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Shaking Off Pressure Like the Fed By Luke Jensen I believe Roger Federer will go down as so much more than a great tennis player. He was a transitional player in many aspects. Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi handed him the torch to improve upon the state of the game. Up to that point, the Pro Tour was dominated by Americans. Federer and his generation changed all that. Today’s pro game is truly European and growing even stronger. The world rankings on both the ATP and WTA Tours say everything about the strength and growth of European tennis. I believe that Federer playing with such class and grace has been easy for American tennis fans to embrace more international stars. There will never be another player with

such timing and technique that could win on all surfaces and with different styles. Roger has the rare ability to play fast without looking like he is going fast. He rarely seems rushed or pressed. He always seems relaxed, and even down two sets to one and a match point in the Wimbledon final, he was able to fight back and send the match into the fifth set because he never panics under pressure. I can tell immediately when most players are winning or losing. Not Roger! He knows that revealing negative emotion reveals weakness in a sport where big points are won by mentally tough players. So, the next time you take the court for a match or a practice, take a page from the great Fed! Play with poise and be aware of negative body language that helps strengthen your opponent’s resolve. This is not easy to do … it’s extremely difficult to

be honest! But, as Federer has shown us, you can win a ton of pressure points if you allow missed shots to just glide off your back as smooth as a Roger Federer slice backhand. Good luck and keep going for the lines! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lbjensen@syr.edu.

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GROW TENNIS

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Table Of Contents

2014 U.S. Open Preview: Wozniacki Gets Dow in Flushing Meadows

Previewing the stars as they get set to take over New York at the 2014 U.S. Open, wit tenders, pretenders and sleepers … the sights, the sounds, the dining, the attractio is the final Grand Slam of 2014 right in our own backyard. See page 18

Feature Stories 4

Grow Tennis New York: St. John’s Duo Takes Crown at LI Tennis Challenge Engineers Country Club hosted more than 100 tennis players who competed for prizes at the Long Island Tennis Challenge.

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The Next Generation of American Juniors By Andrew Eichenholz Andrew Eichenholz takes a closer look at the future of the American men’s tennis field, profiling local Noah Rubin, Jared Donaldson, Francis Tiafoe and Stefan Kozlov.

14 Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Tennis Pros By Steven Kaplan Steve Kaplan takes a look at getting back to the glory days of tennis in the United States.

50 Maslau and Weymar Take Shot at Mixed-Doubles Glory By Andrew Eichenholz Two Long Islanders advance for a shot at the mixed-doubles draw at the 2014 U.S. Open.

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Additional Features 11 44 49 54 56 57

Tennis Travel Destinations: Mauna Kea Beach Hotel New York Beach Tennis Shines on Crest Hollow CC Centercourt Hosts Antigua Performance Apparel Men’s Tournament City Parks Foundation Continues to Open New Doors Acknowledge the Good, Don’t Criticize the Bad By Andrew Eichenholz Mini-Tennis By Miguel Cervantes III

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Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports


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SEPT./OCT. 2014 Vol 6, No 5

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff

wn to Business

th a closer look at the conns and the pageantry that

David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com

Cover photo credit: Elsa

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director

Columns 1 12 16 34 37 38 40 42 46 48 52 53 58 59 62

The Jensen Zone: Shaking Off Pressure Like the Fed By Luke Jensen Tennis Medicine: ACL Reconstruction By Dr. Eric Price We Will Feel Your Presence at Flushing Meadows … Just Remember Us for at Least a Moment By Lonnie Mitchel Tennis Injury Prevention: Tennis Elbow Is Not the Only Injury to Avoid By Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller The Pink Elephant is BACK on the Court: Five More Things Your Child Won’t Tell You By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters By Ricky Becker Fitness & Nutrition: Snacking Your Way to On-Court Success By Irina Belfer-Lehat, RD, CDN Hidden Secrets of the Greats: Jimmy Connors By Dr. Tom Ferraro Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives: L.I. Teens Host Points for Patriots Fundraiser for Vets Long Island Tennis Club Directory Long Island Rankings USTA/Long Island Region 2014 Tournament Schedule

s Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2014 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Matt Cohen Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 306 Brian Coleman Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • brianc@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Beverly Bolnick National Sales Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Scott Koondel Office Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Andrew Eichenholz Editorial Contributor

Kelly Keenan Intern

Michael Cervantes Editorial Contributor

Michele Lehat Intern

Calvin Rhoden Staff Photographer

Michael Liebman Intern

Sarah Sklar Intern

Samantha Sklar Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. 3 Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.


GROW TENNIS

Grow Tennis New York St. John’s Duo Takes Crown at Long Island Tennis Challenge he Long Island Tennis Challenge, hosted by Long Island Tennis Magazine took place at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. and featured a day of free tennis instruction, as well as four divisions of play for all levels. With close to 100 players participating, it was a day of non-stop tennis, which included college players, former high school state champions, and some of the best players in the local area. The event consisted of round-robin play, leading up to the championship and consolation matches.

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In the Men’s “A” Division, Gary Kushnirovic & Gustavo Loza (Team Harley, sponsored by Dana Resnick) defeated Jay Harris & Cameron Daniels, who were representing Sportime, to win the tournament. Kushnirovic, a recent graduate of St. John’s where he played his college tennis, and Loza, the assistant coach of the St. John’s tennis team, beat Harris & Daniels 6-3 in a hard-fought title match. “I think the biggest thing that helped us was we had played once before together,” said Kushnirovic, who previously played

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

with Loza in a tournament at the La Jolla Tennis and Beach Club in California. “I am normally a singles player, so my volleys aren’t great but Gustavo was so solid.” Each team held serve through the first five games, until the St. John’s duo notched a pivotal break point to go ahead 4-2. “When you play to just one set each game becomes bigger and bigger,” said Loza, who currently resides in Queens via Mexico. “You need to stay focused and hold serve, which we did, and got a great opportunity to get a key break point.” The break point allowed the duo to seize control of the match. The seventh game went to deuce following an excellent backhand return from Daniels, but the St. John’s team held serve to bolster their lead to a commanding 5-2 margin. Daniels, who will be taking his tennis talents to Connecticut’s Wesleyan College in the fall, held serve in the following game to bring the set to 3-5. That put the ball back on Kushnirovich’s racket, and with serves over 130 miles per hour, he and Loza closed out the set and match. “I really enjoyed coming out for this today. Thank you to Long Island Tennis Magazine and Engineers Country Club for putting this event together” said Kushnirovic, who graduated from St. John’s this past spring. “This is the second time I have


Long Island Tennis Magazine Challenge participants gather for a photo at Engineers Country Club

played here, we played in the Pro-Am last year, and it was just a nice environment and the people were great. There was a lot of competitive tennis.” The combination of power and finesse were evident on the St. John’s side as Kushnirovic’s power game clicked well with the accuracy of Loza. “We complimented each other really well,” said Loza after the match. “He has the power game and I have good placement, so we work well together.” While there could only be one winner of the tournament, all of those who participated enjoyed a wonderful afternoon at Engineers. “It was a really great event,” said Harris, who serves as regional manager of Sportime Syosset, Bethpage and Roslyn. “There was a lot of really solid play, tight competition, and the members here at Engineers were all great. They got involved in the clinic before the tournament began and it made for a very nice day.” In the Men’s “B” Division, the finals came down to a matchup between Engineers’ own Jerry Finestone and his partner, John Harkavy, who would face off against another long-time Engineers Country Club member, Mike Paulenoff, and his partner, Edwin Mosquera. In the end, Finestone & Harkavy were crowned LI Tennis Challenge

Champions, as the duo defeated Paulenoff & Mosquera 6-2 in a well-played match. What made the win even more impressive was that it was Finestone & Harkavy’s first time playing together. After the match, Finestone said, “The competition was excellent. We consistently got stronger and played better together throughout the round-robin part of the tournament.” The duo were clearly playing their best tennis of the day when they stepped on to the court for the finals.

“I thought Engineers hosted an outstanding event,” said Harkavy. “I also really enjoyed watching the ‘A’ Division play their matches. The level of play was tremendous.” Paulenoff said, “Edwin and I had partnered up twice before and developed a nice synergy, so we decided to enter as a team. I am so thrilled that we were very competitive against such excellent competition. We will be back to take the trophy continued on page 6

Israel Tennis Centers Mission to Israel Live A 5 Star Experience! See, hear and feel Israel like never before!! • October 18 – 28, 2014 • Meet amazing people, stay in luxurious hotels and eat magnificent meals • Spend time with the children of the ITC Space is limited. To make a reservation, call Jacqueline Glodstein, ITC VP/Development, at 646-884-7450 or email jglodstein@israeltenniscenters.org or register online at http://www.daattravel.com/israel-tennis-centers-2014-israel-trip.aspx

www.israeltenniscenters.org LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Men’s “A” Division winners Gustavo Loza & Gary Kushnirovic with runners-up Cameron Daniels & Jay Harris at Engineers Country Club

Brown University’s Hannah Camhi in the Women’s “A” Division Final

Jay Harris of Sportime leads the free clinic prior to the start of the Long Island Tennis Magazine Challenge

grow tennis new york continued from page 5 next year! I thoroughly enjoyed playing in The Long Island Tennis Challenge. The format was excellent, Long Island Tennis Magazine and the staff of Engineers ran an excellent event and Engineers Country Club was a terrific venue for this tournament.” Mosquera added, “I brought my wife and kids with me today because I assumed we would leave for our summer vacation right

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after Mike and I were eliminated from the round-robin. I never thought with such great competition that we would make it all the way to the finals. The start of my vacation was a bit delayed.” In the Women’s “A” Division, all eyes were on the big finals showdown featuring Brown University’s Hannah Camhi and her partner, Jennifer Kellner, who played for Notre Dame

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Jennifer Kellner took home the W

(both representing Bethpage Park Tennis Center), taking on Shelby Talcott who plays for the University of Iowa and Madalina Florea from the New York Institute of Technology on center court. Camhi & Kellner started strong, opening up a 3-0 lead, but their opponents made a three-game run of their own to even the match at 3-3. Each team used heavy balls to keep their opponents off balance. In the end, with the help of Kellner’s steady and deep shots, and Camhi’s net play, the duo was able to close out the match and claim the championship, 6-3. Camhi, a sophomore who plays for Brown and a former Syosset High School standout, admitted both her and her partner Kellner were a little off early as they have not had their regular training during their off season this summer. The pair seemed to get their footing as the tournament progressed. “The biggest challenge for me during the tournament was dealing with the clay court’s tricky bounces,” Camhi noted. “All of collegiate tennis is on hard courts, so that took some getting used to.” Her partner Kellner, a Notre Dame student and former Hauppauge High School player said, “Having Hannah at the net really helped lead us to the win.” All four players put on a great show that the crowd truly appreciated. In the Women’s “B” Final, Laurie Karol &


(pictured) along with Hannah Camhi Women’s “A” Division title

Women’s “B” Division winners Laurie Karol & Karen Ruben with one of their supporters who was on hand to cheer the duo on to the win

Karen Ruben were the winners as they took the LI Tennis Challenge crown with an impressive 6-1 finals win over Marjorie Slonim & Lauren Shannon. After the match, all four players expressed how much they enjoyed the tournament. “We felt great out there,” said Rubin. Her partner Karol added, “We had a lot of support … many were cheering for us.” The support was evident as some of the team’s supporters even had t-shirts on showing support for the Rubin/Karol tandem.

Men’s “B” Division champs Jerry Finestone & John Harkavy with their finals opponents Mike Paulenoff & Edwin Mosquera

Slonim & Shannon played well through the pool play, but ran out of steam in the finals. The duo is already looking ahead to the next LI Tennis Challenge. Slonim said, “It was a great match and a ton of fun! We definitely will be back next time!” Shannon added, “It was our first time playing together, and we definitely will be back.” The most important thing is that it was a great event and that players of varying lev-

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els enjoyed their experience, which will bring them back on the court again. This event was another part of the Long Island Tennis Magazine Summer Series, which has been a huge success for the local community this summer. The tournament was directed swiftly and efficiently by Engineers Country Club’s Dean Nogrady and Emilie Katz. The beautiful Country Club was the perfect setting for the event. The free clinic by Sportime Roslyn in the morning, led by Jay Harris, set the tone and the players did the rest.

OPE YEAR-R N OUND

18 GOODFRIEND DRIVE E A S T H A M P TO N , N Y

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Next Genera of American Jun L I ’s N oah Rub i n e ar ns si ng le s a n d d o u b le s w ild c a r d s p o t s i n 2 0 14 BY ANDREW EICHENHOLZ

ong Island’s own Noah Rubin was in his third semifinal at the USTA Boys National Championships in the 18-year old division. The first two times, he fell short, failing to reach the final. Up 5-1 in the third set of a grinding battle against the 11th

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ranked junior player in the world, Michael Mmoh, Rubin was on the verge of breaking his curse. In the blink of an eye, that 5-1 lead came apart and the scoreboard read 5-5. A double break lead had slipped away … a plot twist, to say the least. Scratching and clawing for every point, as he has become known for, Rubin fought back to defeat Mmoh and move on to the finals. A finals appearance in Kalamazoo guarantees a spot in the US Open Qualifying Tournament, a win in Kalamazoo, however, earns a wild card entry into the U.S. Open main draw. After being awarded a wild card into last year’s qualifying tournament, it is safe to say that Rubin did not go back to Kalamazoo, Mich. to do it again. He wanted to earn his shot in the main draw of the U.S. Open. Facing Collin Altamirano of Yuba City,

Calif., the defending champion at the tournament and a feisty competitor at that, the native New Yorker had himself a challenge. Yet, with timely spot-serving, patient baseline play and pure speed, Rubin found himself playing very solid tennis. In the first set, just like in the semis, Noah was up a double break. Again, it looked like it might disappear after losing one of the breaks. However, this time, the Wake Forest-bound freshman reversed the script, serving it out to grab a one-set lead. Second set? Pretty much exactly the same. Another double break lead for Rubin was nearly erased before he calmly held his second chance for the set at love with an impressive serving display to put himself on the verge of one of the biggest wins of his life. Early on in the third, Rubin looked like he


could run away with it. He broke Altamirano and consolidated it to lead 2-0, frustrating the defending champion to no end. Rubin is the one better known for his fiery attitude on the court, yet the University of Virginiabound Altamirano was chastising himself at every twist and turn. There had to be another shift in momentum, as Altamirano got his mental game together long enough to take his first lead in a set since 1-0 in the opener, grabbing a 32 third set lead. Once again, Rubin stayed calm to hold and grab the break back again. Yet another set, another chance to hold out for the victory. The very next game, Rubin faced 0-40, three break points for his opponent to

ation iors

U . S . O pen m a i n d r aw throw a wrench into his plans. However, this time, Rubin played extremely solid baseline tennis, hanging on in rallies which, at points, favored Altamirano. He would hold and break to win the best-of-five set match for the main draw wild card into the U.S. Open. Noah Rubin was the winner of the USTA National Championships, 6-4, 64, 6-3. He also won the doubles title with partner Stefan Kozlov, earning another wild card into the main draw of the Open. Noah will be duking it out with the very best in the world in two draws, with the possibility of getting drawn against the likes of Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and the Bryan Brothers. In early July, Rubin defeated who would eventually be his doubles partner, Stefan Kozlov, in three tough sets that lasted over two hours 6-4, 4-6, 6-3 to win the Boys Junior Wimbledon Championship. Rubin

came to Wimbledon having played just one other junior event this season, the Junior French Open, as he had been playing Challengers and Futures. Due to the lack of junior tournaments this year, he was forced to qualify to earn a spot in the main draw of the Wimbledon Juniors. He took the challenge and breezed through qualifiers and then battled through the main draw enroute to eight total victories and the 2014 Junior Wimbledon Championship. The Boys Wimbledon Final marked only the second-ever all-American boys’ final at Wimbledon and the first since 1977 when Van Winnitsky defeated Eliot Teltscher, with Rubin becoming the first American to win the title since 2007 when Donald Young hoisted the championship. Three of the junior boys semifinalists at Wimbledon were American, including 16-year-old Taylor Fritz of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.—the first such occurrence at a Grand Slam since the 2000 U.S. Open when Andy Roddick, Robby Ginepri and Ytai Abougzir were all in the final three. For now, the Wake Forest-bound Rubin is in the focus of the spotlight as he heads to play at Flushing Meadows, but recent outbursts of the red, white and blue show that there are plenty of youngsters fighting their way to the top of the game to join the likes of John Isner and the recent crop of Americans currently on the ATP Pro Tour. People question the state of American tennis, especially on the boys side, and soon slowly but surely, Noah Rubin and the emerging crop of American juniors will show that they have what it takes to change skeptics’ minds. In addition to Noah, here are a few other American juniors to watch out for:

Jared Donaldson Jared Donaldson, the Kalamazoo finalist

from a year ago has been on fewer radars than any other up-and-comer, yet he has the most physically mature game of any American. After suffering a pretty humbling loss in the final of the 18-year old National Championships in Michigan, which provides a wild card into the main draw of the U.S. Open for the champion and qualifying for the runner-up, Donaldson had a chance to show fans at Flushing Meadows who he is. Would he be the mentally fragile talent that he showed at Kalamazoo, or the mature tennis player that professionals aspire to be? Playing Farrukh Dustov, a physically imposing opponent to have to face in the first major tournament of Donaldson’s career, he passed with flying colors. He got a taste of what his career will consist of, guys that hit a bigger ball than juniors do, with more spin, location and depth. Donaldson impressed with his consistency, hitting a pretty heavy ball for his age, forcing Dustov into errors. Now what will translate best to the next level was the change of direction Donaldson showed. Players in the top-50 in the world even have a stroke that they aren’t willing to take to different areas of the court, yet Donaldson exudes a confidence in yanking the ball side to side, line to line whenever he wants. If one wanted to search YouTube videos of the youngster, they’d see that he quite frequently disengages cross court rallies to change direction, helping him open up the court. Perhaps one of the more important qualities of a player in today’s age is their serve. In an era in which so many giants rely on tiebreakers, it is important to have a holdable serve, especially after the first fault. Second serve points won is one of the more reliable storytellers of a match. Whoever takes a higher percentage of those points consistently wins the match, and Donaldson has a clean and efficient motion, allowing him to keep opponents off of the offensive, at least for the first shot of the rally. His biggest issue moving forward will be his mental game. Against Dustov, he showed tremendous positive emotion, keeping himself together in a three continued on page 10


the next generation of american juniors continued from page 9 set war. On other occasions, he will nitpick every shot he hits. Does Nadal complain about every shanked forehand? A mental game is arguably more important than any physical trait, and if Donaldson can pull a 180-degree turn in that department, something that many of today’s stars had to do at his age, he can be the next big thing in American tennis. Too many guys go out there without the fire needed to win battles on the court. At least he has it, Donaldson just needs to tame it.

Francis Tiafoe At the Citi Open in Washington, D.C., Francis Tiafoe made his ATP World Tour debut against a solid, under-ranked player in Russian Evgeny Donskoy. Donskoy will end up gaining notoriety as a wily veteran that is solid from the baseline and capable of causing trouble with his groundstrokes, albeit without the big frame usually needed to do so. Bottom line: Not the easiest first big-time match for the 16-year-old. Many will look at the final scoreline of 4 and 4 and see a routine match. In reality, it wasn’t, and the American had a lapse of concentration in each set that let him down. For the rest of the match, it is not out of the realm of reason to claim that he was the better player. Tiafoe has a ridiculous forehand, with racket head speed eerily close to that of the present “next big thing,” Jack Sock. Tiafoe’s ball is slightly flatter, with a bit less height over the net, which causes him to take the ball behind the baseline, when in reality taking it 10

early would be absolutely deadly. It is not crazy to say that if he gives the ball a bit more shape so that he can get it a tad deeper that he will have a top-20 forehand. Now, many will look at the shot and say that it isn’t conventional, with a very “torque-y” swing that as mentioned uses a lot of acceleration and arm. A lot of coaches may want to see a smooth motion like Roger Federer, but more and more guys are having success with a whippy motion. Even in America alone, Sock, Sam Querrey, Bradley Klahn, Steve Johnson and even to an extent, Rhyne Williams, all have very whippy forehands. They’re all playing Grand Slams, so they have to be doing something right. The only thing that may hold Tiafoe back is his serve. With pure athletic ability he hits it and hits it hard, but it is really inefficient, and can become much bigger than it already is. His shoulder turn is nonexistent, which is really the second place power comes from after the lower body pushes off the court. Furthermore, a lack of shoulder turn inhibits repeatability, as the toss being off just a slight bit would throw the whole plane of the serve off. Tiafoe is young, and everything is correctable, but this would improve his game greatly.

Stefan Kozlov Now, it is hard to continue without acknowledging the other young rising stars in our country that have a bright future in this game, but the most complete player, in my opinion, is Stefan Kozlov. Although Stefan is the youngest

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

of this American bunch, he already has the most sound groundstroke game technique-wise. Keeping in mind he hasn’t developed an outstanding shot as of yet, like everything in the game of tennis, new things develop with age. One of those just happens to be explosiveness and power. Already known as a kid that hits an extremely heavy ball for his age, Kozlov, the constant practice partner for pros will eventually have just a little more pace and spin on his ball. At the “big boy” level, this translates to depth and jump onto the opponent. Right now, a big thing for Kozlov will be how his frame develops. If he grows, or works himself into a bigger frame, his ground game could very possibly be the best of any American on tour now, once he really gets into his career. His service motion will also greatly help him as the years tick on, as with the free-swinging, smooth motion that he has, Kozlov will only get more and more pop. Looking at the resumé of a lot of the top juniors, they all have won a big title. Tiafoe won the Orange Bowl, while Noah Rubin just won Wimbledon. Look at Kozlov, and he has had to settle with deep runs at the Slams. No question, those are great accomplishments, but he must be bummed to an extent to have not broken through. Come the U.S. Open, if he makes a run, gets a huge win or anything of the sort, look out for Stefan Kozlov. Andrew Eichenholz is a journalism student at Stony Brook University, where he currently is a staff writer for The Statesman, covering tennis amongst many sports. He grew up playing tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where he learned to love the game, eventually becoming a part time tennis instructor, working for the most part with the QuickStart 10 & Under Program. Andrew has also served as a ballperson at the U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at andrew.eichenholz@stonybrook.edu.


TENNIS TRAVEL DESTINATIONS

A Closer Look at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

What makes Mauna Kea a “Top Tennis Destination?” The legendary Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, an architectural icon designed to coexist beautifully with the unforgettable landscape of the Kohala Coast is located on a silky white-sand crescent beach, Kauna’oa Bay. Escape to paradise where you will find 258 luxurious guest rooms, Laurance S. Rockefeller’s private collection of Asian and Pacific artwork, impeccable service, one of the world’s finest golf courses and tennis club plus tantalizing cuisine with unforgettable settings. The 11-court Seaside Tennis Club is one of the largest and most sought-after tennis experiences in Hawaii. Each one of the 11 courts offer an incredible view of the Pacific blue ocean and on a clear day, you can see Maui in the background. Craig Pautler and his team serve up some of the most thoughtful touches available at the best private luxury tennis clubs, as well as lessons and daily clinics, round robin tourneys, and a comfortable lanai to relax in the shade.

Recent accolades include Top 25 Tennis Resorts and World’s Top 100 Resorts, Tennis Resorts & Camps–Tennis Resorts Online and Top 10 Resorts in the U.S. (biannual)-Tennis Magazine. Facilities and services include 11 oceanside tennis courts, a pro shop offering equipment and apparel, equipment rentals, men and women locker rooms, video instruction service, ball machine, tournament planning, racquet stringing, individual game-matching, customized special events, tennis clinics, round-robin

tournaments, private and group lessons. Enjoy the many other amenities offered at the resort like the weekly Lu’au and Clambake, 2,500-square-foot fitness room and spa just to mention a few. Enjoy some private time at this world-class resort, improve your tennis game while taking in some of the most incredible views in the world and create memories that will be treasured for a lifetime. The club is open 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. daily, and can be reached at (808) 882-5420 or by visitingwww.maunakeabeachhotel.com.

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516-484-4200 LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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TENNIS MEDICINE

By Dr. Eric Price The ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) is a major stabilizing ligament in the knee. A ligament is a dense band of connective tissue, like a

12

ACL Reconstruction

rope or cord. The ACL prevents abnormal movement of the thighbone (femur) on the shinbone (tibia). People with ACL tears often complain that their leg “gives out” and feel that they are unable to trust their leg, especially when they pivot, turn or twist. This

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

sensation is called “instability.” Instability can occur during sports and everyday activities. ACL injuries often occur as a result of an abrupt twisting motion during sports or a fall. Often people say they twisted their knee, felt a pop, and then were unable to walk. Many report that the knee quickly became swollen and filled with fluid. To diagnose an ACL tear, a doctor will take a history and perform a physical examination along with X-rays and often an MRI. Certain abnormal movements occur in the knee after an ACL tear and the doctor can feel these movements during the examination. The X-rays show the bones of the knee and the MRI shows the ACL. Treatment options vary from physical therapy, to bracing, to surgery. Options are best discussed with the doctor. Often, people who wish to resume an active lifestyle choose to have surgery. Some patients need to have physical therapy before surgery to improve motion or strength.


ACL surgery is called a “reconstructive surgery” which means the torn ACL is removed and a new one is placed. A torn ACL will not heal back together, either on its own or if a doctor stitches the torn ends together. Therefore, in order for ACL function to be restored, a new ACL must be made. It is made with a graft which will serve as a replacement ligament. A graft is a piece of tissue from another part of the body or a cadaver. The graft is surgically placed in the proper location in the knee to function as a new ACL. Most of the surgery is done through small incisions with small instruments, but some larger incisions are needed to obtain the graft and place it in its new location. During surgery, the torn ends of the ACL are removed and tunnels are drilled in the shinbone and thighbone. These tunnels allow placement of the graft in the proper location to become the new ACL. The graft is held in place with metal or absorbable screws, stitches or both. Over time, the graft ligament heals to the surrounding tissue and functions as a new ACL.

Patients usually go home the same day, often with a brace on the leg. Recovery after ACL reconstruction surgery is gradual. Several months of physical therapy will be required for a proper recovery. Activity restrictions will apply after surgery until appropriate rehabilitation goals have been achieved. Eventually, running and sports will be permitted.

Dr. Eric Price is a board-certified, fellowship-trained sports medicine specialist with Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group. He takes care of all types of athletes, from pee-wee league players to pros and from weekend warriors to triathletes. As an athlete himself, he understands the need to get people back in their game. Dr. Price’s expertise includes shoulder arthroscopy for repair of rotator cuff tears, dislocations, knee arthroscopy, including ACL and meniscus surgery. He also teaches shoulder arthroscopy as an Associate Master Instructor for the Arthroscopy Association of North America and as a Laboratory Instructor at several shoulder surgery conferences. For more information on Dr. Price scan the QR Code below. To schedule an appointment, call (516) 536-2800 or visit www.orlincohen.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

13


Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Tennis Pros

“… the player development programs which strive to provide ‘a pathway to excellence’ create few new opportunities since skill and ability are the most significant factors for program selection.” By Steve Kaplan American professional tennis success reached a historic low at this year’s Wimbledon, and theories have been thrown around on how to fix this “problem,” but I’m not so sure it’s a “problem.” Maybe it’s an opportunity to reflect and reevaluate what we really value as a culture. Why is it so important to pursue manifest destiny of the tennis world? Isn’t it a bit elitist to define the success of a sport that is enjoyed by millions of American’s and enhances the health and education of countless young people by the ultimate success of a few? Forget about the one percent, that’s the 0.000001 percent! 14

As a tennis coach, I support and root for my students. I’m also a sports fan, and I support the home team like most sports fans, but don’t take this diversion too seriously because it’s an escape from reality and recreation, not the foundation of a happy and prosperous life. Tennis is a vehicle to enhance a broad education, not a substitution for a wellrounded education. If a child defines their self-worth by their second serve, they will almost certainly be a better player, but they will teeter closer to the edge of emotional fragility. Is the slim chance of temporary fame and the even more fleeting chance at making a living worth the emotional and practical cost? Don’t put all your balls in one hopper. Still as American tennis is struggling,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

theories abound. Jose Higueras, high performance director of the USTA, thinks that we don’t see the court and construct points as well as the players from his native Spain because we don’t train on clay. Vamanos Jose … can you see more because of the court surface? Even if such a broad correlation can be made between clay and tactical development, I don’t buy the validity of his argument. Correlation is not causation and this reeks a little too of convenience and ethnocentrism … much like Nike saying that the problem is that we don’t universally wear their sneakers. I also hear that the “Best athletes in this country choose other sports.” Perhaps that is true, but no more than in than in past. Unfortunately, the player devel-


opment programs which strive to provide “a pathway to excellence” create few new opportunities since skill and ability are the most significant factors for program selection. With very few exceptions, you need to have resources invested in you to be selected in the first place so that the very best players are cannibalized from other programs. The shifting of resources is not the creation of opportunities. Players returning from tournaments with stories of getting penalties for whispering “Oh my God” at a national event certainly don’t further the cultural sensibility that tennis is an “inner city” sport attractive to athletes who might otherwise play basketball or football. Brad Gilbert thinks it’s “just a cycle, we can’t stay on top forever,” even though “cycles” repeat and this decline and slump in American professional tennis has never before happened in the history of the sport. Who knows, maybe in another 100 years we will bounce back. I cannot wait, but for now, I think the fault is not in our tennis stars, but in us.

When it comes to success in American tennis, we are the tail wagging the dog. Let’s shift the paradigm and stop complaining about the lack of American tennis dominance because that conversation is part or the problem and a self-fulfilling prophecy that undermines the sport in popular culture. Do we really want to reinforce the notion that tennis is an elitist sport? Why are we failing to dominate the world tennis stage? Perhaps because today, it takes a complete commitment of time and resources at a very young age to succeed, and most Americans feel the educational and emotional price is not worth the remote possibility of the ultimate reward. Tennis fame and fortune is an expensive goal. Every player I know who attended an academy (and I know many) tells me that they would never subject their children to that kind of environment. How many second generation top professionals from the past generation’s elite professionals do we actually see today? Think about it, the former pros who didn’t quite make it sometimes push

their children to be pros, but the top former players, the ones who know exactly what it takes, the hardship talent and luck, rarely do. Tennis excellence is one of the best pathways to the excellence of a better life. Let other countries risk the futures of their children to entertain us by encouraging tennis achievement as the ultimate destination, while we invest in tennis as a pathway to achievement. If we can succeed at using tennis to grow, we can grow tennis. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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We Will Feel Your Presence at Flushing Meadow … Just Remember Us for at

By Lonnie Mitchel So the U.S. Open is just about to begin, and if you are reading this, it is a safe bet that you love tennis and you are conflicted as to whether you are going out tonight or staying in and watching the matches on TV. Do you have tickets? Then off to Flushing Meadows you go, as you watch some great tennis at the place where people love to be seen as new drama unfolds for 14 days. I am jealous of you if you are at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center watching great tennis. As far as professional tennis is concerned, you are at the center of its universe. The game draws you in, and the Open seems to have something for everyone, right down to the stores which sell the newest racquets and gear. If you are a fashion buff, the latest from Adidas, Nike and Reebok will attract you with their latest styles. It is a place where so many senses are stimulated and 16

can extract you from everyday reality. Now comes a little dose of tennis reality for you and let’s share some news from the Eastern, Northern, Southern and Western USA tennis fronts. So what happens in my world of tennis during the two-week period of the U.S. Open? The team I coach at the State University of New York at Oneonta and hundreds of collegiate squads nationwide will be convening on campuses and training for a season of competition. Days before classes begin, student/athlete tennis players will report to school and train, sometimes twice a day for three to four hours per day, preparing for a tennis season that spans eight to 10 weeks. Meanwhile, back in Flushing Meadows, you are witnessing greatness at the U.S. Open, taking in not only illustrious tennis players, but world-class athletes who exhibit their skills that an overwhelming majority can just dream about. Up at my school, some 200 miles north of New York City deep inside the Catskill Mountains, young men and women are working at their craft of just trying to be a

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

good tennis player. They get up early in the morning and train hard just for the opportunity to vie against other collegiate players from a variety of schools against competition from all walks of life. They won’t be getting the accolades of the international press giving them countless hours of attention. The praise these young men and women receive is the reward of competing and the attention they receive is based upon the importance a college places on its tennis program. Crowds of less than 25 people show up to see the matches, and in many colleges, football takes center stage. Thousands show up at the football game and most have, at the very least, a slight peripheral interest in tennis thinking of it as nothing more than a nice recreational activity. They compete on an anonymous stage. So, you flipped on your television, or if you’re lucky enough to be at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, I want you to remember us. We are out there, licking our wounds and drowning our sorrows after a tough loss or celebrating with our teammates


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10 after a hard-fought victory. From the players who cannot attend the U.S. Open because we have other obligations, namely academic obligations and to the tennis team, we send our regards. We want to be there with you to share in the dramatics on the court, but we have our own drama to tend to. The drama at the collegiate level is as equal and compelling as that of the U.S. Open. but it is doubtful you will ever know about it in any great detail. On the next court change or at the commercial break, remember those who cannot be with you and put a positive vibe out into the universe. We appreciate every bit of attention that comes our way. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Credit photo to Matthew Stockman

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2014 U.S. Open Preview Wozniacki gets down to business in Flushing Meadows Former world number one looks to regain top form at U.S. Open BY ANDREW EICHENHOLZ

C

Credit photo to Elsa

aroline Wozniacki has been in the news a lot lately, and for both herself and the tennis community, it has been for all the wrong reasons. With the summer hard court season well under way, the former world number one has a chance to right her woes, and gather momentum for a major run at this year’s U.S. Open. In very public fashion, Rory McIlroy, golf’s world top-ranked golfer, and long-time boyfriend of Wozniacki, decided that he was not ready for marriage. The day after the engaged couple sent their wedding invitations out, McIlroy got cold feet and reached out to Caroline to end their relationship. Even Serena Williams, arguably the most visible figure on the WTA Tour, reached out to Wozniacki through social media to be by her side. The duo have since been spotted spending time together in Miami, accompanying each other to the beach and out in the Miami nightlife. One thing that did go unnoticed was the fall that Wozniacki’s ranking had taken over the last few seasons. After spending an impressive 67 weeks at the top of the world rankings, the Denmark native eventually plummeted all the way to 18th in the world, a far cry from the top spot she once called

home for so long. With the distraction of her relationship out of the way, Wozniacki, known for her defensive prowess and ability to frustrate opponents into losses, has begun to slowly return to form. Showing signs of beginning to step into the ball a bit more to put matches into her own hands, Wozniacki recently won her first title of the season at the Istanbul Cup, beating the top doubles player in the world, Roberta Vinci, in dominating fashion. When Wozniacki returns to New York City for the U.S. Open, which begins main draw play on Aug. 25, she will be able to rely on her previous success to

boost her confidence at the final Grand Slam of the year. Caroline reached her only major final in Flushing Meadows in 2009 where she fell to wild card Kim Clijsters, while also separately fighting her way to two of the three semifinals of her Grand Slam career. Tennis will not be all that Wozniacki has to look forward to in New York at the end of the summer. After the last balls of the season are struck, Wozniacki will return to the city that never sleeps for a different kind of challenge. On Nov. 2, Wozniacki will be participating in the 2014 TCS New York City Marathon. More than just the tennis world will be watching Wozniacki as she attempts to overcome the 26.2 miles which will pose a tough obstacle. She will be competing in the event to raise money in order to support the Team for Kids charity, which benefits children who may not be privileged to certain physical activity programs, which the charity provides through running. For all that Caroline Wozniacki has gone through both on and off the court, she is doing all she can to overcome it. With her results improving, and charity work flowing, look out for Wozniacki as the tennis world descends upon Queens.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

A closer look at the 2014 U.S. Open men’s and women’s draws On the heels of perhaps one of the most exciting Grand Slam tournaments in years at Wimbledon, the U.S. Open comes at a perfect time to answer lingering questions, pull the curtains open on unknown stars, and provide excitement that only tennis in New York City could provide. The Championships at Wimbledon left the tennis world with interesting storylines to ponder heading into the final major of the year. Could a legend maintain what some call his “resurgence?” Will arguably the best female tennis player to ever touch a racket bounce back from an underwhelming year? For the first time in years, both the male and female draws respectively have an air of openness about them. The so-called “Big Four” aren’t as untouchable as they might have been even last year, and the firm grasp that Serena Williams has had on the women’s game is not as concrete as it once was. Does that mean that the big names of the game will fail to take home the crown at Flushing Meadows? No, not at all, but the easy path to the second week of the big tournaments isn’t as breezy anymore. Who will come out on top? The world will have to wait and see, but here is what to look for when the tour takes over New York.

Contenders: The Men’s Draw

Credit photo: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Credit photo: Kenneth B. Goldberg

With Boris Becker in his corner, Novak Djokovic recently overcame what in his world may be a slump, taking his first Grand Slam title in nearly two years, winning the Wimbledon title. In arguably his best “big-moment” performance yet, Novak beat two opponents: Roger Federer and himself. Armed with the best return game of this generation, and possibly of all time, Djokovic should push every opponent he faces back right off the bat. For a man that hasn’t done worse than the quarterfinals at a slam in the last five years, the world number one’s title as “favorite” is well-deserved. 20

Credit photo: Adam Wolfthal

After what was a shocking loss to many on the grass of Wimbledon against Nick Kyrgios, Rafael Nadal looks to come back with a vengeance at Flushing Meadows. The nine-time French Open champion comes to New York with defending a title in his sights. Packing the best lefty forehand to ever grace the tennis court, Nadal will need to step into the court and be aggressive with his serve to set up his major weapon. Although hard court is not Nadal’s best, an on-form Mallorcan is always a contender at any tournament he plays in.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

What can be said about Roger Federer … the man who has won more Grand Slam titles than any male player in the history of tennis? For one, he knows what it takes to win a major championship. After pushing world number one Djokovic to the brink in the 2014 Wimbledon finals, Federer has shown his critics that he isn’t over the hill just yet. In fact, the father of four is playing better tennis than he has in years, and should be a threat on the fast courts of the Open.


2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Pretenders: The Men’s Draw

contend for a title at a place one has never won at before.

Credit photo: Adam Wolfthal

Credit photo: Adam Wolfthal

Tomas Berdych is one of the more confusing players on the ATP Tour. On any given day, he can serve and hit his forehand unlike anybody else on the Tour, much like Robin Soderling once did before his fight with various illnesses. The difference is, it seems as if Berdych has less of a feistiness to him than the top men in the game. This could be totally off base, but it isn’t out of the realm of possibility to see Berdych come up against a big server, and go out in a few tie-break sets before the big Czech could even react.

Credit photo: Adam Wolfthal

The rising Canadian is no up-and-comer anymore, as Milos Raonic has announced to the tennis world that he is in fact here. The giant man with a giant serve has shown that he is nearly unbreakable, hitting the biggest serve on tour, while backing it up with a strong forehand that gives opponents no times to react. Why is he a pretender? His overall defensive skills are not ready to beat the very best in the world. The best returners in the game could neutralize his serve, and is he willing to grind out a four hour win in a groundstroke battle against the likes of Djokovic? Not just yet, not with his backhand.

COME PLAY TENNIS AT THE HOME OF THE US OPEN What a run it has been for Grigor Dimitrov, a guy that previously has been known as “Baby Fed” and the boyfriend of Maria Sharapova. Dimitrov has mentally improved his game to pair a formidable all-around repertoire that can match the shot making output of anybody on tour. Dimitrov will soon make himself known to the world, very probably entering the top five sooner rather than later, but there is something about New York that has troubled the youngster. Three appearances, zero wins. It’s hard to

Sleepers: The Men’s Draw

The man has won a Gold Medal at the Olympics, multiple Grand Slams, yet outside of his hiring of new coach Amelie Mauresmo, Andy Murray has been somewhat out of the discussion. The second best returner in the game, Murray possesses a rare tool: The ability to win by defending. There are very few guys on the ATP Tour who can sit on their heels and still dominate a match. If he is to threaten the likes of Djokovic come the second week of the Open, the Scot, who has recently dropped to his lowest ranking in six years at 10th in the world, will have to be aggressive and attack, to regain the form that won him the Open just a couple of years ago.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Contenders: The Women’s Draw

Marin Cilic was never a huge name for casual fans. The big-serving Croatian has spent his career in a ring of respectability, reaching the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam four times. After a positive drug test made the quiet Cilic fade further from the spotlight, he has come back quietly once again, this time with a vengeance. Goran Ivanisevic has gotten the slingshot server to somehow get more out of his biggest shot, allowing him to hit more aces than all but three other guys on Tour this season, while trailing only two in first serve points won. A dangerous forehand in his arsenal, an on-his-game Cilic will not be an easy out for anybody.

In 2003, Ivo “Dr. Ivo” Karlovic shocked the tennis community by beating thenworld number one Lleyton Hewitt at Wimbledon in the first round. Ever since then, everybody on Tour has feared one of the most intimidating serves in the game of tennis, shooting down from his six-foot, 11-inch frame. The thing is, the Croat now has more than just that in his game. Known for his weak backhand slice of the past, Karlovic has come a long way in hitting over it with his onehander, as well as more consistently thumping his previously big forehand. Forget winning a couple of rounds as he did in that Wimbledon, Karlovic can really go far with the fifth set tiebreak rule in effect. 22

Credit photo: Adam Wolfthal

The story heading into the 2014 U.S. Open for the 17-time Grand Slam champion is quite simple. If she plays well, there is nobody that can hit with Serena Williams off the ground, especially behind her massive serve. Add in the fact that Serena has not advanced past the Round of 16 at a Grand Slam this year, and she will have all of the motivation she needs to push for a good end to the season. An angry Serena is not somebody players want to deal with.

Credit photo: Getty Images Sport

For all intents and purposes, Maria Sharapova has done some things this season that don’t warrant the title of “contender.” Over 200 double faults on the season, the Russian has let her most inconsistent shot get to her, especially on the biggest of stages. Her Grand Slam serving statistics will wow nobody, but she has more than made up for it with her aggressive baseline play. With a second Roland Garros crown under her belt, Maria is hitting the felt off the ball, and with hopes of serving better in Flushing, she should be a favorite.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Quarterfinals, finals and semifinals ... not a bad set of results at the Grand Slams for any player, let alone the Romanian, who has quietly risen to star status on the women’s tour. Simona Halep has an imposing baseline game that is eerily similar to that of Kim Clijsters, minus a couple of inches. In an era where controlled aggression is winning a lot of matches in the women’s game, Halep will have a chance come the second week, should the likes of Williams struggle.

Pretenders: The Women’s Draw

After Petra Kvitova won Wimbledon in 2011, she lost in the first round of the U.S. Open. Will she do so again? Probably not, but Kvitova’s inconsistent, albeit powerful, groundstroke game could falter at any moment. It would be no shock to see the Czech make a solid run, but if she doesn’t serve well, somebody will have a chance to pick her off.


2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

in the road somewhere, and her hopes may be flying out of JFK at the end of the first week.

With all of this in mind, there is still one big thing to look out for…

Aussie, Aussie, Aussie Sleepers: The Women’s Draw Credit photo: Adam Wolfthal

They say that defense wins championships. Unfortunately, the same does not hold true in tennis. Although having the ability to cover the court and force opponents to play an extra ball can get players through the first week of a Grand Slam, it won’t help come the second week. If somebody is on their game, Agnieszka Radwanska’s defense will only hold on for so long, and they will be able to eventually end points on their own terms. Don’t expect a championship run this year.

Credit photo: Adam Wolfthal

Eugenie Bouchard’s second year of Grand Slam play has been a heck of a ride. For arguments sake, the Canadian sensation has outplayed every other female tennis player at the majors, making at least the semifinals of each of the three played so far this season. She has the game to win not a major, but multiple, but it is extremely hard to maintain the consistency she has shown on the big stage. She can hit the ball as well as many, but there has to be a bump

Credit photo: Getty Images Sport

It is extremely hard to call a seven-time Grand Slam champion a sleeper, but Venus Williams will be a very dangerous dark horse at this year’s Open. Serving as strongly as ever, Venus’ always powerful ground game almost eliminated eventual champion Petra Kvitova at Wimbledon. If Venus is firing on all cylinders, look out, she can go a long way.

Australian fans always make for a fun atmosphere at any tournament one of their favorites plays in. This year, the Aussies may have a lot to cheer for as they are playing better tennis than they have in a while. Lleyton Hewitt always brings tremendous fight, Bernard Tomic seems like he may finally be maturing, Samuel Groth fires one of the fastest serves in the game, Marinko Matosevic has recently broken his Grand Slam bugaboo and young guns Nick Kyrgios and Thanasi Kokkinakis are the future of the sport. A run by one of those guys will shock nobody.

Every so often, the tennis world sees former U.S. Open champion Svetlana Kuznetsova pop up. Sporting an explosive motor that propels one of the quickest movers in the game, Kuznetsova puts herself into position to hit a massive forehand. When she’s confident, Svetlana can uncork a ball that opens up the court like few other shots in the game. She hasn’t had the best of years, but it is about that time for her seemingly annual deep run at a Slam.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Total U.S. Open Prize Money Hits Record Mark of $383 Million Photo credit: Eric C. Peck

The USTA has announced that the total purse for the 2014 U.S. Open will increase by $4 million, bringing the total purse for the tournament to a record $38.3 million, an 11.7 percent increase over the 2013 U.S. Open. Both the men’s and women’s singles champions will earn $3 million, the largest payout in U.S. Open history. Each round of the singles competition will see double digit percentage increases over last year’s record payouts. Total main draw prize money, which includes both the singles, doubles, and mixed-doubles competitions, has increased by 12.5 percent over last year. Both the men’s and women’s doubles champions will earn $520,000, the highest total in U.S. Open history. The U.S. Open qualifying tournament will now offer more than $1.5 million in prize money ($1,572,000) for the first time, an 11 percent increase over 2013. In the last three years, U.S. Open main draw prize money has increased by 64.6 percent. Round-by-round individual prize money for the US Open is as follows: Singles

Doubles (each team)

Winner ........................$3,000,000

Winners ..........................$520,000

Runner-Up ..................$1,450,000

Runners-Up....................$250,000

Semifinalist ....................$730,000

Semifinalist ....................$124,450

Quarterfinalist ................$370,250

Quarterfinalist ..................$62,060

Round of 16....................$187,300

Round of 16......................$32,165

Round of 32....................$105,090

Round of 32......................$20,060

Round of 64......................$60,420

Round of 64......................$13,375

Round of 128....................$35,750

“Last year, to recognize the importance of the players and the key role they have in building our sport, the USTA shared our vision to reach $50 million in prize money at the U.S. Open by 2017,” said Dave Haggerty, USTA chairman of the board and president. “This year’s prize money increase continues the commitment to make the U.S. Open one of the most lucrative purses in all of sports.”

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com


2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

U.S. Open Timeline 1881

Begins as a singles men’s tournament, for entertainment purposes only. The United States Championship is held at The Casino in Newport, R.I. Richard D. Sears is the first champion.

1887

Ellen Hansel is the first female singles winner.

1915-1920

The tournaments are held at West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y.

1968

The Open Era begins. Professionals are allowed to compete with amateurs. Name changes to the U.S. Open. Arthur Ashe is the first winner of the newly-named tournament.

1973

The U.S. Open becomes the first Grand Slam tournament to offer equal prize money to male and female winners.

1978

The National Tennis Center at Flushing Meadows Corona Park becomes the site of the U.S. Open.

1997

The stadium used for the tournament inside the USTA National Tennis Center is named Arthur Ashe Stadium.

2006

The USTA National Tennis Center facility, home of the U.S. Open, is renamed the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

Winners of Most Men’s Singles Titles (Post-1968) Jimmy Connors, Pete Sampras & Roger Federer (tied with 5) Winner of Most Women’s Singles Titles (Post-1968) Chris Evert (6) Winner of Most Consecutive Men’s Titles (Post-1968) Roger Federer (5) Winner of Most Consecutive Women’s Titles (Post-1968) Chris Evert (4)

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

2014 U.S. Open restaurant guide Along with the best tennis and entertainment in the world, the U.S. Open offers premium dining experiences—from Mojito, the Cuban-inspired restaurant and bar, to Champions Bar & Grill, a classic American steakhouse. Whether you are in the mood for a light snack, lunch, dinner, meeting friends for cocktails or satisfying a sweet tooth, the U.S. Open’s restaurants can cure any craving.

Aces and Champions Bar & Grill: Vaulted ceilings, vibrant colors and a casual, but elegant wine and sushi bar, combined with superlative seafood offerings, makes Aces the ultimate dining experience. You can also enjoy Aces’ flavorful and sumptuous cuisine in your suite with the Aces Platinum Package Series. Join us for lunch, dinner or after the matches. A contemporary setting with classic leather and wood accents, Champions Bar & Grill is a modern take on the traditional clubhouse atmosphere. The Grill offers premium steaks, hearty chops, fresh seafood, salads and a wide variety of wines. Join us for fun, delicious menu items and the finest cuts of meat and more.

U.S. Open Club: The U.S. Open Club is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium. The Club is available to all Subscription Series ticket holders for the duration of the tournament for a nominal 26

entrance fee, and is included for Silver Loge Box seat holders. With its contemporary décor, the U.S. Open Club Presented by Emirates Airline is famous for its Chef’s Table and seasonal selections of eclectic American cuisine. Restaurant passes are required.

transports you to a dramatic setting in a tropical oasis reminiscent of 1950s Havana. Experience Mojito’s luscious flavors with Latin specialties and cool cocktails either inside or outdoors in our whimsical outdoor garden. Mojito is available for all ticket holders.

Patio Café & Bar: Soak up the beautiful surroundings of the U.S. Open grounds at the expanded outdoor café and bar located outside the U.S. Open Club Presented by Emirates Airline. Enjoy fresh selections of seasonal sandwiches and salads, paired with summer specialty cocktails. The Patio Café & Bar is available to all ticket holders.

Heineken Red Star Café: The Heineken Red Star Café is located next to the South Plaza Fountains. The Heineken Red Star Café sits on the top level of the two-story building, providing guests a spacious, ideal setting to unwind and keep track of the matches while enjoying the Café’s laidback atmosphere and enhanced menus. The U.S. Open Collection Store, located on the ground level, features a complete assortment of 2014 U.S. Open merchandise and mementos alongside a limited selection of Heineken-branded offerings.

Mojito Restaurant & Bar: Mojito, the Open’s Cuban-inspired restaurant,

Moët & Chandon Terrace: The Moët & Chandon Terrace, located next to the

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com


2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Patio Café & Bar, features Moët & Chandon Imperial Champagne, along with full-service bar options. Guests can relax and enjoy a glass of champagne in an outdoor lounge setting.

cocktail, along with Grey Goose specialty cocktails and a full-service bar.

Baseline Cocktails: Come quench your thirst with a full-service bar that includes premium wine upgrades. Food Village: Enjoy regional cuisine and specialty items at the U.S. Open Food Village. Rejuvenate by the Fountains: Visit the U.S. Open’s refreshing food destinations by the fountains, including the South Plaza Café, Cuppa Spotta, Carnegie Deli, and Ben & Jerry’s. Grey Goose Bar: Located in the Food Village, the Grey Goose Bar features the Honey Deuce, a U.S. Open signature

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

27


2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

19th Annual Arthur Ashe Kids Day to Kick Off 2014 U.S. Open The USTA has announced that country superstar Hunter Hayes, breakout duo MKTO, girl group McCLAIN, British pop rock band The Vamps, teen sensation Madison Beer and EDM prodigy DJ Salerno will team up with tennis icons Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal at the 19th Annual Arthur Ashe Kids Day, Presented by Hess, Saturday, Aug. 23 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. from 9:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Singer and actress China Anne McClain (Sing Your Face Off, A.N.T. Farm) and Jeff Sutphen (Figure It Out, BrainSurge), will co-host the show, with a special guest appearance by popular fitness trainer and choreographer, Shaun T. Arthur Ashe Kids Day, Presented by Hess, will kick off the 2014 U.S. Open, Aug. 25-Sept. 8. From 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., kids and their families can enjoy an exciting array of free tennis games, live music and attractions taking place throughout the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Inside Arthur Ashe Stadium from 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., the live tennis and music show will feature fun exhibition matches and skills competitions with Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal, as well as musical performances by Hunter Hayes, MKTO, McCLAIN, The Vamps and Madison Beer and Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day house DJ Salerno. Additional talent will be announced in the coming weeks. Arthur Ashe Kids Day will be broadcast nationally by CBS on Sunday, Aug. 24 from Noon-1:30 p.m. “Not only is Arthur Ashe Kids Day, Presented by Hess a fantastic way to kick off the U.S. Open, but it’s also a great time to encourage youth to be active, play tennis and develop healthy habits,” said Gordon Smith, USTA executive director and chief operating officer. “This annual event continues to bring the entire family together for a fun-filled day of sports and entertainment.” Proceeds from Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day benefit the USTA Foundation which helps fund the National Junior Tennis & Learning Network (NJTL), a nationwide group of more than 600 non-profit youth-development organizations that provide free or low-cost tennis, education and life-skills programming to more than 325,000 children each year, founded 45 years ago by Arthur Ashe, along with Charlie Pasarell and Sheridan Snyder. Over the years, Arthur Ashe Kids Day has been a launching ground for many of music’s biggest acts, including Ariana Grande, Austin Mahone, Justin Bieber, Rihanna, The Wanted, Jonas Brothers, Demi Lovato, Carly Rae Jepsen, Cody Simpson, Sean Kingston, Britney Spears, Ne-Yo, Jessica Simpson, Hanson and Backstreet Boys. The Grounds Festival offers a wide range of interactive activities and the opportunity for children of all ages to test their skills, hit with top tennis pros, win prizes and enjoy music: n Hess Express Stage: The Grounds Festival’s free concert featuring upand-coming musical talent including hip-hop phenoms The Bomb Digz, “Hip Pop” duo Kalin and Myles, New York’s Impact Rep and recent Billboard “Hot Shot Debut” Shawn Mendes. Additional acts to be confirmed.

n Hess Express Obstacle Course: Test agility, balance, running and tennis skills on the engaging and challenging obstacle course.

n YouthTennis.com (two courts): Tennis is sized right for kids! With

n Hess Target Time: Intermediate and advanced-level kids can test their

28

shorter courts, smaller racquets and lower-bouncing balls, the focus is on the fun so kids enjoy the game right from the start.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

skills hitting targets. n Xerox Beat the Pro: Challenge the best playing points against some of the top touring and teaching pros in the world. n PTR 10 & Under Tennis: Have some fun with PTR professionals and work on improving your beginning serve, rally and scoring skills.


2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW n USPTA 10 & Under Tennis: USPTAcertified teaching professionals host this court consisting of colorful hitting stations using a variety of teaching aids. n Nike Tennis: Tennis and skill activities on two courts featuring Nikesponsored athletes. n Esurance Champions of the Court: Exciting doubles play for all levels. Which team will win Champions of the Court? n USTA Foundation Tennis Skills: Innovative, fun, tennis and fitness activities to develop the skills of beginning players of all ages.

n Coca-Cola Get Fit and Play: Challenging tennis courses for varying skill levels focusing on agility, balance, coordination, speed and strength. n IBM Speedzone: Just like the pros, utilize IBM’s speed serve technology to test the power behind your shot. n The U.S. Open American Express Fan Experience: Step inside the U.S. Open American Express Fan Experience for even more tennis fun! The Fan Experience is located in the Chase Center near the East Gate.

Court 17. Watch the video boards for schedules. n From Nickelodeon: Live appearances by SpongeBob, Patrick, Dora and Diego! n And Much More: Autographs, juggling workshop, face painting, hair beading and braiding, storytelling, balloon artists, roving entertainers and more.

n Watch the Pros Practice: See tennis’s biggest stars up close as they prepare for the U.S. Open. Public practices are featured on Louis Armstrong Stadium, Grandstand and

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2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Kids comment on the U.S. Open experience Every summer, Long Island Tennis Magazine visits dozens of tennis camps. This summer during our travels, we asked kids at all the camps the following question: “If you had a chance to play in the U.S. Open, how would you feel and who would you want to play against?” Here are some of the answers from our local tennis players: Matthew Bahar (Bethpage Park Tennis Center): “I would feel excited, yet very nervous, to play in the U.S. Open. I would want to play against Vanessa Scott.” Zach Bernstein (Hofstra Summer Camps): “I would be really excited to play in the U.S. Open. The experience of playing against new people and professionals would be really cool, especially since it is the Open. I would love to play against Rafael Nadal, he is my favorite player.” Athell Bennett (Sportime Bethpage): “I would feel very happy and excited if I got a chance to play in the U.S. Open. I would want to play Roger Federer because I would have a chance to win and because I would be able to show off my talent on Center Court.” Alex Carmenaty (Sportime Massapequa): “I would feel nervous because I would probably lose in each set. I would want to face Rafael Nadal.” Avery Dodd (CATS Summer Camp, Rockville Centre): “It would be cool and fun.” Eli (Shelter Rock Country Club): “I would be excited and happy. I would want to play on the Stadium Court because everyone could watch and clap. I would want to play Rafael Nadal … he would probably win.” Allan Fridburg (Carefree Racquet Club): “It would feel amazing to play in the U.S. Open. I would want to face Roger Federer because I watched him before and he 30

looks like a good opponent to play against.” Hailey (Sportime Kings Park): I would be amazed and would try hard to get to first place and win. I would feel great, like I’m learning to be a really good tennis player. Serena Williams is who I would like to play against. Ian (Sportime Kings Park): “I would be happy because I’m good enough to be in the U.S. Open. I would want to play either Roger Federer or Rafael Nadal because they are two of my favorite players.” James Iannotta (Sportime Syosset): “It wouldn’t be that big of a deal if I got to play in the U.S. Open. I would rather be playing in the MLB All-Star game. I would want to play against Derek Jeter because he is no longer in his prime.” Matthew Koeppel (CATS Summer Camp, Rockville Centre): “I would be excited if I got to play in the U.S. Open. It would be cool to play against a professional.” Dillion Moehringer (Carefree Racquet Club): “It would be an awesome feeling if I got a chance to play in the U.S. Open. I would want to face Novak Djokovic because he inspired me to get serious in tennis.” Natalie (Port Washington Tennis Academy): “I would be nervous because there’s a big crowd. I want to play Li Na because it is my nickname and she sounds nice. I like Serena Williams because she’s good and wins

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

tournaments. I want to be just like her. I am doing this camp for the first time so that I could be a professional when I grow up.” Justin Omen (Huntington Indoor Tennis): “I would be honored and really excited to play the best players from around the world. I would want to play Rafael Nadal, just to see how crazy his spin is.” David Reinharz (Sportime Bethpage): “I would feel nervous, but excited because everyone would be watching me in the U.S. Open. I would want to play Rafael Nadal because I am a lefty and it would be great to play the best lefty in the world.” Riya (Glen Head Racquet Club): “I would feel excited. If I won it I would be thankful that I took tennis lessons! I don’t really know any tennis players. Anyone who is good I would like to play.” Nicole Sandler (Sportime Syosset): “I would feel like a tennis star if I got to play in the U.S. Open. I would want to play Coach Cory [Parr] so I could kick his butt!” Vanessa Scott (Bethpage Park Tennis Center): “I would feel very proud of myself if I had an opportunity to play at the Open. I would want to play against Matt Bahar.” Fiona Blaze Wheeler (Sportime Massapequa): “I would feel scared because I wouldn’t want to get booed. I would want to play against Alex Carmenaty.”


2014 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

2014 U.S. Open Match Schedule Subject to change Date/Session

Day/Evening

Time

Featured Matches

Monday, August 25

1 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Monday, August 25

2 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Tuesday, August 26

3 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Tuesday, August 26

4 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Wednesday, August 27

5 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s 1st Round/Women’s 2nd Round

Wednesday, August 27

6 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Thursday, August 28

7 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Thursday, August 28

8 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Friday, August 29

9 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s 2nd Round/Women’s 3rd Round

Friday, August 29

10 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s 2nd Round/Women’s 3rd Round

Saturday, August 30

11 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round

Saturday, August 30

12 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round

Sunday, August 31

13 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s 3rd Round/Women’s Round of 16

Sunday, August 31

14 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s 3rd Round/Women’s Round of 16

Monday, September 1

15 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Monday, September 1

16 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Tuesday, September 2

17 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinals

Tuesday, September 2

18 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s Round of 16/Women’s Quarterfinals

Wednesday, September 3

19 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s and/or Women’s Quarterfinals

Wednesday, September 3

20 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s and/or Women’s Quarterfinals

Thursday, September 4

21 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s Quarterfinals

Thursday, September 4

22 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s Quarterfinals

Friday, September 5

23 Day

11:00 a.m.

Women’s Semifinals/Mixed-Doubles Final

Saturday, September 6

24 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s Semifinals/Women’s Doubles Final

Sunday, September 7

25 Day

12:00 p.m.

Women’s Final/Men’s Doubles Final

Monday, September 8

26 Day

5:00 p.m.

Men’s Final

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

31


SPORTIME JUNIOR

From Tennis Whizz to the John M SPORTIME has a player pathwa

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Tennis Whizz is a complete preschool tennis program that fosters the healthy mental, physical and emotional growth of our youngest players. Tennis Whizz is offered at all SPORTIME and JMTA locations.

SPORTIME U10 Tennis is comprised of Red and Orange levels and trains our players under 10 to become wellrounded competitive athletes. Using the appropriate sized courts (36’ - 60’) and balls (low compression Red and Orange), the U10 Tennis Pathway provides the best start for young athletes, allowing them to serve, rally and actually play the game of tennis quickly. SPORTIME U10 Tennis is offered at all SPORTIME and JMTA locations.

SPORTIME HAS IT ALL THIS FALL!

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SPORTIME is New York’s tennis leader since 1994. With 162 tennis courts in soft and hard surfaces, indoors and outdoors, across Long Island, in NYC, Westchester and the Capital Region, SPORTIME offers world-class facilities, instruction, programs and services for kids and adults. Our tennis programs for adults are some of the world’s best and include Adult Tennis Kinetics Clinics, Priva and Semi-Private Instruction and USTA and Corporate Leagues. Why would you play anywhere else? Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com


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The John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA) is the New York region’s #1 green to yellow ball program for developing serious players - like JMTA’s 2014 Wimbledon Boys’ singles champion and 2014 Boys’ National singles and doubles champion Noah Rubin. Conceived, developed and directed by John McEnroe and his world-class staff, JMTA boasts players that have won titles at sectional, national, intercollegiate and international levels. JMTA’s original location is at SPORTIME’s flagship club on Randall’s Island in NYC, with JMTA Annexes on Long Island and in Westchester.

The EXCEL Pathway is designed for green to yellow ball players who want to make tennis an integral part of their lives and who are ready to commit to doing so, with the goal of playing competitive tennis at the high school and/or collegiate levels, as well as playing USTA tournament tennis. The EXCEL pathway is provided at all SPORTIME tennis locations where JMTA is not offered.

SPORTIME‘s trademarked green to yellow ball junior development program, dedicated to meeting the instructional and recreational needs of our junior members by providing an excellent learning environment, creating important social interactions, and offering challenging and fun competitive opportunities. Junior TK is offered all all SPORTIME and JMTA locations.

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33


TENNIS INJURY PREVENTION

Tennis Elbow is Not the Only Injury To Avoid Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS For most tennis players, the most feared injury is usually tennis elbow, as this was traditionally the most common. However,

with more modern training and swing adaptations, the frequency of this injury is shrinking. Yet, one of the more underrecognized injuries among players is a shoulder injury. Tennis is a game of repetition, where players are running side to side, while

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

using power generated in their core which is funneled and magnified through the shoulder blade and into the shoulder and the arm to return each shot or serve. In fact, 50-60 percent of the energy of each shot or serve comes from the lower extremities and the body’s core. This then needs the correct biomechanical function of the shoulder blade to funnel this energy into the upper extremity and to the racquet and eventually the ball. The muscles of the shoulder blade, including the upper, middle, and lower trapezius and the serratus muscles are very important to retract, stabilize and rotate the scapula (shoulder blade) to facilitate proper shoulder function and strength. The rotator cuff consists of four muscles and tendons that attach at the shoulder together with a “ball in socket” function. The forward, side to side, internal and external rotation of the shoulder area are all controlled by the rotator cuff and the muscles of the shoulder blade. Fatigue and loss of neuromuscular control


of these muscles is common with repetitive overuse which can cause altered biomechanics, loss of performance and ultimately shoulder injuries, including injuries to the labrum (the cartilage that lines the outside of the shoulder socket) and the rotator cuff. For these reasons, tennis players are considered “overhand athletes,” and often suffer from the same types of injuries as often seen in baseball players and quarterbacks. As a young athlete, repetitive stress on the shoulder initially causes two significant problems which can cause pain and decrease performance. First is scapular dyskinesis, or altered muscular control of the shoulder blade. The shoulder blade needs to retract as a racquet is brought into the overhead cocking phase of a serve or shot. Then these same muscles must control the shoulder blade as the racquet is swung through into the deceleration phase of a serve which occurs in a fraction of a second. This pulls the shoulder blade forward which then needs to be retracted again for the next shot or serve. With repetitive stress, the shoulder

blade might sit in a protracted (or more forward position) and usually lower than the other shoulder. This then leads to loss of muscular control and abnormal movement of the shoulder blade with the overhead swing of serving. The second problem that arises is tightness of the posterior capsule (tightness of the tissue that forms the back of the shoulder joint) which is also most likely from the repetitive stress of the decelerating arm. This is called “glenohumeral internal rotation deficit” or GIRD. With repetitive stress on the back of the shoulder capsule the capsule thickens and the athlete loses internal rotation of the shoulder. This can affect the way the shoulder rotates and can cause superior labrum tears or tears of the cartilage at the top of the shoulder socket where the biceps tendon attaches. Typically, scapular dyskinesis and GIRD cause pain, but a superior labral tear usually will cause a tennis player to have a significant drop in performance if they are able to play at all. In fact, a recent study showed that 25 percent of players be-

tween the ages of 12-19 reported having shoulder pain usually from dyskinesis and GIRD. Perhaps even more concerning is that 50 percent of middle-aged players reported having shoulder pain, but not entirely from dyskinesis and GIRD. For the athletes over the age of 35, repetitive overuse can injure and fray the tendons of the rotator cuff. This is most likely from repetitive stretch on these tendons in the deceleration phase of swinging a racquet and is exacerbated by altered mechanics of the shoulder blade. These injuries increase with age and complete tears of the rotator cuff become more common every decade over the age of 50. So, while younger players have altered biomechanics of the shoulder blade (scapular dyskinesis) and stiffness of the back of their shoulder capsule (GIRD) and might even develop tears of their superior labrum, players over the age of 35 also have to deal with fraying and tearing of their rotator cuff. continued on page 36

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

35


a few miles per hour to your serve as well.

tennis elbow continued from page 35 The most important way of preventing these problems is stretching and focused muscle strengthening. Posterior capsular stretching (stretching the back of the shoulder) has been shown to be successful in limiting loss of shoulder internal rotation and has also been shown to decrease the injury rate in overhand athletes. Focused strengthening of the muscles of the shoulder blade and the rotator cuff can help maintain correct biomechanics and keeps the tennis player at their highest level of play. Some tips that professionals and casual players alike can follow: l Always stretch before and after competition. Posterior shoulder stretching or the “sleeper stretch” is an important part of this routine. l Receive professional coaching to ensure a mechanically sound serve and hitting motion.

l Do not start off serving fast out of the gate. Start at 50 percent and allow blood flow to increase and then gradually speed up. l Avoid tossing the ball too high or in one direction. Having to lean one way or reach too high puts unnecessary stress on the rotator cuff. l If you have shoulder pain during play, do not push it under any circumstance. However, that does not mean to keep your shoulder completely immobile. Rather, keep the shoulder mobile to maintain blood flow and avoid stiffness. l If you tend to feel soreness after competition, be sure to ice the shoulder the same way a pitcher in baseball would. l If you are an avid tennis player, spend time strengthening your rotator cuff in addition to your normal regimen. It will not only help you avoid injury, but add

Dr. Charles Ruotolo is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and the founder of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with locations in Massapequa, East Meadow and the Bronx, N.Y. Dr. Ruotolo completed his orthopedic residency program at SUNY Stony Brook in 2000. After his residency, he underwent fellowship training in sports medicine and shoulder surgery at the prestigious Sports Clinic of Laguna Hills, Calif. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. As an Associate Master Instructor of Arthroscopy for the Arthroscopy Association of North America, Dr. Ruotolo actively teaches other orthopedic surgeons advanced arthroscopic skills in shoulder surgery. As an avid researcher he has also published multiple articles on shoulder injuries and shoulder surgery in the peer review journals of Arthroscopic Surgery and of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. For more information, visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com


B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

At the time this issue went to print, some of the 18 & Over League playoffs were still in progress and the 55 & Over League was still playing its local season matches. The winning teams in the 40 & Over League are as follows: l Women’s 3.0: Sportime Massapequa (Captains Debbie Trimboli & Kelly Walther) l Women’s 3.5: Carefree Racquet (Captain Denise Michel) l Women’s 4.0: Sportime Syosset (Captain Sharon Zuch) l Women’s 4.5: Carefree Racquet (Captains Donna Ryan & Sally Disabato) l Men’s 3.0: Long Beach Tennis Center (Captain Joe Esposito) l Men’s 3.5: Point Set (Captain Brian Katz & Anthony Cristi) l Men’s 4.0: Eastern Athletic-Blue Point (Captains Steve Subject & Jeff Kee) l Men’s 4.5: Sportime Syosset (Captain Andy Ross) The winning teams in the 18 & Over League are as follows: l Women’s 2.5: Huntington Indoor (Captain Yvonne Evelyn) l Women’s 3.0: Winner undecided at time of publishing l Women’s 3.5: Winner undecided at time of publishing l Women’s 4.0: Sportime Kings Park (Captain Michelle Stoerback) l Women’s 4.5: Sportime Kings Park (Captain Tina Buschi) l Women’s 5.0: Sportime Lynbrook (Tina Buschi)

l Men’s 3.0: Sportime Massapequa (Captains Jerry Kinalis & Sergio Rivera) l Men’s 3.5: Long Beach (Captain Andrew Camacho) l Men’s 4.0: Sportime Kings Park (Captain Wayne Freeman) l Men’s 4.5: Sportime Roslyn (Captains Art Kornblit & Robert Scherr) l Men’s 5.0: Christopher Morley (Captain Sean Worth) The 55 & Over League will begin their playoffs mid-August, with their sectional event set for the weekend of Sept. 27-29. We wish all of our advancing teams the best of luck! Next up will be the Tri-Level League (three doubles courts, one at the 3.5 Level, 4.0 Level and 4.5 Level). Details have not yet been worked out, but we are planning to run it as a weekend event like we did last year. We will do the best we can with which weekends in October, but I cannot take into account everyone’s plans, and whether or not teams are going to Nationals. It’s a lot of court time I am going to have to find, and it has to be based on that. The Mixed-League will begin the end of October and run through April 2015. I will be e-mailing last year’s captains in September. If you would like to captain a new team this year, please email me at kathym65@aol.com. Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

Ricky Becker’s

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Contact former Stanford University and Roslyn High School MVP Ricky Becker today at 516-605-0420 or rbecker06@yahoo.com. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

37


The Pink Elephant is BACK on the Court: Five Mo By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC n the July/August 2014 issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine, I published “The Pink Elephant on the Court.” Since it appeared in the pages of this magazine, I have received an overflow of comments from kids who said “OMG, how did you know what I was thinking? This is exactly what I want to tell my mom and dad.” And then from parents, I have heard comments such as, “Really, I often wondered about what my son/daughter was thinking … wow, this is helpful.” Because of the number of responses, I have written a second part to this article. In this article, I have highlighted five more comments that kids share with me in my private sessions as a mental training coach. Hopefully, they are helpful to better understand what your kids might be thinking and best supporting their dreams, both on and off the court.

I

1. You think you re supporting me, but I need you to support me another way! Oftentimes, a parent will express to me or their child that they are doing everything they can to support their child. Usually what they talk about is the money being spent, the miles driven in the car, and the number of tournaments and lessons they registered for. However, from the child’s perspective, they don’t see this, they might say “Okay, I know that (and dismiss it), but when I look up from the court and you nod your head in disgust or throw your hands up after I miss an easy shot, that doesn’t feel like support! You never seem to be satisfied with how I play.” Clearly there are different definitions of “support” being used. The parents speak of support in regards to time and money spent, while the kids speak of support in regards to their emotions. 2. Just because I don’t get upset or fist pump doesn’t mean I don’t care! Sometimes a parent will come to me because they perceive their child lacks a competitive fire and want me to help bring that competitive nature out. I always mention to the parent how all kids show their competitive nature in a different ways. This is evident even at the professional level. Look at Rafael Nadal vs. Roger Federer vs. Lleyton Hewitt, or Maria Sharapova vs. Steffi Graff. All of these players express themselves differently on the court. There is not a right or wrong way as long as it is respectful to themselves, their opponent and the game. The key is to encourage your child to be themselves, while moving past adversity. 3. I know the ball was out, but I don’t want confrontation! Many times kids will not call out balls out, they will play on! Parents are wondering if the child cannot see the lines or if they need glasses? In reality, the problem is none of the above. The underlying issue is the child either does not want confrontation, and/or they do not want to be called a cheater. The ball not being called out is not really the issue here, but it is one of confidence and seeking to avoid confrontation. 38

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com


ore Things Your Child Won’t Tell You

pete.” Some parents keep it even more simple and just say, “I love you!” I know you all try to do the best you can do to help your child do their best in given situations. This parenting stuff is hard! Hopefully some of the “Pink Elephants” on the court from both parts of this story will provide you with some insight as to what your son or daughter may be thinking and also help put you at ease. They often don’t need your help in solving or fixing the situation, but just need to know you are with them.

4. When I’m quiet before a match, ally, it doesn’t work that way! More often than not, it just puts pressure on the child to perit’s because I’m nervous! The night before a match, or even on the car form. Their focus goes directly to the outride driving to a match, has your child ever come, a place they cannot control and been silent? It seems like they have clammed moves them away from the process of where up or gone into a shell. Don’t take this to mean anything other than they “THE KEY IS TO ENCOURAGE just need time to be with themselves Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the YOUR CHILD TO BE and process their nervousness. The founder and director of Inside the T H E M S E LV E S , W H I L E M O V I N G best remedy is to just be there for Zone Sports Performance Group. P A S T A D V E R S I T Y. ” them and not to force conversation. As a mental training coach, he This will only facilitate short and edgy works with athletes and teams in all answers. The key is to help them just be they need to be—to compete … something sports and levels, helping them to gain the they can control. Additionally, The child thinks mental edge. He has spoken nationally and themselves. to themselves, “If I don’t win, I will disappoint internationally and has been quoted by 5. It’s not helpful when you tell me I my parents.” Certainly they don’t want to let ESPN, Sports Illustrated, The New York anyone down, therefore the pressure dou- Times and other major media publications. should win, I feel more pressure. Oftentimes, parents will think by telling their bles, and unfortunately on the court, the His new book, Tennis Inside the Zone has child they are the favorites or telling them child’s nerves get tighter. It’s never a good just been released. He may be reached by they have a better record/ranking than their recipe for success. Simply tell them to “Play phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail rob@insidopponent, it will give them confidence. Actu- proud,” “Just be yourself,” or “Just com- ethezone or visit www.insidethezone.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Eastern Lo LI Region hosts Annual Kids Day

The USTA Eastern/Long Island Region hosted its annual Long Island Kids Day in July, co-sponsored by National Junior Tennis & Learning and the Baldwin Tennis Club. More than 200 children from across Long Island participated in this event at the tennis courts at Baldwin High School. Coordinated by local tennis pros and other volunteers, the kids enjoyed tennis learning, games, contests, food and fun. Newcomers to the sport were introduced to the basics of 10 & Under Tennis, while those with more experience

played matches. The children played tennis with their peers from other parts of the Island, learned new skills and made new friends. The following groups brought their campers/students to Kids Day: Youth En-

richment Services, West Islip, Hicksville Community Tennis, Baldwin Tennis Club, Central Islip Community Tennis, Alliance Tennis, Roosevelt, and Daniel Burgess Tennis Academy Summer Camp, Freeport.

Girls Inc. utilizes grant for summer program

Girls Inc. of Long Island used a USTA Eastern/Long Island Region grant to help run its second annual free summer tennis camp at Central Islip High School. Long Island Region grants are designed to help organizational members promote and develop tennis participation. Girls Inc., the local affiliate of a national group, reaches out to girls ages five through 18, inspiring them to be strong, 40

smart and bold through programming that is girl-centric and girls only. The organization’s one-week Tennis and Wellness Summer Camp included tennis lessons and matches plus discussions of college, scholarships and careers, as well as information on mindful eating, sports nutrition and living a healthy lifestyle. USTA LI Region grants are available to Long Island-based USTA member organi-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

zations seeking to support and participate in the Region’s mission to promote and develop the growth of tennis on the Long Island. These grants are designed to foster participation in tennis and USTA programs throughout the Region. For more information on USTA LI grants, please visit www.longisland.usta.com and click on “Grant Application” on the left hand side.


ng Island Region Mixed-Doubles teams headed to Nationals The USTA Eastern/Long Island Region is proud to have two Mixed-Doubles teams going to Nationals this fall, the USTA League 6.0 Mixed-Doubles team out of Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis and the 8.0 Mixed-Doubles USTA League Team out of Long Beach Tennis Center. Hempstead Lake’s 6.0 Mixed-Doubles team, captained by Darlene Sotomayor, had a great season on its way to reaching the Eastern Sectional Championship. “Everyone played a very big and tremendous part in helping our team reach this goal,” Sotomayor said. The group will be heading to Tucson, Ariz. in November to play for the National Championship. Hempstead Lake team members include Gary Spector, Jeffrey Ross Miller, Lori Stone, Marley Anna Spector, Deena Mavroudis, Shanon Blue, Matthew Vota, Anthony Cristi, Maria Cristina Gonzales, Allie Spector, John Cuevo, Shaun Edward Willis, Karen E. Groeger, Steven E. Waters, Adam Moramarco and Todd Greenwald. The Long Beach 8.0 team, captained by Andrew Camacho, took home the gold at

The Long Beach 8.0 team celebrates its win at Sectionals—(back row, left to right): Evelyne Le Goupil, Nancy Wisniewski, Adam Jaskowski, Casey Schnabel and Lori D’Antonio; and (front row, left to right): Cristina Camacho, Andrew Camacho, Paul Schnabel, Jean Tanklowitz and Brian Connor (not pictured is team member Terry Kossegi)

the Eastern Sectional Championships in Schenectady, N.Y. This team will also head to the National Championships in Tucson in November. “The team unity was so present that whenever anyone got into a tight situation, it was our support for each other that got them through,” Camacho said. Long Beach team members include Adam Jaskowski, Cristina Camacho, Casey M. Schnabel, Andrew Camacho, Shahzeb Mirza, Evelyne Le Goupil, Terry P. Kossegi,

The Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis 6.0 Mixed Doubles team of (back row, from left): Lori Stone, Adam Moramarco, Steven Waters, Anthony Cristi and Gary Spector; (middle row, from left): Maria Gonzales, Darlene Sotomayor, Shanon Blue, Allie Spector, Marley Spector and Todd Greenwald; and (front row): Shaun Willis and Deena Mavroudis

Elizabeth Ingrassia, Jared Berse, Amy L. Bernstein, Paul F. Schnabel, Oksana Aivazian, Jean Tanklowitz, Adele Mancuso, Nancy Wisniewski, Lori M. D’Antonio, Brian Vincent Connor and Mindy Reed.

Junior Team Tennis All-Stars represent LI Region

Credit photos to Pat Mosquera

Junior Team Tennis All-Stars recently represented the USTA Long Island Region at Riverside Park in Manhattan to compete against their counterparts from USTA Metro in July. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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BY

Vacation time Maria Sharapova, along with her tennis star boyfriend Grigor Dimitrov, vacationed in Mexico after Wimbledon. The two were spotted by the pool and having drinks while enjoying the sun. Fernando Verdasco, who also saw first round defeat at Wimbeldon, was in Bastad preparing for the Swedish Open. On his downtime, he soaked in the rays from the beach.

No p rshi membe s fee

E M I L I E

KAT Z

Ana Ivanovic enjoys the sun as she tans by the water.

And the ESPY goes to …

Tennis in the Swiss Alps anyone?

The 2014 ESPYs took place in Los Angeles, as the top athletes and celebrities from the world of sports and entertainment were in attendance to honor the best moments and players from the past year in sports. There were a number of tennis players who attended the event, as awards are given out

It all started with a Skype conversation between the Roger Federer and Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn regarding a tweet Vonn directed at Federer last October about how she would gladly play tennis with Federer if he would take to the slopes with her. Add in a clever promotion by a Swiss chocolatier, and the two pals recently played some tennis together atop a glacier smack dab in the Swiss Alps.

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to the best male and female tennis players. Rafael Nadal took home the Best Male Tennis Player Award, beating out Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic, despite his recent struggles. On the women’s side, Russian Maria Sharapova won the award for Best Female Tennis Player.

Phone: (631) 421-0040 Fax: (631) 423-3207 HITennis@myway.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Wedding bells for the Djoker Wimbledon champion and world number one Novak Djokovic married his fiancée Jelena Ristic in a ceremony in Montenegro at a resort on the Adriatic Coast. Djokovic and Ristic, who first met back in high school, have been together for more than eight years. They are expecting their first child later this year.


First pitch in Beantown After winning his first-round match at the Hall of Fame Tennis Championships in Newport, R.I., the event’s top seed John Isner headed off to nearby Fenway Park in Boston to throw the first pitch at a Red Sox game and watch the Sox in action against the Chicago White Sox.

Tweets from the pros l Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Do we have @onedirection fans in our #nolefam crew? I got to practice with @niallofficial this weekend ;) #1DNews l Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): Very happy for this award! Thanks to @ESPYS and to all of you for always supporting me. l Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): Join me at my favorite event in NYC @TasteofTennis #TOTNYC14 8/21 @aysworld cya there! l Chris Evert (@ChrissieEvert): Having a cocktail with @phshriver, my good friend …

l Nicholas Kyrgios (@NickKyrgios): Good preparation in Toronto. So far hit with Matosevic, Federer, Hewitt & Dancevic. Next will be Nole?? l Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Thanks for the hit @ARadwanska! We always have a blast! Ps you owe me an ice cream?? #montreal l Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): Did someone say Oreo Dream Extreme? #SayCheesecakeContest @Cheesecake l Noah Rubin (@Noahrubin33): I came here with nothing, but I will leave with a legacy l Sloane Stephens (@sloanetweets): I’m excited! Today, we have a great day planned for NJTL kids with @USTA_Foundation #servingupdreams l Andy Roddick (@andyroddick): He just always does that on a stage … Unreal! #Jeter l John Isner (@JohnIsner): Oh NFL, I’ve missed you. l Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Got schooled by some NHL players today. Had a blast! l Justin Gimelstob (@JustinGimelstob): Had a great time supporting @Bryanbros at their charity event over the weekend l Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): On the cover of the August issue of @ElleQuebec :) l Serena Williams (@SerenaWilliams): My bestie @CaroWozniacki is doing the

l l l

l

l l

NYC marathon for @TeamforKids charity running team, to donations PLZ visit http://www.crowdrise.com/carolinew Milos Raonic (@MilosRaonic): Thoughts go out to @Paul_George24 A speedy recovery! Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): “@Noahrubin33: If you wear short socks to play tennis, I don’t respect you.” Ouch. Sabine Lisicki (@SabineLisicki): Well ... at least I broke the world record for fastest serve on @WTA ... ???? #131mph #history #record Gael Monfils (@Gael_Monfils): Very proud to become a new ambassador for @DeBethune Looking forward to a successful partnership :-) Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): Having a little debate about superheroes movies … who is your favorite? Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76): Thanks! :) RT @AnaheimDucks: Congrats to diehard #NHLDucks fan @LDavenport76 on her induction into @TennisHallofFame!

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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New York Beach Tennis S

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each tennis is a lot of fun to play, but just like anything else, things are more fun when you can enjoy them with your friends. The backbone of any sport is the sport’s competitors, and beach tennis simply needed more of them. Before this summer, there were no beach tennis leagues in New York, no weekly organized play, and tournaments had become extremely small. As winter turned to spring, there were many questions with few answers regarding what the summer of 2014 would bring for the sport within the Metropolitan area. Luckily, those questions were answered by a newly formed organization named New York Beach Tennis (NYBT). NYBT brought fun in the sun and many new “friends” out onto the sands of Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y. NYBT was founded in the spring of 2014 by David Sickmen (owner of United Sports Publications). NYBT formed a partnership with Crest Hollow Country Club, a facility that boasts four beautiful sand courts in its backyard. NYBT found Crest Hollow to be the perfect site to host four tournaments, as well as weeknight “Under the Lights” league play and weekend organized practice sessions. Overall, NYBT formed a business plan, bringing in sponsors and players, while making sure communication, 44

organization and marketing were all top notch to breed the growth essential for sustainability of the sport. It didn’t take long for success to begin, as the organization, host facility and NYBT’s strong ties to the tennis community throughout the Metropolitan area brought players out in droves to the Crest Hollow’s sands. At the first tournament of the summer, Devin Wakeford from Westchester, N.Y. and Phil Stolt from New York City were crowned the Men’s Doubles Champions. After the tournament, Stolt had this to say: “A great tournament with great weather and an all-around great day! Thanks to NYBT, DJ Curtis McCalla, and all of the sponsors. I encourage everyone to join us and play NYBT. It will surely be a great day in the sun and the sand.” Phil’s sentiments were echoed by everyone who was on the sand that day, and it set the tone for what NYBT would bring to the table all summer long. “I had an amazing time playing in the NYBT tournaments at Crest Hollow,” said Jen Petersen. “The competition was great, the atmosphere and the music were amazing, and my doubles partner and I cannot wait until the next tournament!” Competition is always fierce on the court, but the camaraderie off the court is of major significance as well. The NYBT

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

competitors get along really well and had tons of fun together. NYBT certainly made sure all the players and onlookers were entertained during tournaments. Music played in the background, courtesy of DJ Curtis McCalla, players mingled between the Jamba Juice Player’s Hut, which offered complimentary smoothies, the John McEnroe Tennis Academy beach games where Cornhole and the Ring Toss became big hits, and players even took a swim in the beautiful pool at Crest Hollow just steps away from the courts. The New York Islanders Ice Girls made an appearance, hitting a few shots on the sand and taking pictures with the players at tournaments, and there was never a shortage of good food to eat as the Crest Hollow staff had waiters/waitresses serving food to the players throughout the day. Players were always treated well and swag bags with tons of gifts from the many sponsors that NYBT worked with this summer were given out to players. During the weekly “Under the Lights” league play, there was often a great band playing (Tooty and the Mother Plucker, featuring two NYBT players who are also members of Crest Hollow, Barbara and Raf Pincon) and the Club had the food and pool open late night while NYBT brought in dozens of players to play each week. Peo-


hines on Crest Hollow CC

ple would play late into the night, and everyone left smiling. “NYBT has infused life into the beach tennis community in New York this summer, using its vast resources to create a young, athletic and talented base of players that is growing daily,” said Sickmen. “There is such a positive buzz around what we are doing, and so many good tennis players and athletes are getting involved. To have full draws, professional organization, a beautiful club to play at and great people involved has made it a fun summer

on the sand for myself and many others. Everyone is happy!” The partnership between NYBT and Crest Hollow allowed for a place for players to play on weeknights and weekends. NYBT supplied the players and Crest Hollow provided the venue. NYBT players also volunteered their time to teach new players and train with players at no cost to anyone. This made Crest Hollow’s members quite happy as many joined the fun this summer for the first time. “I am really pleased with the turnouts of

T E N N I S

the NYBT tournaments, and to see so many new beach tennis players at Crest Hollow,” said Brad Berger. “With so much new competition, we all had a great summer!” In its first summer, NYBT created the largest base of beach tennis members in the country. More than 100 new players took to the sand for multiple sold-out tournaments, an amazing feat from where things began in May. NYBT, Crest Hollow and its members, the NYBT players and the sport were all winners this summer despite the many obstacles that had to be overcome.

R U S H

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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college tennis spotlight

MYTHBUSTERS Thoughts of an International Division II Player Spending a Summer on Long Island

By Ricky Becker f Division I is known for the big name “rah-rah” schools and Division III is known for smaller academia-focused schools, Division II is well … blue-collar? International? Well, probably a little bit of both. Many clients have asked me, “Is there a Division II, and why do I just hear of Division I and Division III?” The reason is that there aren’t as many D-II schools in the Northeast, and most if not all, fly under the radar. Matthew Finnerty from Warwickshire Leam in the United Kingdom, who will be a senior at D-II Mount Olive College in Mount Olive, N.C., is both international and hard-working.

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JuniorTennisConsulting: How did a kid from Warwickshire Leam in the United Kingdom end up at Mount Olive? Matt Finnerty: Mount Olive came completely by chance. I used to play with a friend in London who went to Mount Olive. He got me in contact with the coach and the whole thing just snowballed from there. Matthew Finnerty

Mount Olive has men’s tennis players from five different countries? How does everyone work around that? To be honest, having so many players from different countries works well. We all have something in common, and that’s why we had so much success this year What do you think is the biggest advantages and/or disadvantages of playing Division II tennis? You get to be part of a team and travel the country. Other than that, it’s all the same to me. 46

What are other options for high school-aged kids from the United Kingdom (or other countries) looking to continue their tennis careers? In England, there are a few options to continue playing tennis and studying, however, nothing really compares to what the United States has to offer. I think the fact that athletic scholarships are available adds more people from a variety of countries to the mix, including England. America was really the only option for me as I would not have been able to afford English University. Is it hard to assimilate at a university a continent away? It was hard at first, and I experienced a bit of culture shock to say the least. But after a month or so, it was easy to adapt. To be honest, coming here was a big hit or miss for me. I had not played in a year due to work, so I did not really know what was going to happen. Luckily, I was pleasantly surprised how quick I was able to get back into it. What would you say to people who think American tennis scholarships should go to American players? Of course people don’t want internationals taking their scholarships. I can completely understand that. However, I do believe that Europe is a stronger tennis area so that’s why I think it continues. Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, director of Tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors year-round. Ricky was named the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and was a top-five nationally-ranked junior. He can be reached by e-mail at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com


COMING IN NOVEMBER

Distribution scheduled for 11/01/14

This edition will feature: • Coaches Roundtable Discussion • Travel Destination Guide • Holiday Gift Guide • 2014 Girls High School Season Recap

Distribution across Long Island at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Restaurants and health food stores • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the next edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine November/December 2014!

Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due 2014 by October 2014 LITennisMag.com LITennisMag.com • September/October July/August 2014 ••Long Long Island Island1, Tennis Tennis Magazine 47 LITennisMag.com ••March/April 2014 Tennis Magazine 47 For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com


Snacking Your Way to On-Court Success By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN Following proper nutrition preparation will guarantee an improved tennis match. Packing your lunch box with proper snacks and fluids will help you to avoid fatigue and cramps, and will prepare you for any early, late or multiple matches. Here are some easy tips on what super snacks and drinks to have in your lunch box when playing in a tournament. l Freeze some water and Gatorade the night before and pack it with your snacks and drinks. It will help to keep your refreshments cool and fresh. Coconut water

is loaded with potassium and is an excellent source of electrolytes. l The myth about Vitamin Water and Smart Water … they have empowering flavor names like “Endurance,” “Energy,” “Essential” and “Focus.” Vitamin Water gives the illusion of a healthy, hydrating and rejuvenating miracle elixir. The bottles are beautiful, colorful, and the text on them is snappy and clever. However, they do not provide proper electrolytes and often are full of sugar that can lead to further dehydration. Low-calorie Gatorades, such as G2, do not provide proper hydration either. Regular water, Gatorade and coconut water are the best sources of hydration.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

l Fiber is a super nutrient that keeps you full for a long time. Look for snack bars that have more than five grams of fiber in them. Dry fruits such as dates and apricots are an excellent source of fiber, they will provide you with energy between sets. l Fruits are super snacks. Not only do fruits provide all kinds of vitamins and minerals, but the potassium in fruit helps to prevent muscle cramping. Bananas and oranges are the best sources of potassium and are the easiest to have on the run. Here is a tip … peel your orange in advance to avoid a mess on the court. Another perfect super snack after your match is a fruit smoothie with coconut water and two tablespoons of almond butter and a teaspoon of chia seeds! This super drink will quickly reload you and help you to properly recover for your next match! Always consult a registered dietitian if you are on a special diet. Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solution Co. is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. Irina Lehat RD Nutrition Solutions offers group classes starting in September, for kids in kindergarten through high school. Small groups, affordable prices! Mention this article and receive 20 percent off any services. For more information, call (917) 769-8031, e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com or visit www.irinalehat.com.


Centercourt Hosts Antigua Performance Apparel Men’s Tournament

Men’s 45s Singles runner-up Sadik Sendich in the championship match

Phil Mintz (far left) and Jeff Rothstein (far right) present the winning prizes to Men’s 45s Singles finalists Sadik Sendich (second from left) and Adrian Chirici (second from right)

he Antigua Performance Apparel $5,000 Men’s Tournament recently wrapped at Centercourt Athletic Club in Chatham, N.J. The tournament featured very strong draws, with 62 participants in the Men’s Open Singles, 24 in the Men’s 45s singles and 21 teams in the Men’s Open Doubles. Among the participants, the field consisted of many current and former college players, a few players that had ATP rankings and many tennis enthusiasts. Every player was provided with a gift bag with items provided by Antigua, Wilson and Centercourt. The results of the Antigua Performance Apparel finals at Centercourt Chatham are as follows:

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l Men’s Open Singles: Carles Poch Gradin, the number two seed from Barcelona, Spain with his highest ATP pro ranking of 215th in the world, defeated Victor Pugliese, the number three seed from Paris, France, currently the number one player for Monmouth University, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1 Gradin, as champion received $2,000

Antigua Doubles Open Champs Carles Poch Gradin (serving) with Jason Prezant (at the net)

Men’s Open Singles winner Carles Poch Gradin (second from right) and runnerup Victor Pugliese (second from left), are congratulated by Executive Regional Director of JTL at Centercourt Jeff Rothstein (far left) and Sales Manager of Antigua Performance Apparel Phil Mintz

and Pugliese, the runner-up, received $800.

$600, while runner-up Sendich took home $250.

l Men’s 45s Singles: Adrian Chirici from Huntington, N.Y., the number one seed and former number one in Men’s 35s, defeated Sadik Sendich, the number two seed from Staten Island, N.Y., current number one in USTA Eastern 45s, 6-3, 6-4. Chirici, as champion, won

l Men’s Open Doubles: The team of Jason Prezant & Carles Poch Gradin defeated Steve Capo & Matt Sabo, 6-0, 6-2 to win the Men’s Open Double Championship. Prezant & Gradin took home $600 in prize money, while Capo & Sabo won $250 as runners-up.

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Maslau and Weymar Take s Shot at M Hleb Maslau was sitting on a couch next to the tournament desk on the viewing deck of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center during the U.S. Open National Playoffs-Eastern Qualifier. Words could not accurately describe the state of shock drawn across Maslau’s face following his semifinal loss in the men’s singles draw, which could have eventually earned him a berth in the U.S. Open Qualifying draw. Even with the defeat, the Southampton, N.Y. native wasn’t heading home just yet. Somehow, someway, he would have to gather himself to join Simona Weymar in their attempt to win the Eastern Qualifier’s Mixed-Doubles tournament, not such an easy feat. “I played so poorly in singles in the semifinal,” Maslau said in reference to his loss to Gary Kushnirovich of St. John’s University. “It gave me extra motivation to play better doubles.” He would need to raise his level, as the 24-year old Maslau and his 23-year old partner Weymar faced a tough field

Credit photos to Kelly Keenan

By Andrew Eichenholz

Simona Weymar & Hleb Maslau en route to victory during the U.S. Open National Playoffs-Eastern Qualifier

in the Eastern Qualifier. Multiple players in the draw either have or have had a world ranking, an accomplishment in itself, indicative of the world-class play necessary to compete at such an event. The duo faced no major hurdle until

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the semifinals of the event, which was where they met the bulk of the challenge. Maslau and Weymar would need to beat three players from there on out who have had world rankings. How would they react … with dominance. Without dropping a set, the Long Island duo left no doubt for those watching that they were the best to represent Eastern in the finals of the U.S. Open National Playoffs. In the qualifier’s final, they beat another Long Island duo, Elizabeth Kobak & Cory Parr 6-4, 6-3. For a player who has earned a reputation as a fighter, always grinding through every match, regardless of opponent or his own level of play on that given day, Maslau had even more reason to put the match behind him. “I am also playing doubles with my girlfriend,” Maslau said in teaming up with Weymar. “[I’m] not going to throw that away.” Nor should he, as the tandem, both of whom graduated from the University of North Florida, won a big prize money tournament last summer, giving them plenty of experience together, especially when it is most important, under large amounts of pressure. It certainly did not phase them at the Eastern Qualifier. “I mean, I think we just played,” Maslau said. “Every match is different and we just took our chances.” That they did, and doing so, the pair moved one step closer to their ultimate goal, earning a wild card into the U.S. Open. From Aug. 20-23, New Haven and its Connecticut Open will play host to the finals of the U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles Championships, including Maslau & Weymar, along with 12 other teams vying for the chance to live out a dream. The winner will find themselves competing in Flushing Meadows alongside the best tennis players in the world, in the main draw of the U.S. Open. That doesn’t mean that Maslau & Weymar


Mixed-Doubles Glory are sweating it. “It’s just about being mentally ready to go ahead and play,” Maslau said about the pressure of the moment. “It gets us more excited I suppose. At the end of the day, it’s just tennis. You win … you lose … it’s all part of it.” So, how did the two students who went to school in Florida end up on the Eastern end of Long Island, one may ask? “I came to work for the Ross School Tennis Academy,” Maslau said. “It is a great place for me to be able to still compete and help develop some players.” Weymar, according to Maslau is also going to be a part of the Ross School family, working in the admissions department, as well as helping out on the court from time to time. It does not hurt that the doubles team works at the same place. They have plenty of time to work on their games in preparation for the big challenge at the end of the summer. “We practice before work at 8:00 a.m. and after work at 5:00 p.m.,” Maslau said, adding that the team will have something extra in their corner when the tournament

arrives. “My coach will come also from Tennessee to come see us play, so that’s cool.” As what many would see as a “do or die” moment with a chance of a lifetime on the line, tons of players would crumble under the spotlight. It isn’t easy to come so close to living a dream without getting caught up in the suspense of everything. Not for Maslau. “I don’t want to get ahead of myself, or start thinking, ‘what if’?,” he said. What if Maslau & Weymar manage to fight their way back to where it all began, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center? Long Island will be able to say that not only did some of their own make it, but they did it the right way, through hard work and perseverance. A semifinal singles loss will not look so bad anymore. Andrew Eichenholz is a journalism student

Simona Weymar & Hleb Maslau will compete for a shot at the 2014 U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles main draw at the Connecticut Open in New Haven, Conn.

at Stony Brook University, where he currently is a staff writer for The Statesman, covering tennis amongst many sports. He grew up playing tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where he learned to love the game, eventually becoming a part time tennis instructor, working for the most part with the QuickStart 10 & Under Program. Andrew has also served as a ballperson at the U.S. Open. He may be reached by email at andrew.eichenholz@stonybrook.edu.

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HI DDEN SEC R E T S O F T H E G RE AT S

Jimmy Connors

The brash, tenacious, angry outsider from St. Louis

By Tom Ferraro, Ph.D. This marks the fifth installment in the series “Secrets of the Tennis Greats.” I have sought to uncover the one distinctive and overriding character trait that determined the greatness of the top players in the world. Yes, all of the tennis greats have much in common, including natural talent and the ability to work hard, but they were all very different as well. Thus far, I have discussed Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Pete Sampras. This month, we take a look at Jimmy “Jimbo” Connors. What was the one trait that contributed most to his rise to the top? Well first let’s look at his record. James Scott Connors was born in 1952 in East St. Louis, Ill., home of Miles Davis. His mom was a tennis pro and Jimmy witnessed the savage beating of her and his grandparents when he was just eight-years-old. His mom received more than 100 stitches and never fully recovered from the attack. Connors was clearly affected by this incident and said he often used that memory to destroy his enemies on the court. His mother moved with him to California and placed him in the hands of Pancho Segura when he was 16-years-old. Connors went to UCLA where he quickly won the NCAA singles title as a freshman. He turned pro the next year and by the age of 22, he had won 15 times, including three Grand Slam titles. He would go on to win eight Grand Slam titles over the course of his career, 109 tournaments and was ranked at number one for a total of 268 weeks. His contemporaries included Bjorn Borg, Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe who together ushered in the modern age of tennis with all its money and entertainment value. 52

It is clear to me that Connors had an inner rage that made him a great fighter. His mom would tell him “get those tiger juices flowing before you step on court.” These are comments similar to what Tiger Woods mom would say before he left for any tournament. “Go destroy them all,” were her parting words. I think Connors’ inherent shyness, his hardscrabble upbringing and the witnessing of his mother’s violent assault all contributed to his anger and his tenacity. But to make sure I was on the right track, I sauntered over to the beautiful tennis courts of the Cherry Valley Club in Garden City, N.Y. and sat down with their tennis staff. Akiko, the assistant director of tennis, told me that Connors was the most passionate player she had ever seen. The director of racquet sports was the blue-eyed Miguel Cobbs who was gracious enough to spend some time with me analyzing Connors. He told me, “Connors was a pure alpha male with an intense merciless desire to dominate all opponents. He had a desire to do more than win … he wanted to be the very best, and in that way, he was very similar to both Nadal and Federer. Connors showed no compassion, no pity and no mercy, and I don’t think he was very well liked on the Tour.” Miguel went on to say that Connors also had an unwavering belief in himself and was intimidating as a result. Miguel Cobb’s comments reminded me of the time I met Arnold Palmer. Palmer was, at that point, in his mid-70s and one would expect that he would look like a tired and weak old man. But there was nothing tired or weak-looking about Arnold Palmer. He had the steadiest and most powerful gaze I had ever seen in a male. Pure alpha. So it is easy to pick out the secret trait that got Jimbo to the top. He was pure and

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

unadulterated alpha male. I think this was partly genetic, partly because his mom gave him encouragement to be this was and partly due to witnessing such trauma. In that way, he is similar to Djokovic. Add it all up and what you got was a real crowd pleaser and one of the most merciless ball strikers in tennis history. His game was not flashy, just flat over-the-net punches to the baseline along with a grunt. He also had that odd way of constantly blowing air into his hand. He ushered in all that pumped up testosterone and cursing into the genteel game of tennis. And the game has not been the same since. He was that mophaired lefty that the crowd loved to hate. What you can learn from Connors? I think the simplest point to make is that if a parent wants to raise a warrior like Jimmy Connors, you need to give the youngster permission to be that way. Freud called this the “Super Ego,” or the values learned from the parents. If you want to raise a tennis player with unrelenting drive, all you have to do is give your child permission to do so. What will occur are two things. First, they will become far more aggressive on court. But the negative side of this lesson is that they will lose their popularity and their likability … such is life. One must take the good with the bad. Connors was aware that he was not liked, but said, “I needed to have that tough edge if I was going to dominate and win.” So buyer beware … you can raise a warrior on the court, but it will unquestionably come with a price. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.


Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives L.I. Teens Host Points for Patriots Fundraiser for Vets

Michael Schumer and Michele Lehat, two 17-year-olds from Long Island, hosted the Third Annual Points for Patriots Charity Tennis Tournament in early August, a round-robin doubles tournament that took place at Le Club Tennis in Westhampton Beach, N.Y. The previous two Points for Patriots events raised $30,000 and gained major support from Suffolk County officials, local celebrities and dozens of neighboring businesses. The biggest honor, according to Schumer who founded the First Annual Points for Patriots event in 2011, was welcoming the Gabreski Air National Guard’s presentation of the colors prior to the start of the 2012 games. This year’s event marked the third annual event, and raised thousands more in pro-

ceeds to exceed the $30,000 previously raised by the last two tournaments. The Third Annual tournament boasted nearly 60 players, 40 spectators and raffle prizes provided by some of the area’s top corporations and small businesses, including Donnay, Energyfruits, Topspin Tennis & Fitness, and Victor Talbot’s. The tournament also featured Bob Litwin, a performance coach and senior tennis world champion as a keynote speaker, as well as the Gabreski Air National Guard for performing the Color Guard once again. Schumer, a graduate of Jericho High School, lives in Muttontown, N.Y. and will attend the University of Chicago in the fall. He was a two-time captain of Jericho’s Varsity Tennis Team.

Lehat, a resident of Great Neck, N.Y., joins the Points for Patriots team with years of tennis experience as a top-ranked USTA Eastern tournament player. Lehat plans on playing college tennis in the fall of 2015. “With thousands of troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, support of their ongoing needs is more critical than ever, particularly medically,� said Lehat. “Our nation’s heroes deserve our support, and hosting a fun tennis event is the least we can do,� said Schumer. Proceeds from the event will go directly to the construction of Traumatic Brain Injury and PTSD rehabilitation centers across the nation, most notably the Center for the Intrepid in San Antonio, Texas and the National Intrepid Center of Excellence in Bethesda, Md.

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City Parks Foundation Continues to Open New D

Long Island native Mike Silverman brings tennis to t n the summer of 1981, Mike Silverman of City Parks Foundation, a Levittown, N.Y. resident, was fresh out of college with an undergraduate degree in political science and plans to take a year off to work before going to law school. When Silverman accepted a six-week summer job teaching free beginner tennis lessons to kids for the New York City Parks Department, all of his plans changed. “I realized how much I enjoyed working with children who might not be able to afford tennis lessons and being involved with a sport that I loved,” said Silverman. That first summer ended with a free, fun-filled clinic for 300 kids in Central Park featuring John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg. Local tennis hero Vitas Gerulaitis helped organize the clinic and made sure that every child received a free tennis racquet. “That event in Central Park made a lasting impression on me about the potential of connecting public parks with the private sector to grow the sport and inspire kids,” said Silverman. For the past 30 years, Silverman, director of sports for City Parks Foundation, has been involved in youth tennis, and today, oversees one of the largest municipal tennis programs in the nation, reaching 7,500 children annually with free lessons and competitive opportunities in 38 public parks throughout New York’s five boroughs. When he first started, there was a citywide beginner program and a small advanced academy at the National Tennis Center, but no real pathway existed for kids to progress. According to Silverman, “We were also too dependent on the City for funding, which limited our ability to expand our services and control our own destiny.”

I

Credit photos to City Parks Foundation

Mike Silverman, director of sports for City Parks Foundation, with tennis legend Billie Jean King 54

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com


Doors

the Five Boroughs One of Mike’s first initiatives, with support from USTA Eastern, was creating the “Penn Series,” an authentic junior tournament circuit held in New York City parks. The popular low-cost summer circuit made USTA-sanctioned tournaments more available and affordable for urban youth, and helped pave the way for a Metro-region ranking designation for New York City. Mike also enlisted Reebok’s support to save and expand his advanced-training academy from budget cuts, a partnership that would last 28 years. The effort has since helped produce more than 100 college scholarship recipients. A major speed bump occurred in 1991, when Mike and most of his staff were laid off by the NYC Parks Department due to widespread budget cuts. It proved to be a blessing in disguise. The newly-formed non-profit organization, City Parks Foundation, hired Mike to preserve and grow the program. It has flourished ever since,

Mike Silverman at tryouts for the Lacoste Tennis Academy

thanks to longstanding public/private partnerships from key supporters such as the USTA, Chase and tennis legend Billie Jean King, who learned to play the sport in a public park. In 1998, King helped Mike establish an annual tennis benefit that has since raised in excess of $2 million for City Parks Foundation’s youth tennis efforts. “I have seen, firsthand, the magic that Mike works, and I admire and continue to support the enormous, free tennis program he oversees for the City Parks Foundation,” said King. “Mike has intro-

duced and popularized our sport to countless kids and adults over the past 30 years and he is making a big difference in the lives of so many people.” Mike has used his tennis program as a model to create additional free, parkbased opportunities for kids to learn new sports, such as track and field, and golf. Still, after 30 years, Mike Silverman maintains a one time-honored tradition that has never changed. Every August before the U.S. Open, he still organizes a free pro event in a city park for kids, just as Vitas Gerulaitis did.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Acknowledge the Good, Don’t Criticize the Bad “Rarely does the media take the time to acknowledge just how great professional tennis players are at what they do, no matter their ranking.”

By Andrew Eichenholz James McGee is finding his way in the world of professional tennis. With recent success on the Challenger Circuit, which acts as a second tier for those trying to either break onto the big stage or cling to a career, he has risen to a career high in the rankings, breaking into the top-200 in the world. In 2012, McGee was at the El Gezera Sporting Club of Egypt, fighting for his country in Davis Cup, eventually winning a fifth and final rubber to keep Ireland in Group II, dropping to the ground in celebration after hitting a pressure-packed stretch volley to seal the deal. Were there 23,000 spectators and journalists galore like there are at Arthur Ashe Stadium during the U.S. Open? Not quite. For a player that has spent his young career scratching and clawing his way in the tennis world, McGee has not gotten the media attention that the likes of Rafael Nadal and Serena Williams have, even after having arguably the most positive moment of his career. To McGee, there is no problem with that. “I am not too concerned about getting recognition or media attention,” the 27year-old McGee said. “I play for myself and am not playing for other people’s recognition.” So if a guy who will eventually go down in Irish tennis history, seemingly on track to eventually make the main draw of majors, a feat that has rarely occurred, doesn’t care much for media attention when he doesn’t get it, how must the stars of the sport feel about all of the press attention they receive, especially when much of it is negative? “It’s definitely nice to get some media at56

tention for positive reasons from time to time, but it’s not something I strive for,” McGee said. Take note of the word “positive” in that statement. Writing about a good match, or when a player is striking the ball well is one thing, but the constant criticism of even the world’s best has risen to a whole new level. Seeing a headline in the International Business Times read “Rafael Nadal’s Legacy in Jeopardy” is negative to say the least. The man just won yet another French Open crown a couple of months back, making an incomprehensible nine for his career. Not for nothing, but that’s nearly as positive of an accomplishment as one can achieve. What has the writing industry come to when the most notable pieces out there are harping on what the best do badly? Maybe it’s time to take a look at the bright side of things. Unfortunately for readers, the opposite has happened for the man that was once the lone favorite to win pretty much any tournament he played in. Winning 17 majors in his career thus far, Roger Federer has dared to lose, or at least that is the taste that the media has left for readers. After losing to a dangerous dark horse at this year’s French Open, a writer for the New York Times wrote that, “Federer, soon to turn 33, is running out of time to remain a champion.” Just a couple of months later, he played his best match in years to nearly beat now world number one Novak Djokovic for the Wimbledon title. The match was an instant classic between two of the best to ever play the game, so the question is, with these types of performances, why not be optimistic? Frederik Nielsen, 2012 Wimbledon Doubles Champion feels that his fellow Tour

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

member is still near the top of the game. So why does he get viewed pessimistically in the media? “The news stories will always have a negative spin if you constantly judge him on his peak,” Nielsen said. “In general, we’ve become a society where stories have to be blown out of proportions to attract interest,” Nielsen, who had a career high doubles ranking of 17th in the world said. “The sports world is no different.” Maybe it is time to view each match and individual performance in the present, so this “negative spin” won’t be as viable. The way articles are coming out, all players, from those first breaking into the top-200 to the best to ever live, everybody is getting treated unfairly. People watch and play tennis because it is interesting, with the intent of watching the sometimes magical shots world class talent produces. Rarely does the media take the time to acknowledge just how great professional tennis players are at what they do, no matter their ranking. It is time to change that. Reading about the incredible performances of the greats of the game, and how the greats who lose still are, well, greats, is just as entertaining as putting them down. Andrew Eichenholz is a journalism student at Stony Brook University, where he currently is a staff writer for The Statesman, covering tennis amongst many sports. He grew up playing tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where he learned to love the game, eventually becoming a part time tennis instructor, working for the most part with the QuickStart 10 & Under Program. Andrew has also served as a ballperson at the U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at andrew.eichenholz@stonybrook.edu.


MINI-TENNIS By Miguel Cervantes III Mini-tennis is the best way to warm up for any tennis endeavor. Whether that be a match, some casual hitting, a drill session or anything else, mini-tennis sets you up for success by getting you ready to play your best. I was playing a match recently, and as usual, I started by warming up. Usually my opponent will want to warm up by hitting groundstrokes from baseline to baseline. We’ll then take turns at the net hitting a few volleys. Finally, we’ll finish off with some serves before starting to play the match. This particular match, I decided to shake off my usual tentative nature and ask my opponent to start off by playing a little mini-tennis. The usual routine of warming up before a match was so ingrained in me that I thought I was breaking some unspoken rule by changing things up. My opponent, to my surprise, had no issue playing a little mini-tennis. They actually seemed to enjoy our short time inside the service boxes. The result was a much better warm-up, and I was able to perform better than expected in the match. Teaching and playing tennis actively has given me the experience to say that mini-tennis makes a huge difference when it comes to results. Here’s why. Mini-tennis (a short rally played inside the service lines) gives the players a chance to warm up. What that really means is that the players have an opportunity to get their legs used to the movements they’ll need to perform, and their eyes a chance to adjust to tracking that ever elusive fuzzy yellow ball. Using the entire court to warm up can be daunting, as your footwork can break down easily. Players tend to take just a few huge steps to the ball when they should be taking several smaller steps. Someone might think to themselves that a service box is not large enough to practice good footwork. Almost any player could reach any ball inside of a service box without moving much at all. That is not good mini-tennis though. Good minitennis means going through the steps of good footwork: Split-step, turn, move, hit and re-

cover. Moving your legs and getting into good position inside of a small space is beneficial because it allows you to isolate better than if you were hitting from baseline to baseline. Mini-tennis is not just about warming up the legs, It also means tracking the ball the whole way and staying focused on the point of contact until the ball has left the strings.

Your eyes need to warm up and get use to following the ball from strings to strings. This in turn allows you to hit the sweet spot of the racket every single time. A start to mini-tennis means an end to miss-hits. Quite honestly, if mini-tennis were a separate sport, I probably wouldn’t play regular tennis. Things can get pretty competitive between my friends and me when we play for points. Here is how we do it: The first player to 10 (by two) wins. To start, one of the players

BACK

to

will hold the ball on the net with their nondominant hand, they then hit the net with their racket. The ball lands either on their side or your side (it’s random) and the point is played live from there. The only other rule is that you’re not allowed to hit the ball hard. This includes no smashing any lobs. Mini-tennis is all about control. You’ll be surprised at the amount of control you develop after playing a few times. You’ll find yourself being able to place the ball exceptionally well in any part of the box with any desired shot, be that drop shot, topspin or lob. There are other variations like volleyball mini-tennis where you can play doubles and instead of hitting the ball over, you pass it to a partner (on your side of the net) who then hits the ball over to the other team. Everyone is trying to play their best every single time they step onto the court. If you want to play better, consider playing some mini-tennis before you start hitting from baseline to baseline. Who knows … maybe one day mini-tennis will actually be its own sport. Miguel Cervantes III now teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

directory Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 • catsrvc@gmail.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 271-6616 • www.easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club 9A Montauk Highway • Blue Point, NY 11715 (631) 363-2882 Eastern Athletic Club 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 (631) 420-1310 Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Stephanie Leo: (516) 676-9849 glenheadrc@verizon.net Huntington Indoor Tennis Club Richard Rottkamp—Manager/Owner 100 Broadway Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 421-0040 hitennis@myway.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive • Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com

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Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 tonny@pointsettennis.com www.pointsettennis.com

SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 731-4432 • rlouie@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-multi-sport

Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 • tennis@pwta.com • www.pwta.com

SPORTIME Kings Park Jeff Morys—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 • jmorys@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/kings-park

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 • www.rwtt.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 (516) 676-9107 • www.rwtt.com Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 • hli@ross.org • www.ross.org/tennis Shinnecock Tennis Club 125 Sandy Hollow Road Southhampton, NY 11968 (631) 283-3422 • www.shinnecocktennisclub.com SPORTIME Amagansett Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • amagansett@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett Eric Scoppetta-Camp Director (631) 267-2267 (CAMP) • ehsc@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/ehsc SPORTIME Amagansett Multi-Sport Mike Ritsi—General Manager 385 Abrahams Path Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • mritsi@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett-multi-sport SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Long Island Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Mike Kossoff—General Manager 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 • mkossoff@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-tennis

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

SPORTIME Lynbrook Danny Caseas—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 • dcaseas@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lynbrook SPORTIME Massapequa Chris Leahy—General Manager 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, NY 11758 (516) 799-3550 • cleahy@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/massapequa SPORTIME Quogue Greg Bolitsky—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead • East Quogue, NY 11959 (631) 653-6767 • gbolitsky@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/quogue SPORTIME Randall’s Island Manhattan Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Allison Hodgkins—Director of Tennis Central One Randall’s Island • New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 • ahodgkins@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—General Manager Landing Road, PO Box 1 • Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 • jharris@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Wendi Enright—General Manager 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 • wenright@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/syosset-tennis USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11568 (718) 760-6200 • www.usta.com World Gym Bay Shore Tracie Forsythe—Director of Tennis 225 Howells Road • Bay Shore, NY 11706 (631) 456-0994 • tracieforsythe@yahoo.com www.worldgymbayshore.com


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 07/08/14)

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1........Brandon Lee ......................Valley Stream, N.Y 2........Peter Anastasakis ..............East Norwich, N.Y. 3........Luke Karniewich ................Glen Head, N.Y. 4........Mark Ryan Taranov ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 5........Peter Albert Bukary ............Jericho, N.Y. 6........Joseph Monticciolo............Coram, N.Y. 7........Brandon Lin ........................Great Neck, N.Y 8........Brandon Zhu ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 9........Adrian Kristofer Tsui............Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 10......Justin Shen ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 11......Max Daniel Safir..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 12......Joshua Elenowitz................Syosset, N.Y. 13......Aryan Kumar Sethi..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 14......Gunnar S. Overstrom ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 15......Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 16......Alexander Hom ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 17......Sujay Alluri ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 18......Valentine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 19......Michael Koscinski ..............Center Moriches, N.Y. 20......Sohrob Yavari......................Syosset, N.Y. 21......Robert Steven Bellino ........Huntington, N.Y. 22......Arin Siriamonthep ..............Greenvale, N.Y. 23......Amani Siddiqui....................West Babylon, N.Y. 24......Peter Lau ............................Great Neck, N.Y. 25......Alex Eli Vinsky ....................Westbury, N.Y. 26......Daniel Chikvashvili..............Melville, N.Y. 27......Justin McMackin ................North Baldwin, N.Y. 28......Adam Lammers ..................Central Islip, N.Y. 29......Maximillian Wreidt ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 30......Zachary David Gruber........Port Washington, N.Y. 31......Martin Gonzalez-Zurro ......Huntington, N.Y. 32......Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 33......Ethan Sims..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 34......Aaron Marcos Vinsky..........Westbury, N.Y. 35......Justin Benjamin Oresky ....Syosset, N.Y. 36......Michael Hayden Singer......Greenlawn, N.Y. 37......Matthew Strogach..............Commack, N.Y. 38......Matthew Zeifman................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 39......Blake Brown........................Glen Head, N.Y. 40......Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1........Sol Yoon ..............................Commack, N.Y. 2........David Ammendola..............Massapequa, N.Y. 3........Jagger Gillman....................Glen Head, N.Y. 4........Michael Kaydin ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 5........Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 6........Rohan Mathur ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 7........Nicholas Mark Newell ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 8........Luke Karniewich ................Glen Head, N.Y. 9........Samir Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 10......Adam M. Canarick..............Woodbury, N.Y. 11......Nicholas Gajda....................Smithtown, N.Y. 12......Tyler London........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 13......Christopher Grisham ..........Huntington, N.Y. 14......Josh Gelfond ......................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 15......Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 16......Andrew Marc Nakhjavan....Dix Hills, N.Y. 17......Griffin Schlesinger ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

ISLAND

18......George Kaslow ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 19......Adrian Kristofer Tsui............Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 20......Jacob Buchbinder..............Roslyn, N.Y. 21......Alexander Benanti ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 22......Tommy George Srisuro ......Garden City, N.Y. 23......Christopher Kokkinos ........Manhasset, N.Y. 24......Yash Samantaray................Syosset, N.Y. 25......Brandon Lee ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 26......Matthew T. Roberts ............Setauket, N.Y. 27......Valentine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 28......Aditya Dave ........................Syosset, N.Y. 29......Evan Brady..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 30......Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y. 31......Peter Leonard Fahy............Huntington, N.Y. 32......Preet Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 33......Sanford Greenberg ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 34......Matthew Reid Zapken........Roslyn, N.Y. 35......Aaron Marcos Vinsky..........Westbury, N.Y. 36......George Rettaliata................Bay Shore, N.Y. 37......Varun Gaddam Reddy........Glen Head, N.Y. 38......Sohrob Yavari......................Syosset, N.Y. 39......Alex Childs ..........................East Setauket, N.Y. 40......Michael Wexler....................Old Westbury, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles

RANKINGS

Long Island Boys 18 Singles

Long Island Girls 14 Singles

Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

1........Christopher McGorty..........Bellmore, N.Y. 2........Evan Kober..........................Wantagh, N.Y. 3........Steven Kucharczyk ............Rocky Point, N.Y. 4........Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 5........Sebastian Alvarez ..............Mastic Beach, N.Y. 6........Faran Nazir..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 7........James George Blatchly......Locust Valley, N.Y. 8........Jason Gerber ......................Commack, N.Y. 9........Jordan Diamond ................Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 10......Luke Douglas Johnston ....Port Washington, N.Y. 11......Kenneth Michael Wang......Manhasset, N.Y. 12......Vincent Thompson ............Massapequa, N.Y. 13......David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 14......Evan Lowitt..........................Syosset, N.Y. 15......Tyler Grosse ........................Bayport, N.Y. 16......Connor Gould ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 17......Ankur Kejriwal ....................Hewlett, N.Y. 18......Cameron Posillico ..............Bayville, N.Y. 19......Vinny Sciortino....................Merrick, N.Y. 20......Jonathan Matros ................East Islip, N.Y. 21......Robert Mattia ......................Farmingdale, N.Y. 22......Rishav Mukherjee ..............Syosset, N.Y.

1........Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppague, N.Y. 2........Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 3........Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4........Michelle Roitgarts ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 5........Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 6........Brooke Ann Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 7........Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 8........Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 9........Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 10......Madeline A. Clinton ............Manhasset, N.Y. 11......Christina Lorraine Jud ........Glen Head, N.Y. 12......Daniela J. Benigno..............Shoreham, N.Y. 13......Jillian Rebecca Shulder......Setauket, N.Y. 14......Haley Raphael ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 15......Kaitlyn Byrnes ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 16......Ann Sophia Kogosov ........Syosset, N.Y. 17......Jade Fixon-Owoo ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 18......Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Huntington, N.Y. 19......Sofia Walzer ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 20......Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 21......Madeline Lane ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 22......Elena Artemis Vlamakis......Garden City, N.Y. 23......Carly Menker ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 24......Gina LaRusso ....................Melville, N.Y. 25......Lauren Ann Bishop ............Woodbury, N.Y. 26......Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 27......Ariana Malik ........................Melville, N.Y. 28......Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 29......Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 30......Bryn Schlussler ..................Bay Shore, N.Y. 31......Riley Elizabeth Katzman ....Halesite, N.Y. 32......Rachel Bernstein ................Plainview, N.Y. 33......Victoria Anna Bialczak........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 34......Natalia Caroline Krol ..........Greenvale, N.Y. 35......Julia Kinalis..........................Amity Harbor, N.Y. 36......Anastasia Hoffman ............North Massapequa, N.Y. 37......Cara Becker ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 38......Joelle Ann Benigno ............Shoreham, N.Y. 39......Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ..Lynbrook, N.Y. 40......Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City 1........Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 2........Matthew Kolkhorst ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 3........Evan Lander........................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 4........Christopher McGorty..........Bellmore, N.Y. 5........Faran Nazir..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 6........Patrick Sean Lombardi ......Halesite, N.Y. 7........Jason Gerber ......................Commack, N.Y. 8........Saiteja Damineni ................Albertson, N.Y. 9........Matthew G. Levine ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 10......Jagger Gillman....................Glen Head, N.Y. 11......Nicholas Gajda....................Smithtown, N.Y. 12......Joshua Samuel Simoncic ..Glen Head, N.Y. 13......Jack Cameron Goldman....Old Westbury, N.Y. 14......Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 15......Shane Darius Terry..............Southampton, N.Y. 16......George Kaslow ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 17......Jordan Diamond ................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 18......Brandon Nomberg..............Deer Park, N.Y. 19......Connor Wright ....................Commack, N.Y. 20......Aaron Askowitz ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 21......Spencer Kirschman............Dix Hills, N.Y. 22......Jay Burkett..........................Syosset, N.Y. 23......David Seth Zuckerman ......Valley Stream, N.Y. 24......James George Blatchly......Locust Valley, N.Y. 25......Nicholas M. Sica ................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 26......Adrian Kristofer Tsui............Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 27......James Kyrkanides ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 28......Christopher Kokkinos ........Manhasset, N.Y. 29......Jordan Michael Bennett ....Valley Stream, N.Y. 30......Evan Lowitt..........................Syosset, N.Y. 31......Jake Landsberg ..................Huntington, N.Y. 32......Austin Egna ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 33......Julian Thomas MacGurn....Amagansett, N.Y. 34......Drew Greenberg ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 35......Curran Varma......................Manhasset, N.Y. 36......Benjamin Craddock............Stony Brook, N.Y. 37......Kevin Kucharczyk ..............Rocky Point, N.Y. 38......Ian Bank ..............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 39......Robert Sangirardi................Lynbrook, N.Y. 40......Timothy Nacca....................Garden City, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1........Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 2........Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 3........Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 4........Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 5........Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 6........Janelle Chen ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 7........Julianna Marie Romeo ......Massapequa, N.Y. 8........Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 9........Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 10......Daniela J. Benigno..............Shoreham, N.Y. 11......Lauren Zola ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 12......Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 13......Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 14......Sydney Simmons ..............East Northport, N.Y. 15......Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 16......Emily Tannenbaum ............Commack, N.Y. 17......Ida Nicole Poulos................Manhasset, N.Y. 18......Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 19......Alina Rebeca Lyakhov........Great Neck, N.Y. 20......Nicole Kyrkanides ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 21......Anna Vanessa Malin ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 22......Anastasia Hoffman ............North Massapequa, N.Y. 23......Olivia Broder........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 24......Lauren Hutton ....................Huntington, N.Y. 25......Gabriela Sciarrotta..............Woodmere, N.Y. 26......Andrea Irta Brazyte ............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 27......Annaliese Zola ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 28......Madeline Richmond ..........Syosset, N.Y. 29......Sarah Gabrielle Faber ........Roslyn, N.Y. 30......Lauren Jordana Druz..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 31......Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 32......Michaela Liz Ben-Sorek ....Great Neck, N.Y. 33......Isabella Sha ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34......Jessica Wang......................Albertson, N.Y. 35......Daniella Victoria Paikin ......Valley Stream, N.Y. 36......Kavina Amin........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 37......Shoshanna Leah Tokar ......Great Neck, N.Y. 38......Remi Berlent ......................Huntington, N.Y. 39......Gabriela Glickstein..............Commack, N.Y. 40......Jolie Nemshin ....................Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1........Alexandra Waldman ..........East Hampton, N.Y. 2........Rebecca Elizabeth Stern....Dix Hills, N.Y. 3........Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4........Emily Kate Shutman ..........Huntington, N.Y. 5........Grace Graham ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 6........Montaine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 7........Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 8........Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y. 9........Elena Nastasi ......................Bayville, N.Y. 10......Emily Rose Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 11......Ann Sophia Kogosov ........Syosset, N.Y. 12......Elinor Simek ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 13......Christina Lorraine Jud ........Glen Head, N.Y. 14......Nicole Lin Chin....................Selden, N.Y. 15......Brooke Emily Digia ............Manhasset, N.Y. 16......Michelle Roitgarts ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 17......Danielle Mirabella................Wantagh, N.Y. 18......Jessica Schwarz ................Oceanside, N.Y. 19......Mina Sarcevic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 20......Lakshmi Babureddy ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 21......Amanda Ress-Liere............Yaphank, N.Y. 22......Victoria Evelyn Villalba........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23......Sabrina Ferretti....................Setauket, N.Y. 24......Taylor Bradford....................Sea Cliff, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG 25......Juliana Shenker ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 26......Emily Davidow ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 27......Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 28......Gabrielle Raziel ..................Melville, N.Y. 29......Hannah Vimod Abraham....Syosset, N.Y. 30......Laura Jean Halsey..............Westhampton, N.Y. 31......Rachel Flynn Collins ..........Port Jefferson, N.Y. 32......Emma Kate Rosenberg......Port Washington, N.Y. 33......Courtney Connors ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 34......Sophie Grace Wilson..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 35......Rachel Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 36......Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Huntington, N.Y. 37......Lindsay Jane Haley ............Hicksville, N.Y. 38......Michelle Carnovale ............Massapequa, N.Y. 39......Kendall Julia Kutner............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 40......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1........Rebecca Elizabeth Stern....Dix Hills, N.Y. 2........Bridget Connors ................East Quogue, N.Y. 3........Grace Graham ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 4........Claudia Ruiz........................Glen Head, N.Y. 5........Julia Khan............................Port Washington, N.Y. 6........Ellen Huhulea ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 7........Elena Nastasi ......................Bayville, N.Y. 8........Victoria Evelyn Villalba........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 9........Montaine Le Goupil-Maier Oceanside, N.Y. 10......Alexandra Waldman ..........East Hampton, N.Y. 11......Nicole Lin Chin....................Selden, N.Y. 12......Suzanne C. Silecchia..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 13......Eirini Margarita Kontaki ......West Islip, N.Y. 14......Cameron Leigh Moskol......Wantagh, N.Y. 15......Tayler Bradford....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 16......Juliana Shenker ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 08/05/14)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 1........Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 4........Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 8........Sujay Sharma......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 10......Maxwell Moadel..................Brookville, N.Y. 11......Logan Paik Chang..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 18......Jack Flores..........................Huntington, N.Y. 19......Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 22......Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 25......Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 34......Isaac Smith ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 41......Rohan Gaddam Reddy ......Glen Head, N.Y. 43......Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 47......Alexander Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 69......Justin Benjamin Oresky ....Syosset, N.Y. 73......Brandon Zhu ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 76......Daniel Chikvashvili..............Melville, N.Y. 80......Aryan Kumar Sethi..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 86......Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 87......Peter Anastasakis ..............East Norwich, N.Y. 91......George Scribner Bader ......Water Mill, N.Y. 94......Michael Weitz......................Roslyn, N.Y. 99......Brandon Lee ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 101 ..Adam Lammers ..................Central Islip, N.Y. 106 ..Jared M Phillips ..................Plainview, N.Y. 117 ..Sujay Alluri ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 118 ..Luke Louchheim ................Sagaponack, N.Y.

60

121 126 130 137 144 146 150

ISLAND

..Brandon J Lin......................Great Neck, N.Y. ..Gunner Overstrom..............Locust Valley, N.Y. ..Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. ..Mark Ryan Taranov ............Valley Stream, N.Y. ..Peter Albert Blukary............Jericho, N.Y. ..Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. ..Justin Y. Shen ....................Glen Head, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 4........Daniel Eric Pellerito ............Syosset, N.Y. 7........Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 9........Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 10......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 13......Neel Raj ..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 14......Ronald Hohmann ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 16......Patrick Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 19......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 30......Michael Medvedev ............Oceanside, N.Y. 41......Benjamin Cole Grossman..Sands Point, N.Y. 42......Alan Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 46......Abinhav Srivastava ............Melville, N.Y. 47......Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 53......Karan Amin..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 54......Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 55......Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 65......Zachary Ian Khazzam ........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 72......Jack Flores..........................Huntington, N.Y. 78......Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 80......Matthew Porges ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 81......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 82......Lazar Ivan Markovic ..........Lattingtown, N.Y. 95......Matthew Terlovsky..............Merrick, N.Y. 104 ..Maxwell Moadel..................Brookville, N.Y. 106 ..Sujay Sharma......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 111 ..Luke Karniewich ................Glen Head, N.Y. 114 ..Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 120 ..Alexander Roti ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 121 ..Adrian Krisofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 124 ..Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y. 133 ..Sol Yoon ..............................Commack, N.Y. 137 ..Logan Paik Chang..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 149 ..Michael Kaydin ..................Valley Stream, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 2........Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 5........Athell Patrick Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 11......Sean Mullins........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 22......Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 23......Yuval Solomon....................Plainview, N.Y. 24......Daniel Shleimovich ............Syosset, N.Y. 26......Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 27......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 28......Sean Patrick........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 37......Stephen Gruppuso ............Bayport, N.Y. 38......Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 40......Chris Kuhnle........................Shoreham, N.Y. 45......Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 47......Kyle Hudson Gower ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 48......Alan Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 49......Dylan Granat ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 50......Tyler Ng................................Great Neck, N.Y. 52......Aziz Rashidzada ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 57......Alex Grossman ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 58......Rajan Vohra ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 67......Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 69......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ........Massapequa, N.Y. 74......Michael Medvedev ............Albertson, N.Y.

RANKINGS

89......Del Schunk..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 95......Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 97......Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 102 ..Andy Zhou ..........................Commack, N.Y. 105 ..Nicholas Braden Gunther ..East Hampton, N.Y. 112 ..Matthew Holweger ............Manhasset, N.Y. 119 ..Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 120 ..Xin Eric Yu ..........................Manhasset, N.Y. 121 ..Timothy Hayden Nacca ....Garden City, N.Y. 130 ..Garrett Malave ....................Laurel, N.Y. 133 ..Julian Thomas MacGurn....Amagansett, N.Y. 135 ..Benjamin Cole Grossman..Sands Point, N.Y. 136 ..Patrick Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 137 ..Matthew Kolkhorst ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 148 ..Nicholas Gajda....................Smithtown, N.Y. 149 ..Jake Parker Cohen ............Oceanside, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 1........Daniel Grunberger ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 6........Josh Silverstein ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 13......Lubomir Cuba ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 16......Phillip Antohi ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 22......Brendan Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 28......Bryant J. Born ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 30......Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32......Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 38......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 40......Dylan Appel ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 42......Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 52......Kyle Alper ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 58......Brian Hoffarth......................Fort Salonga, N.Y 66......Justin Park ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 69......Julian Zlobinsky ..................Greenvale, N.Y. 71......Michael James DeNigris ....Islip, N.Y. 75......Benjamin Rosen..................Port Washington, N.Y. 83......Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 85......Conor Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 89......Athell Bennett......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 93......Zain Ali ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 104 ..Cory Seltman ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 107 ..Fernando Filho....................East Hampton, N.Y. 108 ..Cooper Francis Lacertera ..Speonk, N.Y. 115 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 116 ..William Bader......................Water Mill, N.Y. 118 ..Joseph James D’Orazio ....Saint James, N.Y. 122 ..Palmer T. Clare....................North Bellmore, N.Y. 123 ..Florimond Le Goupil-Maier Oceanside, N.Y. 126 ..Ross Reiffman ....................Melville, N.Y. 128 ..Jonathan Paris....................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 130 ..Henry Tell ............................Woodbury, N.Y. 137 ..Jake Sandler ......................Lynbrook, N.Y. 146 ..Andy Zhou ..........................Commack, N.Y. 147 ..Sean Mullins........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 148 ..Duane Davis........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 149 ..Alex Grossman ..................Sands Point, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 4........Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 5........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 22......Amy Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 24......Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 40......Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 50......Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 56......Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 60......Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

62......Kavina Amin........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 66......Rose Hayes ........................East Moriches, N.Y. 67......Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 70......Madeline Richmond ..........Syosset, N.Y. 72......Alina Rebeca Lyakhov........Great Neck, N.Y. 74......Kaya Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 80......Gabriela Sciarrotta..............Woodmere, N.Y. 90......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 95......Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 101 ..Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 112 ..Ida Nicole Poulos................Manhasset, N.Y. 114 ..Janelle Chen ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 123 ..Julianna Romeo..................Massapequa, N.Y. 128 ..Emily Tannenbaum ............Commack, N.Y. 132 ..Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 141 ..Lauren Hutton ....................Huntington, N.Y. 142 ..Lauren Zola ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 144 ..Sydney Simmons ..............East Northport, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 2........Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 16......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 19......Merri Kelly............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 25......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 35......Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y. 52......Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 61......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 79......Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 81......Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 85......Madeline Clinton ................Manhasset, N.Y. 89......Alexa Susan Goetz ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 94......Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 96......Evangelina Maria Frankis ..Manhasset, N.Y. 100 ..Kaitlyn Byrnes ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 101 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 116 ..Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 118 ..Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 121 ..Jade Fixon-Owoo ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 128 ..Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 130 ..Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 133 ..Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 137 ..Jill Lawrence ......................Hauppauge, N.Y. 146 ..Risha Malhotra....................Syosset, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 4........Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 6........Taylor Cosme ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 11......Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 16......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 20......Ashley Lessen ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 28......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 29......Celeste Rose Matute..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 38......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 52......Courtney B. Kowalsky........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 57......Esther Chikvashvili..............Melville, N.Y. 69......Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 71......Amanda Allison Foo ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 82......Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 88......Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 93......Danielle Mirabella................Wantagh, N.Y. 95......Morgan Wilkins ..................Huntington, N.Y. 97......Oliva Rose Scordo..............Glen Head, N.Y. 104 ..Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Melville, N.Y. 107 ..Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 112 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 116 ..Rachel Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 119 ..Emily Shutman....................Huntington, N.Y.


LONG 120 121 124 128 134 138 140 141 142 145

..Michelle Roitgarts ..............Roslyn, N.Y. ..Michelle Carnovale ............Massapequa, N.Y. ..Alexandra Waldman ..........East Hampton, N.Y. ..Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. ..Theodora Brebenel ............Glen Head, N.Y. ..Olivia Faulhaber ..................Saint James, N.Y. ..Montaine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. ..Courtney Connors ..............Manhasset, N.Y. ..Merri Kelly............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. ..Brynn Maris April ................Dix Hill, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ......................................City 7........Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 9........Aleksandra Mally ................Franklin Square, N.Y. 11......Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 23......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 34......Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 38......Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 42......Eirini Margarita Kontaki ......West Islip, N.Y. 46......Madison Courtney Appel ..Locust Valley, N.Y. 53......Taylor S. Cosme..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 56......Lauren Ann Livingston........Sands Points, N.Y. 72......Sunaina Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 87......Bridget Elaine Harding........Northport, N.Y. 92......Julia Khan............................Port Washington, N.Y. 95......Claudia Ruiz........................Glen Head, N.Y. 99......Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 106 ..Rebecca Elizabeth Stern....Dix Hills, N.Y. 107 ..Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 114 ..Ashley Lessen ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 120 ..Amber Nicole Policare........East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 126 ..Paulina Tafler ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 131 ..Grace Graham ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 133 ..Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 134 ..Michele Sheila Lehat ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 138 ..Danielle Giannetti................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 146 ..Vanessa Scott ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 148 ..Bridget Connors ................East Quogue, N.Y. 149 ..Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 08/06/14)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 6........Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 8........Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 72......Sujay Sharma......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 95......Logan Paik Chang..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 150 ..Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 152 ..Maxwell Moadel..................Brookville, N.Y. 181 ..Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 224 ..Jack Flores..........................Huntington, N.Y. 299 ..Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 311 ..Isaac Smith ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 319 ..Rohan Reddy......................Glen Head, N.Y. 627 ..Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 730 ..Alexander Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y.

ISLAND

82......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 102 ..Neel Raj ..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 115 ..Ronald P. Hohmann............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 126 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 161 ..Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 190 ..Michael Medvedev ............Oceanside, N.Y. 507 ..Alan Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 659 ..Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 677 ..Billy Suarez..........................Huntington, N.Y. 763 ..Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 779 ..Karan K. Amin ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 809 ..Benjamin Grossman ..........Sands Point, N.Y. 922 ..Matthew Porges ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 31......Brenden Andrew Volk ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 69......Patrick Athell Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 103 ..Sean Mullins........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 241 ..Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 258 ..Yuval Solomon....................Plainview, N.Y. 288 ..Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 359 ..Sean Patrick........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 363 ..Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 369 ..Daniel Shleimovich ............Syosset, N.Y. 409 ..Stephen Grappusso ..........Bayport, N.Y. 517 ..Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 675 ..Dylan Granat ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 714 ..Chris Kuhnle........................Shoreham, N.Y. 763 ..Rajan Jai Vohra ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 830 ..Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 865 ..Alex Grossman ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 932 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 21......Daniel Grundberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 29......Josh Silverstein ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 145 ..Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 218 ..Lubomir Cuba ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 223 ..Julian Zlobinski ..................Greenvale, N.Y. 236 ..Noah B. Rubin ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 337 ..Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 361 ..Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 383 ..Bryant Born ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 439 ..Dylan Hobbs Appel ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 466 ..Philip Daniel Antohi ............Glen Head, N.Y. 584 ..Brian Hoffarth......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 650 ..Jesse Levitin........................Manhasset, N.Y. 677 ..Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 744 ..Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 782 ..Billy Suarez..........................Huntington, N.Y. 806 ..Zain Ali ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 816 ..Conor Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 893 ..Sean M. Mullins ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

RANKINGS

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 26......Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 46......Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 137 ..Amy Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 213 ..Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 428 ..Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 937 ..Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 967 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 973 ..Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 982 ..Madison Smith....................Glen Cove, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 9........Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 193 ..Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 208 ..Merri Kelly............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 353 ..Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 471 ..Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y. 755 ..Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 34......Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 164 ..Taylor S. Cosme..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 201 ..Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 336 ..Jasmine Abidi ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 427 ..Celeste Rose Matute..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 493 ..Ashley Lessen ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 543 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 727 ..Jacqueline Rae Buzkin ......Manorville, N.Y. 890 ..Courtney B. Kowalsky........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 978 ..Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Huntington, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 105 138 197 600 612 625 664 682 774 912

..Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. ..Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. ..Aleksandra Mally ................Franklin Square, N.Y. ..Madison Courtney Appel ..Locust Valley, N.Y. ..Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. ..Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. ..Mia Vecchio ........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. ..Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. ..Sunaina Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y. ..Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 32......Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 67......Daniel Eric Pellerito ............Syosset, N.Y. 80......Patrick Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2014

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. SEPTEMBER 2014 Friday-Sunday, September 5-7 L1B Bethpage September Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail paitchison@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, September 5-7 L1B RSTA September Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail pstankevich@ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. Friday-Sunday, September 5-7 L1B RWTTC September Challenger Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Aug. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, September 5-7 L1B Point Set September Challenger Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14, 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 536-2323.

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Friday-Sunday, September 5-7 L2O Sportime Lynbrook September Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE), Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 1 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, September 5-7 L2R Sportime Syosset September Regional Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, September 5-7 L3 Deer Park Eastern September UPS Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) and Quick Start Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail deerparktennis@optimum.net or call (631) 667-3476. Friday-Sunday, September 12-14 L1B Sportime Lynbrook September Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 7 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, September 12-14 L1B Sportime Syosset Fall Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) and Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, September 12-14 L2O Sportime Kings Park September Open Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE), Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 7 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, September 12-14 L1B CMTC September Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 7 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, September 12-14 L3 Huntington Eastern UPS Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Novice Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) and Quick Start Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 8 at 4:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.


USTA/Long Island Region 2014

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, September 19-21 L1 Sportime Bethpage September Championships Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 12 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, September 26-28 L3 Sportime Kings Park Eastern UPS Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 21 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, September 19-21 L3 RWTTC September UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 18 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, September 26-28 L1B CMTC September Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, September 19-21 L1B Christopher Morley Fall Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14, 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 14 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, September 26-28 L1B Long Beach Apple Pie Classic Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) and Challenger Mixed Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Saturday, September 26-27 L1B RWTTC September Challenger Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Aug. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Saturday, September 27 L3 Sportime Syosset September UPS Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Novice Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

OCTOBER 2014 Friday-Sunday, October 3-5 L1B CMTC October Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, October 3-5 L1B Sportime Kings Park October Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, October 3-5 L2R Sportime Lynbrook October Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE), Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE)) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 29 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, October 3-5 & October 10-12 L1 Huntington Indoor Fall Championships Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Sept. 25 at 6:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2014

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Monday, October 10-13 L1 Sportime Bethpage October Championships Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles & Doubles 78 Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 5 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, October 10-12 L1B CMTC Fall Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Monday, October 10-13 L1 RSTA October Championships Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 5 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail pstankevich@ross.org or call (631) 907-5162.

Friday-Monday, October 10-13 L1 RWTTC October Championships Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 81 Round Hill Road Roslyn Heights, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 5 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, October 10-12 L1B Sportime Kings Park October Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 5 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Monday, October 10-13 L1B Bethpage State Park Fall Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Friday-Sunday, October 10-12 L1B Sportime Lynbrook October Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 6 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Monday, October 10-13 L2R Deer Park Tennis October Regional Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE), Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 3 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail deerparktennis@optimum.net or call (631) 667-3476.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Saturday-Monday, October 11-13 USTA National Selection Tournament-October Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Boys & Girls Singles 18 (FIC-R16) and Boys & Girls Doubles 18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 for one event, $135.38 for two events, additional fees may apply if registered in three or more events (deadline for entries is Thursday, Sept. 11 at 11:59 a.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 17-19 Empire Cup National Doubles at RWTTC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (FMLC) and Championships Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Oct. 8 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 17-19 L1B Bethpage Park Autumn Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, October 17-19 L1B CMTC Autumn Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.


COME PLAY TENNIS AT THE HOME OF THE US OPEN

We are open to the public 11 months of the year and feature: • • • • • • •

Year round Programs for Adults and Juniors 10 and Under Tennis Summer/Seasonal Camps Open/Contract Court Time Corporate Events, Birthday parties, Field Trips, Tours and more Private Lessons Cardio Tennis

For more information call

718.760.6200 or visit ntc.usta.com

Photo Courtesy of the DIRECTV Airship and Chief Pilot Allan Judd.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine 75 © 2014 USTA. All rights reserved.


When it’s match point and you’ve met your match, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED with our team of orthopedic subspecialists. Shoulder Jonathan Ticker, M.D. Eric Price, M.D. Eric Keefer, M.D. Craig Levitz, M.D. Kenneth Kearns, M.D. Daniel Woods, M.D.

Spine Michael Shapiro, M.D. Alfred Faust, M.D. Seth Grossman, M.D. Andrew Tarleton, M.D.

Hip Bradley Gerber, M.D. James Germano, M.D. Peter Lementowski, M.D.

Foot & Ankle John Feder, M.D. David Zaret, M.D. Omar Saleem, M.D.

Hand, Upper Extremities Walter Rho, M.D. Bennett Brown, M.D. Joshua Mitgang, M.D.

Knee Craig Levitz, M.D. Eric Keefer, M.D. Gregory Lieberman, M.D. Robert Garroway, M.D. Eric Price, M.D. Charles Milchteim, M.D.

Orlin & Cohen is Long Island’s leading orthopedic practice. Our subspecialty focus means that athletes – and all patients – get the very best care from nationally renowned orthopedists who specialize exclusively in your area of concern: hand, shoulder, neck and back, elbow, knee, foot and ankle, and more. Our board-certified, fellowship-trained team features some of the country’s top Sports Medicine subspecialists for expert care of all tennis and other sportsrelated injuries. Available by appointment six days a week, we offer the most advanced orthopedic treatment with comprehensive diagnostic services, including the latest in digital X-ray and MRI technology. Additionally, our pain management and physical therapy and rehabilitation programs will help relieve your pain fast.

Offices in Rockville Centre, Lynbrook, Cedarhurst, Merrick, Massapequa, Woodbury and Bohemia. To schedule an appointment, visit www.orlincohen.com or call 516.536.2800. 76 Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine September October 2014  

Back to Business—Former world #1 looks to regain top form at U.S. Open

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