanie Loutsenko..........Bellmore, N.Y. 50........Missy Edelblum..................Roslyn, N.Y. 51........Julia Elbaba ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 56........Nadia Smergut ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 57........Samantha Rosca-Sipot ......Malverne, N.Y. 60........Sophie Barnard ..................Mill neck, N.Y. 67........Ludmila Yamus ..................Melville, N.Y. 70........Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 72........Samantha L. Elgort ............Melville, N.Y. 74........Taylor A. Diffley ..................Hampton Bays, N.Y. 77........Devlin-Ann Ammendola......Massapequa, N.Y. 83........Carly Siegel........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 88........Melissa Carlay....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 89........Jessica Nowak ..................Huntington, N.Y. 91........Alison Wang ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 92........Vivian Cheng ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 93........Ashley Sandler ..................Jericho, N.Y. 97........Claudia M. Ruiz ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 105......Lila B. Martz ......................Long Beach, N.Y. 107......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 108......Samantha Gann ................Massapequa, N.Y. 111......Paige J. Mintz ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 133......Sunaina Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 134......Alyssa D. Rosello................Garden City, N.Y. 142......Erica Bundrick....................Mattituck, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region

Boys & Girls National Rankings

Rank ..Name ............................City

(as of 04/20/11)

9..........Hannah L. Camhi................Woodbury, N.Y. 13........Nadia Smergut ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 16........Sophie R. Barnard ..............Mill Neck, N.Y. 18........Vivian Cheng ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 22........Ola Mally............................Franklin Square, N.Y. 25........Julia Elbaba ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 39........Morgan C. Feldman ............Glen Head, N.Y.

78

BOYS

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 92........Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 100......Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

RANKINGS

114......Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 155......Athell Patrick Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 167......Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 228......Jordan Michael Bennett ....Valley Stream, N.Y. 238......Colin Francis Sacco............Brightwaters, N.Y. 244......Alan Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 277......Daniel Shleimovich ............Merrick, N.Y. 340......Rajan Jai Vohra ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 378......Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 473......Ronald P.Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 552......Daniel Eric Pellerito ............Syosset, N.Y. 564......Brian Shi ............................Jericho, N.Y. 596......Michael Medvedev ............Oceanside, N.Y. 643......Patrick Maloney ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 693......Kyle Hudson Gower ............Oceanside, N.Y. 867......Yuval Solomon....................Plainview, N.Y. 877......James Kyrkanides..............Stony Brook, N.Y. 914......Neel Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 937......Andy Zhou..........................Commack, N.Y. 967......Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 61........Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 75........Brenden Andrew Volk ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 120......Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 136......Daniel Grunberger..............Great Neck, N.Y. 221......Lubomir T. Cuba ................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 262......Jared Halstrom ..................Bellmore, N.Y. 285......Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 471......Dennis Uspensky................Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 617......Bryant J. Born ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 789......Palmer T. Clare ..................North Bellmore, N.Y. 981......Benjamin Rosen ................Port Washington, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 14........Noah B. Rubin ....................Merrick, N.Y. 41........Aidan Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 77........Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 144......Vihar Shah ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 179......Ethan Bogard ....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 268......Alexander Schidlovsky ......Sea Cliff, N.Y. 398......Conor A. Dauer ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 406......Douglas Notaris..................Wantagh, N.Y. 428......Lamar Remy ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 503......Philip Daniel Antohi ............Glen Head, N.Y. 576......Brandon T. Stone ................Melville, N.Y. 610......Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 632......Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ........Greenvale, N.Y. 685......Austin P. Davidow ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 773......Tyler J. Hoffman ................Sayville, N.Y. 822......Alex C. Sacher....................Glen Head, N.Y. 850......Stanislav Korshunov ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 925......John P. D’Allesandro ..........Northport, N.Y. 979......Jeremy Dubin ....................Southampton, N.Y. 984......Conor Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 102......Josh M. Levine ..................Syosset, N.Y. 150......Andrew S. Yaraghi ..............Mill Neck, N.Y. 153......Bert Vancura ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 173......Matthew O. Barry ..............Lido Beach, N.Y. 189......Eric Rubin ..........................Lido Beach, N.Y. 206......Jensen Reiter ....................Syosset, N.Y. 292......Eric Ambrosio ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 296......Howard J. Weiss ................Great Neck, N.Y. 368......Alex Tropiano ....................Laurel Hollow, N.Y. 382......Jonathan Defrancesch ......Manhasset, N.Y. 402......Shaun Bernstein ................Plainview, N.Y. 478......Zachary Morris ..................Garden City, N.Y. 496......Noah B. Rubin ....................Merrick, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com

659......Jonahiby Tauil ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 792......Alexander Friedlich ............Great Neck, N.Y. 894......David Greenbaum ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 895......Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 916......Brendan Henry ..................Massapequa, N.Y.

GIRLS

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 80........Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 196......Claire Handa ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 239......Celeste Rose Mautute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 390......Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Syosset, N.Y. 439......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 517......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 552......Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 738......Merri Kelly ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 837......Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 963......Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 984......Ashley Lessen....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 985......Amanda Allison Foo............Manhasset, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 157......Isabella Pascucci................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 167......Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring harbor, N.Y. 325......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 387......Taylor Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 420......Shanice Nadia Arthur..........Glen Head, N.Y. 558......Karen A. Serina ..................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 614......Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 642......Morgan Herrmann..............Garden City, N.Y. 790......Bridget Elaine Harding........Northport, N.Y. 928......Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 56........Hannah L. Camhi................Woodbury, N.Y. 59........Julia Elbaba ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 121......Vivian Cheng ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 150......Nadia Smergut ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 447......Morgan C. Feldman ............Glen Head, N.Y. 608......Stephanie Loutsenko..........Bellmore, N.Y. 610......Ola Mally............................Franklin Square, N.Y. 873......Paulina Tafler ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 964......Alison Wang ......................Great Neck, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ............................City 109......Hannah L. Camhi................Woodbury, N.Y. 146......Katherine Yau ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 158......Shelby Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 186......Julia Elbaba ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 188......Theresa Smith....................Port Washington, N.Y. 540......Stephanie Loutsenko..........Bellmore, N.Y. 548......Jacqueline Raynor..............Garden City, N.Y. 698......Morgan Feldman ................Glen Head, N.Y. 847......Samantha Rosca-Sipot ......Malverne, N.Y.

Long Island Rankings Sponsored by


USTA/Long Island Region 2011

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. MAY 2011 Friday-Sunday, May 6-8 L1 Sportime Lynbrook Championship Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B(18)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 22) For more information, call (516) 887-1330.

Saturday, May 7 LI Regional Junior Team Tennis 12U Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: BG(12)sd; XJ(12)d Surface: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $0.00 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 2) For more information, call (516) 822-8711.

Friday-Sunday, May 6-8 L1B Ross School Tennis Academy Championship Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(18-12)s, SE; BG(12)d, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 29 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 907-5721.

Friday-Sunday, May 13-15 L1 Sportime Syosset Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B(16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, May 6-8 L3 Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(18-12)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, May 13-15 L2O Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(16-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, May 6-8 10 & 8U QuickStart Sportime Syosset Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: QuickStart BG(10-8)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, May 13-15 L1 Sportime LR Summer Championship Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B(12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player for one event (deadline for entries is Friday, April 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, May 6-8 L1 LBTC Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Championships G(12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player for singles/$28 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, May 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, May 13-15 L1 Sportime Kings Park Championship Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships G(18-16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player for singles (deadline for entries is Friday, April 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, May 6-8 & May 13-15 L1 Deer Park Anuj Agarwal Memorial Championship Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG(14)s, SE Surface: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 22) For more information, call (631) 667-3476.

Friday-Sunday, May 13-15 L1B LBTC Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(18-16)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player/$28 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, May 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, May 13-15 Sportime Massapequa NTRP Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked NM(3.0-4.5)sd, SE; NW(3.04.0)sd, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, May 7at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550. Saturday, May 14 L3 Eastern Athletic at Bluepoint Eastern UPS Championship Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(14)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, May 7at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Saturday, May 14 JTT LI Regional 18U Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: BG(18)sd; XJ(18)d Surface: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $0.00 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 2) For more information, call (516) 822-8711. Friday-Sunday, May 20-22 L3 Sportime Massapequa Eastern UPS Championship Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(14-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550. Friday-Sunday, May 20-22 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Syosset Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B(18-10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, May 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, May 20-22 & Friday-Monday, May 27-30 +L1 RWTTC Eastern Designated Closed Championship L3 FIC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G(16)sd, FIC Surface: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per singles player/$28 per doubles per player with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Monday, May 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, May 20-22 & Friday-Monday, May 27-30 +L1 Sportime Lynbrook Eastern Designated Closed Championship L3 FIC Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G(18)sd, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per singles player/$28 per doubles per player with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Monday, May 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, May 20-22 & Friday-Monday, May 27-30 +L1 Point Set Eastern Designated Closed Championship L3 FIC Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix B(16)sd, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per singles player/$28 per doubles per player with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Monday, May 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323. Friday-Sunday, May 20-22 & Friday-Monday, May 27-30 +L1 Sportime Bethpage Eastern Designated Closed Championship L3 FIC Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix B(14)sd, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: Entry Fee: $54.25 per singles player/$28 per doubles per player with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Monday, May 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

79


USTA/Long Island Region 2011

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, May 20-22 & Friday-Monday, May 27-30 +L1 Sportime Roslyn Eastern Designated Closed Championship L3 FIC Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G(12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per singles player/$28 per doubles per player with an additional $25 for players qualifying or accepted directly to the main draw (deadline for entries is Monday, May 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, June 3-5 L3 Sportime Kings Park Eastern UPS Championship Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(18-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, May 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, June 10-12 L1B LBTC Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(18)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player for singles/$27.38 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, May 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, June 17-19 L1B Old Westbury Challenger Racquet Club At Old Westbury 24 Quail Run • Old Westbury, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, June 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 626-1625.

Friday-Sunday, June 3-5 L2O LBTC Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B(18-10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Saturday-Sunday, June 11-12 3rd Annual Bayport-BluePoint Men’s & Women’s Doubles Open—CIP 150 Academy Street Bayport, N.Y. Divisions: Unranked M(Op)d; W(Op)d Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per doubles team For more information, call (516) 524-2971.

Friday-Sunday, June 24-26 L2O ATS Summer Kick-Off Advantage Tennis Strategies LLC/Cedarbrook Club 32 Oak Lane Old Brookville, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(18,14)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, June 10-12 L2O Eastern Athletic at Bluepoint Championship Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B(16-14)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 27at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, June 17-19 L2O Eastern Athletic at Bluepoint Championship Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate G(16-14)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 3at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, June 24-26 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Roslyn Championship Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(16,12-10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, June 10-12 L1B Sportime Bethpage Challenger Sportime Tennis Bethpage Friday-Sunday, May 27-29 8U & 10U QuickStart Sportime Syosset Championship 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Sportime-Syosset Divisions: Challenger BG(16)s, SE 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Surface Type: Unknown Divisions: QuickStart BG(10-8)s, RR Entry Fee: Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadSurface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries line for entries is Tuesday, May 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. is Monday, May 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, June 10-12 L3 Huntington Eastern UPS Championship Friday-Monday, May 27-30 Huntington Indoor Tennis L1B Sportime Kings Park Challenger 100 Broadway Street Sportime Kings Park Huntington Station, N.Y. 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(18-10)s, RR Divisions: Challenger BG (14-10)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player/$25 per player for dou- Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries bles (deadline for entries is Friday, May 13 at 1:00 p.m.) is Friday, June 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. For more information, call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, June 17-19 L1B Sportime KP Challenger Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, June 24-26 L3 Deer Park Tennis Eastern UPS Championship Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(18-10)s, RR Surface: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 667-3476.

Friday-Sunday, June 17-19 L1B Atlantic Beach Mayor’s Cup Challenger Atlantic Beach Tennis Center 60 The Plaza Atlantic Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(16)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 239-3388.

Friday-Sunday, June 24-26 L3 LBTC Eastern UPS Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(16-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, June 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

JUNE 2011 Friday-Monday, June 3-6 L1B Sportime Amagansett Sportime Amagansett 320 Abraham’s Path • P.O. Box 778 • Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(18-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 267-3460.

Friday-Sunday, June 17-19 L3 Sportime Massapequa Eastern UPS Championship Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(14-10)s, RR Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550.

Friday-Tuesday, June 24-28 L1 Port Washington Eastern Open Championship Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG(18-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, June 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 883-6425.

Saturday-Sunday, May 21-22 First Niagara Tennis Family Classic @ RWTTC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G(16)sd, FIC Surface: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $20.50 per singles player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, May 27-29 L3 Sportime Lynbrook Eastern UPS Championship Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(14-12)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per singles player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330.

80

Friday-Sunday, June 10-12 & June 17-19 L2R Long Island Regional Point Set Championship Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(18-10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2011 • LITennisMag.com


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Long Island Tennis Magazine - May/June 2011  

New York Sportimes Look to Build Off Successful 2010 Season and Gear Up for a Summer of World TeamTennis in New York.

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