Page 1

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

73


74

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


Two Long Islanders Soak in the Open Experience his year, two Long Islanders had the opportunity to live out one of their dreams by getting to play in the 2010 U.S. Open Junior Tournament. The U.S. Open Junior Tournament is played on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center during the U.S. Open. Long Island Tennis Magazine spoke with the two top Long Island juniors, Julia Elbaba of Oyster Bay, N.Y. and Shaun Bernstein of Plainview, N.Y., to get their thoughts on their big moment. Julia played both girls singles and doubles at the 2010 Junior Open, while Shaun played boys singles.

T

Shaun Bernstein “It was really exciting to finally be able to play at the U.S. Open after going as a spectator from the age of five until now. Getting a player’s badge made it official, being that I got second looks from most teenaged girls and mothers that walked by. I thought I played okay, but didn’t serve well enough to win that particular day.

“My opponent was a good competitor, stayed level-headed, and closed out the match well. It was extremely fun to get the chance to play an official match on those courts, and to finally say that I competed in the U.S. Open. “This will be an experience that will stay with me for a while, even though I lost in straight sets in the first round. This was a very significant point in my life and tennis career, for it was my final tournament competing as a junior. It was a great way to conclude the last several years as a junior player, and now I am off to the next step in my tennis and life in having the privilege to attend and play for the University of Michigan. “It was also great to have my long-time coach, Lawrence Kleger, on hand to watch, as well as my other coach, Salomon Levy, my college coach Bruce Berque, and most importantly, my family and a few friends. “I want to take this opportunity to let everyone know who showed up that it meant a lot, and that I couldn’t be more appreciative of your support. Long Island tennis has treated me well up until now, and I have definitely met a lot of great people along the way.”

Julia Elbaba “As a kid growing up, I’ve always been inspired by the amazing tennis played at the U.S Open. Being able to play in it this year for the first time was a dream come true and an unforgettable experience. “My favorite part of the experience was having a team with me, ‘The J-Block,’ which consisted of my family members and many friends who cheered me on during my three singles and two doubles matches. My fans were very supportive as well. “It was a great feeling being able to gain entry into the U.S. Open Junior Tournament on my own based on my own hard work. I got in off of my own ITF Girls 18s ranking, rather than being handed a wild card by the USTA. All of the traveling for ITF tournaments has really paid off! “I feel fortunate to have this Grand Slam event in my own backyard where I am able to train throughout the two weeks with my fitness trainer and tennis coach, Adrian Chirici and compete at the highest level without traveling.”

CALL 888/NY TENNIS (888/698-3664) or log on to www.SportimeNY.com to find the SPORTIME Tennis location nearest you. LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

1


November/December 2010 Volume 2, Number 6

Cover story The 2010 U.S. Open: A Look Back at Two Memorable Weeks of Tennis in the Big Apple A collection of articles, photos and highlights recapping the 2010 U.S. Open as the stars of the tennis world descended upon New York for two weeks of non-stop action

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen National Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 david@litennismag.com Emilie Katz Marketing and Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 emilie@litennismag.com Andrew T. Berman Vice President/Sales (516) 409-4444, ext. 333 andrew@litennismag.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 eric@litennismag.com Domenica Trafficanda Managing Art Director

Cover photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Features

Columns

1 Two Long Islanders Soak in the Open Experience

4 College Tennis for Girls By Steven Kaplan

Insight inside the world of the U.S. Open from the eyes of two Long Island Junior players, Julia Ebalba and Shaun Bernstein.

3 Windtuition By Daniel Kresh Author Daniel Kresh takes a look at the impact of Mother Nature and wind on a tennis match and how to use wind to your advantage.

6 Stony Brook Hosts Collegiate Women’s ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES Event By Gary Simeone

Author Steven Kaplan recounts the recent City Parks Foundation event featuring Steffi Graf and Billie Jean King and his discussion on collegiate tennis.

8 Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Emilie Katz delves into the off-court lives of the sport’s top stars.

9 Injury Prevention: Knee Injuries By Dr. Eric Price

A recap of a recent Stony Brook University hosted unique and innovative women’s tennis event.

14 The World’s Best Beach Tennis Players Shine on Long Beach for Nationals

Dr. Eric Price discusses the severity, surgery and recovery of a torn meniscus injury.

10 My Opinion: What’s the Story With How to Beat Nadal? By Eric Meditz Eric Meditz strategizes ways in which to topple the world’s top men’s tennis professional, Rafael Nadal.

A look back at the $10,000 Beach Tennis National Championships held in our own backyard, Long Beach, N.Y.

Karen Krizman Senior Account Executive (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 karen@litennismag.com

20 USTA Eastern Juniors Honored at the 2010 U.S. Open

Jon Blake Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 jonb@litennismag.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine was on hand as the USTA took time out of the 2010 U.S. Open to celebrate the season of many of the area’s top junior players.

By Brent Shearer Brent Shearer takes a look at the book co-authored by Rod Laver and Bud Collins, The Education of a Tennis Player.

21 Corporate Challenge Has a Beautiful Day of Tennis Play

18 College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … Playing College

Jennifer Moeller Billing Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Eric Meditz Editorial Contributor

Gary Simeone Writing Intern

Brent Shearer Editorial Contributor

Laura Schroeder PR Associate

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or e-mail david@litennismag.com.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please contact David Sickmen at (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 or email david@litennismag.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@longislandtennismag.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2010 United Sports Publications Ltd.

2

16 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Literary Corner

Tennis Will Hurt Your Social Life By Ricky Becker

By Bill Mecca A recap of the Third Annual Corporate Challenge from Broadway Park in Sayville, N.Y.

22 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Coaches Roundtable Discussion

Ricky Becker tells his own personal stories of joining the Stanford’s college tennis team and the many on-the-court and off-the-court perks that went along with it.

28 Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller

The area’s top tennis coaches sound off in our second annual Coaches Roundtable Discussion on a variety of topics from their opinions on the New York tennis scene to the relationship between coach and player.

30 Junior Player Spotlight: Matt Richards … A Lesson in Resilience By Laurie Grupposo Laurie Grupposo focuses on USTA-ranked national player Matt Richards and his family’s off-the-court battle with illness and Matt’s perseverance through it all.

Kathy Miller recaps the Adult League Sectionals and previews the Tri-Level League.

34 Dr. Tom on Dealing With Rage By Dr. Tom Ferraro Sports Psychologist Dr. Tom Ferraro explains the cure to keeping your cool on the court.

52 The Sand Pit: Jump on the Beach Tennis Bandwagon A look at the growing global phenomenon that is beach tennis.

32 Alan King Pro-Am Raises $20,000 for Wheelchair Sports Federation By Peter Fishbach

60 Tips From the Tennis Pro: Doubles Weapons … The Cross-

Peter Fishbach reviews the annual charitable event, the Alan King Pro-Am benefitting the Wheelchair Sports Federation.

Miguel Cervantes III takes a look at what he considers the most underestimated weapon in USTA doubles, the cross-court lob.

38 It’s High School Football Season—A Little Respect for Tennis Please! By Lonnie Mitchel

Court Lob By Miguel Cervantes III

67 Long Island Tennis Club Directory

toc

Lonnie Mitchell takes a look at the lack of respect that tennis players get from other athletes and unveils some of pro football’s top names who got their start in the world of tennis.

48 An Open Experience By Daniel Kresh

Daniel Kresh recaps his experiences as a ballboy at the recent 2010 U.S. Open.

68 Long Island Rankings Sponsored by Denny’s

71 USTA/Long Island Region 2010 Tournament Schedule

News Briefs

28 South Shore Tennis Captures the 2010 North Shore Men’s Tennis League Title

51 Long Island Tennis Charitable Initiatives: Commack Tennis Student/Teacher Doubles Event Raises Breast Cancer Awareness

35 Long Island Teams Take Second Place at 2010 Summer

Commack High School Varsity Girls Tennis takes up a good cause with some fun as they host a tennis fundraiser for breast cancer with their school’s faculty members.

35 Carefree Women’s 2.5 Team Finishes Fourth in the Nation

62 A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps: Summer of 2010

Long Island Tennis Magazine highlights some of the area’s top summer camps from 2010 in this photo gallery.

Sectional

53 New Yorkers to Represent Team USA for International BTUSA Event in Aruba

57 Garden City’s Jacqueline Raynor and South Side Doubles

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

Team Win 2010 Nassau County Championship


Windtuition By Daniel Kresh

Most recreational tennis players could be grouped into two categories when it comes to dealing with the wind. I like to call them either windmills or straw houses. A windmill is someone who uses the wind to enhance their tennis game and a straw house is someone who gets blown over by a breeze. A tennis ball only weighs around 2 oz., and therefore, any amount of wind will impact its flight through the air. The astute player understands how to use the wind to his or her advantage instead of letting it negatively impact the quality of tennis. Shot selection and game plan should vary depending on the velocity and direction of the wind. Here are some tips to prevent the fall weather from blowing you off the court. 1. With the wind at your back, hit more topspin and don’t be afraid to rush the net Topspin is great at preventing a ball from flying long since it pulls the ball into the court more sharply than a ball which is hit flat; with the wind at your back it is easy to over hit, so not only does topspin give you extra safety, but the wind accentuates the topspin, thus making the ball seem even heavier to your opponent. Conversely, since your opponent is hitting into the wind their ball will fall short more often thus attacking the net can be an intelligent game plan. Your opponent’s passing shots will have less on them since the wind slows them down, and their lobs will oftentimes fall short or be easier to run down. Be careful slicing into the wind however as a sliced ball descends slower so with the wind at your back and your slice have more of a tendency to float longer than other shots.

have to hit out a little more to prevent your balls from becoming easy shot for your opponent to capitalize on. Slices into the wind will really die on you, so they can be good to change the pace, and if you catch your opponent behind the baseline, a drop shot into the wind can be incredibly effective.

4. If it’s windy don’t cancel Sometimes, recreational players will decide not to play if it is too windy, this is a mistake. You may have an important match in the wind sometime and there is no substitute for practicing under these conditions.

3. Serve and volley with the wind at your back The advice I gave on ground strokes also applies to your serve. If I am playing a match outside with heavy wind at my back, one of my favorite plays is to hit a big kick or topspin serve and follow it into net. If my opponent is serving into the wind I know to step in a little more and hit aggressive, heavy topspin returns, especially on second serves. Oftentimes, wind will not just be blowing from one baseline to the other, but also laterally, so try to take advantage of it. If the wind is blowing to my left, serving as a righty, I know a slice serve will pick up more action. If it is blowing to my right, I like to hit kick or twist serves out wide on the ad side, the wind can often help you to pull the ball off of the court more then you could on a calm day.

Do not be discouraged by wind, remember that tennis is as much mental as it is physical, and next time you play on a windy day, play smarter than your opponent and see if you can become a windmill. G Daniel Kresh is a USPTA-certified tennis professional working out of Sportime in Kings Park, N.Y. where he is also the tennis concierge. He graduated from Binghamton University in May of 2009 with a bachelor of arts degree in English. While at Binghamton, he was the captain of the Club Tennis Team and was the undefeated three-time champion of the school’s biannual Intra-Club Tournament. He was also a rookie ballperson at the 2010 U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at dankreshtennis@gmail.com.

2. When you are hitting into the wind aim higher over the net and hit a faster flatter ball The wind will deaden your shots, so you LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

3


College Tennis for Girls By Steven Kaplan

On Sept. 2, 2010, The City Parks Foundation hosted a clinic in Central Park for 40 of the best eight to 12-yearold girls in the USTA Eastern Section. Steffi Graf and Billie Jean King were the stars in attendance and they were wonderful, helping the players for over three hours. I had the opportunity to address the girls on long-range preparation for college tennis. The following is a summary of this talk ‌ Welcome, and if you are accomplished enough to have been invited here today, then I have some very good news for you. It’s a great time to be a female tennis player because there are so many opportunities for you to use tennis to help your education. It is also fitting that we are just miles away from the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center during the U.S. Open

Even at a very young age, it is not too early to recognize and understand the athletic, academic and personal qualities that coaches look for when recruiting a team. It is a long road ahead, but tennis success, especially for girls, is not a sprint, it is a marathon If past history remains consistent, many of you will not be competitive tennis players at 17 and 18, and that would be a shame because you will miss out on some great experiences and opportunities that will enhance the rest of your lives. The following areas are of tremendous importance and should be considered as you plan the road ahead: 1. Establishing a record of tournament participation, success, achievement and improvement. Don’t worry about any one tournament win or any single loss. By the time you reach the age that coaches will take serious notice of you, as

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

/4 *0

 5&

5

4

7&3.0/

CWT4bbTgATb^acB_P C CWT4bb bTgATb^aacB_P  4bbTg1da[X]Vc^]EC 4bbTg1da[X]Vc^]EC '&!&#!($ '&! !&#!($ ff fffEc2d[X]PahATb^acR^\ ffEc2d[[X]PahATb^acR^\

"5 // * 47"$

T Q[

<T]cX^];^ <T]cX^] ;^]V8b[P]SCT]]Xb ^]V8b[P]SCT]]XbbU^a U^a ^UU ^UUh^da! h^da!

X [P

}5d] }5d]R^^ZX]VR[PbbTbX] ]R^^ZX] ]VR[PbbbTbX] 2 2^^Z0RPST\h ^^Z0RRPST\h }Cf^PfPaSfX]]X]VaTbcPdaP]cb }Cf^ ^PfPaS Sf fX]]X]VaTbcPPdaP]cb } !X]eXcX]VVdTbca^^\b ! X]eXcX] ]VVdTbcca^^\bb }5d[[bTaeXRTb_PbP[^]fXcWX]S^^a^dcS^^a_^^[b }5d[[ [bTaeXRTTbb_P bP[^]f fXcWX]S S^^a^d dcS^ ^^a_ _^^[b }0Xa_^acbWdcc[TUaTTfXUXP]SUaTT_PaZX]V }0Xa_ _^acbWd dccc[TUaTTTfXUXXP]SUaaTT_PaZZX]V V }}5P\X[h_TcUaXT]S[h }5P\ 5P\ \X[h_ X[h  _TccUaXT] ]S[h ]S[h }0[[cWXb_[db }0[[ cWXb_ _[d db ETa ETa\^]cCT]]XbEPRPcX^]b a\^]cC CT]]XbE EPRPcX^] ]b

eP bP aS

Our tennis tenn e nis iss the he icicing ciingg onn the he cca cake. akke.

P 2 XUc 6



in a public park because Billie Jean King is such a strong supporter of tennis in the parks both here in New York and everywhere else. She grew up playing in public parks and became one of the greatest tennis players of all time! We would not be here today to talk about college tennis opportunities for girls, were it not for Billie Jean King because these opportunities might not exist and many of you today would not be athletes. Billie Jean King founded the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sport Foundation and championed Title (9) legislation which equalized opportunities for women in sports. What that means is that today, there are tremendous opportunities for girls to achieve college tennis scholarships despite the influx of foreign players and the increasing competitive playing level. Fully-funded womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs have eight full scholarships for women and only four for men.

cT]]XbePRPcX^]


you will have played hundreds of matches and you will have a record of achievement that will represent your abilities. 2. Displaying athleticism and versatility as a singles and doubles player. The sport is becoming increasingly athletic, and even though your wins and losses matter, this emphasis should be balanced with the goal of improving, learning to play the whole court and developing your game. Coaches look for players with the potential and desire for improvement. 3. Tending to health and well-being, with a record and emphasis of being illness and injury resistant, fit and well-conditioned. College tennis is challenging, and you are not going to be a great help to the team sitting on the sidelines unable to play because you have not taken great care of your body.

may take for granted now, like laundry and getting to sleep on time. Coaches will get a good feeling if they know that you can take care of yourself when you get to school. 8. A desire to improve and grow so that coaches feel you will improve and inspire others rather than merely use your tennis to leverage admission and money. Once you get into a school, there is often little a coach can do if you do not perform your best. Many experienced coaches will look to character, as well as ability, when choosing a team. Tennis can help you get into a school that you might have been otherwise unable to attend. It can help you get a scholarship that is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. It will help you form lifelong friendships and be one of the most important and fun parts of your education.

4. Achieving a record of academic participation, success, achievement and improvement. As a student-athlete, schools want you to represent them well in the classroom and on the tennis courts, and often, the classroom will come first. You will need to maintain a healthy grade point average to be eligible to play and you will need to be a strong student to get into some the best schools. 5. Recognizing the value of team and community orientation with an emphasis on using your abilities to help others. While junior tennis is an individual sport, college tennis is a team sport and coaches will be sensitive to your willingness to put the needs of the team first.

I hope you all choose this path … good luck. G Steven Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 33 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 14 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

Steffi Graf delivers oneon-one instruction during the City Parks Foundation-hosted clinic in Central Park

Steven Kaplan oversees activities during the City Parks Foundationhosted tennis clinic in Central Park Players have their agility tested during the Central Park clinic

6. Having personal integrity and a reputation of competitive, as well as fair, play. As I have discussed, in college tennis you represent the school as well as yourself. Coaches will be very concerned about players whose past behavior indicates that they may not be sportsman like, as well as behavior disruptive to team harmony. 7. Understanding personal independence, as well as a demonstration that you can be responsible for yourself. You may not have your family with you to help you with the day to day tasks that you

Steven Kaplan discusses college opportunities with the girls in attendance at the City Park Foundation-hosted event LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

5


Stony Brook Hosts Collegiate Women’s ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES® Event By Gary Simeone irls from 10 major college teams took part in a new and innovative form of tennis at Stony Brook University on Sunday, Sept. 19. ONE-ON-ONE DOUBLES®, as it is called, is a half-court serve and volley singles game played on a doubles court. Two players challenge each other in a singles match. The second match waits a second after the first match has finished their point to start playing. There is an invisible line drawn through the middle of the court from the center service line to the middle of the baseline. The game was invented by Ed Krass, founder and director of College Tennis Exposure camps and former Harvard University Women’s Tennis team coach. “The scoring is the same as regular tennis. It is the first person to six games with a tiebreaker played at five-all. It is a little bit different format, but a very exciting game particularly at the collegiate level.” “It really highlights the importance of serve and return,” said Army’s Anne Houghton who has won back to back championships. “It is more aggressive with a lot of moving forward towards the net. Females for the most part have a tendency to stay back away from the net but with one on one doubles you can’t do that and expect to win.” “We’ve played this format in some of our practices,” said Lehigh’s Patricia Muething. “It is fast-paced and exciting and is good practice for regular doubles.” “It is a whole new type of game,” said this year’s runner-up, Katherine Hanson from Stony Brook. “It is a lot of fun and puts pressure on the player to move towards the net.” Stony Brook Head Coach Gary Glassman helped bring the game to the Long Island area. “This is our third year doing this,” said Coach Glassman. “It helps take a lot of kids out of their comfort zone and brings them forward towards net. It is great for working on that first volley.”

G

6

“This is just the tip of the iceberg for us,” said Coach Krass. “Our next step is to bring more exposure to the game at the professional level. Having some of the top players involved with is one of our main goals. We

know the USTA is excited about this so from here we can only go forward.” G Gary Simeone is writing intern/public relations associate for Long Island Tennis Magazine.

All photos credited to Kenneth B. Goldberg

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


NYC RACQUET SPORTS $:HVWWK6WUHHW %HWZHHQ%·ZD\ WK$YH ‡‡ZZZJUDQGFHQWUDOUDFTXHWFRP


By Emilie Katz Agassi Opens Up in New York City

out a great @johnlegend show tonight ... good times.” N The Bryan Brothers (@Bryanbros): During the U.S. Open after Roger Federer made the through the legs shot, “Another Federer ‘tweener!?!’ This cat is one sick pup!”

On Thursday night Sept. 2 with Long Island Tennis Magazine on hand, Andre Agassi spoke about his book Open, while discussing his life in general and answered questions from the audience at Town Hall in New York City. Here are a few of Agassi’s best quotes from the show: N On being number one in the world: “I found being the best player on earth to be a very overrated experience.” N On his feud with Pete Sampras: “If we woke up and found out we were the other person, we’d both go back to bed.” N On how top Americans of his generation would match up with Roger Federer in his prime: “People would be asking me what’s wrong with American tennis, and that includes Pete, too.” N On his kids: “My son sees that people know us and we don’t know them and that’s bizarre.” N His life motto: “Every day is an opportunity to make yourself one day better.”

N Serena Williams (@Serenawilliams): After Venus Williams won her evening match on Arthur Ashe Court at the U.S. Open, “Great dancing Venus! Next time do your pretty boy swagg!” N Kim Clijsters (@Clijsterskim): After her opening night win at the 2010 U.S. Open, “Beautiful ceremony at the U.S. Open! That 12-yearold could sing!:-) Having a massage now, Jada and Brian are running around the massage table :-)” N Svetlana Kuznetsova (@Vika7): While in New York City at the U.S. Open, “So many people out there watching and cheering! How is everyone? I’m walking in the city, I love NYC! Going for breakfast with my mom.”

Tennis tweets of late

N JoWilfred Tsonga (@JoWillyTsonga): Excited for his home country’s big win, “France sweeps into Davis Cup final. A year after staving off relegation, France charged into the Davis Cup final.”

N Andy Roddick (@Andyroddick): For his birthday, he saw a concert, “Checked

N Serena Williams (@Serenawilliams): Watches reality TV, “Congrats to Rick Fox on Dancing With the Stars! U and Brandy worked it!”

8

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

Bob Bryan gets engaged, finds new doubles partner for life Sorry ladies, tennis doubles superstar and American standout Bob Bryan is now engaged Credit: Creatas to his long-time girlfriend, Michelle Alvarez. Here are some Tweets from the tennis world about the engagement: N Bob Bryan (@Bryanbros): “Just got engaged at Pfeifer Falls in Big Sur, Calif. Special place, special girl.” N Lindsey Davenport (@LDavenport76): “Woohoo! Congrats! Great news!” N Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): “CONGRATULATIONS for your engagement! So happy for you!” N Kim Clijsters (@Clijsterskim): “Congratulations … It is about time you put a ring on her finger :-) Just kidding!”


By Dr. Eric Price A meniscus is a cartilage structure that provides shock absorption and cushioning in the knee joint. There are two menisci. They are located in between the thigh bone (femur) and the shin bone (tibia). Meniscus tears are very common among tennis players. They are often the result of a twisting injury. When a patient has a torn meniscus, he or she usually complains about sharp pain in the knee. A torn meniscus is similar to a hangnail. The same way that a hangnail can catch and cause discomfort, a torn meniscus can catch and get pinched between the bones in the knee during regular activities causing pain. Torn menisci can occur as a result of a singular traumatic event, such as an abrupt twist of the knee, or as the result of many years of wear and tear. To diagnose a meniscus tear, a doctor will take a history and perform a physical examination. X-rays and an MRI are usually ordered. X-rays show the bones of the knee but do not show the meniscus. The MRI shows the meniscus and any possible tears. Other causes of knee pain in addition to meniscus tears include ligament tears, such as a torn ACL, sprains and arthritis. These are elucidated by the X-rays, exam and MRI, and are treated differently than meniscus tears. The majority of meniscus tears do not heal on their own. Therefore, surgery is often recommended. Surgery for a torn meniscus is performed arthroscopically. Arthroscopic surgery uses small incisions and small tools, about the size of a pencil, to perform the procedure. All the work is visualized with a small camera, the arthroscope. The surgeon sees inside the knee with the arthroscope and its images are projected on a video screen.

The torn meniscus fragment is removed and the remaining meniscus is trimmed. Occasionally, the meniscus is torn in such a way that it can be sewn back in place and will heal if stitches are placed across the tear. However, the majority of meniscus tears are treated by removing the torn fragment. Even though a portion of the meniscus is removed in these procedures, a significant portion of a normal intact meniscus is left behind. While it does not function in the way that it did prior to the injury, a significant amount of its function is still retained. Recovery after meniscus surgery depends upon whether a repair or a partial meniscus removal was performed. If a partial meniscus removal is performed, then a patient can usually resume his or her normal activities within several weeks of surgery. If a repair is performed, weight-bearing restrictions may apply and crutches may be needed. Additionally, the patient may be restricted from returning to sports until appro-

priate healing has taken place. Rehabilitation with physical therapy may be necessary, and if so, it will be prescribed by the surgeon. Dr. Eric Price is a board-certified, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon at Orlin and Cohen Orthopedic Associates, Long Island’s premier orthopedic group. He specializes in Sports Medicine. For appointments, call (516) 536-1212, ext. 213.

• Stroke Development • Intense Live Ball Drill • Technique Training with Points Play All coaches are renowned for coaching nationally ranked players. The best Elite Junior Program in New York!

Please contact Maurice Trail at 516-302-5613 or advancedtennis@verizon.net LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

9


my opinion BY ERIC MEDITZ

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Story With How to Beat Nadal? et me start off by saying that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a huge Rafael Nadal fan. I respect his talent. I respect his drive to be the very best. I respect the way he competes and handles himself during his matches. I even respect his entourage of family members he always has in his box supporting him during his matches. I mean, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all totally insane and probably have spent most of his childhood yelling and throwing flower pots across the living room when he lost, but you have to have that type of demeanor to produce a player of that caliber. And even with that all being said â&#x20AC;Ś I still respect that! Outside of tennis, Nadal seems like heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really nice guy who spends a lot of time smiling. In my opinion, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect ambassador for the sport. So the point Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to make here is that I like Rafael Nadal

L

as a tennis player and as a person. In fact, I will even go so far as saying that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a level above Roger Federer. And if you should disagree with me, please try to explain his 14-7 record against him. Plus, he pretty much owns him in every grand slam final match on a variety of different surfaces. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made Federer cry more times than when I do when Rudy finally gets into that stupid college football game. The bottom line is that Rafael Nadal is a special talent that is, at times, almost superhuman, but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not perfect. He has blatant weaknesses that opposing players havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taken advantage of over the years. I think many players and fans have failed to detect these weaknesses â&#x20AC;Ś but not me! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been on to him this whole time! If I ever had the opportunity to coach a top 75 in the world player, I would sit him down and

lay out a blueprint on how to beat the best tennis player in the world. And since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in a good mood today because the Pumpkin Spice Lattes are back at Starbucks, I will let you in on what needs to be done to beat the great Rafael Nadal. A big weakness that Nadal has that can be exploited by an opponent is that he suffers from an extreme case of an obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). In fact, he uses this disorder to his advantage when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out there competing. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a firm believer that his OCD helps him stay focused throughout a tennis match. And this deep OCD makes him one of the most mentally tough athletes that I have ever seen compete. I firmly believe that the most beautiful woman in the world could streak across a tennis court during one of his matches, and Nadal wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even notice her pres-

TENNIS COURT EQUIPMENT& MATERIAL 7HQQLV3RVWV 1HWVÂ&#x2021;&RXUW$FFHVVRULHV :LQGVFUHHQÂ&#x2021;1HWWLQJ +DUGZDUH

TRU

DecoTurfÂŽ TENNIS SURFACE OF CHAMPIONS

CLAY COURTS

ZZZYHOYHWRSFRP (631) 427-5904 1HZ<RUN$YH+XQWLQJWRQ6WD1< 10

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ November/December 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ LITennisMag.com


ence. Most players would laugh and ogle her, while Nadal would be staring at the ground. This is because he’s so compulsively into his routines when he’s not playing points that acknowledging anything else would disrupt his subliminal patterns. I feel that this is one of the major reasons that he never gets into any type of argument with a chair umpire. This is simply because yelling at a chair umpire in the middle of play would take him out of all his routines and fluster him tremendously. Now, a lot of tennis players have strange little quirks that they do in between points. Andy Roddick paces quickly back and forth as if he’s waiting for a urinal to open up in a men’s room. Maria Sharapova stands with her back to her opponent with her head down as if I just approached her at a bar and was trying to start a conversation with her. These are two examples of relatively small doses of OCD that these players have developed over their lifetime of playing tennis matches. All players have their own certain routines, but Nadal is dif-

ferent. He has about 10 different things that he does that puts all others to shame. First off … when Nadal gets on the court, he sits down, and then takes his sweet time arranging and setting up camp at his changeover chair. He always makes sure that when it is time for the coin flip, that the chair umpire and his opponent are always waiting for him at the net as he sits there futzing around with his power gel and tow-

“The bottom line is that Rafael Nadal is a special talent that is, at times, almost superhuman, but he’s not perfect.” els. He never waits for his opponent, they always wait for him. Next, and most importantly to him, is that he always sets up two water bottles in between his feet when he sits down at a changeover. Those water bottles stay per-

fectly positioned next to each other and they always have equal amounts of water in each bottle. There’s even a video on YouTube of a ballboy moving one of the bottles aside and then Nadal quickly reprimanding him not to touch them, then rearranging it back to the way he needs them to be. Now when play starts, Nadal has a few more patterns that needs to be done in between points. He infamously picks at the back of his shorts just like we all do when we think nobody else is around. He always fixes and adjusts the level of his socks. Much like the water bottles, they too have to be at the same level on his calf. Before he starts each point, he makes sure the hair that sticks out from underneath his headband is tucked behind his ears. With all of this stuff to do, it has helped Nadal always stay focused and become as mentally strong as he can be. So if you were a top 75 player and I was coaching you to play him, I would make sure that you try to continued on page 12

Home to 20 outdoor courts, 3 stadium courts, 12 indoor courts and a brand new, state of the art, 245,000 square foot indoor tennis facility, featuring:

Did you know... we now have 4 clay courts Junior Programs – featuring the QuickStart Tennis play format Utilizing 12 courts designed specifically to fit kids 10 and under, coupled with age appropriate equipment and practice plans, kids play and have fun right away.

Adult and Junior programs for all levels The US Open courts are available year-round to the public and host a wide variety of tennis programs.

Entertain Book your next event at the home of the US Open – where the excitement never ends. The facility is available for corporate and private events and birthday parties.

For more information call 718.760.6200 (ext. 0) or visit ntc.usta.com USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Flushing Meadows - Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11368

Bring this ad in and receive 20% off open court time. Expires 31st ExpiresDecember October 31st

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

11


M Y O P I N I O N continued from page 11 take Nadal out of these routines. If you take someone like that out of their routines, then you take one of Nadal’s biggest strengths away from him … his mental toughness. From the get go, when you go on the court, I would say to stay in your chair and make Rafa wait for you for the coin toss. Nadal probably won’t break, and it might get to a point where the chair umpire comes up to you and tries to pull you up from a chair like a high school student who stole someone’s seat in the lunch room. If this doesn’t work, a point has been made to him. Now as the match starts, at the first changeover while you are switching sides of the court, you “accidentally” knock over one of his water bottles. Trust me, Nadal would go crazy with high anxiety about this. He’ll look like me when I check my Ameritrade account and see how much money my stock portfolio has left in it. What the hell was I thinking buying that Chinese text messaging stock? Stupid … so stupid! Moving right along … Nadal does all these quirks in between points, and because of it, he goes way past his allotted 25 sec. Sometimes, he’s clocked at around 50-60 sec. Right away from the get go, you should make an issue of this to the chair umpire and continue to pressure him to force Nadal to speed it up. This is a legitimate rule, and I can understand if there’s leeway to go a little over

sometimes, but not double or sometimes triple the allotted time. That’s ridiculous! During the whole match, every time you walk past the umpire’s chair you should address it. Okay, so now we’ve disrupted his focus, and now we move to the tactical thing that needs to be done to beat him. In my opinion, I feel Nadal’s two biggest weapons are his heavy spinning forehand and his speed. Nadal gives many players fits, especially Federer, by hitting heaving spinning forehands that immediately hit the ground and fly up to his opponents shoulders. This shot is especially difficult to handle when he’s playing on clay and when he’s playing guys who have one-handed backhands like Federer. Another huge weapon that he has is his speed and his ability to run down balls that seem far out of reach. This is usually followed by a Nadal fist pump, and a very deflated opponent. Combine these two things, and it makes beating him almost an impossible task. So the advice I would give you (a top 75 player) would be to simply, pound his backhand. Now I know this sounds like advice you would overhear from a parent during a 10-min. break when you split sets at a 12-

and-under tournament, but it will take two of his weapons out of the mix. Nadal hits his backhand relatively flat. In fact, every player pretty much does. It’s almost impossible to hit super heavy two-handed backhands. Plus, if you watch carefully, Nadal chips a lot of backhands as well, and his chips really don’t impress me at all. So, by pounding that backhand side, you would be able to have opportunities to take advantage of what presents itself from using this tactic. And you would be keeping him in that corner instead of allowing him to use his speed all around the court. Now are you going to hit every ball to that side of the court? No, of course not! But you are going to try to for the majority of the time, and use this tactic especially during the big points (break points opportunities, first points in games, etc.). So there you have it … a blueprint of how to beat the greatest tennis player in world. Try to take him out of his routines, try to take his speed away and try to pound his backhand … simple, but effective. If you do these three simple things, you might have an opportunity to beat him one day. And remember, if that doesn’t work, there is always the Tonya Harding way! Good luck! G Tennis Pro Eric Meditz may be reached by e-mail at meditzisfunny@yahoo.com.

ROCKVILLE RACQUET CLUB JUNIOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 15 WEEK SESSION STARTING SEPTEMBER 13TH

WOMEN’S & MEN’S LEARNING LEAGUES CALL FOR TRY-OUTS

AGE 4 YRS – 18 YRS

GROUPS, PRIVATES, SEMI-PRIVATE

Call For Screening Appointment • New Members Only

DIRECTOR, PAT MOSQUERA

MEN’s HOLIDAY TOURNAMENT

Seasonal Court Time Available

SINGLES & DOUBLES DECEMBER 20 - JANUARY 1

NEVER A MEMBERSHIP FEE

516-764-5350

80 N. CENTRE AVENUE, ROCKVILLE CENTRE • RockvilleTennis@optonline.net RockvilleRacquet.net 12

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


ADVANTAGE TENNIS

225 Post Avenue, Westbury

516-334-8180

WE CUSTOMIZE YOUR NEEDS

SELECT

USTA Members Extra Discount

BABOLAT RACKETS 25% OFF

Everything Must Go

LARGEST SELECTION OF CLOTHING, SHOES & RACKETS

Donnay Racquets $

199.95

Clothing

Buy two pieces get one piece

Racquets Head, Dunlop,Yonex, Prince

Buy one racquet, get FREE Bag

FREE ADIDAS ALL SOCKS SNEAKERS Thor-Lo BUY One Jox Sox GET 2nd Pair

50% off (Expires 12/24/10, in stock only)

BUY 3 Pair, GET 1 Pair Free (Expires 12/24/10, in stock only)

($30 Value) (In stock only)

RESTRING SPECIAL Babolat X-CEL

25% off (Expires 12/24/10)


The World’s Best Beach Tennis Players Shine on Long Beach for Nationals Sun, Sand and Sport! That’s one of the mottos of Beach Tennis. On Saturday-Sunday, Sept. 4-5, the world’s best beach tennis players converged on Long Beach, N.Y. to compete in the $10,000 Beach Tennis National Championships. This tournament was the first national tournament held in the United States sanctioned by the new governing body of Beach Tennis USA, the ITF (International Tennis Federation). The best players from the United States, Italy, Brazil, Greece, Aruba, Bermuda, Holland, Czech Republic and other nations, as well as hundreds of beachgoers, descended on Long Beach to watch the best in the world compete. In addition to the highly anticipated pro division play, there was also an amateur tournament, a mixed-doubles tournament, and a junior tournament which ensured everyone who wanted to take part in the fun and give the sport a try could. And who wouldn’t want to give this sport a try with the setup that was out in Long Beach? Along the beach was a 60-ft. tent, fully equipped with everything from food and drinks, to a player’s lounge with couches

and tables. Also, seating was set up on all ends of the main courts. Music was played by a DJ throughout to further liven the experience and two announcers brought fans the play by play of the action on the courts. On Saturday, wind from the remnants of Hurricane Earl were swirling, but Pro Division action got underway. Pool play started things out with eight pools of four teams each on the men’s side, with the top two teams from each pool advancing. Three of those teams that advanced were American teams and the rest were comprised of international players. These American teams advanced through pool play and to the round of 16 which was a big accomplishment in this international competition—Chris Henderson & Phil Whitesell, Devin Wakeford & Stephen Sayoc, and David Sickmen & Mike Cochrane. Women’s pool play was also completed on Saturday, with the top two teams from the pools advancing from Saturday to Sunday. The advancing American teams were Nadia Johnston & Nicole Melch, Ashley Hornishy & Lisa Goldberg, and Jennifer Petersen & Irene Plonczok.

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY Learn how to manage your emotions with a credentialed Ph.D. level Sport Psychologist.

Dr. Tom Ferraro is an international noted Sport Psychologist who has worked with professional and Olympic level athletes in many fields. He publishes internationally and appears both on television and radio. • Control anger • Cope with anxiety • Re-establish confidence • Learn how to focus • Get proper diagnosis and treatment for your emotions

1-1 consultations, phone consults, family counseling, on site visits Dr. Tom Ferraro (516) 248-7189 • 2 Hillside Avenue, Ste. E • Williston Pk, NY 11596 Drtomferraro.com • drtferraro@aol.com

14

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

On Sunday, with the weather perfect and the crowds even larger than the previous day, everyone was ready for the big finale. The day concluded with the main event ... the Men’s Pro Divisional Final. With all of the American teams having been knocked out by the top international squads, the final was played between the top two seeded teams, both from Italy. The level of play was extremely high and the competition was fierce. In the end, Matteo Marighela & Alex Mingozzi from Italy won the Beach Tennis Championship by defeating fellow Italian countrymen, Michelle Cappelletti & Alessandro Calbucci, 6-4, 67 (4), 6-2. This match showed all in attendance just how Beach Tennis is played at its highest level. In the Women’s Pro Division, Simona Bonnadonna & Joana Cortez defeated Federica Bacchetta & Veronica Visani 7-5, 3-6, 6-4 to take home the women’s crown. Earlier in the day ... In the Mixed-Pro Division ... Niccolo Strano & Giorgia Pennetta defeated Bertrand Coulet & Maria Buuts 9-5. In the Amateur Division ... Anthony Chan & John Bonnet defeated David Mate & Michael Dieber, 2-6, 7-6 (4), 7-5. In the Junior Division ... Alegrea Hanlon & Rachel Gastaldo defeated Ben Lee & Robby Altheim, 9-8, (7-3) tie-breaker. A great time was had by all, and to conclude the festivities, all the players from around the world enjoyed a Players Party in Long Beach. Beach Tennis has become a huge international sport and it’s growing fast across the U.S. Next summer, we hope you join us for the Long Island Tennis Magazine Challenge events, as well as the 2011 Nationals which will again be played in Long Beach, N.Y. G For more information, www.beachtennisusa.net.

visit


Junior Division winners Alegrea Hanlon & Rachel Gastaldo and the runner-up team of Ben Lee & Robby Altheim smile for a photo

Alex Mingozzi & Matteo Marighella take on Michelle Cappelletti & Alessandro Calbucci in the Men’s Pro Finals of the Beach Tennis National Championship

The top American women’s team of Nadia Johnston & Nicole Melch in semifinal action

The American team of Chris Henderson & Phil Whitesell in action

Beach tennis tournament action on the side courts

Mitchell Drucker diving for a shot while partner Marc Altheim looks on

A view from above Center Court and the Players Lounge in Long Beach, N.Y.

Men’s Pro Division Champions Alex Mingozzi & Matteo Marighella from Italy

Andrew Schnier and David Fuchs enjoying a great day of beach tennis action at the Beach Tennis Nationals in Long Beach, N.Y. LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

15


Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Literary Corner

By Brent Shearer

The Education of a Tennis Player By Rod Laver With Bud Collins Among the many fascinating tidbits of tennis history, the reader can glean from The Education of a Tennis Player by Rod Laver with Bud Collins is that accusations of stinginess between top

rivals didn’t start with Andre Agassi’s jokes about Pete Sampras being a lousy tipper. Here is Laver on his great rival Ken Rosewall. “Somewhere in his home outside of Sydney, Kenny has his first five dollar bill framed over the mantel.” Laver goes on to say that Rosewall is the least appreciated great player in the history of tennis. He attributes this to the fact that Rosewall spent some of his best years playing as a pro in the era before the arrival of Open tennis. Laver also points out that any ranking of

the game’s great rivalries such as Chris Evert-Martina Navratilova, Sampras-Agassi and Rafael Nadal-Roger Federer must include the Laver-Rosewall matchups. The book reports that the two most likely tallies of this series of matches has Laver slightly ahead by either 71-68 or 69-67, as recordkeeping was shaky during both players’ barnstorming “pro” years. The Education of a Tennis Player is full of portraits of the game’s great players and coaches who were on the scene during Laver’s career.

POINT SET INDOOR RACQUET CLUB The South Shore's Premier Indoor Tennis Facility • TOP PROS • SUPERIOR PLAYING CONDITIONS • PROGRAMS AVAILABLE FOR ALL LEVELS OF PLAY

Best USTA QuickStart Program on the South Shore For Ages 10 and Under • 17 Week Programs Beginner Stations As Well As Future Stars Courts

Perfect for Overall Athletic Development A Smaller Court for a Smaller Kid

Claudio Eulau World Class Junior Development Specialist

High Performance Junior Program

Adult Programs

Come Train With Our Ranked Players

• Tennis 101 • Stroke of the Week Sign Up Drills and Learn & Plays

Tournament Training Sessions for all Levels

Tonny vandePieterman Director of Tennis

Brett Nisenson Director of Junior Development

Nadia Johnston Adult Tennis Director, Former WTA-Ranked Player

To Ensure The Best Program For Your Child or Group, Call For a Free Screening Appointment Today!

16

3065 New Street, Oceanside (516) 536-2323

Alternative Uses of Point Set facilities (Lacrosse, Soccer & Basketball) Also Available

Spacious Lounge Available for Tennis Parties, Charity Events Please Contact Lori • www.pointsettennis.com

Call About wheelchair and multiple sclerosis clinics

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


As the only man to win two Grand Slams, in 1962 and in 1969, Laver is the perfect player to share stories and insight about the on and off-court battles of his era. In addition, at the end of each chapter, there is an instructional segment designed to help readers improve their games, as well as becoming well-versed in the perspective of the man who may have been the greatest tennis player in history. It isn’t hard to argue that if Laver, like Rosewall, hadn’t spent years at the height of his skills unable to play in the Slams, he might even have pulled off a third Grand Slam. As it is, it doesn’t appear that his twoSlam record will ever be equaled. While Nadal looks like he is on the verge of being able to pull off a Slam after his first U.S. Open triumph, the idea of a second player being able to do it twice seems unlikely. But even in his two years of triumph, Laver had some shaky moments. As it has been for generations of attacking players, the French Open was Laver’s toughest Slam. In fact, his bid to win the Slam in 1962 almost vanished when he found himself down two sets to one and serving at 4-5, 30-40 against fellow Aussie Marty Mulligan in the quarterfinals. On that match point, he missed his first serve, but managed to pull the match out. Laver had to win three straight five-set matches that year to win in Paris. New Chapter Press has reissued the book to honor the 40th anniversary of Laver’s second Slam in 1969, with new forewords from both Laver and Collins. This is a perfect pairing because while tennis people may argue about who the greatest player is, Collins is clearly the greatest tennis writer. And if any scribes or fans of tennis writing dispute this, yeah, A Handful of Summers by Gordon Forbes gives Collins some competition, show me another tennis writer who has won a “gold” ball, signifying a national championship. Collins won a U.S. national indoor doubles title in the 1950s. This timely reissue of The Education of a Tennis Player, a collaboration between possibly the greatest player ever and the “Rod Laver” of tennis writers deserves a place on every tennis player’s bookshelf. G Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.

HOLIDAY CHECK LIST

✓✓✓

Everyday Low Prices On Racquets! Newest Styles in Men's, Ladies' and Kids' Clothing! Large Selection of Tennis Luggage. Tennis Shoes Professionally Fitted.

BALL MACHINE ✓ NEW RACQUET ✓ NEW STRINGS ✓ NEW GRIP ✓ NEW TENNIS SHOES ✓ KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFFBALL HOPPER ✓ 34 YEARS EXPERIENCE TENNIS BALLS ✓ OVERGRIP ✓ EXPERT STRINGING DONE VIBRATION DAMPENER ✓ ON PREMISES - ALL WRIST & HEAD BAND ✓ RECORDS STORED ON HEAD TAPE ✓ COMPUTER. NEW SHIRT ✓ NEW SHORTS ✓ DEMO RACQUETS NEW WARM-UP ✓ AVAILABLE. SOCKS, PANTIES ✓ GIFT CERTIFICATES NEW SWEATER ✓ ALSO AVAILABLE NEW HAT ✓

214 COMMACK ROAD • COMMACK (1/2 MILE SOUTH OF JERICHO TPKE)

631-499-6444 LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

17


Mythbusters: Playing College Tennis Will Hurt Your Social Life By Ricky Becker My experiences were 15 years ago, but I remember them like they were yesterday. I stepped foot on Stanford’s Palo Alto, Calif. campus, an academically and socially unconfident kid from Long Island. I almost felt like I didn’t belong. I had two freshman roommates: A “hippie” pot-smoking kid from Chicago who would go “jam” with his friends every night and another kid who oozed intelligence and played Nintendo every night. “This is why I worked my tail off? To be overmatched?,” I asked myself. Now to be honest, my first version of this article included some stories about well-known tennis players and very famous non-tennis players who spent time

with the tennis team. However, after reading the first version, I realized that some of the stories were more apropos for People magazine or Cosmopolitan than a family tennis publication. So, this article is the cleaned-up version, but I hope you get the idea. The first night of Freshman Orientation, we had a hall meeting where we introduced ourselves. When it was my turn to speak, I did the standard naming my hometown, possible major and included that I play tennis for the tennis team. The look I got from my RA made me realize I wasn’t considered just another freshman. Later that night, while discussing the Popol Vuh with my dorm, three upperclass tennis players came into the lounge, interrupted the meeting and asked me

why I wasn’t at the SAE house. They proceeded to take me to the fraternity house where all the upper-class tennis players lived. It was from this point forward that I realized in high school, playing tennis was sometimes considered kind of lame, but, in college, it is considered cool to be a tennis player! What motivated the tennis team in the fall to play well was the annual Thanksgiving Trip to Hawaii. The top eight guys and top eight girls went with Stanford tennis benefactors for a week of fun and sun in Hawaii. Challenge matches were fierce! Once in Hawaii, everything was paid for. We had some of the best food and hotel accommodations in the world. We played a match against the University of Hawaii to make the trip legal, but

Size Us Up!

1-800-221-1601 • www.cho-pat.com

18

The fact is that all athletes are not alike. At Cho-Pat, we understand people are different and that is why our American-made supports are available in a range of sizes. The choice is yours!

Tennis Elbow Support

Dual Action Knee Strap

Calf Compression Sleeve

Designed to relieve the pain and discomfort associated with tennis elbow.

Patented strap allows full mobility while providing relief from knee pain caused by degeneration and overuse.

Combines warmth, compression, and support to help reduce pain and discomfort and promote healing.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


it was a joke. The guys and girls would party together until 4:00 a.m., teach the benefactors at 8:00 a.m. (with sunglasses in tow), nap until 6:00 p.m. and do it all over again. “What happens in Hawaii, stays in Hawaii” was the popular refrain. The spring season was the team matches and the subsequent daily newspaper articles. An unimportant non-conference match might draw 200 people, matches against UCLA or USC would get a sell-out crowd of around 2,000 people. The Stanford band would come and play between singles and doubles for the big matches. I once heard that tennis matches used to get more student attendees than any other varsity sport outside football until 1995. I think students came because it was a leisurely afternoon activity to wear skimpy clothes, get some sun and have a few adult beverages. Sometimes, the crowds got personal and verbally attacked the visitors. The fans created some very clever signs.

Our coaches publicly acted like they cared, but in reality, they asked us to recruit our fraternity brothers to come out and cause some havoc. Most of the tennis players at Stanford live in the SAE fraternity house. My freshman year, I decided to join an unhoused fraternity thinking the housed fraternity life was too fast. My sophomore year, I changed my mind and wanted to live in the SAE house. If I wasn’t a tennis player, there would have been no shot getting in. Being a tennis player, there were no questions asked and no problems getting a bid. Life was wilder than I probably would have wanted it to be, but it was fun. Where else would I be able to celebrate Pac-10 Basketball Championships with members of the basketball team who were also my fraternity brothers? The big spring trip for the fraternity was to go to the NCAA Tennis Championships. The guys took over the town. Hotel vacancy signs were manipulated to

read pro-Stanford messages. Fraternity brothers brought their adult beverages on-court and celebrated with us live on ESPN after winning the national championships. Commercial airlines returning home from successful team events turned into airborne party buses. Does playing college tennis prevent someone from having a social life? Not in the least. As a high school kid, little did I know (or think) that running weekly sprints at Roslyn High School in the pitch black at 10:00 p.m. on Friday nights would pay off social dividends down the road. G Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, which offers off-court college guidance services to junior tennis players, in addition to teaching tennis at the Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center in Glen Cove. He can be reached by phone at (516) 605-0420, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or visit www.JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

19


USTA Eastern Juniors Honored at 2010 U.S. Open n Monday, Aug. 30, 24 junior players from across New York, New Jersey and Connecticut were awarded for their outstanding performance in tournaments this year at USTA Eastern’s Annual Junior Awards Gala. The gala honored juniors, ages 12-18, who have excelled in sectional tournaments and traveled across the country to represent the Eastern section in team competitions this summer. All of the junior players received free grounds passes to watch the best players in the world compete on Opening Day of the 2010 U.S. Open. “These juniors are not just strong individual competitors, but also outstanding team players,” said Julie Bliss, director of competition and player development for USTA Eastern. “They recognized the importance of playing local tournaments and representing the section on Eastern teams in places like Texas, Louisiana, and California.” The gala was held in the Indoor Training Center at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center prior to the start of Day One of 2010 U.S. Open play.

O

2010 USTA Eastern Award Winners (Long Island Region winners in bold)

Boys’ 12

Boys’ 16

1. Brendan Volk (Dix Hills, N.Y.) 2. Mwendwa Mbithi (Succasunna, N.J.) 3. Justin Lee (Cos Cob, Conn.)

1. Eric Rubin (Lido Beach, N.Y.) 2. Ian VanCott (Unadilla, N.Y.) 3. Alex VanCott (Unadilla, N.Y.)

Girls’ 12

Girls’ 16

1. Morgan Herrmann (Garden City, N.Y.) 2. Jessica Livianu (Brooklyn, N.Y.) 3. Madison Battaglia (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.)

1. Emily Saffron (New York, N.Y.) 2. Lexi Borr (Westfield, N.J.) 3. Katrine Steffensen (Scarsdale, N.Y.) 3. Jamie Loeb (Ossining, N.Y.)

Boys’ 18 Boys’ 14 1. Taiyo Hamanaka (Eastchester, N.Y.) 2. Douglas Notaris (Wantagh, N.Y.) 3. Kyle Mautner (Greenwich, Conn.)

1. Cameron Silverman (Mount Kisco, N.Y.) 2. Asika Isoh (Cambria Heights, N.Y.) 3. Emilio Mora (Mamaroneck, N.Y.)

Girls’ 18 Girls’ 14 1. Ola Mally (Franklin Square, N.Y.) 2. Anna Ulyashchenko (Brooklyn, N.Y.) 3. Louisa Chirico (Harrison, N.Y.)

1. Tina Jiang (Edison, N.J.) 2. Jamie Loeb (Ossining, N.Y.) 3. Akiko Okuda (Tenafly, N.J.)

Julie Bliss, director of competition and player development for USTA Eastern, recognizes the accomplishments of the junior players

Boys 12’s winners, Brendan Volk from Dix Hills, N.Y.; Mwendwa Mbithi from Succasunna, N.J. and Justin Lee from Cos Cob, Conn. are congratulated by Tim Heath, president of USTA Eastern (far left); Annelies Karp, head of Junior Competition Scheduling and Sanctioning for USTA Eastern (second from left) and D.A. Abrams, executive director of USTA Eastern (far right)

Girls 12’s winners: Morgan Herrmann of Garden City, N.Y.; Jessica Livianu from Brooklyn, N.Y. and Madison Battaglia from Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 20

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


Corporate Challenge Has a Beautiful Day of Tennis Play By Bill Mecca he Third Annual Corporate Challenge was played on a beautiful September day at Broadway Park in Sayville, N.Y., courtesy of the Town of Islip. It was a full-filled day with five teams competing in a round-robin format for prizes and trophies. The tournament has three major sponsors: Outback restaurants, which provided a great meal for all participants and guests; Synergy 3, the official marketing partner; and World Gym in Bay Shore, N.Y., which provided all participants with event tshirts and other gifts and coupons. Other sponsors that provided raffle prizes included: Advantage Tennis shop in Westbury, N.Y.; Grand Slam Tennis shop in Commack, N.Y.; Steve Abbondondelo; and Long Island Tennis Associates. Clif’s Bars were the official snack of the event. If you would like to have a team enter the Corporate Challenge next year or if you are interested in becoming a sponsor of the Corporate Challenge, contact Terry Fontana at (516) 822-8711. G Making it happen … Bill Mecca from USTA/Eastern, Nancy Howland from the Bill Mecca is a USTA/Eastern tennis service rep- Town of Islip, Tracy Forsythe from World resentative for the Long Island Region. He may be Gym and Tournament Director Terry Fontana reached by e-mail at mecca@eastern.usta.com.

T

The winning team of the Third Annual Corporate Challenge from Locust Valley, N.Y.

The USTA/Long Island team, volunteers and staff of (from left to right): Bill Mecca, the Harris’, Mike Pavelides, Ed Wolfarth and Terry Fontana

We Grow Champions from the Ground Up Whether your child is wielding their first racquet or is already competing in sectional and national tournaments, we have the ability and experience to support their growth. Under the direction of Howie Arons, who has coached over 150 nationally ranked players in the past 30 years and has served as USTA National Coach in 1991 and 1997, our top level coaching staff emphasizes the fundamentals of proper technique, and will ensure that your child learns and enjoys the game of tennis. We offer: Instruction at every level, from beginners to tournament training; Individualized attention; Flexibility in accommodating students’ and parents’ busy schedules; Ten courts with viewing; Ample parking.

Two 15-Week Sessions Beginning October 15th For more information, call us at 718-740-6800.

The New York Tennis Academy at Cunningham Tennis Center 196-00 Union Turnpike, Fresh Meadows, NY 11356 • www.cunninghamsportscenter.com LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

21


Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Coaches Roundtable Discussion he Long Island tennis community is blessed to have some of the best indoor facilities and best coaches in the world right here in our backyard. Recently, Long Island Tennis Magazine spoke with some of these top coaches to get insight into their coaching/training strategies, what they look for in a great player, views on important local tennis topics, and a background in how they got into coaching. Even the best coach can always learn an extra tip or two, and the following article will provide all players and coaches with a chance to learn from the best.

T

Meet the roundtable… Howie Arons Cunningham Park Tennis Center 196-00 Union Turnpike • Queens, N.Y. (718) 217-6452 Howie Arons has been coaching and directing junior programs in Queens, N.Y. for the past 35 years at Alley Pond, Bay Terrace and currently, Cunningham Park Tennis Center. Howie served as a national coach for ETA in 1991 and 1997. He was ETA Coach of the Year in 1989 and USPTA High School Coach of the Year in 2007. As head coach of Benjamin N. Cardozo High School in Flushing, N.Y., his teams have won 18 City Championships. With 556 wins, Howie has the most of any coach in New York State.

Carl Barnett Glen Head Racquet Club, Home of the Early Hit Training Center 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 455-1225 This is the ninth season of Carl Barnett’s Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club. Early Hit is dedicated to providing lessons, groups and training in its comprehensive ALPS program. Pat Etcheberry has worked with Carl as an advisor with the ALPS training program. Carl has concluded that students learn faster when they have core fitness, flexibility and explosive strength. Early Hit not only serves juniors, as the program features nationally-ranked players in the U.S. Open, 40s, 60s and 70s divisions.

Vinicius Carmo Ross School 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, N.Y. (631) 907-5162 Vinicius Carmo is tennis director of the Ross School tennis academy and coach of the boys and girls varsity tennis teams. As a player, Vinicius was ranked among the top five junior players in Brazil and played several international junior tennis tournaments, and attended the University of Ten-

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

22


nessee for four years on a full scholarship. For seven years, Vinicius was the regional tennis director of the East End Sportime locations. He also coached many top juniors in the country and has helped them to get tennis scholarships in many universities. Now, Vinicius runs the tennis program at the Ross School. The boys varsity tennis team won the league VII title in 2010 and finished second in the Suffolk County team tournament. The Ross School tennis team also had three players qualify for the state tournament in 2010.

Adrian Chirici Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. (516) 759-0505 Adrian Chirici has been a coach at Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training (RWTT) Center at Glen Cove for over 15 years. In that time, more than 50 of his students have gone on to play for NCAA Division I colleges, and a handful have gone on to play on the pro tour. Adrian is currently the head pro/coach at RWTT’s Glenwood Landing facility and part owner of the RWTT facility at Glen Cove. He is a two-time Long Island Section Coach of the Year, three-time USPTA Sectional Touring Coach of the Year, and recently received the USPTA National Touring Coach of the Year Award. In addition, Adrian still enjoys competing and currently holds the number one ETA sectional ranking in both the Men’s 35s and Men’s 40s age divisions.

Steven Kaplan Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, N.Y. (516) 777-1358 Steven Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 33 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 14 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money.

Lawrence Kleger Sportime Clubs of New York (516) 938-6076 Lawrence Kleger is nationally acclaimed as a unique talent in junior development. As the director of Sportime’s Excel Tennis Camps each summer and of the Elite development program each winter, Lawrence has trained hundreds of sectionally- and nationally-ranked juniors. 23

His knowledge, experience and keen “eye” help Lawrence to produce players who are fundamentally, technically and mechanically sound. His commitment to true sportsmanship and proper tennis etiquette has produced 13 USTA/Eastern yearend Sportsmanship Award winners. Lawrence is one of a select group of coaches invited to attend two levels of the USA High Performance Coaching Program. He was named the 2006 USTA/Eastern Section Long Island Section Tennis Professional of the Year. Lawrence’s campers have captured more than 70 USTA National Championships.

Whitney Kraft USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Meridian Road at Grand Central Parkway Queens, N.Y. (718) 760-6200 Whitney Kraft is director of tennis programs at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and director of player operations for the U.S. Open. A native of Summit, N.J., Whitney brings more than 25 years of tennis experience to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Prior to joining the USTA, Kraft served as director of tennis for the city of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. where he oversaw the daily programming and operations of more than 45 courts at nine different facilities. His tennis industry affiliations include serving in as district president of the USPTA, district director for the USTA, as well as city liaison for First Serve of Broward County. He is also a member of the National Cardio Tennis Speaker Team. For the past eight years Kraft has served as tournament director for both the USTA Boy’s 14 Clay Court Nationals and USTA Open National Clay Court Championships. As a tennis player, Kraft was a four-time National Mixed-Open Champion and most recently in 2006, Kraft was the USPTA International Championship 45 Doubles Champion. An avid beach tennis player, in 2007 Kraft captured two national tour events winning Beach Tennis USA events in Delray Beach, Fla. and Long Beach, NY.

Maurice Trail Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 302-5613 Maurice Trail has been coaching for 15 years, beginning as a coach at the Rick Macci Academy in Florida. Maurice played on the circuit for a few years before moving to New York. He is currently the director and owner of the Advanced High Performance Tennis Academy in N.Y. “I find great satisfaction in helping players develop their tennis and accomplishing their goals,” said Trail. “Knowing that you’ve had a hand in the success of a player you’ve worked with is very rewarding.” continued on page 24

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


Tonny vandePieterman Point Set Indoor Racquet Club 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. (516) 330-6070 Tonny vandePieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club in Oceanside, N.Y. He is the co-founder of Point Set’s high performance Tournament Training (TTP) programs, and he has coached many juniors to sectional and national rankings. Before arriving in New York, he was traveling coach for the Harry Hopman Academy in Saddlebrook, Fla. He was briefly an ATP touring pro after college. Tonny was the captain of the University of Miami Hurricanes men’s tennis team where he won the Big East title in 1993. He currently resides in Long Beach, N.Y.

What are the best things you see about tennis in the New York area? What are your biggest concerns about the local tennis scene? Steven Kaplan: The local area has a tradition of inspiring tennis activity and success. We are the home to the U.S. Open and to as great a wealth of the top players, coaches, trainers and facilities as anywhere in the world. Local players, as a whole, value education, achievement and understand time efficiency and they need to because tennis is costly here. Players and parents also have lofty goals and high expectations for success. I am concerned about the ability of the industry to satisfy its demanding population with the economy tanking, the cost of living rising and the underlying economics of providing tennis services rising. Lawrence Kleger: The most exciting thing to happen in tennis in the greater New York area in a long, long time is the opening of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA) at Sportime Randall’s Island. Not only is John McEnroe one of the all-time great tennis players, he is considered by many to be one of the top five competitors in the history of all sports. With Gilad Bloom at the helm, the JMTA will be developing and training many of the areas top juniors and overcoming many of the obstacles towards future champions hailing from the greater New York City area. Advantage … all New Yorkers. On Long Island, we have some of best and most dedicated junior coaches in the country. Many have excellent track records in developing junior talent for the national and international level. And, most of these names are know in tennis playing households across Long Island and are regular contributors to this fine publication. Advantage … Long Island. The main challenges in our region start with our northeastern climate. We mostly train and play indoors from September to June, so our players are less prepared to face the challenges and adverse conditions of outdoor play. The cost of participation is high and court time is not always available. Advantage … warm weather climates. Whitney Kraft: The vitality and interest in tennis in the New York area is incredible. A lot of credit should go to the USTA Eastern

Section and their competent and innovative staff for coordinating, promoting and implementing so many great programs, events and tournaments. I think people appreciate and value the sport and game, and view court time as a privilege and coveted amenity which, in turn, produces constructive use of one’s play and practice time. On the flip side, this is probably the biggest concern: Not enough courts and/or court time to go around or court time that is inexpensive enough to supply the demand in winter and during inclement days. If you were training an elite junior player, would you advise them to attend college or go right to the pro circuit? Howie Arons: If I were coaching an elite junior player who had to make this decision, my answer would be pretty one-sided. John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Todd Martin, James Blake and Justin Gimelstob were all great juniors who decided to go to college to further develop their tennis abilities. The top schools in the United States offer elite juniors the opportunities to play other elite players on a regular basis. There is a huge influx of international players in many of the top conferences which leads to even greater competition. In terms of fitness and conditioning, that junior player, fresh out of high school, will become a lot stronger and more fit. The opportunity to become a better tennis player and ultimately turn pro can be achieved by going to college. The college tennis experience will enable that elite junior to know just how good they really are. Turn pro after you win the NCAAs. Carl Barnett: These are rare kids that can make the early transition to the pro circuit out of high school.. Would John Isner have made it out of high school? Absolutely not. Timing is very important and very few are ready to make that transition at such a young age. Maurice Trail: This is a question I’ve been asked so many times over the years from players, parents and people looking for my advice. My advice would be to sit down and determine what your level is. If you are 16 or 17, and are on a level in which Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Rafael Nadal or Roger Federer are at, then go straight to the pros. However, if you are not quite at that level, go to college and play on a college team first. Playing for a college is an honor and will help improve your match play, while you are obtaining an education. A few notable players that took this route are Todd Martin, John McEnroe, James Blake, and recently, John Isner. This route will give you the best of both worlds, college education and then the opportunity to play on the pro tour. What do you suggest a junior player look at when they are approaching the college recruiting process? Howie Arons: When a junior player is approaching the college recruiting process, there are many important issues to consider. Every one of these issues has equal importance in selecting the right school. Ultimately, the junior being happy with their choice is the number one consideration. Meeting and talking with coaches in person is essential. Did they like the coach? Was the coach interested in you? Did you visit the school and meet the team? Do you think you can honestly play for the team and will

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

24


you have an opportunity to play? Does the college meet your needs academically and socially? If you weren’t an athlete, would you still enjoy attending that particular school? If you can answer “yes” to all of these questions, then I think you have found the right school. Adrian Chirici: A junior player should look at what schools will fit their academic profile and playing ability, and make a list of them in the summer before their junior year. The list should include schools that are a realistic fit and some of the list should have “reach” academic schools sprinkled with some “reach” tennis schools in case there is improvement in either or both areas. Once the list is made, the player should e-mail the coaches immediately. Maurice Trail: Research is key in this process. Not every school is a good fit for everyone. Players should visit schools and meet with coaches. Players need to make sure their targeted school offers studies of main interest, and geographically, it is an environment they are looking for. Players need to look into schools that will best serve them academically and provide them the best chance to play on a team. How do you feel about training on different surfaces? How important is it that your players understand how to play on all surfaces? Whitney Kraft: I’m a huge proponent of training on all surfaces, especially clay where players learn to play defense, are more apt to learn and make use of a drop shot, topspin lob, slice backhand, etc. Stamina and conditioning improve from longer points being played and the body doesn’t absorb the same physical toll that playing on a hard court can cause. Tonny vandePieterman: Training players on different surfaces is an interesting challenge. It often takes a few sessions for a player to get in sync with a different court surface: The timing, the different footing and the pace of play requires some time to adjust to. Having played my junior tennis in Europe, I believe I got the best of both worlds. In the summer, all training and tournaments were held on the slow red clay courts, where in the winter, lightning-fast carpet courts had to be dealt with. This resulted in most juniors ending up with skills for allaround games. I think Rafael Nadal has shown us all how a once labeled “clay court specialist” can be successful on all surfaces by continuing to add to his game. By adding a backhand slice, little nuances in his court positioning and beefing up his first serve, he attained allcourt surface champion status. During our high performance tournament training sessions at Point Set, which are held on hard courts, we sometimes hold little Grand Slam practice tournaments. We encourage our players to visualize being at Wimbledon and playing grass court tennis. Or to battle out long baseline exchanges with lots of variety, while pretending to be at Roland Garros. It is not only a valuable exercise, it is great fun as well! What makes for the perfect player/coach relationship? Vinicius Carmo: I think that what makes the perfect coach/player relationship is how the coach understands the player’s needs and 25

how the coach will help his/her player. Players have different needs and it is up to the coach to find them and work with them. Being a coach is not only understanding tennis, but it is understanding the players as human beings. In order for a tennis player to be successful, the player needs to have confidence and needs to be mentally tough to overcome the challenges inside the court. Tonny vandePieterman: Naturally, there has to be a great deal of trust. A “we are in this together attitude” has to be developed and the player has to know that the coach has the player’s best interest at heart. Naturally, over the years, a relationship changes. I have found myself change during longer term player/coach relationships from teacher, to coach, to mentor. In addition, motivation has to be present on both parts of the equation. Sometimes, I need to be the spark to get the session off on the right foot, sometimes my student’s enthusiasm and readiness to be productive will start us off right. Most of the time it is both. What is your opinion of the state of American tennis? Vinicius Carmo: I think that American tennis needs a professional player with charisma that will motivate the kids to get out there and play more tennis. I think that Patrick McEnroe is doing a great job in Flushing Meadows working with the juniors. He understands the game and cares about this country. Adrian Chirici: On the men’s side, we are doing okay. I see no need to panic like some articles I have read have mentioned. Sam Querrey and John Isner have positioned themselves nicely to possibly make a top 10 run or better. Some of our younger crop of players, like Ryan Harrision, are starting to make a mark on the ATP Tour, and Jack Sock and Dennis Kudla have shown that they have potential by winning on the highest level in the juniors. The old guard of Andy Roddick and Mardy Fish are still playing top 10 level tennis and are great role models for the younger players because they have been putting in the hard work which is the key to success. They still have the hunger and that’s what its going to take for the younger American crew to make an impact on the tour. Hopefully, these up and comers take some pointers from these guys. On the women’s side, we are not doing quite as well once you take away Venus and Serena Williams. Our next highest player is Bethanie Mattek-Sands ranked at 59th. Why is this … I’m just not sure we have the athletes at the moment. Melanie Oudin, Vania King and Christina McHale are good, don’t get me wrong, but there are no major weapons there to make me believe they could reach the top 10 within the next couple of years. A few athletes with athletic pedigree that catch my eye and could do damage in a few years are Coco Vandeweghe and Sloane Stephens. What would be the most important things for a parent of a young child (ages three to six) to look for when choosing a coach? Carl Barnett: I would suggest that they look for a coach that is patient, strong on fundamentals, well-versed in Quick Start and can make it fun for children. continued on page 26

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

25


Whitney Kraft: I’d have them ask friends and others who the “pied piper” of tennis professionals is in their neighborhood, and who works well with that age range. Some coaches have a knack for connecting and relating well to Pee Wees. They know how to make it fun! They most likely use lots of props, soft balls, properly-sized racquets and are advocates of the QuickStart Under 10 Tennis format of how to learn and play. What in your teaching/coaching philosophy do you think is the backbone of your teaching and coaching methods? Adrian Chirici: The backbone of my coaching philosophy is to start accentuating the things that a student does well which in turn will make the player have confidence, and with that confidence, makes them more eager to want to evolve. Steven Kaplan: My philosophy of coaching centers on enabling students with those tools necessary to develop problem solving abilities. I do so by exploring the “why” of performing skills, tactics and behaviors, rather than simply directing them “how” to perform. While I have always viewed coaching as the integration of art and science, I have come to believe that the science of tennis is undervalued and overcompartmentalized, and that, too often, teaching emphasizes style over substance. Clear, precise and persuasive communication skills are important of course, but they are no substitution for proving sound information derived from understanding, mechanics, physics, physiology and psychology. The reinforcement of the idea that success is derived primarily from a philosophy of, “whatever you believe, you can achieve,” is limiting, because while motivation is a necessary prerequisite to achievement, it is not the foundation of success. Lawrence Kleger: My philosophy of coaching junior players is: Athletes first; winning second. I believe that the chances of any of my students having a successful career on the pro circuit are very remote at best. And, if any of them had the talent and drive for greatness, it would show itself like a beacon of light. I do not think that I can create greatness, nor do I think I can prevent it. Therefore, my role as a coach is to make each individual player better off for having gone through the process of trying to become the best player he or she can be. I never tell my students that it is impossible to make it on the tour. I would never kill a child’s dream. But, I have to be realistic as I help each player set their goals. I take the responsibility of being a coach very seriously. I am very comfortable with the life lessons I teach my players. My greatest accomplishments as a coach do not involve the highest-ranked players. I believe in the process. If the process is healthy, feelings of accomplishment and winning usually follow. If the process is not healthy, I do not believe the player will be happy, regardless of the level he or she reaches. I believe in hard work and goal-directed work. Working hard gives a player a sense of accomplishment and the feeling that he or she is deserving of success. It is very hard to feel like a true winner when part of you believes that your preparation has been inadequate.

I believe that competition is inherently healthy. As long as the player realizes that his or her self-worth is totally independent of winning or losing a match, competition can be used for character building. Competition is a big part of every aspect of life. It cannot be ignored, but it must be placed in its proper perspective. What role should a parent play in their child’s tennis development? Howie Arons: A parent’s job is the most important job they will ever have. Giving your children good values and teaching them to be good human beings is an important role and one not to be taken lightly. The most important factor a 10-yearold junior looking to get better in tennis is by truly enjoying the sport. Juniors who love the game become the best players as they grow from 16s to 18s to college. Parents really have the ability to help their children enjoy the game even more by being totally supportive. Supportive means many things because there are many things a parent has to do to let a junior try to become a national player, including time spent going to practices and lessons, and all those late Friday night matches in New Jersey. The time that you spend with your child in between matches and in the car is all very important. This time period will go very fast, so enjoy it and make it a life positive experience. Be a loving parent and not a coach! Maurice Trail: Parents play a big role in helping their child reach their fullest potential. The encouragement and support of a parent is very important in their child’s development as a tennis player. Parents must pick a coach that best suits their child’s needs. They must also pick a coach that they can trust, and that will help their child reach their potential. Tonny vandePieterman: The role of parents in this process seems to be the hardest part to get right. Parents often feel the need to help coach the player, especially after they have become “experts” by watching hours and hours of tennis. Parents, of course, mean well, but I find their most important role is in the balance of life part. They must try to keep their child emotionally balanced, pick them up when they are down and bring them back to Earth when they’re flying high. It’s not an easy job, but a very important one nonetheless! What is your opinion of the new USTA rules for 10-andunder tournaments? What impact do you think it will have? Carl Barnett: Because of our physical training program, our seven- and eight-year-olds are already playing full court. I personally feel, and so do many other coaches, that many nine- and 10-year-olds will start playing the 12-and-under events sooner possibly than they should. Steven Kaplan: The 10-and-under rule changes at a grassroots level makes the game easier and more fun, and is a very worthwhile development; however, the imposition of this change at the tournament level is a concern. My curiosity was sparked when I first read about the change on the USTA Web site after reading the following statement: “Studies have found that competition, when conducted in a wel-

Long Island Tennis • March/April 2009 LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 •Magazine Long Island Tennis Magazine


ments has been, and will continue to be, a very hotly debated issue. Obviously, for any (Boys/Girls) BG10 that is already playing 12-and-under tournaments, this rule is irrelevant. For any BG10 that is ranked very high in the standings, he or she will be forced to move to BG12 possibly a little earlier than expected; not very tragic in my opinion. But, BG10s who are not quite ready to make the jump to BG12 competition will face a dilemma. Do they move up to BG12 and take their lumps, or do they play BG10 in the new format that some might consider “going backwards?” For all others, there really is no choice … they must play within the new format. In order to introduce a new comprehensive system of learning, there have to be major changes made. QuickStart Tennis, and similar programs around the world, are now accepted as the best methods for learning our sport. By utilizing slower-moving and lower-bouncing balls, on smaller courts and with lighter, smaller racquets, QuickStart now parallels Little League Baseball and youth soccer. The mantra is now, “The scaled-down equipment and smaller playing fields allow kids to achieve success the first time out—and sustain that success as they continue to develop and refine their skills.” Time will tell if this system will work in the United States as it has in other countries, but I believe that it deserves the opportunity.

PLAY COLLEGE TENNIS !

coming environment that allows for multiple play opportunities, enhances kids’ enjoyment of the game.” This statement seemed out of context, so I contacted the USTA director, recreation coaches and programs, and asked to see these “studies” and guess what … they don’t exist. They were “lengthy discussions” about de-emphasizing winning and increasing play opportunities. When the headline article on the USTA Web site deceptively references fictional studies that focus on unrelated topics to promote the rule change, it makes me question just how thought-out this change was planned. The USTA director subsequently explained to me that the philosophy of the change is in part the result of the notion that, in his words, “We basically have nothing to lose by changing the format because we have such a small amount of players in the 10-and-under age group who are actually competing in tournaments.” I happen to coach seven players ranked in the top 10 in the east in boy’s and girl’s. In conversations with some of these players and their parents, it is clear that they would like the option of competition in the current format, as well as the new format. Ultimately, the loss of opportunity and freedom of choice for this group of highly-skilled players is unfortunate, unnecessary and potentially counterproductive to growing the game. Lawrence Kleger: The new format for 10-and-under tourna-

Coach Ed E Krass’

22nd Annual A College Te Tennis ennis

EX POSURE CAMP

The Nation’s Only Training Camp Taught Exclusively by College Coaches

2010

For co mpetitive

e s ag r e y pla

18 s 15 -

College Tennis Academy University of of South Florida | Tampa, FL | June University South Florida | Tampa, FL13 - 18 Brown University | Providence, RI | July 5 - 10 Saturday & Sunday, December 4th & 5th

Lehigh Univers University sity | Bethlehem, PA | JJuly uly 1 18 8-2 23 3 | July 2 25 5-3 30 0 | Augu August ust 1- 6 1-813-684-9031 |

www.collegetennis.com

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

27


By Kathy Miller

ongratulations to the Long Island teams that won at sectionals and have or will be advancing to the Nationals! The Women’s 2.5 team from Carefree Racquet Club, captained by Carrie Alfano and coached by Gabe Raneses, went to the nationals in Palm Springs and placed fourth. Congratulations to them for a job well done! Also advancing to nationals is the Men’s 5.0 team from Sportime Syosset captained by David Grossman, the Women’s Super Senior 6.0 team from Rockville Racquet captained by Joyce Tomaino and the Men’s 7.0 Super Senior team

C

from Robbie Wagner Racquet captained by Chet Singer. Great job by all the teams! The Tri-Level League began play the first week in October and will run until mid-December. Next up will be the Mixed-Doubles League. This league will be based on the final ratings which will be out the end of November. League play will begin the first week in January and run through May. The Mixed-Doubles League is based on combined ratings at the 6.0 Level (two 3.0 players or a 2.5 and 3.5 player), 7.0 Level (two 3.5 players of a 3.0 and 4.0 player), 8.0, 9.0 and 10.0 Level. A match consists of three

courts of mixed-doubles with the winning Long Island team advancing to sectionals in June. If you are interested in captaining a team or joining an already existing team, please e-mail me at Kathym65@aol.com. I must know of all teams by Wednesday, Dec. 1 so schedules can be made and distributed to all captains by mid-December. Looking forward to hearing from you and seeing you on the courts! G Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

South Shore Tennis Captures the 2010 North Shore Men’s Tennis League Title he North Shore Men’s Tennis League (NSMTL) is an outdoor league comprised of teams representing clubs from across Long Island. The outdoor season runs from May through August, and matches are played on Tuesdays with the playoffs taking place in mid-August. The match format for the North Shore Men’s Tennis League consists of five courts of men’s doubles. The NSMTL finals were scheduled to be held at Shelter Rock Tennis Club on Aug. 24, but rain forced the event to be moved indoors. In the finals, Great Neck Park District, captained by Alan Wexler, was defeated by the team of South Shore Tennis, captained by Mitch Kessler. If you are interested in information about the league or are a club considering fielding a team during the 2011 season, contact Steve Abbondondelo by e-mail at steveabby@optonline.net. G

T

28

Members of the winning South Shore Tennis team and their captain Mitch Kessler holding the North Shore Men’s Tennis League trophy

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


(631) 393-2995


Matt Richards: A Lesson in Resilience By Laurie Gruppuso

As Matt Richards prepared to play in his first USTA match seven years ago as a 10-yearold, something would happen off the court that would change his life forever. It was the morning before Thanksgiving when Matt was awakened by his father

and he was told that his 19-year-old sister Jenn was taken to Stony Brook University Hospital in the middle of the night after discovering a lump the size of an orange protruding from her neck. He would soon learn she had Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system. Matt remembers his sister showing an inner strength as she battled through chemotherapy and radiation treatments, and averting death after a blood clot dislodged into one of her lungs. He was by her side when the nausea from chemotherapy was at its worst. “Nobody knew what was going to happen next,” recalled Matt. “But the one thing we never doubted was the love we shared as a family. We always believed my sister would get better, and that we would help her every step of the

way. And even though I was only 10 at the time, my parents made sure I knew what I needed to know.” Throughout the worst of times, Matt’s parents did all they could to maintain a sense of normalcy. Even though both his father and mother lost their jobs due to the time commitment required to care for his sister, they still found the resources necessary to support his newfound passion for tennis. Before picking up a tennis racket, Matt was already applying his athletic ability to winning championships playing baseball, soccer and basketball. It wasn’t until he was on a family vacation in New Hampshire’s White Mountains that he discovered tennis. “Everyone wanted to take a steam engine train to the top of Mount Washington,”

RACQUET CLUB 1414 Jerusalem Avenue, North Merrick, NY 11566 • 516-489-9005

LEARN TO PLAY TENNIS OR JUST IMPROVE YOUR GAME ADULTS: 14 Week Learn & Plan Session Beginning Saturday, September 11th, 2010* *4 Students in a group with pro for 1 hour each week plus 1 1/2 hour practice time each week Day, Night and Weekend Times Available • Groups Now Being Formed JUNIORS: 14 Week Session Beginning Saturday, September 11th, 2010* *Group, Semi Private and Private Lessons Available *Ladder Match Program *Saturday and Sunday Practice Time New Tournament Training Program Please Call for Testing Dates and to Make an Appointment

No Membership Fees! Call Today! 30

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


said Matt. “My father, though, is afraid of heights. So he encouraged us to go to the top of the mountain, and said he would meet us back at the hotel. I decided to chill with him. When we got back to the hotel, we spotted a red clay tennis court. My dad asked me if I wanted to try playing tennis. After a few games, I was hooked.” Seven years later, Matt is a USTAranked national player (he just aged out of the Boys 16s with a ranking of 76th in the Eastern Section, and is quickly rising up the rankings in Boys 18s). His major weapons are his 120 mph flat serve and equally nasty kick and slice serves. He has trained under such coaches as John and Bill Cook (Sportime Kings Park), Nick Brebenel, Afzal Ali (Deer Park Tennis), and Craig Schwartz (Queens College men’s tennis coach). He has also practiced at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and at Robbie Wagner Tournament Training. Matt is also going into his sixth year

playing for the Bayport Blue-Point High School varsity boy’s tennis team, leading the Phantoms at first singles since eighth grade under coach Keith Scharfshwerdt. He is a two-time All-County player and has helped Bayport make the playoffs the last two years. Matt also won a gold medal playing for the Long Island team that captured first place two years ago at the Empire State Games. Last summer, he and his doubles partner, David Arroyave, won a Long Island doubles tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. He also recently won a USTA singles tournament at Sportime in the Hamptons. “Matt’s upside is very high, which is why college coaches across D1, D2, and D3 schools are paying close attention to him,” noted John Cook. “As good as he is now, he has the potential to take his game to an even higher level. I believe he’s going to get there because of his deep commitment to achieving his goals.”

For Matt, it’s about keeping life in perspective. “I love tennis, but it’s not life and death. I learned how to be resilient during my family’s dark times,” said Matt. “My sister beat cancer and went on to graduate from Pratt Institute, which is one of the best art schools in the world. And you know what? If you believe in yourself and are willing to work hard, you can achieve anything.” G Laurie Gruppuso is president of Bayport-Blue Point Community Tennis Association. The association was founded in 2009 and its goal is to offer high-quality, low-cost tennis to residents of the Bayport-Blue Point and surrounding areas. More than 200 juniors and adults are involved in the Bayport-Blue Point Community Tennis Association. She may be reached by phone at (516) 5242971, e-mail autofix04@verizon.net or visit www.bbpcommunitytennis.org.

www.miavecchio.com

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

31


Alan King Pro-Am Raises $20,000 for Wheelchair Sports Federation By Peter Fishbach helter Rock Tennis Club played host to the annual Alan King Pro-Am event on Aug. 29. Tennis champions Peter Fleming, Virginia Wade, Johan Kriek, Mark Woodforde, Rosie Casals, Bob Lutz and many others teamed with some of Long Island’s best amateurs for a day of fun that raised nearly $20,000 for the charitable beneficiary. Thanks to the support of Donna Bernstein, the Wheelchair Sports Federation benefits from events such as the Alan King Pro-Am. Once again, as he has done for so many years, host Morris Levy ensured that everyone enjoyed the day.

S

The members of Shelter Rock were very supportive, and plans are already underway for next year’s event. Shelter Rock’s professional Robin DeitchNogrady helped organize many of the members into volunteer groups, and the club raffle raised a considerable amount of money for charity. Our sponsors included Donnay USA and Netjets. Former number one-ranked Stan Smith dropped by to lend a hand, and other participants included Jimmy Arias, the Jensen brothers, Rick Leach, and many other former champions.

The Alan King Pro-Am has become a fixture on Long Island, and will continue to help the Wheelchair Sports Federation achieve its goals. If you would like to help contribute to this event, or are interested in joining our family of sponsors for next year’s please contact Tournament Chairman Peter Fishbach by e-mail at p.fishbach@yahoo.com. G Peter Fishbach is Alan King Pro-Am Tennis Tournament Chairman. He may be reached by e-mail at p.fishbach@yahoo.com.

Murphy Jensen and Jonathan Klee take part in a charitable event for a good cause Fomer women’s champion Virginia Wade gives some pointers

Marc Woodforde serves during the 2010 Alan King Pro-Am

Many thanks to the event organizers for coordinating the very successful 2010 Alan King Pro-Am Members of the Wheelchair Sports Federation were on hand to play a wheelchair tennis exhibition

32

Alan King Pro-Am Champions Adam Schwartz and Dick Stockton discuss strategy mid-match at the 2010 Alan King Pro-Am

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


Thank you for a great Summer. Our Long Beach Leagues and Open Play format was incredibly successful. This Fun and exciting sport is the hottest thing to hit the beach since the bikini. Summers gone but don’t worry ! Beach Tennis is “All Volley Tennis“ and can be played on any surface. Grass Snow Pavement and of Course Sand. Play it in your backyard or be the first to take it to your favorite ski resort... The game is easy to learn fun for all ages and can be played EVERYWHERE !

Now Available: Beach Tennis USA® Paddles and Net Systems! You’ll need your official BTUSA paddle to play so visit our web site and check out our line store at www.beachtennisusa.net. These carbon paddles are sturdy and stylish and can only be purchased from Beach Tennis USA. Also available is our portable net system which includes a custom beach tennis net, poles, custom court lines, sand stakes and an instructional DVD. Don’t forget your Penn QST 60 low-compression tennis balls! Order Now for all your Holiday needs! Receive a 10% discount when you place your order online by Dec. 15. Use promo code BT 5577

www.beachtennisusa.net


“Raging Player”

Dr. Tom on Dealing With Rage By Tom Ferraro, Ph.D. ennis is a frustrating game. You get a bad call, you double fault or miss an easy net ball and you’re ready to blow. But wait just a moment before you break that racket. One mistake will never destroy you, but the way you react to it can. The days of yelling, screaming and pouting like John McEnroe or Jimmy Connors are long gone. The bad boys of tennis lived in the 1970s and they taught an entire generation of players to behave like babies. We now know that acting like this warrants a diagnosis of “Intermittent

T

Explosive Disorder.” These are the players who cannot control their anger and destroy property. They also destroy their reputation in the process. Losing your temper wastes energy, kills focus and will get you depressed enough to lose the next few points. I always tell my players that if you are serious about winning, you cannot afford to lose your temper. It serves to do nothing other than encourage your opponent and give the opposition hope.

IS of Commack GRAND SLAM TENN to the members

es and expertise extends our great servic Dix Hills, IC CLUB in Melville, of EASTERN ATHLET ll as the PUBLIC. and Blue Point as we is located at the Our NEW PRO SHOP Tpke.). tion (854 E Jericho EAC Dix Hills loca T SALES, RINGING, RACQUE ST T EA GR s, ay alw As CQUETS, RACQUETBALL RA RS AND MORE. CLOTHING, SNEAKE 97. information 631-935-10 Don't hesitate to call for Slam Tennis -See You Soon, Grand

34

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

The cure The best thing to do if you have anger problems is as follows: 1. Realize it will hurt your game if you show your anger. 2. Realize you are not perfect and do not need to be perfect in order to win. 3. Learn to forgive yourself by taking a deep breath after misses. 4. Use the great Roger Federer as a role model. He rarely shows anger and has taught a generation of players how to manage their anger with grace, dignity and patience. Do these things and you will play better tennis and enjoy the game a lot more as well. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, at (516) 248-7189 or visit www.drtomferraro.com.


Long Island Teams Take Second Place at 2010 Summer Sectional he 2010 USTA Eastern Summer Junior Team Tennis (JTT) season culminated with the Eastern Summer Sectional Championship. The event was held at Central Park in Schenectady, N.Y. on Aug. 21-22. The round-robin tournament followed the Junior Team Tennis format of boys and girl’s singles, doubles and mixed-doubles. Sportsmanship and teamwork demonstrated by both the players and the coaches highlighted the event. Two teams from Long Island took home second place honors in both the 18 & Under Division and the 14 & Under Division. Congratulations to the 14 & Under team from Sun & Surf Beach Club and the 18 & Under team Hicksville Smash representing Hicksville Community Tennis. Danielle Lapierre from Hicksville Smash and The second place team, the Hicksville Smash, in the 18 & Under Intermediate Division Francesca DeMarco from Sun & Surf were hon- at the Eastern Summer Sectional Championship ored with two of the three sportsmanship awards presented. The Long Island Region would like to recognize all of the players, parents and coaches for their hard work and dedication to the JTT program. The Winter Junior Team Tennis program will be starting in November. If you would like any information about the JTT program or the upcoming season, please contact Steve Abbondondelo, JTT Eastern Committee Chair/L.I. Regional Coordinator by e-mail at steveabby@optonline.net. G

T

Carefree Women’s 2.5 Team Finishes Fourth in the Nation The USTA 2.5 Women’s team from Carefree Racquet Club in Merrick, N.Y., who first won their Long Island Regional, and then traveled to Syracuse and won their Sectional, headed out to Palm Springs, Calif. for the Nationals. At the 2010 Nationals, they represented Long Island very well by finishing fourth in the nation. “I am very proud of what they have accomplished,” said Gabe Raneses, coach of the Women’s 2.5 team from Carefree. “They are a great bunch of ladies to work with on and off the court. The team could not have gotten this far without the support of their friends and family.” Congratulations again to the Women’s 2.5 team from Carefree (pictured here, from left to right): Debra Lehman, Debbie Pinciotto, Ann Marie Conniff, Coach Gabe Raneses, Liz Schiff, Mara Mazza and Captain Carrie Alfano in Palm Springs at the Nationals. G

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

35


888/NY TENNIS www.SportimeNY.com


CALL 888/NY TENNIS (888/698-3664) or log on to www.SportimeNY.com to find the SPORTIME Tennis location nearest you.

1 0 % OFF

ANY Y PURCHASE E OF F $30 0 OR R MORE! Offer good through December 31, 2010 at the following SPORTIME Pro Shop locations: Bethpage Tennis, Kings Park, Lynbrook, Massapequa, Quogue, Roslyn and Syosset Tennis. Offer valid for in store purchases only and excludes racquet sales. Offer expires December 31, 2010. Offer not valid at Randallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Island. Not to be combined with any other offer or discount. 2840-LITM-PS


It’s High School Football Season– A Little Respect for Tennis Please! By Lonnie Mitchel It’s a warm fall September day in 1975, and I am in my senior year of high school. The football players are getting ready for practice in the locker room. They have blood stains all over their shirts and pants and “machismo” oozing out of their lockerroom, and onto the field. In the back of the locker, there are a few of us tennis players getting ready for tennis practice because in those days, boys high school tennis was played in the fall season. I am trying to be inconspicuous and not let the football players see me. I am a thin, nerdy kid putting on my tennis whites and I am about to trot out to the tennis courts which, of course, is right next to the football field. The merciless trash talking directed at us was hardly bearable. “Tennis was for nerds, tennis is a sissy sport, real men play

football” were comments that I heard almost on a daily basis. I emerged from the locker room unscathed and my head was still held up high with pride. Not just because there was something deep inside me that told me that the football players were wrong, but how could they be right? I had tendonitis in my knees, my body ached from the daily pounding I took running on the hard cement with the endless directional changes just to win one point. I had blisters on my feet and calluses all over my hands and feet. I felt a mental toughness that the football players would never experience in that I was out on the tennis court battling my opponent one on one. I was 100 percent committed to the sport of tennis, and I worked hard at it throughout the year. Never once did the football coach tell the players to respect the other school athletes, and yes, I am sorry to say that the high school tennis coach was a part-

timer who really knew very little about tennis. I was truly out there on my own along with my teammates. I did not know it at the time, but I really believe these experiences helped build some great character. I wonder what Mike Holmgren and Pat Summerall would have said? What would Chad Ocho Cinco and Drew Brees say? Mike Holmgren, in addition to his illustrious career as football coach in the NFL having coached two separate teams to the Super Bowl, started his coaching career as a coach for the high school girl’s tennis team. He is now the president of football operations for the Cleveland Browns. Pat Summerall, a great football player who played for the New York Giants won the Florida State Tennis Championship. Chad Ocho Cinco, a regular competitor in the USTA, is now an all-pro wide receiver for the Cincinnati Bengals. Drew Brees was an accomplished high school and collegiate

Q. What does a good tennis player have in common with a good attorney? A. They keep their eye on the ball. Workers’ Compensation • Occupational Diseases • Social Security Disability Long Term Disability • Veterans Benefits • NYS & NYC Disability Pensions Accidents of all types Conveniently located offices in Woodbury, Commack, Medford, Uniondale Manhattan, Bronx, Queens and Brooklyn

Call Toll Free: 38

1.800.416.5454

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


tennis player who beat Andy Roddick early in their junior tennis careers and who, as quarterback of the New Orleans Saints, won Super Bowl XLIV. All of these men have one thing in common … they learned much of their athletic and coaching exploits on a tennis court. Football is played on a rectangular plot of grass where the players and teams compete for territorial positioning. Tennis is also played on a rectangular playing surface and each player battles for positioning advantages. These two games have a lot in common and let’s not forget about the mental toughness each game requires of their participants. I wish I knew then what I know now. I could have been a much better ambassador for our game rather than just hoping to make it out of the locker room in one piece. However, I did wonder why many of the football players then and now did not give the respect a tennis player deserves. Other than ignorance, there is more to it than that in the eyes of a teenager. In middle class towns across Long Island and nationwide, the high school football player trains, in many cases, year-round for what amounts to less than a three-month season. Football players are required to lift weights and begin their practices in mid- to late-summer. These practices can last two-plus hours in some cases and are usually performed in 90 degree heat, oftentimes twice a day. This is a requirement, otherwise you cannot play. The coaches rarely tolerate a note from a parent for a child to leave practice early because of a doctor’s appointment, orthodontic appointment or a similar excuse. Yet, in my game, the great game of tennis, the game that can be played for a lifetime, many of the participants want to be on an athletic team but just don’t take it quite as serious. The parents of some of these participants might be guilty as well, thinking that the coach won’t mind if they miss a practice here or there. Now I am saying it as blunt and straight as I can … short of an academic excuse or a major health issue, “you come to practice or you’re off the team.” Of course, I am not talking about some of the top USTA ranked players who might

be leaving their team practice to practice elsewhere. I am talking about the members of these teams who play tennis only during tennis season so they can have something nice on their transcript. Some do not bother to train in the offseason, whether it is some weight training, cardiovascular work or the obvious tennis drills like hitting a tennis ball. I know this for a fact because some of my students show up just three to four weeks before tennis tryouts looking for the magic pill to make them a tennis player. Guess what, there is no magic pill. If you want respect from your athletic peers, you have to prepare and do the things that work. I was recently at a gathering with some other families who have teenagers that participate on the tennis team. The comments coming from them were just unbelievable to me, “Oh, the coach did not like my child because he missed practice because of orthodontic appointments, he was too tired that day, etc.” I am a tennis coach, so this is something I am admittedly more sensitive to. Come on, if you want respect from your peers in the athletic arena, you better take it serious. Suffice is to say they did not agree with me. But I am a tennis coach, what could I possibly know? I am blunt on this topic and even opinionated maybe to a fault. Like any successful coach though, commitment is demanded and nothing less is tolerated. Just imagine the football, bas-

ketball and baseball coaches allowing this. Maybe if the coaches on some of these tennis teams give their players some tough love, the tennis team in some of these schools would earn a little more respect. The high school caliber player will improve and that helps the sport in general. Come on high school tennis coaches and players … if you want more respect … go and earn it. Tennis is a game that requires brains, brawn and commitment! G Lonnie Mitchel has been teaching tennis since 1985, mostly at Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, N.Y. and is a USPTA Level 1 certified tennis instructor. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College ) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). Lonnie has also worked in the travel and tourism industry as a regional sales manager for 25-plus years for such companies the Walt Disney Company and Royal Caribbean International. Lonnie is now the national account manager for Sandals and Beaches Resorts. His wife, Harriet, is a club level tennis player and can often be found on the court. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

TOPSPIN

TENNIS & FITNESS CLOTHES FOR THE PROS

Kids Apparel & Sneakers • Great Prices On Racquets Workout Apparel • 1 Hour Stringing Tennis & Running Shoes • Warmup Suits

WE’VE MOVED!! Open 7 Days • Demos Available

$

$

10 OFF

USTA Long Island Retailer of the Year

ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

218 JERICHO TURNPIKE SYOSSET • 516-364-9470 ACROSS FROM SYOSSET HOSPITAL

topspintennisLI.com

10 OFF

WARMUP SUITS and TENNIS & RUNNING SHOES W/COUPON • Exp. 12/10/10 • Not Combinable 1 PER FAMILY, IN STOCK ONLY

$

10 OFF

Restringing/Regrip Combo W/COUPON • Exp. 12/10/10 • Not Combinable 1 COUPON PER FAMILY

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

39


Long Island Tennis Magazine spent three weeks at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center covering all the matches, press conferences, story lines and everything else that surrounds the world’s greatest tennis event, which is played right in our backyard, the 2010 U.S. Open. Our Web site was updated daily with tremendous inside coverage and an oncourt photo gallery. For the fourth consecutive year, attendance topped 700,000 at the U.S. Open. In all, 712,976 fans visited the competition, and new records were set in merchandise, food and beverage sales. Here’s a look back at the final results from the event:

2010 U.S. Open Men’s Singles Champion Rafael Nadal

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Rafael Nadal won his first ever U.S. Open title by defeating Novak Djokovic in the finals in four sets. Nadal proved why he is the number one ranked player in the world and became the seventh male player in history to capture a career Grand Slam title. Pictured here, Nadal returns a shot against Djokovic in the finals match. 40

The following is taken from Nadal’s post-match press conference on Monday, Sept. 13th during the 2010 U.S. Open: It’s a remarkable achievement what you did out there tonight and in such an impressive fashion with such great play. Now you have the career Grand Slam. Talk about what tonight means to you and this trophy means to you. Yeah, well, just thank you very much, first thing. Yeah, it was an amazing feeling. I think winning against Novak is always very, very difficult, and the results say that lots of times, I lost against him. So, I think for the first time in my career, I played a very, very good match in this tournament. That’s my feeling, no? I played my best match in the U.S. Open at the most important moment, so I am very, very happy for that, for sure. How did you stay so strong mentally throughout the tournament? I don’t know. I think my the practice is done a lot of years ago, so is not the moment now that I have. I am strong now because I think you can practice everything. I think the mentality, I practice it a lot, my mentality, a lot when I was a kid, so right now for me, it is a little bit easier, I think. What do you think you have to accomplish to convince yourself that you’re ahead of Roger, maybe the greatest ever? Remain for a lot of titles, so that’s no doubt

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

about that, no? I think I am more than happy that, with my titles, I think the talk about if I am better or worse than Roger is stupid, because the titles say he’s much better than me, so that’s true at that moment. I think that will be true all my life. What do you think the future of your rivalry is with Roger? How long do you think it will last? I don’t know. Well, now Novak is, too, but he has to defend a lot of points now in the end of the season now. He is going to have his chance to win the year number two. But Roger is there, too, to finish number two. You’ve achieved so much over these brief years starting with the clay court streak and then winning in so many different circumstances. In the big picture, we sort of debate what are your greatest strengths. What do you think your greatest strengths are as a champion? Is it strokes or focus, willingness to make changes, attitude? What do you think are your two or three greatest strengths? What’s my best thing? I think the mentality, attitude on court I think was always good for me. I am positive on court, and I fight all the time. But not the only thing. Positive attitude is not only fighting on court. I think I was able to listen all the time to the coach and to have adjustments and to be ready to change things to be better and to improve. So that was probably the best thing for me.


2010 U.S. Open Women’s Singles Champion Kim Clijsters Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Kim Clijsters was dominant in the finals, defeating Vera Zvonareva in straight sets 6-2, 6-1 en route to her second consecutive U.S. Open title. The match took just 59 min. to complete. The win gave Clijsters her third U.S. Open title and her match winning streak at the Open is now at 21. Pictured here, Kim Clijsters raises her hands in victory after defeating Zvonareva in the 2010 Open finals. The following is taken from Clijsters’ post-match press conference on Saturday, Sept. 11th during the 2010 U.S. Open: Last year at the 2009 U.S. Open, when you came in, we called it the “Kimdarella Story.” This year, expectations were much higher as the second seed. Did you feel that pressure? Obviously, when I started my U.S. summer, the U.S. Open was my main goal. It was a new situation for me as well, going back to the Grand Slam where I was actually defending my title for the first time. Not having been able to do that in 2006 was frustrating at the time. Last year it was, you know, it was a different kind of attention. People were still curious to see how I was playing, and now, people knew that obviously with my history here that I was maybe one of the contenders. Upsets can happen in the beginning of the tournament, and, you know, I wasn’t playing my best tennis in the beginning, but I was able to lift my game in the last two matches when I needed it.

you think you are so successful in this tournament? Grand Slams are always tough. You have to stay focused throughout those whole seven matches or for two weeks. It’s not just the tennis. There’s so much more involved around it. I’m very excited that I was able to defend my title, which is always an honor, especially since its a Grand Slam, where you’ve done well and you’ve won. You obviously want to bring your best tennis again. Obviously, tennis-wise, I knew that if I would bring my best, that I’m capable of beating a lot of the top players. To be honest, I don’t think it’s been that long since Venus yeah, maybe in 2000-2001 or so where she won back to back. The heat was a factor in the beginning of the tournament. There’s a lot of little details that make a difference. But, yeah, I’m happy that I was capable of repeating history. Is there something about the atmosphere here at the U.S. Open that seems to bring out the best in you? Yeah, for sure. The surface has always been one of my favorite surfaces to play on. I also like the blue courts, which, you know, make it a lot easier for me to see on. I’ve always had a very good run on American hard courts, even when I was younger, you know, the whole U.S. Open

Series, Stanford, San Diego, Los Angeles ... those kinds of tournaments. Now that you have your daughter but are also playing at such a high level, do you have an idea in your mind of how you want to balance tennis and family going forward or how much longer you want to continue to play? Obviously, I would like to keep it going until the Olympics. But then again, you never know what can happen. You know, my main goal is to try and just stay injury free. If I can do that and if I can practice hard and work hard, the Grand Slams will always be my focus. So now that I’m playing well, obviously I’m not going to just give it up. I just want to keep it up. As long as it’s worth balancing, and if I’m able to balance it with the family, Jada [Kim’s daughter] is not obligated to go to school yet, so, it becomes a totally different story once that becomes mandatory. Does your place in tennis history matter to you? Do you care if you go down as an all time great? I mean, it’s not that I think about that, but maybe when I’m older and retired, I’m sure it will be nice. But it’s not that that’s something that I’m trying to achieve once I’m out on court. No, I don’t think about that. continued on page 42

You are the first player to defend the title since Venus Williams almost 10 years ago, so why do you think it is very tough for players to defend at this tournament? Why do LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

41


2010 U.S. Open Men’s Doubles Champions Mike & Bob Bryan Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

The Bryan Brothers continued their recordbreaking men’s tennis doubles dominance as they were victorious in the 2010 U.S. Open Men’s Doubles Finals against the team of Rohan Bopanna from India & AisamUl-Haq Qureshi from Pakistan, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4). Pictured here, the Bryans embrace after their record victory at the 2010 U.S. Open. The following is taken from the Bryan Brothers’ post-match press conference on Friday, Sept. 10th during the 2010 U.S. Open: You guys talked about your emotions a little bit out there, but could you elaborate a little more on how you guys are feeling right now? Bob Bryan: It’s just been a crazy summer. You know, there’s so much emotion in Los Angeles after we won there. There was a lot of pressure building, and breaking the record in front of our whole family actually just released a lot of tension. Maybe we were just playing safe up to that point, but the flood gates have kind of opened since and we’ve played the best tennis we’ve

ever played. This is the craziest summer we’ve ever had. Have you been in an atmosphere like this final in a doubles match? Mike Bryan: No, not from the very beginning. I mean, when we came out, it was pretty full. Usually they start filling in toward the end of the match, waiting for the next match. But they came out to see the doubles, which was really nice. Bob Bryan: I’ve got to give Jim Curley and the USTA and the U.S. Open a lot of credit, because they were playing that final at 11:00 a.m. for many years, and it was just too early. Just moving it back that hour and 15 min. has really made the difference in the crowd, and it’s a lot more fun. For a lifetime you’ve shared your career with the world. You’ve made tennis in doubles what it is today. What does that mean to you guys right now? Mike Bryan: I mean, we have the best jobs in the world and we love what we do. We’re happy to be campaigning for doubles tennis and making doubles tennis big. Can you guys name what those skills are that you doubles specialists have over singles specialists playing the doubles sport? Mike Bryan: Yeah, it’s the quick hands. It’s the precise returns, the communication

Locations Bellmore, NY Oceanside, NY Cedarhurst, NY Plainview, NY Commack, NY Woodbury, NY Little Neck, NY

Main Office Plainview Centre • 516-681-4490

Visit us at: www.dennyschildrenswear.com 42

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

with your partner ... knowing when to poach. If you play a lot of singles and you’re not sharp on your doubles, you can come up there and the ball is coming pretty quick. Standing right at net, you feel like a fish out of water. It takes a lot of years to keep getting better at doubles until your mid-30s. Some of these guys are in their upper 30s and still playing top 10 doubles tennis. It’s basically just the quick hands that you need. In the singles game, guys are standing on the baseline a lot. You don’t see a lot of net play anymore.

2010 U.S. Open Women’s Doubles Champions Vania King & Yaroslava Shvedova Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Vania King & Yaroslava Shvedova, the sixth seed on the women’s doubles side, defeated the number two-seeded team of Liezel Huber & Nadia Petrova in the U.S. Open Women’s Doubles Finals, 2-6, 6-4 7-6 (4). The following is taken from King & Shvedova’s post-match press conference on Monday, Sept. 13th after their Women’s Doubles Finals Match at the 2010 U.S. Open: Can you two just talk about winning back to back Grand Slam doubles titles? What’s the feeling like right now, both of you? Yaroslava Shvedova: It’s strange. I don’t feel like we won, because today was such a short day. We played only a couple of games, and it just didn’t feel like we had long practice warm-up before the match, and so we went warm on the court already, but still, it was so short. It’s like it was strange. Can you talk about your doubles success this year? It’s kind of I mean, it seems like a little bit out of nowhere. Are you committed to becoming a really good doubles player? Vania King: I think I was always a good doubles player. Doubles always came easier for me, even before I was playing with Slava. I was always in the top 30,


but I never had the success that I did obviously with Slava. I don’t think we expected it as well, because usually great pairs pair together for a long time to know each other, and they really get a feel for each other and become a true team. We had that from the beginning. I mean, we bonded together so well and we’re also good friends, which helped. I actually didn’t feel so stressed, because we kind of went through it before at Wimbledon. At Wimbledon, I was really stressed. Today, I was really stressed, because I didn’t want to lose my serve. You know, I didn’t want to be like the factor to lose the match. I know my serve is not like a rocket, so I was really hoping that we’d pull that game out. Then once we did that, we were back even again. But when we won, I was I was shocked. It was strange. You hit two beautiful lobs, the 5-6 game and then match point. That’s hard because you’re ripping the ball, and all of a sudden to hit a touch shot like that, is that a natural shot for you? Do you hit that a lot? What were you thinking in that situation? It was a perfect shot. Yaroslava Shvedova: Yeah, I’m just, like I feel it very good, and I use it a lot in the doubles. Vania King: She’s very talented. She can do anything.

2010 U.S. Open Boys Junior Singles Champion Jack Sock American and tops e e d e d m e n ’s junior Jack Sock defeated the number two seed, Marton Fucsovics of Hungary, 6-3, 6-4 in the finals of the U.S. Open Boys Singles Championship. The following is taken from Jack‘s postmatch press conference on Saturday, Sept. 11th during the 2010 U.S. Open: Talk about the week and winning the whole thing. What does it mean to you? It obviously means a lot. I had a good week here in the juniors. I thought I played pretty well all week. I was just trying to stick to the game plan every match I had with the help of my coach, and I think I did that pretty well. I just try to play every point as tough as I can and compete well. How would you describe the atmosphere out there? Today, there was obviously a lot of people watching, which was nice. It was just it was a very fun match. Court 11 is a good court for people to watch. They can be pretty close to the court and watch, especially with having my group of people over there that watched. Hav-

ing them support and root me on was nice. Then, just the American crowd was an awesome crowd to play in front of. Can you talk a little bit about your start in the game and also the decision to move at age 11 from home to train? I started tennis when I was eight. I was in Lincoln, Neb. and my mom was a recreational player. So I found some racquets at the house and just started playing and hitting against the garage door. My parents put me in some clinics at a local racquet club and I kind of got started there. Then, I was playing some local tournaments in our section or just local tournaments wherever I could play, and that’s where my coach, Mike Wolf, saw one of my matches. My parents talked to him a little bit. We decided for the next year when I was 10 to go down every weekend. We’d leave Saturday morning and drive back Sunday night to go to two of his camps or clinics on the weekends. Then, after a year, we just had to make a decision, a family decision, whether to move down full-time or not. My mom, brother, and I moved to Kansas City while my dad stayed back for his job and all that. I’ve been there since. I think it was a pretty good decision. Have you decided about college or pro? I have not. I’m indecisive right now, pretty continued on page 44

2010 U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles Champion Bob Bryan & Liezel Huber Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

The number one mixed-doubles seeds, Bob Bryan & Liezel Huber, made the home crowd happy by defeating Kveta Peschke & Aisam Ul-Haq-Qureshi in the finals, 6-4, 6-4. Pictured here, mixed-doubles champions Bob Bryan & Liezel Huber celebrate after their 2010 U.S. Open win.

Read all about it in these books “The Education of a Tennis Player” By Rod Laver with Bud Collins “Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection” By Rene Stauffer

Available at Book Stores, Amazon.com

and www.NewChapterMedia.com LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

43


much. I’m going to finish out 2010 and see where my game is and my ranking, and take some visits this fall. I think my ultimate goal in tennis is to be a professional player and hopefully be able to make a living, so I’ll just decide which path is the best for me to get there. If it’s college, then it’s college; if it’s the pros right away, then it will be pros.

Girls Junior Singles Champion Daria Gavrilova Russian Daria Gavrilova came in as the number one seed girl’s junior and had no trouble defeating fellow Russian Yulia Pulintceva, 6-3,6-2 in the finals. Pictured here, Gavrilova raises her hands in victory after her finals win over Yulia Pulintceva. The following is taken from Daria’s postmatch press conference on Saturday, Sept. 11th during the 2010 U.S. Open: How does it feel to win your first Grand Slam? Well, I didn’t understand yet, but I’m so happy. But it will take a while to understand that I won my first Grand Slam. Were you nervous? How were you feeling this morning? I slept so bad during the night. I woke up like

10 times, and I was thinking I think I played my match in my dreams like 10 times. Have you faced Yulia Pulintceva before? Yeah. Since we were young, we have been playing against each other, and the last time in an official match I lost to her on clay in Italy.

Did you gain confidence from winning the gold medal in Singapore? That made you the number one seed. Yeah, I was confident, but also I felt a lot of pressure because I was the number one seeded. So everyone expected something good from me.

Proud to be an American Eight Americans won championship trophies at this year’s U.S. Open N Mike and Bob Bryan captured the 2010 U.S. Open Men’s Doubles Championship. N Bob Bryan teamed with fellow American Liezel Huber to claim the 2010 U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles Championship. N Vania King teamed with Yaroslava Shvedova of Kazakhstan to capture her first Women’s Doubles Championship at the 2010 U.S. Open. N Lincoln, Neb. native Jack Sock won the boys’ singles title by defeating fellow American Denis Kudla, for the 2010 U.S. Open Junior Boys Championship. N Sloane Stephens was on the winning Girls Junior Doubles team with Timea Babos. N David Wagner won a pair of trophies by capturing the Quads Singles Championship and teaming with fellow American Nicholas Taylor to win the Quads Doubles Championship as part of the 2010 U.S. Open Wheelchair Competition.

Sports Photography Is My Specialty • Tennis • Boxing • Soccer

• Portraits • Corporate Events

E-mail: brooklynbridge21@gmail.com Phone: 917-355-9290 See My Portfolio at: www.photoshelter.com/c/kennethgoldberg 44

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


Scenes From the 2010 U.S. Open Credit all photos to Kenneth B. Goldberg

Novak Djokovic, Melanie Oudin and Andy Roddick join kids on the court for Arthur Ashe Kids Day As part of the U.S. Open, eventual Women’s Singles Champ Kim Clijsters throws out the ceremonial first pitch at Citifield prior to the New York Mets game

Nick Cannon hosted the 2010 Arthur Ashe Kids Day

Gloria Estefan sings during Opening Night of the 2010 U.S. Open

Gael Monfils of France, the number 17 seed, in his opening round win over American Robert Kendrick, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-7(5), 6-4

American and fourthseeded Andy Roddick returns a shot in one of the 2010 Open’s biggest upsets as Roddick fell to Serbian Janko Tipsarevic, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3, 7-6(4)

The fourth seed Andy Murray shows his disappointment in his third round upset loss to the number 25 seed Stanislas Wawrinka, 6-7(3), 7-6(4), 6-3, 6-3

Serbian Ana Ivanovic in action against France’s Virginie Razzano at Louis Armstrong Stadium

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

45


Scenes From the 2010 U.S. Open Credit all photos to Kenneth B. Goldberg

Julia Ebalba from Oyster Bay, N.Y. took part in the 2010 U.S. Open Junior event

American Beatrice Capra in her upset defeat over the number 18 seed Aravane Rezai from France, 7-5, 2-6, 6-3

The number two seed Roger Federer bids farewell to the U.S. Open crowd as he was eliminated from play in the men’s semifinals by Serbian and number three seed Novak Djokovic, 5-7, 6-1, 5-7, 6-2, 7-5

Top-seeded women’s player Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark in third round action against Yung-Jan Chan

Eventual Men’s Singles Champion and top-seeded Rafael Nadal in his third round win over Gilles Simon of France

Sweden’s Robin Soderling defeated American Taylor Dent, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4, in second round action The American doubles team of Bob & Mike Bryan defeated Spain’s Marcel Granollers & Tommy Robredo, 6-1, 6-4, on the doubles side 46

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

The number 14 seed, Russian Maria Sharapova fell to topseeded Caroline Wozniacki, 6-3, 6-4 in fourth round action


g n i m Co In y r a u Jan

Distribution scheduled for 1/1/11 This edition will feature: • Guide to Long Island’s Top Tennis Clubs • Long Island’s Best Tennis Apparel Stores • Australian Open Preview • Girls High School Season Recap

Don’t miss the advertising and editorial opportunities in the next edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine January/February 2011.

Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by December 1st. For more information, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com.

Distribution across Long Island at (300+ locations): • indoor tennis clubs • country clubs • tennis camps • retail stores • supermarkets • gyms • and many more

Visit us on

LongIslandTennisMagazine.com

for ...

• HOT TOPICS: Breaking pro tour news. • LOCAL NEWS: The hottest local tennis news. • GUIDES: Camps, clubs, retail outlets and anything related to tennis on Long Island • VOICE: Share your opinions and experiences in LI Forums. Participate in polls. Comment on articles. • WHAT'S GOING ON: Check out upcoming tennis events and tournaments • READ: The latest issue and archives of Long Island Tennis Magazine. • PHOTOS: Photos, photos and MORE photos.

Go to LITennisMag.com and sign up for free registration. Connect with us on Follow us on

.com/LongIslandTennis @LITennisMag (twitter.com/LITennisMag)


An Open Experience By Daniel Kresh Since 2000, when I became a ballperson for The Hamlet Cup, I have longed to try out for the U.S. Open, the most elite group of ballpeople in the world. Ten years later, I finally had that opportunity. At the age of 23 with five years of experience as a ballperson for the former Commack ATP event, and five years experience teaching tennis, I was not typical in the field of 400 who began tryouts in late June. My experience, however, didn’t assuage my nerves, in fact, it only made me more anxious since I felt as though I was expected to make it. After a try out and a call back, there was one step left, work-

48

ing through the qualifying rounds and officially being hired for the main draw. On Friday Aug. 27, I was told that I had made the cut and could breathe a sigh of relief. There were quite a few highlights to my experience over the fortnight in Flushing, N.Y. The first main draw match I worked was that of Francesca Schiavone, 2010 French Open Champion. Ironically, even though it was a top 10-seeded match and on the Grandstand, the third largest court (out of 18), I was not nervous and enjoyed every moment of it. I gained a new appreciation for Schiavone’s game with the newfound opportunity to take, quite literally, a

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

much closer look than I ever had before. Her unrelenting one-handed backhand and fearlessness on the attack were truly admirable. After her match was completed, I got to start Robin Soderling’s first round match which left me awestruck. Soderling is particularly interesting to me since he has done what no one else in the sport has done, he has beaten Rafael Nadal in the 2009 French Open and then became the first person besides Nadal to eliminate Roger Federer at the French Open since 2004. He is a truly an entertaining player to watch and a few of his forehand shots left me in disbelief. continued on page 50


© Disney/Pixar. © Mattel, Inc. All Rights Reserved. MR. POTATO HEAD and MRS. POTATO HEAD are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © Hasbro. All Rights Reserved. Slinky®Dog is a trademark of Poof-Slinky, Inc.

The magic begins with Opening Night Tickets starting at just $17!*

NOV. 9 - 14 Tue. NOV. 9

7:00 PM*

Wed. NOV. 10

7:00 PM

Thu. NOV. 11

7:00 PM

Fri. Sat. Sun. NOV. 14 NOV. 12 NOV. 13 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM

*(Excludes VIP and VIP Floor seats. No double discounts.)

Buy tickets at www.disneyonice.com, Ticketmaster.com, Retail Locations, Nassau Coliseum Box Office or call 1-800-745-3000 œÀʈ˜vœÀ“>̈œ˜ÊV>Ê­x£È®ÊǙ{‡™ÎääÊUÊÀœÕ«ÃÊ­x£È®ÊǙ{‡™ÎääÊiÝÌ°ÊÓÇÓ

Regular Ticket Prices: $20 - $27.50 - $32.50 - $55 VIP - $80 VIP Floor

Limited number of VIP Floor and VIP seats available. Call or go online for details. ­-iÀۈViÊV…>À}iÃ]Êv>VˆˆÌÞÊ>˜`ʅ>˜`ˆ˜}ÊviiÃʓ>ÞÊ>««Þ°®


AN OPEN EXPERIENCE Other highlights included working the last few sets of the Fernando VerdascoDavid Nalbandian, where Verdasco managed to stay steadier later in the match, and finishing out a Mardy Fish match, an American who is having the best season of his career. In the main draw, the coolest match I got to work was probably the men’s doubles semifinals between the Bryan Brothers and Tommy Robredo & Marcel Granollers from Spain. It was really fascinating to see the Bryan Brothers, the winningest doubles team of all time, do their thing in person. I was particularly surprised by how hard it was to earn points against them and how they could hit seemingly weak, but wellplaced, defensive shots to get back in a point even after they were against the ropes. I also truly enjoyed working some matches in the junior draw and in the men’s quadriplegic wheelchair division. I was on

50

continued from page 48

court for the final two sets of the men’s quadriplegic finals and got to watch American David Wagner clinch his first major singles title. Seeing people who were wheelchair ridden, with partial hand paralysis, tape tennis racquets to their hands before battling three exciting sets, was a truly awe-inspiring experience that reinforced the idea that tennis is really a lifelong sport that can be widely accessible. I was also privileged enough to hold an American flag during the trophy presentation for the main draw men’s and women’s singles finals. Seeing Kim Clijsters win her third U.S Open was amazing, and it was truly a heartwarming experience especially when she held the trophy and her daughter Jada. This tournament was also historic, by clinching this U.S. Open Rafael Nadal became only the seventh man in history to win a career Grand Slam (all four major singles titles), and only the second to win a

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

Career Golden Slam (all four major singles titles and an Olympic gold medal in singles.) Being merely feet away from Nadal when he finally received that trophy was about the most incredible thing a tennis fan could ever experience. I thoroughly enjoyed the experience and hope that I will have the opportunity to continue to do take part again for many years to come. G Daniel Kresh is a USPTA-certified tennis professional working out of Sportime in Kings Park, N.Y. where he is also the tennis concierge. He graduated from Binghamton University in May of 2009 with a bachelor of arts degree in English. While at Binghamton, he was the captain of the Club Tennis Team and was the undefeated three-time champion of the school’s biannual Intra-Club Tournament. He was also a rookie ballperson at the 2010 U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at dankreshtennis@gmail.com.


LONG ISLAND TENNIS

Charitable Initiatives Commack Tennis Student/Teacher Doubles Event Raises Breast Cancer Awareness Members of the Commack High School Varsity Girls Tennis squad recently teamed up with some of their favorite faculty members for friendly, competitive doubles tennis matches to raise money for breast cancer awareness. “This is a great way for staff and students to recognize this serious issue,” said Commack High School Girls Tennis Varsity Coach Shane Helfner. “There is also a little competition going on, as each team wants to make it to the finals.” The two teams that made their way into the finals were Lea Foster,

who plays first doubles for Commack High School with Math Teacher Bruce Leon, as they took on second singles player Michelle Graziosi and her partner, Guidance Counselor Jackie Clark. Graziosi & Clark played well and got the win in a close final, two games to one. More than 70 local businesses in the Commack area donated gifts for the event, including trophies, pendants, t-shirts and other items. All of the funds raised for the event will be donated to breast cancer research foundations, such as the local Friends for Life Foundation and Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

51


The Sand Pit

Jump on the Beach Tennis Bandwagon eople often ask, “What is there to love about beach tennis?” The response should always be the same … “What’s not to love?” You get to spend the day outside in the sun on the beach. You get to socialize with the other players forming new friendships. You get great exercise on a forgiving surface that isn’t too tough on the body. It’s great competition, you get a nice tan and it’s just a great way to spend a day. Now, as the winter has come and the weather has grown colder here in New York, the 2010 Beach Tennis Summer Season has come to a close, but beach tennis around the world continues to strive, and this year, the sport has made great strides to bring in more players and moved closer to becoming an Olympic sport in the near future.

N Thursday night and weekend beach tennis league play was held from Memorial Day to Labor Day weekend.

P

Fun facts about beach tennis around the world … N Beach tennis is a very big global sport and is played in numerous countries around the world, as its very prevalent in Italy, the Czech Republic, Holland, Aruba, Curacuo, St. Martin, Brazil, and many more. N The top teams in the world on both the men’s and women’s tours are from Italy. N The Beach Tennis Tour is an ITF-sponsored tour which, in 2010, hosted international tournaments year-round. N Each sanctioned tournament is played for both an ITF ranking, as well as prize money. Many tournaments are for at least $10,000 in prize money. N In Aruba (a favorite Long Island vacation spot), between The Marriott and The Holiday Inn, is Moomba Beach Bar featuring five beach tennis courts. N Next summer, beach tennis will be part 52

Quotes from those involved with beach tennis …

of the Pan American Games in Mexico and the United States will take part.

Fun facts about Beach Tennis in the United States and locally on Long Island … N This summer, Long Island Tennis Magazine sponsored four tournaments that were played in Long Beach, N.Y. N Two beach tennis courts were put in at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The courts were used during camps, as a back draw option at USTA tournaments, and for free open play. N The U.S. National Championships were hosted in Long Beach, N.Y. over the 2010 Labor Day weekend. The top teams from all over the world competed for $10,000 in prize money. N Beach tennis was played as an exhibition at the Sony Ericsson in Miami, the Pilot Pen in Connecticut and the French Open. N Beach tennis was part of the AAU games in Virginia Beach. AAU is the largest youth multi-sporting event in the country. N Sportime Kings Park‘s Summer Camp brought in beach tennis to it’s summer program by putting two courts in on the grass and it was a huge hit with the campers.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

“From the first day I played beach tennis, I was hooked. Not only was it a great workout and way to get back into pro competition, but it was just plain fun.” —Nadia Johnston, a two-time Women’s Beach Tennis National Champion who resides on Long Island. “It’s nice to be able to play a tournament match, then jump in the ocean and then come out and play another match. You are mixing tough competition with a great day at the beach.” —David Sickmen, publisher, Long Island Tennis Magazine, and fourth-ranked American in the 2010 Men’s Pro Division BTUSA Point Series Standings “The beauty of this sport is that anybody can play it. The sand is a very forgiving surface for weekend athletes and seniors. The learning curve is really short. Even beginners can pick up beach tennis in a few hours. This is why it’s so perfectly suited for recreational leagues. This summer, being part of the AAU was a crucial step toward our ultimate goal of making beach tennis an Olympic sport.” —Jim Lorenzo, president of Beach Tennis USA and a resident of Long Beach, N.Y. “The sport of beach tennis is a movement whose time has come. Enormous efforts were taken over the past five seasons to lay the foundation for beach tennis here in the United States. We’re very excited to be aligned with the ITF and anticipate the movement to grow exponentially.” —Marc Altheim, founder and commissioner of Beach Tennis USA


New Yorkers to Represent Team USA for International BTUSA Event in Aruba In November at the International Beach Tennis Tournament in Aruba, countries from all over the world will compete for the Nation’s Cup, the Beach Tennis equivalent of the Davis Cup. Represented countries will include the United States, Aruba, the Czech Republic, Bermuda, Holland, Italy, Greece, Brazil, Curacao, and many more. Each participating country will field a team consisting of one men’s team, one women’s team, as well as one mixed-doubles team. Multiple New Yorkers will compete on the United States Nation’s Cup team, and the team will be captained by Long Island

Tennis Magazine’s David “The Iceman” Sickmen. Joining him in Aruba will be USTA Director of Tennis Whitney “The Sandman” Kraft. Barbara Drodznik, Jennifer Petersen and Emilie Katz will also compete for Team USA on the women’s side. The Nation’s Cup tournament will take place the day before the two-day $10,000 professional Men’s and Women’s ITFsanctioned tournaments begins where Sickmen and Kraft will join forces once again in hopes of bringing an international beach tennis title to the shores of the USA.

2010 Men’s Pro Division U.S. BTUSA Point Series Standings

2010 Women’s Pro Division U.S. BTUSA Point Series Standings

(Top 15 Only) Rank ....................Name ......................................................Points 1 ............................Whitney Kraft ..............................................600 2 ............................Devin Wakeford............................................480 3 ............................Stephen Sayoc ............................................430 4 ............................David Sickmen ............................................370 5 ............................Jared Rada ..................................................340 6 ............................Bob Considine ............................................330 7 ............................Alex Mingozzi ..............................................300 8 ............................Alessandro Calbucci ....................................250 9 ............................Brian Johnson..............................................200 10 ..........................Anthony Chan ..............................................190 11 ..........................Matteo Marighela ........................................150 12 ..........................Ernesto Faisal ..............................................150 13 ..........................Arturo Czerwiak ..........................................150 14 ..........................Kris Barnes ..................................................120 15 ..........................Mike Edison ................................................120

(Top 15 Only) Rank ....................Name ......................................................Points 1 ............................Nadia Johnston............................................680 2 ............................Nicole Melch ................................................680 3 ............................Lisa Goldberg ..............................................230 4 ............................Ashley Horishny ..........................................230 5 ............................Jennifer Peterson ........................................190 6 ............................Elisa Ryan ....................................................150 7 ............................Carina Kealy ................................................150 8 ............................Alison Tepas ................................................150 9 ............................Caroline Bristol ............................................150 10 ..........................Simona Bonadonna ....................................150 11 ..........................Joana Cortez................................................150 12 ..........................Joslyn Burkett ..............................................150 13 ..........................Lee Whitwell ................................................150 14 ..........................Anastasiya Shevchenko ..............................130 15 ..........................Linda Tempelfelde........................................130

JuniorTennisConsulting LLC Full-Service College Guidance!! Call 516-605-0420 or www.juniortennisconsulting.com Get the benefit of our 200+ college coach contacts, as well as, step-by-step guidance through the process. CHOOSING A COLLEGE SHOULD BE A FUN PROCESS. NOT A STRESSFUL ONE!

Still Available: JuniorTennisConsulting College Recruiting Lists - Compare your tennis ranking and academics to every university to make the most comprehensive college list anywhere. At juniortennisconsulting.com! *NEW* USTA Cut-Off Lists – What national rankings do you need to get into each USTA National? Find out at www.juniortennisconsulting.com. At Some Level, We Can Assist Anyone! Guaranteed!

Personal Consultation – Get answers to a myriad of questions that you have about walk-ons, timelines, videos, and items you didn’t consider!

Contact former Stanford University and Roslyn High School MVP Ricky Becker today at 516-605-0420 or rbecker06@yahoo.com. www.juniortennisconsulting.com LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

53


Sponsored by Denny’s Childrenswear

Guide to Party Planning & Entertainment CATERING

FLORIST/DECORATORS

Bill Kakis

800-526-7301 • www.NYWeddingFlowers.com

Come and see our new Private Catering Room! Perfect for Communions, Confirmations, Graduations, Sweet Sixteens and Birthdays. Call now to book your next party or event!

“Where Did You Get Those Beautiful Flowers?” That is the question most commonly asked when Mormile Floral Decorators provide the floral décor for a Wedding, Bar or Bat Mitzvah or Special Event. We import the most beautiful and desirable flowers from every corner of the world. Our team of award winning designers, has been providing beautiful flowers for nearly 100 years and 4 generations.

CATERING

INVITATIONS

1227 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793 516-783-8338

TOWN BAGEL 1133 Old Country Road Plainview, NY 516-931-7698 Catering for any occasion. Choose from our wide display of crudites, platters, salads, heroes and desserts. You'll love how easy it is to create your own menu . . . and how great Town Bagel Catering tastes!

SOCIAL PRINTING Invitations for All Occasions at

20% off

Party Favors, Gifts and a Whole Lot More!

See our exclusive collection of albums for Weddings, Bar & Bat Mitzvahs, Sweet Sixteen & other special occasions!

Party

Oxygen

Call Anna for a private consultation! Ltd.

“We Give Your Party Life”

(516) 536-4321

PARTY PLANNING

DJ/ENTERTAINMENT

631-926-9198 csevents@creativeoccasionsli.com www.creativeoccasionsli.com

www.LIDJExtreme.com • 516-284-6017 Our formally-attired professionaly trained personnel using state-of-art equipment helping provide you a worry free event. We're much more than disc jockeys, we are experienced entertainers that act as the Masters of Ceremonies and provide seamless coordination between all your other services. We can create custom genre or song specific playlists based on your needs.

Don’t let planning your event take you off the court! Let us plan your Sweet 16, Birthday, Shower, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Wedding, Fundraiser, Corp.Events/On Site Event Coord. We're a full service event company that does full/partial event planning. Vast knowledge of LI’s party venues/vendors-creating the perfect event for you! Mention LI Tennis Mag & get a discount when booking a full service event.

Showcase your product, service or company to 23,000 plus tennis enthusiasts throughout Long Island in our Off The Court Directory. Less than

$42 per month

54

For more details, contact info@litennismag.com or 516-409-4444.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

LONG ISLAND MAGAZINE The Ultimate Guide for Long Island Tennis


Guide to Sports Injury Medical Professionals ORTHOPEDIC CARE

ACUPUNCTURIST METROPOLITAN

ACUPUNCTURE

Metropolitan Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine, LLC Acupuncture for Pain Management

Acupuncture can stimulate the body’s own natural pain-relieving endorphins to alleviate pain and can effectively suppress the body’s inflammatory mediators to reduce inflammation and swelling.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment, please contact: Dr. Michael Bennett L.Ac., Dip. O.M.

347-565-4255 • www.metropolitanacupuncture.com

Offices in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Bohemia and Merrick www.orlincohen.com s 516.536.2800

CHIROPRACTOR

PHYSICAL THERAPY

DR. STEPHEN R. GOLDMAN CHIROPRACTOR

We are an outpatient Orthopaedic Physical Therapy facility, focused on individualized treatment to get patients restored and back to their active lifestyles. Our clinicians have a high level of expertise and experience with a variety of conditions. Our Physical Therapists have a high success rate and have helped patients to reach their full potential.

Special Attention To Sports Injuries & Rehabilitation 309 Woodbury Rd., Hicksville, N.Y. 11801 • (516) 433-0147

475 Northern Boulevard, Suite 11 • Great Neck, NY 11021 Phone: 516-466-7720 • www.reddycare.net • information@reddycare.net

MASSAGE THERAPIST

PSYCHOLOGIST

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY Learn how to manage your emotions with a credentialed Ph.D. level Sport Psychologist.

• Control anger • Cope with anxiety • Re-establish confidence • Learn how to focus • Get proper diagnosis and treatment for your emotions

SPECIALIZING IN: SPORTS, MEDICAL/REHABILITATIVE AND THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE KINGS PARK, NY 631-269-1800

1-1 consultations, phone consults, family counseling, on site visits

Dr.Tom Ferraro (516) 248-7189 2 Hillside Avenue, Ste. E • Williston Pk, NY 11596 Drtomferraro.com • drtferraro@aol.com

Showcase your practice to 23,000 plus tennis enthusiasts throughout Long Island in our Off The Court Directory. Less than

$42 per month

For more details, contact info@litennismag.com or 516-409-4444.

LONG ISLAND MAGAZINE The Ultimate Guide for Long Island Tennis

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

55


The Fun Begins at $12 for Opening Night Tickets!* (Excludes VIP Gold, VIP Floor and VIP seats. No double discounts.)

JAN. 6 - 9 JAN. 13 - 17

Thu. JAN. 6

Fri. JAN. 7 10:30 AM

7:00 PM* Thu. JAN. 13 7:30 PM*

JAN. 21 - 23 JAN. 27 - 30

Sun. JAN. 9 11:00 AM 3:00 PM

7:00 PM

Sat. JAN. 8 11:00 AM 3:00 PM 7:00 PM

Fri. JAN. 14

Sat. JAN. 15

Sun. JAN. 16

Mon. JAN. 17

2:00 PM

1:00 PM

7:30 PM

1:00 PM 5:00 PM

Fri. JAN. 21

Sat. JAN. 22 11:00 AM 3:00 PM 7:00 PM* 7:00 PM

Sun. JAN. 23 11:00 AM 3:00 PM

Thu. JAN. 27

Fri. JAN. 28 10:30 AM

7:30 PM*

7:30 PM

Sat. JAN. 29 10:30 AM 3:00 PM 7:30 PM

Buy tickets at www.disneyonice.com, Retail Locations, Arena Box Offices or call 1-800-745-3000 Limited number of VIP Gold, VIP Floor and VIP seats available. Call or go online for details. *(Service charges, facility and handling fees may apply. Price does not include $3 facility fee at Nassau Coliseum and Prudential Center and $4.50 facility fee at Madison Square Garden.

Sun. JAN. 30 10:30 AM 3:00 PM


Garden City’s Jacqueline Raynor and South Side Doubles Team Win 2010 Nassau County Championships arden City’s Jacqueline Raynor and Syosset’s Hannah Camhi have had a long-standing history with each other. The two number one singles players and archrivals have battled it out for Nassau County Girls High School Tennis supremacy and bragging rights in the past. It was all or nothing in the finals of the Girls Nassau County High School Championship, as both players put it all on the line for a chance to be crowned 2010 Nassau County Girls High School Champion. Camhi came out on a tear, taking the first three games in dominant fashion. Raynor was able to fight back and even up the score at 5-5. From there, Raynor pounded shots at Camhi’s backhand and came to the net to put balls away. She won the first set in a back and forth tie-breaker, 7-6 (7-4). The second set was not as close, as Camhi was unable to overcome several

G

mental errors early on. She fell behind 4-2 and was unable to muster a comeback, losing 6-7(4-7), 2-6. “I just concentrated on keeping balls in play and hitting everything to her backhand,” said Raynor. “I lost to her two times during the season, and I really wanted this victory as a senior.” The South Side High School Girls Doubles team of Rachel Shenker & Deana Davoudiasl were probably the happiest girls on the planet after beating Roslyn’s Missy Edelblum & Paige Mintz, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4 in the Nassau High School Girls Doubles Final. Playing the underdog role, the duo of Davoudiasl & Shenker took out last year’s champs in one of the best matches of the day. “This is an unreal moment,” said Shenker. “I cannot even describe to you how I’m feeling.” In the consolation singles match, Farm-

ingdale’s Devlin Ammendola beat Syosset’s Ashley Sandler, 6-3, 6-1. Ammendola and Sandler will join Raynor and Camhi at the 2010 New York State Girls High School Championships. In the doubles consolation match, Great Neck South’s Emma Brenner & Nicholle Torres defeated Sewanaka’s Courtney Sokol & Samantha Perri, 6-3, 6-3 and will head to the New York State Girls High School Championships along with the finalists (South Side’s Shenker & Deana Davoudiasl and Roslyn’s Edelblum & Paige Mintz). Long Island Tennis Magazine will have a full “High School Girls Recap” in its January/February 2011 edition, including draw sheets from States and Counties, along with team results, final standings and player honors. In the meantime, check our Web site, www.longislandtennismagazine.com, for results and recaps.

The South Side High School Girls Doubles team of Rachel Shenker & Deana Davoudiasl with Roslyn’s Missy Edelblum & Paige Mintz

Garden City’s Jacqueline Raynor, 2010 Nassau County Girls High School Tennis Singles Champion

The team of Courtney Sokol & Samantha Perri from Sewanaka display their plaques

In the Doubles Consolation Match, Great Neck South’s Nicholle Torres & Emma Brenner were victorious

Nassau County first-place finisher Jacqueline Raynor from Garden City; third-place finisher, Farmingdale’s Devlin Ammendola; and runner-up Hannah Camhi from Syosset are all headed to the 2010 New York State Girls High School Tennis Championship LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

57


NASSAU COUNTY GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS Oceanside High School Singles Out-Bracket (10 Game Pro-Set)

October 16th & October 17th, 2010 First Round (2 of 3 sets)

Quarter Finals (2 of 3 sets) (All-County)

Semi-Finals (2 of 3 sets) (All-County)

H. Camhi (Syosset)

Seeds: 1. Camhi (Syosset) 2. Raynor (Garden City)

Camhi L. Diller (Mepham)

Finals (2 of 3 sets)

Moskol

C. Moskol (MacArthur)

Camhi A. Taranova (Hewlett) Taranova J. Glasner (GNN) Camhi D. Ammendola (Farm)

K. Deonaraine (Carle Place)

Ammendola Gaimarro

A. Giamaro (Lynbrook)

Ammendola P. Tafler (Oceanside) Tafler

B. Hu (Carle Place) Sickles J. Sickles (Massapequa)

Raynor S. Arthur (Jericho)

WINNER Nassau County Singles Champion

Arthur

L. Kallenberg (Port Wash.) Kallenberg D. Mirabella (Wantagh) V. Macchia (MacArthur)

Sandler Macchia

N. D’Aversa (Oyster Bay)

Sandler A. Sandler (Syosset) Raynor R. Gordon (Mepham) Funk O. Funk (Hicksville) Raynor

S. Cheng (Baldwin) Goldman H. Goldman (West Hamp.)

Raynor J. Raynor (Garden City)

58

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

3rd/4th Place Ammendola def. Sandler


NASSAU COUNTY GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS Oceanside High School Doubles First Round (10 Game Pro-Set)

October 16th & October 17th, 2010 Second Round (10 Game Pro-Set)

Edelblum & Mintz (Roslyn)

Quarter Finals (2 of 3 sets) (All-County)

Semi-Finals (2 of 3 sets) (All-County)

Edleblum & Mintz Baum & Madison (Lawrence)

Seeds: 1. Edelblum & Mintz (Roslyn) 2. Cameron & Elbeck (Garden City) 3. Froccaro & Froccaro (Port Wash.) 4. Lattner & Miller (Manhasset)

Edleblum & Mintz

Mocorrea & Heisig (Friends) Mocorrea & Heisig Gregas & Vollmer (Carey)

Finals (2 of 3 sets)

Edleblum & Mintz

Ruiz & Vohra (North Shore) Ruiz & Vohra Rosello & Burke (Garden City)

Ruiz & Vohra

Wu & Weinstein (Baldwin) Gerin & Pemberton Gerin & Pemberton (Glen Cove) Edleblum & Mintz

Lattner & Miller (Manhasset) Lattner & Miller Alpert & Mitsuda (Lawrence) Reddy & Nicholas

Gianetti & Mattut (Oyster Bay) Reddy & Nicholas Reddy & Nicholas (Syosset)

Brenner & Torres Brenner & Torres (GNS) Brenner & Torres Aronin & Gerstman (Lynbrook) Brenner & Torres

Imber & Weiss (Bellmore) Miller & Appel Miller & Appel (Roslyn)

Davoudiasi & Shenker

Biancardi & Krackow Biancardi & Krackow

WINNER Nassau County Singles Champion

Seigies & Dananberg (Massapequa) Davoudiasi & Shenker Petruzillo & O’Rourke (Syosset) Davoudiasi & Shenker Davoudiasl & Shenker (South Side)

Davoudiasi & Shenker

Leon & Paikin (Hewlett) Leon & Paikin Adler & Silecchio (South Side) Froccaro & Froccaro Brooks & Carlisi (Oceanside) Froccaro & Froccaro Froccaro & Froccaro (Port Washington) Davoudiasi & Shenker

Findlayter & Findlayter (Malv/East Rky) Lavin & Kohan Lavin & Kohan (Friends) Koskovolis & DiGia Koskovolis & DiGia (Manhasset) Koskovolis & DiGia Tamborino & Bentz (Massapequa) Perri & Sokol Perri & Sokol (Carey)

Perri & Sokol

Juszczak & Juszczak (MacArthur)

Perri & Sokol

Jacoby & Cohen (Oceanside) Cameron & Elbeck Cameron & Elbeck (Garden City)

3rd/4th Place Brenner & Torres def. Perri & Sokol

Eisenberg & Bassin (Oyster Bay Krackow & Biancardi (Bellmore)

Line #17

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

59


Doubles Weapons: The Cross-Court Lob By Miguel Cervantes III The Cross-Court Lob is probably the most underestimated weapon in USTA doubles today. I’d argue that it’s the best utility shot a doubles team can have, and yet, most doubles matches will go by with hardly one or two cross-court lobs hit at all. Here are a few reasons why the Cross-Court Lob needs to be in your toolbox before you step out for your next doubles match. The biggest and best reason why the Cross-Court Lob works is because it has the ability to change the dynamic of the point. In tennis, you have offensive positions, defensive positions and neutral po-

sitions. Doubles tennis is no different than singles in that respect and most times the team that can recognize what position they are currently in will have positive results. In doubles, it can be said that when both players are at the net that their team is in an offensive position, while if both players are back, it can be said that the team is in a defensive position. There are not a great deal of options available to a team that is in a defensive position in doubles. You can drill the ball hard and hope the team at the net misses the put-away. You can try to go down the alley and hope the team at the net will let it go thinking it will go out (this also assumes your shot will stay in).

Lastly, aside from a lob, you can try to go down the middle and hope that the team at the net will get confused and they’ll give up the point on an unforced error. A lob though is a dynamic point changer, in that if successful (meaning they cannot hit an overhead) it will push the team at the net off of the net. This changes things so that now you have an opportunity to either neutralize their advantage or put yourself and your team in an offensive position by coming to the net yourself. Why cross court? Because it’s a longer distance. A big reason as to why most approach shots are hit straight, or better yet, down the line, is that it is a shorter distance than

Save Air Heating & Air Conditioning Service & Repair “Save Money With Save Air”

Servicing all brands for residential and commercial applications for: G

Air conditioning service and repairs G Heating service and repairs G New or replacement of heating & air conditioning systems Maintenance & Service Contracts available

Save Air has developed a comprehensive residential central air conditioning 21-point tune-up program…and we are offering it at an unbeatable price of only $99 (regularly $199.00) until June 30, 2010! Call for your appointment today.

A

Sav is giv e Air Resid ing awa y en Air C tial Cent ra ondit ionin l Tune g -Ups for On (Reg ly $99 ula ! rly $1

99.00

)

OUR EMERGENCY SERVICE CALLS ARE STILL PRICED AT $90.00! With over 15 years of heating and air conditioning experience, Save Air Heating and Air Conditioning will deliver quality workmanship at competitive pricing for all your repairs, service, and new and replacement heating & air conditioning systems.

SAVE AIR Heating and Air Conditioning

60

For Service or a Quote for New or Replacement Units Call 516-717-8006 or 516-300-0909 Serving Nassau County - Lic. #H3603290000

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com


going cross-court. Taking a shot that gets to its destination sooner takes time away from your opponent. Cross-court is the opposite. The Cross-Court Lob is such a great shot because it’s a longer distance, therefore making it far much safer to play. I cannot count the number of times I’ve hit a straight lob over someone’s head to see it bounce an inch outside the baseline. If I had taken that lob cross-court, it would have fallen far in. By taking the lob crosscourt, it allows us to hit it higher over the net as well (avoiding an ugly overhead return), while being confident that the ball will still stay in play. Another reason to take the lob crosscourt is because it throws your opponent off balance—literally! Most players will feel comfortable backwards and forwards, and most players will feel comfortable moving sideways left and right, but most players are not comfortable moving diagonally backwards and forwards while tracking a ball in the air. There is a very simple reason for this and that is that it throws off your equilibrium. While tracking a ball in the air, your court awareness is severely hampered by the fact that you don’t have the usual things to relate your position to. Rallying a ball is easy since you can see where you are relative to the net, the lines, even the other players. While tracking a lob in the air, if you are moving back, you can

judge how far back you are by remembering where you were, and the same applies moving left and right. When moving both backwards and sideways (diagonally) your court awareness suffers since tracking is now being guesstimated in an extra di-

“The biggest and best reason why the Cross-Court Lob works is because it has the ability to change the dynamic of the point.” mension. Hitting the lob cross-court will literally throw most players off balance. Lastly, the cross-court lob is an excellent weapon of choice in doubles because you are hitting to the extremities of the court. By using the absolute corners of the court as a target, not only are you increasing your chances of keeping your lob in (by hitting it a longer distance), but you are opening the court up and making one player (namely the player not hitting your lob) cover more court than they feel comfortable doing. The cross-court lob is applicable in several situations. Most notably, if you find yourself at the baseline with the opposing team at net, the cross-court lob can neutralize their advantage and even, at times, put you in an offensive position.

The cross-court lob is also good for those pesky serve and volley players who cannot help but come in after their serve. Even in a situation where both teams are playing the baseline or just in a neutral position, playing a lob cross-court can help give you the time to come to net and position yourself for an overhead or volley winner. To sum things up, because you are hitting the ball across a longer distance, you will find more success in keeping the ball in. Hitting the lob cross-court will also facilitate being able to hit it higher over the net so that your opponents have a more difficult time hitting an overhead, rather, they will prefer to run back and play it as a groundstroke. Tracking a ball in the air while moving diagonally is a tough task for a player at any level and so you’ll find greater success in making the lob difficult to play back. Finally, hitting the lob cross-court will open the court up for easier play. With so many reasons to hit the cross-court lob, I sincerely hope that you’ll consider adding it to your arsenal before your next doubles match. G Formerly with Daniel Burgess at Freeport Tennis, Miguel Cervantes III now teaches at the Long Beach Tennis Center and Carefree Racquet Club. He may be reached by e-mail at UnderstandingTennis@gmail.com.

Whats formaldehyde free and only 10 minutes? INTRODUCING

KERATIN GLAZING

10 minute application - Formaldehyde free - Only $60 plus blow-out or hair cut

FOR SILKY, SMOOTH HAIR IN JUST MINUTES

Total Beauty.

Visit www.CactusSalon or call 631 586-4849 for more information

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

61


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps: Summer of 2010 4 Star Camps at Stony Brook University

62

22nd Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp

Long Island Tennis Magazine â&#x20AC;˘ November/December 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ LITennisMag.com

Bethpage Park Tennis Center Summer Tennis Camp


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps: Summer of 2010 Future Stars Tennis Camps

The Early Hit Training Center Junior Tennis Camp at Glen Head Racquet Club

Glen Head Advanced High Performance Summer Camp

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

63


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps: Summer of 2010 Joel Ross Tennis & Sports Camp

Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy

Tennis & Sports Camp

64

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center Summer Tennis Camp


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps: Summer of 2010 Rockville Racquet Club Summer Camp

ROCKVILLE

The Suffolk County Junior Tennis League Camps

Sportime Excel Tennis Camps

RACQUET CLUB

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

65


A Look Back at Long Island Tennis Summer Camps: Summer of 2010 Sportime at Kings Park Tennis Summer Camp

66

Summer Camp @Ross Tennis

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

USTA-BJK National Tennis Center Summer Camps


Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas-Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller-Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Cunningham Tennis Center Howie Arons-Director of Tennis 196-00 Union Turnpike • Fresh Meadows, NY 11356 718-740-6800 www.cunninghamsportscenter.com Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones-Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 631-363-2882 easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson-Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-271-6616 easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones-Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 631-753-3696 easternathleticclubs.com Glen Head Racquet Club Heath Koch: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 earlyhit@optonline.net Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman-Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2323 www.pointsettennis.com tonny@pointsettennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Igbal-Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, Ny 11050 516-885-6425 www.pwta.com • tennis@pwta.com Racquet Club at Old Westbury Rose Fiorenti-Manager 24 Quail Run • Old Westbury, NY 11568 516-626-1625 Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ GLEN COVE Stephen Alcala-Business Manager 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 516-759-0505 • www.rwtt.com

Rockville Racquet Club Susan Alvy-Manager 80 North Centre Avenue Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 rockvilletennis@optonline.net

SPORTIME at Lynbrook Chris Morales-Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com tdlynbrook@sportimetfm.com

Ross School Holly Li-Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, NY 11937 631-907-5162 www.ross.org/tennis hli@Ross.org

SPORTIME at Massapequa Fayez Malik-Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com tdmassapequa@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME at Amagansett Sue De Lara-Co-General Manager Hana Sromova-Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com amagansett@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME at ProHealth Jay Karl-General Manager 3 Delaware Drive Lake Success, NY 11042 516-348-8463 www.SportimeNY.com jkarl@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME at Bethpage Tennis Perry Aitchison-Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, NY 11714 516-933-8500 www.SportimeNY.com tdbethpageten@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie-General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike Bethpage, NY 11714 516-731-4432 www.SportimeNY.com bethpagemulti@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME of the Hamptons Mauricio Gattuso-Director of Tennis Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com tdhamptons@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Harbor Island Eric Fromm-General Manager, Director of Tennis In Harbor Island Park Mamaroneck, NY 10543 914-777-5050 www.SportimeNY.com efromm@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Kings Park Petr Perecinsky-Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com tdkingspark@sportimetfm.com

SPORTIME at Randall’s Island Ted Dimond-Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com randallsisland@SportimeTFM.com SPORTIME at Roslyn Jared Rada-Director of Tennis Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com tdroslyn@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Schenectady Philippe Ceas 2699 Curry Road • Schenectady, NY 12303 518-356-0100 www.SportimeNY.com tdschenectady@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME at Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Karl Sommer/Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com SPORTIME at Syosset Fitness & Racquetball Joe Gazio-General Manager 10 Gordon Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 516-496-3100 www.SportimeNY.com jgazio@sportimetfm.com USTA National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft-Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 718-760-6200 www.usta.com

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

67


LONG

ISLAND

Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings

39 ......Aziz Rashidzada ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 40 ......Jackson Weisbrot........Dix Hills, N.Y.

(as of 10/01/10)

Long Island Boys 14 Singles

BOYS

Long Island Boys 10 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Daniel Eric Pellerito ....Syosset, N.Y. 2 ........Steven Well Sun ..........Glen Cove, N.Y. 3 ........Billy G. Suarez ............Huntington, N.Y. 4 ........Benjamin Grossman ....Sands Point, N.Y. 5 ........Neel Raj ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 6 ........Ronald P. Hohmann ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7 ........Oliver Worth ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 8 ........David Ammendola ......Massapequa, N.Y. 9 ........Parker Appel................Locust Valley, N.Y. 10 ......Zachary Khazzam........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 11 ......Jacob Weiner ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12 ......Matthew T. Roberts ....Setauket, N.Y. 13 ......Cody Bograd ..............Huntington, N.Y. 14 ......Robert Bellino..............Huntington, N.Y. 15 ......Sujay Sharma ..............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 16 ......Joey Austin..................Hewlett, N.Y. 17 ......Gardner Howe ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 18 ......Eli Grossman ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 19 ......Cannon Kingsley ........Northport, N.Y. 20 ......Alexander Roti ............Woodmere, N.Y. 21 ......Jeffrey McDonnell........Glen Cove, N.Y. 22 ......Spencer Brachman ....Commack, N.Y. 23 ......Daniel Chikvashvili ......Syosset, N.Y. 24 ......Amani Siddiqui ............West Babylon, N.Y. 25 ......Niles Ghaffar................Massapequa, N.Y. 26 ......Brandon T. Cohen ......Westhampton, N.Y. 27 ......Matthew Zapken ........Roslyn, N.Y. 28 ......Henry Bilicic ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 29 ......Dylan E. Spilko ............Port Washington, N.Y. 30 ......Wiktor Marek Figiel......Sea Cliff, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Yuval Solomon ............Plainview, N.Y. 2 ........Curran Varma ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 3 ........Austin Egna ................Port Washington, N.Y. 4 ........Brian Shi......................Jericho, N.Y. 5 ........Dylan Granat ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 6 ........Ian Bank ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 7 ........Steven Well Sun ..........Glen Cove, N.Y. 8 ........Arjun Mehrotra ............Woodbury, N.Y. 9 ........James Kyrkanides ......Stony Brook, N.Y. 10 ......Brady Berman ............Glen Head, N.Y. 11 ......Michael Jaklitsch ........Islip, N.Y. 12 ......Thomas A. Korossy ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 13 ......Joonho Ko ..................Huntington, N.Y. 14 ......Spencer Bozsik ..........Sag Harbor, N.Y. 15 ......Kyle Hudson Gower ....Oceanside, N.Y. 16 ......Benjamin Tenner..........Roslyn, N.Y. 17 ......Alex Grossman ............Sands Point, N.Y. 18 ......Mark Julian Baker........North Baldwin, N.Y. 19 ......Christian Ardito............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 20 ......Carl Grant ....................Water Mill, N.Y. 21 ......Aaron Askowitz............Great Neck N.Y. 22 ......Nasser Ghaffar ............Massapequa, N.Y. 23 ......Neel Raj ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 24 ......Garrett Malave ............Laurel, N.Y. 25 ......Tyler Spencer Bloch ....Jericho, N.Y. 26 ......Titus Syon Sung ..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 27 ......Daniel Shleimovich ......Merrick, N.Y. 28 ......Jack Briamonte ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ......Justin Ilan Lempert......Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 30 ......Del Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 31 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito ....Syosset, N.Y. 32 ......Patrick F. Maloney ......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 33 ......Ronald P. Hohmann ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 34 ......Kyle C. Yaun ................Sands Point, N.Y. 35 ......William Salzano ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 36 ......Max Egna ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 37 ......Zane Siddiqui ..............West Babylon, N.Y. 38 ......Ryan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y.

68

Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Cole Lafitte ..................East Setauket, N.Y. 2 ........Bryant J. Born ............Manhasset, N.Y. 3 ........Zachary M. Chang ......Massapequa, N.Y. 4 ........Andrew J. Bentz ..........Massapequa Park, N.Y. 5 ........Curran Varma ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 6 ........Evan Kober..................Wantagh, N.Y. 7 ........Kevin Alec Kowalsky ..Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8 ........Samuel Federman ......Sea Cliff, N.Y. 9 ........James Heaney ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 10 ......Andrew Muran ............Glen Head, N.Y. 11 ......Daniel Grunberger ......Great Neck, N.Y. 12 ......Michael DeNigris ........Islip, N.Y. 13 ......Kevin Cino ..................East Quogue, N.Y. 14 ......Ian Combemale ..........Bridgehampton, N.Y. 15 ......Erik Joshua Klug ........Sands Point, N.Y. 16 ......Nikhil Raj ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 17 ......Rajkumar Pammal ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 18 ......Michael L. Schumer ....Syosset, N.Y. 19 ......Riki Ishikawa................Woodbury, N.Y. 20 ......Jonathan Staudigel ....Northport, N.Y. 21 ......Varun Mehta ................Hauppauge, N.Y. 22 ......Kyle Hudson Gower ....Oceanside, N.Y. 23 ......Benjamin Tenner..........Roslyn, N.Y. 24 ......Jack Ian Lindenman ....Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 25 ......Garrett Malave ............Laurel, N.Y. 26 ......Jesse M. Levitin ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 27 ......Jeremy Grossman ......Woodbury, N.Y. 28 ......Michael Liebman ........Roslyn, N.Y. 29 ......Jacob Ross Pion ........Roslyn, N.Y. 30 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ..Massapequa, N.Y. 31 ......Raizada Bhavin Vaid....Old Westbury, N.Y. 32 ......Palmer T. Clare ............North Bellmore, N.Y. 33 ......Cory Seltman ..............Smithtown, N.Y. 34 ......Thomas Dacosta ........Massapequa, N.Y. 35 ......Zacarias Imperial ........Garden City Park, N.Y. 36 ......Sahil Massand ............Woodbury, N.Y. 37 ......Daniel Lucian Okin ......Amagansett, N.Y. 38 ......Daniel Shleimovich ......Merrick, N.Y. 39 ......Henry Tell ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 40 ......Christian Ardito............Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Trevor S. Mitchel..........East Meadow, N.Y. 2 ........Erik Ujvari ....................Hauppauge, N.Y. 3 ........Sean Jagi Chhugani ....Roslyn, N.Y. 4 ........Matthew Demichiel......Hewlett, N.Y. 5 ........Jake Horowitz..............Smithtown, N.Y. 6 ........Ian Baranowski............Syosset, N.Y. 7 ........Daniel Sliwowski..........Islip, N.Y. 8 ........Daniel Wong ................Great Neck, N.Y. 9 ........Michael Freilich ..........Lawrence, N.Y. 10 ......Richard Mitchell ..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 11 ......Marcell Rengifo ..........Copaigue, N.Y. 12 ......Gabriel P. Lazar ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 13 ......Jeffrey Cherkin ............Melville, N.Y. 14 ......Michael Hakimi............Great Neck, N.Y. 15 ......Eric Sumanaru ............Middle Island, N.Y. 16 ......Samuel Hajibai ............Kings Point, N.Y. 17 ......James Heaney ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 18 ......Doron Saraf ................Great Neck, N.Y. 19 ......Michael A. Vera............Bethpage, N.Y. 20 ......Dylan Hobbs Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 21 ......Clark D. Ruiz................Glen Head, N.Y. 22 ......Henry D. Lee................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 23 ......Nick Bauer ..................Great River, N.Y. 24 ......Daniel Grunberger ......Great Neck, N.Y. 25 ......Michael McFelia ..........Huntington Station, N.Y. 26 ......Benjamin Mermelstein..Northport, N.Y. 27 ......Roshun Patel ..............Syosset, N.Y. 28 ......Brett Titcomb ..............Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 29 ......Ian Combemale ..........Bridgehampton, N.Y. 30 ......Joshua Williams Gordon..Hicksville, N.Y. 31 ......David Saxman ............Plainview, N.Y.

RANKINGS

32 ......Aman Sharma..............Roslyn, N.Y. 33 ......Alex Philip Rosenfield..Holtsville, N.Y. 34 ......Julian Koby Adler ........Roslyn, N.Y. 35 ......Jack Vissicchio............Port Washington, N.Y. 36 ......Shoki Yamada ............Port Washington, N.Y. 37 ......Caleb Van Loon ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 38 ......Jayant S. Sani ............Great Neck, N.Y. 39 ......Ethan Hayden Handa ..Rockville Centre, N.Y. 40 ......Matthew Orlich ............Valley Stream, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Jared Drzal ..................West Sayville, N.Y. 2 ........Jacob Mishkin ............Woodbury, N.Y. 3 ........JT Esposito..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 4 ........Sean Jagi Chhugani ....Roslyn, N.Y. 5 ........Sloan Millman..............Woodmere, N.Y. 6 ........William Speranza ........Hicksville, N.Y. 7 ........Matthew Zuckerman ..Valley Stream, N.Y. 8 ........Brian Heinlein ..............Patchogue, N.Y. 9 ........Austin Davidow ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 10 ......Christopher DeSimone..Centerport, N.Y. 11 ......Kesar Virendra Shah....Great Neck, N.Y. 12 ......Brandon Lum ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 13 ......Jaewon Kim ................East Northport, N.Y. 14 ......Steven Ferrantello ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ......Eric Sumanaru ............Middle Island, N.Y. 16 ......Jonathan Sanders ......Holbrook, N.Y. 17 ......Zach Cooper ..............Holbrook, N.Y. 18 ......Clark D. Ruiz................Glen Head, N.Y. 19 ......Jason Fruchter ............Lawrence, N.Y. 20 ......Jason Quintana ..........Bethpage, N.Y. 21 ......Paul Abrudescu ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 22 ......Jordan Lindenmam ....Commack, N.Y. 23 ......Stephen Peng..............Woodbury, N.Y. 24 ......Anton Averin................South Setauket, N.Y. 25 ......Gregory B. Gittler ........Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 26 ......Gonzalo E. Mocorrea ..Locust Valley, N.Y. 27 ......Matthew Ryan Basile ..Smithtown, N.Y. 28 ......Kenneth Gaudio ..........Miller Place, N.Y. 29 ......David Kane ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 30 ......Daniel Wright ..............Babylon, N.Y. 31 ......Gregory Krolikowski ....Massapequa, N.Y. 32 ......Anil Nandkumar ..........East Northport, N.Y. 33 ......Aman Sharma..............Roslyn, N.Y. 34 ......Christian Oliver Damour Hauppauge, N.Y. 35 ......Justin Fitze ..................Greenlawn, N.Y. 36 ......Daniel Sedgh ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 37 ......Ryan Zuckerman ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 38 ......Andrew O’Connell ......Medford, N.Y. 39 ......Dylan Quintana............Bethpage, N.Y. 40 ......Gabriel Moses Stine ....Great Neck, N.Y.

GIRLS

Long Island Girls 10 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Trinity Chow ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 2 ........Olivia Rose Scordo......Glen Head, N,.Y. 3 ........Julia Kielan ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4 ........Francesca Karman ......Port Washington, N.Y. 5 ........Merri Kelly ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 6 ........Katelyn Walker ............Sands Point, N.Y. 7 ........Lea Ma ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 8 ........Celeste Wang Traub ....Jericho, N.Y. 9 ........Alexa Susan Goetz ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 10 ......Rachel Arbitman..........Hewlett, N.Y. 11 ......Risha Malhotra ............Syosset, N.Y. 12 ......Emily Austin ................Hewlett, N.Y. 13 ......Maryam Ahmad ..........Albertson, N.Y. 14 ......Alison Coben ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 15 ......Cara Becker ................Great Neck, N.Y. 16 ......Amy Delman ................Great Neck, N.Y. 17 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 18 ......Kira Rose Giordano ....Massapequa Park, N.Y. 19 ......Nicole Kyrkanides ......Stony Brook, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Lexee Taylor Shapiro ..Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

2 ........Brynn Maris April ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 3 ........Nicole Kielan ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 4 ........Jacqueline Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 5 ........Stephanie Nakash ......Great Neck, N.Y. 6 ........Emily Kate Shutman....Huntington, N.Y. 7 ........Courtney Kowalsky ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8 ........Morgan A. Wilkins ......Syosset, N.Y. 9 ........Olivia Rose Scordo......Glen Head, N.Y. 10 ......Abigail Carrie Okin ......Amagansett, N.Y. 11 ......Trinity Chow ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 12 ......Danielle Mirabella ........Wantagh, N.Y. 13 ......Ayesha Chhugani ........Roslyn, N.Y. 14 ......Cecelia Combemale ....Bridgehampton, N.Y. 15 ......Danah Han ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 16 ......Michelle Carnovale......Massapequa, N.Y. 17 ......Ashley Yevdosin ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 19 ......Amanda Alison Foo ....Manhasset, N.Y. 20 ......Rachel Weiss ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 21 ......Victoria Bialczak ..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 22 ......Taylor Ferguson ..........East Quogue, N.Y. 23 ......Dasha Dlin ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 24 ......Katherine M. Heaney ..Locust Valley, N.Y. 25 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ....Glen Head, N.Y. 26 ......Devika Kedia ..............East Norwich, N.Y. 27 ......Fiona Stocks-Lyons ....Glen Cove, N.Y. 28 ......Alexa Susan Goetz ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 29 ......Francesca Karman ......Port Washington, N.Y. 30 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes ............Massapequa, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Lauren Livingston ........Sands Point, N.Y. 2 ........Bridget Harding ..........Northport, N.Y. 3 ........Katharine Brandow......East Northport, N.Y. 4 ........Brittany Burke..............Garden City, N.Y. 5 ........Rhea Malhotra ............Syosset, N.Y. 6 ........Cameron Moskol ........Wantagh, N.Y. 7 ........Aidan Owens ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 8 ........Lauren Difazio..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 9 ........Elena Nastasi ..............Bayville, N.Y. 10 ......Nicole Koskovolis........Manhasset, N.Y. 11 ......Michele Sheila Lehat ..Great Neck, N.Y. 12 ......Sarah Dionisio ............Shirley, N.Y. 13 ......Morgan Hermann ........Garden City, N.Y. 14 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 15 ......Campbell Howe ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 16 ......Katie Jane Cirella ........Woodbury, N.Y. 17 ......Julia Ciardullo..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 18 ......Ryann Moelis ..............Hewlett, N.Y. 19 ......Madison Appel ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 20 ......Sofiya Tumanova ........Middle Island, N.Y. 21 ......Caroline Keating ..........Huntington, N.Y. 22 ......Lauren J. Mayo............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 23 ......Danielle Mirabella ........Wantagh, N.Y. 24 ......Claire Handa................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 25 ......Olivia C. Funk ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 26 ......Jeannie Lozowski ........Amityville, N.Y. 27 ......Eudice Wong Chong ..Port Washington, N.Y. 28 ......Aimee Manfredo ..........Shoreham, N.Y. 29 ......Hannah Shay Juhel ....Roslyn, N.Y. 30 ......Angelika Rothberg ......Centerport, N.Y. 31 ......Annelise Meyding ........Port Washington, N.Y. 32 ......Michelle Haykin ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 33 ......Courtney A. Digia ........Manhasset, N.Y. 34 ......Denise Vollmer ............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 35 ......Bridget Connors ..........East Quogue, N.Y. 36 ......Lauren Salzano............Dix Hills, N.Y. 37 ......Stephanie Nakash ......Great Neck, N.Y. 38 ......Michelle Vancura ........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 39 ......Noa Alexandra Dubin ..Southampton, N.Y. 40 ......Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Jennifer C. Ferguson ..Franklin Square, N.Y. 2 ........Mary Harding ..............Northport, N.Y. 3 ........Lara Fishbane..............Commack, N.Y. 4 ........Taylor Rose Anderson Locust Valley, N.Y. 5 ........Alison Wang ................Great Neck, N.Y.


LONG 6 ........Ruth Freilich ................Lawrence, N.Y. 7 ........Bridget Harding ..........Northport, N.Y. 8 ........Cameron Moskol ........Wantagh, N.Y. 9 ........Danielle Byrnes ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 10 ......Laura Torsiello ............Bayport, N.Y. 11 ......Hannah Goldman ........West Hempstead, N.Y. 12 ......Jennifer Glukhman ......Syosset, N.Y. 13 ......Annie Yueh ..................Hauppauge, N.Y. 14 ......Nicholle Torres ............North Hills, N.Y. 15 ......Rithika D. Reddy ........Syosset, N.Y. 16 ......Yuliya V. Astapova ......Port Washington, N.Y. 17 ......Danielle Lapierre..........Hicksville, N.Y. 18 ......Anna Poslusny ............Centerport, N.Y. 19 ......Erica Bundrick ............Mattituck, N.Y. 20 ......Bianca Posa ................Valley Stream, N.Y. 21 ......Emma R. Brezel ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 22 ......Claudia M. Ruiz ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 23 ......Sarah Dionisio ............Shirley, N.Y. 24 ......Robin Mehta................Manhasset, N.Y. 25 ......Amanda Luper ............Melville, N.Y. 26 ......Megan Tamborino ......Massapequa Park, N.Y. 27 ......Kristen Bomkamp........Northport, N.Y. 28 ......Karen Serina................Islip Terrace, N.Y. 29 ......Sarah Han....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 30 ......Karishma Tank ............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 31 ......Zenat Rashidzada ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 32 ......Sunaina Vohra ............Glen Head, N.Y. 33 ......Jessie Sarkis ..............Long Beach, N.Y. 34 ......Jessica Sickles ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 35 ......Amanda Nowak ..........Huntington, N.Y. 36 ......Brittany Burke..............Garden City, N.Y. 37 ......Rhea Malhotra ............Syosset, N.Y. 38 ......Allie N. Rothstein ........Plainview, N.Y. 39 ......Christine Rienzo ..........Smithtown, N.Y. 40 ......Betty Ma......................Dix Hills, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Veronika Paikin ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ........Alyssa Lavin ................Glen Head, N.Y. 3 ........Carly Siegel ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Amy Ginny Naula ........East Hampton, N.Y. 5 ........Alyssa D. Rosello ........Garden City, N.Y. 6 ........Jessica Nowak ............Huntington, N.Y. 7 ........Brett Lieb ....................Cutchogue, N.Y. 8 ........Amanda Seeley ..........Sound Beach, N.Y. 9 ........Taylor Wilkins ..............Syosset, N.Y. 10 ......Mary Harding ..............Northport, N.Y. 11 ......Robin Mehta................Manhasset, N.Y. 12 ......Courtney Sokol............Floral Park, N.Y. 13 ......Alison Wang ................Great Neck, N.Y. 14 ......Taylor A. Diffley............Hampton Bays, N.Y. 15 ......Nicholle Torres ............North Hills, N.Y. 16 ......Sophie Lanter ..............East Rockaway, N.Y. 17 ......Paige J. Mintz..............Roslyn, N.Y. 18 ......Yuliya V. Astapova ......Port Washington, N.Y. 19 ......Jessica Sickles ............Massapequa Park, N.Y. 20 ......Marissa D. Lazar..........Hewlett, N.Y. 21 ......Daria Schieferstein ......Sag Harbor, N.Y. 22 ......Bianca Posa ................Valley Stream, N.Y. 23 ......Ashley Sandler ............Jericho, N.Y. 24 ......Elan King ....................Baldwin, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 10/18/10)

BOYS

Sectional Boys 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Alan Delman ................Great Neck, N.Y. 2 ........Ryan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y. 8 ........Brian Shi......................Jericho, N.Y. 12 ......Pete Siozios ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 13 ......Cannon Kingsley ........Northport, N.Y. 14 ......Neel Raj ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 15 ......Patrick F. Maloney ......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 16 ......Ronald P. Hohmann ....Oyster Bay, N.Y.

ISLAND

17 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito ....Syosset, N.Y. 20 ......Gardner Howe ............Locust valley, N.Y. 27 ......Michael Medvedev ......Oceanside, N.Y. 33 ......Steven Well Sun ..........Glen Cove, N.Y. 34 ......Eli Grossman ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 37 ......Billy Suarez..................Huntington, N.Y. 38 ......Amani Siddiqui ............West Babylon, N.Y. 39 ......Benjamin Grossman ....Sands Point, N.Y. 55 ......Joey Austin..................Hewlett, N.Y. 59 ......Sujay Sharma ..............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 60 ......Cody Bograd ..............Huntington, N.Y. 62 ......David Ammendola ......Massapequa, N.Y. 68 ......Robert Steven Bellino..Huntington, N.Y. 70 ......Oliver Worth ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 71 ......Zachary Ian Khazzam..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 77 ......Alexander Roti ............Woodmere, N.Y. 78 ......Parker Appel................Locust Valley, N.Y. 81 ......Niles Ghaffar................Massapequa, N.Y. 83 ......Kyle C. Yuan................Sands Point, N.Y. 86 ......Spencer Brachman ....Commack, N.Y. 88 ......Jacob Wiener ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 89 ......Daniel Chikvashvili ......Syosset, N.Y. 105 ....Jeffrey McDonnell........Glen Cove, N.Y. 110 ....Eric Li ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 127 ....Brandon T. Cohen ......Westhampton, N.Y. 139 ....Henry Bilicic ................Locust Valley, N.Y. 145 ....Dylan E. Spilko ............Port Washington, N.Y. 149 ....Alec Hunter Barres ......Old Westbury, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 1 ........Brenden Andrew Volk..Dix Hills, N.Y. 12 ......Sean M. Mullins ..........Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 13 ......Athell Patrick Bennett..Valley Stream, N.Y. 14 ......Colin Francis Sacco ....Brightwaters, N.Y. 19 ......Finbar Talcott ..............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 23 ......Sean Patrick ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 25 ......Jordan Bennett............Valley Stream, N.Y. 26 ......Alan Delman ................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ......Ryan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y. 35 ......Keegan Morris ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 36 ......Chris Kuhnle................Shoreham, N.Y. 44 ......Vincent Caracappa......Smithtown, N.Y. 48 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ..Massapequa, N.Y. 49 ......Rajan Jai Vohra............Glen Head, N.Y. 50 ......Alex Grossman ............Sands Point, N.Y. 54 ......Christian Moyer Ardito..Rockville Centre, N.Y. 56 ......Kyle Hudson Gower ....Oceanside, N.Y. 62 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito ....Syosset, N.Y. 63 ......Daniel Shleimovich ......Merrick, N.Y. 64 ......Brian Shi......................Jericho, N.Y. 68 ......Patrick F. Maloney ......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 74 ......Logan Beckerman ......East Norwich, N.Y. 77 ......Giancarlo Cavallero ....West Hempstead, N.Y. 81 ......Ronald P. Hohmann ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 83 ......Garrett Malave ............Laurel, N.Y. 87 ......Ian Bank ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 96 ......Andy Zhou ..................Commack, N.Y. 97 ......Michael Medvedev ......Oceanside, N.Y. 100 ....Pete Siozios ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 101 ....James Kyrkanides ......Stony Brook, N.Y. 102 ....Titus Syon Sung ..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 109 ....Zane Siddiqui ..............West Babylon, N.Y. 110 ....Justin Ilan Lempert......Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 115 ....Neel Raj ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 116 ....Curran Varma ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 122 ....Steven Well Sun ..........Glen Cove, N.Y. 130 ....Del Schunk ..................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 136 ....Yuval Solomon ............Plainview, N.Y. 138 ....Benjamin Tenner..........Roslyn, N.Y. 139 ....Carl Grant ....................Water Mill, N.Y. 144 ....Arjun Mehta ................Woodbury, N.Y. 146 ....Spencer Bozsik ..........Sag Harbor, N.Y. 150 ....Jack Briamonte ..........Great Neck, N.Y.

RANKINGS

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 2 ........Lamar Remy ................Roslyn, N.Y. 3 ........Noah B. Rubin ............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 5 ........Julian Alexi Zlobinsky..Greenvale, N.Y. 7 ........Dylan Hobbs Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 14 ......Josh Silverstein ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 16 ......Brandon T. Stone ........Melville, N.Y. 17 ......Zain Ali ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 21 ......Alexander Lebedev ....Island Park, N.Y. 33 ......Brenden Andrew Volk..Dix Hills, N.Y. 34 ......Lubomir T. Cuba..........Massapequa Park, N.Y. 35 ......Jonathan Paris ............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 37 ......Daniel Grunberger ......Great Neck, N.Y. 43 ......Jared R. Halstrom ......Bellmore, N.Y. 49 ......Eric Wagner ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 53 ......Kyle Alper ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 60 ......Palmer T. Clare ............North Bellmore, N.Y. 68 ......Alex Brebenel ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 70 ......Conor Mullins ..............Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 73 ......Kevin Cino ..................East Quogue, N.Y. 76 ......Benjamin Rosen ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 82 ......Zacarias Imperial ........Garden City Park, N.Y. 90 ......Bryant J. Born ............Manhasset, N.Y. 91 ......Josh Young..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 110 ....Ian Combemale ..........Bridgehampton, N.Y. 111 ......Joshua Williams Gordon..Hicksville, N.Y. 117 ....Andrew J. Bentz ..........Massapequa Park, N.Y. 118 ....Nikhil Raj ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 124 ....Cory Seltman ..............Smithtown, N.Y. 130 ....Cole Laffitte ................East Setauket, N.Y. 136 ....William Scribner BaderWater Mill, N.Y. 143 ....Finbar Talcott ..............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 149 ....Zachary M. Chang ......Massapequa, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 3 ........Andrew Yaraghi ..........Mill Neck, N.Y. 4 ........Eric Rubin....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 5 ........Josh Levine ................Syosset, N.Y. 7 ........Howard J. Weiss..........Great Neck, N.Y. 10 ......Noah Rubin ................Merrick, N.Y. 14 ......Brendan Henry ............Massapequa, N.Y. 15 ......Aidan Talcott................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 19 ......Samuel Lam ................Old Westbury, N.Y. 24 ......Ethan Bogard ..............Lido Beach, N.Y. 26 ......Kevin Katz ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 28 ......Vihar Shah ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 31 ......Ofir Solomon ..............Plainview, N.Y. 33 ......Eric Bertuglia ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 36 ......Alan S. Pleat ................Roslyn, N.Y. 40........Alexander Schidlovsky ..Sea Cliff, N.Y. 45 ......Brandon T. Stone ........Melville, N.Y. 55 ......Lamar Remy ................Roslyn, N.Y. 60 ......Alex Sacher ................Glen Head, N.Y. 62 ......Douglas Notaris ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 63 ......Conor Dauer ................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 68 ......Daniel R. Grinshteyn....Hewlett, N.Y. 73 ......Eric Sumanaru ............Middle Island, N.Y. 77 ......Sean Jagi Chhugani ....Roslyn, N.Y. 82 ......Matthew Demichiel......Hewlett, N.Y. 84 ......Jeremy Dubin ..............Southampton, N.Y. 88 ......Austin Davidow ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 89 ......Tyler J. Hoffman ..........Sayville, N.Y. 97 ......Michael Paul................Baldwin, N.Y. 100 ....Dylan Hobbs Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 102 ....Clark D. Ruiz................Glen Head, N.Y. 106 ....Benjamin Q. King ........East Meadow, N.Y. 107 ....Daniel Wong ................Great Neck, N.Y. 110 ....Paul Abrudescu ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 112 ....Zachary A. Lessen ......Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 113 ....John P. D’Alessandro ..Northport, N.Y. 114 ....Gabriel P. Lazar ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 118 ....Doron Saraf ................Great Neck, N.Y. 123 ....Brian W. Slivonik..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 125 ....Mark Daniel Temporal..Carle Place, N.Y. 140 ....Gonzalo E. Mocorrea ..Locust Valley, N.Y.

143 ....Nick Bauer ..................Great River, N.Y. 144 ....Erik Ujvari ....................Hauppauge, N.Y. 148 ....Michael Frelich ............Lawrence, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 17 ......Bert Vancura................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 18 ......Jensen H. Reiter..........Syosset, N.Y. 19 ......Andrew Yaraghi ..........Mill Neck, N.Y. 22 ......Eric Ambrosio ..............Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 30 ......Matthew O. Barry ........Lido Beach, N.Y. 35 ......Alex Tropiano ..............Laurel Hollow, N.Y. 37 ......Josh M. Levine ............Syosset, N.Y. 39 ......Jonathan Defrancesch..Manhasset, N.Y. 41 ......Shaun Bernstein..........Plainview, N.Y. 45 ......Howard J. Weiss..........Great Neck, N.Y. 49 ......Zachary Morris ............Garden City, N.Y. 53 ......Jonahiby Tauil..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 54 ......Oliver Loutsenko ........Bellmore, N.Y. 55 ......Jason Hubsher ............Sands Point, N.Y. 60 ......Austin Blau ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 65 ......Alan S. Pleat ................Roslyn, N.Y. 66 ......David Greenbaum ......Great Neck, N.Y. 68 ......Dennis Zlobinsky ........Greenvale, N.Y. 80 ......Kevin A. Katz ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 82 ......Eric Sumanaru ............Middle Island, N.Y. 84 ......Harrison R. Digia ........Manhasset, N.Y. 92 ......Matthew J. Richards ..Bayport, N.Y. 94 ......Michael T. Puntillo ......Sands Point, N.Y. 103 ....Ignacio Casali..............Farmingdale, N.Y. 104 ....Paul Abrudescu ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 109 ....Alexander Friedlich......Great Neck, N.Y. 111 ....Sean Jagi Chhugani ....Roslyn, N.Y. 112 ....Clark D. Ruiz................Glen Head, N.Y. 115 ....Austin Davidow ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 124 ....Brendan Henry ............Massapequa, N.Y. 126 ....Sloan Millman..............Woodmere, N.Y. 127 ....Richard Sipala ............Quogue, N.Y. 133 ....Jared Drzal ..................West Sayville, N.Y. 136 ....Stephen Peng..............Woodbury, N.Y. 137 ....Jason A. Fruchter ........Lawrence, N.Y. 145 ....Zach Cooper ..............Holbrook, N.Y.

GIRLS

Sectional Girls 10 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 4 ........Jacqueline Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 5 ........Lea Ma ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 6 ........Jennifer Yu ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 10 ......Francesca Karman ......Port Washington, N.Y. 16 ......Celeste Wang Traub ....Jericho, N.Y. 17 ......Julia Kielan ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 18 ......Alexa Susan Goetz ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 23 ......Merri Kelly ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ......Olivia Rose Scordo......Glen Head, N.Y. 27 ......Katelyn Walker ............Sands Point, N.Y. 36 ......Maryam Ahmad ..........Albertson, N.Y. 38 ......Trinity Chow ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 50 ......Emily Austin ................Hewlett, N.Y. 53 ......Amy Delman ................Great Neck, N.Y. 54 ......Nicole Kyrkanides ......Stony Brook, N.Y. 59 ......Marisa L. Menist..........Great Neck, N.Y. 61 ......Rachel Arbitman..........Hewlett, N.Y. 70 ......Cara Becker ................Great Neck, N.Y. 81 ......Alison Coben ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 92 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 104 ....Kira Rose Giordano ....Massapequa Park, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 2 ........Madison Battaglia ......Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 3 ........Morgan Herrmann ......Garden City, N.Y. 4 ........Alexa Graham..............Garden City, N.Y. 17 ......Esther Chikvashvili ......Syosset, N.Y. 19 ......Jeannie Lozowski ........Amityville, N.Y. 20 ......Claire Handa................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

69


LONG 22 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 26 ......Celeste Rose Matute ..Amityville, N.Y. 36........Stephanie Chikvashvili ..Syosset, N.Y. 51 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ....Glen Head, N.Y. 60 ......Courtney Kowalsky ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 65 ......Jacqueline Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 73 ......Lea Ma ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 74 ......Dominique Woinarowski Syosset, N.Y. 81 ......Jennifer Yu ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 82 ......Nicole Kielan ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 84 ......Stephanie Nakash ......Great Neck, N.Y. 88 ......Abigail Carrie Okin ......Amagansett, N.Y. 95 ......Emily Kate Shutman....Huntington, N.Y. 97 ......Theodora Brebenel......Glen Head, N.Y. 99 ......Morgan Wilkins............Syosset, N.Y. 102 ....Lexee Taylor Shapiro ..Syosset, N.Y. 103 ....Brynn Maris April ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 118 ....Amanda Allison Foo ....Manhasset, N.Y. 120 ....Ashley Yevdosin ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 121 ....Michelle N. Carnovale Massapequa, N.Y. 124 ....Danielle Mirabella ........Wantagh, N.Y. 128 ....Alexa Susan Goetz ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 129 ....Olivia Rose Scordo......Glen Head, N.Y. 134 ....Gillian Moser ..............Hewlett, N.Y. 136 ....Celeste Wang Traub ....Jericho, N.Y. 137 ....Rachel Weiss ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 141 ....Trinity Chow ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 145 ....Nicole Kyrkanides ......Stony Brook, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 4 ........Ola Mally......................Franklin Square, N.Y. 13 ......Paulina Tafler ..............Oceanside, N.Y. 21 ......Isabella Pascucci ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ......Mia M. Vecchio............Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 32 ......Madison Battaglia ......Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 34 ......Alexa Graham..............Garden City, N.Y. 36 ......Shanice Nadia Arthur ..Glen Head, N.Y. 38 ......Claudia M. Ruiz ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 39 ......Sunaina Vohra ............Glen Head, N.Y. 40 ......Cameron Moskol ........Wantagh, N.Y. 51 ......Karen A. Serina............Islip Terrace, N.Y. 54 ......Rachel Gastaldo..........Syosset, N.Y. 66 ......Morgan Hermann ........Garden City, N.Y. 68 ......Aimee N. Manfredo ....Shoreham, N.Y. 71 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 82 ......Madison Appel ............`Locust Valley, N.Y. 89 ......Bridget Harding ..........Northport, N.Y. 97 ......Lauren Livingston ........Sands Point, N.Y. 98 ......Olivia C. Funk ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 102 ....Elena Nastasi ..............Bayville, N.Y. 113 ....Brittany Burke..............Garden City, N.Y. 115 ....Nicole Koskovolis........Manhasset, N.Y. 117 ....Michele Sheila Lehat ..Great Neck, N.Y. 119 ....Esther Chikvashvili ......Syosset, N.Y. 123 ....Katharine Brandow......East Northport, N.Y. 138 ....Campbell Howe ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 144 ....Sarah Dionisio ............ Shirley, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 3 ........Katherine Yau ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 7 ........Hannah L. Camhi ........Woodbury, N.Y. 13 ......Nadia Smergut ............East Hampton, N.Y. 19 ......Vivian Cheng ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 20 ......Sophie R. Barnard ......Mill Neck, N.Y. 29 ......Julia Elbaba ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 31 ......Claudia Li ....................Jericho, N.Y. 35 ......Morgan C. Feldman ....Glen Head, N.Y. 44 ......Stephanie Loutsenko ..Bellmore, N.Y. 51........Samantha Rosca-Sipot..Malverne, N.Y. 57 ......Paulina Tafler ..............Oceanside, N.Y. 60 ......Sara Finger ..................St. James, N.Y. 63 ......Diana Vamvakitis ........Quogue, N.Y. 67 ......Alison Wang ................Great Neck, N.Y. 69 ......Ola Mally......................Franklin Square, N.Y. 75 ......Nicholle Torres ............North Hills, N.Y.

70

ISLAND

78 ......Sunaina Vohra ............Glen Head, N.Y. 82 ......Taylor A. Diffley............Hampton Bays, N.Y. 93 ......Bianca Posa ................Valley Stream, N.Y. 95 ......Rithika D. Reddy ........Syosset, N.Y. 96 ......Melissa Carlay ............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 101 ....Claudia M. Ruiz ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 102 ....Zenat Rashidzada ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 104 ....Erica Bundrick ............Mattituck, N.Y. 110 ....Ludmila Yamus............Melville, N.Y. 111 ....Aimee N. Manfredo ....Shoreham, N.Y. 112 ....Laura Torsiello ............Bayport, N.Y. 116 ....Jennifer Ferguson........Franklin Square, N.Y. 125 ....Lila Martz ....................Long Beach, N.Y. 127 ....Mary C. Harding ..........Northport, N.Y. 131 ....Emma R. Brezel ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 145 ....Yuliya V. Astapova ......Port Washington, N.Y. 150 ....Ruth Frelich ................Lawrence, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 6 ........Jacqueline Raynor ......Garden City, N.Y. 7 ........Theresa Smith ............Port Washington, N.Y. 11 ......Katherine Yau ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 13 ......Hannah L. Camhi ........Woodbury, N.Y. 15 ......Jennifer Kellner............Smithtown, N.Y. 17 ......Shelby Talcott..............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 33 ......Samantha L. Elgort......Melville, N.Y. 36 ......Jessica Podlofsky ......Port Washington, N.Y. 37 ......Stephanie Loutsenko ..Bellmore, N.Y. 38 ......Missy Edelblum ..........Roslyn, N.Y. 41 ......Julia Elbaba ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 43 ......Samantha Gann ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 66 ......Olivia Pascucci ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 70 ......Samantha Rosca-Sipot ..Malverne, N.Y. 72 ........Devlin-Ann Ammendola ..Massapequa, N.Y. 83 ......Carly Siegel ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 85 ......Melissa Carlay ............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 87 ......Jessica Nowak ............Huntington, N.Y. 95 ......Taylor A. Diffley............Hampton Bays, N.Y. 98 ......Paige J. Mintz..............Roslyn, N.Y. 99 ......Jamie Hann ................Westhampton, N.Y. 106 ....Ludmila Yamus............Melville, N.Y. 111 ....Brett A. Lieb ................Cutchogue, N.Y. 117 ....Ashley T. Harel ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 123 ....Jennifer Fridman ........Port Washington, N.Y. 128 ....Morgan Feldman ........Glen Head, N.Y. 129 ....Elan King ....................Baldwin, N.Y. 133 ....Nadia Smergut ............East Hampton, N.Y. 136 ....Sydney Simpson ........North Babylon, N.Y. 137 ....Alyssa D. Rosello ........Garden City, N.Y. 139 ....Sophie Barnard ..........Mill neck, N.Y. 143 ....Daria Schieferstein ......Sag Harbor, N.Y. 144 ....Claudia Li ....................Jericho, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 10/13/10)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 5 ........Brenden Andrew Volk..Dix Hills, N.Y. 129 ....Sean Patrick ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 157 ....Sean Mullins................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 230 ....Finbar Talcott ..............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 236 ....Colin Francis Sacco ....Brightwaters, N.Y. 260 ....Athell Patrick Bennett..Valley Stream, N.Y. 292 ....Ryan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y. 323 ....Jordan Bennett............Valley Stream, N.Y. 400 ....Chris Kuhnle................Shoreham, N.Y. 416 ....Keegan Morris ............Franklin Square, N.Y. 535 ....Christian Moyer Ardito ..Rockville Center, N.Y. 548 ....Alan Delman ................Great Neck, N.Y. 599 ....Ronald P.Hohmann......Oyster Bay, N.Y. 603 ....Vincent C. Caracappa Smithtown, N.Y. 650 ....Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ..Massapequa, N.Y.

RANKINGS

747 ....Rajan Jai Vohra............Glen Head, N.Y. 748 ....Logan Beckerman ......Muttontown, N.Y. 769 ....Alex Grossman ............Sands Point, N.Y. 780 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito ....Syosset, N.Y. 985 ....James Kyrkanides ......Stony Brook, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 10 ......Noah B. Rubin ............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 11 ......Lamar Remy ................Roslyn, N.Y. 43 ......Julian Alexi Zlobinsky..Greenvale, N.Y. 76 ......Dylan Hobbs Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 118 ....Brandon T. Stone ........Melville, N.Y. 146 ....Josh Silverstein ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 188 ....Alexander Lebedev ....Island Park, N.Y. 221 ....Zain Ali ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 295 ....Lubomir T. Cuba..........Massapequa Park, N.Y. 317 ....Brenden Andrew Volk..Dix Hills, N.Y. 325 ....Jonathan Paris ............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 420 ....Eric Wagner ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 456 ....Daniel Grunberger ......Great Neck, N.Y. 483 ....Jared Halstrom............Bellmore, N.Y. 733 ....Kyle Alper ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 787 ....Benjamin Rosen ..........Port Washington, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 23 ......Eric Rubin....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 26 ......Howie J. Weiss ............Great Neck, N.Y. 45 ......Andrew Yaraghi ..........Mill Neck, N.Y. 71 ......Josh M. Levine ............Syosset, N.Y. 88 ......Noah B. Rubin ............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 143 ....Samuel Lam ................Old Westbury, N.Y. 156 ....Aidan Talcott................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 165 ....Brendan Henry ............Massapequa, N.Y. 253 ....Vihar Shah ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 302 ....Kevin A. Katz ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 318 ....Ethan Bogard ..............Lido Beach, N.Y. 322 ....Ofir Solomon ..............Plainview, N.Y. 376 ....Alan S. Pleat ................Roslyn, N.Y. 438 ....Alexander Schidlovsky ..Sea Cliff, N.Y. 582 ....Conor A. Dauer............Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 776 ....Lamar Remy ................Roslyn, N.Y. 799 ....Brandon T. Stone ........Melville, N.Y. 807 ....Austin P. Davidow........Glen Head, N.Y. 813 ....Eric P. Bertuglia ..........Dix Hills, 928 ....Daniel R. Grinshteyn....Hewlett, N.Y. 977 ....Tyler J. Hoffman ..........Sayville, N.Y. 979 ....Douglas Notaris ..........Wantagh, N.Y. 984 ....Dylan Hobbs Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 173 ....Bert Vancura................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 204 ....Jensen Reiter ..............Syosset, N.Y. 213 ....Eric Ambrosio ..............Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 230 ....Shaun Bernstein..........Plainview, N.Y. 372 ....Howie J. Weiss ............Great Neck, N.Y. 374 ....Jonathan Defrancesch..Manhasset, N.Y. 443 ....Alex Tropiano ..............Laurel Hollow, N.Y. 538 ....Matthew O. Barry ........Lido Beach, N.Y. 543 ....Andrew S. Yaraghi ......Mill Neck, N.Y. 576 ....Oliver Loutsenko ........Bellmore, N.Y. 583 ....Zachary Morris ............Garden City, N.Y. 675 ....Josh M. Levine ............Syosset, N.Y. 698 ....Dennis Zlobinsky ........Greenvale, N.Y. 758 ....Alexander Friedlich......Great Neck, N.Y. 800 ....Eric Rubin....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 836 ....David Greenbaum ......Great Neck, N.Y. 842 ....Adam Gottleib ............Great Neck, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 28 ......Madison Battaglia ......Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 41 ......Morgan Herrmann ......Garden City, N.Y. 140 ....Taylor S. Cosme ..........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 159 ....Alexa Graham..............Garden City, N.Y. 249 ....Jeannie Lozowski ........Amityville, N.Y. 356 ....Esther Chikvashvili ......Syosset, N.Y. 377 ....Celeste Mautute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 401 ....Claire Handa................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 561 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi ....Glen Head, N.Y. 645 ....Courtney Kowalsky ....Oyster Bay, N.Y. 648 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili ..Syosset, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 154 ....Isabella Pascucci ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 189 ....Paulina Tafler ..............Oceanside, N.Y. 193 ....Ola Mally......................Franklin Square, N.Y. 319 ....Mia M. Vecchio............Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 334 ....Sunaina Vohra ............Glen Head, N.Y. 348 ....Madison Battaglia ......Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 534 ....Karen A. Serina............Islip Terrace, N.Y. 576 ....Claudia M. Ruiz ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 686 ....Cameron Leigh Moskol..Wantagh, N.Y. 900 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur ..Glen Head, N.Y. 968 ....Rachel Gastaldo..........Syosset, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 35 ......Hannah L. Camhi ........Woodbury, N.Y. 53 ......Julia Elbaba ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 66 ......Katherine Yau ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 119 ....Vivian Cheng ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 194 ....Nadia Smergut ............East Hampton, N.Y. 215 ....Sophie R. Barnard ......Mill Neck, N.Y. 405 ....Morgan C. Feldman ....Glen Head, N.Y. 624 ....Stephanie Loutsenko ..Bellmore, N.Y. 809 ....Taylor A. Diffley............Hampton Bays, N.Y. 840 ....Claudia Li ....................Jericho, N.Y. 856 ....Samantha Rosca-Sipot..Malverne, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank ..Name ..........................City 109 ....Julia Elbaba ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 120 ....Shelby Talcott..............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 134 ....Theresa Smith ............Port Washington, N.Y. 157 ....Jennifer Kellner............Smithtown, N.Y. 211 ....Katherine Yau ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 282 ....Jacqueline Raynor ......Garden City, N.Y. 418 ....Hannah L. Camhi ........Woodbury, N.Y. 507 ....Samantha L. Elgort......Melville, N.Y. 600 ....Olivia Pascucci ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 620 ....Stephanie Loutsenko ..Bellmore, N.Y. 696 ....Jessica Podlofsky ......Port Washington, N.Y. 842 ....Samantha B. Gann ......Massapequa, N.Y. 954 ....Missy Edelbaum..........Roslyn, N.Y. 964 ....Ashley T. Harel ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

Long Island Rankings Sponsored by


USTA/Long Island Region 2010

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. NOVEMBER 2010 Friday-Sunday, November 5-7 L3 Long Beach Eastern UPS Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (10-14)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, November 5-7 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Massapequa Championship Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG (14-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 31 at 8:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550. Friday-Sunday, November 5-7 LBTC Men’s/Women’s NTRP Challenger & Men’s Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: M (40, 50, 60, 70, 80)s; M (40, 50, 60, 70)d; NMW (3.0-4.0)sd Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for singles/$33 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Nov. 2 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, November 5-7 L3 Sportime Roslyn Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG (10-16)s, RR Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, November 5-7 & November 12-14 L2R Long Island Regional Westhampton Championship Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club 86 Depot Road • Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (12-16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060.

Friday-Sunday, November 12-14 L2O Long Beach Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: B (10-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 11:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, November 12-14 L1 Sportime Roslyn Championship Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: BG (12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, November 12-14 L2O Sportime Syosset Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate G (10-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, November 12-14 & November 19-21 L1 Sportime Kings Park Championship Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B (14)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for singles/$25.50 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, November 12-14 & November 19-21 L1 RWTTC Championship Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B (14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, November 12-14 & November 19-21 L1 Huntington Championship Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: G (14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Friday-Sunday, November 12-14 & Friday-Friday, November 19-26 L1 Sportime Bethpage Ron Smyth Memorial Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Wednesday-Sunday, November 24-28 L1B RWTTC Thanksgiving Classic Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger B (10-12, 18)s, SE; G (10-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Nov. 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, November 26-28 10U & 8U Sportime Syosset QuickStart Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start BG (8-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Saturday-Sunday, November 13-14 L3 Sportime Massapequa Eastern UPS Championship Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (10-18)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550.

Friday-Sunday, November 26-28 L2R Long Island Regional Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (10-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, November 19-21 L3 RWTT at Glenwood Landing Eastern UPS Championship Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 81 Round Hill Road • Roslyn Heights, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG (12-14)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, November 26-28 L20 Long Beach Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (16-18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 for per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, November 19-21 10U Roslyn QuickStart Championship Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start BG (10)s, RR Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $28 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, November 26-28 Huntington Championship Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: M(Op)s Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 19 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2010 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

71


USTA/Long Island Region 2010

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. DECEMBER 2010 Friday-Sunday, December 3-5 L3 Sportime Bethpage Eastern UPS Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (10-18)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, December 3-5 L3 Westhampton Eastern UPS Championship Westhampton Beach Tennis & Sport Club 86 Depot Road Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG (12-16)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 288-6060. Friday-Sunday, December 3-5 L2O LBTC Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (10-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 for per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Nov. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, December 3-5 & December 10-12 L1 RWTTC Championship Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 81 Round Hill Road Roslyn Heights, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, December 3-5 & December 10-12 L1 Sportime Syosset Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Championships G (18)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

72

Friday-Sunday, December 3-5 & December 10-12 L1 Huntington Championship Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Championships G (14)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player for singles/$28 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Friday-Sunday, December 3-5 & December 10-12 L1 Sportime Roslyn Championship Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Championships B (18)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Nov. 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, December 10-12 L2R Sportime Bethpage Championship Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate G (12-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, December 10-12 L2O LBTC Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (16-18)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $45 per player for singles/$25 per player for doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 26 at 11:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, December 10-12 L3 RWTT @ Glenwood Landing Championship Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 81 Round Hill Road Roslyn Heights, N.Y. Divisions: Novice BG 12-14)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, December 10-12 L1B Sportime Massapequa Winter Challenger Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger B (12-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550.

Friday-Sunday, December 17-19 & Sunday-Monday, December 26-27 L1B World Gym Setauket Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (16-18)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 751-6100.

Friday-Sunday, December 10-12 & December 17-19 L1 Sportime Kings Park Championship Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (10)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 269-6300.

Saturday-Thursday, December 25-30 L2O Point Set Holiday Championship Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate BG (10-18)sd Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Dec. 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323.

Saturday, December 11 10U & 8U QuickStart Sportime Roslyn Championship Sportime Roslyn Landing Road, P.O. Box 1 • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start BG (8-10)s, RR Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Nov. 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222. Friday, December 17 10U & 8U Sportime Syosset QuickStart Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start BG (8-10)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $40 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Dec. 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, December 17-19 & Friday-Wednesday, December 24-29 L1B Sportime Bethpage Challenger Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (10-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2010 • LITennisMag.com

Sunday-Friday, December 26-31 L1 Sportime Massapequa Championship Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Championships BG (12, 16)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Dec. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550. Monday-Thursday, December 27-30 L1 Sportime Syosset Championship Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger BG (14, 18)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $45 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Dec. 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.


• Tennis courts • Basketball courts • Volleyball courts • Batting Cages • Paddle Tennis, Pickle Ball & Badminton courts • Roller / Deck Hockey • Putting Greens • Garage Flooring • Court Renovations & Maintenance We’ll build the ultimate “play station” for your family and friends right in your own back yard!! Our Courts, Cages and Greens are built to last, featuring the latest technology in Suspended Modular Surfaces and the highest grades of Steels, Netting, Synthetic Turf, Court Accessories and Hardware.


TH E LUX URY I NCLUDEDÂŽ VACATION

Choose from 14 Caribbean resorts voted Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best where every amenity and adventure is thoughtfully included for the two of you. Enjoy activities including tennis, racquetball, beach volleyball, basketball, unlimited golf, and diving V

with the Caribbeanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most trusted and comprehensive scuba program.* Discover renewal at a Red LaneÂŽ Spa ; Q

and experience accommodations more luxurious than any dream, many with private plunge pools and personal butlers. Savor global dining that takes you from the Far East to the West Indies and accompanied by BeringerÂŽ wines. All this and more makes Sandals â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Luxury IncludedÂŽ Vacation,â&#x20AC;? because we always give more than anyone ever dreamed of.

J A M A IC A â&#x20AC;˘ A N T IG U A â&#x20AC;˘ S T. L U C I A â&#x20AC;˘ B A H A M A S V Amenities vary by resort. Green fees included at Sandals Resorts in Jamaica and St. Lucia.

*Resort dive certiďŹ cation course available for a nominal fee. Q Spa treatments additional.

/,%(57<

Long Island Tennis Magazine - November/December 2010  

COVER: The 2010 U.S. Open: A Look Back at Two Memorable Weeks of Tennis in the Big Apple A collection of articles, photos and highlights rec...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you