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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2012 • LITennisMag.com


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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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September/October 2013 Volume 5, Number 5 Long Island Tennis Magazine

1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover story 40

2013 U.S. Open Preview Previewing the stars as they get set to take over New York at the 2013 U.S. Open, with a closer look at the contenders, pretenders, the state of American tennis … the sights, the sounds, the dining, the attractions and the pageantry that is right in our own backyard.

Staff

David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Jon Blake Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • jonb@usptennis.com

Feature Stories 20 NY Sportimes Entertain Local Crowd With Two Nights of WTT Action The New York Sportimes returned to Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island for two July dates.

24 2013 Girls High School Preview We take a look at the top teams and returning players as the 2013 Girls High School season gets underway.

Adam Wolfthal Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 • adam@usptennis.com Daisy Schwartz Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • daisy@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Marketing Coordinator Beverly Bolnick National Sales Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Scott Koondel Office Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Jeff Arlen National Account Executive (516) 409-4444, ext. 317 Brent Shearer Editorial Contributor

Kristina Hyland Intern

Michael Cervantes Editorial Contributor

Erin Brown Intern

Advertising

To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com.

Article Submissions/Press Releases

To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

Subscriptions

To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2013 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Additional Features 3

What’s Wrong With the American Men and How Can Their Game be Helped By Tim Mayotte

6 10 13 17 18 23 26 38 39 66

Costa del Tennis: Playing Abroad is all the Rage Injury Prevention: Avoid Overuse Injuries By Dr. Kenneth Kearns MeiGray Helping Tennis Fans Take Home a Piece of the Match Proper Balance Equals On-the-Court Success: Tennis Balance Board Smart Tennis With the New PlaySight SmartCourt Boosting On-Court Confidence Through Proper Preparation By Margie Zesinger Queens College Indoor Tennis Center: Rebuilt and Rebounding Gamesmanship vs. the Spirit of the Game By Miguel Cervantes III Tips to Mental Mastery: Performing Under Pressure By Tina Greenbaum, LCSW An International Competition You Know Little About By Lonnie Mitchel

Columns 4 8 12 16 22 27 28 30 32 35 60 63 64 67 66 68 71

Ask Nick … Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Q&A Forum With Nick Bollettieri The Jensen Zone: Tennis … In the Mind or in the Body? By Luke Jensen Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Player Spotlight: Lamar Remy Dr. Tom on Learning How to Enjoy the Game By Dr. Tom Ferraro Get a Grip By Steven Kaplan Slumps, Chokes and the Yips: Understanding Performance Blocks By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters By Ricky Becker USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update Tips From the Tennis Pro: Lefty Secrets By Tonny van de Pieterman The Serve: Take the Best of Your Serve for a Killer Overhead (Part II) By Lisa Dodson Fitness and Nutrition: Everything You Need to Know About By Irina Belfer-Lehat Literary Corner By Brent Shearer Off-the-Court Directory Long Island Tennis Club Directory Long Island Rankings USTA/Long Island Region 2013 Tournament Schedule


? What’s Wrong With the American Men and How Can Their Game be Helped By Tim Mayotte s we enter the season of the U.S. Open, a question that hangs over American tennis is why have we not produced male champions in tennis over the past 10 years? It’s a problem that I have spent months seriously considering. Like most issues, the answer is complicated, but I feel confident that I have arrived at a framework to approach a chunk of the issue. Our players need to learn to trade, neutralize and defend better, particularly on the backhand side. From many corners, we are hearing that our athletes are not the best or our players lack the hunger of the athletes from other nations. It’s very difficult to answer those questions, so what I hope to accomplish is identify the specifics and address those problems. What is obvious is that the world’s best have a remarkable ability to trade, neutralize and defend attacks. Many observers believe that our players don’t want to suffer from long rallies. I believe most of our players have technical issues that prevent them

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from doing this at the highest levels. A look at two of our nation’s biggest prospects, Jack Sock and Ryan Harrison, demonstrates this. When I speak about technique, I mean more than just the shape of the swing. I also mean footwork patterns, loading and recovery. The technical elements of trading, neutralizing and defending are distinct (though related). Any breakdown at the highest levels will be exploited. Both Sock and Harrison hit with subpar ball quality while trading and neutralizing on their backhands. As always, technical weaknesses lead to tactical weaknesses. They are both forced to hit forehands from deep in the backhand corner which, over time, leads them to be exposed in the forehand corner. It’s fascinating to compare these two with Andy Roddick. All three have inefficient footwork patterns and neglect to use their legs and core sufficiently to create world-class ball quality. The technical and tactical weaknesses of all three are remarkably similar though, obviously Roddick was a far more powerful player. Any look at American tennis in the past

15 years shows a group of players adept at attacking, but inadequate at neutralizing and defending. Going back to Roddick and up through James Blake, Sam Querry and John Isner, most of America’s best players suffer from the same issues. Only the most solid technical players have a chance of making it to the top. I hope we can help our players reach the top again. Anyone interested in a deeper technical analysis of Harrison and Sock’s game can contact me at my Twitter account, @Tim Mayotte. Tim Mayotte was one of the nation’s best tennis players during the 1980s. Twice during the 80s, he finished the year ranked in the world’s top 10. Besides reaching the semifinals of Wimbledon and the Australian Open, he also won a Silver Medal in the Olympics and represented his nation in Davis Cup action. For the last decade, Tim has shifted his focus to developing top American players and is currently running 360 Tennis at the Cunningham Tennis Center with his partners, Lee Hurst and Carl Thorsen. He may be reached by phone at (917) 596-0746 or visit 360Tennis.net.

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888/698-3664 www.SportimeNY.com LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Q&A Forum With Nick Bollettieri

ach bi-monthly issue, Long Island Tennis Magazine has the unique opportunity to pose questions from our readers to tennis coaching legend Nick Bollettieri. Nick has coached 10 world number ones, including Andre Agassi, Boris Becker, Jim Courier, Martina Hingis, Jelena Jankovic, Marcelo Rios, Monica Seles, Maria Sharapova, and Venus and Serena Williams, as well as a host of other worldclass players, including Tommy Haas, Anna Kournikova, Jimmy Arias and Nicole Vaidisova, to name a few. If you want to ask Nick questions in a future issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine, e-mail info@usptennis.com with the Subject Line “Ask Nick.”

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Question from Steven (Dix Hills, N.Y.) … I am currently a high school junior and played high school tennis last season. I play number one singles and I am in the top 15 in my Section. I had some real

good matches at number one singles and some not so competitive. My outside coach thinks I should not play on the team, but rather, take additional drill sessions and train with him and better juniors every day. I’m conflicted and really not sure because I do love being on the team and hanging out with my teammates. What do you think I should do? Nick Bollettieri: This is not an easy question to answer, one way or the other, but my suggestion is to consider the following: l Are you in the best physical shape you can be? l Why not do both and have your coach video some of your high school matches and then sit and review them? l There must be specific drilling sessions that your coach should consider, but also have him watch you play practice matches. Review the tape after to see what is taking place when you play.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Question from Judith (New York, N.Y.) … As a coach what is the biggest indicator that a player has what it takes to make it professionally in tennis? Nick Bollettieri: I have been a coach for almost 60 years, and it would be difficult to pin it down to only one tip, but here are a few to think about: l Refuse to lose. l Never make excuses. l It’s all about winning. Playing the best you can play is only accepting second place. l The game today is divided into three categories that you must master: The Technical, the Physical and the Mental. l Your game cannot have a weakness and you must have one or two weapons. l Make sure you have a well-selected support team. l Last and most important, I want a player that will hit the last ball to win. Question from Jordan (Sayville, N.Y.) … What about your Academy keeps it as one of the top-ranked training facilities in the nation year after year? Nick Bollettieri: IMG Academy is the leading training institution in the world because we keep adding new facilities and innovating. We compete with ourselves and never become complacent. We are spending more time on integrating the physical and mental parts of the game than ever before. The IMG Academy Bollettieri Tennis Program has a dedicated staff, directed by Rohan Goetzke, and they work as a team to develop high-performing athletes who can go on to have successful collegiate and professional careers.

Photo credit: Nicole Guglielmo

ask nick …


Question from Kristen (Merrick, N.Y.) … Heading in to this year’s U.S. Open, which young American do you feel has what it takes to make a deep run? Nick Bollettieri: At this time, Pat McEnroe and his USTA staff are making a major breakthrough, especially with the ladies including: Sloane Stephens, Jamie Hampton, Madison Keys, Taylor Townsend, Vicky Duval and Varvara Lepchenko. Of course, we have the best female player to ever play the game in Serena Williams and we all hope Venus can make another run. With the men, there is finally a bit of sunlight coming through. Ryan Harrison, who trains at IMG Academy, has moved down to the USTA Center and is working with one of our former students, Jay Berger. Keep an eye on Ryan’s younger brother, Christian, who also trains at IMG Academy, as he will be special. John Isner, when healthy, can beat the very best. He just won the BB&T Open in Atlanta and hopefully he will get back on top. Don’t put aside Sam Querrey, James Blake or Rhyne Williams. It is also time for Jack Sock to start living up to his very sound game. Question from Bob (Flushing, N.Y.) … Roger Federer has dropped out of the top five in the ATP Rankings for the first time in a long time. Do you think he is still capable of winning another major? Nick Bollettieri: Roger Federer has dropped out of the top five, but in my mind, he has not been eliminated from challenging for another Grand Slam win. His coach, Paul Annacone, is a former student at IMG Academy, and is one of the very best. I am sure you will see Roger playing more aggressively, including serve and volleying, and also coming to the net more and more. Question from Samantha (New York, N.Y.) … What are your views on professional player prize money at majors? Do you feel the men’s and women’s purses should be equal or should the men’s be higher because they play three out of five sets? Nick Bollettieri: I definitely believe that there should be equal money. The men should still play the best of five matches. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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C O S TA D E L T E N N I S : P L AY I N G A B R O A D I S A L L T H E R A G E laying tennis abroad gives new perspective, mental strength and a fresh environment in which to discover your game and yourself.

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So what’s the big deal about experiencing tennis in Spain? The main reason is that Spain is not only a top tourist destination in the world, but a country where tennis represents an international example of excellence. With 10 of the top ATP Tour players hailing from this special place on the Mediterranean, you have to wonder … what makes it such a tennis powerhouse? To be clear, Spain has a “pay it forward” system in which each generation of coaches and highly-ranked Tour players nurtures the next. Coaches develop kids from an early age and typically stay together cultivating their player’s game and character over the long haul. The temper-

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ate climate of the Mediterranean allows players to play outdoors year-round on red clay, developing their all-court game. Mental and physical conditioning in Spain are paramount, but it’s their passion and dedication that separates them as champions! Experienced players Fortunate to have firsthand experience with these coaches, including custom programs, Costa del Tennis focuses on experienced adults, college and high school players. For ambitious players, there is no greater tennis and life experience than training like the pros on red clay. Tennis travelers have ambitious lifestyles on and off court, and Costa del Tennis covers both. The academies The academies and clubs are based on the excellence of players. Coaches are nothing

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

less than ATP Tour pros who have played on tour with ATP Rankings or are experienced in high-level competition. The philosophy on court is to prepare players for national or international levels of play. Adult teams and coaches find excellent resources for their future in tennis, either for competitive or club play. Tennis holidays include boutique accommodation, 15 hours on-court instruction and play-per-week, leaving more time to explore these compelling regions at your own pace. The perfect combination Combining Spain’s ultimate tennis instruction, dynamic destinations and ideal accommodations make your tennis travel experience one for the memory books. Costa del Tennis is certainly not your typical tennis camp! For more information, visit www.costa-del-tennis.com or call (888) 814-6465.


LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Tennis: In the Mind or in the Body?

By Luke Jensen am asked all the time from competitive tennis players … is the game more mental or physical? In my life-long adventure through the world of competitive tennis, I have found that the mentally tough players win more than the physically gifted. When I was a young player in the juniors, most of my problems came from a lack of consistency with my shots. I had the ability physically and I knew how to accomplish the goal, but I was too young, stupid and impatient to maintain a long rally. I grew out of it by competing with the length of rallies, rather than winning or losing the point. For example, before

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the point would begin, I would make a goal of 20 balls in the court. I would count right from the serve to the last shot. I would not try to end the point until the rally reached 20. I would change the number depending on if I was winning or not. Most of my success came from putting the number at 50 every point. As my game grew, so did my mental approach to training. My ability to drive myself through pain when my body told me to stop. I began demanding more performance from my body in practice, so in any match, I had one more gear to shift to for a victory. I won a five-set match at the U.S. Open and my mindset to

my fitness approach was the main key for the victory. At the very crest of my career on the ATP Tour, I felt I was capable on any shot, in any match, against anyone. I knew when I had enough firepower to win and when I needed more. In 1996, I played Andre Agassi who was at the top of the game with the most feared return of serve since Jimmy Connors. Andre’s return was bigger than any serve I could hit. So my approach to the match was simple. I could not hit any second serves under 110 miles per hour. I had to throw flames at him at every opportunity.

“It’s not easy taking a wimp and making them a warrior.”

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


My ability to serve left-handed and righthanded never bothered Andre in previous matches, so I needed to fire the heavy artillery from both wings. My mental approach was a “go for it” mindset, and even though I hit a ton of double faults, Andre never had a read on my serve in my two-set victory that night. Now, as a coach of aspiring pro tennis players at Syracuse University, my mental toughness is challenged all the time. I explain to all my players and their parents that they will all be treated fairly, but not the same. I put the same extreme effort into every player on my team that I put into my game towards winning a French Open Title. The main difference is that I had more drive and commitment than they do. I take every player individually and break down their complete game, from their best to worst. Then, I go to work. Most of my coaching is instilling a mental toughness and self-confidence in my team. You are who you think you are. I always believed I was the best player when I walked on the court regardless of the situation. In the Agassi match, I knew the odds and I knew I was capable. Now if you think you are a chump, well then that’s how you will play under pressure. It’s not easy taking a wimp and making them a warrior. It takes time and a commitment from the individual and their tennis parents to believe in the fighter and not the score. That is why our game is ALL mental. The space between the ears can be a weapon or a meatball. Aim for the lines! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen is head coach of the Syracuse University Women’s Tennis Team. Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or email lbjensen@syr.edu

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Injury Prevention: Avoid Overuse Injuries By Dr. Kenneth Kearns he shoulder has the greatest range of motion of any joint in the body. A full range of motion is essential to normal shoulder mechanics and a pain-free reproducible tennis stroke. While it’s common for players to hit just a few warm-up shots before a match, stretching and a proper prematch routine is vital to avoid injury. Failure to implement these warm-ups can result in overuse injuries and is a common reason why players seek medical care. Tennis players are susceptible to overuse injuries due to the repetitive nature of the game. An un-warmed shoulder is at increased risk to injury, specifically the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is a confluence of four muscles that surround the shoulder joint, a ball and socket joint, which is stabilized by keeping the humerus (ball) centered on the glenoid (socket). Not stretching or hitting the appropriate number of warm-up shots can lead to rotator cuff dysfunction and superior elevation of the humerus and impingement on the rotator cuff, causing pain and a limited range of motion. In addition, the overhead serve exerts a significant force on the shoulder. Microtrauma to the posterior shoulder capsule can result from the stress loads associated with the follow-through. The capsule is a thickened band of tissue that surrounds the shoulder joint and adds stability. The posterior capsule is subjected to repetitive high tensile forces that can lead to capsular hypertrophy and contracture. This leads to a loss of shoulder internal rotation, abnormal shoulder mechanics and can result in injury to the labrum (a soft tissue extension of the shoulder socket that adds stability) and/or rotator cuff. To prevent an overuse injury, a thorough stretching and warm-up routine should be implemented with every match. However, if symptoms are present, the first response

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is rest, ice and anti-inflammatory medicines, as directed by your doctor. If these treatments fail to relieve the pain, you should consult an orthopaedic surgeon who specializes in the shoulder. Conservative management is usually the first line of treatment and consists of a varied combination of physical therapy, prescription anti-inflammatories and a cortisone injection. Physical therapy will focus on improving range of motion, synchronizing the rotator cuff and shoulder muscles and reestablishing normal shoulder kinematics. If these measures fail, arthroscopic surgery may be necessary to repair a torn labrum or rotator cuff or release a contracted capsule that fails to respond to therapy. Stretching and warming-up is often overlooked and perceived as a mundane part of tennis. However, imagine taking a rubber band out of the freezer and stretching it to its max while still cold. It will snap. The shoulder functions similarly and needs to be stretched and warmed up in order to avoid overuse injuries and enjoy a pain-free enduring tennis career. Dr. Kenneth Kearns is a board-eligible, fellowship-trained shoulder and elbow surgeon at Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group who specializes in arthroscopic surgery, minimally invasive surgery, joint replacement and fracture care. Dr. Kearns is an award-winning researcher who has published and presented extensively in the areas of shoulder and elbow as well as adult reconstruction. An avid athlete who played varsity ice hockey throughout his undergraduate years, Dr. Kearns brings a special affinity to patients who are counting on his expertise to help them return to their active lives. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call (516) 5362800, visit www.orlincohen.com or scan the QR Code above.


LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

ood Luck to all of our Long Island winning teams at the Sectional Championship in Albany! At the time this article was due, the 55 & Over Division was playing the last week of their season. Final results will appear in the next edition. As many of you know, this was a tough season with the new age format that the USTA imposed upon us. We ask that you bear with us as we try to work out the kinks. We knew this would be a “learning” year for us and appreciate those who went with the flow. When this article comes out, the Long Island League Board will have met to discuss ideas to help improve the League for next season. The Board consists of seven individuals who all care tremendously about this League. We have to consider the rules of the USTA League that we must abide by, the limited court time and time constraints along with what is best for ALL involved. There were 40 Divisions within the 18 & Over, 40 & Over and 55 & Over Leaugues this past season and we must consider what will work with all of them. We appreciate your understanding and hope to see you back next season! Next up is the Mixed-Doubles and TriLevel Leagues. If you are interested, please e-mail me at kathym65@aol.com. Look forward to seeing you on the courts!

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FINAL STANDINGS 18 & Over League (Women) 2.5 Division ....Blue Point (captained by Kiersten Arata & Jane Kelly) 3.0 Division ....Carefree (captained by Donna Hallas) 3.5 Division ....Carefree (captained by Bonnie Kolenberg) 4.0 Division ....Jericho Westbury (captained by Alyssa Bonadonna & Suzanne Putnam) 4.5 Division ....Robbie Wagner (captained by Akiko Tohmatsu & Dawn Bernstein) 5.0+ Division ..Jericho Westbury (captained by Akiko Tohmatsu)

18 & Over League (Men) 3.0 Division ....Rockville Racquet (captained by Kevin Gray & Saahil Brahmbhatt) 3.5 Division ....Sportime Lynbrook (captained by Arik Yochai) 4.0 Division ....Blue Point (captained by Gerald Henline & Lars Gustafson) 4.5 Division ....Jericho Westbury (captained by Devang Parmar) 5.0+ Division ..Jericho Westbury (captained by Sean Worth & Phil Castellano)

40 & Over League (Women) 3.0 Division ....Glen Head (captained by Geri Verola & Heather Knoft) 3.5 Division ....Sportime Lynbrook (captained by Marlaina Teich & Lisa Tabman) 4.0 Division ....Carefree (captained by Ilene Sommer) 4.5+ Division ..Sportime Lynbrook (captained by Ginger Wade)

40 & Over League (Men) 3.0 Division ....Hempstead Lake (captained by Lawrence Ham) 3.5 Division ....Huntington Indoor (captained by Ron Marsh & Robert Wendt)

Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com. 12

4.0 Division ....Blue Point (captained by Steve Subject) 4.5+ Division ..Sportime Syosset (captained by Andy Ross)

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


MeiGray Helping Tennis Fans Take Home a Piece of the Match tennis collector at the 2012 U.S. Open paid $2,000 for a tennis ball? Well, it was not just any tennis ball. It was THE tennis ball. It was match point of the 2012 Men’s Singles Finals. It was the last ball struck on the last point won by Andy Murray in his dramatic five-set triumph over Novak Djokovic. Seconds after the match ended, with Murray still on the court celebrating his victory, the USTA-MeiGray Group MatchUsed Authentication Program had begun to identify, secure, authenticate and register one very valuable and historic tennis ball … a ball which now rests in a private tennis fan’s impressive collection. The USTA-MeiGray Group Match-Used Authentication Program debuted last summer, and it was a rousing success. With its booth near Court 11 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, MeiGray introduced to tennis fans and collectors the availability of match-used balls and other items that came directly off the courts in real-time, through an on-site authentication process, and into the hands of tennis fans and collectors—often within hours of a match. “Sports collectors love to own a piece of an event they witnessed. It’s part of American culture,” said Barry Meisel, MeiGray president and director of the program which works with the U.S. Open to aid USTA Serves. “With the help of the USTA, the U.S.

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Open, the officials and so many others behind the scenes, we now are on the ground securing these unique items for fans to add to their collections.” Whether it’s the pure silver pre-match flip coin available for $75 from one of the matches in Arthur Ashe, Louis Armstrong or Grandstand, or a match-used ball for $29.99 from a men’s or women’s first-round match, or a towel used by one of the participants, MeiGray is on the grounds, taking possession of the unique item directly from an on-court official.

The authentication process done on the grounds by MeiGray includes marking each item with counterfeit-proof invisible ink, adding a unique serial number and hologram which is stored in a database, and preparing a letter of authenticity backed by the USTA and MeiGray. “When we attend great American sporting events, we save our programs, we save our ticket stubs, we cherish the memories of those matches,” Meisel said. “Now you can take home a real piece of that match, too.”

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Nadal’s first round loss at Wimbledon sets tournament Twitter record Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

According to Wimbledon, more people tweeted about Rafael Nadal’s first round loss to Belgian Steve Darcis with 7,000 tweets per minute, than last year’s men’s final.

Serena and Murray entertain idea of battle of the sexes match Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Serena Williams would be happy to take on Andy Murray on a tennis court after the Olympic champion said he would fancy a match against the 16-time Grand Slam winner … but just for fun. After being challenged by a fan on Twitter to take on Serena, Murray said in his column for BBC Sport that such a matchup could create interest among tennis fans. “I’ve never hit with her, but she’s obviously an incredible player, and I think people would be interested to see the men play against the women to see how the styles match up,’’ said Murray. Serena replied, “Really? He wants to play 14

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me? Is he sure? That would be fun. I doubt I’d win a point, but that would be fun.” There have been several high profile matches between stars from the men and women’s game. The most famous of them was held in 1973, with Billie Jean King humbling Bobby Riggs in straight sets.

On-court royalty Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

If Andy Murray wins Wimbledon again in 2014, he will do so as “Sir Andy Murray” if British Prime Minister David Cameron get his way. Here’s what Cameron had to say after Murray defeated Novak Djokovic to become the first British winner of Wimbledon in 77 years, “I can’t think of anyone who deserves knighthood more.” Sources inside the British government have confirmed they would be nominating Murray to the Honors Committee, the group who determines who is bestowed such titles.

Wimbledon winner Bartoli faces criticism Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Marion Bartoli won the 2013 Wimbledon Women’s Singles Title. BBC radio commentator John

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Inverdale, had this to say to his radio listeners after Bartoli’s triumph: “Do you think Bartoli’s dad told her when she was little, ‘You’re never going to be a looker? You’ll never be a Sharapova, so you have to be scrappy and fight.’” We doubt that exchange occurred, and not just because her dad probably had no knowledge of Sharapova’s existence when Marion was little. Inverdale later attempted to make amends, saying, “We poked fun, in a nice way, about how she looks ... but Marion Bartoli is an incredible role model.” The BBC also apologized later. None of it stopped the torrent of social media criticism from rolling in. As for Bartoli herself? She replied to the criticism, “It doesn’t matter, honestly. I am not blond, yes. That is a fact. Have I dreamt about having a model contract? No. I’m sorry. But have I dreamed about winning Wimbledon? Absolutely, yes.” Marion’s father, Walter, also handled the situation with class. “I am not angry. She is my beautiful daughter,” he said when told of the comments.

Yonex severs ties with Wozniacki Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

The relationship between Caroline Wozniacki and Yonex has been interrupted, due to the Dane being caught training with an old Babolat racquet, disguised with the colors of Yonex. Someone who watched her


train posted the pictures on Twitter. This all didn’t escape from the careful eyes of Yonex Director Benni Holst Andersen, who affirmed that her contract is now void. Wozniacki enjoyed her best results using a Babolat racket, but the former world number one stands to lose a lot of money from the Yonex contract. Wozniacki has been struggling mightily lately, and will not find it easy to get a similar contract elsewhere.

And the ESPYs go to? Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams won 2013 ESPY Awards for the Best Male and Female Tennis Players at ESPN’s ESPYs award show. “Aww yeah,” said Serena’s sister Venus Williams via Twitter. “It was some tough competition, so proud of ‘lil sis.”

Djokovic releases gluten-free diet book

International Tennis Federation (ITF) for refusing to submit to blood testing before this past April’s Monte Carlo Masters. The ITF said Troicki broke an antidoping rule by providing a urine sample, but not a blood sample. His ban from the sport ends Jan. 24, 2015. “I am innocent,” said Troicki. “I have never ever taken any prohibited substance or ever thought of doing so. I did not lie and this really hurts.” Troicki told an independent tribunal he had been assured by the doping control officer at the event that it would be acceptable to not provide blood because he had not been well that day, the ITF said. The tribunal, however, ruled that the officer had told Troicki “she could not advise him as to whether his reason for not providing a blood sample was valid, and that no such assurances were given by her.”

Novak Djokovic attributes his success in recent years to a Tweets from the pros change of diet. Now he’ll be sharing his l Roger Federer (@rogerfederer): Went to see a 3D movie, man there was a lot nutrition tips in a of steel! book to be released l Kim Clijsters (@clijsterskim): Hey prior to the U.S. guys, check out @maditenniskeys is on Open. Serve to Win: Twitter now! The 14-Day Glutenl Maria Sharapova (@mariasharaFree Plan for Physical and Mental Excelpova): New York is just around the corlence is the title of Djokovic’s ‘’nutrition-based performance guide.” The top-ranked Serbian has won six of his seven Grand Slam tournament championships since adopting a “performance-focused” gluten-free diet in late 2010. In 2011, he took the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. He has since won two more Australian Opens. “Finding the right foods for my body has made me lighter, healthier, and more focused,” said Djokovic. “It’s made all the difference in my career and in my life.”

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ner!! Saw the TV ads and got all excited @usopen Victoria Azarenka (@vika7): Going for a day to where it all kinda started for me in the states! Back to AZ :) Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): Welcome back Twinkie! My dessert for tonight. Andy Roddick (@andyroddick): My friends and I do a “Guys on Steroids” pool where we guess/draft players who might get busted for steroids … #bigday Andy Murray (@andy_murray): Dexter! Justin Gimelstob (@justingimelstob): My 1st movie role! Albeit a small one (though no small roles I’m told!) “Break Point” I’m “Dash Stevens” :) Maria Kirilenko (@mkirilenko): Practice, cotton candy, a couple of interviews, next stop @Starbucks. Caroline Wozniacki (@carowozniacki): It’s a wrap!! Just finished a four and a half hour photo shoot for Adidas by Stella McCartney! Next year’s collection is so cool!! Mardy Fish (@mardyfish): I’m such a massive baseball fan, but this Arod stuff could push me far far away … Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Thank you @NaomiCampbell for supporting @novakfoundation See you soon my friend!

Troicki suspended 18 months World number 53 Viktor Troicki of Serbia has been suspended for 18 months by the LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

player spotlight LAMAR REMY Photo credit: Alexander Maeda

By Adam Wolfthal

and the desire to bring his highest levels. The Florida game to the next level heat that you experience at amar Remy is a top-ranked junior ten- brought him down to IMG for IMG Academy prepares you nis player who grew up in Roslyn, N.Y., a two-week summer training for the most stifling of enviand at the age of 13, made his way down program in 2009. While playronments and builds your to Bradenton, Fla. to attend the IMG ing, he caught the eye of stamina and endurance for Academy. Soon after taking up tennis at Nick Bollettieri and was oflong tournaments, giving an the age of six, along with basketball, fered an opportunity to come edge over players who train baseball, golf and swimming, he knew he down and train for the upindoors or in cooler climates. would have to decide on a single sport to coming school year. He and Being surrounded by the focus his energy on if he was going to be- his father took the opportubest equipment, players and come great. Lamar was drawn to tennis nity and he moved down to trainers who help regiment because on the court, “it’s all you, there Bradenton, Fla. and began your days to maximize imis no team to rely on, and no one to blame his training under Nick. provement in your game has but yourself and no one to take praise but Lamar began to gain con- Photo credit: Bill Kallenberg taught Lamar what to focus you after winning.� fidence in his play, starting to make deep on in his own training. Now, he makes his At the age of 11, Lamar gave up playing runs in big tournaments in the 2010 sea- own daily schedules each night before other sports competitively and focused all son. Getting the chance to play with cur- bed and always keeps his days busy with his attention on tennis, training at Robbie rent and former pros and having training training regiments to keep improving each Wagner’s Tournament Training Center regiments directed at bringing players to day. near his home. By the time he was 12, he the next level helped to instill great assurLamar will be playing some local tourwas competing locally in tournaments, ance in his ability to play and win at the naments on Long Island before going to Bradenton for the school year. When he gets to Florida, he will play in some ITF tournaments in September. Looking ahead, Lamar is planning to play in college before considering turning pro. If Lamar could speak to his 12-year-old self just before heading down to IMG, he would tell himself to ‘Make the most of his “Long Island’s Tennis Store� opportunities there, it’s a great place to Kids Apparel & Sneakers t Great Prices On Racquets train, work hard every day and the results Workout Apparel t 1 Hour Stringing will come.’ To upcoming juniors, he would tTennis & Running Shoes Racquet recommend to work on fundamentals tU.S. Open Merchandise Available until they are truly sound because that will Open 7 Days t Demos Available USTA Restringing Long Island Shipping Available help to prevent injuries growing up, and 8$0610/t&YQt/PODPNCJOBCMF Retailer of ONE COUPON PER FAMILY ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED the Year to compete hard and have heart. If you have heart, you can go a long way. 218 JERICHO TURNPIKE

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Adam Wolfthal is director of business development for New York Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by e-mail at adam@usptennis.com.


Proper Balance Equals On-the-Court Success

Tennis Balance Board Is it balance or weight distribution? We hear it all the time ... the finest tennis players in the world are those who have great “balance.” However, it’s not as simple as looking at it as just “balance,” it’s a bit more complex than that. If we focused on weight distribution in the foot versus generic balance training strategies, we would be getting much further in improving balance. The problem is, not every player is able to feel the proper weight distribution through their foot needed for optimal balance, despite having the right coaching and/or training regimen. It simply comes down to the way we are “wired” as humans and how our central nervous system works. From one player to the next, inherent neuromuscular control will be very different, and therefore, achieving proper balance, which stems from our central nervous system, will be unique for each player. Therefore, some players will struggle with ideal weight distribution through their foot, while others, utilizing the same coach, will have no problem at all. As an expert in the field of physical therapy and sports biomechanics, David Lipetz, who serves as a consultant to the sports medicine division of the USA Olympic Committee, set out to develop a product that will have a profound effect on a tennis player’s balance by manipulating their central nervous system. The Tennis Balance board, unlike other balance systems, will force the central nervous system to react specifically to the sport of tennis during the load phase of ground strokes. Once the athlete’s brain is

able to “feel” the correct weight distribution through their foot, there will be an instantaneous mind body connection. Ultimately, the athlete will be able to transfer this feeling to on-court technique and notice a dramatic improvement in balance, thereby creating a more powerful, efficient stroke. For those elite players, the Tennis Balance Board is the most effective strengthening tool avail-

able to them by utilizing single limb body weight exercises while on the board. This is truly the most sports-specific approach to training the lower extremity musculature for ground strokes. The Tennis Balance Board is for every level player and is a training aid that no player should be without. For more information, visit www.tennisbalanceboard.com.


Smart Tennis With th New computerized system revolutionizing tennis as we know it t’s a new ballgame for Gilad Bloom, a former professional tennis player who is currently director of tennis at The Tennis Club of Riverdale (TCR). For the past two months, Bloom has been using the PlaySight SmartCourt, a new system aiming to revolutionize tennis. The PlaySight SmartCourt is a computerized tennis analysis system using state-ofthe-art technology to improve tennis players at all levels. PlaySight Smart Court makes tennis more challenging and fun. Whether you are a social player who plays recreationally, an advanced player or even a pro, the PlaySight SmartCourt has a lot to offer. Using a five-HD camera system and with no sensors attached to the players, PlaySight utilizes advanced image processing and analytical algorithms (incorporating the company’s “auto-tagging” technology) to record and track player movement and shots. The system is selfoperated, as both the player and coach can easily work the user-friendly and intuitive touch-screen kiosk on-court. The PlaySight SmartCourt digitally records and analyzes every aspect of a match and training session. It calculates comprehensive game statistics (player and ball position, speed and distance of each shot) and classifies strokes automatically (serve, backhand/forehand ground strokes and volleys, etc.). Players can be shown a video analysis in realtime while courtside, as a coach can pinpoint specific rallies, shots and events in the match, as well as immediately demonstrate match stats. “I’ve been coaching for years now,” said Bloom, “but I’ve never seen my students and players improve their game so fast in such a short amount of time as they have when using SmartCourt.” Bloom uses the different modes of the system for different types of practices,

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from stroke and serve practices to playing a full set. But the SmartCourt is far from being just a training tool, it makes the whole game much more exciting and enjoyable even if you play tennis just for fun. Just imagine how it would be to play with a real line calling system? No more disputes or arguments. When was the last time you saw yourself playing tennis on video? And wouldn’t it be cool to know how fast you serve, your first serve percentage and many more stats that were available until now only for the pros? SmartCourt does all that and much more. The SmartCourt experience does not end on the court. Match and training activities are recorded, analyzed and uploaded to Playsight.com, where it is stored in the players’ personal accounts, where they can review and track their performance and share it with their coach, friends and family. Parents now have the ability to follow and track their children’s progress and see all of their practices and matches on video. Furthermore, after each match, the SmartCourt automatically creates a short video clip showing the match’s highlight. Video and stats can be reviewed and shared by players via e-mail and/or social media. Today, tennis ranks second to last in the list of sports using sophisticated analytics, according to the MIT Sloan Sport Analytics Conference 2012. “We strongly believe that a sports analysis platform is feasible on every tennis court, with the ability to accurately analyze and immediately share a player’s performance, during and after a match or training, will revolutionize the game of tennis,” said Chen Shachar, CEO and founder of PlaySight Interactive. “I have no doubt that tennis can lead the way in adopting advanced technology, funda-


he New PlaySight SmartCourt mentally changing all aspects of the game, training and coaching, as well as playing and reviewing matches.” Most tennis players have never received any visual feedback. Players who engage in dozens of matches throughout the year rarely get to see themselves playing and hardly receive any feedback. With PlaySight, players and coaches at all levels will receive automatic and instant on-court biomechanical and 3D tactical feedback with no prior preparation, as an integral part of each SmartCourt. The lack of umpires in most tournaments, especially in junior tournaments, causes a number of problems, such as bad calls, cheatings, frustration, parents’ negative involvement, etc. So when the

guys from PlaySight started working on the SmartCourt, they knew from the start that their system would include a built-in line calling system. “For the first time ever, PlaySight is bringing officiating abilities that, until

now, were only available at Grand Slam tournaments, to the club level,” said Shachar. As of August, the SmartCourt is installed in three tennis clubs in the New York region, including The Tennis Club of Riverdale, Port Washington Tennis Academy and CourtSense in New Jersey. Two additional SmartCourts will soon be installed at the Tennis Club of Hastings and Proform Tennis Academy. SmartCourts are also installed at the Queen’s Club in London and in other countries around the world. PlaySight officials say that there will be more SmartCourts installed in the New York area during the coming months. For more information, visit www.playsight.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Robert Kendrick in men’s doubles action for the Sportimes against the Texas Wild

Credit all photos to Adam Wolfthal

NY Sportimes Entertain Local Crowd With Two Nights of WTT Action

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rofessional tennis returned to New York this summer as World TeamTennis (WTT) and the New York Sportimes treated New Yorkers to two back-to-back nights of tennis fun at Sportime Randall’s Island. The Sportimes played to a nice crowd, including former Mayor David Dinkins and the General Manager of USTA Player Development Patrick McEnroe, who turned out to see two former world number ones square off in WTT action as John McEnroe led the Sportimes against Jim Courier and the Texas Wild. Unfortunately, Mother Nature didn’t help 20

out this evening as rain forced the match indoors, but that didn’t deter from the fun and intensity. On the court, things didn’t start too well for the Sportimes. In men’s doubles, Alex Bogomolov Jr. & Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi of the Wild defeated the team of Robert Kendrick & John McEnroe of the Sportimes 5-2. Next up was women’s singles where young Canadian player Eugenie Bouchard of the Wild defeated the Sportimes’ AnnaLena Groenefeld 5-2, giving the Wild a 104 overall lead. The third match of the night was the marquee encounter as John McEnroe and Courier squared off. Both players exhib-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

ited the type of play that propelled them to become the world’s top-ranked players with McEnroe’s serve and volley, and Courier’s blasting of cross-court forehands. The set was tight throughout, with no breaks of serve. At 4-4, they played a nine-point tie-breaker that was won 5-3 by McEnroe, giving the Sportimes their first win of the night. The fourth match was a mixed-doubles event, which was arguably the most intense of the night. The team of Darija Jurak & Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi of the Wild defeated Kveta Peschke & John McEnroe of the Sportimes 5-4 in a tie-breaker. This gave the Wild an overall 19-13 lead.


Martina Hingis in mixed-doubles action for the Washington Kastles against her former WTT squad, the New York Sportimes

Jim Courier with a backhand against John McEnroe at Sportime Stadium

In the fifth match of the night, it was the women’s doubles team of Anna-Lena Groenefeld & Kveta Peschke getting another win for the Sportimes, defeating Eugenie Bouchard & Darija Jurak 5-2 to secure the win for the Wild. On night two, the weather was more cooperative, allowing the match to be played at the outdoor stadium. The Sportimes came up short again, but that didn’t deter the home fans from enjoying the atmosphere presented with intense

Kids enjoying a night of World TeamTennis action at Sportime Stadium at Randall’s Island

WTT action. The Washington Kastles defeated the Sportimes 23-15, as the matches were very competitive with the Sportimes giving the Kastles a hard time in each encounter. Martina Hingis, playing the 2013 WTT season for the visiting Kastles, showed the crowd why she was once ranked number one in the world as well and more than deserving of her recent induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. And while the Sportimes fought hard all

The New York Sportimes prep for their World TeamTennis match against the Texas Wild at Sportime Stadium

season, in the end, it was the Kastles who defeated the Springfield Lasers 25-12 in the Mylan World TeamTennis (WTT) Finals to capture their third consecutive title and their fourth in five years. “It is the best feeling in the world to share so much success with such great people,” said the Kastles’ Murphy Jensen, WTT coach of the year. “We are America’s team and it’s kind of cool. It’s kind of a dream come true to be able to wear a jersey that says coach.”

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Dr. Tom on Learning How to Enjoy the Game BY TOM FERRARO, PH.D.

t’s summertime and the living is easy (at least I hope so). Summer is the time to relax and get away from the grind of work, work and work. There is no better way to back off from life then to find some great books to get into. Tennis has always been a game that has attracted our greatest novelist and poets. Some of them play the game and the game’s natural elegance, country club background, geometry and the human drama of matches make for uniquely compelling material to write about. In fact, the only poetry I have ever published was about tennis at Flushing Meadows. The beauty of Roger Federer’s stroke, the madness of John McEnroe or the energy of the statue of Arthur Ashe at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center all stimulate the writer’s mind. So here is a list of my favorite tennis books:

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l Tennis and the Meaning of Life: A Literary Anthology of the Game, edited by Jay Jennings: Here, you will find real treasures such as Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. You will read the chapter on tennis where Humbert describes the vision of Lolita playing tennis. The anthology has stories by 22

Ring Lardner, AA Milne, EB White and Paul Theroux. l David Foster Wallace’s two books of collected essays (A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again: Essays and Arguments and Considering the Lobster and Other Essays): Wallace was America’s most gifted younger writers before he took his own life three years ago. We are all lucky to have these works and luckier still that Wallace was an accomplished tennis player who writes with wit and wisdom about the likes of Tracy Austin.

must be re learned by most adults. The role and great value of artists, novelists and poets is that they know how to find this joy and this love of the game. This is their primary function in every society. They cannot teach you how to play, but they can teach you how to enjoy playing. Thankfully, tennis has an allure that attracts writers to the game, while the writer has the ability to show us the riches inherent in tennis. So go find a good book and dive right in. If you still don’t believe me, here is an excerpt from a poem by William Scammell entitled “Bjorn Borg” …

l The Inner Game of Tennis by Timothy Gallwey: Harvard-educated tennis player Tim Gallwey was about 40 years ahead of sport psychology when he used Asian mindfulness techniques to help tennis players play with a blank and accepting mind. This is one of the few worthwhile sport psychology texts.

“Eyes criminally close together Fastest feet in the business Borg’s groundstrokes would have landed In Kensington but for One small consideration: topspin He struck them as stepmothers Once brushed their daughters’ hair”

There are far too many players who no longer enjoy tennis. They are lost in their extreme competitiveness and have lost the capacity to enjoy the game. The ability to enjoy tennis or life is a skill that

For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Leave it to a poet to get it right.


Boosting On-Court Confidence Through Proper Preparation By Margie Zesinger n addition to pure talent, the greatest champions of the game acquire relentless self-belief and determination through preparation. Every player has experienced a certain amount of doubt when down in the score or struggling through a match. Look at Andy Murray during the 2012 Olympics and 2013 Wimbledon Championships. There were critical points in each of his matches when his self-belief was tested. It is during those moments that if a player knows he or she did everything they could to prepare, then they have a greater chance of success. Process-oriented players, rather than

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result-oriented, are the ones who experience true self-confidence. At the end of the day, on the last court, when no one was watching, how hard did the player work during their training? How was the quality? Were they willing to go the extra mile to improve their fitness? Did they serve extra baskets of balls on their own? Did the player make optimal nutritional decisions? How much time was spent on reviewing stroke or match footage? If a player knows that they were willing to sacrifice everything they could to prepare for a match or tournament, then they will have the courage to put everything on the line until the match is over. The match is often won even before the player steps on the court. A match is just one moment, while it is all of the mo-

ments prior to the match that lead to the outcome. My instructional tip: If you want to be a successful tennis player at any level, hold yourself accountable with your training. Understand that if you have done all that you can to prepare, then you have every reason to walk on to the court with 100 percent self-belief. All the sacrifices that you make along the way translate into a belief that you deserve to win. Margie Zesinger has been coaching tennis at IMG Academy since 2004. Prior to joining IMG, Margie played tennis for James Madison University where she was the number one player at her school. She may be reached by e-mail at margie.zesinger@imgworld.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW n 2012, for the fourth consecutive year, Nassau County Champion Syosset High School Girls Tennis team defeated Suffolk County Champion Half Hollow Hills East to win the Long Island Championship. This was the fifth straight Long Island title for Syosset and they are one of the favorites again this year. Syosset will return with a strong roster, looking to stay on top, but this year, they will be without New York State Champion Vivian Cheng. They will be challenged this year by Port Washington, Garden City and Manhasset. In Suffolk, Half Hollow Hills East is the defending champion. They will be tough to beat this year as well. Their top challengers are led by rival Half Hollow Hills West, along with Walt Whitman who both finished last year with only two losses.

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Top returning players to watch in 2013: l Morgan Herrmann (Sophomore) & Brittany Burke (Senior) of Garden City High School: In 2011, Morgan Herrmann finished second in the Nassau County Singles Tournament. Last year, Herrmann along with Brittany Burke, were the runner-ups at Nassau County Doubles Championships. The duo returns to a strong Garden City team looking to take the next step this year. l Lauren Livingston (Senior) of Port Washington High School: In 2012, the duo of Lauren Livingston & Emma Brezel finished third in the Nassau County Doubles draw. This year, Brezel is off to college, but Livingston returns

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

hoping for a successful close to her high school career. l Alexa Graham (Sophomore) of Garden City High School: In 2012, Alexa Graham won the Nassau County Singles Title and then finished third in the State Championships. She is only a sophomore, but seems poised for another run at the State title. l Katie Cirella (Junior) of Syosset High School: Katie Cirella returns to lead Syosset in their charge for a fifth consecutive Long Island Championship. Last year, Cirella played in Counties with Rithika Reddy and the duo finished fourth in the Nassau County Doubles Championships. With Syosset having


2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW lost a few key players, Cirella will be counted on even more heavily this year in their title defense. l Vanessa Scott (Junior) of Half Hollow Hills East High School: Vanessa Scott finished second in the Suffolk County Singles Championships in 2012. With last year’s winner having graduated, Scott has a good chance to take the next step this year and win the Suffolk County title. l Allison Huber (Senior) of Half Hollow Hills East High School: Along with her partner Amanda Luper, Allison Huber finished third in last year’s Suffolk County Doubles Tournament. Luper has graduated, but Huber returns to a strong Hills East squad.

l Bridget Harding (Senior) of Northport High School: In 2011, Bridget Harding, along with her sister Mickey Harding, won the Suffolk County Doubles Championship before losing in the New York State Quarterfinals. Going into her senior season, Bridget returns to Northport hoping to finish her high school career on a high note. Additional players to watch in 2013 include: l Nicole Koskovolis of Manhasset High School l Taylor Cosme of Herricks High School l Liz Kallenberg of Port Washington High School l Ally Linder of Port Washington High School

l Rhea Malhotra of Syosset High School During this fall on Long Island, the girls high school season will be going strong. The talent level is high and the match-ups will be competitive. Some key dates have already been announced: l For Nassau County, tryouts begin Monday, Aug. 26 l For Nassau County, the first matches begin Thursday, Sept. 12 l The Nassau County Championships will take place the weekend of Oct.19-20 l The 2013 State Tournament will be held Friday-Monday, Nov. 1-4 l Events in Suffolk County will be forthcoming and available online at www.longislandtennismagazine.com

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Before

After

Queens College Indoor Tennis Center Rebuilt and Rebounding ew York City is often praised for its toughness and resiliency. The nearly nine million citizens appreciate a good redemption story. As the city is littered with the tales of sports teams overcoming adversity, people being down, but not out, and other trials and tribulations of life in the big city. Queens College has its own redemption story playing out presently, with the re-opening of the newlyrenovated, indoor tennis bubble on its campus in Flushing. The white-clothed bubble, sitting adjacent to the Long Island Expressway, served the local tennis community for years as a safehaven for zealot players and beginners alike. However, the improbable happened in 2009, when a storm ripped through the area and took the bubble with it as it laid its force upon the area. The improbable had happened and the tennis community was left reeling, but shortly thereafter, the impossible trumped the improbable as another storm ravaged Queens and took the repaired bubble away a second time. Not only did the bubble signify a loss in revenue for the College, but it also impacted the members of the nationally-ranked, Queens College Knights tennis teams, who called the place home. Senior Daniela Celi, remembered the day, “You don’t fully appreciate something as seemingly unimportant as where you play

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your matches.” She went on, “That was how the entire team felt. We saw our home taken from us in less than 15 minutes.” The Knights persevered, however, continuing on with limited play on their six pristine, outdoor courts. They alternated time on those courts between rentals and the two teams. It severely hampered the revenue from renting court time, and provided an additional obstacle for the Knights tennis teams to overcome. After the initial impact of the damage had hit, the Queens College community did what countless New Yorkers had done and continue to do, they dug in their heels, rolled up their sleeves, and began the rebuilding efforts. The renovations, spearheaded by former Vice President of Student Advancement Sue Henderson, surpassed $2.1 million and took nearly two years for completion, but on a quiet day in 2012, the indoor tennis bubble at Queens College opened its doors to the public, once again. Now the facility is thriving, offering the metropolitan tennis community a beacon for tennis lovers. The facility has ongoing private lessons, court space and tournaments available for rental and participation. In fact, many tennis professionals choose to hold their lessons in the newly renovated space. Its boasts

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

six new hard court surfaces, bleachers for spectators and fans, a safe-climate controlled environment and easy access from anywhere in the city. Fans looking for year-round tennis need to look no further than Flushing, Queens, in the shadow of Arthur Ashe Stadium. Under the auspices of Head Tennis Professional and Men’s Head Coach Wayne Martin and Assistant Tanni Scott, the bubble is home to yearround tennis; whether it is the cold days of winter or the sultry days of summer. In either case, players will be tucked neatly into the weather-controlled facility. Groups, schools, or individuals wishing to rent the courts for an event or tournament are encouraged to call the Tennis Center at (718) 997-2771 or visit www.queensknights.com/tennis. Flushing, Queens, is considered the home of tennis in New York City. With the U.S. Open played nearby—seemingly closer than a forehand winner—fans congregate to the borough in late summer to see the top players in the world compete and witness great comebacks. Well, those fans need to look at the Queens College tennis bubble, where, like its nine million brethren, it went through its own redemption story and won the biggest comeback of its career.


Get a Grip By Steve Kaplan rips matter because they are the most intimate connection between you and the racket. A poor grip, not within an acceptable parameter, will limit performance. Grip improvement is often a difficult, disruptive and time intensive task, and I’ve seen plenty of attempted grip adjustments in my 40,000-plus hours instructing players that are too often unnecessarily slow and frustrating. That’s because weak grips are not the cause of underperformance, but the symptom of poor stroke mechanics. Bad grips are actually correcting compensations for dysfunctional movements, so that if a grip is corrected BEFORE the underlying mistake is addressed, performance will be worsened. What defines the parameter of a correct grip? Simply put, good grips don’t require

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correcting movement compensations to make them work. A classic example of the need to correct movement fundamentals before changing a grip is the extreme western forehand grip commonly seen in young tournament players. An extreme western grip allows and requires excessive external arm rotation. This arm bend, while risky and limiting, will actually help the immediate performance of those athletes that do not link power from the ground to their torso. Ironically, the best young players are often the best movement compensators and frequently evolve into the worst grips. Similarly, the practice of squeezing the racket with a “death grip” is also a correcting compensation since a firm hand grip will pack the shoulder back and down into a stable position in a process called “irradiation.” Of course a tight grip is not a sound long term practice, but it is the body’s natural way of protecting an unsta-

ble shoulder and corrections must be undertaken with care to prevent injury. When weak grips are viewed as isolated problems and corrected before first correcting their cause, the result is often frustration, negative performance and injury. In contrast, tennis players who eliminate the need for the grip compensation will improve their grip quickly, safely and successfully. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

Ricky Becker’s

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Contact former Stanford University and Roslyn High School MVP Ricky Becker today at 516-605-0420 or rbecker06@yahoo.com.

www.juniortennisconsulting.com LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Slumps, Chokes, and the Yips: Understanding Performance Blocks By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC ow many times have you seen an athlete get tight, underperform or choke in a big event? In practice, they play great—not a care in the world, going for broke on every shot, and effortlessly succeed while doing so. Yet once the competition starts, their best shots become their worst. Perhaps their big forehand, previously a weapon, turns defensive. Or maybe the formerly simple act of a two-foot putt now becomes unmanageable. Suddenly the reliable catcher cannot make a routine throw back to the pitcher. Inexplicably, the runner hesitates during a pivotal point in the race. Fans become dumbfounded and cannot believe that an elite athlete can succumb to this type of pressure. “How can this happen? What’s the cause of this?” they ask. In looking for the solution, many coaches, fans, players, media and even

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performance experts start by critiquing what they can see (i.e. the double faults, missed free throws or errant putts). Their initial intent is to look above the surface to find what’s broken in hopes of a technical quick fix. Certainly, this is the place to look if the situation occurs once or twice. However, if the choke or slump continues repeatedly under pressure, it falls in the category of a repetitive sports performance block. A repetitive sports performance block (i.e. choke, slump, yips) is actually the

symptom of an underlying issue. The cause is an accumulation of trauma-like experiences that the athlete has not been able to move on from. In actuality, this block has little to do with the last time the player “choked.” Rather, something about that pressure situation was the trigger that brought the unprocessed issue to the surface where it distracted the athlete’s performance. In fact, before or during the competition, some athletes are aware that “something is just not right.” They experience underlying nervousness, anxiety and try to hide or resist it. Oftentimes, the athlete doesn’t want to address their anxiousness for fear of being judged by teammates or fans as lacking mental toughness. Yet other times, the athlete may be completely unaware of the root cause of their anxiety, since it has been disassociated from their consciousness in an effort to protect their personal psyche. Either way, the athlete’s performance bears the burden. Much like “baggage” we hold onto on a daily basis, these trauma-like experiences

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


grip a person and can accumulate during a person’s life from both on and off the field incidents. The emotional trauma can come from situations such as embarrassment from double faulting in a big match, striking out with the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth inning, or repeatedly missing short putts on the green. The physical trauma can derive from getting beaned with a baseball, getting blindsided on the football field, or lying face down in pain after your ankle gave way on a wide forehand. Additionally, off-field trauma can occur and accumulate, stemming from issues such as divorce, death, car accidents, or other traumatic circumstances. Similarly, excessive judgment, expectations, and comparisons from parents, coaches, media or friends can also unknowingly add weight to the burden of pressure and distract a player from playing freely. Throughout our lives, we encounter physical and emotional trauma-like experiences. Depending upon the severity of these instances and our preparedness to meet them at the time, we sometimes successfully absorb and process through these encounters, and other times, we do not. When we are unable to process these traumas, the stress does not evaporate over time. Rather, we store the unprocessed memory inside, where it may show itself at unexpected times. For instance, a baseball player who had been beaned by a pitch may be scared to get back in the batter’s box, sometimes with-

out admitting it to himself, and certainly not to his teammates. Or perhaps a tennis player may be so scared of losing or making the same error from previous matches they tense up, hesitate or even freeze during current matches. These unprocessed negative experiences can accumulate like balls in a bucket. Each individual issue represents a different size ball. Some may be small, like the size of a golf ball, others are bigger like a tennis ball, and then still bigger like a football, depending upon the level of stress and trauma the person/athlete carries. These emotional/physical trauma-like experiences get held in the body’s central nervous system. They directly interfere with the athlete’s ability to access and adapt to situations and perform movements that were once so easy and instinctual. Finally, when a ball tumbles out of the bucket, the player’s repetitive sports performance block is now on public display for all to see, judge, and evaluate. We often forget that behind the superstar athlete’s exterior, the athlete is a person first and performer second. It’s almost impossible not be affected by the day-today troubling events which we all experience. Each person holds onto different things in different ways. James Blake summed it up best in his autobiography Breaking Back, explaining, “If there is something wrong in your life, it’ll show up in your tennis game—not always in predictable ways … self-belief might be manifested in weak second serves, impatience

can cause you to make low-percentage gambles, and so on.” In summary, it’s clear to see how we hold emotional (fears) and physical (injuries) trauma-like experiences in our bodies. As a person, this “baggage” can consciously or unconsciously impact how we react, adapt and adjust to everyday situations. As a player, it can also carry onto the playing field and affect an athlete’s ability to perform, especially in a high-pressure situation. In light of this, it makes sense to look beyond the slump, choke or yips, below the surface to the root cause. The athlete is not irreparably damaged, broken or a “head case,” as some suggest. The block is part of their process and actually can be a valuable clue to turning their situation around. Ultimately, they will emerge mentally stronger, move without hesitation and compete with increased confidence. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach he works with athletes and teams of all levels. His work focuses on helping athletes gain the mental edge and letting go of blocks which get in the way of peak performance. He is a USTA Zonal Coach and has spoken and been published for the USTA, USPTA and ITA. Additionally, he has conducted workshops nationally and internationally in India and Israel. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email rob@insidethezone or visit www.insidethezone.com.

Easy as 1-2-3!

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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MYTHBUSTERS:

School is Here ... Time to Take the Mythbusters College Quiz! By Ricky Becker ince school is right around the corner, I thought it would be good to get back into the flow with a Mythbusters Quiz. One factoid was taken from the last articles and formed into a question. This shouldn’t be so hard for the Mythbuster diehards out there. Even if you haven’t been reading all the Mythbusters articles (shame on you!), this quiz should help give you some insight to college tennis and the recruiting process. The answers are at the bottom of the article.

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1. What does living legend Dick Gould think is the single biggest challenge ahead for coaches of college tennis? A. To be able to fund raise for the long term B. To get a big network television contract C. To keep junior players from going pro D. To keep college players from collecting money 2. The four players interviewed by JuniorTennisConsulting each referenced a few things they liked about college tennis. Which attribute did they all reference?

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

A. The team aspect B. The focus on doubles C. The big home crowds D. The Spring Break trips 3. When did the four Long Island standout players from the high school class of 2012 construct their first college list? A. After they had a good tournament B. The very beginning of their junior year. C. After being contacted by their first coach D. After getting yelled at by their parents 4. What did the two interviewed Long Island players who graduated college


over the past three years say was the most unexpected thing from college? A. The lack of private lessons B. The amount of unofficial practices C. The initiation of the freshmen D. The extremely strong bond they still felt with their teammates. 5. What does former Stanford All-American and top-100 world-ranked Jeff Salzenstein say is crucial for any college player looking to play professional tennis? A. A huge serve B. Financial support C. Finding tournaments in remote outposts D. Great college coaching 6. What two colleges played for the 2013 Women’s Division III Tennis Championship? A. MIT and Cal Tech

B. Carnegie Mellon and Emory C. Williams and Emory D. Redlands and Emory 7. What should you do after your freshman year of high school? A. Familiarize yourself of the academic and tennis thresholds of different schools and see what is realistic B. Start visiting your target schools C. Contact any school you may conceivably be interested in attending D. Nothing 8. What does JuniorTennisConsulting see as two big problems facing the younger junior tennis age groups which could lose tennis some good athletes? A. Mandatory QuickStart tournaments and too many unofficiated matches B. Pushing and moon balling C. Pushy parents and egocentric coaches

D. A lack of compass draw tournaments and too many defaults In the November/December 2013 issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine you will find the second half of the quiz which is eight more tidbits from previous articles. Class dismissed! Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, director of Tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and high-performance manager at Glen Head Racquet Club. Ricky was named the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and was a top-five nationally-ranked junior. He can be at e-mail by reached rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

Answers: 1-A, 2-A, 3-B, 4-D, 5-B, 6-C, 7-A, 8-A

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www.DeerParkTennis.com LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA EASTERN LONG ISLAND REGION

Team Eastern wins Church Cup

those from the Metro Region in an action-packed competition at the West Side Tennis Club, former home of the U.S. Open in Forest Hills, N.Y. Intermediate players in the 10U, 12U, 14U and 18U age divisions competed, with Metro taking home the championship. All participants received medals and t-shirts as well as lunch. The one-day event used the World TeamTennis format but modified it to include one additional singles match on both the girls’ and the boys’ side, thus allowing for teams of up to 10 players.

Rockville Racquet Team goes to Nationals Team Eastern, coached by Jason Pasion, was bursting with pride this summer after winning the Church Cup, an achievement it has accomplished only twice before in the last 25 years of play. This year’s Church Cup matches were played on the grass courts at the Huntington Crescent Club. In the finals, Team Eastern beat Team New England with victories by Josh Silverstein (at 17, the competition’s youngest player), Josh Levine, Eric Rubin and Andrew Yaraghi, all from Long Island. This event marked Josh Silverstein’s first time competing in a men’s open. He played first doubles and third singles and beat a player with ATP points. The Church Cup was donated by George Myers Church in 1918 for competition between men’s teams representing Boston, New York and Philadelphia, and it continued in that format until 1932. The competition was not held between 1933 and 1945. In 1946, the competing teams represented three USTA sectional associations: USTA Eastern, USTA Middle States and USTA New England. In 1947, what is now called the USTA Mid-Atlantic Section was admitted to the competition.

JTT All-Stars shine

The first-ever Junior Team Tennis All-Star Competition pitted intermediate players from the USTA Long Island Region against 32

The Men’s 3.5 USTA League team, captained by Don Rodgers, had a very successful year, reaching the National Championships. The team, which plays out of Rockville Racquet Club in Rockville Centre, was 14-0 during the regular season with a total of 61 (of a possible 70) courts won, leading its closest competition (Lynbrook) by 21 courts won. The team then played in the three local playoff matches— winning each—and advanced to Sectionals with a record of 17-0. The team remained undefeated at Sectionals, sweeping the other teams and earning the right to represent the USTA Eastern Section in the National Championships in Tucson, Ariz., with a combined record of 22-0. Team members were: Don Rodgers, captain; Woodmere; Earl Chin, Valley Stream; Miguel Gordon, Springfield Gardens; Mike Ahearn, Massapequa Park; Prakash Pisipati, Farmingdale; Jose Rosa, Freeport; Joey Seplow, Cedarhurst; Jemal Creary, Hempstead; Rich Dacosta, Lynbrook; Johan Lood, West Hempstead; Gabe Moreira, Mineola; and Ravi Lam, Melville. “Although we did not win the Championship in Arizona, we finished the year as better tennis players and friends, and with one of the greatest experiences the tennis world has to offer,” said Rodgers. “After the season, the team held a special dinner for me, where they presented me with a wall plaque on which each player’s name is inscribed. I will forever cherish this special gift as well as a poster-sized team photo, which will be framed and hung in my trophy room.”

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


USTA EASTERN LONG ISLAND REGION

LI introduces kids to tennis

More than 200 young tennis players enjoyed their introduction to the sport at the USTA Long Island Region’s annual Kids’ Day in August. The event, which took place at the Baldwin High School, brought together juniors from across Long Island for a fun day of tennis learning plus games, skills contests, prizes, lunch and more. Kids Day allows tennis facilities, programs and summer camps to introduce newcomers to the sport while also giving current juniors the opportunity to learn new skills and meet new friends. The event was chaired by USTA LI Region Board Member

Terry Fontana and presented by the USTA National Junior Tennis League (NJTL), a nationwide network of community tennis organizations seeking to develop the character of young people through tennis and education. Founded in 1969 by Arthur Ashe, Charlie Pasarell and Sheridan Snyder, this growing network of tennis providers shares similar values, ideals and goals. Kids Day was sponsored by St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Astoria Federal Bank, USTA Eastern, Modell’s, USPTR, Napoli’s Pizza, Baldwin High School and the Baldwin Tennis Club.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA EASTERN LONG ISLAND REGION

NYJTL and USTA Eastern Section present Camp Eastern Thirty-six collegebound tennis players from across the USTA Eastern Section took part in a unique training opportunity this summer, thanks to New An artist’s rendition of the Cary Leeds Center York Junior Tennis & Learning (NYJTL) and the USTA’s Eastern Section. NYJTL is the largest tennis and educationthemed community organization in the United States and offers comprehensive The USTA LI Region group prepares to attend school and commuCamp Eastern, joined by Daniel Burgess, nity based programs USTA LI Region president; and Jill Fonte, throughout New York USTA Eastern Section executive director City’s five boroughs reaching more than 75,000 youth from ages six through 18. For 40 years, NYJTL has pursued this mission by bringing the joys of tennis and education to underserved children.

The participants in NYJTL’s Camp Eastern represented all six regions in the Eastern Section: Western, Northern, Southern, Metro, New Jersey and Long Island. Players were selected by the Regional Presidents and enjoyed a five-day, four-night sleepaway tennis, educational and cultural camp in New York City. The juniors received top-notch tennis instruction plus activities including a tour of the National Tennis Center in Flushing, a seminar on career planning, a cruise on the Circle Line, a tour of Central Park and much more. Participants slept in dorms at Columbia University in Manhattan. Tennis instruction took place at the Cary Leeds Center in Crotona Park in the South Bronx and at Riverside Park in Manhattan. The Cary Leeds Center, which is under construction, currently has 20 outdoor courts. When completed in early 2015, the 12,600square-foot facility will feature a community center designed for use by adults and a youth clubhouse, complete with study areas. With 20 tennis courts plus two stadium courts with spectator seating for 1,000, the facility will serve all five New York City boroughs and will provide children with more than 6,000 hours of free tennis lessons and academic enrichment annually. The $22 million tennis project is being built under a public-private partnership, with funds provided both by New York City and the NYJTL through a capital campaign. For more information on the Cary Leeds Center in Crotona Park or to contribute to the capital campaign, visit www.nyjtl.org.

LI Region honors league captains The LI Region honored the memories of two long-time USTA League Captains at its 23rd Annual LI Awards Dinner. Family members of Birdie Tarulli and Blane Magee attended the emotional presentation and received awards in their memory. Next year and in each following year, the Region will present the Birdie Tarulli Women’s Sportsmanship Award to a female captain and the Blane Magee Sportsmanship Award to a male captain. According to her friend, Sue D’Alessandro, Birdie Tarulli lived in Garden City and captained teams out of Rockville Racquet in Rockville Centre. From 2000-2004, she ran two teams (adult & senior) and then from 2005 until 2012 she added a third team (super senior). As captain, she always played her teammates first and only played herself if she was needed in the lineup. She could always be seen at the window cheering on her teammates. For many years, Birdie was very involved in the North Shore Tennis 34

League out of Hempstead Country Club. Birdie’s “leadership and enthusiasm for tennis will certainly be missed, but not as much as her friendship,” said Sue. According to his friend, Elliott Fleishhacker, Blane Magee also captained teams out of Rockville Racquet and lived in Rockville Centre with his wife of 33 years, Maryann, and six children (Maryclare, Kerri, Blane, Kate, Timothy and Maggie). Blane was born and raised in Massapequa Park, the third of six children. He graduated from LeMoyne College in Syracuse with a BA in History, and in 1978 he earned his JD from St. John’s University Law School. Previously a partner in the law firm of Agoglia Fassberg and Magee, Blane opened his own firm in 1996 and practiced in the area of personal injury law. He loved playing tennis and was a member of several USTA teams over the years. He was a dedicated and unselfish captain for almost 20 years, according to Elliott.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


Lefty Secrets By Tonny van de Pieterman Attention: This article is not to be read by right-handed players, our opponents! fter my last article in the July/August 2013 issue revealing my “lefty insecurities,” I am hereby reaching out to my lefty compadres to deliver some lefty power tips. Lefties have an advantage in the game of tennis. Actually two of them. First of all, since a mere 10 percent of the population is left-handed, we get to practice against our right-handed opponents much more often than vice-versa. We get used to their favorite patterns and their spins become very predictable after seeing them so often. Second of all, the unusual scoring system in tennis is made for us! The more important points in every game are started from the left (ad) side, which perfectly suits our eye, and the more creative and dominant shot in tennis, the forehand (our forehand side). If there is any doubt or discussion on this second point, think of some of the classic matches between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. If you have watched several of these matches, with Nadal coming out on top more often than not, you get the feeling that whenever Nadal really needs to win a point, he pins Federer in the backhand corner and keeps pounding him with his topspin cross-court forehands. When this happens on the more important ad-side points, 40-30, 30-40, ad in/out, it happens on the first ball and Nadal’s winning percentage on those points is very high. Both players seem to be

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aware of this pattern, which makes the outcome even more predictable. There are three important skill shots every lefty should possess to take full advantage of the lefty edge: l A strong running cross-court forehand: This shot will allow you to “cheat” over to your backhand side a little more and still be able to counter the initiative if you are forced to do so. l A backhand slice down the line: This shot will get you out of unfavorable (their) forehand to (your) backhand rallies and will tempt your right-handed opponent to hit the backhand crosscourt (to your forehand)! l A slice serve to the backhand: This shot, the “McEnroe Can-Opener” if you will, will set you up for the most

“Lefties have an advantage in the game of tennis.” favorable (your) forehand to (their) backhand rallies. Keep pounding them like Nadal! To summarize, my fellow lefties, understand your edge, use these skill shots to your advantage, and use them on the more significant points! Tonny van de Pieterman … a proud lefty. Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/EasternLong Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail tonny@pointsettennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Gamesmanship vs. the Spirit of the Game By Miguel Cervantes III Disclaimer: This article is written of my own volition and experience. At no point has the USTA, Carefree Racquet Club, nor any individual helped, endorsed, or in any way, influenced my articles. As always, my contact information is at the end of the article and any readers whom are so motivated may use it for correspondence purposes. Thank you for reading. y previous article focused on how there are times when the rules of tennis are used in such a way that may be considered to be at odds with the spirit of the game. I want to push further into this grey area and talk on gamesmanship. The term originates from Stephen Potter’s book, The Theory and Practice of Gamesmanship (or The Art of Winning Games Without Actually Cheating). Although gamesmanship may not be precisely against the rules, it is certainly not parallel to fair play. There are several techniques to use when employing this strategy and I’ll be describing just a few. “Breaking the flow” of play is one tactic that can be used in the employment of gamesmanship. It is seen in both the professional and amateur level. How often have we seen professional players call for

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the trainer when their opponent is settling into a good rhythm? Maybe they actually need the trainer or maybe they don’t. Calling the trainer when they don’t is an easy way to break the rhythm of their opponent and attempt to come back. This is not against the rules, nor could any rules be created to prevent it since there would be too many variables to consider, the largest of which is how can it be determined if the player is not in real need of assistance. Matches at the amateur level see breaking the flow as well. Players can take longer to serve, ask for a third ball off in the corner of a court to slow the pace of play down, move slowly and casually back into position so that the game can continue, pretend to talk to a partner about strategy, or any other number of excuses. Breaking the flow is not against any rules and it would be difficult to create rules against the tactic; should players be prepared to accept this as part of the game? Some time ago, an old mentor suggested that if I was having difficulty in a match with an opponent I had faced before that I should ask them if they had changed something on their forehand. I asked him why and he said that it would make my opponent overthink the forehand and result in a higher rate of errors. My immediate thought was that it was a devious ploy. I loved it, and although I have never used it,

I consider it at times. Getting into an opponent’s head to make them overthink or underestimate a situation is another tactic under the umbrella of gamesmanship. One classic example is when one athlete says to another, “No pressure!” They’re trying to get into the head of their opponent to elicit a mistake. There are even times when you can practice gamesmanship on yourself, most notably when we tell ourselves, “Don’t miss” on a second serve. Finally, there are times when opponents will make mistakes on purpose. This season, I have seen more of this happen than in other seasons. A great example of this is the no-call. A no-call is when an opponent does not make a call which leaves the other team at a disadvantage. The easiest scenario to point to is the let. A serve which hits the net and bounces into the opponent’s service box should be called a let. A no-call in this situation is when the other team plays it out, while the team serving is standing there wondering why they just lost the point. The other team can claim that they didn’t hear it and play moves on. This is probably the closest example to willful cheating, but it’s not prohibited in the rules. There are plenty of other examples, such as squeaking your sneakers when your opponent is about to serve, excessively talking to your opponents in between points, moving to the other side of your baseline after you hit a serve out, or switching rackets inside a game without breaking a string. Gamesmanship is limited only by the imagination of the player using it. The tactics described are at best dubious, but are part of the game and no rules can be made to help protect against it. That being the case, tennis players should make themselves aware of it so that they can steel their minds in the wake of such grey attacks. Knowledge is power to the tennis player. Miguel Cervantes III teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


Tips to Mental Mastery:

Performing Under Pressure By Tina Greenbaum, LCSW s soon as we begin to play for points, we immediately move from the realm of practice into the realm of competition. And that simple addition of risking winning or losing a point, set, or match requires a totally new skill: Performing under pressure. Believe it or not, our ability to perform under pressure frequently stems from our childhood experiences. There is a sophisticated relay system between the body and the mind that determines how well we will do later in life when required to skillfully execute something that we have previously learned. Timed tests, sports, oral reports all get registered in a part of the brain that remembers these events (the hippocampus). There’s also another part of the brain, called the limbic system, whose job is to sense danger and react to it accordingly. If we’ve had negative experiences when we were younger and we find ourselves feeling fearful from the pressure of competing, the body releases hormones that prepare us for danger. These hormones, then affect our ability to think clearly or problem solve. You can imagine what that kind of havoc does to your ability to play your best! So, how do we retrain our minds (or actually the limbic system) to be able to perform well even though we cannot go back and change the past? The answer is to re-define the experience of discomfort or pressure as either positive or neutral, rather than seeing it as a threat. In this way we become more resilient and more able to handle the ups and downs that are inevitable, not only in the game of tennis, but also in life.

A

Here are two tips to get you started: 1. Acknowledge that pressurerelated discomfort is normal If we attempt to avoid it, the fear only gets bigger, and we diminish our potential to become really good at tennis. Practice accepting the feeling. It may feel unusual at first, but, as with everything else, the more you practice, the more progress you will make. 2. Learn to welcome the feeling of discomfort Again, we are re-interpreting the meaning of the sensation of discomfort or pressure. I had a client who used to worry about his performance when he did not feel the butterflies in his stomach. He knew that when he felt them, he would be more prepared for the challenge ahead. This is a beginning. Understanding how your mind and body work together can put

2013 ETA Recipient “Innovative Tennis Program of the Year” LI’s first Tennis Academy devoted to the USTA’s 10 & under Initiative.

“There is a sophisticated relay system between the body and the mind that determines how well we will do later in life when required to skillfully execute something that we have previously learned.” you at a great advantage. Realizing that our past does not have to dictate our present or our future gives us the ability write a new story. Practicing the mental side of tennis will enhance your ability to succeed, as well as increase your enjoyment of an exciting and demanding sport. Tina Greenbaum, LCSW is a sport psychology consultant. She, along with her partner Fred Sperber is co-owner of Tennis to the Max, a program that combines the technical elements of the game with the all important mental side to ensure maximum performance. She may be reached by email at tina@tennistothemax.com or visit www.tennistothemax.com.

Butch Seewagen is a former varsity coach at Columbia University. He holds over 15 national and international titles and is the owner/program director of the Children’s Athletic Training Schools. For Boys and Girls 5 – 9 years old.

188 Maple Avenue Rockville Center Phone: 516-753-1299

www.catsny.com LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW 2013 U.S. Open times of entry Day sessions l All gates open to the public daily at 10:00 a.m. l For Session 25/Women’s Singles Final on Sunday, Sept. 8, gates open at 11:00 a.m. l For Session 26/Men’s Singles Final on Monday, Sept. 9, gates open at 3:00 p.m. Evening sessions l All grounds gates open at 6:00 p.m. and Arthur Ashe Stadium will open at 6:30 p.m. or 40 minutes after the conclusion of the day sessions l Guests with restaurant passes, hospitality invitations and Luxury Suite ticket holders will have access to the site, through the East Gate, and restaurant elevators at 5:00 p.m. l Early entrance evening ticket holders will have access to the grounds at 4:00 p.m. Final Sunday grounds admission ticket Share in the excitement of Final Sunday, Sept. 8, with a $5 Grounds Admission. You can catch all the action of the Junior’s and Wheelchair Championships and see the Women’s Singles Final on big-screen TVs located throughout the grounds. You can also enjoy regional cuisine and live entertainment in the Food Village and South Plaza. These Grounds Admission tickets may be sold in advance at the discretion of the USTA and will be available for purchase at the Box Office on the day of the Finals (subject to availability). All Final Sunday Grounds Admission proceeds benefit USTA Serves, the national charitable foundation of the USTA, which funds tennis and education programs for at-risk children and people with disabilities Free Qualifying Tournament Come out and see the tennis stars of tomorrow! The U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament takes place Tuesday-Friday, Aug. 20-23, with matches beginning at 11:00 a.m. daily. Photo credit: Eric C. Peck

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW Attractions 2013 l The U.S. Open American Express Fan Experience: The U.S. Open U.S. Open American Express Fan Experience returns in 2013 Open to all U.S. Open at- restaurant tendees. The U.S. Open American Express Fan Experience will feature guide swing analysis hitting bays allowing Along with the best tennis and entertainment in the world, the U.S. Open offers premium dining experiences—from Mojito, the newly-redesigned Latin-inspired restaurant and bar, to Champions Bar & Grill, a classic American steakhouse. Whether you are in the mood for a light snack, lunch, dinner, meeting friends for cocktails or satisfying a l U.S. Open Fountain Plaza Desk: sweet tooth, the restaurants on the The U.S. Open Fountain Plaza Desk in grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King Nathe South Plaza is where ESPN and tional Tennis Center can cure any craving. CBS will broadcast live during select Come experience all the U.S. Open has to sessions. You won’t want to miss the interviews with today’s tennis stars. fans to get instant feedback on their swing, along with other activities The full-size tennis court returns to the space allowing fans to try out their strokes, demo the latest racquets, and other special programming for kids and adults.

offer. Reservations are recommended for Aces and Champions Bar & Grill, and can be made by calling the reservation line at (718) 393.1933 or using the online reservation system at www.usopen.org. l Aces and Champions Bar & Grill: Both are located on the Club level in Arthur Ashe Stadium between Gates 3 and 4 and are available to Courtside Box seat holders and Luxury Suite guests. You can access both restaurants by using the elevators on the east side of Arthur Ashe Stadium adjacent to the U.S. Open Club Presented by Emirates Airline.

l Where to see the stars: The practice courts located by the West Gate are a great place to get an up-close look at some of the world’s best players. l Merchandise: An array of tournament souvenirs and mementos are available to commemorate the 2013 U.S. Open experience. l International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum Gallery at the U.S. Open: Be sure to visit the US Open Gallery, located inside the Chase Center. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW Loge and Promenade Subscription Series ticket holders may purchase passes for the duration of the tournament. l U.S. Open Club Presented by Emirates Airline: The U.S. Open Club Presented by Emirates Airline is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium. The Club is available to all Subscription Series ticket holders for the duration of the tournament for a nominal entrance fee, and is included for Silver Loge Box seat holders. With its contemporary décor, the U.S. Open Club Presented by Emirates Airline is famous for its Chef’s Table and seasonal selections of eclectic American cuisine. Restaurant passes are required.

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l Patio Café & Bar: Soak up the beautiful surroundings of the U.S. Open grounds at the expanded outdoor café and bar located outside the U.S. Open Club Presented by Emirates Airline. Enjoy fresh selections of seasonal sandwiches and salads, paired with summer specialty cocktails. The Patio Café & Bar is available to all ticket holders. l Mojito Restaurant & Bar: Mojito, the newly-redesigned Latin-inspired restaurant available to all ticket holders,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium near the Patio Café & Bar Experience. Seating is available either indoors or outside in the grounds garden, enhanced by multiple bars and TVs showing the matches as they happen. l Heineken Red Star Café: The Heineken Red Star Café is located next to the South Plaza Fountains. Newlyredesigned just last year, the Heineken Red Star Café sits on the top level of the two-


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW story building, providing guests a spacious, ideal setting to unwind and keep track of the matches while enjoying the Café’s laidback atmosphere and enhanced menus. The U.S. Open Collection Store, located on the ground level, features a complete assortment of 2013 U.S. Open merchandise and mementos alongside a limited selection of Heinekenbranded offerings. l Heineken Light Lounge: With the option of outdoor and indoor seating, the Heineken Light Lounge, located near the East Gate, is the perfect spot to take a break. Outside, fans can relax and take in the sights and sounds of the U.S. Open. Inside, visitors will experience the Heineken Star Bar and cabanastyle seating and can enjoy the oneand-only turkey waffle club—a sandwich unlike any other and exclusive to the Heineken Light Lounge. A custom line of Heineken merchandise, available only at the U.S. Open, is also on display and available for purchase.

l Moët & Chandon Terrace: The Moët & Chandon Terrace, located next to the Patio Café & Bar, features Moët & Chandon Imperial Champagne, along with full-service bar options. Guests can relax and enjoy a glass of champagne in an outdoor lounge setting.

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l Grey Goose Bar: Located in the Food Village, the Grey Goose Bar features the Honey Deuce, a U.S. Open signature cocktail, along with Grey Goose specialty cocktails and a fullservice bar. l Food Village: Enjoy regional cuisine and specialty items at the U.S. Open Food Village: Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Shop, Carnegie Deli, Classic Burger, Cuppa Spotta, Farm 2 Fork, Franks and Fries, Fresca Mexicana, Fulton Seafood, Glatt Kosher Cart, New Delhi Spice, Pizza/Pasta, Southern Barbeque, and Sweet & Savory Crepes.

Baseline Cocktails: Come quench your thirst with a full-service bar that includes premium wine upgrades

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW An Insider’s Look at the Men’s and Women’s Draw Beginning immediately after the conclusion of Wimbledon, the U.S. Open Series links together WTA and ATP tournaments that take place on hard courts across America throughout the summer. As the summer comes to a close, fans are gearing up for the fourth and final Grand Slam event of the season, the 2013 U.S. Open. With the 2013 U.S. Open beginning Aug. 26, the big names in the tennis world will converge on New York in hopes of winning the fourth and final Grand Slam of the year. Since 1978, the tournament has been held at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. and has been a highlight to the summers of New York tennis fans. This year’s championships will undoubtedly provide a high level of drama, action, and excitement as the world’s best players compete for the final Grand Slam title of the year. Some players go into the tournament looking to finish a disappointing season off on a more positive note, and some seek to build on the solid season they’ve had thus far. No matter what the player’s individual goals are for the tournament, we can fore-

cast the true contenders, pretenders and American hopefuls for this year’s U.S. Open.

Contenders: Men’s singles Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Novak Djokovic is the 2011 U.S. Open Champion, current world number one and top seed heading into this year’s tournament. Djokovic has enjoyed much success at the Open, having reached the semifinals in 2008 and 2009; the finals in 2007, 2010 and 2012; and took home the championship in 2011. Having lost to Andy Murray a year ago and in the Wimbledon Finals, Djokovic comes in highly motivated to win his seventh Grand Slam title (2008, 2011, 2012, and 2013 Australian Open; the 2011 Wimbledon Championships; and the 2011 U.S. Open).

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Andy Murray is the defending champion at Flushing Meadows and has momentum coming into the event off his first Wimbledon Championship. At the 2012 U.S. Open, he defeated Novak Djokovic in five sets to win the title, and he became the only British male to become a Grand Slam singles champion during the Open Era. With a Gold Medal at the 2012 Olympics and a Wimbledon title both in front of his home fans in Great Britain, the pressure is off Murray and he can relax and play. Defending a title is no easy feat, but Murray may be playing well enough to do so. Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Rafael Nadal is the reigning French Open Champion and 2010 U.S. Open Champion returns to Flushing Meadows after not playing due to injury a year ago. Nadal has won 12 Grand Slam singles titles, including an all-time record eight French Open titles. In 2010, Nadal completed the Career Grand Slam by winning the U.S. Open proving that while this isn’t his best surface, he is a threat on any surface. He is only the second male player to complete the Career Golden Slam (winner of the Career Grand Slam and the Olympic gold medal) after Andre Agassi. Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Juan Martin del Potro has won the U.S. Open before and poses a serious threat this year. The 2009 Champion was 44

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW also a quarterfinalist in 2008 and in 2012. In January 2010, del Potro reached a careerhigh ranking of world number four. As the only player other than Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and Andy Murray to have won a men’s Grand Slam singles title since 2005, del Potro stands a true chance to survive two weeks in New York and win a Championship. Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Tomas Berdych had not had much success at the U.S. Open until last year when he made a nice run making the semifinals before a loss to Andy Murray. In his career, he has also reached two other quarterfinals, in 2010 at the French Open and last year’s U.S. Open. Berdych has a big serve that will play well on the hard courts at Flushing Meadows.

ing Meadows. His career best was as a quarterfinalist in 2010, and last year, he suffered a fourth round loss.

Pretenders: Men’s singles Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Roger Federer finds himself in an unfamiliar position this year as he enters the tournament as the fifth seed. Also, while three male players have won majors this year (Djokovic, Nadal and Murray), Federer is not one of them. Federer, however, is a five-time U.S. Open Champion (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008) and can never be fully counted out. In June at Wimbledon, his streak of 36 consecutive Grand Slam quarterfinals appearances was broken. Bouncing back at the U.S. Open will be no easy feat. Stanislas Wawrinka, the world’s 10thranked player, has had a nice year, but has never enjoyed tremendous success at Flush-

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

David Ferrer is very consistent and tough to beat. Last year, he was a semifinalist at the U.S. Open, and this year, he lost in the French Open finals to fellow Spaniard Rafael Nadal. While Ferrer should make a nice run at the Open, he may only wind up as a quarterfinalist.

The Centercourt Performance Tennis Center is the Northeast’s premiere High Performance Tennis Academy. The Centercourt Performance Tennis Center (CPTC) is located in Morristown, NJ. The facility is one of a kind as it is fully dedicated to the development and performance of tennis players. The Performance Center went through a complete renovation in 2012 and has seven hard courts (five are domed in the winter and two are permanent), one red clay court, state of the art strength and conditioning room, study area, new lobby, and new locker rooms. Our philosophy is if you want to improve, you need to train. While you don’t have to be exceptionally talented, you do need to be seriously committed to your training. Our mission is to help every student-athlete we train realize his or her full potential; athletically, academically and within life itself. We believe that the trials and tribulations that our student-athletes endure in the tennis pathway will develop our young athletes into leaders on and off the court. Our players respect the game, their peers, parents, environment, and coaches. Our players are coached to not only become great players, but hardworking, self-sufficient individuals. The CPTC curriculum features on-court and off-court lesson programs which include comprehensive tennis instruction complimented with both physical and

mental conditioning conducted by performance specialists; all of whom are committed to developing players into champions. Total athletic training programs are designed to increase player development and facilitate higher overall performance by incorporating mental toughness, nutrition counseling, speed/movement, communication, and vision/reaction skills in all of our players. Our culture is simple, We live the sport! Seven days a week, 365 days a year. Continually striving for improvement, we do not celebrate mediocrity. We strive to get the most out of all our players. If you are serious about your tennis and want to be the best athlete you can possibly be, you owe it to yourself to experience the Centercourt Performance Tennis Center firsthand! 65 Columbia Road, Morristown, NJ 07960 For more information, contact Clay Bibbee at clay@centercourtclub.com

For more information, contact Clay Bibbee at clay@centercourtclub.com. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW Sleepers: Men’s singles Jerzy Janowicz, playing in his first U.S. Open last year, lost in the first round. However, over the past year, he has made tremendous strides. A run to the semifinals at Wimbledon was certainly a career best and he reached a career-high of 17th in the world in July 2013. Janowicz has the type of game that can bring down the top players. If he gets a good draw, he should be able to make a nice run. Alexandr Dogopolov reached the third round a year ago and the fourth round in 2011. At this year’s Australian Open, he reached the quarterfinals of the hard court event. Dogopolov has a unique type of game, but one that could pose problems this year.

Contenders: Women’s singles

again hoist the trophy. She has won 29 WTA singles titles, including four Grand Slam singles titles.

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Serena Williams, the four-time U.S. Open Champion (1999, 2002, 2008 and 2012) and defending champion is the one to beat coming in to this year’s event. She is the only player to have achieved a Career Golden Slam in both singles and doubles. Her 31 Grand Slam titles ties her for eighth on the all-time list: 16 in singles, 13 in women’s doubles, and two in mixed-doubles. However, anything can happen to Serena in a Grand Slam, as evidenced by her loss in June at Wimbledon to Sabine Lisicki, but if she is on her game, she should hold the trophy at the end. Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Maria Sharapova won the U.S. Open in 2006 and advanced to the semifinals a year ago. While she has not had much success head-to-head against Serena, if Serena gets knocked off somewhere along the way, Sharapova may

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Prior to last year, Victoria Azarenka hasn’t had much success in New York. Last year, she reached the U.S. Open finals and was on the cusp of victory before Serena fought back She is a two time Grand Slam Champion on hard courts having won the last two Australian Open titles. She likes the surface and will be tough to beat.

Pretenders: Women’s singles Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Sara Errani was a U.S. Open semifinalist in 2012, and has now made at least the quarterfinals in every major event except Wimbledon. Clay, however, remains her best surface. Winning on a hard court seems like too tall of a task for Errani in singles. The 2012 U.S. Open Doubles Champion (with partner Roberta Vinci) is the number one-ranked doubles player in the world and with Vinci once again in 2013, will be the favorites to hoist the doubles crown.

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Marion Bartoli, the reigning Wimbledon Champion, is coming off her first major championship. However, she has never advanced past the quarterfinals in Flushing Meadows, and while momentum is on her side, we don’t expect a repeat of the easy draw she got at Wimbledon. A tougher draw should result in an earlier exit. 46

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW has yet to make a WTA Tour singles final, she has reached four semifinals. The New York crowd will certainly be behind her and might push her to that next level.

Roberta Vinci, currently ranked 11th in the world, has not found much success in the women’s singles draw at the U.S. Open. Last year, she reached the quarterfinals, but prior to that, she lost in the first round seven previous times. At 30-yearsold, don’t expect a breakthrough this year.

Sleepers: Women’s singles

Being a past champion is always a confidence booster heading into a major. Samantha Stosur won the 2011 U.S. Open, defeating Serena Williams, and has also won four other Grand Slam titles to date, two in women’s doubles and two in mixed-doubles. With the right draw, Stosur can make a solid run this year at Flushing Meadows.

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Maria Kirilenko has never reached the quarters at the U.S. Open, but this may be her year. She is not playing doubles in an effort to focus strictly on singles play. This past June, Kirilenko reached her career high ranking of world number 10. She has reached three Grand Slam singles quarterfinals (the 2010 Australian Open, the 2012 Wimbledon Championships and the 2013 French Open).

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Americans at the U.S. Open There is nothing more exhilarating to the New York crowd than getting a chance to cheer for one of their own. Competing in this year’s U.S. Open are a handful of American hopefuls on both the men’s and women’s sides of the draw. Serena Williams leads the women with Sloane Stephens, Venus Williams, Jamie Hampton, Madison Keys and Vavara Lepchenko also in the WTA Top 40. On the men’s side, John Isner and Sam Querrey lead the way, while the returning Mardy Fish gives the Americans another player who can make a run at the men’s singles title.

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CONTROL YOUR MIND GAME • Learn Instant stress reduction • Discover Intense & Quick Focus • 4 Keys to a Competitive Edge • Learn to Identify and Control Distraction • Identify & Control Negative Self Talk Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

The young American Sloane Stephens has reached the third round of the U.S. Open the last two years. This year has been her best year though as she has reached the semifinals of the Australian Open, the fourth round at the French Open and the quarters at Wimbledon. While she

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW Local Tennis Stars at the U.S. Open: Now and Then BY STEVE KAPLAN

Photo credit: Adam Wolfthal

The New York M e t ro p o l i t a n area has a storied history of great tennis players and today’s current Local juniors Noah Rubin crop of rising and Jamie Loeb are among j u n i o r s t a r s the New Yorkers to appear at continues that the 2013 U.S. Open tradition of excellence. Notable juniors in this year’s U.S. Open junior draw include Noah Rubin from Rockville Centre, N.Y., a quarterfinalist at the 2012 French Open Juniors and currently ranked number one in his class by Tennis Recruiting; Jamie Loeb from Ossining, N.Y., ranked 465th by the WTA and quarterfinalist at the 2013 Wimbledon Juniors; and Louisa Chirico from Harrison, N.Y. who is ranked ninth in the ITF Juniors and

was a Junior French Open and Wimbledon Semifinalist this year. All three of these players are fantastic and promising. Hopefully one day they will join the ranks of New York Metropolitan area greats. On the men’s side, Rubin has enjoyed tremendous success in the junior ranks and is one of the top American juniors. Perhaps Rubin will one day make his mark on the game the way local greats before him have, and we will be able to compare him to local tennis legends such as seven-time Grand Slam Champion John McEnroe. Some of the local greats and near greats from our area’s history include: Vitas Gerulaitis, 1977 Australian Open Champion; Fritz Buehning from Summit N.J., former number 21 in the world in singles and number four in doubles; and Peter Fleming from Chatham, N.J. who, along with McEnroe, won seven Grand Slams and 52 titles overall. Peter Rennert from Great Neck, N.Y. was 40th in the world in singles and eighth in doubles. Jimmy Gurfine, also from Great Neck, N.Y., was ranked 96th by the ATP

and Marcel Freeman from Port Washington, N.Y. was ranked 46th in the world. A few years later John’s brother, Patrick McEnroe, achieved a singles ranking of 28th in the world and a doubles ranking of number three. Paul Annacone from East Hampton, N.Y. was number 12 in singles and third in doubles before achieving coaching fame with Pete Sampras and Roger Federer. Richard Matuszewski from Newark, N.J. proved that you do not have to be a great junior to be a successful professional. Hard work at Clemson University helped Richard achieve an ATP ranking of 49th in the world in singles and 87th in doubles. John Sullivan from Rockville Centre, N.Y. was a student of mine early in my career and also a Clemson product. He was ranked 371st in singles and 101st in doubles. I watched another early student, Howard Endelman from Roslyn, N.Y., play in the main draw of doubles on Court 14 at the Open. Howie was ranked 603rd in singles and 183rd in doubles. Photo credit:

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Kenneth B. Goldberg

More recently, Tennis Channel’s own, Justin Gimelstob from Livingston, N.J. rose to a world ranking of 63rd Merrick’s Scott Lipsky in in singles and doubles action at the 2011 18th in doubles. U.S. Open Scott Lipsky from Merrick, N.Y. was the 2011 French Open mixed-doubles champion along with Casey Dellacqua. I gave Scott lessons for a few years as a young junior, and he loved to come forward even as a little boy. How many play-


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW ers can put a Grand Slam title on their resume? Several years ago, my long-time student Bryan Koniecko from Jericho, N.Y. was ranked 651st in the world and was the number one-ranked college player in the country for almost two years at Ohio State. Jamie Loeb and Louisa Chirico are top American juniors who might one day be rival some of the local women’s stars who have come before them. Mary Carillo from Douglaston, N.Y. was number 33 in the world and was the 1977 French Open Mixed-Doubles Champion with John McEnroe. They were both so young it made for an even more amazing accomplishment. Melissa Brown from Westchester, Terry Phelps from Larchmont and Mollie Van Nostrand from Brightwaters, N.Y. all arrived on the world tennis scene at about the same time, and they certainly left their mark. Brown was a French Open quarterfinalist in 1984, Mollie was a Wim-

bledon quarterfinalist in 1985, and was ranked 37th in the world. Terry was ranked 20th in singles and 37th in doubles on the WTA Tour. In 1988, my long-time student Sandra Birch was a U.S. Open Junior Singles Finalist. Sandra went on to win two NCAA singles titles for Stanford and achieved a world singles ranking of 187th, and a doubles ranking of 163rd (I cannot help but add a ranking of number one in the world for hard work, sportsmanship and class). Another student of mine, Bea Bielik from Valley Stream, N.Y. won the NCAA Singles Title in 2002 for Wake Forest and had a great run at the U.S. Open that year, reaching the third round. Bea was ranked as high as 130th in the world. Recently, Christina McHale from Englewood Cliffs, N.J. was ranked 24th on the WTA Tour and reached the third round of the U.S. Open in 2011. Irina Falconi from

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Christina McHale from Englewood Cliffs, N.J. in action at the 2011 U.S. Open

New York, N.Y. played in The City Parks Foundation Academy on the outside practice courts in Flushing Meadows before achieving a ranking of 73rd in the world in singles and 71st in the world in doubles. As a coach of highly-ranked juniors and a club owner just 20 miles from the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, I have had some wonderful personal experiences watching and coaching players at the U.S. Junior Open. Of course, I’ll never

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW forget the roar of the crowd as Sandra Birch came back from a big deficit to win 75 in the third on a packed Court 17. A few years later, Jordan Richman, who lived just a few miles from the National Tennis Center, dropped his court maintenance broom and rushed to change when his name was called from the junior alternate list. It might be the first and only time in U.S. Open history that a player has swept the court before playing on it. In 1997, Kyle Kligerman

from New York, N.Y. was selected as a doubles alternate, and despite being matched with a partner he had never met, beat the number two seeds in the first round! I hope the rising local stars, as well as their coaches and families, have an equally memorable time in 2013 on their way to the top. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director

of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

U.S. Open Timeline 1881

Begins as a singles men’s tournament, for entertainment purposes only. The United States Championship is held at The Casino in Newport, R.I. Richard D. Sears is the first champion.

1887

Ellen Hansel is the first female singles winner.

1915-1978 The tournaments are held at West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y.

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1968

The Open Era begins. Professionals are allowed to compete with amateurs. Name changes to the U.S. Open. Arthur Ashe is the first winner of the newly-named tournament.

1973

The U.S. Open becomes the first Grand Slam tournament to offer equal prize money to male and female winners.

1978

The National Tennis Center at Flushing Meadows Corona Park becomes the site of the U.S. Open.

1997

The stadium used for the tournament inside the USTA National Tennis Center is named Arthur Ashe Stadium.

2006

The USTA National Tennis Center facility, home of the U.S. Open, is renamed the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

Winners of Most Men’s Singles Titles (Post-1968)

Jimmy Connors, Pete Sampras & Roger Federer (tied with 5)

Winner of Most Women’s Singles Titles (Post-1968)

Chris Evert (6)

Winner of Most Consecutive Men’s Titles (Post-1968)

Roger Federer (5)

Winner of Most Consecutive Women’s Titles (Post-1968)

Chris Evert (4)

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW National Tennis Center Set for Upgrades The USTA joined with New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Queens officials to release details of a proposed strategic vision for future development at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center (NTC) in Flushing Mead-

ows Corona Park. The New York City Council voted overwhelmingly in favor of the USTA’s plan to improve the National Tennis Center by a resounding 471 margin. In exchange for the 0.68 acres, the USTA will return to the City a portion (1.56 acres) of its currently leased land. The USTA will also launch an increased community outreach program and has made a long-term commitment to fund capital improvements in Flushing Meadows Corona Park and will help establish the FMCP (Flushing Meadows Corona Park) Alliance, which will be dedicated to improving all aspects of the park

moving forward. The strategic vision, a series of interconnected construction projects that includes building developments, infrastructure upgrades and improvements to site circulation—aims to enhance the current conditions at the NTC and preserve its stature as a world-class venue. The project will positively impact the facility’s ability to host its flagship event, the U.S. Open, while simultaneously providing a superior experience for both visiting fans and players, allowing the City of New York to continue to reap substantial economic benefits. “Our goal remains to ensure that the

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center remains a world-class facility for the top professional tennis players, for the hundreds of thousands of fans who annually attend the US Open, and, as importantly, the near hundred thousand recreational tennis players who use this facility all year round,” said Jon Vegosen, chairman of the board and president of the USTA. “The strategic vision will enable us to achieve this goal.” The project, expected to develop throughout a multi-year period and cost hundreds of millions of dollars, will be undertaken by the USTA, which will investigate a multitude of potential financing options. The project will primarily entail the replacement and renovation of aging facilities and infrastructures. Since 1978, the USTA has invested more than $500 million of its own funds into the NTC, and this project will continue that investment. Most notably, the project calls for the construction of two new stadiums, one to replace the aging Louis Armstrong Stadium in its current location at the northeast corner of the site, and the other a brand new Grandstand Stadium, built in a different location at the southwest corner of the property. Seven tournament courts on the southern section of the site will be relocated between 30-50 feet, and a new walkway will

be built to allow for easy access through the southern part of the site. Two parking garages will be constructed over existing parking lots to accommodate additional spaces, and seven courts on the northwest section–five practice and two tournament- will be replaced and linked by a new, elevated viewing platform that will provide better seating and viewing options for fans. As a direct result of the collective enhancements, the project will enable the facility to accommodate an extra 10,000 people each day during the U.S. Open, increasing attendance by approximately 100,000 new visitors, and amounting to a significant economic boost to Queens, New York City and the entire metropolitan region. The U.S. Open creates 6,000 seasonal jobs–with 85 percent of all employees coming from New York City and 41 percent from Queens. These 6,000 seasonal jobs yield the equivalent of 585 (direct and indirect) full- and part-time jobs for Queens residents, earning $40.33 million in direct and indirect employee compensation. Strategic vision overview includes: l Louis Armstrong Stadium (replaced with a new adjacent administrative and retail building): The existing Louis Armstrong Stadium,

located in the northeast corner of the site, is a 125,000 gross square-foot facility with approximately 10,000 seats. First constructed as the Singer Bowl for the 1964-65 World’s Fair, the stadium is now nearing the end of its useful life. After demolition of the existing stadium, a new 15,000-seat stadium would be built on the same site. Similar to the existing facility, the new stadium would include concession, retail, broadcasting and administrative space, as well as expanded rest room, first aid and guest services centers, and would have two stories of administrative and retail space in an adjacent new building. l The Grandstand (new and relocated): The current 6,000-seat Grandstand is located on the property’s east façade, adjacent to Louis Armstrong Stadium. Just like Louis Armstrong Stadium, it also was built as part of the 1964-65 World’s Fair Singer Bowl and is near the end of its useful life. The proposed project would replace the current Grandstand with a new 8,000-seat stadium in the southwest corner of the site. Most of the area in which the stadium would be located falls within the boundaries of the USTA’s lease. One exception is a connector road between United Nations Avenue and Meridian Road, which runs through the leased area in which the new stadium would be located, and would be added to the area covered by the lease. This would increase the area subject to the lease by approximately 11,449-square feet, or .26 acres. The connector road would be relocated to the area south of United Nations Avenue North near the Queens Museum of Art parking lot. New pedestrian walkways would also be created. l Tournament Courts (relocated): Currently, there is a row of seven tournament courts on the southern portion of the site. Under the proposed

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW project, four of the courts would be relocated approximately 50 feet to the south, and three of the courts would be relocated approximately 30 feet to the south. The new NTC boundary line under the lease would move south to United Nations Avenue North, allowing space for pedestrian circulation around these courts and along a walkway connecting to the new Grandstand Stadium. This would increase the area subject to the lease by up to approximately 32,973-square feet, or 0.76 acres. New bleacher seating areas would be provided. The area to be added to the NTC lease is currently a mix of grassy and paved areas, including one lane of the three-lane United Nations Avenue North, which would be reduced to two lanes. The lane that would be eliminated is lightly used, primarily as a service road.

l Parking Garages (two new garages and relocated transportation center): Currently, there is a 200-space surface parking lot and transportation center in the northwest corner of the site and an approximately 100-space surface parking lot in the northeast corner of the site. Under the proposed project, the northwest lot and transportation center would be replaced with an approximately 432-space, two-level parking garage and transportation center, and the northeast lot would be replaced with an approximately 370-space, three-level parking garage. No additional land outside the existing boundaries of the NTC would be required for these elements of the proposed project. l Northwest Tournament Courts (reconfigured, new elevated viewing platform): At present, the north-

west courts include five practice courts and two tournament courts, each with bleacher seats. The proposed project would replace the existing courts and bleachers with five new practice courts and three new tournament courts. A new, elevated viewing platform would be constructed between the practice and tournament courts. No additional land outside the existing lease boundaries of the NTC would be required for this aspect of the proposed project. l Miscellaneous Renovations: The proposed project would also include lighting, infrastructure and utility improvements, as well as improvements to landscaping, paving and drainage within the NTC site, with sustainability features and potential cosmetic enhancements to Arthur Ashe Stadium.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW Ariana Grande and Austin Mahone to Headline 2013 Arthur Ashe Kids Day For the past 17 years, fans of all ages have been entertained by some of the biggest names in music and tennis. With chart-topping singer Ariana Grande and rising star Austin Mahone leading the way in 2013, the 18th Annual Arthur Ashe Kids Day Presented by Hess promises to be no different. Joining Grande and Mahone in the lineup for 2013 Arthur Ashe Kids Day, to be held Saturday, Aug. 24 from 9:30 a.m.4:00 p.m. will be spirited-teen sensation Coco Jones, breakout UK band Lawson and Swedish DJ duo Cazzette, as well as world number ones Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams, five-time U.S. Open champion Roger Federer and world number one wheelchair tennis champion David Wagner. Arthur Ashe Kids Day will kick off the 2013 U.S. Open, which runs from Aug. 26 through Sept. 9.

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From 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., kids and their families can enjoy an exciting schedule of free tennis games, live music and attractions taking place throughout the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Inside Arthur Ashe Stadium from 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., the live tennis and music show will feature fun exhibition matches and skill competitions with Djokovic, Serena, Federer and Wagner along with musical performances by Grande, Mahone, Fifth Harmony, Jones, Lawson and Cazzette. USTA 10 & Under Tennis spokesperson Jeff Sutphen, the star of Nickelodeon’s “Figure It Out,” will also take part in the action. Arthur Ashe Kids Day will be broadcast nationally by CBS on Sunday, Aug. 25, from noon-1:30 p.m (ET). Kids 12 and under with stadium-show tickets will receive a free Arthur Ashe Kids Day hat from the USTA and Hess on a first-come, first-served basis.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Over the years, Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day has featured many of music’s biggest acts including Justin Bieber, Rihanna, The Wanted, Jonas Brothers, Demi Lovato, Carly Rae Jepsen, Sean Kingston, Britney Spears, Ne-Yo, Gavin DeGraw, Jessica Simpson, Backstreet Boys, Cody Simpson and Hanson. This year’s lineup will feature: Ariana Grande: Music has always been Ariana Grande’s first love. In fact, long before millions of fans fell in love with the singer and actress as Cat Valentine on the hit Nickelodeon shows Victorious and Sam & Cat, she began professionally pursuing her musical career at only eight-years-old. After performing with symphonies around her native Florida, Ariana made her national television debut, singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the first-ever broadcast of the national anthem for the Florida Panthers. The breakout single for Republic Records, platinum-selling “The Way” featuring Mac Miller, is the best way to get to know Ariana. Over shimmering piano and a slick beat, her voice echoes soulfully before she carries an inescapable and impressive hook. The follow-up single, “Baby, I” is creating similar buzz—reaching number two on the iTunes chart just hours after its release. Both are simply a prelude to her forthcoming full-length 2013 debut. Ultimately, the new album will welcome everyone into Ariana’s world, and it’s a wonderful place.


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW Austin Mahone: At just 17-years-old, singer/songwriter Austin Mahone is poised for stardom. Not only is Austin nominated for MTV’s Video Music Award “Artist to Watch,” but his new hit single, “What About Love” has gained over 19.5 million views on YouTube and can be heard on top radio stations around the nation. Austin was one of a select few presenters at this year’s Billboard Music Awards where he presented “Best EDM Artist” alongside singer Kelly Rowland, as well as opened at the 2013 Radio Disney Music Awards where he took home his first RDM award for the “Ultimate Breakout Star–Biggest Viral Artist.” Not only does he have a solid fan base, known as “Mahomies,” but the teen sensation is gaining a legion of loyal fans in the media as well.

Natasha Bedingfield), who worked with the girls on The X Factor, is executive-producing the album. Coco Jones: It would be hard to find another teen with the poise, chops, and confident charm of Coco Jones. With her debut Hollywood Records EP, “Made Of,” the 15-year-old singer shows the world what her growing fan base already knows: Coco Jones is a spectacular talent of limitless potential. Sound like hype? In 2010, Coco emerged as a finalist on the Disney Channel’s “Next Big Thing” which led to a recurring role on “So Random” followed by her breakout role in the Disney Channel movie “Let It Shine.” The video for her first single, “Holla at the DJ,” has surpassed 2.2 million YouTube views and garnered praise from MTV who likened Coco’s performance to a “young Beyonce.” Lawson: After racking up five top 10 hits in their native United Kingdom, Lawson are coming to America. The London-based four-piece consists of Andy Brown, Ryan

Fletcher, Joel Peat and Adam Pitts and anticipation is building ahead of their debut U.S. album “Chapman Square” which reached number four on the British charts. Lawson have cut their teeth as a band opening up for the likes of Avril Lavigne, Jessie J and Bruce Springsteen on tour. Unsigned at the time, these shows marked a turn in fortunes for the band culminating in sold out performances at London’s O2 Arena. Soon after, the band signed with Polydor Ltd. (UK) and four years after forming, Lawson had lift-off. Cazzette: From the house that brought you Avicii, comes Cazzette. The Swedish DJ duo is currently tearing up clubs worldwide with “Beam Me Up,”

Fifth Harmony: Thanks to their showstopping vocals, charisma and genuine sisterly bond, Fifth Harmony have attracted a growing, devoted fan base. “Miss Movin’ On” is the first single from Fifth Harmony’s upcoming debut album, which will be released by Epic Records and Syco Music later this year. The girls have been in the studio working on their debut album with The Suspex (Demi Lovato), The Monsters (Demi Lovato, Selena Gomez), J Kash (Kesha, Avril Lavigne), Lil’ Eddie (Usher, Pink), Toby Gad (Beyoncé, Fergie) and others. Multi-platinum-selling producer/songwriter Julian Bunetta (One Direction, LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW a club banger with a hard-charging kick drum, an epic vocal track and dub bass drops designed to get the party going. Cazzette, aka Alexander Björklund and Sebastian Furrer, incorporate a variety of sounds into their dub house tracks, including aspects of trance, hip-hop and funk. They’ve been on the rise since making a huge splash in 2011 with their official remix of Avicii’s “Sweet Dreams.” Since then, they’ve become the only group to have ever played the Ultra Music Festival’s headline stage three times in two years. Since launching their EJECT project on Spotify, Cazzette has topped Billboard’s dance charts and garnered a combined eight million views on Vevo/YouTube. With an album coming on PRMD, through Island Def Jam Music Group, Cazzette is poised to become a major force in electronic music. Jeff Sutphen: Jeff Sutphen has a great talent for creating shows that engage kids and teens, whether he is behind the camera or in front of an audience. As host of

Nickelodeon’s “Figure It Out,” Sutphen brings high-energy and laughs to the game show which challenges celebrities to guess kid contestants’ unique talents and skills. Prior to “Figure It Out,” Sutphen hosted all three seasons of Nickelodeon’s Emmy-nominated hit “BrainSurge,” for which he also served as a producer. He most recently hosted the ABC summer game show “101 Ways to Leave a Game Show” from the producers of “Wipeout” and completed the first episode of his Web talk show, “The Garage Show With Jeff Sutphen,” in which he interviews celebrity guests from the comfort of his own garage (thegarageshowwithjeff.com). The Grounds Festival offers a wide range of interactive activities as well as a chance for children of all ages to test their skills, hit with top tennis pros, win prizes and enjoy music: l Hess Express Stage: The Grounds Festival’s free concert featuring upand-coming musical talent including pop/R&B group Lucki Gurlz, Atlantic Records artist Trevor Jackson, Disney Channel’s “Shake It Up!” star Kenton Duty, New York’s own CityKids and “Summer Forever” songstress Megan

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

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Nicole. Additional acts to be confirmed. YouthTennis.com: Learn real tennis and have fun doing it using racquets, balls and courts that are sized right for kids so they enjoy the game right from the start. Hess Express Obstacle Course: Test agility, balance, running and tennis skills on the engaging and challenging obstacle course. From Nickelodeon: Live appearances by characters from your favorite Nickelodeon shows. Nike Tennis SPARQ Challenge: Tennis and skill activities on two courts featuring Nike sponsored athletes. USTA Serves/Aetna Tennis Skills: Activity stations for very young kids or special populations. Stations include rolling balls with racquets and bouncing Koosh balls. Esurance Champions of the Court: Exciting doubles play for all levels. Which team will win Champions of the Court? Hess Target Time: Intermediate and advanced-level kids can test their skills hitting targets and win prizes. Xerox Beat the Pro: Challenge the best playing points against some of the top touring and teaching pros in the world. IBM Speedzone: Just like the pros, utilize IBM’s speed serve technology to test the power behind your shot. PTR 10 & Under Tennis: Hit with PTR-certified pros on mini-courts at full speed and with complete strokes using a special restricted flight foam ball. USPTA 10 & Under Tennis: USPTAcertified teaching professionals host this court consisting of 30 colorful hitting stations using a variety of teaching aids. Also: Watch the Pros Practice, Player Autographs, Juggling Workshop, FacePainting, Hair Beading and Braiding, Storytelling, Roving Entertainers and more.


2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW Kids comment on the U.S. Open experience Every summer, Long Island Tennis Magazine visits dozens of tennis camps. This summer during our travels, we asked kids at all the camps the following question: “If you had a chance to play in the U.S. Open, how would you feel and who would you want to play against?” Here are some of the answers from our local tennis players: Victoria Carol (age 11, Point Set Indoor Racquet Club): “I would be really proud of myself to play in the U.S. Open and would definitely want to play Azarenka.” Kevin Carbone (age 12, Future Stars Camp Farmingdale): “Playing in the U.S. Open would be great because tennis is a fun sport. I would want to play Djokovic, Nadal or Federer because I would need someone to give me a challenge.” Katherine Changtroraleke (age 16, Early Hit Training Center): “I’ve been to the U.S. Open a few times and think it would be an awesome experience to play there. I would either want to play Novak Djokovic or Serena Williams because to me, they are the best players out there.” Vivian Cheng (age 18, Bethpage Park Tennis Center): “Amazing. It would be very special to represent my country. I would want to play Li Na.” Pavel Gromov (age 13, Sportime Massapequa): “Nervous because the whole world can see if I mess up, and I would love to play Federer.” Nikhil Jaiswal (age 12, Deer Park Tennis Center): “I go to the U.S. Open every year with my parents and friends, and I would want to play Nadal because of how fast he is.”

Sarah Josinsky (age 10, Sportime Bethpage): “Happy, scared and afraid of getting beaten. I would choose Maria Sharapova as my opponent.” Christine Kong (age 11, U.S. Sports Camp): “I have been to the U.S. Open, and I would want to play Serena Williams because she hits the ball harder than any of the women’s players.”

against Serena Williams because she is the best women’s player right now.” Grace McGinley (age 11, Centercourt Athletic Club): “It would be a dream come true with everyone watching and coming to see you. I want to play Maria Sharapova because she is one of my favorite female tennis players.”

Michael Liuim (age 14, New York Tennis Academy): “Even though he retired, I would want to play Andy Roddick at the U.S. Open.”

Ben (age 9, Rockville Racquet Club): I would be flattered and thankful to be at the U.S. Open. I would want to play either Federer or Djokovic if I had the chance.”

Tim Macca (age 14, Sportime Bethpage): “Amazing—it’s always been a dream of mine since I was a little kid. I would play Djokovic.”

Kendall (age 14, Sportime Lynbrook): “It would be the most amazing dream in the entire world! I would want to play against Sloane Stephens at the event.”

Nathanya McCalla (age 13, Sportime Syosset): “It would be fun to play in the U.S. Open because I’ve only ever watched it on TV. I would want to play

Mitchell (age 15, Carefree Racquet Club): “I would be very honored to be playing with the greats. The opponent I would choose would be Roger Federer.”

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW 2013 U.S. Open Match Schedule SUBJECT TO CHANGE Date/Session

Day/Evening

Time

Featured Matches

Monday, August 26 1 2

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s First Round Men’s/Women’s First Round

Tuesday, August 27 3 4

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s First Round Men’s/Women’s First Round

Wednesday, August 28 5 6

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s First Round/Women’s Second Round Men’s/Women’s Second Round

Thursday, August 29 7 8

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s Second Round Men’s/Women’s Second Round

Friday, August 30 9 10

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s Second Round/Women’s Third Round Men’s Second Round/Women’s Third Round

Saturday, August 31 11 12

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s Third Round Men’s/Women’s Third Round

Sunday, September 1 13 14

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s Third Round/Women’s Round of 16 Men’s Third Round/Women’s Round of 16

Monday, September 2 15 16

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s Round of 16 Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Tuesday, September 3 17 18

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinals Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinals

Wednesday, September 4 19 20

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s and/or Women’s Quarterfinals Men’s and/or Women’s Quarterfinals

Thursday, September 5 21 22

Day Evening

11:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

Men’s Quarterfinals Men’s Quarterfinals

Friday, September 6 23

Day

11:00 a.m.

Women’s Semifinals/Mixed-Doubles Final

Saturday, September 7 24

Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s Semifinals/Women’s Doubles Final

Sunday, September 8 25

Day

Noon

Women’s Final/Men’s Doubles Final

Monday, September 9 2013 •5:00 LITennisMag.com 58 Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 26 Day p.m. Men’s Final


COMING IN NOVEMBER

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By Lisa Dodson n the last issue, we started discussing the major differences between the serve and the overhead. Hopefully you have started cleaning up your overhead technique by improving your movement, balance and preparation for this important shot. If you have, you may now be looking forward to hitting your overhead instead of avoiding it. Let’s do a quick review of the major similarities and differences between the serve and overhead:

I

Similarities l Sideways set-up with Continental grip

r o f e v r e S r

O r e l l a Ki

d a e verh

Power (Points C, D & E). When you are serving, you are in complete control of the situation, so choosing your contact point is really a matter of choice and practice. There are three main l Relaxed arms and legs types of serves: Flat, Slice and Kick. Typl Use a “throwing” action with the hit arm ically, players start by hitting a flat serve l Power attained through use of legs, because they initially hold a forehand trunk, shoulders, rotation and pronation grip. A flat serve seems easier because a l Power is achieved by forward contact full racket face with all the string area point going towards the ball gives a higher sucl Potentially a power shot cess rate. In an ideal world, the Continental grip should be learned first, Differences therefore developing the slice serve. This sets the Serve Overhead edge forA. Stationary shot Movement shot ward to the B. Drop toss and hit arms Raise non-dominant and hit arms ball and alC. Contact hitting “up” Contact hitting “down” lows the D. Contact point varies Contact point needs to be the same hand, wrist, E. Accurate, versatile, high Overpowering shot for power forearm, percentage shot with a elbow and potential for power shoulder to F. Drive up off front or both legs Drive up off front, both or back leg move natuG. Follow through is longer Follow through is short rally in a “throwing” For your next phase of improvement, motion. It also prepares the player for let’s concentrate on Contact Point for learning the more complex kick serve and

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easier understanding of the volley (and all under spin shots). Learning the various serve types allows players to choose the best serve for a situation, keeps the opponent guessing and creates a very high serve percentage Let’s make one thing very clear: Where you toss your ball creates contact point. Place the ball in the path of the moving racket, rather than hunting for the ball and contacting it. It must be predictable, precise and consistent. Tosses should have no spin, excessive speed or arc (except the kick and topspin serve must arc back). Understanding that concept will help both your serve and overhead. Each serve type has its own corresponding toss. It is impossible, for example, to hit a flat serve from a kick toss or a kick serve from a slice toss. The flat and slice serve toss are very similar and often players don’t differentiate between the two and don’t understand why their serve doesn’t work. It’s time to get serious about your toss so that you feel like you are in control of a controllable situation.

Contact point Contact point is equally important on the overhead, but is much more difficult to negotiate. Opponents are attempting to make you fail by throwing up various high balls and lobs with varying spins, speeds, heights, trajectories and angles. You have no direct control of the situation and are constantly fighting to put the ball in a good relationship to your body to hit a successful overhead. It makes sense that the more intentional versatility one has on the serve the better the potential for hitting a great overhead. If you can choose to serve from different tosses then you have a bigger range of places to contact the crazy balls your opponent lobs in your direction. The bigger the range, the more balls you’ll be able to cover. However, the ideal place to contact the ball for the overhead is in the flat (or slice) range. Power If power is what you want on the overhead, then contact the ball out in front of the hitting shoulder. Since overpowering the opponent is the primary objective, success will be yours. After a player has attained

good preparation and movement, the next big task is tracking the ball. Remember that preparation gives you a sideways, balanced position to the net, a prepared racket and an extended non-dominant arm. The non-dominant hand is basically across the body to the right (for right hander) so that the hitter is looking over the forearm. The hand is further to the right and stretched up to “catch” the incoming ball. The non-dominant shoulder is higher than the hitting shoulder and is high under the chin. These common similarities to the serve provide an appropriate amount of turn for a powerful hit (see Figure 1). Figure 1-Jana Juricova, NCAA Singles Champion 2011, Doubles 2009

continued on page 62

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The Serve continued from page 61 Hit “down” when hitting an overhead When hitting a serve, we are hitting “up” to the ball. This is a fairly confusing concept for a lot of players who attempt to hit down on the ball. Simply stated, hitting up means that contact is initiated with the racket head on the way up which creates spin to help bring the ball down. Then, going through the phase of pronation (the hand, wrist, forearm go from an inward to an outward direction) creates a downward direction of the ball. Studies have been done to prove this point and show that even a very tall man hitting at 102 miles per hour must hit up and add some spin or the ball will travel seven feet long of the service line. When hitting an overhead, we want to hit more “down.” Of course, we cannot physically hit the top of the ball, but we want to get more of that feeling. Again by pronating the hand, wrist and forearm one can safely hit down with power to clear the net and keep the ball within court boundaries. In summary, in order to hit the ideal, powerful overhead, first understand where the best contact point is for a flat serve. This ball will always be well forward of you. The challenge on the overhead will be to accurately move into

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great hitting position and be in a good relationship with the ball. Practical homework 1. To understand where the serve toss should generally be for a flat or slice serve Set up to serve, then place your racket on the ground with the butt of the racket off of the left toes and the head in the direction of the right net post (off right toes and left net post for lefty). Toss the ball up to height so that it will land on the racket head. This is proper placement for a power serve. This will help you understand the ideal contact point for the overhead (see Figure 2). Figure 2Amy Jensen, NCAA Doubles Champion 1998, 1999 & 2000

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

2. Stand 10 feet from the net and start in abbreviated position Toss the ball forward and hit it down into the opposite service box. Attempt to hit the ball so that it bounces very high. This will develop hand, wrist and forearm action (pronation) and help you learn to hit “down” on the ball for the overhead (See Figures 3 & 4)

Figures 3 & 4-Kat Winterhalter, Women’s Assistant Coach at St. Mary’s College

Okay, it’s time to get to work. Check in the next issue for better leg use on the serve and overhead. Lisa Dodson is owner of The Total Serve, a USPTA Pro 1, and a formerly WTA worldranked player. She may be reached by email at ldodson57@yahoo.com or visit www.thetotalserve.com.


Everything You Need to Know About Cramps and Nutrition By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN verybody knows that fluid imbalances and mild dehydration can trigger muscle cramping. Although, we know that muscle cramps can and do occur with severe dehydration and heat injury, there is no conclusive evidence that consuming adequate fluid with or without electrolytes will prevent typical nocturnal or exercise-associated cramping. In fact, studies have found that runners, cyclists and triathletes who develop cramps during an endurance event are no more likely to be dehydrated or to have lost greater amounts of bodily water than are those who do not develop cramps during the same race. A diet, complete in specific vitamins and minerals, can prevent muscle cramping. Here are some nutrients that can prevent muscle cramping, if incorporated in proper amounts into one’s diet, your chances of being cramp-free during a long match can greatly improve. Sodium is one of the main positively charged mineral ions or electrolytes in body fluid. The body needs sodium to

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help maintain normal body-fluid balance and blood pressure, and in conjunction with several other electrolytes, it is critical for nerve impulse generation and muscle contraction. Sodium is distributed widely in nature, but is found in rather small amounts in most unprocessed foods. An athlete should not consume a low sodium diet and should always drink regular Gatorade to prevent sodium deficiency. Current guidelines for sodium intake is 2,300 milligrams of sodium—about one teaspoon of salt (one teaspoon [six grams] contains 2,325 milligrams). Potassium is the major electrolyte found inside all body cells, including muscle and nerve cells. It works in close association with sodium and chloride in the generation of electrical impulses in the nerves and the muscles, including the heart muscle. Potassium is found in most foods, but is especially abundant in fresh vegetables, potatoes, certain fruits (melons, bananas, berries and citrus fruits), milk and meat. Calcium found in the body is found in the skeleton where it lends strength to bone. Calcium is involved in muscle contractions, including that of the heart,

skeletal muscles, and smooth muscle found in blood vessels and intestines, as well as the generation of nerve impulses. Blood calcium is tightly controlled and regulated by several hormones, including parathyroid hormone and Vitamin D. Adding an extra glass of milk and yogurt for breakfast will assist in helping prevent cramping as well. Magnesium plays an important role in stabilizing adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy source for muscle contraction, and also serves as an electrolyte in body fluids. Muscle weakness, muscle twitching and muscle cramps are common symptoms of magnesium deficiency. For example, three ounces of broiled halibut has 91 milligrams of magnesium, and a serving of an artichoke has 101 milligrams, but the grains are the richest in magnesium, one cup of grain, ranging from 100-300 milligrams of magnesium. A registered dietitian, specializing in sports nutrition, can prepare an individual balanced meal plan, including all the proper nutrients to ensure an excellent athletic performance, one that is crampfree!

Irina Belfer-Lehat is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. She may be reached by phone at (917) 769-8031 or e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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You Cannot be Serious by John McEnroe With James Kaplan By Brent Shearer t’s a good thing the editors at Long Island Tennis Magazine asked me to review John McEnroe’s book, You Cannot be Serious, because I discovered a big, fat lie on page 260. Describing a February 1991 match against his brother, Patrick, John McEnroe says he was serving at match point when a phone rang. The older McEnroe brother looked at his father who was sitting at courtside and said, “Dad, mom’s on the phone.” John writes “That was when, for one of the few times in my life, I actually said something funny.” But John McEnroe says funny things all the time. He says them when he’s commenting on matches on TV. And one of the things that makes You Cannot be Serious one of the best sports autobiographies ever, is that he says a lot of them in the book. As New York area tennis fans, we all know a lot about the McEnroes, especially if we can remember wood racquets. For better or worse, McEnroe and Jimmy Connors were nearly bigger than the game when they played. A lot of people, including John in this book, say that his career would have been better if the tennis world had held him to stricter standards while he was playing. But that’s water over the dam now. Among the things you have to admire about

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

John McEnroe is his willingness to try new things, to explore worlds where his tennis skills don’t matter. He opened an art gallery, he had TV show and he’s always been a music-oriented guy as a fan and as a player. Not only is he honest, and yes, frequently funny about his tennis career in the book, but he has a number of great stories about his missteps hanging out with and playing with musicians. If there has ever been a meeting of two, volatile Irish artistic geniuses to top one story McEnroe relates, I don’t know what it could be. Okay, maybe it was when the young writer James Joyce told the older writer William Butler Yeats, “You’re too old. I can’t help you.” Anyway, McEnroe tells the story of going backstage after a Bob Dylan concert in London in 1994. “I go into a room that had five people in it: Dylan, the musician Chrissie Hynde, ex-Beatle George Harrison and his son Dhani, and one guy I didn’t recognize. I went up to the guy and said, “I’m John McEnroe, who are you?” He said, “I’m Bozo the freaking clown.” McEnroe found himself out-McEnroe’d by a guy even more prone to pissing off his audiences than he was. Tennis’ bad boy had met another performer for whom smashing glassware at a Davis Cup tie in Sweden would have been just a warm-up. The fifth person was the incomparable musician, the Belfast Cowboy, Van Morrison. One way to read this book is absorb the tennis stuff along the way, but to key in on the arts stuff because it shows that John McEnroe has talents way beyond the court.


For example, I didn’t know that McEnroe’s wife, singer Patty Smyth, had been married to one of the godfathers of NY’s CBGB punk rock scene in the 1970s, the guy who taught English punk bands to tear their shirts, Richard Hell. What other sports star cannot recognize Van Morrison and be married to someone who probably hung out with Blondie, Televi-

sion and the other Patti Smith? And because I know John McEnroe has a sense of humor, I have to mention that the book’s cover photo, a reenactment of the famous James Dean photo in Times Square, is marred by the goofy coat they put him in. But the book isn’t perfect because McEnroe mentions meeting Lars Ulrich from Metallica without mentioning that

Lars’ dad, Torben, was the original tennis pro/jazz musician/hippie who played on the tour in the 50s and 60s. You Cannot be Serious is a masterpiece that all tennis fans, especially if they’re also into music, should read. Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.

COMING IN NOVEMBER 2013 This edition will feature:

Distribution scheduled for 11/01/13

• Coaches Roundtable Discussion • Tennis Travel Destination Guide • Holiday Gift Guide • Looking Ahead to 2013

• Experts in elimination of termites, carpenter ants and other wood boring insects • Residential and commercial pest control maintenance programs • Experienced pest control professionals for over 25 years • Nassau, Suffolk, Queens County and Brooklyn • References available • Certified Pesticide Applicator NYS #C1-625256

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An International Competition You Know Little About By Lonnie Mitchel he players, spectators and fans are about to embark on a two-week journey known as the U.S. Open Championships at Flushing Meadows, N.Y., the final Grand Slam event of the year. If you are an American tennis fan, you are likely going to watch a lot of tennis on television or perhaps you will scramble for tickets to see the matches live. What tennis fan during this time of year is not engrossed and intrigued by the action? Halfway around the world, nearly 6,000 miles from Flushing Meadows was a tennis event that 95 percent of the tennis reading public did not know about that took place just a few short weeks ago. The Maccabiah Games takes place in Israel every four years, one year after Olympic Competition, bringing more than 6,000 athletes from around the world to compete in Israel making it the third largest sporting event in the world behind the Olympics and Pan American Games. Among those 6,000 athletes are more than 300 athletes competing in tennis for

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gold, silver and bronze medals from many age groups. This year, I was honored to be named one of the coaches for the American team for Grand Masters Tennis. With Head Coach Bob Litwin, we coached many senior players to 17 medals for them to bring back to the United States. More importantly, our game has transcended tennis to bring people from the world over to compete on a high level and to share pride in their Jewish heritage. Tennis is the tool used to show the world that people, although of the same religion still coming from different cultures, can put aside their differences and compete inside the lines. The rules of tennis are the same all over the world, and a racquet and ball are the instruments used to communicate in a way which is understood by all. We watch our four major Grand Slams every year, and each Slam has a level of anticipation which always seems different from the previous year. Who will emerge the champion … who will be upset … what newcomers will emerge? Many questions need to be answered, and after two weeks of heated competition, they are.

However, with little fanfare other than in the world of the Maccabiah Games athletes, is a tennis competition that needs to have a footnote in the world’s stage. The United States tennis players marched into a stadium with over 40,000 spectators to rousing applause and with an entertainment spectacle as thrilling as any Olympic Games or Super Bowl. They competed in the hot Middle-Eastern sun every day in thrilling matches and hardly anyone in the States knew this event was taking place. It was thrilling and every bit as worthy of any world-renowned competition because it was just that, “an international competition.” Many thanks to those who went abroad for two weeks and represented their country and heritage and played the game we love. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was an assistant coach to Team USA for the Maccabiah Games in Israel this summer for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com


LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

directory Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 • catsrvc@gmail.com

Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 • tennis@pwta.com • www.pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 • www.rwtt.com

Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road • Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 (516) 676-9107 • www.rwtt.com

Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com

Rockville Racquet Club Colleen Woods—Manager 80 North Centre Avenue • Rockville Center, NY 11570 (516) 764-5350 • rockvilletennis@optonline.net

Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones—Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 (631) 363-2882 • www.easternathleticclubs.com

Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 • hli@Ross.org • www.ross.org/tennis

Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 271-6616 • www.easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones—Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 (631) 753-3696 • www.easternathleticclubs.com Glen Head Racquet Club Home of Early Hit Training Center 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 • glenheadrc@verizon.net Karl Sommer: (516) 676-9849 • earlyhit@optonline.net Long Beach Tennis Center Sid Siddiqui—Director of Tennis 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, NY 11561 (516) 432-6060 • www.longbeachtenniscenter.com info@longbeachtenniscenter.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive • Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 • tonny@pointsettennis.com www.pointsettennis.com

Shinnecock Tennis Club 125 Sandy Hollow Road Southhampton, NY 11968 (631) 283-3422 www.shinnecocktennisclub.com

SPORTIME Lynbrook Jeff Morys—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 • jmorys@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lynbrook SPORTIME Massapequa Chris Leahy—General Manager 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, NY 11758 (516) 799-3550 • cleahy@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/massapequa SPORTIME Quogue Will Van Rensburg—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead, Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 (631) 653-6767 • tdhamptons@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/quogue SPORTIME Randall’s Island Manhattan Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Felix Alvarado—Assistant Director of Tennis One Randall’s Island • New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 • falvarado@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—Regional Director Landing Road, PO Box 1 • Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 • jharris@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/roslyn

SPORTIME Amagansett Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • amagansett@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett

SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Robert Kendrick—Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 • rkendrick@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/syosset-tennis

SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Long Island Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 • mkossoff@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-tennis

SPORTIME Lake Isle Westchester Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Brian Inglis—General Manager 660 White Plains Road • Eastchester, NY 10709 (914) 777-5151 • binglis@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lake-isle

SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 731-4432 • rlouie@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-multi-sport

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11568 (718) 760-6200 • www.usta.com

SPORTIME Kings Park Claudio Yamus—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 cyamus@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/kings-park

World Gym Bay Shore Tracie Forsythe—Director of Tennis 225 Howells Road • Bay Shore, NY 11706 (631) 456-0994 • tracieforsythe@yahoo.com www.worldgymbayshore.com

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LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 08/05/13)

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Timothy Lewis Chiu ..........Holtsville, N.Y. 2 ........Luke Karniewich ................Glen Head, N.Y. 3 ........Sohrob Yavari ....................Syosset, N.Y. 4 ........Tommy George Srisuro ....Garden City, N.Y. 5 ........Kian Louis Ghazvini ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 6 ........Robert Steven Bellino ......Huntington, N.Y. 7 ........Justin Benjamin Oresky ....Syosset, N.Y. 8 ........Alexander Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 9 ........Christopher Grisham ........Huntington, N.Y. 10 ......Louie Kotler........................Roslyn, N.Y. 11 ......Sol Yoon ............................Commack, N.Y. 12 ......Michael Wexler ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 13 ......Aryan Kumar Sethi ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 14 ......Bradford J. Lin ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 15 ......Lazar Ivan Markovic ..........Lattingtown, N.Y. 16 ......Arin Siriamonthep..............Greenvale, N.Y. 17 ......Amani Siddiqui ..................West Babylon, N.Y. 18 ......Rohan Gaddam Reddy ....Glen Head, N.Y. 19 ......Justin McMackin ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 20 ......Yoel Andre Yamus ............Deer Park, N.Y. 21 ......Abhinav Raj Srivastava ....Melville, N.Y. 22 ......Jared M. Phillips ................Plainview, N.Y. 23 ......Mark Ryan Taranov ..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 24 ......Valentine Le Goupil-Maier Oceanside, N.Y. 25 ......Adrian Kristofer Tsui ..........Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 26 ......Richard James Kelly..........Manhasset, N.Y. 27 ......Henry Bilicic ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 28 ......Jared Lake ........................Hewlett, N.Y. 29 ......Michael Hayden Singer ....Greenlawn, N.Y. 30 ......Gunnar S. Overstrom ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 31 ......Alexander Hom..................Manhasset, N.Y. 32 ......Michael Weitz ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 33 ......Jack Flores ........................Huntington, N.Y. 34 ......Ravi MacGurn....................Amagansett, N.Y. 35 ......Brandon Zhu......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 36 ......Alexander Aronow ............Syosset, N.Y. 37 ......Rehan Melwani..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 38 ......Jacob Buchbinder ............Roslyn, N.Y. 39 ......George Scribner Bader ....Water Mill, N.Y. 40 ......Jack Louchheim ................Sagaponack, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Serge Ushkevich-Zezulin ..Sands Point, N.Y. 2 ........Jay Burkett ........................Syosset, N.Y. 3 ........Alexander Roti ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 4 ........Justin Ullman ....................Huntington Station, N.Y. 5 ........Connor Leaf ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 6 ........Simar Sawhney..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7 ........Matthew Terlovsky ............Merrick, N.Y. 8 ........Jack Cameron Goldman ..Old Westbury, N.Y. 9 ........Peter Yu..............................Smithtown, N.Y. 10 ......Curran Varma ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 11 ......Evan Kirsh..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 12 ......Tyler London ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 13 ......Matthew T. Roberts ..........Setauket, N.Y. 14 ......Tyler Neirman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ......Leonard Lazar Koblence ..Jericho, N.Y. 16 ......Ian Mitchell Capell ............Woodbury, N.Y. 17 ......Joonho Ko..........................Huntington, N.Y. 18 ......Marco Ammirati ................Halesite, N.Y. 19 ......Matthew Lee Catton..........Woodbury, N.Y.

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ISLAND

20 ......Adam Bradley Wilck..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 21 ......Matthew Reid Zapken ......Roslyn, N.Y. 22 ......Cameron Klepper ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 23 ......Carl Grant ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 24 ......Sangjin, Song ....................Rosyln Heights, N.Y. 25 ......Matthew Kolkhorst ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 26 ......Saiteja Damineni................Albertson, N.Y. 27 ......Ian Bank ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 28 ......Spencer Lowitt ..................Syosset, N.Y. 29 ......Robert Sangirardi ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 30 ......Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 31 ......Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 32 ......Christopher Kokkinos........Manhasset, N.Y. 33 ......David Ammendola ............Massapequa, N.Y. 34 ......Jeffrey M. McDonnell ........Glen Cove, N.Y. 35 ......Josh Antell..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 36 ......Daniel Hyunjae Chang ......Manhasset, N.Y. 37 ......Zachary Ian Khazzam........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 38 ......Lynus Arevalo Fortaleza....North Babylon, N.Y. 39 ......Justin Lempert ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 40 ......Jagger Gillman ..................Glen Head, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Matthew Bahar ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 2 ........Nick John Stamatos..........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 3 ........Jay Burkett ........................Syosset, N.Y. 4 ........Kenneth Edward Fox ........Smithtown, N.Y. 5 ........Nicholas Troiano ................Oakdale, N.Y. 6 ........Kenneth Francis Chiu........Holtsville, N.Y. 7 ........Simar Deep Sawhney ......New Hyde Park, N.Y. 8 ........Harris Durkovic ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 9 ........Vincent Tozzi ......................North Babylon, N.Y. 10 ......Jake Sandler......................Lynbrook, N.Y. 11 ......George Carmi ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 12 ......Faran Nazir ........................Deer Park, N.Y. 13 ......Florimond Goupil-Maier....Oceanside, N.Y. 14 ......Evan Nierman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ......Zane Siddiqui ....................Long Beach, N.Y. 16 ......Jordan Diamond................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 17 ......George Robert Muller........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 18 ......Benjamin Craddock ..........Stony Brook, N.Y. 19 ......Patrick Sean Lombardi......Halesite, N.Y. 20 ......Joonho Ko..........................Huntington, N.Y. 21 ......Mitchell Reid Berger..........Lake Grove, N.Y. 22 ......Evan Lowitt ........................Syosset, N.Y. 23 ......Saiteja Damineni................Albertson, N.Y. 24 ......Drew Greenberg ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 25 ......Kevin Alec Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ......Jack Aaron Briamonte ......Great Neck, N.Y. 27 ......Curran Varma ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 28 ......Evan Kober ........................Wantaugh, N.Y. 29 ......Jonathan Eisenson............Saint James, N.Y. 30 ......Arnav Raj Srivastava ........Melville, N.Y. 31 ......Jason Gerber ....................Commack, N.Y. 32 ......Jake Parker Cohen............Oceanside, N.Y. 33 ......Jack Ian Lindenman..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34 ......Connor Dove......................Baldwin, N.Y. 35 ......Spencer Lowitt ..................Syosset, N.Y. 36 ......Robert Sangirardi ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 37 ......Christopher McGorty ........Bellmore, N.Y. 38 ......Derek Menker ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 39 ......Brandon Jay Nomberg......Deer Park, N.Y. 40 ......Matthew Holweger............Manhasset, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles

RANKINGS

5 ........Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 6 ........Chirag A. Doshi..................Sands Point, N.Y. 7 ........Joshua Sydney..................East Northport, N.Y. 8 ........Adam Diaz..........................Bellerose Village, N.Y. 9 ........Jonathon Ochoa................Hicksville, N.Y. 10 ......Rajan Jai Vohra..................Glen Head, N.Y. 11 ......Tyler Grosse ......................Bayport, N.Y. 12 ......Henry Tell............................Woodbury, N.Y. 13 ......Cole Laffitte........................East Setauket, N.Y. 14 ......Joseph James D’orazio ....Saint James, N.Y. 15 ......Jeremy Morgenbesser ......Bayport, N.Y. 16 ......Evan Nierman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ......Troy Michael Haas ............Huntington Station, N.Y. 18 ......David Kim ..........................Commack, N.Y. 19 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar........Massapequa, N.Y. 20 ......Timothy Sorenson ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 21 ......Michael Liebman ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 22 ......Max E. Huffman ................Bayport, N.Y. 23 ......Chris Buckley ....................Bohemia, N.Y. 24 ......Michael Brian LeMonda....Garden City, NY 25 ......Anurag Thotkura................Hicksville, N.Y. 26 ......Cory Harris Weinstein........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 27 ......Antonio Michael Grillo ......Melville, N.Y. 28 ......Christopher Peter Kramer Valley Stream, N.Y. 29 ......Connor Gould ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 30 ......Joshua A. Fried..................Plainville, N.Y. 31 ......Tyler Richard Nuss ............Setauket, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Alexis Madison Huber ......Melville, N.Y. 2 ........Julia Gentile........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 3 ........Madeline Richmond ..........Syosset, N.Y. 4 ........Denise Lai ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 5 ........Madeline A. Clinton ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 6 ........Madelyn Kay Germano ....Islip, N.Y. 7 ........Alina Rebeca Lyakhov ......Great Neck, N.Y. 8 ........Ivanna Nikolic ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 9 ........Gabriela Sciarrotta ............Woodmere, N.Y. 10 ......Jill Olga Lawrence ............Hauppauge, N.Y. 11 ......Evangelia Maria Frankis ....Manhasset, N.Y. 12 ......Brianna Loeffler..................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ......Hannah Vinod Abraham....Syosset, N.Y. 14 ......Lauren Hutton....................Huntington, N.Y. 15 ......Lucia Hu ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 16 ......Kaya Amin..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 17 ......Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 18 ......Brooke Ann Fernandez ....Shirley, N.Y. 19 ......Margaret Esther Haykin ....Great Neck, N.Y. 20 ......Kavina Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 21 ......Sofia Rose Anzalone ........Center Moriches, N.Y. 22 ......Ally Friedman ....................East Hampton, N.Y. 23 ......Grace Isabel Riviezzo........Syosset, N.Y. 24 ......Kristina Pali ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 25 ......Morena DeVito ..................Syosset, N.Y. 26 ......Hannah Rose Niggemeier Sayville, N.Y. 27 ......Madison Jane Williams ....Glen Cove, N.Y. 28 ......Julianna Marie Romeo ......Massapequa, N.Y. 29 ......Rebecca E. Suarez............Huntington, N.Y. 30 ......Rebecca Kuperschmid ....East Hampton, N.Y. 31 ......Lauren Zola ........................Rockville Center, N.Y. 32 ......Sarah Gunasekera ............Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 33 ......Sarah Jayne Lubow ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 34 ......Allison Cooney ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 35 ......Olivia Broder ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Matthew Bahar ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 2 ........Nick John Stamatos..........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 3 ........Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Florimond Goupil-Maier....Oceanside, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Samantha Lena Galu ........Jericho, N.Y. 2 ........Rachel Weiss ....................Great Neck, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

3 ........Emily Rose Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 4 ........Julieta Eulau ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 5 ........Stephanie Cole ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 6 ........Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 7 ........Christina Lorraine Jud ......Glen Head, N.Y. 8 ........Rachel Flynn Collins..........Port Jefferson, N.Y. 9 ........Lauren Gold ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 10 ......Brooke Emila Digia ............Manhasset, N.Y. 11 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes....................Massapequa, N.Y. 12 ......Riley Elizabeth Katzman....Halesite, N.Y. 13 ......Victoria Anna Bialczak ......New Hyde Park, N.Y. 14 ......Madeline A. Clinton ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 15 ......Rachel Hirschheimer ........Jericho, N.Y. 16 ......Erica Forrest ......................Jericho, N.Y. 17 ......Evangelia Maria Frankis ....Manhasset, N.Y. 18 ......Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ..Lynbrook, N.Y. 19 ......Mina Sarcevic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 20 ......Isabelle Policarpio..............Rocky Point, N.Y. 21 ......Olivia Faulhaber ................Saint James, N.Y. 22 ......Michelle Roitgarts..............Roslyn, N.Y. 23 ......Kerri Leah Goldfuss ..........Westbury, N.Y. 24 ......Stephanie Zelenetz............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 25 ......Danah Han ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26 ......Trinity Chow ......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 27 ......Fiona Stocks-Lyons ..........Glen Cove, N.Y. 28 ......Carly Menker......................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ......Jacqueline Guidice............East Northport, N.Y. 30 ......Jade Fixon-Owoo..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 31 ......Kimilya Egalite....................West Hempstead, N.Y. 32 ......Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 33 ......Olivia Rose Scordo............Glen Head, N.Y. 34 ......Julia Gentile........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 35 ......Lucia Hu ............................Roslyn, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Danielle Mirabella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 2 ........Katherine Changtroraleke ..Greenvale, N.Y. 3 ........Michelle Carnovale............Massapequa, N.Y. 4 ........Emily Kate Shutman..........Huntington, N.Y. 5 ........Sabrina Ferretti ..................Setauket, N.Y. 6 ........Rebecca Stern ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 7 ........Sarah Seeman ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 8 ........Noa Alexandra Dubin........Southampton, N.Y. 9 ........Elena Maria Nastasi ..........Bayville, N.Y. 10 ......Laura Jean Halsey ............Westhampton, N.Y. 11 ......Adele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 12 ......Rachel Weiss ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 13 ......Rini Halder..........................Huntington, N.Y. 14 ......Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 15 ......Courtney Connors ............Manhasset, N.Y. 16 ......Courtney Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 17 ......Claudia M. Ruiz..................Glen Head, N.Y. 18 ......Cameron Leigh Moskol ....Wantagh, N.Y. 19 ......Victoria Makulik ................Medford, N.Y. 20 ......Lauren Difazio....................Greenlawn, N.Y. 21 ......Sophie Grace Wilson ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 22 ......Lindsay Jane Haley ..........Hicksville, N.Y. 23 ......Caitlin Falvey......................Setauket, N.Y. 24 ......Rachel Flynn Collins..........Port Jefferson, N.Y. 25 ......Grace Graham ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 26 ......Stefanie Ebo ......................Sayville, N.Y. 27 ......Rosa LaCorte ....................Merrick, N.Y. 28 ......Nia Gilliam..........................Central Islip, N.Y. 29 ......Elizabeth Sossan ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 30 ......Ellen Nicole Huhulea ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 31 ......Mara Danielle Stewart ......Oceanside, N.Y. 32 ......Julia Khan ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 33 ......Fiona Stocks-Lyons ..........Glen Cove, N.Y. 34 ......Victoria Evelyn Villalba ......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 35 ......Emily Rose Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y.


LONG Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Olivia Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 2 ........Veronika Paikin ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 3 ........Katherine Changtroraleke ..Greenvale, N.Y. 4 ........Kerrin Elizabeth Toner ......West Babylon, N.Y. 5 ........Cameron Leigh Moskol ....Wantagh, N.Y. 6 ........Kaitlyn Mead......................Manorville, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 07/31/13)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 2 ........Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 5 ........Ronald P. Hohmann ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 6 ........Neel Raj..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7 ........Spencer Brachman ..........Commack, N.Y. 10 ......Billy G. Suarez....................Huntington, N.Y. 12 ......Kabir Rajpal........................Syosset, N.Y. 15 ......Abhinav Srivastava............Melville, N.Y. 16 ......Benjamin Grossman..........Sands Point, N.Y. 27 ......Niles Ghaffar ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 28 ......Logan Paik Chang ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 31 ......Sujay Sharma ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 32 ......Jack Flores ........................Huntington, N.Y. 42 ......Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 50 ......Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 52 ......Karan K. Amin....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 59 ......Jack Louchheim ................Sagaponack, N.Y. 61 ......Aman K. Sharma ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 72 ......Daniel Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 73 ......Tommy George Srisuro ....Garden City, N.Y. 81 ......Richard James Kelly..........Manhasset, N.Y. 89 ......Rohan Gaddam Reddy ....Glen Head, N.Y. 91 ......Luke Louchheim................Sagaponack, N.Y. 94 ......Jeffrey M. McDonnell ........Glen Cove, N.Y. 105 ....Sam Reichbach ................Syosset, N.Y. 107 ....Alexander Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 116 ....Kian Louis Ghazvini ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 117 ....Luke Torel Karniewich ......Glen Head, N.Y. 119 ....Sohrob Yavari ....................Syosset, N.Y. 120 ....Amani Siddiqui ..................West Babylon, N.Y. 123 ....Adam Lammers ................Central Islip, N.Y. 124 ....Aryan Kumar Sethi ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 129 ....Justin Benjamin Oresky ....Syosset, N.Y. 130 ....Kristofer Adrian Tsul ..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 134 ....Michael Weitz ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 135 ....Timothy Lewis Chiu ..........Holtsville, N.Y. 147 ....Robert Steven Bellino ......Huntington, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 6 ........Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 7 ........Alan Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 8 ........Brian Shi ............................Jericho, N.Y. 9 ........Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y 16 ......Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 22 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito............Syosset, N.Y. 23 ......Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 25 ......Keegan James Morris ......Franklin Square, N.Y. 26 ......Rajan Vohra........................Glen Head, N.Y. 27 ......Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 29 ......Patrick Maloney ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 30 ......Daniel Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 32 ......Gardner Howe ..................Locust Valley, N.Y.

ISLAND

35 ......Yuval Solomon ..................Plainview, N.Y. 38 ......Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 46 ......Daniel Shleimovich............Merrick, N.Y. 50 ......Michael Medvedev............Oceanside, N.Y. 52 ......Neel Raj..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 55 ......Matthew Porges ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 57 ......Ben Snow ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 64 ......Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 72 ......Austin Egna........................Port Washington, N.Y. 82 ......Julian Thomas MacGurn ..Amagansett, N.Y. 88 ......Max Egna ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 89 ......Ronald Hohmann ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 92 ......Benjamin Grossman..........Sands Point, N.Y. 103 ....Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 104 ....Daniel Meinster..................South Setauket, N.Y. 110 ....James Kyrkanides ............Stony Brook, N.Y. 123 ....George Kaslow ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 128 ....Nicolas Demaria ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 129 ....Xin Eric Yu ..........................Manhasset, N.Y. 132 ....Jack Cameron Goldman ..Old Westbury, N.Y. 134 ....Alexander Roti ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 141 ....Timothy Serignese ............Port Washington, N.Y. 142 ....Matthew T. Roberts ..........Setauket, N.Y. 145 ....Adam Bradley Wilick ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 148 ....Daniel Hyunjae Chang ......Manhasset, N.Y. 150 ....Peter Yu..............................Smithtown, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 2 ........Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 3 ........Brenden Volk......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ......Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 21 ......Dennis Uspensky ..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 24 ......Jesse Levitin ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 27 ......Lubomir Cuba....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 30 ......Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 31 ......Bryant Born........................Manhasset, N.Y. 38 ......Athell Patrick Bennett........Valley Stream, N.Y. 42 ......Justin Park ........................Huntington, N.Y. 47 ......Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 49 ......Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 52 ......Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 57 ......Dylan Granat......................Woodbury, N.Y. 58 ......Palmer Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 61 ......Stephen Gruppuso............Bayport, N.Y. 64 ......Michael James DeNigris ..Islip, N.Y. 69 ......Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 71 ......Aziz Rashidzada ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 75 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar........Massapequa, N.Y. 79 ......Brian Hoffarth ....................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 86 ......Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 91 ......Duane Davis ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 92 ......Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 94 ......David Henry Reinharz........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 95 ......Dylan Davis ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 96 ......Joseph James D’Orazio....Saint James, N.Y. 112 ....Chris Kuhnle ......................Shoreham, N.Y. 118 ....Nikhil Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 125 ....Alex Grossman ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 128 ....Nicholas KevinFox ............Commack, N.Y. 131 ....Kyle Hudson Gower..........Oceanside, N.Y. 132 ....Noah Reisch ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 148 ....Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 4 ........Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 10 ......Noah Rubin........................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

RANKINGS

14 ......Vihar Shah..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 19 ......Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 20 ......Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 22 ......Conor Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 26 ......Aidan Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 28 ......Ethan Bogard ....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 32 ......Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 38 ......Alex Sacher........................Glen Head, N.Y. 39 ......Conor Dauer ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 43 ......Dylan Appel........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 48 ......Jonathan Paris ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 58 ......Zain Ali................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 63 ......Jared R. Halstrom..............Bellmore, N.Y. 68 ......Kyle Alper ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 71 ......Benjamin Rosen ................Port Washington, N.Y. 72 ......Philip Daniel Antohi............Glen Head, N.Y. 73 ......Tyler J. Hoffman ................Sayville, N.Y. 76 ......Fernando Filho ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 78 ......Justin Park ........................Huntington, N.Y. 88 ......Douglas Notaris ................Wantagh, N.Y. 89 ......John D’Alessandro............Northport, N.Y. 91 ......Cooper Lacertera ..............Speonk, N.Y. 93 ......Brandon Stone ..................Melville, N.Y. 99 ......Zachary A. Lessen ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 101 ....Kevin Cino..........................East Quogue, N.Y. 104 ....James Edward Heaney ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 109 ....Lubomir Cuba....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 110 ....Henry Tell............................Woodbury, N.Y. 113 ....Dennis Uspensky ..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 115 ....Bryant J. Born....................Manhasset, N.Y. 117 ....Matthew Bahar ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 120 ....Pete Sciozios ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 122 ....Brian Slivonik ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 128 ....Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 135 ....Chirag A. Doshi..................Sands Point, N.Y. 136 ....Matthew R. Demichiel ......Hewlett, N.Y. 138 ....Sander Brenner..................Port Washington, N.Y. 141 ....Joseph James D’Orazio....Saint James, N.Y. 145 ....Cole Lafitte ........................East Setauket, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ......Alexa Susan Goetz............Greenlawn, N.Y. 20 ......Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ......Rachel Arbitman................Hewlett, N.Y. 27 ......Maryam Beshir Ahmad ....Albertson, N.Y. 30 ......Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 44 ......Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 51 ......Denise Lai ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 54 ......Ivanna Nikolic ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 55 ......Madison Jane Williams ....Glen Cove, N.Y. 61 ......Amy Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 72 ......Calista Sha ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 78 ......Gabriela Sciarrotta ............Woodmere, N.Y. 85 ......Lucia Hu ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 92 ......Julia Gentile........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 102 ....Alexis Madison Huber ......Melville, N.Y. 106 ....Madeline Richmond ..........Syosset, N.Y. 108 ....Hannah Vinod Abraham....Syosset, N.Y. 126 ....Madelyn Kay Germano ....Islip, N.Y. 134 ....Rebecca E. Suarez............Huntington, N.Y. 136 ....Alina Rebeca Lyakhov ......Great Neck, N.Y. 139 ....Jade Fixon-Owoo..............Lynbrook, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 5 ........Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 13 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 14 ......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin......Manorville, N.Y. 18 ......Claire Handa ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 24 ......Ashley Lessen....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 43 ......Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Melville, N.Y. 48 ......Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 55 ......Olivia Rose Scordo............Glen Head, N.Y. 56 ......Stephanie Anne Petras ....Manhasset, N.Y. 63 ......Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 69 ......Katelyn Walker ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 70 ......Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 72 ......Courtney Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 78 ......Abigail Carrie Okin ............Amagansett, N.Y. 90 ......Trinity Chow ......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 99 ......Theodora Brebenel............Glen Head, N.Y. 103 ....Mina Sarcevic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 113 ....Emily Rose Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 116 ....Julieta Eulau ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 119 ....Kaitlyn Byrnes....................Massapequa, N.Y. 120 ....Risha Malhotra ..................Syosset, N.Y. 125 ....Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ..Lynbrook, N.Y. 128 ....Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 135 ....Samantha Lena Galu ........Jericho, N.Y. 136 ....Emily Kate Shutman..........Huntington, N.Y. 139 ....Nicole Rezak......................Merrick, N.Y. 140 ....Evangelina Maria Frankis..Manhasset, N.Y. 142 ....Michelle Roitgarts..............Roslyn, N.Y. 147 ....Dasha Dlin..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 150 ....Christina Lorraine Jud ......Glen Head, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 8 ........Amber Policare ..................East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 16 ......Madison Battaglia..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 26 ......Taylor Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 36 ......Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 44 ......Esther Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 48 ......Celeste Rose Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 51 ......Michele Sheila Lehat ........Great Neck, N.Y. 58 ......Stephanie Nakash ............Great Neck, N.Y. 76 ......Katie Jane Cirella ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 77 ......Vanessa Scott....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 79 ......Rhea Malhotra ..................Syosset, N.Y. 89 ......Julia Khan ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 91 ......Courtney B. Kowalsky ......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 94 ......Amanda Allison Foo ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 98 ......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 102 ....Abigail Claire Okin ............Amagansett, N.Y. 107 ....Sarah Seeman ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 111 ....Danielle Mirabella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 114 ....Katherine Changtroraleke ..Greenvale, N.Y. 115 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin......Manorville, N.Y. 118 ....Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 120 ....Dominique Woinarowski ..Syosset, N.Y. 123 ....Ashley Lessen....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 124 ....Noa Alexandra Dubin........Southampton, N.Y. 125 ....Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi Bayville, N.Y. 126 ....Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 130 ....Rini Halder..........................Huntington, N.Y. 135 ....Maria Diaz Juarez ..............East Hampton, N.Y. 136 ....Ellen Nicole Huhulea ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 137 ....Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 138 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Melville, N.Y. 140 ....Adele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 147 ....Rebecca Stern ..................Dix Hills, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City

Rank Name ............................City 28 ......Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 129 ....Madison Battaglia..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 247 ....Taylor Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 259 ....Amber Policare ..................East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 382 ....Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 590 ....Julia Khan ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 712 ....Vanessa L. Scott................Dix Hills, N.Y. 817 ....Rhea Malhotra ..................Syosset, N.Y. 829 ....Esther Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 923 ....Celeste Rose Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 1006 ..Stephanie Nakash ............Great Neck, N.Y. 1241 ..Katie Jane Cirella ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 1455 ..Michele Sheila Lehat ........Great Neck, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

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National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players

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Rank Name ............................City 48 ......Brian Shi ............................Jericho, N.Y. 69 ......Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 157 ....Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 177 ....Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Rank Name ............................City 9 ........Noah B. Rubin ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 73 ......Daniel Grundberger ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 190 ....Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 202 ....Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 230 ....Lamar Remy ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 233 ....Dennis Uspensky ..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 301 ....Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 347 ....Aidan Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 385 ....Vihar Shah..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 465 ....Ethan Bogard ....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 517 ....Philip Daniel Antohi............Glen Head, N.Y. 637 ....Conor Dauer ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 691 ....Alex Sacher........................Glen Head, N.Y. 788 ....John P. D’Alessandro ........Northport, N.Y.

Rank Name ............................City 161 ....Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 254 ....Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 280 ....Ashley Lessen....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 430 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 464 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin......Manorville, N.Y. 982 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Melville, N.Y. 1005 ..Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1216 ..Theodora Brebenel............Glen Head, N.Y. 1247 ..Katelyn Walker ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 1254 ..Stephanie Anne Petras ....Manhasset, N.Y. 1360 ..Nicole Keilan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y.

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National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players

ub

2 ........Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 9 ........Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 14 ......Ronald P. Hohmann ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ......Neel Raj..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 57 ......Spencer Brachman ..........Commack, N.Y. 70 ......Billy Suarez ........................Huntington, N.Y. 105 ....Abhinav Raj Srivastava ....Melville, N.Y. 110 ....Kabir Rajpal........................Syosset, N.Y. 112 ....Logan Paik Chang ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 160 ....Benjamin Grossman..........Sands Point, N.Y. 245 ....Niles Ghaffar ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 292 ....Sujay Sharma ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 362 ....Jack Flores ........................Huntington, N.Y. 432 ....Karan Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 526 ....Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 597 ....Richard James Kelly..........Manhasset, N.Y. 626 ....Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 765 ....Alexander Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 1035 ..Benjamin Reichbach ........Syosset, N.Y. 1127 ..Daniel Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 1250 ..Sam Reichbach ................Syosset, N.Y.

Rank Name ............................City 9 ........Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 121 ....Alexa Goetz........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 122 ....Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 182 ....Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 209 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ....Albertson, N.Y. 254 ....Rachel Arbitman................Hewlett, N.Y. 491 ....Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 505 ....Madison Jane Williams ....Glen Cove, N.Y. 588 ....Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 552 ....Denise Lai ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 877 ....Kimberly Liao ....................Commack, N.Y. 1089 ..Ivanna Nikolic ....................Glen Head, N.Y.

d.

BOYS

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players

Rank Name ............................City 168 ....Aleksandra Mally ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 432 ....Sophie Barnard..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 450 ....Amber Nicole Policare ......East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 500 ....Sunaina Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 529 ....Vivan Cheng ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 561 ....Claudia Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 572 ....Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 748 ....Rithika Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 751 ....Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 802 ....Paulina Tafler......................Oceanside, N.Y. 825 ....Taylor S. Cosme ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 1218 ..Bridget Elaine Harding ......Northport, N.Y. 1260 ..Lauren Ann Livingston ......Sands Point, N.Y. 1488 ..Sara Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y.

ions, Lt

(as of 08/07/13)

Rank Name ............................City 14 ......Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 21 ......Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 32 ......Dennis Uspensky ..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 47 ......Brenden Andrew Volk........Dix Hills, N.Y. 181 ....Lubomir Cuba....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 188 ....Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 200 ....Bryant Born........................Manhasset, N.Y. 307 ....Jesse Levitin ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 340 ....Athell Patrick Bennett........Valley Stream, N.Y. 359 ....Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 547 ....Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 597 ....Justin Park ........................Huntington, N.Y. 681 ....Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 771 ....Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 772 ....Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 807 ....Dylan Granat......................Woodbury, N.Y. 850 ....Palmer Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 858 ....Michael James DeNigris ..Islip, N.Y. 1027 ..Dylan Davis ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1166 ..Brian Hoffarth ....................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 1168 ..Nasser Abdel Ghaffar........Massapequa, N.Y. 1336 ..Andy Zhou..........................Commack, N.Y. 1347 ..Brian Shi ............................Jericho, N.Y. 1365 ..Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1375 ..Chris Kuhnle ......................Shoreham, N.Y. 1407 ..Joseph James D’Orazio....Saint James, N.Y.

GIRLS

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players

licat

Boys & Girls National Rankings

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

826 ....Conor Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 833 ....Dylan Hobbs Appel ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 933 ....Brandon T. Stone ..............Melville, N.Y. 971 ....Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 981 ....Zain Ali................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1038 ..Benjamin Rosen ................Port Washington, N.Y. 1041 ..Jared Halstrom ..................Bellmore, N.Y. 1061 ..Jonathan Paris ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 1311 ..Douglas Notaris ................Wantagh, N.Y. 1334 ..Zach Lessen ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 1425 ..Kyle Alper ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y.

ub

Rank Name ............................City 4 ........Aleksandra Mally ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 20 ......Sophie Barnard..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 21 ......Amber Nicole Policare ......East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 28 ......Sunaina Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 32 ......Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 37 ......Bridget Elaine Harding ......Northport, N.Y. 38 ......Paulina Tafler......................Oceanside, N.Y. 40 ......Claudia Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 45 ......Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 47 ......Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 58 ......Vivian Cheng......................Woodbury, N.Y. 59 ......Rithika Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 61 ......Alexandra Linder................Sands Point, N.Y. 66 ......Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 69 ......Emma Brezel......................Port Washington, N.Y. 76 ......Brittany Burke....................Garden City, N.Y. 77 ......Michele Sheila Lehat ........Great Neck, N.Y. 82 ......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 83 ......Lauren Ann Livingston ......Sands Points, N.Y. 84 ......Sara Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y. 85 ......Cameron Leigh Moskol ....Wantagh, N.Y. 86 ......Madison Battaglia..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 88 ......Bridget Connors ................East Quogue, N.Y. 96 ......Stephanie Nakash ............Great Neck, N.Y. 99 ......Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 103 ....Allison Gabrielle Huber......Melville, N.Y. 118 ....Olivia Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 129 ....Laura Torsiello....................Bayport, N.Y. 135 ....Esther Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 141 ....Katie Jane Cirella ..............Woodbury, N.Y.

218 ....Alan Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 232 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito............Syosset, N.Y. 270 ....Keegan James Morris ......Franklin Square, N.Y. 295 ....Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 297 ....Patrick Maloney ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 336 ....Rajan Jai Vohra..................Glen Head, N.Y. 412 ....Yuval Solomon ..................Plainview, N.Y. 463 ....Daniel Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 474 ....Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 476 ....Gardner Howe ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 606 ....Michael Medvedev............Oceanside, N.Y. 674 ....Matthew Franklin Porges..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 678 ....Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 762 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 805 ....Daniel Shleimovich............Syosset, N.Y. 830 ....Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 1062 ..James Kyrkanides ............Stony Brook, N.Y. 1217 ..Neel Raj..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 1240 ..Daniel Meinster..................South Setauket, N.Y. 1279 ..Nicolas Demaria ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 1342 ..Ben Snow ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 1352 ..Austin Egna........................Port Washington, N.Y. 1377 ..Brady Berman....................Jericho, N.Y. 1499 ..Benjamin Sands ................ Point, N.Y.

RANKINGS

nited Sports P

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region

ISLAND

•U

LONG


USTA/Long Island Region 2013

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. SEPTEMBER 2013 Friday-Sunday, September 13-15 L1B Sportime Lynbrook September Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, September 13-15 L1B Sportime Syosset Fall Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(12)s, SE; QuickStart: BG(10 [78’Court/Green Ball])s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L2O EAC Fall Classic Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(16-14)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $60.97 per player For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L3 LBTC Eastern UPS Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(18-12)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, September 13-15 L1B Long Beach Fall Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(18-16)sd, SE; XJ(18-16)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 & Sunday, September 29 L1 Point Set September Championships Point Set Indoor Racquet Club 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG(18)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 15 at 11:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323.

Friday-Sunday, September 13-15 L3 Huntington Eastern UPS Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street • Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(18-12)s, RR; QuickStart: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 9 at 4:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L2O Kings Park Sportime September Open Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(18-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L3 Sportime Kings Park Eastern UPS Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(14-12)s, RR; QuickStart: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Saturday, September 28 L3 Sportime Syosset September UPS Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG(14-12)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

OCTOBER 2013 Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 L2R Sportime Lynbrook October Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(18-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 & Friday-Monday, October 11-14 +L1 RWTTC Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G(12)sd, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 & Friday-Monday, October 11-14 +L1 PWTA Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 4 FIC Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G(16)s, FIC; G(16)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 883-6425. Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 & October 11-13 L1 Huntington Indoor Fall Championships Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street • Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG(10 [78’Court/Green Ball])s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 6:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Friday-Sunday, October 11-13 L2R Sportime Lynbrook October Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate G(16-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

71


USTA/Long Island Region 2013

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, October 18-20 L3 Sportime Kings Park Eastern UPS Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(14-12)s, RR; QuickStart: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, October 11-13 L1B LBTC October Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Oct. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, October 11-13 L1B EAC October Challenger Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18-16)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Monday, October 11-14 L2R Deer Park Tennis October Regional Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 667-3476.

Friday-Sunday, October 18-20 L1B Sportime Massapequa October Challenger Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger G(14)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Oct. 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550. Friday-Sunday, October 18-20 L1B Long Beach October Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG(18-16,12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Oct. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Saturday, October 19 L3 Sportime Bethpage 10U 8U October UPS Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: QuickStart BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball] ,8 [36’Court/Red Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $38.13 per player For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, October 25-27 L2O Sportime Kings Park Fall Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, October 25-27 L2O Sportime Syosset October Open Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG(18-16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Oct. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, October 25-27 L1 Sportime Bethpage Ron Smyth Memorial Championships Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG(16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, October 25-27 L1 Eastern Athletic Fall Championships Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG(14)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, call (631) 363-2882.


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Long Island Tennis Magazine September/October 2013  
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