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LITennisMag.com • July/August 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2011 • LITennisMag.com

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The Night Before the Big Match By Tom Ferraro, Ph.D. The night before an event often determines who the winner is. The loser will be anxious, worried, distracted, thinking of troubling things, and above all, never be thinking of how good a player he or she actually is. The winner, on the other hand, will be remembering who they are, and will recall

and own their talent. This will allow them to relax, rest, practice a bit (but not too much) and be ready to enjoy the match. The winner knows there will be ups and downs, but that they are a good player and can easily bounce back from a bad point. The mindset of the loser focuses on anxiety and how tough the opponent will be. The winner does not do this, but rather,

thinks more about his past wins. You can determine the winner versus the loser by this mindset, so try to learn the winner’s mindset by practicing the above points. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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November/December 2011 Volume 3, Number 6 Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover story Cover photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

USA Back on Track: Americans Showing Signs of Life at the U.S. Open

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Andrew T. Berman Vice President/Sales (516) 409-4444, ext. 333 • andrew@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

Feature Story 24 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Coaches Roundtable Discussion The area’s top tennis coaches sound off in our third annual Coaches Roundtable Discussion on a variety of topics including coaching philosophies, the state of American tennis, the development of 10 & Under tennis, how involved should coaches and parents be in the development of a player, and at what age should junior players begin cross-training, among others.

Jon Blake Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • jonb@usptennis.com Michael Sarro Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 • michael@usptennis.com Anthony Pastecchi Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • anthony@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Marketing Coordinator Tara Cook Billing Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Brent Shearer Editorial Contributor

Gary Simeone Editorial Contributor

David Drucker Editorial Contributor

Ken Goldberg Photographer

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@usptennis.com.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or email david@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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As evidenced by the results of American tennis players at the recent U.S. Open, American tennis is once again on the rise. From the upsets scored by Christina McHale and Donald Young, to the winning of the mixed-doubles crown by Jack Sock & Melanie Oudin, the Americans are again taking the spotlight and the future looks bright for the USA.

Additional Features 16 37 38 40 44 46 52 54

The Biofile: Scott Lipsky By Scoop Malinowsky Charitable Initiatives: Tennis Benefits The Cancer Center for Kids Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Junior Player Spotlight on Claire Handa The On-Court Consultation: A New Way to Find the Perfect Racquet for You By Roman Prokes Carefree 2.5 Team Finishes Second at Sectionals By Arlene Griggs A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps: Summer of 2011 The Teacher is King By Lonnie Mitchel Camhi Rolls to 2011 Nassau County Girl’s Championship By Gary Simeone

Columns 1 3 6 8 18 20 30 34 35 36 42 45 56 58 60 63

Dr. Tom on the Mindset for Winning—The Night Before the Big Match By Dr. Tom Ferraro The Jensen Zone By Luke Jensen USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region Recap Riding the Waves: Using Momentum to Win in Competition By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC Fitness and Nutrition: Meeting Energy Needs By Irina Belfer-Lehat Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Good to Great: A Model for Safely Building the Tennis Champions of Tomorrow (Part II) By Steve Kaplan College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … College Club Tennis is for Losers By Ricky Becker The Sand Pit Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Literary Corner: The Wimbledon Final That Never Was and Other Tennis Tales From a Bygone Era By Brent Shearer Tips From the Tennis Pro: Power … You Want It? You Got It! By Miguel Cervantes III Adult League Recap By Kathy Miller Off the Court Directory Long Island Tennis Club Directory Long Island Ranking, Sponsored by Denny’s USTA/Long Island Region 2011 Tournament Schedule

News Briefs Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2011 United Sports Publications Ltd.

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2011 Hall of Fame Class Honored at the Legends Ball Inwood County Club Captures Their First LIMTL Championship Top USTA Eastern Section Juniors Honored Prior to U.S. Open Army and Navy Capture the Women’s Collegiate One-on-One Doubles® Tournament at Stony Brook University’s Fall Classic


By Luke Jensen am still fired up from this year’s U.S. Open … the most physical Grand Slam tournament I’ve ever been a part of since I began playing in 1983. Before the tournament began, there was an earthquake centered in Washington, D.C. and felt on the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center with no physical damage to the site of the Open. A Hurricane named Irene put a direct hit on the U.S. Open grounds just a day before the tournament began. The matches were delayed by just an hour on the field courts and two hours on Arthur Ashe Stadium. Two solid days of rain in the second week pushed the women’s final to Sunday and the men’s final to a third Monday. In addition, you must also take into account the emotional toll of the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 on the New York area, as so many of the professional tennis family have connections to that tragedy. The event I was supposed to participate in at the 2011 U.S. Open, the “Dead Division” or the “Over Your Playing Weight by 35 Pounds Division,” aka the “Former Champions Division,” was cancelled due to the bad weather. The entire tournament presented some amazing challenges and still produced one of the best U.S. Opens in history. The men’s final was a match that reflected the rough and tough U.S. Open of 2011. Novak Djokovic defeated Rafael Nadal in four sets, 6-2, 6-4, 6-7(3), 6-1, but by the fourth set, both players had gone past empty and were playing on fumes. Djokovic tweaked his lower back late in the third set and Nadal poured every

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ounce of energy, power and will into winning the third set. It was the most physical men’s Grand Slam final I have ever seen. I have seen the five-set thrillers in other Slams, but this final was played at a level none of those were played at. I have never seen anyone wear Nadal out, but Djokovic did. The pace of the rallies was at a level in the third set I have never seen in the game. Nadal dug so deep into himself to redline to the max in order to win the third set and stay alive in the final. Nadal was so spent after the third set, that even an injured Djokovic was too much to handle. Djokovic is 6-0 against Nadal this season alone, and Nadal must evolve as a player once again to compete for the top spot in the world. Like Rafa did as a clay court player to win Wimbledon and last year’s U.S. Open, Nadal must adapt his game to beat Djokovic. That is the beauty of our game. It will

always challenge you to come up with more to succeed. If you don’t … the game will pass you by. The game gets better … are you getting better? Go for the lines! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen is head coach of the Syracuse University Women’s Tennis Team. Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lbjensen@syr.edu.

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2011 Hall of Fame Class Honored at The Legends Ball Credit all photos to Anne Marie McLaughlin/International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum

n the eve of U.S. Open Finals Weekend, tennis champions, industry leaders and supporters of the game gathered at Cipriani Wall Street for The 2011 Legends Ball. The event honored the greatest legends and supporters of the sport of tennis while raising funds to support the International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum in their mission to preserve tennis history and inspire its future. Class of 2011 Hall of Fame inductees Andre Agassi 2012 Tennis Hall of Fame and Peachy nominee Jennifer Capriati Kellmeyer were honored at the arrives at The 2011 event. An inLegends Ball

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Stefanie Graf and Andre Agassi were honored at the 2011 Legends Ball Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert chat with Andre Agassi

credible collection of tennis champions and Hall of Famers joined in the celebration, including Stefanie Graf, Billie Jean King, Tracy Austin, Martina Navratilova, Chris Evert, Pam Shriver, Tony Trabert, Maria Bueno, Vic Seixas, Stan Smith and Dick Savitt. Additionally, some of the sport’s most influential contributors attended, including Hall of Famers Donald Dell, Butch Buchholz and Russ Adams. Also joining in

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

the festivities was 2012 Hall of Fame nominee Jennifer Capriati. At the event, legendary sportscaster Dick Enberg was presented the Eugene L. Scott Award, a tribute to his 50-year career in sports broadcasting and long-time support of tennis. Campbell Soup Company was presented the Joseph F. Cullman III Award, in recognition of their years of support for tennis at all levels.


Grammy Award-winning artist Marc Cohn performs his hit, “Walking in Memphis” The crowd was treated to a special performance by Grammy Award winner Marc Cohn, who dazzled the crowd with his always popular “Walking in Memphis.” A live and silent auction of exclusive tennis experiences, travel and memorabilia raised more than $150,000. Additionally, many attendees contributed more than $25,000 to a special fund which will provide free admission to the Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum for kids ages 16 and under for a full year, in support of the Hall of Fame’s mission Former New York Mayor David Dinkins and Murphy Jensen pause for a photo

to inspire the future of tennis. The event was made possible with the generous and dedicated support of the three Legends Ball co-chairs, as well as event sponsors, BNP Paribas, FILA, Rolex and Transamerica Retirement Management. The 2011 Legends Ball co-chairs were Mark Ein of Washington, D.C., founder and CEO of Venturehouse Group LLC and owner of the Washington Kastles of World TeamTennis; Mike Goss of Westport, Conn., who is managing director and COO of Bain Capital; and Bob Jeffrey of New York City, worldwide chairman and CEO of J. Walter Thompson.

Mary Carillo (right) interviews members of the 2011 Tennis Hall of Fame Class, Andre Agassi (left) and Peachy Kellmeyer (center)

2012 Australian Open to Offer $25 Million in Prizes The 2012 Australian Open, set for Jan. 16-29 at Melbourne Park, will be the richest tournament in Grand Slam tennis history, with the winners of both the men’s and women’s singles to pocket $2.2 million U.S. and a total of $25 million U.S. will be paid out at the event. Australian Open Director Craig Tiley expects defending champion Kim Clijsters and 2011 U.S. Open finalist Serena Williams to participate on the women’s side of the draw, in addition to Australia’s own Samantha Stosur, the 2011 U.S. Open champion. “We know that Kim’s been out for most of the year, but she’s planning on being back to defend her title,” said Tiley. “We’ve still got three months to go, but the last communication is that she’s planning on being back. The same thing with Serena, she unfortunately missed this year’s Open [2011 Australian Open] with her injury, but she’s back playing, we all saw at the finals of the U.S. Open, and she’ll be here too.”

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region

Malverne’s “Coach” named L.I. hero Charles Nanton of West Hempstead, N.Y., affectionately known as “Coach” throughout the Malverne schools community, was named a “Hero on Our Island” by FIOS-1 News, the Long Island-focused news channel seen on Verizon FIOS cable systems. Coach Nanton was profiled in a 15min.-long segment filmed at Malverne High School and Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis in West Hempstead. Nanton was previously named Adult Volunteer of the Year by the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region in May 2011 (pictured above with USTA/Eastern-LI Region President Daniel Burgess). The news segment focused on Coach Nanton’s volunteer work with both the Malverne High School tennis and football teams, and included interviews with current and former students who have worked with Coach for many years. “Charles Nanton has worked tirelessly on Long Island as a volunteer to provide positive outlets for children through athletics,” said Daniel Burgess, president of the USTA/Eastern-LI Region. Since his retirement from the New York City Police Department, Nanton has taken on the role of president of the Lakeview Youth Federation, which organizes community tennis programs and basketball leagues, funds and administers track teams and provides tutoring programs. He has been a volunteer tennis coach for many years in the Malverne School District, where he works closely with the athletes to ensure their academic eligibility. “With his dedication and leadership, the overall academic average in the Malverne School District has improved significantly,” Burgess said. “Charles’ tennis mission is to accomplish a standard of excellence in the spirit of friendship, brotherhood, peace, tolerance and respect for all.”

Nassau County thanks the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region USTA/Eastern-LI Region Vice President Michael Pavlides (left) and William Mecca (right), USTA/Eastern Tennis Service Representative, have been honored by Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano (center) for contributing to the health and welfare of Nassau County youth through their efforts in coordinating the 4th Annual Tennis Blitz in the Parks. The event, held in late July, brought nearly 1,000 chil6

dren to eight different Nassau County parks for free tennis lessons. Conceived and organized by Mecca, along with Karen Beckhard-Ravener from Nassau County’s Parks & Recreation Department, the Blitz teaches children the basics of tennis. Many of the lessons utilized the USTA’s QuickStart tennis format, a program specially designed for children under the age of 10 where the racquets are smaller, the balls are lighter and courts are shorter. Nassau County Executive Mangano presented Pavlides and Mecca with special County Citations recognizing their efforts along with the support of the entire Eastern Section and Long Island Region and all of the pros and tennis clubs that participated, making the event a success.

Long Island Region plays at Bellmore Fair The USTA/Eastern-LI Region took its talents outdoors at the 25th Annual Bellmore Family Festival, where the region made it first appearance with a special 10 & Under court set up in the fair’s Sports Expo area. QuickStart courts were the place to be during the Festival, as hundreds of kids took their turns trying out tennis the QuickStart way. Tennis pros from across Nassau and Suffolk Counties volunteered their time and equipment to make the day a success. “Not only did the Bellmore Festival provide an opportunity for us to expose numerous children to the sport of a lifetime, but we also signed up 100 kids for 10 & Under USTA memberships,” said Daniel Burgess, president of the USTA/Eastern-LI Region. Children ages 10 and under who sign up for a new USTA memberships can do so for free until Dec. 31, 2011. For more information on becoming a USTA member, please visit www.TRYUSTA.com/KIDS or call 1-800-990-8782 and mention source code “NEWGAME.” A USTA kids’ membership includes: I An annual subscription to the Bounce newsletter I Access to play USTA Junior Tournaments I Access to play USTA Junior TeamTennis “Special thanks to Bill Mecca, Marian Morris and Melanie Rubin, who coordinated the Region’s activities at the Bellmore Fair, as well as all of the pros who came to help give lessons and sign up new members,” said Burgess. “Additional thanks to the Bellmore Chamber of Commerce for their support. We look forward to participating again next year.”

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com


USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region

Noah Rubin introduces fiveyear-old Dylan Levinter to tennis Marian Morris prepares the USTA/Eastern-LI booth for the Bellmore Street Fair

Michael Liu, Marian Morris and Steve Haar show their support for USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region tennis at the Bellmore Family Festival USTA/Eastern-LI Region President Daniel Burgess (left) gets ready for the Fair with 15year-olds Ross Binder (center) and Jared Zeitlin (right) both of Merrick, N.Y.

A local dog shows his support for the USTA/Eastern LI Region

Tennis players in disguise Sunny Fishkind teaches tennis basics

Ed Fishkind, Sunny Fishkind and Melanie Rubin set up for the 25th Annual Bellmore Family Festival Bellmore JFK High School Tennis team members Ross Binder (left) and Jared Zeitlin (right) join USTA/Eastern-LI Region President Daniel Burgess and Nassau County Legislator David Denenberg

Noah Rubin (center) with Dylan (age 5) and Ryan (age 3) Levinter of Merrick, N.Y.

Ed Fishkind gives a lesson

Tennis pro Kerrisha Buckley introduces young players to the sport

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Riding the Waves Using Momentum to Win in Competition By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC surfer sits out in the open ocean. The water is calm, the surfer is in complete control. Atop his surfboard, the surfer can enjoy the tranquility of his sport. However, he has not come out to the open water to enjoy tranquility. The surfer has ventured out in search of the big wave … the wave that will get his adrenaline pumping; the one that will satisfy his craving for the thrill of competition; the wave that will push him to the absolute limit. He has come not for relaxation, but to embrace a challenge. The surfer looks forward to the biggest wave that may come his way. When the “big one” comes along, it will undoubtedly test his physical abilities, challenge his mental game, and for a moment, leave the surfer wondering if he can come out of the wave unscathed. But if he does, if he stays on the board and is able to ride the wave out, he will be ready for whatever comes next. If he cannot stay on the board, he will spiral out of control, be thrashed under the

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water, and have no ability to take advantage of the calm seas which will follow or handle a new wave. There are parallels between this anecdote and a tennis player competing in a match. Just like the surfer, a tennis player may begin a match in complete control. They make the shots they are supposed to make, and win the points they are supposed to win. But then, just as a wave is bound to occur in the open ocean, a change and momentum shift is bound to occur in a tennis match. This is the natural evolution of nature and sports. Consistency plays a small role in both. The wave is impossible to stop, the momentum cannot be controlled. The best strategy is to continue to battle and try to ride it out. A surfer may see a wave approaching far in the distance, just as a tennis player senses a change in momentum before it shows on the scoreboard. The wave may show itself either as a letdown in one’s own game, i.e., unforced errors, double faults, etc. Or, a boost in your opponent’s game,

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

i.e., aces, running winners, treeing, etc. Factors beyond the player’s control, such as poor line calls or distracting fan conduct, can also lead to a momentum swing. These situations are inevitable in a match. But given the player’s level of awareness to the specifics of a match and their ability to sense the upcoming waves of momentum, players have the opportunity to mentally hunker down and prepare themselves for the impending change. There are times when the waves may be so sudden that all the player can do is hang on, grind it out, and hope to stay afloat. Metaphorically, the wave is a change of momentum often out of the player’s control. Your opponent may hit a winner that paints the line, or hit a ball that hits the net and trickles over for a winner. The only hope to get through the wave is to ride it out. The wave should not be viewed as a setback or even an obstacle, but rather, as an opportunity … an opportunity to test one’s ability to remain focused, levelheaded and in control. An opportunity to adapt and adjust one’s game to what works best in changing situations, and an opportunity to push oneself both mentally and physically towards eventual success. But success can only be achieved if a player can proactively ride out the wave and stay above water. The goal is to simply stay afloat … nothing fancy, just keep grinding. Countless times, Rafael Nadal has demonstrated his ability to do this by saving break point after break point in a match. Just as the calm existed before the wave, the calm will resume after the wave has passed. The question becomes: Is the player still on the board, or have they let that wave throw them off? If they are on the board, they are in a position to battle once the wave and momentum passes. However, if the player feels sorry for them-


selves, cannot stop thinking about past points, and is despondent about the negative turn of events, they will be completely unaware that the wave has passed. They will continue to spiral out of control. The player will not be able to take advantage of the newly-found calm after the storm. A player must recognize that momentum shifts are unavoidable in competition. It is just part of the rhythm of a match. Just as waves in the ocean ebb and flow, the course of a match constantly changes as well. This is a natural phenomenon and the reason why we find sports so entertaining. Waves, momentum shifts and adversity in a match should be seen as a challenge, something to be embraced. Perhaps Billie Jean King said it best when she texted Maria Sharapova “pressure is a privilege.” before Sharapova beat Serena Williams in the 2004 Wimbledon finals. In the end, riding the big wave is the ultimate thrill. A surfer may struggle with the wave, but stay on the board and ride the big wave out. Or, they may completely fall off the board and capsize. When the surfer stays consistent and sensible, calm under pressure, that surfer has a chance to persevere no matter how big and how many waves come his way. A surfer, once he knows he can handle the waves, embraces even bigger waves, hopes for even bigger challenges. Only through challenging oneself and confronting increasingly bigger obstacles can you improve. No one’s saying the wave will be easy to ride out, the object is to battle it and stay afloat. Only by embracing the challenge of a big wave and testing one’s limits will true potential be uncovered. Remember, nothing great is ever achieved without overcoming adversity. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach he works with athletes and teams of all levels. His work focuses on helping athletes gain the mental edge and letting go of blocks which get in the way of peak performance. He is a USTA Zonal Coach and has spoken and been published for the USTA, USPTA and ITA. Additionally, he has conducted workshops nationally and internationally in India and Israel. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail rob@insidethezone or visit www.insidethezone.com.

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Inwood Country Club Captures Their First LIMTL Championship

ince its inaugural season in 1979, no team based on the South Shore of Long Island has won the Long Island Men’s Tennis League (LIMTL). On Aug. 24, that all changed as Inwood Country Club, captained by Lionel Goldberg and co-captained by Jonathan Klee, defeated Cold

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Spring Valley 4-1 to take the championship. Finishing in second place in the regular season behind Woodbury at Crest Hollow Country Club, Inwood defeated two-time defending champion Shelter Rock Tennis Club in the semifinals 3-2 before playing Cold Spring Valley in the finals. The team,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

which previously played their matches at the Village of Lawrence Club, is comprised of Inwood Country Club members and players who live on the South Shore of Long Island. Inwood Country Club will add their name to the league trophy alongside previous LIMTL winners Shelter Rock, Woodbury, North Shore, Fleetwood, Wildwood, Cold Spring Valley, Bethpage, Piquet Lane and Hunting Hills. The LIMTL is comprised of seven teams, with six based on the North Shore, and matches are played every Wednesday night starting from the second week in May through August. Limited to players who are 35 years-of-age or older and made up of predominately 5.0 and 4.5 Level players, the LIMTL consists of five Har-Tru doubles courts. Individual match results for the regular season and playoffs, and more information on the LIMTL can be found on the league Web site, LIMTL.com.


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g n i m • Guide to Long Island’s Top Tennis Clubs Co • 2011 Year In Review In y • Girls High School Season Recap r a u n Ja • Australian Open Preview

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Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by December 1st. For more information, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com. Distribution across Long Island at (300+ locations): • indoor tennis clubs • country clubs • tennis camps • retail stores • supermarkets • gyms • and many more LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Americans Show Signs of Life

at the 2011 U.S. Open By David Drucker he 2011 U.S. Open was certainly one to remember for tennis fans around the world. Whether it was the intense match play, the chaotic weather, or even the 9-11 ceremony, fans will remember this Open for years to come. Of course we remember the epic final between world number one Novak Djokovic from Serbia and world number two Rafael Nadal from Spain; however, what should be given more attention than it’s getting is how well our young American players performed at the final Grand Slam of the year. Over the years, we’ve come to depend on names like Andy Roddick, Mardy Fish, Serena and Venus Williams. The truth is that these players aren’t getting any younger, and we need fresh American talent to step up and represent the United States. This year’s U.S. Open gave us a look at a few names we’ve heard of, such as Donald Young and Ryan Harrison, but also introduced us to players such as Jack Sock, Christina McHale, Madison Keys, Sloane Stephens and more.

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The summer of 2011 was one to remember for Donald Young, who we’ve been waiting to emerge as the talent we Photo credit: Kenneth all thought he would be B. Goldberg when he burst onto the ATP Circuit almost five years ago. Since the conclusion of Wimbledon, Young was 10-4 in his last 14 matches, including a careerbest semifinal run in the Legg Mason Classic where he fell to eventual champion Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic. At the 2011 U.S. Open, Young made it to the fourth round where he picked up quality wins over Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland and veteran Argentine Juan Ignacio Chela before falling to fourth-seeded Andy Murray of Great Britain. It appears as if Young may finally be on his way to becoming the player we thought he’d be. Though Ryan Harrison possesses a great deal of talent, the young American

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

fell in the opening round to Marin Cilic of Croatia. Harrison, who some think has a bit of a childish cocky-like attitude, still has massive potential, and we’ll definitely be on the lookout for him in the 2012 season. Lastly on the men’s side is 19-year-old Jack Sock from Lincoln, Neb. Yes Lincoln, Neb. as in where Andy Roddick hails from. In fact, the two met in the second round of this year’s Photo credit: Kenneth B. Open, where the youngGoldberg ster fell in straight sets to the veteran American. However, Sock did go on to win the mixed-doubles title with American Melanie Oudin. This result was a complete shocker, as the two players never teamed up before the U.S. Open. Oudin who made herself famous for her performance at the U.S. Open a few years back, has struggled since, but with the U.S. mixed-doubles championship now under her belt, perhaps this will kickstart a quality 2012 season.


Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

In women’s singles, we were introduced to players such as Christina McHale, who upset the eighth-seeded Marion Bartoli of France in the second round before losing to Russia’s Maria Kirilenko in the following round.

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Madison Keys showed the fans her potential with a tough three set match against veteran Czech Lucie Safarova. Hopefully, she can continue to improve in the upcoming years and make a name for herself.

Sloane Stephens had a quality tournament making it to the third, round before falling to Serbia’s Ana Ivanovic. However, Stephens upset Israeli veteran Shahar Peer in the second round, which probably was her best career victory to date. American Vania King also reached the third round where she fell to the number one seed Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark. King, who started slow in her singles career, has picked up her play over the past year, so look for her to continue to rise in the rankings. Lastly is Irina Falconi who took out Slovakian Dominika Cibulkova in a Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg grueling three-set match, before falling to Wimbledon semifinalist Sabine Lisicki of Germany in the third round. With all this new young talent, the U.S. finally has something to look forward to in the future. It’s only a matter of time before the Americans we’re used to seeing, such as Andy Roddick, Mardy Fish, James Blake, Serena and Venus Williams are all retired. For a few years now, Americans John Isner and Sam Querrey have made a name for themselves, however, they need some help. The United States remains hopeful for that next big player, whether on the men’s or women’s side, and with the emergence of players like Ryan Harrison, Donald Young, Jack Sock, Christina

McHale, Sloan Stephens, and all the rest, that success is within reach.

American Grace Min upsets top-seeded Caroline Garcia to win U.S. Open Junior Girls Singles Title Grace Min, a 17-yearold from Duluth, Ga., upset top-seeded Caroline Garcia of France, 7-5, 7-6(3), to win the 2011 U.S. Open Junior Girls singles title at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Garcia is currently ranked 135th in the WTA rankings while Min is ranked 552. Min did not drop a set in six matches, which included an upset over the number two seed, Irina Khromacheva of Russia, in the first round, and a victory over fellow American and Stanford University sophomore Nicole Gibbs in the semifinals. With the win, Min becomes the first American to win the U.S. Open Junior Girls Singles Title since Coco Vandeweghe in 2008. When asked how it felt to be a champion Min said, “I don’t really know yet. I’m still processing the win.” Min reached the singles final at the 2010 Orange Bowl and won the Junior Girls Doubles title at Wimbledon earlier this summer. She has trained full-time at the USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, Fla. since the fall of 2009.

American duo of Oudin & Sock capture 2011 U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles Title American teenagers Melanie Oudin and Jack Sock won the 2011 U.S. Open Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg Mixed-Doubles title, beating the eighth-seeded team Gisela Dulko and Eduardo Schwank of Argentina in a third set super-tiebreak, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 10-8. The 19-year-old Oudin had previously taken the tennis world by surprise in becoming the darling of the 2009 U.S. Open, reaching the women’s quarterfinals. The 18-year-old Sock earned his first Grand Slam singles victory in the first round this year before being eliminated by fellow countryman Andy Roddick. The two needed a wild card to get into the tournament, then upset top-seeded defending champs Bob Bryan & Liezel Huber in the second round. “It was actually really easy playing together, because we’re really comfortable with each other,” said Oudin. “It kind of worked really well because he like jokes a lot when we’re playing and he keeps me relaxed, and sometimes, that’s what I have been having trouble with, is staying relaxed playing.” David Drucker is an intern with Long Island Tennis Magazine and is a member of the Nichols College Men’s Tennis team. He may be reached by e-mail at davidd@usptennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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All Eyes Were on Flushing Meadows for the

2011 U.S. Open elevision ratings for the Men’s Singles Finals of the 2011 U.S. Open between top-seeded Novak Djokovic and second-seeded Rafael Nadal were up over last year’s Nielsen Ratings on CBS, with an overnight rating of 2.6 and a six share. The four-hour-plus Djokovic-Nadal match of 2011 was up 18 percent over 2010’s finals match between the two. Nielsen Ratings represent the percentage of all homes with televisions tuned into a program. Shares represent the percentage of all homes with TVs in use at the time. Nielsen Ratings are audience measurement systems developed by Nielsen Media Research that determine the audience size and composition of television programming in the United States. Approximately 53.1 million viewers watched all or part of this year’s Open on CBS Sports, up 17 percent from last year. Ratings overall for the U.S. Open on CBS Sports, which includes broadcasts of Labor Day Weekend and Finals Weekend, saw overall ratings increase over the past three years, matching the ratings of 2007. The 2011 Djokovic-Nadal finals match was moved from Sunday to Monday,

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Sept. 12 due to rain that washed out men’s and women’s action, sending schedule-makers into a frenzy and condensing the schedule for the fourth round onward. The move of the Men’s Singles Finals to Monday, Sept. 12 at 4:00 p.m. may have also given the match a ratings boost as the originally scheduled day and time slot of Sunday, Sept. 11 at noon, was the first Sunday of action of the 2011 National Football League schedule. This year’s Women’s Singles Finals on Sunday, Sept. 11 achieved a 3.3 national rating, with 13.1 million viewers watching all or part of the final, an increase of 93 percent from viewership of the Kim Clijsters-Vera Zvonareva final which aired in primetime on Saturday last year. In addition, the Men’s Singles Final was seen in all or part by 11.8 million viewers. USOpen.org set a new site record for unique visitors (15,421,675), surpassing 2010’s total by 24 percent, and total visits to the site topped 51 million (51,868,345), the second most in history. Additionally, more than 3.1 million hours of live streaming was viewed, an increase of 12 percent over last year. USOpen.org also saw

record mobile traffic across its mobilefriendly Web site (m.usopen.org) and the official iPhone and Android apps, with more than 84 million page views (84,350,596), a 173 percent increase over 2010’s totals. Despite facing Hurricane Irene at the start of the tournament and then working through two days of rain, the USTA announced that the 2011 U.S. Open still attracted more than 650,000 fans to the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Attendance highlights included: I The all-time Labor Day Weekend attendance record (Saturday, Sept. 3-Monday, Sept. 5) of 186,186. I The Men’s Final featuring Djokovic and Nadal also set an all-time attendance record of 24,713 in Arthur Ashe Stadium and on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. I The Men’s Semifinal attendance of 24,071 on Saturday, Sept. 10 set a record as well. I Overall, 11 sessions of the 2011 U.S. Open sold out.

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Scenes from the

2011 U.S. Open Credit all photos to Kenneth B. Goldberg

Switzerland’s Roger Federer (pictured) returns a backhand in his 7-6, 6-4, 3-6, 2-6, 5-7 loss to eventual U.S. Open winner Novak Djokovic in the Men’s Semifinals

Serbian Novak Djokovic celebrates winning the 2011 U.S. Open Serena Williams (pictured), the favorite on the women’s side, ponders her upset loss to Australia’s Samantha Stosur in the Women’s Finals, 2-6, 3-6

Spain’s Rafael Nadal (pictured) en route to his 6-2, 6-1, 6-3 win over American Andy Roddick that would land him a trip to the 2011 U.S. Open Finals

Denmark’s Caroline Wozniacki (pictured) at Arthur Ashe Stadium during her 2-6, 4-6 loss in the Women’s Semifinals to Serena Williams Julia Elbalba of Oyster Bay, N.Y. in first round action on Court 13 at the U.S. Open Junior Girl Singles event

2011 U.S. Open winner Samantha Stosur (pictured) of Australia in early round action against American Coco Vandeweghe at Louis Armstrong Stadium

France’s JoWilfried Tsonga (pictured) defeated American Mardy Fish, the number eight seed, 6-4, 67(5), 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 in fourth round action

Great Britain’s Andy Murray (pictured), the number four seed, in his 7-5, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6(2) quarterfinals win over American John Isner

The American doubles team of Bob & Mike Bryan (pictured) were upset early on in action by Croatia’s Ivo Karlovic & Frank Moser from Germany

The number seven seed Gael Monfils (pictured) of France displays his athleticism during his opening round 7-6(4), 6-3, 6-4 win against Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov

Unseeded American Christina McHale (pictured) celebrates her 76(2), 6-2 win over the eighth-seeded Marion Bartoli from France

Germany’s Andrea Petkovic (pictured), the number 10 seed, celebrates her 3-6, 6-3, 6-3 win over China’s Jie Zheng on the Grandstand

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Biofile: Scott Lipsky

By Scoop Malinowski

Favorite tournament: Wimbledon.

Status: 2011 French Open Mixed-Doubles Champion. Winner of six career ATP doubles titles.

Closest tennis friends: Any of the Americans.

Height: 6’1” • Weight: 175 lbs. Date of birth: August 14, 1981 in Merrick, N.Y. First tennis memory: I’d say hitting balls at the back of the house when I was five. Tennis inspiration: My favorite player was Pete Sampras. Nicknames: My nickname is “Lipper.”

Funniest player encountered: Jordan Kerr because he says a lot of stupid things [smiles]. Embarrassing tennis memory: Can’t think of any. Never lost love and love. Best you’ve ever felt on-court: I played a tournament in Barcelona this year and we beat all the good teams. We beat the Bryans (who were on a 10-match win streak) and we beat Jurgen Melzer & Nenad Zimonjic, as well as Max Mirnyi & Daniel Nestor. Yeah, those were good matches.

Favorite movies: Any comedy.

Strangest match: I played a match in Kuala Lumpur last year. We won 21-19 in the third set tie-break against Santiago Gonzalez & Travis Rettemaier.

Pre-match feeling: I don’t really think about much. Getting ready to play. Just go out there and just do my thing.

Favorite players to watch: Roger Federer … and I like watching Grigor Dimitrov. He plays a lot like Federer.

Favorite meal: Pasta.

Favorite sport outside tennis: Football.

Favorite ice cream flavor: Chocolate.

Funny tennis memory: I got one from Wimbledon this year. The baseline umpire fell asleep during the match [smiles].

Last book read: The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

Current car: A red Jeep. Favorite TV show: Seinfeld. First job: This is my only job. Greatest sports moment: Winning the French Open Mixed-Doubles Title with Casey Dellacqua over Katarina Srebotnik & Nenad Zimonjic. You watch these matches on television, and you wish that someday you can be there. To be on this stage playing a Grand Slam final, and to come out with a win, and to say now for the rest of my life that I’m a Grand Slam champion, it’s amazing. Most painful moment: Losing in the finals of NCAA doubles. We lost to a team from Auburn. 16

Hobbies/interests: I like to watch sports on TV and go to sporting events. People qualities most admired: Sense of humor. Education: Stanford University. Scoop Malinowski is the co-owner of Tennis-prose.com. His next book, Marcelo Rios: The Man We Barely Knew, will be published and available at Amazon.com in October 2011.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com


Top USTA Eastern Section Juniors Honored Prior to U.S. Open

n Aug. 29, prior to the start of the 2011 U.S. Open, some of the top juniors in the USTA Eastern Section were honored at the Junior Awards Gala. All of the junior players received free grounds passes to watch the best players in the world compete on Opening Day of the 2011 U.S. Open. All 25 honorees finished strong in sectional tournaments this year, earning enough points to be recognized. One of the juniors managed to achieve perfection though. Sixteen-year-old Jaime Loeb of Ossining, N.Y. won all eight tournaments that she entered, earning a perfect 800 points and a place in USTA Eastern history. “Jamie’s record is truly incredible,” said Julie Bliss, director of competition and player development for the USTA Eastern Section. “And it is a testament to her talent, hard work and dedication to the sport.” Loeb, who attends Ossining High School, decided to play in all of the sectional tournaments to avoid traveling to International Tennis Federation tournaments

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and missing school. But playing against only Eastern Section girls presented its own set of challenges and rewards. “The pressure was always on me since I was the number one seed,” Loeb said. “It taught me how to deal with high expectations.” Congratulations to the following: 2011 USTA Eastern Award Winners Boys 12s 1. Jeff Zucker (Short Hills, N.J.) 2. George Gramatikov (Vestal, N.Y.) 3. Finbar Talcott (Sea Cliff, N.Y.) Girls 12s 1. Sarah Rahman (East Elmhurst, N.Y.) 2. Stephanie Schrage (Millburn, N.J.) 3. Loren Haukova (Elmsford, NY) Boys 14s 1. Brendan Volk (Dix Hills, N.Y.) 2. Robert Levine (Bedford, N.Y.) 3. Maverick Lin (Edison, N.J.)

Girls 14s 1. Jessica Livianu (Brooklyn, N.Y.) 2. Madison Battaglia (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) 3. Jackie Urbinati (Harrison, N.Y.) Boys 16s 1. Sam Swank (Bedford, N.Y.) 2. Quentin Monaghan (Chatham, N.J.) & Matthew Nardella (Manlius, N.Y.) 3. Josh Silverstein (Great Neck, N.Y.) Girls 16s 1. Quinn Gleason (Mendon, N.Y.) 2. Louisa Chirico (Harrison, N.Y.) 3. Katherine Orozco (New Milford, N.J.) Boys 18s 1. Winston Lin (Williamsville, N.Y.) 2. Andrew Yaraghi (Mill Neck, N.Y.) 3. Andrew Adams (Bronx, N.Y.) Girls 18s 1. Jamie Loeb (Ossining, N.Y.) 2. Amanda Muliawan (Wyckoff, N.J.) 3. Katherine Yau (Manhasset, N.Y.)

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Meeting Energy Needs By Irina Belfer-Lehat he foods that we eat provide the energy and fuel that our body needs. An athlete’s body has different needs and requirements in order to optimize their athletic performance. A lot of people have misconceptions about different food groups, as some try to avoid carbohydrates, while others avoid fat. This type of dieting is called a “Fad Diet� and is never a good idea, especially for an athlete. An athlete needs all the food groups, specifically: Grains, vegetables, fruits, oils, milk, and meat and beans. Carbohydrates, such as sugar and starch, are readily broken down into glucose, the principal energy source of the body. Glucose can be used immediately or it can be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. Blood glucose serves as the

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most significant source of energy for the brain at rest and during exercise. The capacity of your body to store muscle and liver glycogen is limited to about 90-120 min. of continuous, vigorous activity. If you ever hit the wall while exercising, now you know why. That is why it is equally important to include protein and fat in your diet. Fat is the body’s most concentrated source of energy, providing more than twice as much potential energy as carbohydrates or protein (nine calories per gram, versus four calories per gram). During exercise, stored fat in the body in the form of triglycerides in adipose or fat tissue, is broken down into fatty acids. These fatty acids are transformed through the blood to the muscles and are used for fuel. Protein is not being maintained in the body for use of energy. Protein is needed to build and repair body tissue, as well as synthesize important enzymes and hor-

“Elite tennis players require different types and amounts of fuel than most recreational players ‌â€?

mones. Protein, however, provides energy in late stages of prolonged exercise. Elite tennis players require different types and amounts of fuel than most recreational players. A registered dietitian can help accurately estimate your daily caloric needs and assist you in formulating a meal plan that will enhance your athletic achievements. Irina Belfer-Lehat is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. She may be reached by phone at (917) 769-8031 or e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com.

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Hingis to Team With Federer in Comeback at the Australian Open artina Hingis, a five-time Grand Slam champion, will be making a return to the pro tour at the Australian Open for her first time since 2007 when she competed at the U.S. Open. She will be entering the mixeddoubles competition with partner Roger Federer. Hingis is aiming to earn a mixed-doubles entry into the Summer Olympics held in London to take place next summer. She won five majors while in her teens and was number one in the world at one point; she retired from play at the young age of 22 after having chronic ankle problems. In 2006, Hingis played two more seasons where she was able to make it to the quarters of three Grand

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Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Slams where she once again retired after testing positive for cocaine. Hingis has since played for New York’s World TeamTennis teams for the past two years and this will be her first major Grand Slam re-emergence in more than four years. On Federer’s side of play, this will be the first time he enters into a doubles competition at a Grand Slam since 2004. In order for Hingis to enter the Olympics, she has to gain ranking points to enter contention. The exact guidelines for entry into play are not clear, but a mixed-doubles entrance at the Australian Open would be a good beginning to getting into the next Summer Olympics.

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By Emilie Katz Ready for the football season Sabine Lisicki (@sabinelisicki): My favorite player is Drew Brees, so I’m going with the Saints! :) But I still remember how great Packers played in the Super Bowl … John Isner (@JohnIsner): Patrick Peterson meet #89 Steve Smith. This ain’t LSU rook. Best in the league …

What do they do in their time off? Caroline Wozniacki (@carowozniacki): Came home today, unpacked, went grocery shopping and cooked. Proud of myself LOL. Now I am tired, lying in bed chilling.

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Sania Mirza-Malik (@mirzasania): Spa day today with @anammirza :) Girls have to pamper themselves sometimes :)

Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): With @andyroddick we miss you @BrooklynDDecker Andy’s nuts!!!!!

Justin Gimelstob (@ justingimelstob): Hanging at Yankee Stadium.

Victoria Azarenka (@vika7): Watched V. Klitchko fight! Great victory! Congrats! Real strong!

Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): Had an amazing time at Hamptons Party tonight with @Venuseswilliams.

Sabine Lisicki (@sabinelisicki): Horseback riding anyone? :D

Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): I had a good day off today: Had a good hit, relaxing dinner and I‘m ready for tomorrow’s challenge.

Hurricane Irene had them scared Sania Mirza-Malik (@mirzasania): Hurricane Irene coming … supposedly the worst in 100 years … Yikes! Hit at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow before everything shuts down.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): Ok. Its official. I’m scared. I’m in NYC. Oh boy … #HurricaneIrene :(

Sabine Lisicki (@sabinelisicki): Flights are cancelled because of the hurricane ... Hope to find a solution soon! Now I’m off to bed. Good night <3. Fashion Week has them excited Serena Williams (@serenawilliams): Wow. Fashion Night out, football game opener, U.S. Open Tennis … And I have homework :(

Caroline Wozniacki (@carowozniacki): NYC is so busy tonight … Fashion Week starting!!

Victoria Azarenka (@vika7): Aloha people! I’m back in the plane and back to NY for a couple of days! I’m going to Fashion Week :) First time! So I’m really really excited!


Open congrats! Sabine Lisicki (@sabinelisicki): So proud of my doubles partner Sam to win her

Shahar Peer (@shaharpeer): WWWWOOOOWWWW what a match Nadal vs. Djokovic!

first Grand Slam title! Bob Bryan (@Bryanbros): Congrats to Sam Stosur.

Casey Dellacqua (@caseydellacqua): Congrats Sammy … bloody awesome game!

Caroline Wozniacki (@carowozniacki): Watching Nole against Nadal … What a final!

Among the celebrities who attended the open

Anastasia Rodionova (@arodionova): Woohoo! Sam won U.S. Open!!!! Bravo!

Katie O’Brien (@katiejobrien): Sam Stosur … RESPECT!

Amer Delic (@amerdelic): Congrats to my neighbor Sam Stosur on winning the U.S. Open! Well done.

Taylor Dent (@taylordent81): I hope everyone is enjoying this tennis as much as I am!! These guys are incredible!

Donald Trump Jeremy Piven Vanessa Hudgens Justin Timberlake Beyonce Jay-Z Brooklyn Decker Chris Bosh Will Ferrell Olivia Munn Blake Lively The Iceman Bar Refaeli Owen Wilson Christine Taylor Ben Stiller Dennis Leary Bradley Cooper Alec Baldwin Adrian Grenier Zvonareva bares all for magazine World number three ranked Russian tennis star has Vera Zvonareva taken it off for ESPN: The Magazine’s “Body Issue,” posing nude for a pictorial alongside other notable

sports celebs including Jose Reyes of the New York Mets, U.S. Women’s soccer star Hope Solo, and speedskater Apolo Anton Ohno. Savic banned for life for fixing matches Serbian tennis player David Savic has been hit with a lifetime ban from the sport for attempting to fix multiple matches. Savic was fined $100,000 after being found guilty of three violations. These bans begin immediately and at the time of the ban, he was ranked 659th. Just this past May, Daniel Koellerer was banned as well for life for the same violation. First Lady Michelle Obama loves tennis At the 2011 U.S. Open, First Lady Michelle Obama applauded the USTA for engaging millions of children in tennis, introducing tennis into thousands of elementary schools throughout the country, and building more than 2,000 courts that provide a place for young people to play tennis. The USTA’s efforts were part of its partnership with both the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and the First Lady’s Let’s Move! initiative to encourage more children to become active and lead healthier lifestyles. The USTA exceeded its commitment. The First Lady was in New York to participate in a USTA 10 and Under Tennis Clinic at the U.S. Open. She was joined by several current and former tennis champions including Billie Jean King, Serena Williams, John McEnroe, James Blake, MaliVai Washington and Katrina Adams, as she thanked children from the Harlem Junior Tennis and Education Program for participating in her Let’s Move! initiative. “I have been trying to get to the U.S. Open my entire life. I am so incredibly excontinued on page 22

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cited to finally be at my first U.S. Open, but I am equally excited and proud to be standing in partnership with the USTA and all they have done for hundreds of thousands of kids across this country. You are an example of what we can do when we put our minds to it,” said First Lady Michelle Obama. “I am again grateful to the USTA. The courts you build, these kids-sized courts, are just amazing. They will break that barrier; they will make tennis accessible to kids… I am so proud of the USTA.” Djokovic breaks ATP money mark in 2011 Novak Djokovic’s night win over Rafael Nadal in the finals of the 2011 U.S. Open earned the world’s top-ranked men’s singles tennis player a $2.3 million payout, pushing the Serbian’s earnings in 2011 to date over the $10.6 million mark. Djokovic’s $2.3 million U.S. Open payout consisted of $1.8 million for winning the event, plus a $500,000 bonus for finishing second in the U.S. Open Series Standings. Djokovic’s win over Nadal in a rematch of last year’s U.S. Open finals, gave the number one-ranked ATP player his 64th win of the year with just two losses in 12 tournaments to date in 2011. Djokovic will make more money in 2011 than any other men’s professional player during a full season, topping his finals opponent Nadal who took home

around $10 million last year, while participating in 17 tournaments and Switzerland’s Roger Federer who earned around $10 million as well in 2007 and took part in 16 tournaments. McIlroy and Wozniacki verify romantic link U.S. Open champ and golfer Rory McIlroy has admitted that he is romantically involved with top-ranked WTA star Caroline Wozniacki from Denmark. McIlroy’s admission verifies a relationship that has been long-rumored as McIlory has been spotted in New Haven, Conn. supporting Wozniacki at the New Haven Open at the Connecticut Tennis Center in Yale. “Obviously, different sports, but we’re pretty much in the same position at a young age and we can talk about things that probably a lot of 21-, 22-year olds can’t talk about,” said McIlroy. “It’s nice to have someone that sort of understands what you’re going through.”

it out over Oreos at Chelsea Piers in tennis, basketball and an Oreo-eating contest as part of the promotion for the new Triple Double Oreo. Venus lost the competition after Shaq’s Oreo-eating team defeated hers. “Shaq got lucky today but it was really fun,” said Venus. Shaq said of Venus, “She’s fabulous. She’s always been a great athlete.” Serena and Roddick to team up?

Serena Williams has dropped an intriguing Twitter bombshell, with the former number one hinting that she might be teaming up with Andy Roddick for some mixeddoubles in Australia. Her post-U.S. Open tweet, however, begs as many questions as it answers. “Me and @andyroddick decided to play mixed-doubles Australia! We love Aussie! Book it, it’s real!,” the Tweet read.

Venus vs. Shaq for Oreos Venus Williams joined Shaquille O’Neal on “FOX & Friends” with host Brian Kilmeade at FOX Studios in New York City battling

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com


USTA EASTERN ANNUAL MEETING

AND VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

JANUARY 20 | 2012 > JANUARY 21 | 2012

Master the new world of 10 and Under Tennis. Learn about the latest in USTA’s tournament management systems. Sharpen your grant-writing skills. Meet volunteers and teaching pros from across USTA Eastern. Recognize juniors and adults for their achievements and dedication to the sport.

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Coaches Roundtable Discussion he Long Island tennis community is blessed to have some of the best indoor facilities and best coaches in the world right here in our backyard. Recently, Long Island Tennis Magazine spoke with some of these top coaches to get insight into their coaching/training strategies, what they look for in a great player, views on important local tennis topics, and a background in how they got into coaching. Even the best coach can always learn an extra tip or two, and the following article will provide all players and coaches with a chance to learn from the best.

T

Meet the participants … Howie Arons Cunningham Park Tennis Center Union Turnpike & 193rd Street Queens, N.Y. (718) 217-6452 Howie Arons is owner and director of Great Neck Estates Tennis Center and has been coach of the B.N. Cardozo High School Boys Tennis Team for the past 35 years. His teams have won 18 New York City Public School Team Championships, giving Howie 567 wins, the most of any high school coach in New York State. 24

Carl Barnett Glen Head Racquet Club, Home of the Early Hit Training Center 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 455-1225 This is the 10th season of Carl Barnett’s Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club. Early Hit is dedicated to providing lessons, groups and training in its comprehensive ALPS program. Pat Etcheberry has worked with Carl as an advisor with the ALPS training program. Carl has concluded that students learn faster when they have core fitness, flexibility and explosive strength. Early Hit not only serves juniors as the program features nationally-ranked players in the U.S. Open, 40s, 60s and 70s divisions.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Nick Brebenel (516) 852-0591 nickbreb@yahoo.com In the last 20 years, Nick Brebenel has developed three professional players who, at one point, were in the ATP Top 30 (Adrian Voinea, Pavel Andrei and Max Mirnyi). Those three players have wins over the likes of Pete Sampras,


Roger Federer and Andre Agassi amongst others in their careers. On the junior level in the last seven years, Nick has coached a junior champion at Wimbledon and three Kalamazoo Junior Champions (Nikita Krivonos, Mergea Florin, Adam El-Mihdawy and James Wang). Vinicius Carmo Ross School 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. (631) 907-5162 Vinicius Carmo is tennis director of the Ross School tennis academy and coach of the boys and girls varsity tennis teams. As a player, Vinicius was ranked among the top five junior players in Brazil and played several international junior tennis tournaments, and attended the University of Tennessee for four years on a full scholarship. For seven years, Vinicius was the regional tennis director of the East End Sportime locations. He also coached many top juniors in the country and has helped them to get tennis scholarships in many universities. Now, Vinicius runs the tennis program at the Ross School. The boys varsity tennis team won the league VII title in 2010 and finished second in the Suffolk County team tournament. Stonar Coleman Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. (516) 759-0505 Stonar Coleman is a pro at Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Glen Cove facility. Stonar is a USPTA High Performance Coach, Professional 1 Rating, and was ranked in the top four nationally as a Jamaican junior player. Stonar currently coaches several top nationally-ranked junior players.

Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 14 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money. Bandar Kayali Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. (516) 432-6060 Bandar Kayali is assistant director at Long Beach Tennis Center. He was MVP and first singles and doubles player for Adelphi University Men’s Tennis, and an ITF Futures player. Bandar has a 363 U.S. national ranking for the ITF Pro Circuit. He is a USTA 5.0 NTRP rated player. Michael Kossoff Sportime New York 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. (516) 933-8500, ext. 5123 Michael Kossoff is regional director of tennis for Sportime New York. He was a college tennis standout at Bowling Green University and has coached numerous top national players.

Ron D’Alessandro Carefree Racquet Club 1414 Jerusalem Avenue #1 North Merrick, N.Y. (516) 489-9005 Ron D’Alessandro is the head pro and director of tennis at Carefree Racquet Club and Hempstead Golf & Country Club. Ron has more than 20 years of teaching experience, and is USPTA/USPTR Certified, specializing in teaching Cardio Tennis.

Whitney Kraft USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Meridian Road at Grand Central Parkway Queens, N.Y. (718) 760-6200 Whitney Kraft is director of tennis programs at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and director of player operations for the U.S. Open. A native of Summit, N.J., Whitney brings more than 25 years of tennis experience to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Prior to joining the USTA, Kraft served as director of tennis for the city of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. where he oversaw the daily programming and operations of more than 45 courts at nine different facilities. As a tennis player, Kraft was a four-time National Mixed-Open Champion and most recently in 2006, Kraft was the USPTA International Championship 45 Doubles Champion.

Steven Kaplan Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, N.Y. (516) 777-1358 Steven Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation.

Alyssa Morra Rockville Racquet Club 80 North Centre Avenue Rockville Centre, N.Y. (516) 764-5350 Alyssa Morra has been teaching tennis for seven years. She first started working at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center,

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where she played as a junior. She also worked at Cunningham Tennis Center, Queens College Tennis Center, Bronx International (NYJTL) and The Field Club of Greenwich. She played for Queens College and helped her team to four regional championships and was ranked seventh in the east for doubles and 11th for singles in Division II tennis. Alyssa is currently with Rockville Racquet Club where she works with adults and juniors of all ages and levels. Maurice Trail Advanced Tennis Academy (516) 302-5613 advancedtennis@verizon.net Maurice Trail has been coaching for more than 15 years, beginning as a coach at the Rick Macci Academy in Florida. Maurice played on the circuit for a few years before moving to New York. He is currently running drill programs and private lessons at Jericho-Westbury Indoor Tennis Club and also runs Advantage High Performance Tennis Camp at St Dominicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Athletic Fields in Muttontown, N.Y. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I find great satisfaction in helping players develop their tennis and accomplishing their goals,â&#x20AC;? said Trail. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knowing that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a hand in the success of a player youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worked with is very rewarding.â&#x20AC;? Tonny van de Pieterman Point Set Indoor Racquet Club 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. (516) 330-6070 Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club in Oceanside, N.Y. He is the co-founder of Point Setâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high performance Tournament Training (TTP) programs, and he has coached many juniors to sectional and national rankings. Before arriving in New York, he was traveling coach for the Harry Hopman Academy in Saddlebrook, Fla. He was briefly an ATP touring pro after college. Tonny was the captain of the University of Miami Hurricanes menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis team where he won the Big East title in 1993.

What are the best things you see about tennis in the New York area? What are your biggest concerns about the local tennis scene? Vinicius Carmo: I like how the USTA has been trying to help junior players become better tennis players. It is important to grow tennis in this country. It would be great if everyone could be on the same page with the USTA and work together. I think the biggest problem that I found in this area is how expensive tennis has become. We also need more indoor facilities so that we can have more kids playing tennis. Maurice Trail: There is a lot of talent in the New York area. There are a lot of good players who are capable of being highly ranked in the nation and worldwide. My concern is that we need more affordable indoor facilities, which will allow the playing field to be leveled. Junior players need to be able to train more all-year round. This will enable New York area players to compete at a better level with kids from warmer climates like Florida, California and Texas.

What is your opinion of the state of American tennis? Ron Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alessandro: The menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tour is struggling right now. We need someone who is going to compete for Grand Slam championships with Nadal, Djokovic and Federer. We thought that Andy Roddick was going to emerge as the next superstar, but he has been an utter disappointment. American tennis lacks the excitement it had with Connors and McEnroe in the 1980s, and Agassi and Sampras in the 1990s. We could use another good rivalry to get things moving forward. Steven Kaplan: Players from the United States have experienced limited success internationally, at the highest levels of professional tennis in the last 10 years. This doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to have stopped the growth of the sportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity in this country, however. Reuters reports that between 2000-2010, participation in tennis has outpaced growth in all other traditional sports up an astounding 46 percent. Tennis is a $5.5 billion-plus industry in the U.S. and the numbers are growing each year. The USTA has just released numbers for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s U.S. Open, indicating that media interest is up

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Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ November/December 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ LITennisMag.com


17 percent from last year on TV, and up 24 percent online. While the state of American tennis is weak, tennis in America is thriving. Alyssa Morra: Tennis is an expensive sport to play in the U.S. and that can take away from a great player furthering their game with lessons and competition. I also think a lot of juniors start too late. Hopefully, now that QuickStart is being enforced, it will bring younger kids to enjoy the game and want to continue playing. At the pro level, American tennis had declined in recent years, but that is starting to turn around with good young talent like Jack Sock, Donald Young and Christina McHale all posting nice results at this year’s U.S. Open. Maurice Trail: American tennis is in good hands, I believe once again. When traveling recently around the country and going to the U.S. Open, I saw a lot of great young talent, including Sloane Stephens, Ryan Harrison, Jack Sock, Christina McHale and Donald Young. The USTA is doing a remarkable job of getting these young American talented kids together. Hopefully in the future, they can get the talented coaches working with these kids as well.

Serena Williams had another outburst at this year’s U.S. Open. How would you address this sort of issue with kids who saw her outburst and may be negatively influenced by it? How would handle poor sportsmanship by one of your players? Carl Barnett: She lost! Both times, Serena Williams lost! This is a “losing strategy” and that is how I addressed the situation with my students. See my article in the January/February 2010 issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine on page 31, “82,500 Reasons for Fitness.” What happened with Serena is classic “Pampered Player Syndrome,” and only happens when she is losing to a more fit player. Stonar Coleman: I would tell my students that the umpire should not be the determining factor in a match, no matter what the call is. As the player, you ultimately control your own destiny. You have to handle yourself maturely on the court and be aware of the match situation. If my player shows poor sportsmanship, I would explain to them where they were wrong in detail and which points they were wrong on. Poor sportsmanship is bad for their success. Steven Kaplan: Serena Williams behaved poorly during her most recent outburst at the U.S. Open. While she might be defended here by the recognition that it was an emotionally-charged moment, ultimately, Serena is an experienced professional with a history of outbursts at the Open. She should be held to the highest standards of accountability for her behavior and unfortunately for herself, her fans and American tennis, she did not assume responsibility for her actions. Her press conference words conspicuously omitted any personal culpability for her actions, and perhaps this is why she continues on a recurring path of self-destructive behavior. Serena did not apologize for her actions at this year’s Open and the important lesson for kids here is that if you get caught up in the heat of the moment and display bad sportsmanship, then take ownership of your actions, apologize, learn, grow and move on. As a preface to teaching sportsmanship to young players, I believe it is vital as a coach to first understand the values of the player’s parents. If the behaviors that define poor sportsmanship

for me are in conflict with the views held by a player’s parents, then imposing my philosophy will be both ineffective, and even undermining to the student. Good sportsmanship is most effectively taught to players proactively. It is essential, as a coach, to act as a role model for good sportsmanship in interactions with students. This means to first personally behave with the sportsmanship that you wish your students to display. Then, instruct, and reward effort, attentiveness and respectful behavior. Next, provide a positive environment for students that encourages focused determination and hard work and leaves little opportunity for the distraction of negative behavior. Students may still behave with poor sportsmanship at times despite these efforts, and as a coach, I react by first demonstrating my disapproval, and then methodically reinforcing the practices described above. Maurice Trail: I watched the women’s finals of the U.S. Open and was shocked once again by Serena’s behavior. I can see her getting mad at herself, but to belittle the umpire isn’t what she’s there to do. I talk to my students about how it’s important to play with passion, but even more important to keep your emotions under control. Over the years, we’ve seen this behavior time and time again, with several top players including John McEnroe and Ilie Nastase.

Since 10 & Under tennis has been implemented at your club, have you noticed an increase in participation of kids in that age group? Ron D’Alessandro: Since 10 & Under tennis has been implemented at our club, the number of kids participating has risen dramatically. At least half of the children in our junior program are under the age of 10, and that number is rising. We are excited over these numbers, because they are the future of our club, and for the sport of tennis in general. Michael Kossoff: Enrollment is higher this year in our 10 & Under age range, but I am not sure it is directly related to our club having 10 & Under tennis. I think it has more to do with providing highlevel coaches working with our younger age groups. Whitney Kraft: The 10 & Under programs should have a great effect in the New York City area as the population density and numerous clubs and facilities should really build the local base, help with talent by attracting some of the better young athletes, as well as recreational. One concern in this area is cost of indoor court time. Tonny van de Pieterman: Yes, we have had a tremendous increase in participation. We had started four QuickStart programs last year, and with the USTA’s increased focus on this age group with their advertising campaign during the recent U.S. Open, we added two 10 & Under competition training groups as well this year.

At what age, if any, should a serious junior player focus solely on tennis instead of any other extracurricular activities? Nick Brebenel: In my personal experience, the earlier they begin to focus strictly on tennis, the better it is. Champions like Monica Seles, Martina Hingis, Andre Agassi and Lleyton Hewitt won big professional tennis tournaments at a young age. If you are seri-

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ous about the sport of tennis, then focus on the sport as soon as possible. Vinicius Carmo: I think that a player should focus solely on tennis around 12 or 13 years old. Tennis today is super competitive, and you just cannot afford to play other sports. Maybe 20 years ago you were able to. But, not today Whitney Kraft: I’m not sure if this ever needs to occur. Extracurricular activities develop and maintain better athletes and help prevent players from getting stale from the sameness of one discipline/sport.

At what age level, if any, does home schooling become necessary for a serious tennis player? Stonar Coleman: Home schooling should become necessary for the serious tennis player at the age of 14 if they show the proper maturity level for it. Having the desire to be home schooled is also a very important part of it. If he or she does not have the competition in their area, then they have to travel to find it. Steven Kaplan: Schools educate children in “loco parentis” in this country. That means that parents have the right and the obligation to provide schooling for their children institutionally or personally as they see fit. Great caution should be exercised by parents in consideration of this decision. Home schooling, as a tool to provide greater training and playing opportunities for serious tennis players, is effective, but at a potentially high cost. It is very limiting to prioritize tennis education to the extent that it supersedes more academic endeavors. Professional tennis, as a career, is a trade that is a financially rewarding pursuit for a select few. Many kids, if given the choice to drop out of school to pursue the romantic dream of being a tennis professional, or to do homework and study, will choose the latter without weighing the negative consequences of failure. Parents that try to be facilitators of their children’s dream are often unwittingly prioritizing and enabling the satisfaction their own desires. School serves important socialization, and as well as academic functions, and a disruption of this experience will be a negative for the healthy and safe development of most children. While the tennis rewards of home schooling are undeniable, the educational compromise and risk engendered by this road make it, all too often, a well-intended, but misguided, decision for families at any age. I have always believed that athletics are a vital and important part of a young person’s education. Tennis is a wonderful athletic outlet and enhancement to a well-rounded education, but the most lofty goal of education is personal growth and development. Michael Kossoff: I feel like home schooling is only necessary if the player’s goal is to become a high-level professional tennis player. If the player and parents are fully on board and are willing to go “all in” and the child is old enough to understand the decision being made, then there should not be an age restriction for home schooling the player.

At what age should a junior start cross-training? Carl Barnett: Let me first say that tennis for children is cross-training for what happens in their off-the-court life. All of our groups at the Early Hit Training Center have a one-hour component with Jonathan Landsman, our trainer. We use body weight, not free weights. This is 28

a wonderful way for kids to increase strength, awareness and focus. Bandar Kayali: This is a very debatable topic. I believe kids should start working on fitness and physical training for tennis immediately. I’m not saying they should start bodybuilding in the gym at 12-yearsold, but I do believe that juniors should be doing explosive movement drills, agility and balancing drills, and footwork coordination drills on a daily basis. All exercises should be geared towards tennis only and must be related to movements on the tennis court. For example, ladder drills to coordinate foot work, explosive throwing of medicine balls replicating forehands and back hands, and sprints that involve many changes in direction. Things such as long-distance running should be kept to a minimal, maybe only 45 min. runs about six times a year to expand lung capacity because long distance running can slow down ones fast-twitch muscles. Explosive calisthenics exercises and explosive plyometric jumps and sprints can be used to enhance fast-twitch muscle fibers. As you can see, nowhere here have I mentioned weightlifting for youngsters. Yes, it is very effective in building strength and enhancing fast-twitch muscle fibers which are necessary for tennis, but it must be done at the proper age approved by a doctor, and with proper supervision and direction. Alyssa Morra: Juniors of all ages can do some version of cross-training. The key is to limit the regimen to correspond with the player’s age. For younger juniors, I like to keep things easy and have them focus on hopping, skipping, jumping, relay races and other fun activities to work on footwork, hand-eye coordination and balance. Each player is different, and therefore, their training program may vary. Some version of fitness training is always recommended for players. Tonny van de Pieterman: I always advise parents to keep kids involved in team sports at least until the age of 12, and with my European background, I favor soccer as great cross-training for a junior tennis player. Working with stretch resistance bands for fitness could be started relatively early, but I’d wait with lifting weights until the player’s growth spurt has passed.

How much involvement should a parent have in their child’s development? What role does the tennis parent play and what role should be left to the coach? Ron D’Alessandro: It is very important for a child’s parent to be involved in their development. A parent needs to support their child when it comes to transporting them to lessons and tournaments. Also, the financial obligations always need to be factored in. The parent, coach and student need to be on the same page as far as the student’s development. Having an open line of communication between the coach and the parent is vital to having a successful relationship. Whitney Kraft: The operative word is quality of involvement, not quantity. This is the same for coaching. Quantity would vary to produce desirable changes without overload or undue pressure. A parent’s role should focus upon providing a solid support system. Bandar Kayali: The bond between a tennis player and his coach must be very strong on all levels, such as friendship, trust, fun and belief. Any time a parent is on the court, this takes away from that bond and prevents a lot of coach/player social transaction that is vital to that relationship. During private lessons, I believe that the parent should stay in the clubhouse most of the time and maybe once every two weeks, they should take a peek. Children will al-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com


ways see their mom or dad as a parent and never as a true coach, so anytime a parent gives criticism, they do not see it coming from a coach’s perspective, but it seems like they are being scolded. Secondly, even if a parent is a tennis player, all coaching must be left to the coach and the coaching staff of the club they play at. The coach has a special agenda and future vision for their students based on the child’s goals and potential. So, before you decide on a coach, you must trust them 100 percent to take care of your child and their future in all aspects of tennis.

Is it better for a junior player to play up or play down in ability level and why? Howie Arons: Every tennis player knows that the hardest match to play, is the player ranked just below you. Players love to play up, with no pressure and nothing to lose. The player that is number one, is always playing down matches and that’s why that player is so tough. The matches played up will come if you take care of business and always respect the “down match.” Carl Barnett: It really depends on the player. Every parent feels their child will only learn with better players. It will help their strokes, but how about learning to win? Is that going to happen if they only play against better players? Who did Roger Federer practice with all those years at number one in the world? Michael Kossoff: I feel like there is a lot more depth in each age group. It says a lot to the great coaching that we have available in the area, as well as the sport attracting better athletes. One of my biggest concerns is that parents and coaches tend to have their players play “up” in age groups too quickly. I am a big believer in having my players play when they are expected to win. Being put in that situation is crucial in development and helps build character. Alyssa Morra: Playing up or down in ability level depends on the individual junior. They both have advantages and disadvantages physically and mentally. If they want to play at a higher level, then they need to be mentally ready to compete. The junior’s physical condition also plays an important role in whether to play up or not. Juniors who are only playing for fun and want to play with their friends should not move up in ability level. They may lose interest if they are not with their friends

What qualities do you look for in a junior player that makes them stand out from the rest as a potential top player? Vinicius Carmo: I look at their mental toughness. We can all teach kids strokes and get them in shape, but mental toughness is a longer process. Usually, the top players come from good families where they know how to deal with pressure, work hard, and have high self-esteem. Bandar Kayali: There are certain things that I look for in a junior to consider them as a potential ATP or Division I player. Some things are very difficult to teach juniors and they rarely are able to do them naturally. An example can be players who rarely get down on themselves, even if the score is 6-1 or 5-1. These players still believe they have a chance and are playing every point with a clean mindset as if it were the first point of the match. Another thing I look for that is very difficult to teach, but is rarely found naturally is great distance coordination and early recognition of where, when and how to adjust one’s body to the ball coming to them. Very few kids are able to coordinate their an-

ticipation, sprint and adjustment steps immediately after the ball is struck by their opponent on the other side of the net. Another aspect that stands out is when players from a young age are able to properly construct points patiently and smartly. Most top juniors enjoy overhitting or playing the game too safe, and very few are able to play balanced. They have a natural inclination to set up points and vary their speeds and angles, and then know when to risk and pull the trigger at the proper time. Tonny van de Pieterman: Besides good hand-eye coordination, some junior players stand out because of their eagerness to learn and try new things. This excitement usually translates into overcoming difficult hurdles in anything we do in life, as well as in tennis. The amount of time a child can focus is definitely important, but I find that most qualities can be learned if properly trained and repeated.

What’s more important for a junior player: A TennisRecruiting.net ranking or a USTA ranking? Howie Arons: While TennisRecruiting.net has become a valuable tool for prospective college players, there is nothing more important than a USTA Sectional and National Ranking. TennisRecruiting.net is great for networking and meeting coaches, but your ranking gives the coach a bigger picture of your ability level and tennis potential. Any player can do for himself or herself everything that TennisRecruiting.net can do. Nick Brebenel: After having spoken to hundreds of college tennis coaches, I understand that they clearly they prefer TennisRecruiting.net rankings over USTA rankings. Both rankings are important, but inseparable. Stonar Coleman: A TennisRecruiting.net ranking is more important than a USTA Ranking. The reason being because it carries more weight when it comes to match wins.

What in your teaching/coaching philosophy do you think is the backbone of your teaching and coaching methods? Howie Arons: Having the experience of coaching high school tennis and running a junior program for 35 years, I would say the “backbone” of my teaching and coaching philosophy is that just like life … achievement in tennis requires passion and hard work. There are no short cuts for anyone. If you love the game and are willing to really work hard, then you will succeed. Nick Brebenel: Over the last 20 years, I have developed three players in the top 30 on the ATP Tour, and in 2003, a junior champion at Wimbledon in both singles and doubles. I have also coached two Kalamazoo junior champions in the last seven years. I consider all aspects of coaching very important, from technical aspects to physical and mental work. You also need the ability to be able to teach children to play complex percentage tennis from the beginning, and have the ability to instruct them to work very hard all the time. Maurice Trail: This is a very interesting question for me. Just like lawyers, doctors and scientists, these people aren’t born this way, they are made. My belief and the backbone to my coaching is that players aren’t born, they are made. I’m not one to spend time worrying about accolades. The key thing to me is I love what I do. I love working with kids of all ages and skill levels. I feel if you love what you do, you will do a great job no doubt!

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Good to Great:

A Model for Safely Building the Tennis Champions of Tomorrow (Part II) By Steve Kaplan Why Failure is Necessary erhaps the most important quality for success in tennis is steadiness and the avoidance of errors. It might come as a surprise then, that in practice “Blue Chips” miss more shots than “Five Stars,” while “Five Stars” miss more shots than “Four Stars,” etc. If you are thinking that superior players miss more balls because they hit more balls, then you are on the right track, but that is not the complete story. Better players have a higher failure rate in hitting shots than lesser players, because failure is necessary for achievement. As psychologist S.W. Tyler

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points out in his extensive study on human performance, “The power of practice is most profound when it is challenging rather than nice and easy.” Almost every study on performance excellence concurred that only by endeavoring to master what you cannot do, will you become an expert on what you desire to become. Malcolm Gladwell, in his best-selling book on performance, Outliers, talked extensively about the quantity of practice that is needed to become a master at any skill. He identified 10,000 hours of deep concentration in the performance of a skill that is needed to attain expert status. Anders Ericsson, a psychologist at Florida State University, who performed perhaps the most extensive

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

study on human performance achievement, calls this practice “deliberate practice.” I would go further and call this “Practical Practice.” The most productive practices are those which are challenging and specifically-designed to adapt to the demands of the skills necessary for achievement. College coaches, for example, often have their team members run anywhere from one to five miles with the notion that, since tennis requires strong conditioning as does running, “If you can run two miles in 12 min., then you can play top-level tennis.” This convoluted logic is straight out of the “Dodgeball” school of training, in which the coach threw wrenches at his players


and said, “If you can dodge a wrench, then you can dodge a ball.” I call this practice “convoluted” because it does not specifically target and address the demands of tennis. The average run in tennis is seven feet, not two miles. The sport is a series of short, numerous, fast amortization, high intensity, multi-directional sprints, not a moderately fast, long and linear run. Moderate runs may actually be a hindrance since they encourage the development of a low running gait and slow twitch muscle fiber. If you are going to spend the time and energy on practice, then I suggest you first identify the actual goal and target the practice to be practical, addressing the specific demands of that which you seek to accomplish. In this case, if you wish to be adept at short, reactive, explosive, multi-directional sprints, then build VO2 Max with quick directional change runs using a 3:1 Tabata protocol. Failure does not need to be discouraging since success does not impact the learning potential of the experience that can be achieved from feedback.

For example, let’s say you and I are beginners at darts, and we each are given 1,000 chances to hit a bullseye from 10 ft. You get to closely examine the result of each toss, but I must look away after tossing the dart. If you toss too high, then you will immediately know and lower your aim. If you hit the bullseye, then you may reinforce your aim. As long as you have created perfect conditions for feedback, then you will learn and improve. Since I have no opportunity for feedback, I may succeed, but I will not learn and progress. Therefore, it is the quality of the feedback that determines the learning potential of the experience rather than the success of the objective. The most successful players have internalized the joy of practice, rather than the thrill of victory. Monica Seles said, “I just love to practice and drill and all that stuff.” Serena Williams revealed, “It felt like a blessing to practice because we had so much fun.” Tiger Woods once said, “My dad never asked me to go play golf. I asked him.” These players all demonstrate a growth mindset in which the joy of the process is the driving force for aspirations

rather than a fixed mindset in which results are the motivation. Many players confuse hitting tennis balls with meaningful and practical practice. In order for players to go from good to great, they must practice with a clear and practical purpose. They must step out of their comfort zone and take joy in the process of improvement, knowing that failures are inevitable. They must rid their practices of the emotional interference that is precipitated by failure, so that they get quiet and productive feedback. Every shot is a learning experience. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 33 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 14 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Mythbusters: College Club Tennis is for Losers By Ricky Becker At this point in my college consulting career, each of my consults fall into one of a few categories. For example, many consults are with parents of freshmen in high school who want to know whether their child should make an academic or athletic run through college doors. Other clients want to know what colleges might be interested in giving their child a scholarship. Other clients have children outside of the Ivy League ranking threshold, but want to be told (falsely) that there is some backdoor way in. Sometimes, I will know the situation before meeting with the family, and sometimes, I won’t know. One particular consult I did over the summer did not fall into an aforementioned category. I looked up the player on tennisrecruiting.net and did not see the name. I was also told the player never played in a tournament. I had a feeling that this player had good grades and I was told that the player was number one on her high school team. “Okay,” I thought, “This is probably going to be one of those sobering consults where I need to tell someone that if they want to play college tennis, they will need to take an academic drop. Not get the bump up they are looking for.” When I met the girl’s father, he was a very nice guy which made my job harder. We started talking, and I encouraged him to enter his daughter in USTA tournaments. Then he asked me about a lot of the top academic schools and is it possible to play tennis at any of them without setting foot onto a court in a USTA tournament. I empathetically said no. Not un34

less she tries out for a team and somehow makes it, but circumstances like this are rare. “That’s unfortunate,” the father said. “I thought club tennis was always an option.” Wow. I knew club tennis was growing across the U.S., and I also knew that there were club nationals where nationallyranked juniors played. But I never thought that club tennis would really quench a tennis player’s thirst for competition. I did some research and virtually 80 to 90 percent of Division I teams have a club team. “Sure,” I told the father a couple of weeks later. “There are plenty of club tennis options out there.” However, there are some pros and cons to club tennis to consider. The pros I There are inter-collegiate nationals for club tennis as there is for varsity tennis. In fact, the level of top club teams (usual big state schools) is higher than some Division I varsity teams and many Division III varsity teams. I At some schools, club teams have a better chance of going away to the national championships for club tennis than the varsity team does for the NCAA Championships. I The commitment for club tennis is often what one wants it to be. If you can’t make a practice, it’s usually not a big deal. I Often, a bench-warmer for a varsity team would be a star for a club team. Some people would have a much more fulfilling college tennis experience playing high on a club team, rather than riding the bench and not playing team matches.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

I With fundraising as a part of club tennis, often the camaraderie among the players on the team is tighter than that of varsity tennis. Fundraisers can often build team unity. I There is less pressure to perform on a club team then there is on a varsity team. Nobody is playing to keep their scholarship. The cons I Club tennis does not hold the same cache with would-be job interviews out of college. I The search for funds could sometimes be a nuisance. I There is sometimes a struggle for court time while the varsity team doesn’t really need to think about such things. I Club tennis does not provide scholarships, nor does it give a student who plans to play club tennis a real academic bump. I Club tennis is not as organized as varsity tennis. Overall, club tennis is a sound alternative for someone who has a strong proclivity for a school but won’t make the tennis team. Club tennis is also ideal for someone who wants to play college tennis on their own terms. For more information, visit TennisOnCampus.com. Ricky Becker is founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, which offers off-court college guidance services to junior tennis players. He is also director of tennis at Sportime Bethpage. He can be reached by e-mail at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com.


The Sand Pit By Anthony Pastecchi

Beach Tennis Wraps Up Another Successful Summer Season on the Island he summer of 2011 may have come to a close, but not before a great season of progress made in the beach tennis world. Beach Tennis USA (BTUSA), along with Long Island Tennis Magazine, held five great International Tennis Federation (ITF)sanctioned tournaments throughout the summer which came to a close on the weekend of Sept. 17-18. The weekend of Aug. 18-21, saw the 2011 BTUSA International Championships held in Long Beach, N.Y., with players from Italy, France, Brazil, New Zealand, the United States, Aruba and more flying in to compete for $10,000 in prize money for the top finishers on both the men’s and women’s sides of play. The championships included both professional and amateur singles, doubles, mixed-doubles, and open play for all. The playing area in Long Beach included 20 courts, a boutique, a player’s lounge with food provided by Long Beach Bagel and One Natural Experience coconut water for all attendees and players. This year’s tournament was held at a new location, directly in front of the Allegria Hotel in

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Long Beach. The results of the 2011 BTUSA International Championships saw Alex Mingozzi & Matteo Marighella of Italy defeat Alessandro Calbucci & Nicolo Strano in straight sets, 6-4, 6-1, to win the Men’s Professional Doubles title. Another pair of Italians, Simona Bonadonna & Eva D’Elia, defeated Laura Oliveri & Simona Briganti in straight sets, 6-1, 7-5, to take the Professional Women’s title. Also during the International Championships, the first-ever Nation’s Cup was played at Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y. Crest Hollow has developed a beach arena, with five beach tennis courts along with a covered lounge area for players. In just six weeks under the guidance of owner Richard Monti, Crest Hollow turned its underutilized hard tennis courts into the first permanent beach arena on Long Island. Monti and his staff’s great generosity went above and beyond their calling during the opening weekend, providing complimentary cocktails and lunch for players and guests during the one-day Nation’s Cup held on Aug. 19. The Crest Hollow Country Club also put

up $1,500 in prize money for the event. At the Nation’s Cup, each country assembles a team to play against the other countries. In the end, we saw Team Italy come out on top with Team Brazil not far behind to take second. Beach tennis has gained a large amount of traction this past summer, with multiple new locations to play. Country clubs and camps are joining the movement, and tournaments have had some of the largest turnouts to date. The summer may have ended, but that does not mean you have to stop playing. Check into BTUSA’s brand new Web site, BeachTennisUSA.net, for more information about upcoming events and places to play. Serve’s up! Anthony Pastecchi is an editorial and marketing assistant with Long Island Tennis Magazine. He is currently an undergrad at C.W. Post and participant in the honors program. He is also a USTA volunteer and coach for Hicksville Community Tennis. He was recently named USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region 2011 Junior Volunteer of the Year. He may be reached by e-mail at anthony@usptennis.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Literary Corner

By Brent Shearer The Wimbledon Final That Never Was and Other Tennis Tales From a Bygone Era By Sidney Wood With David Wood layers will want to read this book for its many interesting anecdotes and because it may arm them to win drinks at tennis gatherings by betting on either of the following obscure tennis history questions: Who was the youngest Wimbledon winner for over 50 years until Boris Becker’s first title in 1985? And, who is the only tennis player in history to win Wimbledon by default? Of course, the answer to both questions is the author of The Wimbledon Title That Never Was and Other Tennis Tales From a Bygone Era, the Connecticut-born Sidney Wood. Wood (1911-2009), accomplished both of these feats that his book uses as supports to hang the rest of his story on in 1931. His opponent in the final, American Frank Shields, grandfather of Brooke Shields, was

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ordered by U.S. tennis authorities not to play so he could rest an injured knee for an upcoming Davis Cup match. Apparently, amateur officials had more clout in the era between the World Wars. The U.S. team lost the match against England that they had tried to save Shields for. So much for listening to the USTA! Somehow, I think if Donald Young was instructed not to play a Wimbledon final by the national tennis organization, he wouldn’t listen. But this is now, and Wood’s book is about then. The book’s charm lies in the way it recreates early 20th Century tennis history and supplies facts and stories about such pre-World War II tennis stars as France’s Four Musketeers: Rene Lacoste, Jean Borota, Henri Cochet and Jacques Brugnon, as well as other stars such as Ellsworth Vines, Don Budge, Fred Perry, Bill Tilden and Jack Kramer. One thing Wood brings to his analysis of the game, which the reader should remember extends from his playing days before World War II, never mind pre-Open tennis, this is pre-shorts, up nearly until his death in January of 2009, at the age of 97, is an unequaled exposure to every champion.

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When Sidney Wood takes a shot at ranking the all-time greats in our game, it’s a fascinating list because he saw them all of them play and competed against players from Tilden to Gonzales. So Wood’s ranking of the greats and near-greats alone makes this book worth reading. His top 10: Budge, Kramer, Tilden, Gonzales, Laver, Sampras, Perry, Borg, Lendl and Connors. Wood makes good arguments for those he includes and those he leaves out. Tough luck for McEnroe and Agassi. David Wood, Sidney’s son, who helped smooth some of the book’s passages, notes that his father wasn’t able to watch the current contenders for that list, Federer and Nadal, enough to rate them, but that he respected what they have been able to accomplish. Sidney Wood, who stayed involved in the game after his playing days ended, was also responsible for the invention of Supreme Court, the portable court used by the pro tours for many years, and the creation of box seats at the U.S. Open championships at Forest Hills, N.Y. Wood tells the story that, at one of the first events that used his new surface, Ken Rosewall was playing Fred Stolle. As Stolle ran for a wide forehand, he broke through a taped seam and fell under the carpet. He ended up buried up to his chest. Wood recounts that “I pulled Fred to his feet, amid catcalls from the spectators, and used a staple gun to secure the selvages to the pallet below.” Even outside of the game, tennis savvy New Yorkers may remember, as I do, seeing trucks zipping around midtown streets bearing the logo of another one of Wood’s business ventures, the Woods-Budge laundry. Whether as a competitor when male tennis players wore long pants, or as a tennisoriented laundry owner, Sidney Wood’s book is a rich source of stories about tennis history. Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.


CHARITABLE INITIATIVES Tennis Benefits The Cancer Center for Kids

and draw together begins six months prior to the event. Both team captains try their best to match each players’ abilities to ensure a competitive club match. The challenge series is a yearly highlight for all club members. There are many mother-daughter and father-son teams that are now competing and assisting in operations of the day-long charity event, such as sweeping

the clay courts after every match, serving food and beverages during the reception, and most importantly, filling in if there’s an injury or last-minute cancellation. The event continues to grow each year and there are already children and grandchildren of both clubs looking forward to the 2012 matches because they will be of age to participate in this prestigious event.

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

© 2011 USTA. All rights reserved.

On Oct. 1, members from the Garden City Casino hosted a tennis match against the Cold Spring Valley Tennis Club. The two clubs have been playing in similar “interclub” matches for many years to raise funds for Charlie’s Champions Foundation and the United Way of Long Island. Charlie’s Champions was established by Garden City residents Tara and John Schmitt in the name of their son, Charlie who is currently being treated for Leukemia. The mission of the foundation is to raise awareness and funds to benefit the Cancer Center for Kids at Winthrop University Hospital. The United Way of Long Island, together with its community partners, advances the common good by investing in and developing programs that address Long Islander’s critical needs in education, income/financial stability and health. Despite forecasts calling for rain, the weather cooperated, and all 16 matches were played, including men’s senior doubles, mixed-doubles, women’s doubles, men’s doubles, and a pro-am competition. All 16 matches played were hard fought and eight of them went to three sets. Cold Spring Valley Tennis Club was fortunate enough to win 10 of these matches, but the score was secondary in everyone’s mind. The approximate $11,000 that was raised and the good times shared by all in attendance were far more important than everything else. The USTA and the USPTA partnered with the clubs and donated many gifts and tennis balls. “It was a great day,” said Bill Mecca, USTA/Eastern-Long Island Representative. “Doing good by having fun and getting healthy exercise is a bonus for everyone.” The process of putting the tournament

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Rockville Centre’s Claire Handa Claire Handa is a seventh grader from Rockville Centre, N.Y. who attends Friends Academy. Currently, Claire is ranked fourth in the Eastern Section in Girls 12s Division Claire at a National and is ranked 61st event in Rochester, Nationally in Girls N.Y. in July 2011 12s Division, the highest ranked Long Island player in the Girls 12s Division. Long Island Tennis Magazine recently had a chance to interview this top rising junior player …

What are your strengths and weaknesses as a tennis player? The strength of my game is probably my serve. The shot I’d like to improve the most is my volleys and backhand slice. What has been the most memorable moment so far in your short tennis career? This past summer, I won my first national tournament, a Girls 12s event at Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center over Labor Day Weekend.

How did you get started in tennis? And at what age? I started playing at the age of seven. My older brother played Claire taking part in the Zonals in Pennsylvania eartennis, and I would always be lier this year taken to his lessons and matches, and it looked like a lot of fun, so I started playing. How often do you play and whom do you play with? I play around four or five times a week. Twice a week, I play with my tennis coach Maurice Trail and two or three times Claire at the Hard Courts each week, I hit with a college Super Nationals in Atlanta in August 2011 player from New York City. 38

What are your future goals in tennis? I would definitely like to play college tennis. Beyond that, I plan to just keep working hard and see if I can become good enough to make it the pros. What are your interests away from the tennis court? My favorite thing to do away from tennis is reading. I read a new book every two to three weeks. I also enjoy soccer and gardening. Do you plan on playing high school tennis? At Friends Academy, you cannot try out for the tennis team until the ninth grade.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

“Claire has all the necessary tools to continue to be a top player going forward. She is extremely athletic, a student of the game and a very hard worker. She is extremely easy to work with because she is so talented and a good listener. If she realizes how good she can be, the sky is the limit. For now I just ask her to focus and stay relaxed on the court. I see great things from Claire moving forward.” —Maurice Trail, coach of Claire Handa

But yes, I would like to play at that time. I think it would be a lot of fun and a great experience. Since you are playing in national tournaments, have you had the chance to go out of New York to play? Yes, I have played two Super Nationals in Georgia and in Ohio. It is cool going to see other areas and playing players from all over.


Eastern-Long Island Region Hosts Annual Suffolk County Rally Day By Anthony Pastecchi

n Aug. 12, the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region, along with the Town of Islip, hosted its Annual Suffolk County Rally Day, an event designed to promote the sport of tennis to children of all ages with pros on hand to provide free clinics and a day of fun for all. Throughout the event, instruction, games, teamwork and giveaways were all key in making for yet again another great Rally Day. Children who never picked up a racquet before were able to hit ground strokes and volleys with just a few drills and said they want to continue to play tennis in the future. “This is a great way to bring these children out to play tennis and see what the sport is actually about and how fun it really is,” said Amy Evans of Youth Enrichment Services of West Islip. “It keeps them proactive and allows them to interact with their other peers.”

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After a morning of tennis, pizza was provided to all attendees, followed by games and prizes. “This was a great way to give back to the community and get out to play tennis,” said Michelle Lapierre, a junior volunteer. Terry Fontana, Rally Day co-chair, said, “My passion for tennis keeps me motivated to bring the NJTL (National Junior Tennis League) Kids Day each year to Islip.” Anthony Pastecchi is an editorial and marketing assistant with Long Island Tennis Magazine. He is currently an undergrad at C.W. Post and participant in the honors program. He is also a USTA volunteer and coach for Hicksville Community Tennis. He was recently named USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region 2011 Junior Volunteer of the Year. He may be reached by e-mail at anthony@usptennis.com.

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The On-Court Consultation: A N e w W a y t o F i n d t h e P e r f e c t R a c q u e t f o r Yo u By Roman Prokes Players are always looking for an edge on the court. They work with teaching professionals to master their technique, coaches to solidify their tactics, trainers to ameliorate their conditioning. Why not have an expert help with your equipment? That is the goal of an oncourt consultation. I have been working with top pro players for over three decades. I have aided players like Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi, Andy Roddick, Maria Sharapova, Caroline Wozniacki, and countless others throughout the world. This massive experience has pushed me to really understand the game from the equipment perspective. Players are constantly searching for the best specification of frames, handles, weights, balances, strings and tensions. I have seen the enormous diversity when players change any of these variables. One example is recently when I was on the court with Maria Sharapova and her coach Michael Joyce. Even though Maria was hitting with extreme force, Michael hardly broke a sweat. Maria’s shots were not as efficient as they could be. By testing multiple equipment vari-

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ables and giving her direct feedback, Maria was able to alleviate her shoulder pain, add some pop to her ground strokes, improve her confidence and numerous other benefits. By choosing the right specifications, we quickly had Michael doing all the running. The difference was enormous and instantaneous, creating results that translated to tournament wins and ranking points. Professionals are not only superhuman in competition, but they have an uncanny ability to feel differences in almost any infinitesimal change when testing equipment. This continuous discussion of minute details of equipment with myself and top professionals has educated me to really see what specification is needed to achieve a player’s desired results. This gave me the idea to do what I always did for the best players in the world for everyday players as well. I have tested this in a couple of formats, and have tweaked and perfected the system where, within about one hour of on-court time, I can determine the best possible racket frame, grip size, weight, balance, string and tension for any player. Typically, when searching for the correct equipment, players demo rackets. These are programs where a player borrows

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

a racket, tests it for couple days, and after few tests, buys the racket. I have seen more times than I can recount, where a player purchases multiple rackets only to come back a few weeks later saying that they don’t like the racket. In effect, a player ends up having spent a lot of money and the result is not what they hoped for.


That’s where I think an on-court consultation is far superior. The process requires access to all pertinent racket demos for a player’s game, customization resources, a tennis hitter with consistent hitting and meaningful feedback, and a player looking to improve. The player tests different rackets, strings, tensions and customizations, all the while, they receive feedback from the hitter who has the best gauge of their performance. I analyze the performance, hear what goals are desired, and advise which various equipment changes to try. There is really no definitive format of doing this because every player is very unique. Sometimes, the player can try a lot of rackets, whereas other times, not many at all. Sometimes, the results come with retail rackets off the shelf, and sometimes, rackets need to be adjusted to distinct specifications to be perfectly matched to a player’s specific needs. In this well-controlled environment, a player gets the best litmus test of the equipment, as well as allowing the consultant to implement changes to the racket. At the end of the process, the player and the consultant all agree on one to two possible options. The player is then encouraged to test the selected rackets a few more times under different conditions. An on-court consultation is a very precise and methodical way to find out what works best for you. It will always be a chance for a player to test equipment in a controlled environment, with the guidance of an expert, as well as the feedback of an educated coach/pro. It’s a chance for a player to know what works optimally for them without the “what ifs” (what if I tried this racket at a different tension, what if this racket was heavier, what if I used this racket against a big hitter, etc.). Whether you end up with a whole new racket frame, a customization of your current racket, a new string, new tension, or a modification that you didn’t know existed, one thing is certain … you will improve. Roman Prokes is a racket technician guru. He has over three decades of experience in the industry. He works with several of the top touring professionals on the ATP and WTA Tours. He can be found at RPNY Tennis in Robbie Wagner Tournament Training, NYC, Citiview Racquet Club, and other locations. He may be reached by phone at (516) 759-5200 or visit RPNYTennis.com.

Army and Navy Capture Women’s Collegiate One-On-One Doubles® Tournament at Stony Brook University’s Fall Classic Credit all photos to Kelsey Domino

Army’s Jamila Paul won the “A” Flight of the Stony Brook Women’s Collegiate One-On-One Doubles Tournament. Paul defeated Erin McCarthy of Marist, 63 in the quarterfinals of the event and defeated Salom Mkervalidze of Stony Brook University, 6-5(73) in the semis en route to her 6-4 win over Stefanie Ton of Navy to capture the title. Navy’s Caitlin Olsen won the “B” Flight at the event, defeating Kirsten Ackerman of Marist, 6-3 in the quarterfinals, Michelle Dussol of the University of Rhode Island (URI), 6-4 in the semis and Natalie Houle of Navy, 6-4 in the finals to Nini Logvilava and Catherine Hanson of Stony win the “B” draw. Brook took part in the One-On-One Doubles “It’s great to have Division 1 Tournament held at Stony Brook University Collegiate Women playing OneOn-One Doubles Tournaments. This tournament will encourage younger Junior Girls to play in some One-On-One Doubles tournaments in the near future,” said Ed Krass, founder of the College Tennis Exposure Camps and One-On-One Doubles Tournaments. “One-On-One Doubles skills are absolutely imperative in preparing our girls to come forward and make the transitional volley,” said Army Coach Paul Peck, seventime Patriot League Champion. “Girls One-On-One Doubles Tournaments will be a big step forward to help them develop the doubles skills and serve-andvolley half-court skills so desired by college coaches.” Gary Glassman, head tennis coach at Stony Brook and tournament director, said, “It’s exciting to see the women make the first volleys in the midcourt area! These One-On-One Doubles Tournaments get the women’s players who are comfortable feeling uncomfortable. It’s a Action at the Stony Brook Women’s great game to develop their all-court Collegiate One-On-One Doubles confidence, too.” Tournament LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Power ... You Want It? You Got It! By Miguel Cervantes III If you want more power, then I’m going to give it to you. Most of the time when trying to hit the ball harder or achieve more power in tennis, we end up doing things that take power away. It’s a frustrating cycle, but not one that is impossible to break. Keeping a few things in mind, you can hit the ball harder, faster and better immediately. First, we have to define power to give us some perspective on how we can get more of it. At its simplest, power is really just force. Anyone that has ever taken a physics class knows that force is equal to mass multiplied by acceleration. What that means for us is that the only way to achieve greater power is to either increase the amount of mass going into the ball, or to accelerate through the ball faster. Putting more mass into your shots is merely a matter of using good technique to maximize the body weight going into the ball. All too often, the shots we take are performed with only our arms and not our bodies. Using your body to hit the ball will give you a great deal more power. Here are a

few things you can do to use more body mass: Use your hips to hit the ball By using your hips to hit the ball, you know you have as much of your body mass going forward into the ball as possible. A few ways to think about this is, for example on the forehand, is to start with your left shoulder pointed toward the ball and finish with your right shoulder pointed at the ball after your stroke is finished. When executed properly, your back leg should also come around to bring you back into the ready position faster, thus reducing recovery time. Hit at your waist The ball is most comfortable to hit around your waist. A good example of this is to watch baseball players. You rarely see a baseball player try to hit a ball by their shoulders or by their ankles. Hitting at waist level gives you the best weight transfer and thus more power. Stay low and come up as you hit By staying low before the shot and coming up as you hit the ball, you are effectively pushing off of the ground to get more mass into the ball.

Kenneth Goldberg PHOTOGRAPHER

Here are a few things you can do to improve acceleration: Hit the ball in front of your body You should remember to hit even with your front shoulder or in front of your body (depending on where you are on court and how you are positioned). When hitting even with your body or behind your body, your power is dissipated. To get the best weight transfer, contact should be made in front. A good example of this is a boxer’s punch. A straight punch that makes contact too early will not have the force that it would have had it the arm had time to extend and achieve maximum acceleration. Stay loose On a scale from one to five (with five being as tight as you can grip the racket) you should be holding your grip around two. Your body should also be loose in order to respond to your situation on-court. When you stay loose, your body can react quicker and accelerate faster. Staying relaxed and loose is a key to getting that extra power everyone wants.

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Power is not some magical thing that requires hours upon hours of practice to increase. Making a few small changes can make the difference in your game so that you can put away points like you know you can. Play hard and have fun.

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Formerly with Daniel Burgess at Freeport Tennis, Miguel Cervantes III now teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.

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I call this “The Swimming Pool Principle.” If you are in a swimming pool, it will always be easier to swim to the other side if you push off of one side of the pool. In tennis, the ground is that wall we use to push off of.

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Carefree 2.5 Team Finishes Second at Sectionals By Arlene Griggs he Carefree 2.5 USTA team [SHIMON] has advanced all the way to the finals at the Sectionals held in Syracuse, N.Y. This was my first experience playing on a winning USTA team, so my immersion was quick, intense and passionate. The period of time between having been selected to represent at the Sectionals to actually playing the

T

matches was concentrated. Realizing that at my age (I am retired), this opportunity was never going to present itself again, so I had to fully explore this lifechanging event. Seven women and a child mascot drove to Syracuse with little knowledge of what this tournament entailed. This was no chick vacation! Having said that,

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

we bonded as teammates and friends. No team could have been more supportive of each other than ours. Lasting friendships were forged, the laughter resounded and tennis matches were won. By our final match on Sunday, we were tied for first place with the “Lucky Strings” team from Albany, N.Y. Sadly, there was “No joy in Mudville,” as we came in second place after some earnest playing. Perhaps our loss was due to the absence of a cool team name? No Nationals in September for us, but our coach’s 4.5 team will carry on, and we are very proud of them. What have I learned from this event? I This was my one golden opportunity, and I’m happy I took advantage of it. I Road trips don’t physically feel the same as they did back in the 1970s. I Tennis is still a game where one side wins and the other side loses. I There is always room for improvement in all areas of competition, such as sportsmanship, fairness, caring about others and performance. I Anything is possible, considering many of our team members are in the 50 and over category. I Lastly, I will engage in tennis competition with thoughts of self-improvement, and not anxiety. I know I’m too old for that! Thank you, Lisa, our coach, for your intensity, support and coaching expertise. Thank you to our captain Marilyn, for your unbelievable organizational skills, constant correspondence and updates, and passion for the game. Arlene Griggs, an English teacher for 35 years, taught at Grand Avenue Middle School in the Bellmore-Merrick CHSD. She retired two years ago and has been keeping busy playing tennis, teaching Zumba and traveling. She plays at Carefree Tennis in Merrick, N.Y., enjoying the competition, and learning to improve her game. She may be reached by e-mail at arteach97@aol.com.


By Kathy Miller

Congratulations to the Long Island Adult, Senior and Super Senior teams that have advanced to Nationals: I Adult League: The Women’s 2.5 Team from Carefree Racquet Club, captained by Marilyn Shimon, and the Women’s 4.5 Team from Carefree Racquet Club, captained by Sally Disabato and Jenn Miller. I Senior League: The Women’s 4.0 Team from Sportime Syosset, captained by Katrina Clifford. I Super Senior League: The Women’s 6.0 Team from Rockville Racquet, captained by Joyce Tomaino; the Women’s 7.0 Team from Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Cathy Caldwell; and the Women’s 8.0 Team from Sportime Roslyn, captained by Susan Alvy. A job well done by all! The final ratings from the 2011 league will be published on the USTA Web site the end of November. These are the ratings that will be used for the 2012 Mixed-Doubles League which begins the beginning of January. If you were bumped up in the early start ratings, appealed the bump up and had that appeal granted, you will have to appeal the yearend rating if you are again bumped up. The Mixed-Doubles League is a combination level league. Long Is-

land will have a 6.0 Division (a 2.5 & 3.5, or two 3.0 players) a 7.0 Division (a 3.0 and 4.0, or two 3.5 players) an 8.0 Division (a 3.5 & 4.5 or two 4.0 players) a 9.0 division (a 4.0 & 5.0 or two 4.5 players) and a 10.0 Division (a 4.5 & 5.5 or two 5.0 players). A mixed team playing together may not be more than one full NTRP level apart (a 4.0 can play with a 5.0 for a 9.0 match but a 3.5 may not play with a 5.0 or in a 9.0 match). Mixed-doubles matches will be played on the weekend with the season running from January to May. A match consists of three courts of mixeddoubles and is scheduled for two hours. Players must be USTA members and pay a $25 roster fee for each team they play on. Each match is $20 per person, which is paid to the club where the match is being played. If you plan to captain a team, please contact me by e-mail (kathym65@aol.com) by Dec. 1, 2011. If you are looking to play on a team, please contact me after Dec. 1 when I will know which teams need players. Schedules will be distributed by mid-December, with play beginning the first weekend in January. The time frame for me to be aware of participating teams and getting schedules done and distributed is very tight, so I ask that you please follow and respect that. I wish you all a great holiday season! Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps:

Summer of 2011 23rd Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp

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Adidas Tennis Camps at Stony Brook University

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ November/December 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ LITennisMag.com

Advanced High Performance Tennis Academy by Maurice Trail


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps:

Summer of 2011 Bethpage Park Tennis Center Summer Tennis Camp

Carefree Racquet Club

The Early Hit Training Center Junior Tennis Camp at Glen Head Racquet Club

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps:

Summer of 2011 Future Stars Summer Tennis Camps

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Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis Center Junior Summer Camp

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Hofstra Summer Camps


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps:

Summer of 2011 Joel Ross Tennis & Sports Camp

Long Beach Tennis Camp

Nike Tennis Camps

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps:

Summer of 2011 Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center Summer Tennis Camp

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Rockville Racquet Club Summer Camp

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Ross School Tennis Center


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps:

Summer of 2011 Sportime Summer Camps

Sportime Elite Tennis Camps

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Summer Camps

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Teacher is By Lonnie Mitchel have read quite a bit over the years about Eastern philosophies on martial arts instruction and training. I learned that “Karate is a martial art in which the ultimate purpose is not to seek to win, but to work toward perfection of character and strong body. As with any martial art, karate requires solid discipline. The body must go through long and strenuous exercises for many years. Total control is required over not only one’s techniques, but also emotions such as fear, pain and hate.” There are many similarities here to the sport of tennis. While teaching a junior class recently with several high school kids, the idea came to me about what I can share in this article. I had heard that there were some good players in this group, and I was looking forward to instructing them. Ten

I

King

min. into the class, one student presented himself as a behavioral problem. He challenged me on every piece of instruction, if I said white, he said black. The drills were not good for him and this student was a disruptive influence on the others. It became clear to me that this student was smarter than the teacher so he thought. I tried to help him in a professional manner, but one lesson was not going to change his mind. I persevered through the lesson as he rebuffed my critiques of poor shot selections, unadvisable slicing and inconsistent play. Unfortunately, he refused to want to improve even though he was a good athlete and had a high level of potential. It’s sad when a student comes to a class to learn and then refuses. Sure enough, the parent called to complain that their son did not enjoy the lesson and felt that he got nothing out of it. I was not surprised by the call from the parent as

I have received several similar calls over the years … a poorly-behaved child, compounded by a parent who thinks the child is right and the teacher is not. Tennis and school teachers everywhere I am sure have experienced similar stories. I am not a psychologist, but I am a darn good tennis instructor with a lot to offer any student who is willing to open their mind. “Wax on, wax off,” to quote a line from the movie “The Karate Kid.” The student challenged the teacher, but it was wax on, wax off and that’s it. The teacher was instructing the student on correct movements and helping develop muscle memory needed to be successful in the sport of karate. So what if the student did it his way? I think he would have gotten his butt kicked in the karate tournament that took place at the end of the film. Tennis instruction is given so that a student develops muscle memory in order to hit a ball consistently over the net. You cannot argue about the philosophy of “wax on, wax off” to the mechanics and repetition of hitting a tennis ball. My purpose in writing this article is that I hope parents who read this take it to heart. The student attends lessons to learn. Every teacher has different teaching techniques and students have different learning styles. In some cases though, the chemistry may not be right and a change can be made. In life, you will not always have a boss that you like or a job you love, but you have to cope. Teach your children that different teachers have different styles and methods. Opening their mind on the court will pay dividends not only in tennis, but in life.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

Lonnie Mitchel has been teaching tennis since 1985, mostly at Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, N.Y. and is a USPTA Level 1 certified tennis instructor. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). His wife, Harriet, is a club level tennis player and can often be found on the court. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or email lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.


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Camhi Rolls to 2011 Nassau County Girl’s Championship By Gary Simeone Credit all photos to Gary Simeone

yosset High School Senior Hannah Camhi was all business on Oct. 16 winning in impressive fashion over Garden City’s Morgan Herrmann 6-0, 6-0 in the Nassau County Girls Singles Championship at Eisenhower Park. Despite the gusty wind that made adjustments necessary, Camhi was able to place the ball where she wanted to against her younger opponent, the eighth grader Hermann. “I’m used to playing in the wind and didn’t have too much difficulty adapting to it,” said Camhi. “I felt like I was striking the ball cleaner and making my shots more impactful today.” Camhi credited her coach, Steve Kaplan of Bethpage Tennis Hannah Camhi from Syosset High School Syosset’s Hannah Camhi en route to her 6-0, 6-0 finals win in the Nassau County Girls Singles Center, with helping her make was crowned 2011 Nassau County Girls Championship Singles Champion some changes in her game. “He helped me with adjusting some of my shots, including incorporating a lot of spin Camhi, who is off to play for Brown three years as she finished second as a and speed in my game. It really helped University next fall, was able to attain the junior and third as a sophomore and me a lot.” title that had narrowly eluded her the past freshman.

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In the doubles final, Hewlett’s Gabriella Leon & Veronika Paikin took down Port Washington’s Lauren Livingston & Emma Brezel in straight sets, 6-1, 6-0. “It’s all about consistency and teamwork with us,” said Paikin. “We felt like we went out there and controlled the match from start to finish.” Leon added that the duo from Hewlett was motivated to come back and win after losing in the second round in last year’s Counties. “Our goal ever since that loss was to get back and win this thing,” said Leon.

“We practiced really hard and really worked on our volleys in order to get this win today.” In the consolation matches, Great Neck South Junior Nicholle Torres defeated Oceanside’s Paulina Tafler, 6-4, 62 to finish third in the singles draw. In doubles, Garden City’s Marisa Cameron & Brittany Burke pulled out a victory over Syosset’s Lisa Petruzillo & Katie Cirella, 7-5, 6-2. The top three finishers earn All-County Honors and the right to compete in the State Championships on Nov. 4.

Singles I Hannah Camhi, Syosset I Morgan Herrmann, Garden City I Nicholle Torres, Great Neck South Doubles I Gabriella Leon & Veronika Paikin, Hewlett I Lauren Livingston & Emma Brezel, Port Washington I Marisa Cameron & Brittany Burke, Garden City Gary Simeone is writing intern/public relations associate for Long Island Tennis Magazine. Credit all photos to Gary Simeone

Garden City’s Morgan Hermann in her finals match

Nicholle Torres of Great Neck South, Hannah Camhi of Syosset and Morgan Herrmann of Garden City earned All-County honors Port Washington’s Emma Brezel & Lauren Livingston in their Nassau County Girls Doubles Championship match at Eisenhower Park

2011 Nassau County Girls Doubles Champions, Gabriella Leon & Veronika Paikin from Hewlett

The doubles teams of Lauren Livingston & Emma Brezel from Port Washington, Marisa Cameron & Brittany Burke from Garden City, and Gabriella Leon & Veronika Paikan from Hewlett earned 2011 AllCounty honors LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones—Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 631-363-2882 • easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-271-6616 • easternathleticclubs.com

Rockville Racquet Club Susan Alvy—Manager 80 North Centre Avenue • Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 • rockvilletennis@optonline.net Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, NY 11937 631-907-5162 www.ross.org/tennis • hli@Ross.org

Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones—Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 631-753-3696 • easternathleticclubs.com

SPORTIME Amagansett Sue De Lara—Co-General Manager Hana Sromova—Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com/Amagansett amagansett@sportimetfm.com

Glen Head Racquet Club Heath Koch: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 earlyhit@optonline.net

SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Mike Kosoff—Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 516-933-8500 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Tennis tdbethpageten@sportimetfm.com

Long Beach Tennis Center Chuck Russell—Director of Tennis 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, NY 11561 516-432-6060 • www.longbeachtenniscenter.com info@longbeachtenniscenter.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program P.O. Box 220252 • Great Neck, NY 11022 631-431-1180 bigtennis@aol.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2323 www.pointsettennis.com • tonny@pointsettennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 516-883-6425 • www.pwta.com • tennis@pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, NY 11542 516-759-0505 • www.rwtt.com

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Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 516-676-9107 • www.rwtt.com

SPORTIME Lynbrook Mohamed Shabir—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com/Lynbrook tdlynbrook@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Massapequa Fayez Malik—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com/Massapequa fmalik@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Randall’s Island Ted Dimond—Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com/Manhattan randallsisland@sportimeny.com SPORTIME Roslyn Adam Mandell—Director of Tennis Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com/Roslyn tdroslyn@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike • Bethpage, NY 11714 516-731-4432 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Multi-Sport bethpagemulti@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Schenectady Philippe Ceas—Director of Tennis 2699 Curry Road Schenectady, NY 12303 518-356-0100 www.SportimeNY.com/Schenectady tdschenectady@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Quogue Will Van Rensburg—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead, Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com/Quogue tdhamptons@sportimeny.com

SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Karl Sommer—Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Tennis tdsyossetten@sportimeny.com

SPORTIME at Harbor Island Eric Fromm—General Manager, Director of Tennis In Harbor Island Park • Mamaroneck, NY 10543 914-777-5050 www.SportimeNY.com/Harbor-Island efromm@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME Syosset Fitness & Racquetball Jay Karl—General Manager 10 Gordon Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-496-3100 www.SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Fitness jkarl@sportimeny.com

SPORTIME Kings Park Darrin Cohen—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com/Kings-Park tdkingspark@sportimetfm.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

USTA National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 718-760-6200 • www.usta.com


LITennisMag.com â&#x20AC;˘ November/December 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 09/22/11)

BOYS

Long Island Boys 10 Singles Rank..Name............................City 1..........Abhinav Raj Srivastava ........Melville, N.Y. 2..........Jeffrey McDonnell................Glen Cove, N.Y. 3..........Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y. 4..........Arjun K Sharma....................Glen Head, N.Y. 5..........Karan K. Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 6..........Robert Steven Bellino ..........Huntington, N.Y. 7..........Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y. 8..........Alec Hunter Barres ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 9..........Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 10........Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 11........Zachary Reid Berlin..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 12........Spencer Brachman ..............Commack, N.Y. 13........Sohrob Yavari ......................Syosset, N.Y. 14........Hunter Fromm......................Amagansett, N.Y. 15........Jared M. Phillips ..................Plainview, N.Y. 16........Luke Torel Karniewich ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 17........Jacob Rusinek ....................East Hills, N.Y. 18........Bradford J. Lin ....................Kings Point, N.Y. 19........Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 20........Trevor Lanigan ....................North Babylon, N.Y. 21........Logan Paik Chang ................Old Westbury, N.Y. 22........Brandon Zhu ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 23........William G. McCreery ............Albertson, N.Y. 24........Matthew Savino ..................Garden City, N.Y. 25........Aman K. Sharma ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 26........Michael Bruck......................Roslyn, N.Y. 27........Jonathan DeGroot ................Southampton, N.Y. 28........JohnChristian Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 29........Alexander Karman................Port Washington, N.Y. 30........Tyler Joseph Milner..............Jericho, N.Y. 31........Sam Levine..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 32........Anton Geoffrey de Lesseps ..Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 33........Daniel Chikvashvili ..............Melville, N.Y. 34........Grant A. Cantone ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 35........Peter Bukary ........................Jericho, N.Y. 36........Ethan Lipetz ........................East Hills, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank..Name............................City 1..........Thomas A. Korossy ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 2..........George Kaslow ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 3..........Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 4..........Alexander Reiley ..................Manorville, N.Y. 5..........Matthew Roberts..................Setauket, N.Y. 6..........Matthew Franklin Porges......Sands Point, N.Y. 7..........Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 8..........Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 9..........Daniel Meinster....................South Setauket, N.Y. 10........Jackson Weisbrot ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11........Lucas Larese DeSantos........Southampton, N.Y. 12........Austin Pomerantz ................Old Westbury, N.Y. 13........Eric Li ..................................Old Westbury N.Y. 14........Steven Well Sun ..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 15........Billy G. Suarez......................Huntington, N.Y. 16........Eli Grossman........................Woodbury, N.Y. 17........Ben Snow ............................Water Mill, N.Y. 18........Evan Kirsh............................Roslyn, N.Y. 19........Matthew Lee Catton ............Woodbury, N.Y. 20........Jake Spencer Grossman ......Sands Point, N.Y. 21........Gardner Howe......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 22........Carl Grant ............................Water Mill, N.Y. 23........Benjamin Cole Grossman ....Sands Point, N.Y. 24........Adam Stein ..........................Melville, N.Y. 25........Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 26........Zachary Ian Khazzam ..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 27........Alexander Roti......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 28........Nicholas Tyler Decker ..........East Setauket, N.Y. 29........Michael Thomas Jaklitsch....Islip, N.Y. 30........Arjun Mehrotra ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 31........Jonas Feuerring ..................Sagaponack, N.Y.

60

ISLAND

32........Zan Ahmed ..........................Syosset, N.Y. 33........Ronald P. Hohmann ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 34........Alex Joseph Amadio ............Smithtown, N.Y. 35........Jeffrey M. McDonnell ..........Glen Cove, N.Y. 36........Austin Egna..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 37........Adam Bradley Wilck ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 38........Justin Ilan Lempert ..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 39........Michael Stuart Petersen ......Bridgehampton, N.Y. 40........Nicolas Demaria ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank..Name............................City 1..........Brandon Eric Remer ............Hewlett, N.Y. 2..........Arnav Raj Srivastava ............Melville, N.Y. 3..........Dylan Granat........................Woodbury, N.Y. 4..........Cory Seltman ......................Smithtown, N.Y. 5..........Evan Kober ..........................Wantagh, N.Y. 6..........Michael James DeNigris ......Islip, N.Y. 7..........Braddock Chow....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 8..........Raizada Bhavin Vaid ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 9..........Del Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 10........Benjamin Tenner ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 11........Derek Steven Zadrozny ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 12........Thomas Michael Dacosta ....Massapequa, N.Y. 13........Ethan Susser........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 14........Vincent Chen........................Hauppaugh, N.Y. 15........Spencer George Bozsik ........Sag Harbor, N.Y. 16........Jacob Lacks ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 17........Nicholas Kevin Fox ..............Commack, N.Y. 18........Cameron Posillico ................Bayville, N.Y. 19........Simon Adler ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 20........Matthew Powers Holweger ..Manhasset, N.Y. 21........Mitchell Reid Berger ............Lake Grove, N.Y. 22........Eric Handelman....................Melville, N.Y. 23........Andrew Christopher Muran ..Glen Head, N.Y. 24........David Binler ........................East Northport, N.Y. 25........Connor Wright......................Commack, N.Y. 26........Zane Siddiqui ......................West Babylon, N.Y. 27........Joseph James D’Orazio........St. James, N.Y. 28........Daniel Khodosh....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 29........Simar Deep Sawhney ..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 30........Spencer Lowitt ....................Syosset, N.Y. 31........Derek Menker ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 32........Nick John Stamatos ............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 33........Florimond Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 34........David Henry Reinharz ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 35........Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 36........JohnThomas Sepanski ........Huntington, N.Y. 37........Justin Scott Feder ................Bellmore, N.Y. 38........Faran Nazir ..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 39........Matthew Kennedy Diers ......Mastic, N.Y. 40........Grant Rosenberg ..................Melville, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1..........Richard Mitchell ..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 2..........Cole Laffitte ........................East Setauket, N.Y. 3..........Erik Johann Lobben ............Glen Head, N.Y. 4..........Dylan Ander ........................Hewlett, N.Y. 5..........Troy Michael Haas................Huntington Station, N.Y. 6..........Gregory Matthew Rosenthal Syosset, N.Y. 7..........Zachary Chang ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 8..........Samuel Hajibai ....................Kings Point, N.Y. 9..........Brett Titcomb ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 10........Connor J. Gehrke ................Miller Place, N.Y. 11........Jack Vissicchio ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 12........Joshua Fried ........................Plainview, N.Y. 13........Jeffrey Cherkin ....................Melville, N.Y. 14........Samuel Johnson ..................Huntington, N.Y. 15........Steven Marzagalli ................Patchogue, N.Y. 16........Andrew Reiley......................Manorville, N.Y. 17........Sai Senthilkumar..................Manhasset, N.Y. 18........Michael Nelson ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 19........Jesse Richheimer ................Merrick, N.Y. 20........Matthew Bahar ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 21........Richard DeGregoris ..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 22........Cooper Francis Lacetera ......Speonk, N.Y.

RANKINGS

23........Erik Ujvari ............................Hauppauge, N.Y. 24........Connor Daniel Jeran ............Islip, N.Y. 25........Jeremy Grossman................Woodbury, N.Y. 26........Jonathan Carl Smucker........Lido Beach, N.Y. 27........Caleb Van Loon ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 28........Alex Philip Rosenfield ..........Holtsville, N.Y. 29........Derek Thomas Esposito........Stony Brook, N.Y. 30........Milan Asanga Gunasekera....Mount Sinai, N.Y. 31........David Binler ........................East Northport, N.Y. 32........Daniel Sliwowski..................Islip, N.Y. 33........Daniel Christopher Lee ........Port Washington, N.Y. 34........Brian Heinze ........................Garden City, N.Y. 35........Alec Tuckey..........................Melville, N.Y. 36........Stone E. Mitchell ..................Woodmere, N.Y. 37........Michael Hakimi ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 38........Austin Spencer Ash ..............Syosset, N.Y. 39........Matthew Vermont Kantor......Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 40........Will Pratt-Stephen................Northport, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1..........Andrew Steven O’Connell ....Medford, N.Y. 2..........Chris Casamassima ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 3..........Sloan Millman......................Woodmere, N.Y. 4..........Erik Johann Lobben ............Glen Head, N.Y. 5..........Jared Drzal ..........................West Sayville, N.Y. 6..........Richard Mitchell ..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 7..........Matthew Zuckerman............Valley Stream, N.Y. 8..........Jacob Mishkin......................Woodbury, N.Y. 9..........Zachary Aboody ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 10........Michael Freilich....................Lawrence, N.Y. 11........Ryan Zuckerman..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 12........Seth Kornfield ......................Jericho, N.Y. 13........Jonathan Carl Smucker........Lido Beach, N.Y. 14........Samuel Hajibai ....................Kings Point, N.Y. 15........Roger Young ........................Brookhaven, N.Y. 16........Jonathan Sanders................Holbrook, N.Y. 17........Jeffrey Cherkin ....................Melville, N.Y. 18........Ignacio Casali ......................Farmingdale, N.Y. 19........Darren Reisch ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 20........Kevin Kim ............................South Setauket, N.Y. 21........Dennis Uspensky ................Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 22........Clark D. Ruiz ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 23........Josh Young ..........................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 24........Jordan Reiley ......................Manorville, N.Y. 25........Jason Fiderer ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 26........Jason Fruchter ....................Lawrence, N.Y. 27........Zachary H. Mintz..................Roslyn, N.Y. 28........Anton Averin ........................South Setauket, N.Y. 29........Richard DeGregoris ..............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 30........Brett Titcomb ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 31........Daniel Park ..........................East Northport, N.Y. 32........Alex Philip Rosenfield ..........Holtsville, N.Y. 33........Will Pratt-Stephen................Northport, N.Y. 34........Felipe Magalhaaes Reis........East Hampton, N.Y. 35........Zach Cooper ........................Holbrook, N.Y. 36........Steven Ferrantello................Dix Hills, N.Y. 37........Erik Ujvari ............................Hauppauge, N.Y. 38........Justin Paul Masure ..............East Rockaway, N.Y. 39........Nick Wong ..........................Jericho, N.Y. 40........Joseph M. Falcetta ..............Deer Park, N.Y.

GIRLS

Long Island Girls 10 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1..........Alexa Lynn Bracco................Freeport, N.Y. 2..........Marisa L. Menist ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 3..........Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 4..........Madison Li ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 5..........Allison Cooney ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 6..........Alexandra Chirinkin..............Woodbury, N.Y. 7..........Gabriella Sciarrotta ..............Woodmere, N.Y. 8..........Kira Rose Giordano ..............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 9..........Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 10........Rebecca E. Suarez ..............Huntington, N.Y. 11........Morena Devito ....................Syosset, N.Y. 12........Jade Fixon-Owoo ................Lynbrook, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

13........Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 14........Sofia Rose Anzalone ............Center Moriches, N.Y. 15........Katie Dzialga........................Southampton, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name............................City 1..........Olivia Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 2..........Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 3..........Marisa L. Menist ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 4..........Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 5..........Hannah Rosalie Dayton ........East Hampton, N.Y. 6..........Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7..........Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 8..........Celeste Wang Traub..............Jericho, N.Y. 9..........Dasha Dlin ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 10........Amanda Allison Foo..............Manhasset, N.Y. 11........Marina Bracken Hilbert ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 12........Devika Kedia........................East Norwich, N.Y. 13........Ashley Debra Yevdosin ........Hewlett, N.Y. 14........Stephanie Anne Petras ........Manhasset, N.Y. 15........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ........Albertson, N.Y. 16........Katelyn Walker ....................Sands Point, N.Y. 17........Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 18........Julia Sherwood Dudley ........Southampton, N.Y. 19........Angela Chi ..........................Kings Park, N.Y. 20........Christina Lorraine Jud..........Glen Head, N.Y. 21........Abigail Carrie Okin ..............Amagansett, N.Y. 22........Morgan Voulo ......................East Setauket, N.Y. 23........Melissa Cooney....................Manhasset, N.Y. 24........Risha Malhotra ....................Syosset, N.Y. 25........Alexa Lynn Bracco................Freeport, N.Y. 26........Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 27........Adele Sukhov ......................Westbury, N.Y. 28........Ariana Malik ........................Melville, N.Y. 29........Danah Han ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 30........Josephine Winters................Elmont, N.Y. 31........Morgan A. Wilkins ................Syosset, N.Y. 32........Elena Artemis Vlamakis ........Garden City, N.Y. 33........Rory Abigail Mary Gallaher ..East Hampton, N.Y. 34........Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 35........Kerri Leah Goldfuss..............Westbury, N.Y. 36........Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 37........Amanda Mintz......................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 38........Samantha Lena Galu............Jericho, N.Y. 39........Erica Forrest ........................Jericho, N.Y. 40........Stephanie Buchheim ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name............................City 1..........Lauren Ann Livingston..........Sands Point, N.Y. 2..........Lexee Taylor Shapiro............Syosset, N.Y. 3..........Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ....Bayville, N.Y. 4..........Nikaylah Imani Williams ......Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 5..........Julia Khan............................Port Washington, N.Y. 6..........Julia Ciardullo ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 7..........Michelle Haykin ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 8..........Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 9..........Vanessa L. Scott ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 10........Michele Sheila Lehat............Great Neck, N.Y. 11........Sophie Grace Wilson ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12........Aidan Owens........................Manhasset, N.Y. 13........Brynn Maris April ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 14........Danielle Mirabella ................Wantagh, N.Y. 15........Rosa LaCorte ......................Merrick, N.Y. 16........Michelle N. Carnovale ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 17........Courtney B. Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 18........Ariel Natalie Eisenberg ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 19........Eva Rosalia Petersen............Bridgehampton, N.Y. 20........Laura Jean Halsey ..............Westhampton, N.Y. 21........Ellen Nicole Huhulea ............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 22........Juliana Shenker ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 23........Lauren B. Dolowich..............Jericho, N.Y. 24........Alana Weitz ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 25........Ryann Moelis ......................Hewlett, N.Y. 26........Kaysha Forbes ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 27........Matilda Evangelina Bros ......Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 28........Celeste Rose Matute ............Oyster Bay, N.Y.


LONG 29........Jennifer Wang......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 30........Amanda Allison Foo..............Manhasset, N.Y. 31........Ayesha Jagi Chhugani..........Roslyn, N.Y. 32........Shannon Marie Mullins ........Oceanside, N.Y. 33........Emily Margaret Marge..........Medford, N.Y. 34........Tracey Nicole Rosenlicht ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 35........Cecilia Combemale ..............Bridgehampton, N.Y. 36........Courtney A. Digia ................Manhasset, N.Y. 37........Gabrielle Raziel ....................Melville, N.Y. 38........Maxine Lizaso......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 39........Mallie Feldman ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 40........Celeste Wang Traub..............Jericho, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name............................City 1..........Olivia Marie Ammirati ..........Halesite, N.Y. 2..........Katharine Brandow ..............East Northport, N.Y. 3..........Lauren Ann Livingston..........Sands Point, N.Y. 4..........Hannah Goldman ................West Hempstead, N.Y. 5..........Lara Fishbane ......................Commack, N.Y. 6..........Emma R. Brezel ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 7..........Aimee N. Manfredo ..............Shoreham, N.Y. 8..........Kristen Bomkamp ................Northport, N.Y. 9..........Julia Ciardullo ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 10........Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 11........Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ....Bayville, N.Y. 12........Emily Rees ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 13........Michele Sheila Lehat............Great Neck, N.Y. 14........Brittany Burke......................Garden City, N.Y. 15........Bridget Elaine Harding..........Northport, N.Y. 16........Alexandra Linder..................Sands Point, N.Y. 17........Rhea Malhotra ....................Syosset, N.Y. 18........Lauren Difazio......................Greenlawn, N.Y. 19........Ruth Freilich ........................Lawrence, N.Y. 20........Angelika Rothberg................Centerport, N.Y. 21........Holly Hubsher ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 22........Amanda Luper ....................Melville, N.Y. 23........Allison Gabrielle Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 24........Taylor Brent ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 25........Rachel Gastaldo ..................Syosset, N.Y. 26........Bridget Connors ..................East Quogue, N.Y. 27........Rithika Reddy ......................Syosset, N.Y. 28........Stefanie Ebo ........................Sayville, N.Y. 29........Laura Torsiello......................Bayport, N.Y. 30........Morgan Herrmann................Garden City, N.Y. 31........Stephanie Nakash................Great Neck, N.Y. 32........Jennifer Glukhman ..............Syosset, N.Y. 33........Michelle Haykin ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 34........Alexandra Nicole Linde ........Melville, N.Y. 35........Shannon Marie Mullins ........Oceanside, N.Y. 36........Nikaylah Imani Williams ......Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 37........Karishma Ramesh Tank........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 38........Elizabeth Gee ......................Garden City, N.Y. 39........Brianna Biancardi ................Merrick, N.Y. 40........Gina Ciliberti ........................West Islip, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name............................City 1..........Veronika Paikin ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 2..........Hannah Goldman ................West Hempstead, N.Y. 3..........Jennifer A. Carnovale ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 4..........Erica Bundrick ....................Mattituck, N.Y. 5..........Jennifer C. Ferguson ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 6..........Nicholle Torres ....................North Hills, N.Y. 7..........Jaclyn Mary Cartwright ........Deer Park, N.Y. 8..........Claudia M. Ruiz ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 9..........Kate C. Weidenman..............Syosset, N.Y. 10........Rithika D. Reddy ..................Syosset, N.Y. 11........Lara Fishbane ......................Commack, N.Y. 12........Cameron Leigh Moskol ........Wantagh, N.Y. 13........Jennifer Glukham ................Syosset, N.Y. 14........Rachel Gastaldo ..................Syosset, N.Y.

ISLAND

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 09/21/11)

BOYS

Sectional Boys 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 7..........Cannon Kingsley ..................Northport, N.Y. 9..........Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y. 10........Steven Well Sun ..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 12........Spencer Brachman ..............Commack, N.Y. 14........Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 25........Billy Suarez..........................Huntington, N.Y. 26........Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 29........Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y. 39........Jeffrey McDonnell................Glen Cove, N.Y. 48........Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 56........Zachary Reid Berlin..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 62........Karan K. Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 63........Robert Steven Bellino ..........Huntington, N.Y. 69........Arjun Sharma ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 80........Daniel Chikvashvili ..............Syosset, N.Y. 89........Alec Hunter Barres ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 90........Alexander Karman................Port Washington, N.Y. 94........Brandon T. Cohen ................Westhampton, N.Y. 100......Sohrob Yavari ......................Syosset, N.Y. 107......Dylan Paul............................Woodmere, N.Y. 110......Logan Paik Chang ................Old Westbury, N.Y. 111......Brandon Zhu ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 118......Jared M. Phillips ..................Plainview, N.Y. 120......Luke Torel Karniewich ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 122......Bradford J. Lin ....................Kings Point, N.Y. 127......Trevor Lanigan ....................North Babylon, N.Y. 133......William McCreery ................Albertson, N.Y. 134......Torin Suner Bograd ..............Huntington, N.Y. 135......Matthew Savino ..................Garden City, N.Y. 137......Aman K. Sharma ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 141......Jonathan DeGroot ................Southampton, N.Y. 144......Omar JohnChristian Matute..Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 2..........Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 5..........Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 6..........Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 9..........Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 10........Keegan James Morris ..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 18........Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 19........Patrick F. Maloney................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 20........Rajan Jai Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 30........Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 32........Daniel Eric Pellerito ..............Syosset, N.Y. 41........James Kyrkanides................Stony Brook, N.Y. 42........Michael Medvedev ..............Oceanside, N.Y. 44........Ronald P. Hohmann ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 50........Steven Well Sun ..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 51........Neel Raj ..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 53........Cannon Kingsley ..................Northport, N.Y. 56........Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 60........Thomas Korossy ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 67........Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 79........Benjamin Cole Grossman ....Sands Point, N.Y. 83........Ben Snow ............................Water Mill, N.Y. 88........Gardner Howe......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 94........Billy G. Suarez......................Huntington, N.Y. 98........Eli Grossman........................Woodbury, N.Y. 99........Nicolas Demaria ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 100......Matthew Franklin Porges......Sands Point, N.Y. 108......Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 111......Eric Li ..................................Old Westbury, N.Y. 123......Jake Spencer Grossman ......Sands Point, N.Y. 127......Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 132......Michael Thomas Jaklitsch....South Setauket, N.Y. 136......George Kaslow ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 137......Matthew T. Roberts ..............Setauket, N.Y.

RANKINGS

140......Spencer Brachman ..............Commack, N.Y. 145......Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 147......Spencer George Bozsik ........Sag Harbor, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 2..........Brenden Andrew Volk ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 4..........Alexander Lebedev ..............Island Park, N.Y. 19........Lubomir T. Cuba ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 22........Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 29........Bryant J. Born......................Manhasset, N.Y. 31........Colin Francis Sacco..............Brightwaters, N.Y. 36........Athell Patrick Bennett ..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 40........Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 41........Palmer T. Clare ....................North Bellmore, N.Y. 43........Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 49........Stephen Gruppuso ..............Bayport, N.Y. 53........Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 56........Joshua Williams Gordon ......Hicksville, N.Y. 59........Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 61........Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 64........William Scribner Bader ........Water Mill, N.Y. 73........Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 83........Brandon Eric Remer ............Hewlett, N.Y. 85........Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 86........Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 87........Jordan Michael Bennett ......Valley Stream, N.Y. 92........Alex Grossman ....................Sands Point, N.Y. 94........Raizada Bhavin Vaid ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 99........Andy Zhou ..........................Commack, N.Y. 110......Nikhil Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 116......Nicholas Kevin Fox ..............Commack, N.Y. 118......Dylan Granat........................Woodbury, N.Y. 119......Keegan James Morris ..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 124......Michael James DeNigris ......Islip, N.Y. 125......Trippie Franz ........................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 127......Del Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 132......Daniel Khodosh....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 141......Braddock Chow....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 143......Michael Liebman ................Roslyn, N.y. 144......Duane Davis ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 148......Joseph James D’orazio ........Saint James, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 1..........Noah B. Rubin ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 4..........Josh Silverstein....................Great Neck, N.Y. 5..........Aidan Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 6..........Philip Daniel Antohi ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 7..........Samuel Lam ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 9..........Vihar Shah ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 10........Ethan Bogard ......................Lido Beach, N.Y. 14........Douglas Notaris ..................Wantagh, N.Y. 20........Alex Sacher..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 22........Jeremy Dubin ......................Southampton, N.Y. 24........Brandon T. Stone..................Melville, N.Y. 29........Daniel Grunberger................Great Neck, N.Y. 32........Zachary A. Lessen................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 37........Alexander Lebedev ..............Island Park, N.Y. 41........Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ..........Greenvale, N.Y. 44........Conor Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 48........Tyler J. Hoffman ..................Sayville, N.Y. 49........Matthew R. Demichiel ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 50........John P. D’Alessandro............Northport, N.Y. 53........Jared R. Halstrom ................Bellmore, N.Y. 55........Zain Ali ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 64........Lamar Remy ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 67........Joshua Williams Gordon ......Hicksville, N.Y. 71........Jonathan Paris ....................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 84........Mark Daniel Temporal ..........Carle Place, N.Y. 87........Brian W. Slivonik ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 89........Alex Brebenel ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 93........Kyle Alper ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 103......Ian Baranowski ....................Syosset, N.Y. 112......Bryant J. Born......................Manhasset, N.Y. 125......Erik Ujvari ............................Hauppauge, N.Y.

129......James Edward Heaney ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 131......Brett Edelblum ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 132......Jeffrey Cherkin ....................Melville, N.Y. 141......Josh Young ..........................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 144......Steven Marzagalli ................Patchogue, N.Y. 149......Andrew Reiley......................Manorville, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 2..........Josh M. Levine ....................Syosset, N.Y. 4..........Andrew Yaraghi....................Mill Neck, N.Y. 5..........Bert Vancura ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7..........Eric Rubin ............................Lido Beach, N.Y. 13........Matthew O. Barry ................Lido Beach, N.Y. 15........Noah B. Rubin ......................Merrick, N.Y. 18........Jensen H. Reiter ..................Syosset, N.Y. 21........Brendan Henry ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 26........Howard J. Weiss ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 33........Samuel Lam ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 35........Ofir Solomon........................Plainview, N.Y. 38........Alexander Schidlovsky ........Sea Cliff, N.Y. 43........Kevin A. Katz........................Woodbury, N.Y. 48........Jonahiby Tauil ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 55........Aidan Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 56........Alan S. Pleat ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 64........Austin Davidow....................Glen Head, N.Y. 74........Eric Sumanaru ....................Middle Island, N.Y. 75........Conor A. Dauer ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 77........David Greenbaum ................Great Neck, N.Y. 79........Tyler J. Hoffman ..................Sayville, N.Y. 85........Sean Jagi Chhugani ............Roslyn, N.Y. 95........Douglas Notaris ..................Wantagh, N.Y. 96........Doron Saraf ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 97........Eric Ambrosio ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 98........Jacob Mishkin......................Woodbury, N.Y. 100......Daniel Khanin ......................Baldwin, N.Y. 103......Clark D. Ruiz ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 109......Daniel R. Grinshteyn ............Hewlett, N.Y. 111......Henry D. Lee ........................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 113......Paul Abrudescu ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 120......Zachary Morris ....................Garden City, N.Y. 128......Jared Drzal ..........................West Sayville, N.Y. 130......J. T. Esposito ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 131......Darren Reisch ......................Floral Park, N.Y. 138......Michael Anthony Mcfelia ......Huntington Station, N.Y. 139......Chris Casamassima ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 143......Erik Johann Lobben ............Glen Head, N.Y. 146......Jason A. Fruchter ................Lawrence, N.Y. 148......Andrew Steven O’Connell ....Medford, N.Y.

GIRLS

Sectional Girls 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 2..........Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 5..........Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 14........Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 19........Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 21........Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 22........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ........Albertson, N.Y. 28........Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 37........Alexa Susan Goetz ..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 41........Alexa Lynn Bracco................Freeport, N.Y. 54........Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 59........Madison Li ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 60........Allison Cooney ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 65........Jade Fixon-Owoo ................Lynbrook, N.Y. 67........Gabriela Sciarrotta ..............Woodmere, N.Y. 74........Alexandra Chirinkin..............Woodbury, N.Y. 76........Rebecca Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 79........Morena DeVito ....................Syosset, N.Y. 87........Sofia Rose Anzalone ............Center Moriches, N.Y. 91........Katie Dzialga........................Southampton, N.Y.

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LONG Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 4..........Claire Handa ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 10........Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ........Manorville, N.Y. 19........Jasmine Olivia Abidi ............Glen Head, N.Y. 25........Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 32........Stephanie Chikvashvili ........Syosset, N.Y. 33........Courtney Kowalsky ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 40........Josephine Winters................Elmont, N.Y. 51........Celeste Wang Traub..............Jericho, N.Y. 52........Olivia Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 53........Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 63........Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 64........Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 67........Katelyn Walker ....................Sands Point, N.Y. 72........Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 74........Hannah Rosalie Dayton ........East Hampton, N.Y. 88........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ........Albertson, N.Y. 89........Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 104......Theodora Brebenel ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 106......Morgan Wilkins ....................Syosset, N.Y. 111......Marisa Menist ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 116......Hannah Zhao ......................Syosset, N.Y. 118......Dasha Dlin ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 120......Marina Bracken Hilbert ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 122......Stephanie Anne Petras ........Manhasset, N.Y. 123......Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 137......Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 143......Nicole Rezak........................Merrick, N.Y. 144......Morgan Voulo ......................East Setauket, N.Y. 150......Isabella Rose Smith..............Roslyn, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 4..........Madison Battaglia ................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 9..........Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 11........Isabella Pascucci ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12........Shanice Nadia Arthur ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 16........Morgan Hermann ................Garden City, N.Y. 26........Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 28........Mia M. Vecchio ....................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 43........Esther Chikvashvili ..............Syosset, N.Y. 54........Michele Sheila Lehat............Great Neck, N.Y. 55........Dominique Woinarowski ......Syosset, N.Y. 56........Karen A. Serina ....................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 62........Stephanie Chikvashvili ........Melville, N.Y. 66........Alexandra Lipps ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 80........Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ....Bayville, N.Y. 82........Vanessa L. Scott ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 89........Courtney B. Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 95........Celeste Rose Matute ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 100......Nikaylah Imani Williams ......Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 102......Lexee Taylor Shapiro............Syosset, N.Y. 107......Amber Nicole Policare ..........East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 112......Claire Handa ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 113......Rhea Malhotra ....................Syosset, N.Y. 125......Julia Khan............................Port Washington, N.Y. 135......Cecilia Thomas Combemale Bridgehampton, N.Y. 136......Amanda Allison Foo..............Manhasset, N.Y. 144......Katie Jane Cirella ................Woodbury, N.Y. 147......Brynn Maris April ................Dix Hills, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 13........Sophie R. Barnard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 21........Aleksandra Mally ................Franklin Square, N.Y. 26........Vivian Cheng........................Woodbury, N.Y. 35........Nicholle Torres ....................North Hills, N.Y. 42........Alison Wang ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 50........Paulina Tafler ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 54........Sunaina Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 55........Claudia M. Ruiz ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 59........Aimee N. Manfredo ..............Shoreham, N.Y. 63........Rachel Gastaldo ..................Syosset, N.Y.

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ISLAND

64........Madison Battaglia ................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 68........Yuliya V. Astapova ................Port Washington, N.Y. 69........Bridget Elaine Harding..........Northport, N.Y. 70........Rithika D. Reddy ..................Syosset, N.Y. 71........Isabella Pascucci ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 72........Mia M. Vecchio ....................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 73........Zenat Rashidzada ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 77........Olivia C. Funk ......................Hicksville, N.Y. 79........Cameron Leigh Moskol ........Wantagh, N.Y. 82........Sara Finger ..........................St. James, N.Y. 87........Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 93........Gabriella Nicole Leon ..........Woodmere, N.Y. 94........Jennifer C. Ferguson ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 103......Bianca Posa ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 110......Emma R. Brezel ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 118......Ruth Freilich ........................Lawrence, N.Y. 119......Brittany Burke......................Garden City, N.Y. 120......Julia Zhuang ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 125......Shanice Nadia Arthur ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 143......Esther Chikvashvili ..............Melville, N.Y. 144......Karen A. Serina ....................Islip Terrace, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name............................City 5..........Katherine Yau ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 9..........Hannah L. Camhi..................Woodbury, N.Y. 12........Shelby Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 27........Sophie Barnard ....................Mill neck, N.Y. 28........Morgan Feldman..................Glen Head, N.Y. 32........Stephanie Loutsenko............Bellmore, N.Y. 35........Vivian Cheng........................Woodbury, N.Y. 46........Ashley A. Masanto................Baldwin, N.Y. 47........Julia Elbaba ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 51........Nicholle Torres ....................North Hills, N.Y. 55........Taylor A. Diffley ....................Hampton Bays, N.Y. 58........Alison Wang ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 66........Melissa Carlay ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 71........Theresa Smith......................Port Washington, N.Y. 72........Ludmila Yamus ....................Melville, N.Y. 80........Claudia M. Ruiz ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 81........Missy Edelblum....................Roslyn, N.Y. 92........Aleksandra Mally..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 102......Samantha Rosca-Sipot ........Malverne, N.Y. 105......Erica Bundrick......................Mattituck, N.Y. 107......Sunaina Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 113......Ashley Sandler ....................Jericho, N.Y. 116......Lila B. Martz ........................Long Beach, N.Y. 130......Jessica Nowak ....................Huntington, N.Y. 134......Mia M. Vecchio ....................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 135......Veronika Paikin ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 148......Carly Siegel..........................Dix Hills, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 10/05/11)

BOYS

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 53........Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 86........Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 103......Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y 117......Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 156......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 172......Rajan Jai Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 211......Keegan James Morris ..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 223......Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 280......Daniel Eric Pellerito ..............Syosset, N.Y. 290......Michael Medvedev ..............Oceanside, N.Y. 358......Ronald P.Hohmann ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 644......Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 656......Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 696......James Kyrkanides................Stony Brook, N.Y.

RANKINGS

754......Neel Raj ..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 805......Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 930......Steven Well Sun ..................Glen Cove, N.Y.

GIRLS

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

Rank Name............................City 61........Claire Handa ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 116......Hannah Zhao........................Syosset, N.Y. 239......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ............Glen Head, N.Y. 269......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ........Manorville, N.Y. 325......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 373......Ashley Lessen......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 420......Courtney B. Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 423......Stephanie Chikvashvili ........Syosset, N.Y. 502......Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 554......Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 627......Celeste Wang Traub..............Jericho, N.Y. 676......Josephine Winters................Elmont, N.Y.

Rank Name............................City 34........Brenden Andrew Volk ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 43........Alexander Lebedev ..............Island Park, N.Y. 180......Bryant J. Born......................Manhasset, N.Y. 205......Lubomir T. Cuba ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 258......Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 450......Colin Francis Sacco..............Brightwaters, N.Y. 513......Palmer T. Clare ....................North Bellmore, N.Y. 600......Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 618......Athell Patrick Bennett ..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 649......Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 668......Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 785......Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 935......Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 2..........Noah B. Rubin ......................Merrick, N.Y. 41........Aidan Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 48........Samuel Lam ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 56........Josh Silverstein....................Great Neck, N.Y. 77........Vihar Shah ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 98........Philip Daniel Antohi ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 190......Ethan Bogard ......................Lido Beach, N.Y. 192......Douglas Notaris....................Wantagh, N.Y. 239......Alex C. Sacher......................Glen Head, N.Y. 259......Zachary A. Lessen................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 291......Brandon T. Stone..................Melville, N.Y. 356......Daniel Grunberger................Great Neck, N.Y. 432......Lamar Remy ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 481......Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ..........Greenvale, N.Y. 567......Jeremy Dubin ......................Southampton, N.Y. 568......Conor Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 611......John P. D’Allesandro ............Northport, N.Y. 663......Alexander Lebedev ..............Island Park, N.Y. 743......Tyler J. Hoffman ..................Sayville, N.Y. 780......Jared R. Halstrom ................Bellmore, N.Y. 817......Zain Ali ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 833......Stanislav Korshunov ............Oceanside, N.Y. 865......Joshua Williams Gordon ......Hicksville, N.Y. 917......Matthew Demichiel ..............Hewlett, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 57........Josh M. Levine ....................Syosset, N.Y. 97........Matthew O. Barry ................Lido Beach, N.Y. 101......Bert Vancura ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 125......Andrew S. Yaraghi ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 132......Eric Rubin ............................Lido Beach, N.Y. 134......Noah B. Rubin ......................Merrick, N.Y. 212......Jensen Reiter ......................Syosset, N.Y. 236......Howard J. Weiss ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 347......Samuel Lam ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 467......Aidan Talcott ........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 474......Brendan Henry ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 518......Alexander Schidlovsky ........Sea Cliff, N.Y. 579......Kevin Katz............................Woodbury, N.Y. 654......Daniel Khanin ......................Baldwin, N.Y. 663......Lamar Remy ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 721......Jonahiby Tauil ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 772......Ofir Solomon........................Plainview, N.Y. 806......Zachary Morris ....................Garden City, N.Y. 895......Eric Ambrosio ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 966......Julian Alexi Zlobinsky ..........Greenvale, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 97........Madison Battaglia ................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 200......Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 206......Isabella Pascucci..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 300......Taylor Cosme ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 301......Shanice Nadia Arthur ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 354......Morgan Herrmann................Garden City, N.Y. 673......Amber Nicole Policare ..........East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 831......Esther Chikvashvili ..............Melville, N.Y. 874......Mia M. Vecchio ....................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 955......Karen A. Serina ....................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 977......Celeste Rose Matute ............Oyster Bay, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 130......Sophie R. Barnard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 247......Aleksandra Mally..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 278......Vivian Cheng........................Woodbury, N.Y. 687......Sunaina Vohra......................Glen Head, N.Y. 744......Paulina Tafler ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 910......Nicholle Torres ....................North Hills, N.Y. 942......Alison Wang ........................Great Neck, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name............................City 69........Julia Elbaba ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 88........Hannah L. Camhi..................Woodbury, N.Y. 104......Katherine Yau ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 194......Shelby Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 324......Morgan Feldman..................Glen Head, N.Y. 456......Vivan Cheng ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 498......Stephanie Loutsenko............Bellmore, N.Y. 602......Sophie Barnard ....................Mill Neck, N.Y. 944......Ludmila Yamus ....................Deer Park, N.Y.

Long Island Rankings Sponsored by


USTA/Long Island Region 2011

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. NOVEMBER 2011 Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 L2O Eastern Athletic Club BG14s Championships Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (14)s, S E Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 & November 11-13 L1 Sportime Bethpage Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 5 FIC Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix G (16)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 & November 11-13 L1 RWTTC Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 5 Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix B (16)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 L2R Hempstead Regional Championships Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis Center 525 Eagle Avenue West Hempstead, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B (14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 28 at 8:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 486-2165.

Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 Long Beach Tennis Center Men’s Open & NTRP Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (Op)s, FRLC; W (Op)d, FRLC, NMW (3.0-4.0)s, FRLC, NW (3.04.0)d, FRLC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player singles, $25 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Nov. 1 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 & November 11-13 L1 Sportime Kings Park Championships Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger G (14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 21 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 & November 11-13 +L1 Point Set Eastern Designated Closed Championships Level 5 FIC Point Set 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix B (12)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323. Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 & November 11-13 L2R Long Island Regional Westhampton Championships Westhampton Tennis and Sport 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B G (16-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060.

Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 L3 Long Beach Eastern UPS Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (18-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, November 4-6 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Massapequa Championships Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate G (18-16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 809-6458. Friday-Sunday, November 11-13 L2O Eastern Athletic Club BG 16s Championships Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (16)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, November 11-13 L2O Long Beach Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate B (18-10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, November 11-13 L1 Sportime Roslyn Championships Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, November 18-20 L1 Sportime Lynbrook Championships Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (16)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, November 18-20 L1 Eastern Athletic Club BG 18s Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway • Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (18)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 4 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, November 18-20 L1 RWTTC Championships Robbie Wagner Tournament Training 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B (14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Nov. 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Wednesday-Sunday, November 23-27 +Thankful Senior Jericho Westbury Tennis 44 Jericho Turnpike • Jericho, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (25, 35, 50, 60-65)sd, FMLC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $65 for singles, $65 per team doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 18 at 12:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 997-4060.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2011 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2011

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2011 • LITennisMag.com

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Sunday-Friday, December 25-30 L1B Sportime Massapequa Championships Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Dec. 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 765-5771.

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Friday-Sunday, December 9-11 10U & 8U QuickStart Sportime Roslyn Championships Sportime Roslyn P.O. Box 1 Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start BG (10 [60’Court/Orange Ball], 8 [36’Court/Red Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $35 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

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Friday-Sunday, December 16-18 L3 Sportime Massapequa Eastern UPS Championships Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (18-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

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Friday-Sunday, December 9-11 L2 Eastern Athletic Club BP Championships Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (16-14)s, FRLC Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

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Friday, December 16 Eastern Athletic Club Adult Mixed Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked X (Op)d, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $35 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Dec. 5 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Monday-Friday, December 26-30 Winter Solstice at Jericho Westbury Tennis Jericho Westbury Tennis Attn: Laura Gordon 44 Jericho Turnpike Jericho, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (25, 40, 50, 6065)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $65 for singles, $65 per team doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 23 at 12:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 997-4060.

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Friday-Sunday, December 2-4 & 9-11 L1 Sportime Roslyn Championships Sportime Roslyn P.O. Box 1 Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B (18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 809-6458.

Saturday, December 3 L3 Blue Point Round Robin Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (12-10)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Nov. 19 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Monday-Saturday, December 26-31 L1B World Gym Setauket Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (18-16)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Dec. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 751-6100.

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DECEMBER 2011 Friday-Sunday, December 2-4 & 9-11 L1 Sportime Kings Park Championships Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 18 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, December 9-11 L1B Sportime Massapequa Winter Challenger Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger B (14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

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Friday-Sunday, November 25-27 Huntington Championships Men’s Open Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked M (Op)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 18 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, December 2-4 L3 Westhampton Eastern UPS Championships Westhampton Bath & Tennis 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (16-12)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060.

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Thursday-Sunday, November 24-27 L1B EHIT Challenger East Hampton Indoor Tennis Club P.O. Box 4149 East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG (10 [78’Court/Yellow Ball])s, SE; Challenger: BG (16-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 255-1854.


Dr. Drew Tortoriello, M.D. Medical Director of SIRM New York Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist

Sher Institute - New York State-of-Art Fertility Center

425 Fifth Avenue • New York, NY 10016 Toll Free: (866) 747-6692 Phone: (646) 792-7476 Fax: (646) 274-0600 newyork@haveababy.com “We help complete your journey to parenthood”

Sher Institute - Westchester Phone: (914) 696-7476

From the moment you walk into our state-of-the-art fertility center located on Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, you'll feel the warmth and compassion that will define your experience at our reproductive center. Our professional services include: General Infertility, In Vitro Fertilization, Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD), ICSI, Intrauterine Insemination (IUI), Reproductive Surgery, and Egg Donation and Surrogacy.

SIRM-NY Welcomes Metropolitan Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine We are pleased to welcome Michael Bennett L.Ac., Dipl. O.M. from Metropolitan Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine to our SIRM-New York office. Michael Bennett is a Licensed Acupuncturist in New York and New Jersey and is a Board Certified Herbal Medicine Consultant by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). As our in-house acupuncturist and herbalist, Michael specializes in the treatment of female and male infertility, stress and pain. He offers free consultation to new patients.

Did d you u know w thatt Acupuncture e can n positively impact yourr chances s to o conceive? Itt is s a safe e and d scientifically-proven n method d to o enhance fertility y and d increase e your r chances s off conception! At Metropolitann Acupuncturee & Herball Medicine, we specialize in helping couples make the journey from infertility to family. We are conveniently located in Manhattan on the third floor of 425 Fifth Avenue at the corner of 38th street, across the street from Lord & Taylor. Wee aree thee officiall acupuncturee andd herball medicinee practicee forr thee renownedd Sherr Institutee forr Reproductivee Medicinee in n Manhattan.

To o discuss s your r condition n or r to o schedule e an n appointmentt call:

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For r more e information,, please e visit: www.metropolitanacupuncture.com

Metropolitan n Acupuncture e & Herball Medicine,, LLC 425 5 Fifth h Avenue e att 38th St.. | Third d Floorr | New w York,, NY Y 10016 6 | Office:: 347.565.4255


ADVANTAGE E ISLAND DERS MAKE E A COMMITMENT TO ISLANDERS S HOCKEY THIS MONTH Long Island Tennis and the Islanders are serving up a November to remember. Whether you’re playing on your backhand or forehand, you’re going to score a great deal with Long Island’s team.

CHOOSE E FROM M THE E EXCITING G GAMES S BELOW:

THUR. NOV. 3RD @ 7PM VS. WINNIPEG JETS PEPSI FAMILY FUN PACK GAME: 4 Tickets • 4 Hot Dogs • 4 Pepsi Drinks Starting at only $99

SAT. NOV. 5TH @ 7PM VS. WASHINGTON CAPITALS

THUR. NOV. I7TH @ 7PM VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

WED. NOV. 23RD @ 7PM VS. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS

SAT. NOV. I9TH @ 7PM VS. BOSTON BRUINS

FRI. NOV. 25TH @ 3PM VS. NEW JERSEY DEVILS

70’S DECADE NIGHT Induction of Ed Westfall into Islanders Hall of Fame

PEPSI FAMILY FUN PACK GAME: 4 Tickets • 4 Hot Dogs • 4 Pepsi Drinks Starting at only $99

TUE. NOV. I5TH @ 7PM VS. NEW YORK RANGERS MENTION: LI TENNIS

FOR R MORE E INFORMATION N OR R TO O PURCHASE:

I.800.882.ISLES (47537) EXT. I • NEWYORKISLANDERS.COM FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWYORKISLANDERS S • TWITTER.COM/NYISLANDERS


Long Island Tennis Magazine - November/December 2011