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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


Your Spring Cleaning Approach to Tennis This Season By Luke Jensen or many players in the north, our tennis is just starting to come out of our indoor hibernation to dealing with all of Mother Nature’s elements outside. This is one of the most frustrating aspects of the game. Indoor tennis is easy compared to the chaos of dealing with lobbing with your overhead in the sun. I would like to focus first on making sure your gear is up to speed. I’m a huge believer in a new restringing at least four times a year. A general rule is to take the number of days a week you play, and restring that number per year. If you play three times a week, string your frames three times a year. Juniors and massive hitters may break strings more than that and will have to adjust accordingly. Investing in new sneakers is always wise. Just because the shoe does not have a hole yet, the inner support system of your shoe may have broken down and can be causing foot problems. Just be aware of any discomfort when you are playing. Rewrap your grip with a new overwrap for a better grip on your frame. These are cheap and can make your golden boy favorite frames feel new all over again. Finally, go to a local pro shop and demo out some new frames. I have my players play test new strings and frames all the time. New approaches to the game with new technologies are always evolving, and you never know when something new can make your game feel even better. A simple rule in trying new frames is to make sure the racquet fits your best shot. If a demo feels good

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in some areas of your game and not others, do not buy it. A frame is an extension of your body. It should enhance your best weapon and clean up your weakest shots. If you feel that in the play test phase then you have found a winner! Now that you are all geared up for summer, make sure you set a simple goal for your game. I like to add a new shot every season to my player’s game. That would be four per year. This takes time, so I give my players a chance to try it in practice before using it in matches. A simple approach to this is to use a drop shot at least once a game to see if it works. Another is to lob high to your opponent’s backhand to see how they deal with it. It can go beyond tactical to technical. Let’s try getting out of the frying pan grip serve to hitting a real continental grip serve that will give you more options for various spin serves. Your approach is key. Success is making

our game more complete. There is no such thing as a perfect tennis player, but if we strive for it, we are sure to achieve excellence! Keep going for winners … it is the American way! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen is head coach of the Syracuse University Women’s Tennis Team. Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lbjensen@syr.edu.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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May/June 2013 Volume 5, Number 3 Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover story 22

Staff

Is this the year David Ferrer cracks the top three? We take a look at Ferrer’s chances, along with the rest of the men’s and women’s fields as the second Grand Slam of the year is played on the clay courts of Roland Garros.

David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director

Stars to Shine Over Paris: 2013 French Open Preview

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2012 • LITennisMag.com

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Feature Stories 8

The First Annual New York Tennis Expo

Jon Blake Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • jonb@usptennis.com

28 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s 2013 Apparel Guide

Adam Wolfthal Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 • adam@usptennis.com

64 USTA Eastern Long Island Region 23rd Annual Awards Dinner Program

Daisy Schwartz Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • daisy@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Marketing Coordinator Beverly Koondel Office Administrator (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Brent Shearer Editorial Contributor Michael Cervantes Editorial Contributor

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2013 United Sports Publications Ltd. 2

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A closer look at the area’s top tennis equipment and apparel providers.

Celebrate the accomplishments of the local tennis community over the past year at this annual event.

Additional Features 3 4 6 15 16 26 32 36 38 42 43 44 46 50 63

What Parents Should Know About Player Development By Tom Clear Long Islanders Making Waves in the Collegiate Ranks By Emilie Katz New Tennis Facility Set to Open in Roslyn in September High School Coaches Take Part in Bethpage Park Tennis Center Workshop By Gary Simeone Wow … What a Great Split-Step By Tim Mayotte OMG … I’m Nervous! By Rob Polishook Get the Most Out of Your Lesson By Miguel Cervantes III Advanced Match Play Strategies From a Calm Mind By Tonny van de Pieterman Unseeded Gage Brymer Wins Boys 46th Annual Easter Bowl Why People Should Watch College Tennis By Eric Rebhuhn Coming From Behind or Holding Onto a Lead … Which is Easier? By Tina Greenbaum 2013 French Open Apparel By Emilie Katz Charitable Initiatives: Sol Schwartz of Holabird Sports Reaches Out to Sandy Victims The Serve: Immediate Results With Tips and Zone Practice By Lisa Dodson Keeping It Plain By Richard Thater

Columns 1 12 18 20 30 34 35 54 57 76 79

The Jensen Zone By Luke Jensen College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters By Ricky Becker Tennis Travel Destination: TennisMom/SailingDad Strength or Power for Peak Tennis Performance? By Steven Kaplan Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Literary Corner: The Making of a Winner by David E. Moe By Brent Shearer The Biofile: Christina McHale By Scoop Malinowski Dr. Tom on Scholarship Money By Dr. Tom Ferraro Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller Long Island Rankings USTA/Long Island Region 2013 Tournament Schedule


What Parents Should Know About Player Development By Tom Clear hat is development? A buzzword? A marketing tool? The USTA Player Development’s mission is “to develop world-class American players through a clearly-defined training structure and competitive pathway as well as through the implementation of a comprehensive coaching philosophy and structure.” In my opinion, development is gradual growth where a student progresses from dependence to independence. I feel some coaches and parents are obsessed with a quick fix, a “win by Friday approach,” rather than development. They want a short cut. They want all “problems” solved without the growing pains, but true growth/development is gradual. It takes years to develop tennis players. My teaching style focuses on four components of development: Physical, Techni-

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cal, Tactical and Mental. I will add meaning to the four components. l Physically: The tennis player must PERFORM physically. They must perform a physical task like a sprint or an endurance run. l Technically: I am asking my student to EXECUTE or hit the ball technically correct. l Tactically (Strategy/Game Plan): I am asking my student to apply or implement tactics that will lead to success. An example … hit your backhand down the line to your opponent’s weak forehand. l Mentally: My students must ACHIEVE mentally. Achieving things mentally brings all the components together. As many people say, “You are only as strong as you are mentally strong.” All components of development are needed for success. In a perfect world, the components would be in a specific order (Physical, Technical, Tactical and Mental) and the student will be proficient in all four areas. But we all know this is not a perfect world. As a coach, I must understand that there is no perfect player. All players have limitations.

My student can only execute technically that which they can perform physically. My student can only apply tactically that which they can execute technically. However, the most successful players compensate for their limitations. A student may be limited technically, but extremely proficient tactically, and as a coach, I must recognize that and build from that standpoint. I will work on improving my students’ limitations, but understand I have to help compensate for that limitation. There are many other variables in a student’s growth including parents, facility, environment and medical care. As you can see, development is a long process with many fluctuating forces. Tom Clear is a director of tennis for Gotham Tennis Academy at Stadium Tennis Center. Tom brings more than 25 years of industry experience as a coach and director. Most recently, Tom served as a coach at the USTA Player Development Training Center East, working with some of America’s most talented players. He is a member of the USTA Eastern Section Coaches Commission and was a head coach for the Eastern Section 12s National Zonals Team. Tom has served as a head coach at USTA/Eastern High Performance Camps and at USTA National Talent ID Camps. Tom can be reached by e-mailing tom@gothamtennis.com or by calling Stadium Tennis Center at (718) 665-4684.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Islanders Making Waves in the Collegiate Ranks By Emilie Katz

ach year, Long Island junior tennis players graduate from high school and head off to college to take their academics and tennis play to the next level. College tennis takes a huge commitment and a great work ethic if success is going to be achieved. Hopefully, their success can lead to more juniors following in their footsteps on the road to college scholarships and college level tennis.

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Virginia women’s tennis freshman Julia Elbaba from Oyster Bay, N.Y. reached the singles final of the ITA All-American Championships this past fall. She is the first player in UVA history to accomplish this. Not only did she make the finals of the main draw, but she had to battle her way through pre-qualifying and qualifying rounds to get there. Elbaba won 10 matches at the event to reach the final, winning three in pre-qualifying, three in qualifying and four in the main draw. She lost just two sets in those 10 wins, three of which came against 2012 All-Americans. Julia came up short in her bid to win the first major championship in school history, falling to the third-seeded Lauren Embree of Florida 2-6, 6-3, 6-4 in the final. This spring, Julia has continued her success at 17th-ranked University of Virginia. She has twice been named the Atlantic Coast Conference Women’s tennis player of the week. She also led her team to a huge victory over the number one NCAA Division I ranked team of The University of North Carolina with wins in both singles and doubles. Elbaba is currently ranked 11th in the nation in Division I singles. Freshman Hannah Camhi of Syosset, N.Y. led Brown against number nine Miami, earning a three-set win at number two singles, where she upset number 73 Kelsey Laurente, 2-6, 6-0, 6-2. In Brown’s win over Florida International, Camhi won both of her matches, combining with sen-

ior Misia Krasowski of Deerfield, Ill. for an 8-3 win at number one doubles and then earning another three-set win at number two singles, 6-7 (3-7), 6-3, 10-8. Overall, Camhi currently leads the Bears with a 19-5 singles record and a 17-8 mark in doubles competition. Georgetown University men’s tennis team won its eighth consecutive match this spring, defeating Fairfield, 6-1, at the McDonough Outdoor Tennis Complex. The Hoyas have not lost a home men’s tennis match yet this season, amassing an 8-0 mark in D.C. Three Long Islanders have helped Georgetown achieve this accomplishments. Sophomore Daniel Khanin of Baldwin, N.Y., sophomore Alex Tropiano of Laurel Hollow/Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. and freshmen Kevin Katz of Woodbury, N.Y. have been huge contributors to Georgetown’s success. Nichols College graduate student David Drucker of Bellmore, N.Y. won his 55th career singles match to become the

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program’s all-time wins leader. Drucker defeated Taylor Webster of Roger Williams 2-6, 7-6(7-3), 6-3 at number three singles. Ninth-ranked Duke University men’s tennis team concluded its 2013 regular season road schedule with a 5-2 win over Georgia Tech. The Blue Devils improve to 18-4 on the season and 6-1 in Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Playing in the first ACC match of his Duke career, freshman Josh Levine of Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. downed Colin Edwards, 6-3, 6-2, to put the Blue Devils within one point of the win. Levine now owns a 7-0 record in the dual season. Senior Daniel Kreyman of Long Beach, N.Y. and freshman Brandon Henry of Massapequa, N.Y. have both contributed to Wake Forest’s ranking of 26th in the NCAA Division I rankings. The Demon Deacons (16-6 and 5-2 in the ACC) hold sole possession of fourth place in the ACC with three conference matches remaining on the schedule.

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2013

This edition will feature:

Distribution scheduled for 06/11/13

• Guide to the Top LI Sports Medicine Practices • New York Tennis Expo Recap • A look ahead to the 2013 U.S. Open • Wimbledon Preview • 2013 Boys High School Junior Recap

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New Tennis Facility Set to Open in Roslyn in September Christopher Morley Tennis to bring top local professionals together in a new “player-centric” facility hristopher Morley Tennis LLC is bringing a new generation of tennis instruction to the area with the opening of its tennis facility in Nassau County in September. The new facility, which will be located on the grounds of Christopher Morley Park at 500 Searingtown Road in Roslyn, N.Y., will include five hard courts and five HarTru clay courts, and will be available for year-round play. Christopher Morley Tennis will create an environment that focuses on the needs of the individual—those just beginning in the sport or experienced, competitive players. “We will be offering programs that create a pathway for development for any tennis player that focus on his or her specific goals by providing the highest quality of instruction and individualized attention,” said Jason Wass, Christopher Morley Tennis general manager. Wass said this brand-new facility, which also includes a customized clubhouse with locker rooms, upscale pro shop and stringing center, will “provide all players in the surrounding communities with a place to learn and grow their tennis games.” Men’s and women’s leagues; private and group lessons, from introductory to advanced instruction; specialized adult programs for

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seniors; 10 & Under Tennis offerings; court rental opportunities; and summer camps will be available. “The junior program lineup will be firstrate and will focus on developing skills, sportsmanship and on-court strategies in both private and group settings,” said Wass. Wass has teamed with Cory Parr to manage the facility and provide instruction. During his years at Jericho High School, Parr was the top-ranked ETA 18-and-Under for two straight years and was awarded the coveted Sportsmanship Award at the U.S. Hard Court Championships in Kalamazoo, Mich. Parr was also a three-time New York State High School Champion (two-time singles champ and one-time doubles champ). During his time at Wake Forest University, he was a three-time NCAA All-American

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

and went on to compete on the ATP Tour. Wass is an industry veteran who brings 10-plus years of tennis and management experience to Christopher Morley Tennis. Wass was honored as 2010 USTA Tennis Professional of the Year, is a graduate of the USTA High Performance Coaching program and is an expert on 10 & Under Tennis instruction. “We are excited about the opportunity we have here to execute an amazing program in a great state-of-the-art facility,” Wass said. Christopher Morley Tennis programs will be available for children as young as two years old and adults of all ages. For more information, call (516) 214-1900, email info@cmttennis.com or visit www.cmttennis.com.


LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Sunday, April 28, 2013 10:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Brought to You by New York Tennis Magazine and Long Island Tennis Magazine

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY

Nick Bollettieri, Sean Hannity and Tim Mayotte to Headline First Annual New York Tennis Expo Speaker Sessions ong Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine have assembled an incredible slate of speakers for the First Annual New York Tennis Expo, set for Sunday, April 28 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Both Speaker Sessions will be headlined by world renowned Coach Nick Bollettieri and will feature former world top 10 player Tim Mayotte. Serving as emcee and moderator for both Sessions will be news anchor and political commentator Sean Hannity. Space will be limited for these Sessions and bracelets will be given out for those looking to attend the panels on a firstcome, first-serve basis on the day of the Expo. Attendees will be able to sign up and get their bracelets at the registration table. Please arrive early at the event to secure your spot for the Speaker Sessions as space will be sure to fill up quickly. Doors will open and the Expo begins at 10:30 a.m.

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Schedule of Events Sunday, April 28, 2013 (Program is subject to change)

11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Speaker Session #1: The Road to College Scholarships l Headline Speaker: Nick Bollettieri l Featured Speaker: Tim Mayotte l Emcee: Sean Hannity l Panel Speakers: Howie Arons, Clay Bibbee, Whitney Kraft, Jay Harris & Cory Parr

1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. Speaker Session #2: Taking Your Game to the Next Level l Headline Speaker: Nick Bollettieri l Featured Speaker: Tim Mayotte l Panel Speakers: Steve Kaplan, Lawrence Kleger, Tom Clear, Tina Greenbaum & Dr. Tom Ferraro

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


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Speaker Bios Nick Bollettieri Nick Bollettieri is one of the most influential people in the world of tennis, and a legend who has transcended the sport. In 1978, he founded the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy, now known as the IMG Academy Bollettieri Tennis program, in Bradenton, Fla. IMG Academy was the first full-time tennis boarding school to combine intense training on the court with a customdesigned academic curriculum. What was once a program of primarily on-court training, has evolved into a multi-faceted approach which includes blending technical and strategic on-court training with specialized performance physical training and mental conditioning. The Bollettieri approach is designed not only to build athletes on the court, but more importantly, prepare them for a successful life off the court as well. It was this proven method that Nick used to coach 10 number one players in the world, including Andre Agassi, Boris Becker, Jim Courier, Martina Hingis, Jelena Jankovic, Marcelo Rios, Monica Seles, Maria Sharapova, and Venus and Serena Williams, as well as a multitude of other world-class players, including Tommy Haas, Anna Kournikova, Jimmy Arias and Nicole Vaidisova, to name a few. IMG Academy quickly became synonymous with tennis excellence, and its coaches and students continue to reflect Nick’s passion for excellence and the game. Tim Mayotte Tim Mayotte was one of the nation’s best tennis players during the 1980s. Twice during the 1980s, he finished the year ranked in the world’s top 10. Over the course of his career, he has recorded wins over the greatest players of his era, including Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi, 10

Jimmy Connors, John McEnroe, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and others. Besides reaching the semifinals of Wimbledon and the Australian Open, he also won a Silver Medal in the Olympics and represented his nation in Davis Cup action. For the last decade, Tim has shifted his focus to developing top American players and is currently running 360 Tennis at the Cunningham Tennis Center with his partners, Lee Hurst and Carl Thorsen. Sean Hannity Sean Hannity joined Fox News Channel (FNC) in September 1996. He currently hosts his selftitled program, “Hannity” (Monday-Friday, 9:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. ET). He is one of the most prominent and influential conservative voices in the country and his program offers a mix of news, commentary, interviews and branded segments, such as the Great American Panel—made up of three nightly in-studio guests from across the political spectrum to discuss the issues of the day. Known for his provocative style freewheeling, passionate commentary on politics and the American agenda, Hannity has become one of the most popular radio personalities nationwide as the host of ABC Radio Networks’ “The Sean Hannity Show,” syndicated to more than 500 stations and heard in all of the top 50 markets with a loyal listener base of 13.5 million. Howie Arons For the past 37 years, Howie Arons has been one of the most successful coaches in the USTA Eastern Section. His programs have produced more than 75 Division I college players and hundreds of high school players. At Cardozo High School, where he has been the head coach for 37 years, his teams have won 18 PSAL Cham-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

pionships and 12 Mayor Cup Championships. Arons has the most wins of any high school tennis coach in New York State with 582. In 1989, he was recognized as ETA Coach of the Year, and in 2007, he was named Coach of the Year by the USPTA. Currently, Arons is the managing partner and tennis director of the New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates. In addition, he runs The NY Tennis Academy Summer Tennis Day Camp at Shelter Rock Tennis and Country Club. Clay Bibbee Clay Bibbee is managing partner and senior director of player development and founder of The Academy at Centercourt, overseeing the development of more than 700 junior players. The Academy offers all facets of junior development, starting from a complete 10 & Under Tennis program and continuing upward to the development of high performance, nationally-ranked caliber players. Clay, along with his staff of trained tennis professionals, oversees the progress of elite junior players and the general Academy groups. Clay believes in building strong athletes on the courts, and coaching them for a successful life off the courts as well. He is responsible for the development of Centercourt Athletic Club in Chatham, N.J. Tom Clear Tom Clear is a director of tennis for Gotham Tennis Academy at Stadium Tennis Center. Tom brings more than 25 years of industry experience as a coach and director. Most recently, Tom served as a coach at the USTA Player Development Training Center East, working with some of America’s most talented players. He is a member of the USTA Eastern Section Coaches Commission and was a head coach


Speaker Bios for the Eastern Section 12s National Zonals Team. Tom has served as a head coach at USTA/Eastern High Performance Camps and at USTA National Talent ID Camps. Dr. Tom Ferraro Sports Psychiatrist Dr. Tom Ferraro has worked with major insurance companies and brokerage houses in how to set goals, maintain confidence and stay focused in order to achieve success. Dr. Ferraro has a degree in economics from a leading business school, a Ph.D. in applied psychology and a post-graduate degree in psychoanalysis. He has integrated his training in these three areas with his experience working with the nation’s leading athletes to bring to the business community this rare combination. Tina Greenbaum, LCSW Tina Greenbaum has been a practicing holistic psychotherapist for more than 30 years. Her interest in mind/body health and sports psychology merged when her children were engaged in the highly competitive sports arena. Since then, she has worked with athletes, actors, speakers, business executives and others who wish to improve their performance under pressure. Jay Harris Jay Harris is currently a regional manager and director of college consulting for Sportime. Jay was the head men’s coach at Brown University for eight years prior to moving to New York. He left Brown in 2010 as the most successful coach in the 100-plus year history of that program, having led the team to its highest national ranking ever (#33), two straight Ivy League Titles, and seven consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances. In

2005, Harris was named the Northeast Region Coach of the Year and was a finalist for the National Coach of the Year Award. He coached five singles players and 15 different doubles teams to the national rankings, including one All-American team. One of his players recently advanced to his second consecutive Wimbledon Quarterfinals appearance, having been ranked in the top 50 on the ATP Tour. Steven Kaplan Steven Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 35 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 14 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarships. Lawrence Kleger A native New Yorker, Lawrence Kleger is director of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy, and is recognized as one of the top developmental coaches in the U.S. He is a past recipient of the Tennis Professional of the Year Award in the USTA/Eastern Section/Long Island Region. Lawrence is also the personal coach of Noah Rubin, who trains at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy and who has been Lawrence’s student since the age of seven. Noah is a highly-ranked American tennis prospect and reached a career-best number six ITF junior world ranking at the age of 16. He has won two Level 1 ITF singles titles and reached the quarterfinals of the 2012 Junior French Open. Lawrence’s students have won countless national and regional championships and 18 USTA Eastern Year-End Sportsmanship Awards.

Whitney Kraft Since 2007, Whitney Kraft has been the director of tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. and director of player operations for the U.S. Open. Previously, he was director of tennis for the City of Fort Lauderdale Park & Recreation Department (1998-2007). He was a 1983 Singles All-American for Florida Atlantic University, and inducted into their inaugural Athletic Hall of Fame class in 2006. Whitney has been the tournament director for many prestigious events, including the National Public Parks Tennis Championships (2007), ITF World Championships (2002), the inaugural U.S. Open National Sectional Playoffs (2010), USTA Boys 14 National Clay Court Championships (2000-2007) and the USTA National Open Clay Court, and Indoor Championships (1998-present). Cory Parr Cory Parr is a coach with vast playing experience and knowledge from being an All-American at Wake Forest University and an ATP Tour Professional. Cory’s tennis playing career accomplishments include: being named a three-time All-American at Wake Forest University where he led Wake Forest in both career singles and doubles wins; ranking as high as ninth in college tennis singles rankings and first nationally in doubles; winner of the ITA National Doubles Championship in 2008; ranking as high as 272th worldwide in ATP doubles and 787th in singles; named to the All-Atlantic Coast Conference three times; and named ITA Mideast Regional Player of the Year in 2009. Similar to his success as a player, Cory believes in maximizing his player’s abilities through tactics and mental toughness.

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MYTHBUSTERS:

Dick Gould—A Living Legend’s Take on College Tennis By Ricky Becker imply put … Dick Gould is college tennis and a living legend. He was the Stanford men’s tennis head coach for 38-years before becoming the John L. Hinds Director of Tennis at Stanford for the last nine years. Coach Gould’s career credentials are legendary. His teams won 17 NCAA team championships and he was the college coach of 50 All-Americans, 16 Davis Cup team members, 13 different Grand Slam Champions and eight Olympians. He was the ITA/Wilson Coach of the Decade for both the 1980s and 1990s. He was also my tennis coach in col-

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lege and helped me develop as a tennis player, coach and human-being. Many times, situations in tennis arise now where I ask myself, “What would Coach do in this situation?” I cannot remember a time that the answer wasn’t correct. He is all class. No matter how difficult an opposing player or coach was personality-wise, he was always complementary and respectful towards them or the media. He wouldn’t let anyone change these traits in him. I find myself trying very hard to emulate, but not yet able to completely duplicate him in this regard. Dick is definitely qualified to give his views on the overall college tennis landscape and provide advice to aspiring col-

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lege players. We are lucky to hear what he has to say … What do you love about college tennis? Gould: I love the age group that college coaches work with … the players know it all, yet Dick Gould know so little! The fact that college players are just about at the peak of their physical growth and thus are no longer held back by what they can do relative to size and strength! I also enjoy the thrill of the battle—the pre-match expectations, the momentum sways back and forth in each match, the fact that one can “coach” point-by-point

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since si nce 1980


in a match and can thus REALLY help a player tactically, technically and mentally. A coach in a college match can have a big impact on the outcome of a match, other things being nearly equal. What are the major changes you have seen in college tennis over the last 40-years? Gould: Technically, there are many more western forehand grips, as well as open stance forehands (and backhands). Since the western grip offers so much more topspin opportunities, one may stay back and pound the ball! Tactically, there has been the demise of serve-andvolley, as well as, serve return and get in … smash-mouth tennis! There is now an overall decreased confidence in being able to finish points at the net. What if any future challenges are ahead for college tennis? Gould: There are so many challenges starting with the fact that so many programs are continuing to be dropped. The biggest single challenge any coach faces

is to be able to fund-raise for the long term to secure the place of his sport—especially amongst the men’s programs! There MUST be a way to equalize the number of scholarships for men and women. Title IX MUST be interpreted as “equal opportunity for each gender within that sport.” (Note: As Title IX currently exists, every college’s athletic program, not sport, must equalize the number of scholarships for men and women. Because so many scholarships are given for football, other sports have an unequal amount of scholarships for men and women to make up the difference.) I am not sure how to handle this, but there are so many foreign players in college tennis. However, I do think we should stop complaining about it and make our American players better! I also think our collegiate schedule is too full—there are too many events now! I don’t believe in succumbing to the pressure of four- to five-hour dual matches by shortening matches too much though! (Note: A proposal for Division I was made last year and since rescinded that would have made dou-

The Academy at Centercourt Athletic Club is the Northeast’s premiere High Performance Tennis Academy. As a USTA Certified Regional Training Center, we embrace our role as a member of the USTA coaching team and the mission to develop top student athletes. We offer a junior player pathway that can satisfy the high performance needs of nationally ranked juniors. The Academy offers an afterschool program, high performance summer programs, full-time homeschooling program and an Academy travel team.

bles matches one six-game set, as well as super tie-breakers for the third set of singles. Shortened changeovers and a shortened break between doubles and singles have been implemented changes. So has the elimination of the warm-up between opponents before singles and doubles.) What advice do you have for junior players who are looking ahead to college tennis? Gould: Keep as many options open as possible—start by taking challenging courses in high school/online and study hard! Be realistic in investigating schools where you can realistically contribute! Don’t get hung up on D-I, D-II or D-III there are great schools, coaches and programs at all levels! I still preach to develop an attacking game—even in the era of big groundies. Look to get in and finish the point at net—in other words, stay ready for opportunities by playing up near the baseline and have confidence to pressure by continued on page 14

The Centercourt Academy Summer Tennis Camp Why choose the Centercourt Tennis Academy:

! Train in a world class environment with high performance level coaching ! Achieve significant individual improvement in all facets of your game; technically, physically, and mentally ! We are dedicated to meeting the individual needs of each and every one of our students ! Our Academy players are among some of the top section, national, and ITF ranked players from around the world ! We put the needs of the player first, in a developmentfocused model of training ! Each camp will be tailored to the skill level and goals of all players; featuring small group training, match play, individualized fitness plans, mental coaching and video analysis ! Tournament coaching and travel ! Players who commit to our training will see themselves develop life skills that will enable them to become champions on and off the court

The Centercourt Academy Summer Tennis Camp offers three distinct levels: Academy I, Academy II, and Centercourt Advantage. The Camp also features an Overnight Camp option for those interested in the complete summer camp experience. For more information, contact Clay Bibbee at clay@centercourtclub.com. LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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attacking at all realistic times, even with an occasional serve and volley! Learn doubles, an important part of college tennis, and in doing so, respect the value of a lob. Along with under-spin from the backcourt, it is the most underused shot in tennis! Do you have coaching advice for junior players and college players in general? Gould: First ‌ work VERY hard on net play skills and confidence at the net so that you have a means behind your big serve or forehand to finish the point! Second, as I mentioned before, remember the value of a defensive lob, especially in doubles. Third, work hard to develop a great down-the-line backhand to answer the inside-out forehand! Fourth, love the game—you are not playing for your parents; you are playing to enjoy the competitive experience—in meeting the challenge of getting a little better in some phase of your game every day! In college, the “teamâ€? experience can be a great one, if structured correctly—embrace it! Finally, have fun and don’t take yourself too seriously. Have you found anything that college freshman aren’t prepared for when they arrive to college? Gould: First, remember that you are in college to “learnâ€? in the classroom and from association with you fellow students! You are NOT in college just to become a better tennis player! It is difficult to balance studies and social life with you tennis, just as it will be to later “succeedâ€? as a parent, a spouse and in your job ‌ you must accept and embrace this challenge! Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, director of Tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and high-performance manager at Glen Head Racquet Club. Ricky was named the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and was a top-five nationallyranked junior. He can be reached by email at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com. 14

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High School Coaches Take Part in Bethpage Park Tennis Center Workshop BY GARY SIMEONE ethpage State Park Tennis Directors Steve Kaplan and Keith Kambourian recently held their Fourth Annual Coaches Workshop at the Bethpage Park Tennis Center. The event, which ran from 5:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m. helped high school coaches with training tips, performance drills and insights in to how to improve their player’s overall tennis games as the 2013 boys season is underway on Long Island. “The idea behind the workshop is to try and build a bridge between coaches and training pros to open the lines of communication,” said Kambourian. “We provide some insight into the game and they can ask us any questions or express con-

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cerns that they may have.” Kambourian spent the session explaining some of the more misunderstood rules associated with a tennis match. He focused on controversial aspects of match play, including lets, foot faults, injury timeouts and allotted times on changeovers. “Many coaches and players don’t understand some of the rules that have been instituted by the ITF, (International Tennis Federation),” said Kambourian. “They are important to know especially during a competitive match where every point counts.” Kaplan demonstrated a number of drills for coaches, including ball toss

workouts and proper grip techniques to use when serving. “There are a number of high school players who do not use the continental grip when they serve, and this reduces the speed and topspin on the ball,” said Kaplan. “It is important for coaches to work with them on this aspect of their game.” Kaplan and Kambourian both agreed that the workshop help gives coaches and players someone to talk to in the tennis world and expect to continue putting on these events in the future. Gary Simeone is writing intern/public relations associate for Long Island Tennis Magazine.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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WOW ‌

What a Great Split-Step By Tim Mayotte had a problem with one of my students that drove me loco. An otherwise quick 12-year-old boy was confusingly slow on the court. One of the fastest sprinters in our program, he was slow and disorganized with in his movements. I was stumped until a friend of mine hinted I should look at his split-step.

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The most undervalued skill a great player has mastered is the split-step. Have you ever heard an announcer on TV or coach, or a player say, “Wow, what a great split-step?� The lack of a good split plagues the rest of the playing universe. Just watch hackers. At our public courts, I have seen a few decent forehands, a lot of good drop shots and lobs (as well as guys playing in old business suits and

raccoon skin caps), but good splits are nowhere to be found. Look at your club. Nothing but dead feet as their opponent hits the ball. Now watch the pros. Besides not seeing many fur caps, you will likely see everyone splitting (with varying degrees of excellence of course). In my mind, it is quite simply the most overlooked aspect of the game by coaches. This deceptive and complicated skill demands more attention. Why is it so important? Simply put, a great split-step enables the potential for an explosive, quick and balanced first step to the ball. How can you get your pro to say “great split,� or what should teaching pros look for? 1. A wide base with good posture: The base should be just wider than the hips

when landing with slightly bent knees and the core centered directly above the hips. Venus Williams has extraordinary width, particularly on the return of serve. Christina McHale often bends excessively at the waist, thus inhibiting efficient movement, particularly to her forehand side. The width and bend of the knees is wider when at net. Watch old films of Stefan Edberg ‌ he was the best! 2. Timing: Every teaching pro and player worth their weight in salt knows the splitstep should occur when their opponent makes contact. By making a small jump at the time of contact, a player’s weight is neutralized, and therefore, they can decide which way to go when he or she lands. The timing changes dramatically when you or your opponent comes to the net. Watch intermediate players try to drill with one person at net. Everyone appears

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


“Simply put, a great split-step enables the potential for an explosive, quick and balanced first step to the ball.”

the air way too long. Ironically, Michael Jordan, who I played earlier that day, did no split at all!

slower. It’s usually because the timing of the split-step is off. If the rhythm of a split when both players are back is a waltz then when one player comes forward, it’s a fast rock song. Pete Sampras was the best guy I ever played at adjusting his timing. This often meant that he split very far back in no man’s land when he served and volleyed, but was closer than most when he made contact. 3. Pay attention to the height and stay on your toes as much as possible: The split gets the player’s weight going with the small jump. This movement makes the first step much easier. Think of how it’s much easier to move something heavy (I am speaking of me here!) once you get it moving even just a bit. The higher the jump, the more energy you produce that can help the first step. Obviously though, the height needs to be limited so that you do not lose time hanging in the air. I once played tennis with former NBA star and legendary leaper Spud Webb, who, at 5’ 5”, could touch the top of the backboard. He hung in

Stay on those toes! That player I mentioned at the top of the article was slow because when he split, he first landed on his toes and then sunk back on his heels before moving. That loss of a split (no pun intended) second was enough to make him snail-like. Always check to see if a player stays up on the balls of their feet. Don’t be surprised if a younger person or intermediate player struggles to do this. It takes surprising strength to do and conditioning to maintain throughout a long point. Think of how heavyweight boxers start out a round light on their feet, and at the end of three minutes, are flat-footed. Also, watch out for the dreaded double-split. Often, players will bounce twice or even three times before moving to the ball. These are just the basics of a good split In the next issue, I will discuss more subtleties and how to develop a great split.

Tim Mayotte was one of the nation’s best tennis players during the 1980s. Twice during the 80s, he finished the year ranked in the world’s top 10. Besides reaching the semifinals of Wimbledon and the Australian Open, he also won a Silver Medal in the Olympics and represented his nation in Davis Cup action. For the last decade, Tim has shifted his focus to developing top American players and is currently running 360 Tennis at the Cunningham Tennis Center with his partners, Lee Hurst and Carl Thorsen. He may be reached by phone at (917) 596-0746 or visit 360Tennis.net.

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T E N N I S T R AV E L D E S T I N AT I O N

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Let’s talk tennis and more! “Train in Spain Without the Rain; Play on Clay All Day!” ennisMom/SailingDad (TMSD) promotes youth tennis and sailing training in Javea, Spain. The David Ferrer Tennis Academy (DFTA) and TMSD are

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your summer hosts, bringing Spanish tennis, culture, cuisine and the countryside at its finest to you! Experience “Perfect Technical Stroke Repetition,” “Strengthened Tennis Skills,” and “Hone Your Game and Strategy.” Spain has brought home 11 Grand Slam titles,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

seven French Opens, five Fed Cups, five Davis Cups, and one Olympic Gold Medal! Are you ready for the next step in life? Do you have an insatiable thirst to become a true champion? Are you the aspiring player who wants to make this journey with TMSD, while yearning to be the next great tennis player? TMSD is offering a full-service, chaperoned tennis excursion to Spain and the DFTA for 10 aspiring tennis players, ages 12 and up, from June to August 2013. TMSD will host three, three-week programs consisting of five weekday training sessions, with each day consisting of cardio, fitness and tennis training, match play and more. TMSD provides all housekeeping and laundry services, food provisions, cooking, chauffeuring, translation, and administration. TMSD offers an extended, loving and safe family environment which models the Spanish culture of kind heartedness and generosity. TMSD guides you through Spain’s


T E N N I S T R AV E L D E S T I N AT I O N countryside and coastlines discovering waterfalls, lakes, beaches and sea caves. You will socialize and learn to converse in Spanish within local communities and families throughout the Valencia Region. You will hike through ancient ruins, roam through museums, cities, towns, villages and partake in cultural festivals and dance, savoring local cuisines and sail/scuba dive/snorkel in the beautiful Mediterranean Sea! TMSD believes exercise, sports and travel foster and empower students to think critically and autonomously, while embracing compassion, generosity and accountability. It deepens commitments to pro-social values with respect for others and for themselves. As the youth journeys through life with these empowerments, they stand up for their beliefs, feel strength and confidence within themselves and make sound decisions through positive sports and travel inter-

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LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Strength or Power for Peak Tennis Performance? By Steve Kaplan he traditional goal of most strength programs for athletic performance has been focused on increasing maximum strength. Athletes typically train at 75 to 95 percent of their one repetition maximum effort, hoping to achieve greater one repletion weight scores. How does this training method transfer to improved tennis performance? Not well, because athletes lift heavy weights slowly and tennis movements are characterized by mid- to high-velocity efforts. The goal of off-court tennis training should be the development of power which, in simple terms, is the capacity to generate force quickly. If you are familiar with fundamental physics, then you recognize the mathematical formula: Power (p)=Force (f) x Velocity (v). The highest power outputs in this formula occur in the mid-range of both variables. Athletes who lack strength will see an initial increase in power as they increase maximum strength. Studies indicate that in less experienced athletes, increases in strength and gains in power are highly correlated. The research also indicates, however, that once strength thresholds have been reached, power improvements are gained only at the high force/slow velocity end of the power curve. For tennis, this means that once you are strong enough to manage a fast racket, more strength development will do little to help you better perform tennis movements. You develop explosive or ballistic ball striking power by training with lower forces at higher velocities. Power developing exercises include:

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l Olympic Lifts: High power, high force, full body, coordination movements. 20

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


“Athletes who lack strength will see an initial increase in power as they increase maximum strength.” l Plyometric Exercises: Fast movements designed to recruit fast twitch muscle fibers. l Ballistic Weight Efforts: Body-area specific movements for gains in high rates of body system force production. One of my personal favorite power training exercises are medicine ball throws from an athletic stance ready position, as well as a split-squat stance. These movements use light weights that can be managed at high speeds. Since the throws are mechanically and neuromuscularly similar to the rotational movements in tennis strokes, medicine ball throws are a great way to build explosive power, as well as isolate and correct mechanical movement issues. As a matter of practical application, I’ve often found it easier and more effective to identify and correct a stroke by cleaning up the corresponding medicine ball movement than

by addressing the actual stroke. Tennis strokes performed at the highest level strive to be “stretch-shorten cycle” movements, where an eccentric contraction precedes a concentric contraction. This concept may mean little to an athlete, but should be well-understood by trainers and coaches because the resulting power gains from mastering this technique that elasticity stores and releases power from the loading phase have tremendous potential. Recent studies indicate that a strength exercise, followed by a related mobility exercise, followed by a corresponding power movement, will result in greater and safer elastic tendon release improvements then would be achieved by doing each of these exercises separately. Maximum strength is a pre-requisite to power in tennis. While strength is important, the ultimate goal for improvement is the development of powerful tennis

movements. A comprehensive and wellorganized training approach with a foundation of power development will result optimal tennis performance. Coaches and trainers must interact clearly and comprehensively to ensure that players are safely and effectively focusing on the physical skills and abilities they need, both on and off the court. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 33 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 15 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

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LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Stars to Shine Over Paris 2013 French Open Preview

Is this the year? Ferrer looks to crack the top three at Roland Garros avid Ferrer is a Spaniard whose game is bigger than his physical size. Ferrer is currently ranked number four in the world in the ATP Men’s Singles Rankings, one spot ahead of fellow countryman Rafael Nadal. Early in his career, Ferrer was known as a clay court specialist, having won half of his 20 career titles on clay. But through the years, his results have helped him shed that label. Although he has never won a major, Ferrer has had much success at them, making the semifinals at the Australian Open and U.S. Open twice each, and was a semifinalist at last year’s French Open where he fell to Nadal 2-6, 2-6, 1-6. In late January, for the first time in his 10-plus-year career, he became the top-ranked Spaniard, overtaking Nadal for the distinction. While Ferrer has found success on all surfaces, clay is still his strongest surface and if he is to break through and win a major, the French Open seems to be his best chance. At the 2012 French Open, Ferrer lost only 25, games defeating Lukas Lacko, Benoit Paire, Mikhail Youzhny and Marcel Granollers en route to the quarterfinals. In the quarters, he upset world number four Andy Murray and reached his first Roland Garros semifinal where he lost to Nadal. Ferrer is playing well this year, beginning his 2013 season by successfully defending the 2013 Heineken Open title (Auckland, New Zealand), and reached the semifinals at the 2013 Australian Open for the second time in three years where he fell 2-6, 2-6, 1-6 to Novak Djokovic. Is 2013 the year that David Ferrer finally wins a major? Nadal is the clear favorite at the French, and Djokovic is the clear second choice, but this is Ferrer’s best surface, he should have a nice draw as the number four seed, and is playing some of his best tennis ever in 2013.

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

May 21-June 3, 2013 Roland Garros, France


2013 French Open: Facts and figures Red dirt

The French Open is played on clay, which owes its red color to the crushed brick which forms the upper layer of the surface. There are three layers in all—one of limestone, one of clinker and one of stone—as well as drainage pipes. Clay is the slowest of surfaces and much revered by Spanish and South American players who grew up playing on red dirt and know all its secrets inside and out. The first ever clay courts were constructed in Cannes in the South of France in 1880 by Ernest and William Renshaw, who were top players back in the day. Whilst European clay courts are red, the Americans play on (quicker) green clay, with the WTA tournament in Charleston, S.C. every April being the highlight of the green clay season. The “Sunday Start” Ever since 2006, the tournament has been spread over 15 days, rather than 14 days and started on a Sunday. May 26 will be

the opening day this year, with 32 firstround singles matches scheduled for what is called (even in French) the “Sunday Start.” The first round of singles competition stretches over three days, and one half of the draw plays on Sunday and Monday, the other half on Monday and Tuesday. As has always been the case, any player involved in matches at other tournaments on the Friday or Saturday before will not be scheduled to play before the Monday. In the city For the sixth year in a row, the “Roland Garros in the City” event will be set up on the esplanade outside Paris city hall throughout the French Open. The aim of this special event is to bring all the emotions of the tournament to the heart of the French capital. There will be all sorts of tennis-based activities on offer as well as a giant screen showing all the main matches from the tournament—and all free of charge, with the French Tennis Federation’s main aim being to share its love of the sport with as many people as possible. This special event is organized every spring in conjunction with Paris city hall, and will culminate with the Men’s Singles Final. Way back when … The stadium that stages one of the world’s four major tennis tournaments was built in 1928, but the French men’s singles championship goes back much further than that. Originally reserved for members of French clubs, it was first held on the courts of

Stade Francais Club in Paris in 1891. The women’s singles were added six years later, it was not until 1925 that the French Tennis Federation decided to open the event to the best foreign players. Thus, the French Internationals were born, and staged alternately at Stade Francais and Racing Club de France until the Roland Garros Stadium came into being in 1928.

2013 French Open contenders Women’s draw Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Serena Williams, the current world number one is the favorite in France. If she plays her best and is on her game mentally and physically, there is no beating her. However, that is not always the case as we learned a year ago as Serena fell to Virginie Razzano of France in the first round. Certainly Serena will be looking forward to making amends for last year’s poor showing. The defending French Open champion Maria Sharapova defeated Sara Errani in last year’s final. She is curcontinued on page 24

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Stars to Shine Over Paris continued from page 23 rently the world’s number two-ranked player and is playing well. She has always struggled against Serena, but if she gets a good draw, a repeat run to the Roland Garros title is certainly a strong possibility. Victoria Azarenka was ranked number one at last year’s French Open, but she was upset in the fourth round by Dominika Cibulkova. She has fallen a bit to third in the world, but is still a strong contender to win it all. Men’s draw Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Novak Djokovic has the chance to complete a Career Grand Slam by winning the French Open. He has previously won four Australian Open titles, as well as one Wimbledon and U.S. Open title each, but has never won the French Open. A year ago, he fell to Rafael Nadal in a four-set final. This year, he will look to take the next step and win it all.

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Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Rafael Nadal is the clear overall favorite to win the French Open title. Rafa has won 93 percent of his career singles matches on clay, and 52 of 53 singles matches at the French Open since 2005. In addition, Nadal holds the record for most career titles at four clay-court tournaments: Monte Carlo (eight), French Open (seven), Barcelona (seven) and Rome (six). He has won three straight French Open titles since 2010, seven of the last eight overall, and boasts a 21-match winning streak on the red clay of Paris. Plus, Rafa has never needed more than four sets to dispose of his opponent in any of his previous seven French Open finals.

2013 French Open sleepers Women’s draw Sloane Stephens is looking to build upon her upset win over Serena at the Australian Open. She made the fourth round of last year’s French Open before being defeated by

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Samantha Stosur. Currently ranked 16th in the world, Stephens is hoping that she can take another giant leap forward this year at Roland Garros. Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

Sara Errani was a finalist at last year’s French Open, and is currently ranked seventh in the WTA Women’s Singles Rankings. Last year, she came in to the tournament ranked 21st and upset Ana Ivanovic, Angelique Kerber and Samantha Stosur en route to the finals. The Italian plays well on the slower clay surface and is a threat to knock off any top seed again this year. Men’s draw Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

David Ferrer was a semifinalist a year ago at Roland Garros, defeating Andy Murray in the quarterfinals before losing to Nadal in straight sets. It’s hard to call a top five player a “sleeper,” but Ferrer has never won a Grand Slam and the “Big Four” have dominated the tour and specifically the Grand Slams for years. His game does fit nicely on to the red clay of Roland Garros though. Is this the year he wins a Slam?


Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

The only Frenchman to ever win on their home turf of Roland Garros was Yannick Noah. Is this the year they have another hometown hero in Jo-Wilfred Tsonga? With four of the top 25 players being French, there is a chance. Tsonga is the best of the bunch.

2013 French Open pretenders

through six matches against top players is too much to ask. She may win a few rounds, but the 24th-ranked player will have trouble making it through to the second week. Men’s draw Tomas Berdych has played his best tennis in the past year, but clay isn’t his best surface. He lost in the fourth round a year ago to Juan Martin del Potro in four sets. While he may win a few matches, don’t expect him to live up to the sixth seed he will receive.

Women’s draw Marion Bartoli is the top-ranked French player and comes into the 2013 French Open at 14th in the WTA Women’s Singles Rankings. Last year, she fell in the second round to Petra Martic. The weight and pressure of playing in front of her home country may once again be too much for Bartoli whose game has slipped a bit of late.

Big serves are great, but the slow clay will neutralize Milos Raonic’s big serves at Roland Garros. Raonic is not well-rounded enough at this point to overcome his serve not being dominant.

With Venus Williams, the name is there, but the game is not. While Venus has played well of late, expecting to get

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OMG ...

I’m Nervous!

Five ways to work through pre-match jitters By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC ZZZZ, BZZZZZ. It’s usually a weekend in my world. I may have just stepped off a court after an enjoyable morning hitting session, or finished reading the New York Times over eggs and coffee. All is relaxed and status quo. Yet for the athlete on the other end of my buzzing cell phone, his or her world is anything but placid. Butterflies are fluttering through their stomach, their head is spinning with possible performance outcomes, and selfdoubt is creeping in. The concerned athlete wonders what is happening to them. Perhaps they are preparing to step onto the court to play someone seeded higher, or even way lower in a regional, sectional or national tournament. Or maybe the young player feels they need a big victory to change a recent string of bad results. No matter the situation, it can cause a level of anxiety, uncertainty and ultimately a feeling

even, “If I play tight, I’m going to lose.” This, in turns, sets off another negative spiral downward, and the player’s natural nervousness turns into a far more debilitating anxiety. In light of this, I want to share five ideas in which the nervous player can gain some perspective over what’s happening and be able to better manage and work through excessive nervousness.

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of not having full control. It’s at this very moment our paths connect with a BZZZZ on the cell phone or a short, but direct, text message. It’s always the same as I listen intently or scroll down my phone: I hear/read “OMG … I’m nervous, What do I do?” As a sports psychology and performance coach, this is probably the most commonly asked and texted question I receive. As many players who have experienced such jitters can attest to, it’s usually not the nervousness which presents a problem, but all the accompanying thoughts, such as “Why am I nervous?” or “What happens if I’m still this nervous during the match?” or

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

1. It’s okay to be nervous … it’s perfectly normal and natural. In fact, even the top players in the world admit to some degree of nervousness. This self-acceptance of their nerves is actually the way they manage the situation. They don’t fight the tension, rather they accept it as “something inside of them is nervous.” How many of you have tried to resist a feeling or a thought? What happens? It usually gets bigger and bigger, and instead, looms in your mind. Remember … what you resist persists! Roger Federer said the following about nervousness: “I get nervous quite


often on big occasions, especially at Grand Slams. You wait around, you hope to get to the finals … It’s really hard, it works you. You start asking yourself questions … the more you win, the more questions you ask.” Tiger Woods said, “I always feel pressure. If you don’t feel nervous, you don’t care about how you play. I care about how I perform. The day I’m not nervous playing is the day I quit.”

ponent! He or she accounts for 50 percent of the puzzle. In fact, that seemingly challenging figure across the net from you is very likely just as nervous as you are, perhaps even more so! He or she is trying to manage their nerves and play a good match, just like you. By being aware of this point, a player can reframe their focus away from themselves and onto the entire picture.

2. Nervousness is a sign you care. Nervousness isn’t bad, nervousness isn’t good, it simply exists. It’s your way of reacting to a situation. There are always two sides to everything, but when you are nervous, you usually only focus on the negative aspects of how you feel. However, what’s the other side? Aren’t you also excited, challenged and have a great opportunity in front of you? The great Billie Jean King wrote a book titled Pressure Is a Privilege. This was an acknowledgement that if you are feeling pressure, you have often put yourself in a privileged situation, such as the finals of a tournament. Similarly, if you are feeling nerves, you are usually feeling challenged. Remember to be proud of the fact that you have embraced this challenge and are attempting to succeed, and that your nerves are a simple byproduct of these positive choices.

4. What’s the worst that can happen? Alan Goldberg, a nationally-known sport psychologist and mentor of mine, tells the story of Greg Louganis, a famous diver who competed in the 1988 Olympics. Louganis climbed the ladder for his last dive. Knowing he needed a 10 to win the Gold Medal, Louganis thought to himself, “What’s the worst that can happen?” His answer was “Well, my parents will still love me, and I’ll still have my friends.” With this refreshing moment of perspective, he leapt off the board and nailed a perfect 10!

3. If you are nervous, who else is? When a player is nervous, their focus is usually entirely on themselves. In other words, they are not seeing the entire picture, rather just a small piece of it. Don’t forget about your op-

5. Why am I nervous? When I ask this question to players, they usually say it’s because “I want to win” or “I don’t know how I’m going to do” or “I’m not sure how good my opponent is.” Most of us have heard these responses so much that we accept them as routine. However, what’s important to understand is that the player’s focus is distracted or compromised before they walk on the court. Their focus is on something which they cannot control, which is winning (the result). More so, they are focusing on another uncontrollable … their opponent. With a

focus on these things, there is little time to focus on what they need to do to perform their best. It’s normal to be nervous, but the player falls into a trap if they become resultsoriented before play has even begun. Playing any sport requires the ability to accept and manage nerves and emotions. All great performers understand this is a part of their process and fighting it only makes things worse. John McEnroe said, “It’s not if you will choke, it’s how you handle it when it happens.” Nervousness is a natural emotion, the problem is not the nervousness that a player experiences. The issue becomes the negative reaction and fear derived from these nerves, which often leads to a downward spiral and a “frozen” player. The next time you are nervous or anxious, refer to the five techniques above to help you play your best game. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach he works with athletes and teams of all levels. His work focuses on helping athletes gain the mental edge and letting go of blocks which get in the way of peak performance. He is a USTA Zonal Coach and has spoken and been published for the USTA, USPTA and ITA. Additionally, he has conducted workshops nationally and internationally in India and Israel. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email rob@insidethezone or visit www.insidethezone.com.

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Grand Slam Tennis Solow Sports 214 Commack Road 347 A Main Street Commack, N.Y. Huntington, N.Y. (631) 499-6444 (631) 629-4940 What are specialty stores? Specialty stores are a place to go and SolowSports.com receive extensive, dedicated, and welcoming services that do In 2007, Derek Hsiang founded Solow Sports with Doris Maffia not include the click of a mouse. on the revolutionary principle that people should be able to buy Jim Donnelly has been a proud owner and operator of Tennis tennis stuff on the Internet. Armed with a passion for tennis, a Emporium & Grand Slam Tennis for more than 36 years. Jim and dash of blissful ignorance, no business plan, and little industry his three sons (Jes, Ian and Chase) have worked the business knowledge, Derek threw together a Web site and began operatfor the past 15 years and have reached out to service Long Ising out of his bedroom, laptop, cell phone and a closet in Tenland and the tennis community. With the help of Jim’s son Chase nisport in Long Island City, while juggling multiple side jobs. It managing Grand Slam, Jim has had the opportunity to reach out proved to be a massively successful exercise … in mediocrity. and expand his interest in growing the game by creating the SufTwo short years later in 2009, the bedroom and laptop enterfolk County District USTA in conjunction with Joe Arias and the prise revolutionized the industry again, when Derek came up with Suffolk County Junior Tennis League (SCJTL). the industry-transforming concept of allowing people to buy tenGrand Slam Tennis is not just a tennis specialty store—it is a nis merchandise and equipment in a store. With all the inventory welcoming environment to any tennis player, whether you’re a and operations together in its 582-sq.-ft. headquarters in Huntrecreational, club or tournament level player. Their services proington Village, N.Y., operational efficiencies shot up 610 percent vide an array of different possibilities: Tennis racquet, badminton, (this figure is completely made up). squash and racquetball restringing, tennis attire (women’s, men’s Fast-forward another two and a half years to 2012: Solow and children’s), tennis tutor ball machines (sales, services and Sports tripled its retail storefront to its current home 30-ft.away trials), tennis nets, ball hoppers, tennis bags, tennis racquet sales, at 347 A Main Street in Huntington Village, N.Y. Solow Sports is tennis sneakers (Nike, Babolat, Adidas, Head and Prince), ac1700-sq.-ft. of pure retail sexiness that you’ll have to see for yourcessories, and a whole lot more. self, although the picture is pretty much what it looks like. It feaYour experience at Grand Slam Tennis is guaranteed to be diftures all of the innovations of before: Racquets, re-stringing, ferent from any other store. The staff is very experienced, knowlapparel, footwear, bags, racquets, demos, platform tennis, etc. edgeable and willing to help. The demo program is geared There’s just a whole lot more of it, and the display shelves are toward the player, and is based on your feedback; therefore, you significantly shinier than the previous iteration. Also, we built a can be guided in the right direction in purchasing the right raccage to hit balls in. How awesome is that? quet for you. At the point So stop by and check out the fastest-growing and sexiest tennis of purchase, all of your instore in Huntington Village. formation (name, phone Demo some racquets, number, address, racshop for the latest gear, or quet, grip size, string and maybe get your racquet tension) is stored in the re-strung … Derek will computer database for gladly destroy you in Topfuture reference. See you spin 4 for Playstation 3 on the court! while you wait. Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com 28


Tennis East 73 Main Street Southampton, N.Y. (631) 283-9535 TennisEast@optonline.net Tennis East 47 ½ Main Street East Hampton, N.Y. (631) 324-5881 TennisEast@optonline.net For more than 41 years, Tennis East has been the year-round, full-service tennis store of choice for East End racquet sport enthusiasts. More so, we carry a complete line of 10 & Under Tennis equipment so that kids will have more fun playing tennis. Tennis East carries a full-line of Nike, Adidas, Fila, Babolat, Wilson, Head and Prince products. In addition, we have expanded our women’s apparel offering to include new fashion designers that have been featured in the pages of Vogue and Town & Country magazine. Tennis East continues to string all customer and demo racquets on the Wilson Baiardo, the most state-of-the-art stringing machine on the market. Our machines were shipped direct to Tennis East after a short trial run stringing for the likes of Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Maria Sharapova and Victoria Azarenka at the Sony Open in Key Biscayne, Fla. The Baiardo delivers unmatched speed, accuracy and consistency. Tennis East is committed to providing personalized service, professional advice and a high-quality shopping experience. Please look for special offers on Tennis East’s social network sites. For more information, contact Tennis East by phone at (631) 283-9535 (Southampton) or (631) 324-5881 (East Hampton) or e-mail TennisEast@optonline.net.

Topspin Tennis & Fitness 218 Jericho Turnpike Syosset, N.Y. (516) 364-9470 TopSpinTennisLI.com Topspin Tennis & Fitness is Nassau County’s top tennis specialty shop. Topspin moved to its new state-of-the-art location two years ago, now centrally located at 218 Jericho Turnpike in Syosset, N.Y., directly across from Syosset Hospital. Known as the home of “Clothes for the Pros,” Topspin has been serving Long Island Tennis pros and players with equipment and the top fashion in the sport for more than 30 years. Topspin’s staff is known for its expertise and high-quality service. You will find all the premier tennis brands of equipment, apparel and shoes at Topspin for the whole family, including Nike, Adidas, K-Swiss, Asics, Babolat, Wilson, Head, Prince and many more. Topspin carries the actual outfits and footwear worn at the U.S. Open and other major events by Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer. Topspin carries a full line of fitness and workout apparel and running shoes, so you can go from the court to the gym in style. Their racket wall contains a large selection of frames, bags and accessories at great prices. Your racket can be strung while you wait by Topspin’s professional staff. Ask any tennis enthusiast on Long Island and odds are they will be familiar with Topspin Tennis & Fitness. Topspin is a great destination for tennis and Father’s Day gifts as well. Topspin’s staff will ensure that, with the right equipment, you will reach your highest potential as a player and just as importantly, with the right fashion, will look great too!

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BY

Checking Out the NBA World number one Novak Djokovic met up with Dwyane Wade of the Miami Heat after the NBA reigning champions posted their 26th consecutive victory over the Charlotte Bobcats. The two-time defending Sony Open Tennis champion Djokovic arrived at the game in the third quarter after his 6-2, 6-4 third-round win over Somdev Devvarman. It was Djokovic’s 13th straight win at the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournament. Djokovic also met Miami Heat assistant coach, Bob McAdoo, who is an avid tennis fan. Former WTA world number one Caroline Wozniacki and her golfer boyfriend, Rory McIlroy, also watched the Heat-Bobcats game. Earlier in the year, Djokovic met Kobe Bryant and Dwight Howard of the Los Angeles Lakers ahead of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells.

Going for a Bike Ride Serena Williams can claim another first and another victory: She beat the traffic by riding a bicycle to her match. With Key Biscayne’s main road in a traffic snarl on the Saturday night of her third round match, Serena borrowed a bike at her hotel, rode to her match and beat Ayumi Morita in the third round of the Sony Open, 6-3, 6-3. Serena’s match was sched30

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uled to start at 8:00 p.m., and she learned about the gridlock before leaving her hotel. ‘’The traffic was crazy and everyone was like, ‘I have been here for an hour, and I’m staying like eight minutes away,’’’ Serena said. ‘’I’m like, ‘OK, I’m not going to make my match.’ So I asked for a golf cart, and the hotel didn’t have a golf cart. Then they were like, ‘We have a motor bike.’ I’m like, ‘I don’t do motor bikes, ‘We have a bicycle,’ they said, ‘I really don’t do bicycles, but I will today.’’’ Traffic jams are common on Key Biscayne, where only one road connects the island with the mainland and Miami. But Serena never had to resort to a bicycle before. ‘’It was fun,’’ she said. ‘’It was probably one of my best memories I think ever, riding a bike to a match. That’s pretty cool.’’

pened,” Henin said. “This afternoon a little fairy arrived to illuminate our lives. She is called Lalie, she is in top form and we are really delighted!” While Henin welcomed a girl, longtime rival Kim Clijsters and her husband Brian Lynch also gave birth to a baby boy.

Dinner With the Caps

Sony Open organizers have unveiled plans for a $50 million project to improve the tournament site at Crandon Park, with work expected to take three phases and be completed by the start of the 2017 tournament. The tournament’s vision includes an improved stadium court, three additional permanent show courts, increased landscaped green space, and the addition of new park facilities that will be open to the public when the Sony Open is not in session. The Sony Open’s owner, IMG, is prepared to begin construction on April 1, 2014, immediately following next year’s tournament and the project is to be completed in three phases taking ten months each. Miami-Dade county voters agreed last November to allow the $50 million makeover which will be financed solely by IMG and private Sony Open funds that include tournament revenues, such as ticket surcharges and parking fees.

Maria Kirilenko recently enjoyed a night out with her fiancée, Alex Ovechkin of the Washington Capitals, along with Ovechkin’s teammate and fellow countryman Dimitry Orlov and his girlfriend Varya and took to Twitter for the photo opp.

Babies Born Justine Henin and her partner Benoit Bertuzzo have announced the birth of their daughter, Lalie. “We were anticipating this so much, and now it has hap-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Sony Open to Get Facelift


Capriati Charged

Redfoo in the Open?

Former tennis star Jennifer Capriati has been ordered to appear in a Palm Beach County court to answer allegations she sent hundreds of texts to an exboyfriend and then punched him four times while he was working out. The former world number one tennis player was charged with misdemeanor battery and stalking by the Palm Beach County State Attorney’s Office, according to court records. Capriati, who lives on Singer Island in Florida was sent a summons to appear in county court in Palm Beach Gardens on April 17. Prosecutors filed the charges after a series of incidents in which an angry Capriati confronted ex-boyfriend Ivan Dwight Brannan after they broke up in February 2012. In addition to the alleged battery, Capriati also sent 283 texts to Brannan between Dec. 25, 2012 and Jan. 8, police said.

Rapper Redfoo, whose real name is Stefan Gordy, has officially begun an attempt to qualify for the 2013 U.S. Tennis Open in Flushing, N.Y. The LMFAO member, who is the son of Motown Records founder Berry Gordy, grew up playing tennis and has totally gotten back into the sport. Gordy has entered himself in the USTA Northern California Sectional Qualifying Tournament, which is scheduled to take place from June 18-23 in Salinas, Calif. The “Sexy and I Know It” singer is going to make a run in singles, and mixed-doubles with 17-year-old Ayaka Okuno, whom he is currently coaching. Redfoo has recently been party rocking the tennis circuit with “girlfriend” Victoria Azarenka. When asked about his goal, Redfoo said, “It’s always been a dream of mine to play professional tennis.”

Tweets from the tennis pros Maria Kirilenko (@MKirilenko): Looks like today will be a good shopping day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!??oh I need so many ... coats, boots, sweater...etc. Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): Venice Beach could be the most fun place in the world!

Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Had fun at the @MiamiHEAT game tonight!

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Most Out of Your Lesson By Miguel Cervantes III ost tennis players, at one point or another, consider taking lessons to improve their game. Taking lessons is an investment, and like most investments, you’ll usually get what you pay for if you don’t do a little research. Hopefully, this article will help those individuals looking to take tennis lessons and can be an aid to those who

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are already on the court. The first thing you want to take into account when considering tennis lessons are your goals. What are you trying to achieve and/or get out of the lesson? This is the first question I ask a new client. Tennis lessons cannot be structured in a productive way unless the pro knows what you want. Some take lessons for the exercise, others take lessons to do something social with their friend, and most take lessons to improve aspects of

their game. If your goal is to improve one aspect of your game, then you are more than likely going to want to consider private lessons. Working one-on-one with a pro will help you see results faster than in a group lesson. If you are looking to do something social with a friend, then you should consider a group lesson. The camaraderie of a group lesson will be just what you are looking for. Do you want to do a lesson for the exercise? Perhaps, instead of a lesson, you should consider a

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drill. Most clubs have a cardio tennis special with fast-paced drills where you can build up a good sweat. On the other hand, if you are just looking to practice the skills you already have in a competitive environment, then you should consider joining a league instead of taking a lesson. Whatever your own personal goals are, make sure you find something appropriate. Here are a few other things that will help you get the most out of your lessons. Make sure you get to your club a little bit early. You don’t want to feel rushed going onto the court. Additionally, if you have to take care of any business at the front desk, you’ll have the time to do so. Getting to the club early will also give you the opportunity to stretch a bit. Look up a few dynamic stretches you think you’ll enjoy, and get your body warmed up and limber for when you get on court. You don’t want to waste too much of your lesson getting your body prepped to play. In order to have that time before your lesson, try very hard to choose a time that will work for you every week. It has been too often that I have a client who is eager to be at their lesson every week, but then get sidetracked by work or family responsibilities, even traffic. Pick a time you will know works; you’ll get far less bang for your

buck if you’re missing a third of your lessons by arriving late. Furthermore, practice what you do in the lesson. Tennis is like any other hobby or endeavor … to see improvements, you’ll have to practice outside of the lesson. Don’t live under the impression that if you do a one-hour lesson every week that your serve will improve. Lastly, you have to consider what pro you are going to work with. Every pro will get you to where you want to be, the difference is how fast they can get you there. In my experience, the best way to go about choosing a pro is to choose one that has the personality that suits your learning. Some people need a teacher that pushes

them hard, while others need someone who is a bit softer otherwise they’ll retreat into a shell. Some need a teacher with a sense of humor, while others need a more serious demeanor in their instructor. There is absolutely nothing wrong with asking questions and getting some information about your pro. Consider taking a quick 30 minute private lesson with a pro you are considering so you can get to know their on-court personality better. Ask questions about what areas of tennis your pro specializes in. Some pros specialize in beginners, tournament juniors, USTA adult teams, and others specialize in 10 & Under tennis. Play style is important as well. Does your pro teach mostly baseline singles play, doubles strategy, serve and volley, or an all-around game? Choose a teacher that has the skill set that you need to learn what you want to learn. Taking tennis lessons is not usually a cheap investment, and if you want to get the most out of it, you’ll have to do a little leg work before you get started. Doing so will not only help you get more bang for your buck, but it will make you a happier player as well. Miguel Cervantes III teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.


“The Making of a Winner: A Fable About the Power Within” By David E. Moe By Brent Shearer “If you ding it, just re-swing it.” David E. Moe has written a book that will be of use to any tennis player if they are open to a multidisciplinary guide to improving their game. The Making of a Winner: A Fable About the Power Within takes tidbits from sports psychology, biofeedback and Eastern religions, and weaves them into a short primer on how to play better tennis. This isn’t a book that concentrates on the virtues of an open-stance forehand versus a closed-stance, it is concerned with the mental and emotional aspects of becoming a better player. Not surprisingly, it carries a blurb from one James E. Loehr, one of the leading sports psychologists working in tennis. Published in 1990, The Making of a Winner also carries a recommendation from Arthur Ashe. The book’s framework consists of a story about a young tennis player named John who has what we would now call anger management issues. His parents sign him up for lessons with a tennis teacher named Mr. Lovano who immediately gets to work on his bad attitude with a number of techniques that range from computerized personality assessments, to touches of Eastern mediation. As a tennis instructor, Mr. Lovano goes way beyond the approach you might encounter in USPTA or USPTR training videos. One tactic Mr. Lovano teaches his student is to re-swing the stroke after you make an error so that you are imprinting a more successful version of the shot you just screwed up. In the story, it works for John as he is able to beat a guy who is described as being more macho, at least in 34

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as far as he can hit the ball harder. But John is able to pull out a close match by using Mr. Lovano’s positive reinforcement principles. Of course, there is a girl mixed in with the story as well. Marlene, another young player, wants to shape her own game so that it resembles Chris Evert’s. She takes lessons from Mr. Lovano. The guy he beats in the final also wants to hang with Marlene, but apparently using Mr. Lovano’s techniques not only helps the hero win the tournament, but also makes him a better boyfriend for Marlene. The Making of Winner would be a valuable addition to any young player’s library if they have the patience to absorb and practice the lessons that Mr. Lovano, who is basically a mouthpiece for the author, espouses. It’s the kind of book that can help a player reach their full potential. Even though most of the characters and situations are aimed at young players, there are tips here that could conceivably help people like myself who having been playing so long that I am the only player at the East River Park courts still using a continental grip. The author describes himself as a teacher, philosopher, counselor and mathematician. From these various backgrounds, he has put together a tennis instruction book that may well reach a studious young player or veteran who has tried other approaches from Zen Tennis to Brad Gilbert’s classic Winning Ugly. The Making of a Winner will probably not leap to the top of the tennis books bestseller list, but it is a valuable addition to a tennis player’s or a club’s library. It’s a shame it won’t get a marketing push from a big publishing house because I could imagine catchy commercials on Tennis Channel saying, “If you ding it, just re-swing it.” Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.


the biofile: By Scoop Malinowski Status: Currently ranked 55th in the WTA Women’s Singles Rankings. A 2012 U.S. Olympian with wins over Caroline Wozniacki, Marian Bartoli, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Nadia Petrova, Daniela Hantuchova and Victoria Azarenka. Trains at Gordon Uehling’s Court Sense Facility in Tenafly, N.J. Height: 5’ 7” • Weight: 130 lbs. Date of birth: May 11, 1992 in Teaneck, N.J. First memory of tennis: My first memory of tennis was playing with my older sister Lauren at the tennis courts at our apartment complex in Hong Kong. I was probably around six- or seven-years-old. Tennis inspirations: My tennis inspirations growing up were Venus and Serena Williams. Last book read: The last book I read was The Cure by Krista White. She’s one of my favorite authors. Current car: Black Mercedes. First famous tennis player met or encountered: The first famous player I remember seeing in person was Venus Williams when she was playing an exhibition in Hong Kong. I was star-struck! Greatest moment of your career: The greatest moment of my career so far was attending the London Olympics (2012). I’ll never forget that experience.

Christina McHale ily the chair umpire was okay. Favorite sport outside tennis: Baseball. Three athletes you like to watch and follow: Derek Jeter, Rafael Nadal, and my sister Lauren McHale (who plays for the University of North Carolina).

Favorite tournament(s): My favorite tournament is the U.S. Open.

Favorite court to play on: Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Funniest players you’ve encountered on the tour: I’ve been to Fed Cup and the Olympics with Serena, and she is really one of the funniest players on the tour.

Best you have ever felt on court: When I played against (then WTA number one Caroline) Wozniacki in Cincinnati [won in straight sets in 2011]). Also, when I played Marion Bartoli at the U.S. Open (also 2011).

Funny tennis memory: Last year, I played an exhibition QuickStart tennis match for Arthur Ashe Kid’s Day on Arthur Ashe Stadium. It was the “pros” against the “little kids.” I still laugh about it today because I didn’t expect the little kids to be so good at the QuickStart tennis and they beat us [smiles]. Embarrassing tennis memory: I shanked a ball really badly one time in a doubles match and it hit the chair umpire right in the head. It was extremely embarrassing to say the least, but luck-

Fiercest competitors you’ve encountered in tennis: At this level, everyone wants to win, so every player is a fierce competitor. People/personality qualities most admired: I admire those who are extremely dedicated and have great fight and perseverance. Scoop Malinowski is the co-owner of Tennisprose.com. His book, Marcelo Rios: The Man We Barely Knew, is available at Amazon.com. He may be reached by e-mail at mrbiofile@aol.com.

Our facility features 18 outdoor courts, including 4 stadium courts, 12 indoor courts and 4 bubbled clay courts in our state of the art, 245,000 square foot indoor tennis facility. We are open 11 months of the year and offer the following:

Most painful moment: My most painful moment was when I almost got a full body cramp during my first round match at the 2009 Australian Open (against Jessica Moore). Physically, it was extremely painful to endure the cramps, and on top of that, I lost the match 9-7 in the third set.

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Advanced Match Play Strategies From a Calm Mind By Tonny van de Pieterman he mental game of tennis has gained a tremendous amount of attention in recent years. Judging by the articles in this great publication, not only sports psychologists, but tennis professionals as well are becoming more interested and knowledgeable in this field. That being said, it is time to start using our increased mental awareness in our match play to use strategies that make sense. In this article, I am offering some advanced match play strategies that may seem simple. This article is for players who have realized that they have to overcome themselves first in order to solve the puzzle that the opponent brings to a match. If you have a good understanding of your own strengths and weaknesses, a calm mind can make the difference in overcoming a strong opponent. In every match between two individuals, there are continued subliminal messages being sent. Some of these messages are obvious and are also part of basic match strategy. For instance, if your opponent is a

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slow mover, you will make him run. You are trying to tell him, “You are slow!” Some of the more advanced strategies in tournament play however, might not be so obvious to you, but if we continue this simple way of thinking, perhaps they should be. Keep in mind that underneath the strategies resides a mental dialogue! Examples, what to do if: Your opponent is extremely fast Don’t make them run! Most players who are very fast also hit their best shots on the run. They are good at countering your corner shots into aggressive shots into your corners, thereby changing control of the rallies. l Strategy to use against a fast opponent (based on a simple way of thinking to calm your mind): Rally more through the middle of the court as to not make the match a track meet. Usually, these players feel comfortable covering a large amount of territory. Don’t take the bait. If the court looks like it is wide open, it’s probably still better to hit right to them or behind them.

Your opponent has a huge forehand Most players who have a great forehand probably know it. They know it because their opponents are always avoiding that side of the court and they are very comfortable hitting offensive shots with that wing. l Strategy to use against an opponent with a huge forehand: Hit hard and deep to the forehand side early in the rally! This way, you will avoid the forehand that really hurts, their inside-out forehand. This will also open up to the backhand side of the court if you wanted to really pin your opponent in that corner later in the rally. Remember, your opponent’s forehand from an offensive position is a weapon, be sure to test their forehand as far as passing shots are concerned as well. It has been less battle tested for sure! Your opponent is a defensive specialist (pusher) By far, this is the easiest strategy to learn,

and the most frustrating type of player to face. These players are usually very patient to wait it out, and feel very comfortable around the baseline in long baseline exchanges. They usually absorb your pace of play. l Strategy if your opponent is a defensive specialist: Hit shorter, softer and lower shots. Force these players to leave the comfort of the baseline and show their ability (or inability) to come up with unusual shots. Hit short slice shots off of their serve to create a shorter court to hit in, and try to trap them into no-man’s land or even make them come to the net! I hope this made you think a little. Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/EasternLong Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail tonny@pointsettennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Unseeded Gage Brymer Wins Boys 46th Annual ASICS Easter Bowl New York well-represented at annual junior event ust because he won four of his six ASICS Easter Bowl matches after dropping the first set—and five total three-setters—doesn’t mean that Gage Brymer enjoys playing in them. “No, I don’t really like them,” was Brymer’s response to a question posed by USTA First Vice President Katrina Adams, who was handling Tennis Channel on-court commentating duties following the unseeded Brymer’s 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, win over Luca Corinteli in the Boy’s 18s ITF singles final on the final day of the 46th annual event that took place for the first time at the Sunrise Country Club. Adams called Brymer the “Marathon

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Man,” who later added in his post-match media interviews: “I wish I could get it done it two sets every match. It’s been quite a week, quite a grind.” For the third straight year the boys’ 18s ITF singles was won by a UCLA Bruin recruit as Marcos Giron (2011), Mackenzie McDonald (2012) and now Brymer have captured the coveted title. It’s a junior title their coach Billy Martin, who many regard as one of the best junior players of all-time, never won. “I don’t think it’s that I’m getting warmed up because I feel good when I go on the court and I’m hitting good,” Brymer said. “I think the other guy just re-

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

ally comes out pumped up and it takes a little bit of time to get into the match. It’s funny because this is the first tournament where it’s been the case. It’s not that I’m known for losing the first set. It’s just been this week. It’s not too disheartening now when I lose the first set because I know I can come back. Corinteli from Alexandria, Va., who trains at the Junior Tennis Champions Center in College Park, Md., played a solid first set and used his big serve to take the early lead. “Maybe I thought in my head I really wouldn’t face any adversity and that it’s kind of going to go as smooth as it has the first set and a half,” said Corinteli. “But tennis is never like that and this has happened to me before. A couple of times you pass by it and think you’ve overcome it and then it happens again. You never really know what to expect in this sport because I was in cruise control and then a couple different points go his way and it’s a different match.” Brymer also won the ASICS Easter Bowl in 2011 in the Boys 16s. “I don’t like getting second place,” Brymer said. “I feel like once I get to the final I’m there to win it. A couple of weeks ago at the Claremont ITF I got second and that was my first second in a while. I really can’t remember the last time I got second place. I just hate it. I can’t stand going all that way and losing.” Brymer said he got a little nervous up


5-0 and then 5-1 in the final set. “It’s definitely an incredibly tough place to be up 5-0, 5-1, 5-2. Some people say, you’re up by so much and you’ve got nothing to lose and you’ve got nothing to be worried about, but I don’t think that’s the case at all,” said Brymer. “It’s much harder to get up 5-0 and close it out then to get up 5-0.” Brymer doesn’t have much time to rest before he returns to play for his high school team, University High in Irvine, Calif. just two days later. Then it was off to play the 113th Ojai Valley Championships Boys’ CIF Interscholastic Division April 25-28. This year, Brymer is trying to be the first player to win three straight high school titles at The Ojai since Bobby Riggs did it from 1934-1936 playing for Franklin High School in Los Angeles. Two 14-year-olds battled for the Girls 16s singles title as last year’s ASICS Easter Bowl finalist CiCi Bellis, the number eight-seeded player from Atherton, Calif., defeated number seven Caroline Dolehide of Hinsdale, Ill., 6-4, 6-1. “I thought about it a little bit before the match,” Bellis said. “It was pretty disappointing. I didn’t want to think about that before the match.” Dolehide got down two breaks early in the match, but was able to come back and had game point at 4-all before Bellis was able close out the first set, 6-4. “I missed a little bit too much to stay in the match,” Dolehide said. “I didn’t feel tired but I felt like I had to pick it up to stay with her. All her balls were going pretty deep.” Dolehide said she wasn’t nervous playing in the final, just “excited.” Dolehide later teamed with partner Brienne Minor to win the gold ball in doubles to go along with her singles silver as the pair beat Emma Higuchi & Rebecca Weissmann, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2 In the Boys 16s final, top-seeded Sameer Kumar of Carmel, Ind., won his second straight USTA Supernational with a 6-0, 6-0 win over Kalman Boyd of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. “I just couldn’t hang with him,” Boyd said. “He was so fresh and mentally tough, and I just got too tired after every point. I was just dead and trying to re-

cover. I never played on Stadium and I never played in front of a crowd all week. So I think that was a factor. I’m already looking forward to my next tournament.” Kumar said he and his coach actually hit on Stadium court late Saturday night just to get a feel for it. “We wanted to see how the conditions were,” said Kumar, who won the 16s Winternationals to start the year. “Today was tough, but obviously the scoreline doesn’t seem so. I played very well today.” Not even paired together until the day before the tournament, Jordi Arconada and Spencer Papa beat JC Aragone & Mackenzie McDonald, 6-1, 7-5 to win the Boys 18s doubles. Locals at the 2013 Easter Bowl Noah Rubin of Rockville Centre, N.Y. came in to Easter Bowl as the top seed in the Boys 18s and had a great tournament before a semifinal loss to Luca Corintelli. Before that match Rubin had not dropped a single set in the tournament and played very well in his return from a wrist injury that had kept him out for months. “Noah played almost flawless tennis today against Alex Gozun, a very good player with a humongous serve,” said Lawrence Kleger, Noah’s coach and director of tennis at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy, after his quarterfinal victory over Gozun. “The key to victory was Noah’s return of serve. He broke his big serving opponent five times in two sets!” Dennis Uspensky the 15th seed from At-

lantic Beach, N.Y., defeated Logan Staggs of Tracy, Calif. 7-5, 6-4 in the opening round and then defeated Shane Monroe in the a third set tie-breaker in the second round, but his run ended there as he was defeated by the second-seed Mackenzie McDonald in the third round. Rachel Lim of Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. upset fourth-seeded Delaney Nothaft of Tempe, Ariz., 2-6, 6-2, 6-3 in the Round of 32 before falling in the fourth round of the Girls 14s. Alexa Graham of Garden City, N.Y. upset second-seeded Kelly Chan in straight sets and eventually earned a Bronze Ball finishing third in the Girls 14s. In his opening round match, Alexander Lebedev, the number 10 seed from Island Park, N.Y., defeated Austin Hussey of Edgewood, Ky., 2-6, 6-2, 6-1 in a tough three-set encounter, coming back from a set down, and then fought through another three-set match in the second round. Another three-set win was not in the cards though as in the third round he fell to Michael Lorenzini, the 17th seed from Illinois. In an all-New York matchup, Daniel Grunberger of Great Neck, N.Y., who came in as the sixth seed, was upset by Artemie Amari of New York, N.Y. 4-6, 2-6 in the Boys 16s Division. Madison Battaglia Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. defeated Jada Hart of Colton, Calif., 6-2, 7-6(1) in her opening round match in the Girls 16s Division, but was unable to overcome seventh-seeded Caroline Dolehide of Hinsdale, Ill. who defeated Battaglia 6-1, 6-1.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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SERIOUS TENNIS, S

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Photo credits: Adam Wolfthal

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whycollege tennis people should watch

By Eric Rebhuhn 1. The game is played at a level that most people can relate to For many tennis fans who watch professional tennis, the hope of one day hitting that great forehand that they watched Novak Djokovic hit in the finals of the U.S. Open is only a dream. But for aspiring young players, playing college tennis is a realistic goal. By going out and seeing a live college tennis match, their future goals might be within reach! 2. The intensity and atmosphere of a college tennis match Tennis has long been a quiet cerebral sport, but college tennis is very much a boisterous, loud, and exciting sport that only a few people watch. College tennis possesses the intensity and excitement that few other sports possess. In some cases, college sports are even more fun to watch than professional sports.

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3. The potential to see future ATP tour players before they make it Professional tennis players usually play juniors before becoming pro. But some players you have probably heard of have chosen to play college tennis before going on to the pros. John Isner at Georgia, James Blake at Harvard, Bob & Mike Bryan and John McEnroe at Stanford, they all played college tennis and became successful pros after. 4. For juniors, as well as their parents who want them to play college tennis, they can see the actually level of play College tennis gives you the opportunity to earn an academic degree, and at the same time, play tennis at a high level. Junior tennis players who would like to play collegiate tennis in the future should definitely go watch a college tennis game. Some rules changes such as the “let” rule, and the dynamics may be different, but the level is high and the atmosphere is great.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

5. Most matches are played on weekends and matches are usually free to watch! Going to a basketball game with your family or watching a hockey game with your friends is always fun, but can sometimes grow to be a little expensive. If you are a tennis fan, the chances to watch high-level tennis live are very limited. College tennis provides you with the opportunity to have a good time and enjoy good quality sports live almost every weekend. With more than 100 career wins and the 2011 Big East Coach of the Year Award under his belt, head men’s tennis coach Eric Rebhuhn has solidified himself as one of the most successful coaches in St. John’s tennis history. Last season, Rebhuhn’s squad finished with a 17-9 record, while peaking at number 50 in the national polls during the season, the highest ranking in school history. He may be reached by phone at (718) 990-5549 or e-mail rebhuhne@stjohns.edu.


“When we are losing, we are vulnerable to a particular kind of mental chatter and you dearly. a shift in Knowledge is powour body er. Being aware of the language.” mental traps that can po-

Coming From Behind or Holding Onto a Lead … Which is Easier? By Tina Greenbaum, LCSW any of us know that the mental side of tennis is a large part of the game. I have heard different statistics as to how much it actually is, but the most common figure I come across is that the mental side of the sport comprises 80 to 90 percent of the game. That’s a huge amount of the game to which the recreational player frequently gives the least amount of attention to. One of the areas that the competitive player has to contend with is how to “come from behind” versus how to “hold onto a lead.” Each scenario requires a different mental approach. When we are losing, we are vulnerable to a particular kind of mental chatter and a

M

shift in our body language. Statements like, “I better not lose,” “He/she is better than me,” “I have a lot riding on this match,” or “I’m having a bad day” interfere with our ability to concentrate on the elements that would actually assist us in making a comeback. Coming from behind requires motivation—not only to win, but to “dig in” and never give up until the last point is won or lost. It requires us to focus on the present moment, not the one that just passed, and not allow our minds to wander to the final outcome of the match. Conversely, holding on to a lead challenges us in a different way. When winning, it’s easy to allow our minds to jump ahead to the glory of winning and easily lose focus of the present moment. If we are playing an opponent who is of equal skill technically, strategically and mentally, a letdown in concentration can cost

tentially undermine your performance will make you not only a better player, but a stronger overall competitor. Tina Greenbaum, LCSW is a sport psychology consultant and a holistic psychotherapist. She works with tennis players of all levels in learning how to manage their emotions on the court. She shares this passion with her partner, Fred Sperber, a professional tennis instructor of 28 years in a six-week program called Tennis to the Max where they combine mental skills training with on court execution. She may be reached by e-mail at tina@tennistothemax.com or visit www.tennistothemax.com

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 French Open Apparel By Emilie Katz iming to reach his fourth straight grand slam final, U.S. Open and Olympic Gold winner Andy Murray will test his fitness and patience against the world’s best clay-courters at Roland Garros this year sporting an all-new adidas outfit.

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The Barricade SemiFitted Murray Crew (pictured here) in dark blue w/prime blue and vivid yellow, which will be paired with the Barricade 9.5 Short in the same colorway. He will also wear the Barricade 7.0 clay shoe in prime blue and running white. French Open and Wimbledon winners Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal will be looking for further Grand Slam glory this summer as they debut their latest Nike Tennis 2013 apparel and footwear. Federer will arrive in Spain sporting the Premier RF Crew in tourmaline and midnight navy. Federer’s shorts for the clay season will be the All Court 10� Short in midnight navy

with stadium grey and his trendy warmup jacket, the RF Knit Jacket will be featured in light steel heather and midnight navy. The Swiss’ shoe on the dirt this year will be the Zoom Vapor Tour 9 in midnight navy, poison green with white. Nadal will begin his road to Roland Garros donning the Premier Rafa Crew (pictured here) in fiberglass with midnight turquoise, which will be paired with the Premier Rafa 8� Woven Short in midnight turq with total crimson and fiberglass. Rafa’s warmup through the French Open will be the Premier Rafa Woven Jacket in midnight turq with pure platinum and metallic pewter, while his latest colorway for the comfortable Air Max Courtballistec 4.3 will be sport turq, midnight turq, white with violet. Jo-Wilfred Tsonga will look to conquer the red clay while debuting new styles for adi-

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das at the year’s second major at the end of May. Tsonga will be wearing a white, blue and yellow polo shirt. The shirt is 100 percent polyester and features a self-fabric collar with quarter zip- entry, color-blocking, applied three-stripes on the sleeves, mesh panel on the underarms and sides, contrast piping on the back and shoulders, and the adidas logo on the right chest. He will complete his adidas Roland Garros 2013 look with stylish Bermuda Shorts. This climacool short features an elastic waistband with internal drawcord, side pockets, contrast piping on back legs, stripe graphic on the sides, mesh on the inner legs, a printed Roland Garros insignia printed on the left leg and an adidas logo on his right leg. The shorts are 100 percent polyester and will be either blue and yellow or white and blue. This Ventilated ClimaCool technology will keep him cool and comfortable in even the warmest conditions by actively expelling heat and sweat away from his body. On the women’s side, 2008 French Open champion Ana Ivanovic will debut a new Adidas dress (pictured here) at this year’s clay court Grand Slam. Ana’s dress will be predominantly dark blue with an orange stripe contrast at the straps. Ivanovic wore the dress earlier this year in Indian Wells, Calif.; Miami, Fla.; and Monterrey, Calif.


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CHARITABLE Sol Schwartz of Holabird Sports Reaches Out to Superstorm Sandy Victims Late in the night on Sunday, Oct. 28, Hurricane Sandy roared through Long Island and the East Coast and destroyed everything in its path. Superstorm Sandy was officially only a Category One Storm, but what it lacked in force it made up for in sheer size and more effectively, timing. Had Sandy come through during the middle of the day, in the middle of the lunar cycle, it would have been handled. But Sandy was a Superstorm, striking New York and New Jersey at high tide, during a full moon and had a footprint of roughly 1.8 million square miles, from the Mid-Atlantic to Ohio and up into Canada. This was no ordinary, average storm. Couple the massive size and effect of the storm with the complacency that had been brewing ever since New York had “handled” Hurricane Irene just 15 months prior, and what you get is a state of shocked emergency and unprepared terror. At its peak, the new record high tide rose a full nine feet above average, nearly

three feet higher than the previous record, set in 1821. Sustained winds reached 90 miles per hour and gusted up to speeds in excess of 110 miles per hour. Any free-standing structure was under duress and anything not tied down became a projectile. Homes and businesses near the water were especially jeopardized due to the extreme high tide pouring water into the ground floor of many buildings. Particularly susceptible were any outdoor tennis facility that had recently raised its bubble to insulate the courts. The newly-raised tennis bubbles, with penetrable outer linings and delicate footing, were left standing in most cases. The tennis community, especially on the South Shore of Long Island or anyone near the water was devastated by the storm. Sol Schwartz, a retail manager and buyer at Holabird Sports, lives in Baltimore, Md., but was so distraught by the devastation on Long Island that he has decided to do something about it. Below is a letter Sol has made public. If anyone has the ability to donate, please do. Sol

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

and Holabird will be at the upcoming First Annual New York Tennis Expo and will also have a collection bucket at their booth. Feb. 8th was my 43rd birthday. This year was very different for me in that it was my first time celebrating the day without my father. Hours and hours of reflection have gone by since his passing in November. You think of the thousands of memories with each other and the rest of your family and friends, but I have also spent much of the time evaluating how our relationship has helped to mold me into the person that I have become. My dad and I were very different in the social realm. Generally speaking, he was much more outgoing and engaging than I am. There wasn’t a conversation not had, a joke not told, a complement not given, etc., etc. Me, I am much more of a reactionary person. Once the fire is stoked, look out. That being said, there is a trait that I learned from him over the 42 years that I was able to observe him, and that is that I would much rather put myself out on the behalf of others than to look out for my own needs. There is something about being able to make someone smile and laugh that provides a sense of true accomplishment. Like my dad, we may have a bit of a tendency to take this trait to an extreme, but will take whatever recourse is required to accomplish our goal. Now comes the perfect storm. Over the past year, various circumstances have drawn me into what could be considered a bit of an activist role in the U.S. tennis scene. Countless hours spent trying to help do what is right by my sport. Throughout these times, I have been very blessed to have befriended some pretty special people who have been partners in dealing with many of these issues. We


INITIATIVES all agree that there is a lack of proper leadership which has led to, as I see it, a serious lack of community support of one another. My father was a very large part of the tennis community that I was part of growing up in. He made it a point to welcome new people into it, and to support those that were already part of it. On Oct. 29, many of us watched as Hurricane Sandy decimated the New York/New Jersey area. To this day, life is not even close to being normal for a majority of people in that region. People are still displaced from their homes. Battles with insurance companies rage on. There is just a struggle to get back to business as usual. This region is also home to one of the larger tennis communities that this country has to offer. Many of the clubs have been severely damaged if not destroyed. Fellow teaching pros are still out of work or have lost much of their equipment. Current leadership has been slow to react to these matters in my eyes, so I have taken it upon myself to get in there and help out. Recently, I have acquired a wish list from several of the clubs in the Long Island regions for products that have been lost as a result of the storm. I have also been told of the many pros that have been out of work and have lost much income over the past several months. I am also aware of the individual loss that many of the families themselves have incurred, which would obviously include tennis equipment. Over the weeks since, I have been in contact with many of the manufacturers in the tennis industry, soliciting their help in getting product into the region to help fill these needs. This effort is still ongoing, and their involvement is stepping up. Now I am going to reach out to all of you for your help as well. On behalf of my dad’s memory, and in the spirit of teaching my own son Evan

some of the same lessons that I have learned, we a partnering up in a fundraising campaign to help raise as much money as we can in order to turn around and purchase as much of the product as we can to send in to the region to get as many people back on the courts as possible. I am asking you to please, if you have the capacity to do so, make a donation to the cause. In order to speed up our ability to do this, I have piggybacked on a friends existing not for profit foundation called “Tennis Pros of the Future.” This is a 501 (c) (3) foundation, so every donation is tax deductible. If you have the ability to contribute, please make all checks payable to: Tennis Pros of the Future 411 Samantha’s Court Reisterstown, MD 21136 Through my company I will be able to maximize every last dollar raised. I am fully aware of where tennis stands on the importance scale of many people. That being said, I also realize that tennis

is either a way of life for some in the New York region or an escape from what has become a difficult daily life for many of the others. By doing what we are trying to do, we will be able to help in a varying degree, contribute to a sense of normalcy for the people of the area. In the spirit of my late father, Herman Schwartz, I will continue to represent all that he represented and displayed to myself, my family, my friends, and my community. I may not have a lot, but I have a large heart and a big mouth that I am willing to use when necessary. I see this as a perfect time to start. Evan and I thank you very much for helping to support this project. Hopefully we can make a difference in a lot of lives. To my dad, thanks for instilling in me the importance of looking out for others. I could not have had a better example as to how to represent myself. On behalf of me and Evan, thanks for any help that you can provide … Sol gofundme.com/20pkdk

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Do New York Tennis Players

Need to Move to Florida? By Gilad Bloom s a New Yorker and a teaching pro, I have faced frustration from many parents regarding the challenges of raising a tennis player in the New York metropolitan area. First and foremost, the weather forces us to play indoors for more than half of the year, but the real problem is the cost of lessons and the court time, especially during the school year when we go indoors, as court time becomes difficult to come by and very expensive. The fact that New York kids play indoors for most of the year puts them at a disadvantage when they go out of state and compete against kids who are used to playing in hot and humid conditions year round. On top of that, if you take into consideration that the competitive nature of New York City makes the school regiment more intense than most other parts of the nation, you will come to the conclusion that it takes a lot of effort to produce a high-level player from this area. Some families choose to relocate to a

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warmer place or send their child to a boarding school/tennis academy. Another option is to have the child take home schooling courses and quit regular school which allows more time for practice in earlier times of the day. But for the vast majority of New York tennis parents, these options simply do not exist because of their job commitment, financial limitation or simply because they like the New York lifestyle and don’t want to relocate. I don’t think that it is right to remove a child from their natural environment, relocate them, put them in another school and change their life completely. There is a way to become a good tennis player in the Northeast region of the U.S.; it just takes more careful planning and discipline from both the player and their parents. It sounds great when you think of your child being able to play outdoors all year at cheaper rates in warm weather, but the truth of the matter is that many of the academies are pretty commercial, there is not too much technical instruction, and while they do spend a lot of time on the court, it’s not necessarily quality time. In my opinion, to get to a college level, there is absolutely no reason to move out of

No!

New York or to even take the child out of a regular school. Here are a few tips on how to increase the chance of a child to maximize their potential as a tennis player in the New York area:

1. Do the research Try out a few programs before you decide, the nearest club might not be the best one for your child. Sometimes it’s smarter to spend an extra 20-30 minutes in the car to travel to a better facility with better coaching. 2. Find a good coach early on and stick to him/her I have often seen parents switching coaches and programs frequently, which can be counter-productive to the player’s development. Like anyone else, the child needs stability and continuity. Tennis is a long-term sport that takes years to master, if you find a good coach or program that works for the player, it is best to keep the consistency. The kids who excel the most in my programs are those who stuck with me for years and took advantage of a continuing and consistent way of teaching.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


3. Don’t have more than one pro be the primary teacher I faced this dilemma many times in the past where the child will have a “summer coach” or a different coach for weekends at the country club. This too can be counter-productive to the player’s development. The child needs to know who their primary coach is … who is in charge of their technical development and who has the last word. All other pros should be considered as a supplement and should communicate their thoughts to the primary coach. I have had cases where a child would work with me for seven months and then would go to Florida and work with another pro for a week and when he came back, their strokes were all different without the pro telling me what they did, thus creating a very confusing situation for the child. 4. Sense of urgency on the court New York kids need to know from an early age that the New York reality is such that “time is money.” Due to the unique pace of life in our area, court time during prime time is extremely valuable, therefore, the child is expected to make the most of the time on the court, start on time, give 110 percent while out there and listen carefully to their instructors. 5. Off-court fitness The colder climate makes Northeastbased players more vulnerable to heat and humidity, making the fitness part of

your child’s development even more crucial for New Yorkers. They will have to do some extra work at the gym during the winter so they don’t melt when summer comes. 6. Take advantage of the summer and vacations Due to the grueling school schedule endured by New York area kids during the fall and winter, the summer becomes a vital time to step up the volume of hours on the court and play more practice sets and tournaments when court time is easier to get.

Gilad Bloom is a former ATP touring professional who, at his peak, was ranked 61st in singles and 62nd in doubles in the world. Five times an Israel’s Men’s Champion, three times in singles and twice in doubles, Gilad is currently the director of tennis at The Club of Riverdale. He was the director of tennis at John McEnroe Tennis Academy for two years, and before, that ran Gilad Bloom Tennis for nine years. He may be reached by phone at (914) 907-0041 or email bloom.gilad@gmail.com.

7. Think outside the box It may be challenging, but there are ways to find court time and quality practice time during the indoor season. I have kids coming for lessons before school, some of them come out of school early on certain days, some schools are flexible that way if you write a letter. Weekends are always a good time to play more tennis during the school year.

“There is a way to become a good tennis player in the Northeast region of the U.S.; it just takes more careful planning and discipline from both the player The bottom line is that it is very possible to produce good and their parents.” tennis players in the New York area. It’s just like anything else in New York … it’s just a bit harder than in other places in the country.

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www.juniortennisconsulting.com LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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and don’t be afraid of the serve. The information below will give you the start you need.

By Lisa Dodson he serve is the most important and the most under-practiced shot in the game of tennis. We all want a blistering serve, but wanting and owning are two very different things. Personally, I think that most players don’t fully understand the importance of the serve, so don’t put the effort into fully developing it. Most serves remain ordinary and ineffective. When one really wants something, they do something about it. It’s time to feel that way about the serve, TODAY. It really isn’t difficult to greatly improve your serve. The serve has the reputation of being so hard to learn that players just stop attempting to do better. Don’t believe the hype

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Four great reasons to start improving your serve 1. Get cheap points: Your serve doesn’t have to be perfect. You don’t need the trifecta of factors: Power, spin and accuracy, although that would be great. A serve with spin, speed or direction will be returned less often and with less accuracy. Basically, you get free points. If you can count on two no-returns or weak returns per game, it’s the rough equivalent as starting the game at 30-love. 2. Shorten point length in your favor: This is an extension of point number one. If you are just putting the ball in the box, you are not forcing play in your favor. Your opponent can get a jump on you by making you run on the return or hit winners off of your weak serve. This is in their favor. A stronger serve starts the point in your favor potentially elim-

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inating those pesky 30 ball rallies and giving you the opportunity to dictate play 3. Raise your overall confidence level: Go onto the court knowing that you can depend on your serve and your entire game will be elevated. There is nothing better than getting up to the line and feeling in control of the situation. It will give you newfound confidence and change your attitude towards the entire match. It also gives you the impression of being a formidable opponent. That’s always in your favor. 4. Be the “go to” doubles partner: Everyone will want to play with you and not against you. In doubles, the serve is particularly important for many reasons. First and foremost, you want your partner at the net to be a dominant, moving force. A strong serve will cause weaker returns and allow the partner to move and finish points quickly. Fast TIPS for immediate serve improvement

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

1. If you don’t throw well, start practicing throwing Throwing is the same action with the arm as serving and the same grip is held on the ball (see the photo above). Start with the correct grip, elbow back to the fence, with the triceps parallel to the ground. The non-dominant hand and arm are extended forward. Pull the non-dominant hand and arm to the same side of the body quickly before the throw arm moves. Aim to throw high rather than far using a very relaxed hand and arm. The fingers,


palm and inside wrist of the throwing hand will finish facing out away from the body just as they do when pronating to contact a ball with a racket. This all may sound complicated but it’s not. To use a well-known phrase … “Just Do It!” It’s far easier to throw than to serve and throwing will greatly improve your serve.

aim to the right (righties) of your target to allow for the curved flight of the ball. If you hit a slice and aim as though your ball will travel straight it will always go further left than you planned. If you don’t understand this, you will want to quit because your ball never lands in the service box.

2. Bite the bullet and change your grip

Effectively practice for short periods of time by using zones

There really is no choice in grip if you want a good serve. Move it over to Continental and practice the movements without hitting a ball. Get accustomed to what this grip feels like (see the photo above). Players often make a fatal error by trying to hit the serve without shadowing the motion or using a teaching tool to help them. As first the ball typically goes down, sharply to the left (for righty) and feels powerless. The player quits because it seems too difficult. Go through the motions first with the just the racket, toss arm and body without hitting a ball. When you do begin serving expect to spend some time “failing” before you start to improve. Results have nothing to do with learning correct technique. Making mistakes is essential to learning what is correct.

The Zone Practice article in the last issue (page 22 of the March/April 2013 issue) minimally covered the serve. Basically, the practice zone was depth in the service box not right, center or left directions. Now, we will get more specific on how to move the ball laterally in the service box. The photo above shows the deuce court service box marked off into three sections: Wide (forehand), At the Body and Up the Middle (backhand). 30-Minute Serve Practice (10 minutes per zone) Start first in the deuce court hitting to the wide zone. Check your grip to make sure it is correct. Serve to the zone. If your ball goes to the left of the zone, simply aim more to the right as the picture shows by markings on

the net top. Aim at points on the net top net that will allow for the curve of the ball flight. You’ll have to use your “Mind’s Eye” to aim at a different target on the net other than the end point you want the ball to land. For example: If you want to hit a wide serve, aim to the center net strap and your ball will curve nicely into place. For a body serve, aim further right and even further right for up the middle. Eventually, you won’t have to think about aiming to right because your mind and body will assimilate the information and this will be your new and improved way of placing the ball. Remember … your ball will always curve right to left (righty) and left to right (lefty) with a slice serve. So, on the ad court, you will still aim to the right of your target zones (righty) and left of target zone (lefty). If you are up to it, switch to the ad court and spend another 30 minutes. Otherwise, save it for another day. Practicing is about quality and quantity, not just quantity. Practice in batches for best results. There is no reason for anyone to settle for just getting the ball in the box. With this information and Zone Practice, you have a huge head start to learning, changing and upgrading your serve. Stop making excuses and start getting free points now! Lisa Dodson is owner of The Total Serve, a USPTA Pro 1, and a formerly WTA worldranked player. She may be reached by e-mail at ldodson57@yahoo.com or visit www.thetotalserve.com.

3. Hold a very loose and low grip on the racket A loose grip will ensure a loose arm and body. Since we are trying to gain racket head speed for power and spin, we need the racket head to move faster than the hand. A loose, low grip will let this happen 4. Understand that using the Continental grip you will naturally be putting spin on the ball (known as slice) for the serve This basically means that you are going towards the ball with the front edge of the racket. This spin makes the ball always travel in a right to left curve (righties) and left to right curve (lefties) towards the service box. If you are accustomed to your ball traveling flat and straight you aim directly for your target. With a slice serve, you must LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Nike Releases New Workout App Featuring Serena’s Core Workout he Nike Training Club (NTC) app has announced the debut of a new workout with Serena Williams. Serena’s Core Power workout features some of her favorite corestrengthening moves that have helped her stay at the top of women’s tennis for more than a decade. The 15-minute workout is perfect to tack on after a run, spin, cardio class or another NTC workout.

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“Core is incredibly important to my tennis game,” said Serena. “Having a strong, stable core is key to many of the movements I have to make on the court, and the core in general is the foundation for a lot of my strength.” In addition to Serena’s Core Power workout, new NTC workouts with gymnast Gabby Douglas, surfer Lakey Peterson and

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

track & field star Carmelita Jeter will launch monthly throughout the spring. Each workout will be 15-minutes and target a specific body part, making it easier than ever for women to customize their fitness regimen. “The great thing about Nike Training Club is that you can take it anywhere–it’s like having a personal trainer on your phone,” Serena said. “When I’m on the road and need a quick workout, I can do NTC in my hotel room; or if I feel like I need something extra after a training session, I can target a specific muscle group with the 15-minute workouts.” The NTC app also released an update to improve overall experience and performance. The latest version includes an approximate NikeFuel count and calories burned for every workout. The new metrics allow users to measure their activity level and gain better insight into their overall progress and performance. NTC includes more than 115 workouts including 120 drills that build on the fundamentals of strength, cardio and core training. The NTC app includes 15-, 30- or 45-minute workouts and is available for free on iTunes or for Android.


Super Foods and Snacks for Sports By Irina Belfer-Lehat ollowing proper nutrition preparation will guarantee an improved tennis match. Packing your lunch box with proper snacks and fluids will help you to avoid fatigue, cramps and will make you feel ready for any early, late or multiple matches. Here are some easy tips on what super snacks and drinks to have in your lunch box when playing in a tournament.

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l Freeze some water and Gatorade the night before and pack it with your snacks and drinks. It will help to keep your refreshments cool and fresh.

because they provide nine grams of fiber and less than four grams of fat. Always keep extra bars in your lunch box or bag. l Fruits are super snacks. Not only do fruits provide all kinds of vitamins and minerals, but the potassium in fruit helps to prevent muscle cramping. Bananas and oranges are the best sources of potassium and are the easiest to have on the run. Here is a tip … peel your orange in advance to avoid a mess on the court. l Good news for chocolate lovers … in addition to being a feel-good food, chocolate is loaded with antioxidants and minerals such as zinc. Zinc is proven to work as an anti-stressor and provides a

quick fuel release to your brain. Dark chocolate (more than 70 percent), provides up to 9.6 milligrams (64 percent of the Recommended Daily Allowance) of zinc per 100 gram serving (most bars are 50 grams to 100 grams). A small piece of dark chocolate is a must-have in your lunch box or tennis bag. Always remember to drink plenty of water and eat small, frequent meals during your tournament days, and let an expert analyze and personalize your diet. Irina Belfer-Lehat is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. She may be reached by phone at (917) 769-8031 or e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com.

l The myth about Vitamin Water and Smart Water … they have empowering flavor names like “Endurance,” “Energy,” “Essential” and “Focus.” Vitamin Water gives the illusion of a healthy, hydrating and rejuvenating miracle elixir. The bottles are beautiful, colorful, and the text on them is snappy and clever. However, they do not provide proper electrolytes and often are full of sugar that can lead to further dehydration. Low calorie Gatorades such as G2 do not provide proper hydration either. Regular water and Gatorade are the best sources of hydration. l Fiber is a super nutrient that keeps you full for a long time. Look for snack bars that have more than five grams of fiber in them. I like Fiber One snack bars LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Dr. Tom on Scholarship Money BY TOM FERRARO, PH.D. he cost of a college education is outrageous. To go to a top-ranked college will now cost you about $55,000 annually. The fact that the average annual family income is only $46,000 makes the cost of college a very serious problem. However, we all know the value of a diploma from a prestigious school. These elite graduates have demonstrated both intelligence and drive, and therefore, can demand high starting salaries. So how do you take advantage of tennis skills to land some scholarship money? How do you put a plan together that will improve your chances of obtaining money? Here are the 10 things I recommend to parents:

for them. Do this repeatedly, not just once.

1) Realize that the on-court behaviors of the players, their sportsmanship and their demeanor, as well as their performance, are being observed by future college coaches. I have heard many college coaches tell me they will not select players for their teams if they fear that the player or the player’s family will be too much trouble to manage.

5) If you are serious about scholarships, you need to make a commitment to tennis alone. I know many elite coaches who expect a full commitment by the player to get into their elite program. Absences from training because of conflicts with other sports are problematic on the top level, where many hours of training per day are required.

2) Realize that you must market yourself to be seen. Develop an e-mail list of coaches and send them the player’s highlight reel, clippings and the player’s interest in playing

6) Conversely, do not overdo training. Make sure there is time for rest and recovery.

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3) Use all of your social capital to connect with the coaches you are interested in. The role of the parent is to have an established network of connections and then to use them accordingly. 4) The earlier you start the player out in a sport, the better. Studies in learning and neurological development show that it takes about 10 years or 10,000 hours to develop elite level skills, so the earlier you start, the better. This does not mean you push your kid into tennis, but if they show an interest, by all means support it.

7) Shield young players from any talk of

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

money. This will serve to make them feel guilty and add counter-productive pressure. 8) Get the best coaching you can afford. The great coaches have superior knowledge and are connected to the college scene. When they make recommendations, it carries weight. 9) Make sure you spend some time teaching the player how to manage stress, anxiety and disappointment as they move up the ladder and face tougher competition. 10) Make sure that their grades are kept at the highest level possible. This means you must monitor study habits daily. If you are thinking, “Gee … this seems like a lot of work.” Well, you’re right it is. The competition is fierce to get to the top nowadays. When I treat these elite players, I tend to see them as young professionals long before they are paid as such. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.


U.S. Open Prize Money to Reach $50 Million by 2017 he USTA has announced that in keeping with its mission to grow the sport of tennis, it has reached agreement with the ATP and WTA that ensures the vitality and competitiveness of the U.S. Open as a world class, premier event for many years to come. Presently, the USTA is in the midst of several strategic initiatives, all with a common goal of growing tennis at every level in the United States, from youth to seniors, and from those just starting out in the sport to professionals at the highest level of the game. For the U.S. Open and the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center the goal is twofold: To transform the National Tennis Center over the next several years into the most modern and fanand player-friendly tennis center in the world and to continue to attract the world’s best tennis players. In line with this goal, the USTA has reached a five year agreement with the ATP and WTA on U.S. Open prize money. As part of this long-term vision, the

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USTA will provide $50 million in U.S. Open prize money by 2017. Additionally, the USTA will increase base prize money for the 2013 U.S. Open by an additional $4.1 million above the previously announced increase of four million dollars. The original announcement was made in December 2012. Base prize money for the 2013 U.S. Open will now total more than $33.6 million, a more than $8.1 million increase over the $25.5 million available to players at the 2012 U.S. Open. Also, beginning in 2015, the U.S. Open will conclude on the second Sunday of the two-week event with the men’s singles championship. To allow for a day of rest for the finalists, the men’s singles semifinals will be played on Friday. The women’s singles championship will be played on Saturday. “This excellent outcome for the sport of tennis wouldn’t have been possible without the open-mindedness and fairness of USTA President Dave Haggerty and the USTA

staff,” said Roger Federer, a 17-time Grand Slam champion and president of the ATP Player Council. “They approached our concerns with a true spirit of partnership, and as president of the ATP Player Council, I am personally grateful for their support. Everyone I have spoken with is excited about the increases in prize money, as well as the agreement to change the schedule for 2015 and beyond. The U.S. Open is very special, and we all look forward to great competition at Flushing Meadows later this year, and in the years yet to come.” The USTA will announce the exact round-by-round distribution of the total prize money increase for the 2013 U.S. Open this summer. Further year-by-year prize money increases are expected to be announced annually prior to that year’s U.S. Open. This year’s U.S. Open is scheduled for Aug. 26-Sept. 9, with the U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament beginning on Aug. 20.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Playing on a Tennis Team This Season?

Pick the Right One! By Lonnie Mitchel have written a variety of articles in the past and believe in the importance of playing tennis as the sport of a lifetime. Still, tennis players have to learn the skills of a team environment, not just because you might find yourself on a collegiate team or maybe playing on a USTA tennis team at some point in your life. Teamwork is a life skill that can be used at school or in business and on a doubles court. A group of tennis players playing on a collegiate or USTA team does not necessarily constitute a team. Teams normally have members with complementary skills who are able to generate synergy through a coordinated effort which allows each member to maximize his/her strengths and minimize his/her weaknesses. If you truly want to be part of a USTA team or play on a collegiate team and maximize your experience, look at these qualities as described here and find those who share that philosophy. Taking your tennis skills that can have a long life span and putting them into a team structure can provide you with some of the most memorable experiences you could have oncourt.

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Billie Jean King has long been a champion for social change and equality. King created new inroads for women in sports and beyond during her legendary career and she continues to make her mark today. Among her many accomplishments was the creation of World TeamTennis, which made its inaugural appearance on the national stage in the 1970s. Growing up on Long Island, I remember going to the Nassau Coliseum and watching World TeamTennis and seeing top-level professionals, such as Billie Jean and Virginia Wade, playing in a team format for the very first time. Currently, we still have a professional World TeamTennis squad that plays in the New York area, the New York Sportimes. Davis Cup and Federation Cup have a rich tennis history taking worldclass tennis players and having them represent their native country in a team format. We forget that team tennis is an important staple of our sport. The U.S. Open, the French Open, the Australian Open and Wimbledon are the most celebrated events in our sport, but we rarely discuss the Davis Cup or Federation Cup. Many of you reading this article are about to begin playing for USTA leagues this spring and perhaps have a

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

regular team that you compete with each year. I have also heard of those who also have joined teams and have had less than a great experience. The one common complaint I usually hear is that there is no team chemistry. I described in the opening paragraph of what a team is, and therefore, if one had a less than great experience, then I suggest to “find the right team for yourself.” I am lucky enough to work at the collegiate level, coaching two teams (men’s and women’s) for the State University of New York. I know that for our teams to be successful and for the experience to be optimized, you need to do the following: l Check your ego at the door; l Be flexible; l Listen to the captain and/or coach and accept criticism; and l Be all in and go with the flow. How many times have you seen players play opera music (I, I, I, I, Me, Me, Me) and when you do see that most teams are bound for a self-destruction sooner or later. In closing, use the advice I have given above and get yourself on the right team based on the philosophies described. I know you will have the best experience ever playing team tennis this season and beyond. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the Maccabiah Games in Israel this summer for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.


B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

lay will begin for the USTA Adult leagues the week of May 13. The 2013 Captains Scheduling Meeting is set for Monday, May 6 at 7:00 p.m. at the Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y. We have a record number of 292 teams this summer playing in the 18 & Over, 40 & Over, and 55 & Over Divisions. For the 18 & Over and the 40 & Over League, playoffs will be held the week of July 28. Regional Championships will be held the weekend of Aug. 2 at Carefree Racquet Club in Merrick, N.Y. Sectional Championships will be as follows:

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l August 9-11—18 & Over 2.5, 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0+ l August 16-18—18 & Over 3.0, 40 & Over 3.5 and 4.5+ l August 23-25—18 & Over 4.5, 40 & Over 3.0 and 4.0 l September 20-22—55 & Over 6.0, 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 All the above Championships will be held in Schenectady, N.Y. National dates and

locations can be found on the USTA site, www.usta.com. Things to keep in mind for the upcoming season: The 18 & Over League locally is one court of singles and two courts of doubles at the 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5 and 5.0+ Levels. The 5.0 Level is able to put two 5.5 players on their team. When you get to the playoff level and beyond, you will be playing two courts of singles and three courts of doubles. Therefore, we are allowing a 16-player maximum (14 for the 2.5 and 5.0+ which remains one singles and two doubles) to ensure that you having enough players to advance. This format is being used this year due to the limited court time to allow clubs to get all of their makeups in from Superstorm Sandy. Now seeing the available court time the clubs have supplied us with, we would not have been able to get the matches all scheduled had both the 18 & Over and the 40 & Over been five courts. The 40 & Over League will be played on two courts of singles and three courts of doubles

for the local season though Nationals. The roster maximum is 18 players. The League is run at the 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5+ Levels, with the 4.5 Level able to add two 5.0 players. The 55 & Over League will be played on three courts of doubles with all three courts being doubles. The roster limit is 18 players. The League is run at the combined levels of 6.0 (a 2.5 and a 3.5, or two 3.0 players), 7.0 (a 3.0 and a 4.0, or two 3.5 players), 8.0 (a 3.5 and a 4.5, or two 4.0 players) and 9.0 ( a 4.0 and a 5.0 or two 4.5 players). Matches are $20 per person with the roster fee of $28 to join a team. If you are looking for a team, please contact me at kathym65@aol.com. Lastly, good luck to all the mixed teams that will be playing in playoffs and those that will be advancing to Sectionals! Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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U.S. Open National Playoffs Set for National Tennis Center June 9-15 he USTA has announced that the U.S. Open National Playoffs will return for a fourth year to expand the footprint of the U.S. Open to cities nationwide by providing the opportunity for all players 14 years of age and older to earn a berth into the U.S. Open. For the USTA Eastern Section, playoffs are scheduled for Sunday-Saturday, June 9-15 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. The U.S. Open National Playoffs will again include both men’s and women’s singles, as well as mixed-doubles in 2013. The U.S. Open National Playoffs men’s and women’s singles champions earn a wild card into the U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament, held the week prior to the U.S. Open. The U.S. Open National Playoffs mixed-doubles champions receive a wild card into the main draw of the 2013 U.S. Open.

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“Anyone who dreams of playing in the U.S. Open—top junior players, collegians, teaching professionals, ‘weekend warriors,’ or recreational players—can make that dream a reality through the U.S. Open National Playoffs,” said Dave Haggerty, USTA chairman, CEO, and president. “The level of singles and mixed doubles competition is always strong, while our committed USTA sections do a terrific job running the sectional qualifying tournaments. It all makes the event unique and special for our sections, U.S. Open fans and tennis players across the country.” Registration and additional information for each of the 13 sectional qualifying is available online at www.USOpen.org/NationalPlayoffs. The entry fee for each of the sectional qualifying tournaments is $100 for singles and $120 for each mixed-doubles team ($60 per player). All players competing must have a current USTA membership valid through Aug. 26, 2013. The U.S. Open National Playoffs begin as a series of sectional qualifying tournaments and will be held in 13 USTA Sections throughout the country. The 13 men’s, women’s and mixed doubles champions or top available finishers from each sectional qualifying tournament will advance to the U.S. Open National Playoffs–Men’s and Women’s Singles Championship, held Aug. 16-19, and the Mixed-Doubles Championship, held Aug. 21-24. All three tournaments will take place in conjunction with the New Haven Open at Yale presented by First Niagara, an Emirates Airline U.S. Open Series event. A player may only compete in singles and/or mixed doubles at one sectional qualifying tournament during a calendar year. Players competing in men’s singles or women’s singles and mixeddoubles may opt to compete at different sectional qualifying tournaments for each event (one for singles and one for mixed doubles). The draw size at each

sectional qualifying tournament will be a maximum of 256 for each singles event and a maximum of 128 teams for mixed doubles. Participants can be of any playing level, giving everyone an equal opportunity to advance. More than 1,200 players competed in the 2012 U.S. Open National Playoffs, ranging from experienced professionals who were once ranked in the Top 50, to upcoming junior players, to current and former college standouts to recreational players of all playing abilities and walks of life. Participants included those com-

peting for charities as well as pastors, musicians, lawyers, reporters and stayat-home mothers. Former notable participants include Olympic skier Bode Miller and ESPN’s Mike Greenberg, who teamed with six-time U.S. Open champion Chris Evert in mixed-doubles. The U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament will be held Aug. 20-23 and the U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles Championship begins Aug. 28 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. The 2013 U.S. Open begins on Aug. 26.

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Bob Litwin and Lonnie Mitchel Named Coaches of

Maccabiah USA Grand Masters Tennis Team arty Bloom and Sam Sporn, 19th Maccabiah USA Grand Masters Tennis co-chairs, have announced that Bob Litwin, International Tennis Federation (ITF) World Champion, will coach the team and be assisted by Lonnie Mitchel at the Games in July. The Grand Masters Division is for athletes aged 65 to 80-plus years. After playing tennis for Great Neck South High School, Litwin did not play competitively until he tried out for the Maccabiah USA Open Tennis team at 32. He did not make that team but made it his mission to compete for the USA at the next Maccabiah Games in 1985. He qualified for the Masters Tennis team at those Games, traveled to Israel for the competition and won bronze and gold medals. Since then, he has become a local senior legend, winning the ITF World Championship and 14 USTA National Championships, achieving the number one world ranking in 2005 and being an eight-time member of the USA Senior Davis Cup Team.

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“We are thrilled to have such a talented player and coach leading our team,” said Bloom and Sporn. “We have a very impressive team including 12 alumni of past World Maccabiah Games, so we are very excited about the opportunities ahead.” Litwin credits much of his success to creating and following through on The Fo-

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

cused Game Method, a system he created, which develops a player’s focus in highly competitive experiences. He works as a high performance coach with Wall Street hedge fund managers, traders and athletes. Litwin uses the athlete as a model for high performance to help people bring their best to their jobs and will use that methodology as the head coach and competitor for the Grand Masters Tennis team this summer. “Returning to Israel to coach and compete as a member of Team USA at the Maccabiah Games is very important to me,” Coach Litwin said. “Tennis and Judaism are two of my passions and the Maccabiah Games provide the perfect opportunity to combine them. I hope to help all members of our team compete to the best of their ability and enjoy the magic of Israel.” Team members include: Alan Arsht of New York, N.Y.; Harris Barer of New York, N.Y.; Marty Bloom of New York, N.Y.; Barry Brahver of New York, N.Y.; Daniel Burack of Harrison, N.Y.; William Cohon of Shorline, Wash.; Ralph Finerman of Santa Monica, Calif.; Gerald Friedman of Ingelwood, Calif.; Lloyd Glazer of Boca Raton, Fla.; Edward Gluck of Lawrence, N.Y.; Lawrence Greenspon of Longboat Key, Fla.; Howard Guggenheim of Boca Raton, Fla.; James Lipschutz of Havertown, Pa.; Bob Litwin (Head Coach) of Glenwood Landing, N.Y.; Lazar Lowinger of Newton, Mass.; Lonnie Mitchel (Assistant Coach) of East Meadow, N.Y.; Marc Roth of Oakland, Calif.; James Schreiber of Greenwich, Conn.; Irwin Shorr of Olney, Md.; Paul Slayton of Southampton, N.Y.; Bob Sockolov of San Francisco, Calif.; Sam Sporn of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Arnold Stark of Bronx, N.Y.; Bruce Unterman of Bloomington, Ill.; Mark Willner of New York, N.Y.; Michael Wise of Lawrence, N.Y.; and Gerald Zahler of Beachwood, Ohio.


Point Set Re-Opens After Post-Hurricane Sandy Construction n March 9, Point Set Tennis held an open house. Hurricane Sandy did quite a number on the club, but after all of the construction was finally finished, it was time to celebrate. The complete staff was available from 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. for the junior players and from 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. for the adult players. The club stayed open afterwards for free open play until 11:00 p.m. A total of 300 players showed up to celebrate the brand new facility, as different tennis activities were organized on each of the seven new “U.S. Open-style” tennis courts and light refreshments were served. Raffles for a brand new tennis racquet and other equipment were also held throughout

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the evening. The Point Set management said they feel very blessed that the ownership showed tremendous commitment getting the club up and running as soon as possible, as well as making the investment

to upgrade the club to a state-of-the-art, modern facility. Managing Partner Marc Kemp and Club Manager Lori Pujol spent countless hours making sure Point Set Tennis will be better than ever!

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U.S. Falls to Djokovic-Led Serbia 3-1 in Davis Cup Play A match that featured early uncertainty for Serbia’s Novak Djokovic finished as another victory for the world’s number one player and his country, as Djokovic shook off an early ankle injury to defeat world number 20 Sam Querrey, the top-ranked American, 7-5, 6-7(4), 6-1, 6-0, in the Davis Cup World Group Quarterfinal tie, 3-1, on an indoor hard court at Boise State University’s Taco Bell Arena. Early in the first set, Djokovic appeared to injure his right ankle and took a medical timeout. He returned, and served 12 aces to Querrey’s seven, improving his record against Querrey to 6-1 and his Davis Cup singles record to 22-7. Querrey, battling a pectoral injury of his own that limited his serve, moved to 4-6 in Davis Cup singles and 3-5 in live rubbers, with all three of those live wins coming this year. Because Djokovic won the clinching tie in four sets, the fourth singles tie, American John Isner versus Viktor Troicki of Serbia, was not played. Serbia improved to 2-0 against the United States in Davis Cup and, along with Croatia and Spain, remains one of only three countries to have a winning record against the U.S. Davis Cup Team. Jim Courier’s record in three years as U.S. Davis Cup Captain is 4-3, 1-2 at home.

Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

“Obviously it’s very strong emotion when you play for your country,” said Djokovic. “I guess that’s the biggest reason why I kept playing. Injuries are a part of sport, and you try to avoid as much as you can as an athlete. The nature of the injury is still to be determined.” In Friday’s Singles A match, Djokovic defeated Isner 7-6(5), 6-2, 7-5, while in Singles B action, it was Querrey who defeated Troicki, 7-6(1), 3-6, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. In Saturday action in Doubles, the Serbian duo of Ilija Bozoljac & Nenad Zimonjic defeated the world number one-ranked doubles team of Bob & Mike Bryan, 7-6(5), 7-6(1), 5-7, 4-6, 15-13. In Sunday’s Singles C action, it was Djokovic who sealed the win for his homeland with his win over Querrey,

7-5, 6-7(4), 6-1, 6-0. The Singles D match between Isner and Troicki was not played due to Djokovic clinching the win. Serbia advances to play the Canada/Italy winner in the World Group Semifinals Sept. 13-15. Serbia would host Canada and travel to Italy. The United States is expected to be a seeded country in the 2014 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas World Group. The draw will be held following the Semifinals and World Group Playoff in September. “The whole week has been great,” said Querrey. “We had an unbelievable five or six days of practice. We fought hard in the tie. The venue was amazing. The city is great. So I thought everything was perfect. We have no complaints. I thought the fans did a great job coming out and cheering. Boise is a great tennis town. Hopefully, we can have another tie here one day.” Djokovic had his ankle tightly wrapped and had taken anti-inflammatory pills after the match. He plans to travel home to Monte Carlo to have an MRI. He was hoping to be ready to play the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, which he considers his home event, but didn’t sound convinced he’d be ready to play when the event gets underway on April 14.

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18 GOODFRIEND DRIVE E A S T H A M P TO N , N Y


K E E P I N G

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PLAIN By Richard Thater he tennis landscape is littered with labels and language that often does not help us say what we mean. “Take the net” has led generations of players to take the wrong place on the doubles court, usually one racket length from the net. If you are stuck with a bossy partner, you may even be told to stand in the alley and “cover down the line.” Modern tacticians recommend that the forward player stand at the spot where two diagonal lines bisect the service box. A plainer way to say that is to tell the non-serving player to stand in the middle of the service box and change his position as play progresses. And what purpose is served by using geographical terminology to describe the grips we use? Is an Eastern Grip more spiritual? Most knowledgeable players understand that those terms evolved because the different playing surfaces in the eastern and western United States required different grips to efficiently play the game. But in our multicultural world, that information has little practical value. The new trend is to designate grips by the position of the palm relative to the racket handle—palm up/western, palm behind/eastern, and palm on top/continental. Large organizations, whether educational, business or governmental, tend to develop their own jargon. And the language used is expected to serve many masters. Does anyone disagree that bureaucratic language thwarts communication? Employees of the federal government in the United States recognized this problem and began meeting to try to spread the use of plain language. Most recently, President Obama signed the Plain Language Act of 2010, requiring agencies to write in plain language. Plain Language.gov explains its purpose this way:

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Plain language (also called plain English) is communication your audience can understand the first time they read or hear it … No one technique defines plain language. Rather, plain language is defined by results—it is easy to read, understand, and use. So, let’s take a look at a typical service lesson. “Good morning, today we will learn how to serve a tennis ball using the continental grip which requires you to place the knuckle of your index finger over bezel number two on your racket handle and pronate your forearm as you strike the ball at the top of the toss.” At this point, students will be readying themselves to ask if this stuff will be on the test. But I could make things worse by telling the student that a great proponent of the continental grip was Fred Perry, a champion in the 1930s, whose extreme continental grip on the forehand probably contributed to him blowing out his elbow in a match and prohibited him from further success in tennis. I think pronation is an overworked word, and even seems inaccurate. Checking an

anatomy atlas did not help, so I turned to Wikipedia for a simple definition. I was looking for plain language but instead found this—“pronation is a rotational movement of the forearm at the radio ulnar joint … when standing in the anatomical position pronation will move the palm of the hand from an anterior-facing position to a posterior-facing position without an associated movement of the shoulder.” No way this lesson passes the plain language test-it is not easy to understand or use. None of this is meant to disparage the work of the many thousands of teachers and writers who struggled to explain how we could improve our play on the tennis court. Rather, it suggests a simple language tool we can use to improve the way we speak to students, especially those new to the game. They want a peanut butter sandwich, so why tell them how to grow peanuts? Richard Thater is director of 10 & Under Tennis at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills N.Y. He is PTR-certified in Junior Development. He may be reached by phone at (917) 749-3255 or e-mail richthater@aol.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


USTA Eastern Long Island

Regional Volunteer Board of Directors Executive Board Daniel Burgess President

Robert Fernandez Community Development Chair, Nassau

Marian Morris Events Planner, Nominating Committee Chair

Scott Axler Past President, Boys Ranking Chair, Junior Competition

Sunny Fishkind Public Parks Advocate, Facebook Manager

Melanie Rubin Community Development Chair

Mike Pavlides Vice President, Web Site Manager, Scholastic Representative Chair/Nassau

Terry Fontana Rally Day Chair, Corporate Challenge Chair

Craig Fligstein Secretary/Treasurer

Regional Board

Herb Harris Volunteer Chair, Grant Committee Chair

Brenda White Nassau County Delegate Athletic Director Liaison Ed Wolfarth Grievance Committee Chair

Anneleis Karp President Emeritus

Jacki Binder Public Relations Chair, Web Site Manager

Jonathan Klee League Liaison/League Appeals & Inquiries

Jay Binder Legal Counsel

Ronni Klein League Liaison

Bob Coburn Membership/Marketing

Eileen Leonard Competition Training Chair

Martin DeVito Strategic Planning & Development Chair

Kathy Miller USTA Leagues Coordinator

Roberta Feldman Girls Ranking Chair

Akiko Tohmatsu Suffolk County Delegate

USTA Eastern Long Island Staff Bill Mecca Tennis Service Representative mecca@eastern.usta.com

Emily Moore Multicultural Committee Chair

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A Message From Long Island Region President

Daniel Burgess Welcome to our 23rd Annual USTA Long Island Region Awards Dinner, a grand-slam celebration honoring our local tennis champions. I am very proud to recognize so many terrific achievements here tonight—Nassau and Suffolk Counties are well-represented by our many award winners who have accomplished so much, both on the court with their stellar play and off the courts with their time and generosity. Here are some highlights: l Five of our league teams went to, or are headed to, their national championships. l Our Nassau Boys High School Singles Champion was the New York State Singles Champ for the second year in a row. l Nassau’s high school girls took first, second and third place at the State Championships. And Long Island’s achievements went beyond the tennis court: l A high school coach collected racquets and restrung them at his own expense so that his players could compete. l A local boy worked with his neighbors and others in the tennis community to turn a run-down church parking lot into a beautiful, fully-functioning tennis court and gathering place. l Our volunteers across the Region dedicated more time than we can count to supporting the tennis community—introducing the game to kids, running local programs and workshops, coordinating tennis fundraisers that support numerous charitable organizations, and much more. This past year may best be remembered for Superstorm Sandy and its impact on Long Island. While many in our Region lost so much, the tennis community stepped up to help where it could. In the aftermath of Sandy, many of our member organizations opened their doors and their hearts to their neighbors, offering hot showers, cell phone charging stations, Internet access and hot meals to those in need. Others collected clothing and food that they brought to the hardest hit areas. Our Regional volunteers coordinated with retailers and others to collect equipment and provide needed assistance to facilities and tennis pros who were struggling. Special thanks to Sol Schwartz from Holabird for working with manufacturers to secure many needed supplies. Our

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Region, along with the Eastern Section and National USTA, continue to offer grant money to organizations, facilities and individuals within the tennis community who are still struggling in the wake of Sandy. With the recent reopening of Long Beach Tennis Center and Point Set Racquet Club, the Long Island tennis community is on its way back and will be stronger than ever. A hearty congratulations to all of our award winners. Your achievements last year were extraordinary. I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who volunteered his or her time during this past year. The Long Island Region shines with the effort put forth by everyone here tonight. I would also like to express my deep appreciation to all of the members of our Long Island Regional Board of Directors for their hard work. This group of dedicated volunteers has helped the Region achieve greatness yet again. Some highlights include: l A re-designed Web site that is more inviting and easier to navigate, resulting in many more people visiting our online home. l Our digital newsletter celebrating its one-year anniversary with readership that continues to grow. l Offering numerous 10 & Under workshops at many community events and being asked to participate in even more this year. l Coordinating kids play days throughout the Region. l Our Rally Day featuring world champion Chanda Rubin, which was our biggest and best yet. l A Facebook Page which continues to add “Friends.” l Grants awarded to numerous deserving programs. l Our Second Annual Club & Corporate Challenge, which brought together groups from across the Region, all in the spirit of supporting our returning U.S. military heroes. l Our first-ever Adult League Appreciation Weekend as our way of saying thank you to all of our dedicated league players. A special thank you to Marian Morris, our hard-working events planner, who continues to put so much of herself into creating a great night for everyone. I would like to recognize the Eastern Section for its continuing support, and thank the Section representatives and those from other Regions who are joining us tonight. Daniel Burgess, President USTA Eastern Long Island

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


USTA Eastern Long Island 23rd Annual

Awards Dinner Program 5:15 p.m.................................................................................Registration and Photos 6:00 p.m. ......................................................................................................Cocktails 7:00 p.m. ....................................................................................................Gala Buffet 8:00 p.m. ........................................................................................Awards Ceremony 9:00 p.m...........................................................................................................Dessert Raffle drawings to be held throughout the evening.

USTA Eastern Long Island 23rd Annual

Awards Dinner Sponsors and Supporters A Taste of Home Bakery Advantage Tennis AMF Wantagh Lanes Bertucci’s Bethpage State Park Blue Bungalow Carefree Racquet Club Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery & Aquarium Eastern Athletic Clubs Enviro Tote Fairway Robert Fernandez Gamma Sports Golfsmith Grand Slam Tennis

Head/Penn Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis Hicksville Community Tennis Association IHOP Joe Dinoffer—On court/Off court Junior Tennis Foundation Long Beach Tennis Center Martha Clara Vineyards Merrick Theatre & Center for the Arts Modell’s Sporting Goods Moe’s Southwest Grill Long Island Pilot Pen Tennis PinkCalyx.com Jewelry Professional Tennis Registry, PTR Point Set Racquet Club Port Washington Tennis Academy

Robbie Wagner Tennis Academy Sportime Starbuck’s Swirlz World Tennis Industry Association The Bayou Restaurant Total Tennis USPTA Eastern Division USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Home of the U.S. Open USTA Eastern Section Vincent’s Clam Bar Volkl Westhampton Beach Tennis

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USTA Eastern Long Island 23rd Annual

Prestigious Award Winners Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award Susan Alvy Vitas Gerulaitis for the Love of Tennis Award Terry Fontana Arthur Ashe Multicultural Award Al Gunther Madeline Zausner Junior Tournament Director Clark D. Ruiz II Tennis Professional of the Year Dory Levinter Rose Buck Scalamandre Participating Family Lapierre Family Corporate Award Fairway

Private Club of the Year Piping Rock Country Club Special Community Service Award Richie Bustamonte & Kareem Harris Innovative Tennis Program of the Year Butch Seewagen (CATS) Good Samaritan Awards Carefree Racquet Club, Holy Family School (Hicksville, N.Y.), Eastern Athletic Club/Blue Point & Rockville Racquet Club Press Service Award Bob Frick & Abby Lerner Retailer of the Year A Taste of Home Bakery

Tennis Family of the Year Siddiqui Family

Charles Karp Memorial Award for Overcoming Adversity Blades Family, Joseph Esposito, Rhonda Dauway & MaryAnn Cluess

Adult Volunteers of the Year Flo Levine & Zoila Savillo

Anuj Agarwal Sportsmanship Award Jonathan Paris

Junior Volunteer of the Year Shawn Kshatriya

Jennifer Sherry Sportsmanship Award Jasmine Abidi

Outdoor Site of the Year Malverne School District Tennis Club of the Year Huntington Indoor Tennis

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


USTA Eastern Long Island 23rd Annual

Award Winners 2012 High School Champions New York State & Nassau County Boy’s Singles Champion Josh Levine, Cold Spring Harbor High School Nassau County Boy’s Doubles Champions Matt Barry & Ethan Bogard, Long Beach High School Suffolk County Boy’s Singles Jeremy Dubin, Southampton High School Suffolk County Boy’s Doubles Jeff Cherkin & Kyle Alper, Half Hollow Hills East High School New York State Girls Singles Champion Vivian Cheng, Syosset High School Nassau County Girls Singles Champion Alexa Graham, Garden City High School Nassau County Girls Doubles Champions Gabriella Leon & Veronika Paikan, Hewlett High School Suffolk County Girls Singles Zenat Rashidzada, Half Hollow Hills West High School Suffolk County Girls Doubles Amanda Luper & Allison Huber, Half Hollow Hills East High School Nassau County Coach of the Year Crystal Boyd, Garden City High School

Suffolk County Coach of the Year Dave Pia, William Floyd High School

Eastern Section Junior Award Winners Boys 10s Vincent C. Fermo Alexander Karman

Girls 18s Hannah L. Camhi Vivian Cheng

Long Island Junior Award Winners Boys 12s Tommy George Srisuro Abhinav Raj Srivastava

Boys 12s Cannon Kingsley Brian Shi

Boys 14s Zachary Ian Khazzam Serge Ushkevich-Zezulin

Boys 14s Athell Patrick Bennett Keegan James Morris

Boys 16s Arnav Raj Srivastava Matthew Bahar

Boys 16s Daniel Grunberger Josh Silverstein

Boys 18s Richard William Liell Brett Titcomb

Boys 18s Josh M. Levine Vihar Shah

Girls 12s Ivanna Nikolic Denise Lai

Girls 12s Lea Ma Olivia Rose Scordo

Girls 14s Michelle Carnovale Adele Sukhov

Girls 14s Alexa Graham Claire Handa

Girls 16s Katherine Changtroraleke Danielle Mirabella

Girls 16s Madison Battaglia Bridget Elaine Harding

Girls 18s Olivia Marie Ammirati Kerrin Elizabeth Toner

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USTA Eastern Long Island 23rd Annual

Award Winners Eastern Section Adult Rankings Men’s Open Andrew F. Adler Christopher A. Ujkic Men’s 25s Jack Eichler Rodolfo F. Novello Men’s 30s Adrian Chirici Richard E. Becker Men’s 35s Adrian Chirici Jason C. Hand

Men’s 70s Bob Hoffman Raymond K. Rahbari Men’s 75s George Miller William L. Rivers Men’s 80s John M. May Lee J. Roth Women’s Open Joan Manfredi-Carter Aylin Mehter Women’s 40s Maritoni C. Carlos Diann Starcke

Men’s 40s Adrian Chirici Chris Gasiorowski

Women’s 45s Maritoni C. Carlos

Men’s 45s Jonathan Klein Jeffrey S. Snow

Women’s 50s Rosemary Cosentino Eileen Walker

Men’s 50s John Hakanson Mason Olds

Eastern Section Adult Doubles

Men’s 55s Richard W. Adler John Titcomb Men’s 60s Richie Bustamonte Alan E. Chaskin

Men’s Open Zane Siddiqui/Naeem Siddiqui Troy Michael Haas/Joseph M. Falcetta Men’s 40s Robert S. Chesney/Eric Chaffer Adam L. Rosen/Whitney T. Kraft

Women’s 4.0 Maritoni C. Carlos

Eastern Section NTRP Doubles

Men’s 55s David J. Brent/Mark M. Harrison Men’s 4.0 Thomas Gross/Casey M. Schnabel Men’s 60s Casey M. Schnabel/Paul F. Schnabel Douglas A. Barrow/Robert Parnell McKenna Women’s 3.0 Rafael Picon/Richie Bustamonte Maria Jose Soto Beheran/Donna Women’s Open Julie Elbaba/Nicolle Stracar Celeste Rose Matute/Aylin Mehter Women’s 40s Diann Starcke/Connie Insignares

Hallas Women’s 3.5 Ellen June Siddiqui/Paula Moscowitz Kathleen Thompson/Ellen June Siddiqui

League Teams That Went to Nationals

Women’s 45s Maritoni C. Carlos/Susan A. Bacey 3.0 Women/Point Set Captain Nadine Letts Women’s 50s Jackie L. Gaines/Angela Castillo Senior 3.0 Women/Point Set Captain Marilyn Shimon Women’s 60s Peggy Gluck/Nadine Netter Senior 3.5 Women/Carefree Sandy Cooper/Camille Bauer Captain Bonnie Kolenberg

Eastern Section NTRP Rankings Men’s 3.5 Andrew Camacho Mariusz Jaskowski Men’s 4.0 Jack Eichler Paul F. Schnabel

Men’s 45s Women’s 3.5 Men’s 65s Jeffrey S. Snow/Todd Ehren Fran Breckon Robert Costanzo Ellen June Siddiqui Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com 70 Hoffman Bob

Super Senior 9.0 Men/Jericho Westbury Captain Ed Wolfarth 3.5 Women/Eastern Athletic, Blue Point Captain Tricia Livingston

USTA League Awards Birdie Tarulli League Captain Award Birdie Tarulli (in memoriam) Blane Magee League Captain Award Blane Magee (in memoriam)


Congratulations To All Award Winners! Dory is always our Pro of the Year!! Congratulations! Love, Maddie, Emily & Hannah

Danielle, we are so proud of you and your achievements. Congratulations! We love you, Mom and Dad and D

Congratulations to Carefree's 3.5 Senior Women captained by Bonnie Kolenberg. Great job at Nationals

Huntington Indoor Tennis is honored to be the recipient of this year’s CLUB OF THE YEAR AWARD

Long Beach Tennis Center congratulates all the Winners at the 21st Annual Awards Dinner  Great job everyone---thanks for making & keeping the great sport of Tennis a part of your lives!  We would also like to say a special “Thank You”   To USTA for assisting us with our rebuild after Superstorm Sandy. Thank you to our great, loyal staff & customers and our wonderful tennis community for inspiring us to rebuild so quickly! A heartfelt Thank You all of you!! Ellen & Sid Siddiqui

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Congratulations To All Award Winners! If there are tennis teams in heaven, Birdie Tarulli is the "Captain", and we are all teammates. She lives in our hearts forever. Always, Birdie's Players

"Champions keep playing until they get it right." "A champion is afraid of losing. Everyone else is afraid of winning." (Billie Jean King) 

Congratulations, Susan Alvy!   Well-deserved recognition for someone who has been our leader, mentor and most of all… our friend!   —Rockville Racquet Club

Congratulations to Jonathan Paris showing his dedication and determination to the sport of tennis. We love you and are proud of you. Mom, Dad and Family

Danielle - my fearless Champion - Teta

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com


Congratulations To All Award Winners! The USTA Eastern Long Island Region Board congratulates TERRY FONTANA, RECIPIENT OF THE VITAS GERULAITIS FOR THE LOVE OF TENNIS AWARD AND DORY LEVINTER, TENNIS PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR Congratulations on this well-deserved recognition of your commitment  and dedication to growing the game of tennis on Long Island! Thank you for all you do!

Portledge School Congratulates Adele Sukhov Ranked #2 Girls 14s Division Helping Student-Athletes Pursue Their Passion! www.portledge.org P O R T L E D G E S C H O O L

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Portledge tennis stars boasting top 50 state ranking Lazar Markovic ’18, Adele Sukhov ’16, Sophie Barnard ’13 (Georgetown), Cameron Daniels ’14

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June March/April 2013 2013 • LITennisMag.com • LITennisMag.com


Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com

Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 516-883-6425 • www.pwta.com tennis@pwta.com

Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11570 516-763-1299, ext. 10 • CATSRVC@gmail.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, NY 11542 516-759-0505 • www.rwtt.com

Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 516-676-9107 • www.rwtt.com

Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Manager 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, NY 11729 631-667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones—Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 631-363-2882 • easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-271-6616 • easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones—Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 631-753-3696 • easternathleticclubs.com Glen Head Racquet Club Karl Sommer: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center glenheadrc@verizon.net Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 earlyhit@optonline.net Long Beach Tennis Center Sid Siddiqui—Director of Tennis 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, NY 11561 516-432-6060 • www.longbeachtenniscenter.com info@longbeachtenniscenter.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive • Great Neck, NY 11021 516-233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2323 www.pointsettennis.com • tonny@pointsettennis.com

Rockville Racquet Club Colleen Woods—Manager 80 North Centre Avenue • Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 • rockvilletennis@optonline.net Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, NY 11937 631-907-5162 www.ross.org/tennis • hli@Ross.org SPORTIME Amagansett Sue De Lara—Co-General Manager Hana Sromova—Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com/Amagansett amagansett@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis John McEnroe Tennis Academy Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 516-933-8500 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Tennis mkossoff@sportimeny.com SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike Bethpage, NY 11714 516-731-4432 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Multi-Sport rlouie@sportimeny.com SPORTIME Quogue Will Van Rensburg—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead, Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com/Quogue tdhamptons@sportimeny.com

SPORTIME Kings Park Bea Bielik—Regional Manager 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com/Kings-Park SPORTIME Lynbrook Jeff Morys—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com/Lynbrook jmorys@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Massapequa Jordie Dolberg—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com/Massapequa jdolberg@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Randall’s Island Felix Alvarado—Assistant Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com/Manhattan falvarado@sportimeny.com SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—Regional Manager Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com/Roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Robert Kendrick—Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Tennis USTA National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 718-760-6200 www.usta.com World Gym Bay Shore Tracie Forsythe—Director of Tennis 225 Howells Road Bay Shore, NY 11706 631-456-0994 www.WorldGymBayShore.com tracieforsythe@yahoo.com

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 03/25/13)

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Tommy George Srisuro ....Garden City, N.Y. 2 ........Abhinav Raj Srivastava ....Melville, N.Y. 3 ........Louie Kotler........................Roslyn, N.Y. 4 ........Connor Leaf ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 5 ........Kian Louis Ghazvini ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 6 ........Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 7 ........Aman Sharma....................Glen Head, N.Y. 8 ........Luke Karniewich ................Glen Head, N.Y. 9 ........Sohrob Yavari ....................Syosset, N.Y. 10 ......Arjun Sharma ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 11 ......Cameron Klepper ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 12 ......Jack Flores ........................Huntington, N.Y. 13 ......Justin Benjamin Oresky ....Syosset, N.Y. 14 ......Evan Kirsh..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 15 ......David Ammendola ............Massapequa, N.Y. 16 ......Sangjin Song......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 17 ......Alexander Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 18 ......Christopher Grisham ........Huntington, N.Y. 19 ......Alexander Roti ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 20 ......Sol Yoon ............................Commack, N.Y. 21 ......Matthew Terlovsky ............Merrick, N.Y. 22 ......Daniel Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 23 ......Michael Wexler ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 24 ......Tyler Nierman ....................Dix Hills, N. Y. 25 ......Bradford J. Lin ..................Kings Point, N.Y. 26 ......William Sepanski ..............Huntington, N.Y. 27 ......Logan Paik Chang ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 28 ......Lazar Ivan Markovic ..........Lattingtown, N.Y. 29 ......Adam Bradley Wilck..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 30 ......Rohan Gaddam Reddy ....Glen Head, N.Y. 31 ......Justin McMackin ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 32 ......Jared Williams....................Plainview, N.Y. 33 ......Kabir Rajpal........................Syosset, N.Y. 34 ......Preet Rajpal........................Syosset, N.Y. 35 ......Robert Steven Bellino ......Huntington, N.Y. 30 ......Karan Amin ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 38 ......Michael Weitz ....................Roslyn, N.Y. 39 ......Ethan Ertel..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 40 ......Sam Reichbach ................Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Serge Ushkevich-Zezulin ..Sands Point, N.Y. 2 ........Zachary Khazzam..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 3 ........Marco Ammirati ................Halesite, N.Y. 4 ........Jay Burkett ........................Syosset, N.Y. 5 ........Connor Leaf ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 6 ........Joonho Ko..........................Huntington, N.Y. 7 ........Matthew T. Roberts ..........Setauket, N.Y. 8 ........Jake Spencer Grossman ..Sands Point, NY 9 ........Ian Bank ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 10 ......Curran Varma ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 11 ......Jack Cameron Goldman ..Old Westbury, N.Y. 12 ......Sangjin Song......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 13 ......Evan Nierman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 14 ......Spencer Lowitt ..................Syosset, N.Y. 15 ......Kenneth Francis Chiu........Holtsville, N.Y. 16 ......Matthew Lee Catton..........Woodbury, N.Y. 17 ......Ian Mitchell Capell ............Woodbury, N.Y. 18 ......Evan Kirsh..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 19 ......George Kaslow ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 20 ......Tyler London ......................Dix Hills, N.Y.

76

ISLAND

21 ......Peter Yu..............................Smithtown, N.Y. 22 ......Simar Sawhney..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 23 ......Christian Esposito ............Port Washington, N.Y. 24 ......Daniel Meinster..................South Setauket, N.Y. 25 ......Carl Grant ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 26 ......Jeremy Carlos....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 27 ......Leonard Lazar Koblence ..Jericho, N.Y. 28 ......Robert Sangirardi ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 29 ......Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 30 ......Daniel Hyunjae Chang ......Manhasset, N.Y. 31 ......Jackson Weisbrot..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 32 ......Adam Bradley Wilck..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 33 ......Matthew Kolkhorst ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 34 ......David Ammendola ............Massapequa, N.Y. 35 ......Alexander Roti ..................Locust Valley, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Arnav Srivastava................Melville, N.Y. 2 ........Harris Durkovic ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 3 ........Jake Sandler......................Lynbrook, N.Y. 4 ........Nick John Stamatos..........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 5 ........George Carmi ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 6 ........Kenneth Fox ......................Smithown, N.Y. 7 ........Nicholas Troiano ................Oakdale, N.Y. 8 ........Faran Nazir ........................Deer Park, N.Y. 9 ........Matthew Bahar ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 10 ......Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11 ......Mitchell Berger ..................Lake Grove, N.Y. 12 ......Evan Nierman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 13 ......Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 14 ......Jason Gerber ....................Commack, N.Y. 15 ......Evan Kober ........................Wantagh, N.Y. 16 ......Zane Siddiqui ....................Long Beach, N.Y. 17 ......Jordan Diamond................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 18 ......Vincent Tozzi ......................North Babylon, N.Y. 19 ......Kenneth Francis Chiu........Holtsville, N.Y. 20 ......Jay Burkett ........................Syosset, N.Y. 21 ......Connor Dove......................Baldwin, N.Y. 22 ......Chirag Doshi ......................Sands Point, N.Y. 23 ......Ankur Kejriwal....................Hewlett, N.Y. 24 ......Evan Lowitt ........................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ......Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 26 ......Jack Aaron Briamonte ......Great Neck, N.Y. 27 ......Florimond Maier ................Oceanside, N.Y. 28 ......Braddock Chow ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 29 ......Dylan Granat......................Woodbury, N.Y. 30 ......Eric Ravens........................Merrick, N.Y. 31 ......Joonho Ko..........................Huntington, N.Y. 32 ......Jack Ian Lindenman..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 33 ......Spencer Lowitt ..................Syosset, N.Y. 34 ......Kevin Alec Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 35 ......Michael J. Criswell ............Melville, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........John Stamatos ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 2 ........Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 3 ........Brett Titcomb ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 4 ........Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 5 ........Joshua Sydney..................East Northport, N.Y. 6 ........Adam Diaz..........................Bellerose Village, N.Y. 7 ........Jonathan Ochoa................Hicksville, N.Y. 8 ........Brian Heinze ......................Garden City, N.Y. 9 ........Michael Vera ......................Bethpage, N.Y. 10 ......Joseph James D’Orazio....St. James, N.Y. 11 ......Florimond Maier ................Oceanside, N.Y. 12 ......Ronald Spinelli ..................Dix Hills, N.Y.

RANKINGS

13 ......Chirag A. Doshi..................Sands Point, N.Y. 14 ......Zane Siddiqui ....................Long Beach, N.Y. 15 ......Henry Tell............................Woodbury, N.Y. 16 ......James Heaney ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 17 ......Rajan Vohra........................Glen Head, N.Y. 18 ......Jeremy Morgenbesser ......Bayport, N.Y. 19 ......Michael Liebman ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 20 ......Evan Nierman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 21 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar........Massapequa, N.Y. 22 ......David Kim ..........................Commack, N.Y. 23 ......Kush Janak Dave ..............Syosset, N.Y. 24 ......Daniel Baruch ....................East Meadow, N.Y. 25 ......Max Huffman ....................Bayport, N.Y. 26 ......Michael LeMonda..............Garden City, N.Y. 27 ......Anurag Thotkura................Hicksville, N.Y. 28 ......Antonio Michael Grillo ......Melville, N.Y. 29 ......Joshua Fried ......................Plainview, N.Y. 30 ......Connor Gould ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 31 ......Matthew Kantor ................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 32 ......Craig Cusano ....................Bellmore, N.Y. 33 ......Troy Michael Haas ............Huntington Station, N.Y. 34 ......Matthew Bahar ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 35 ......Cory Harris Weinstein........Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Ivanna Nikolic ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 2 ........Denise Lai ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 3 ........Kaitlyn Byrnes....................Massapequa, N.Y. 4 ........Madeline Clinton................Manhasset, N.Y. 5 ........Alexis Madison Huber ......Melville, N.Y. 6 ........Evangelia Frankis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 7 ........Madeline Richmond ..........Syosset, N.Y. 8 ........Madelyn Kay Germano ....Islip, N.Y. 9 ........Madison Williams ..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 10 ......Samantha Lena Galu ........Jericho, N.Y. 11 ......Giuliana Rosa Gibson........Westbury, N.Y. 12 ......Sofia Anzalone ..................Center Moriches, N.Y. 13 ......Julieta Eulau ......................Long Beach, N.Y. 14 ......Marina Hilbert ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 15 ......Julia Gentile........................Rockville Center, N.Y. 16 ......Elena Vlamakis ..................Garden City, N.Y. 17 ......Calista Sha ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 18 ......Jill Olga Lawrence ............Hauppauge, N.Y. 19 ......Brooke Ann Fernandez ....Shirley, N.Y. 20 ......Brianna Loeffler..................Syosset, N.Y. 21 ......Gabriela Sciarrotta ............Woodmere, N.Y. 22 ......Allison Cooney ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 23 ......Ally Friedman ....................East Hampton, N.Y. 24 ......Grace Riviezzo ..................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ......Hannah Niggemeier ..........Sayville, N.Y. 26 ......Lucia Hu ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 27 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ................Oceanside, N.Y. 28 ......Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 29 ......Julia Kepczynska ..............Southampton, N.Y. 30 ......Rebecca Kuperschmid ....East Hampton, N.Y. 31 ......Carly Menker......................Great Neck, N.Y. 32 ......Madison Li ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 33 ......Morena DeVito ..................Syosset, N.Y. 34 ......Lauren Hutton....................Huntington, N.Y. 35 ......Gabrielle Sklar....................Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Danielle Mirabella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 2 ........Michelle N. Carnovale ......Massapequa, N.Y. 3 ........Adele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 4 ........Christina Lorraine Jud ......Glen Head, N.Y. 5 ........Brooke Emily Digia ............Manhasset, N.Y. 6 ........Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

7 ........Rachel Weiss ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 8 ........Ellen Huhulea ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 9 ........Trinity Chow ......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 10 ......Stephanie Cole ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 11 ......Samantha Lena Galu ........Jericho, N.Y. 12 ......Elizabeth Sossan ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 13 ......Julieta Eulau ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 14 ......Rachel Flynn Collins..........Port Jefferson, N.Y. 15 ......Theodora Brebenel............Glen Head, N.Y. 16 ......Mina Sarcevic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes....................Massapequa, N.Y. 18 ......Morgan Voulo ....................East Setauket, N.Y. 19 ......Emily Rose Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 20 ......Kerri Leah Goldfuss ..........Westbury, N.Y. 21 ......Lauren Gold ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 22 ......Victoria Ann Bialczak ........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 23 ......Courtney Connors ............Manhasset, N.Y. 24 ......Gabrielle Raziel ..................Melville, N.Y. 25 ......Laura Jean Halsey ............Westhampton, N.Y. 26 ......Emma Kate Rosenberg ....Port Washington, N.Y. 27 ......Rosa LaCorte ....................Merrick, N.Y. 28 ......Elena Artemis Vlamakis ....Garden City, N.Y. 29 ......Erica Forrest ......................Jericho, N.Y. 30 ......Jacqueline Guidice............E Northport, N.Y. 31 ......Rachel Hirschheimer ........Jericho, N.Y. 32 ......Jennifer Berman ................Jericho, N.Y. 33 ......Kimilya Egalite....................West Hempstead, N.Y. 34 ......Emily Feingold ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 35 ......Olivia Rose Scordo............Glen Head, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Danielle Mirabella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 2 ........Katherine Changtroraleke..Greenvale, N.Y. 3 ........Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ..Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Sabrina Ferretti ..................Setauket, N.Y. 5 ........Michelle Carnovale............Massapequa, N.Y. 6 ........Cameron Leigh Moskol ....Wantagh, N.Y. 7 ........Noa Alexandra Dubin........Southampton, N.Y. 8 ........Emily Kate Shutman..........Huntington, N.Y. 9 ........Grace Graham ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 10 ......Sarah Seeman ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 11 ......Stacy Denbaum ................Syosset, N.Y. 12 ......Claudia Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 13 ......Elena Nastasi ....................Bayville, N.Y. 14 ......Victoria Makulik ................Medford, N.Y. 15 ......Adele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 16 ......Lauren Difazio....................Greenlawn, N.Y. 17 ......Courtney Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 18 ......Caitlin Falvey......................Setauket, N.Y. 19 ......Angelika Rothberg ............Centerport, N.Y. 20 ......Stefanie Ebo ......................Sayville, N.Y. 21 ......Rosa LaCorte ....................Merrick, N.Y. 22 ......Courtney Connors ............Manhasset, N.Y. 23 ......Gina Ciliberti ......................West Islip, N.Y. 24 ......Elizabeth Kallenberg..........Port Washington, N.Y. 25 ......Rini Halder..........................Huntington, N.Y. 26 ......Lindsay Haley ....................Hicksville, N.Y. 27 ......Julia Khan ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 28 ......Sophie Grace Wilson ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 29 ......Celeste Rose Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 30 ......Teresa Dorothy Pinnola ....Islip, N.Y. 31 ......Elizabeth Gee ....................Garden City, N.Y. 32 ......Jamie Rose Brown ............Huntington, N.Y. 33 ......Elizabeth Sossan ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 34 ......Laura Jean Halsey ............Westhampton, N.Y. 35 ......Ellen Huhulea ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y.


LONG Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank..Name ................................City 1 ........Olivia Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 2 ........Kerrin Elizabeth Toner ......West Babylon, N.Y. 3 ........Cameron Leigh Moskol ....Wantagh, N.Y. 4 ........Katherine Changtroraleke Greenvale, N.Y. 5 ........Veronika Paikin ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 6 ........Emma Brezel......................Port Washington, N.Y. 7 ........Kaitlyn Mead......................Manorville, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 04/08/13)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 5 ........Daniel Eric Pellerito............Syosset, N.Y. 6 ........Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 7 ........Ronald P. Hohmann ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8 ........Neel Raj..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 9 ........Michael Medvedev............Oceanside, N.Y. 11 ......Billy G. Suarez....................Huntington, N.Y. 15 ......Abhinav Srivastava............Melville, N.Y. 18 ......Benjamin Grossman..........Sands Point, N.Y. 19 ......Spencer Brachman ..........Commack, N.Y. 31 ......Kabir Rajpal........................Syosset, N.Y. 37 ......Sujay Sharma ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 40 ......Niles Ghaffar ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 51 ......Jack Flores ........................Huntington, N.Y. 52 ......Logan Paik Chang ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 55 ......Karan K. Amin....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 60 ......Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 61 ......Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 73 ......Jack Louchheim ................Sagaponack, N.Y. 78 ......Tommy George Srisuro ....Garden City, N.Y. 81 ......Philip Yunjae Chang ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 82 ......Jeffrey M. McDonnell ........Glen Cove, N.Y. 98 ......Luke Louchheim................Sagaponack, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 5 ........Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 10 ......Keegan James Morris ......Franklin Square, N.Y. 13 ......Alan Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 15 ......Athell Bennett ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 19 ......Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 22 ......Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 24 ......Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 27 ......Rajan Vohra........................Glen Head, N.Y. 29 ......Brian Shi ............................Jericho, N.Y. 35 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito............Syosset, N.Y. 37 ......Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 38 ......Yuval Solomon ..................Plainview, N.Y. 42 ......Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 43 ......Daniel Shleimovich............Merrick, N.Y. 48 ......Patrick Maloney ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 50 ......Gardner Howe ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 53 ......Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 57 ......Daniel Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 62 ......Ronald Hohmann ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 64 ......Nicolas Demaria ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 67 ......Mark Julian Baker..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 77 ......Ben Snow ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 87 ......Matthew Porges ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 94 ......James Kyrkanides ............Stony Brook, N.Y. 96 ......Austin Egna........................Port Washington, N.Y. 97 ......Carl Grant ..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 98 ......Julian Thomas MacGurn ..Amagansett, N.Y.

ISLAND

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 2 ........Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 4 ........Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 8 ........Brenden Volk......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 29 ......Dennis Uspensky ..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 30 ......Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32 ......Lubomir Cuba....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 35 ......Bryant Born........................Manhasset, N.Y. 38 ......Jesse Levitin ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 47 ......Justin Park ........................Huntington, N.Y. 55 ......Tripp Tuff ............................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 57 ......Athell Patrick Bennett........Valley Stream, N.Y. 59 ......Fernando Filho ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 61 ......Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 62 ......Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 63 ......Jared R. Halstrom..............Bellmore, N.Y. 64 ......Benjamin Rosen ................Port Washington, N.Y. 67 ......Conor Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 68 ......Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 75 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar........Massapequa, N.Y. 76 ......Dylan Granat......................Woodbury, N.Y. 79 ......Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 81 ......Alex Brebenel ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 82 ......Palmer Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 98 ......Henry Tell............................Woodbury, N.Y.

RANKINGS

77 ......Gabriela Sciarrotta ............Woodmere, N.Y. 81 ......Amy Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 85 ......Kimberly Liao ....................Commack, N.Y. 86 ......Lucia Hu ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 98 ......Julia Gentile........................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 10 ......Claire Handa ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 14 ......Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 16 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 26 ......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin......Manorville, N.Y. 30 ......Celeste Rose Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 35 ......Ashley Lessen....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 40 ......Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Melville, N.Y. 50 ......Amanda Allison Foo ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 55 ......Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 62 ......Olivia Rose Scordo............Glen Head, N.Y. 67 ......Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 71 ......Courtney Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 78 ......Adele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 82 ......Brynn Maris April ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 87 ......Stephanie Anne Petras ....Manhasset, N.Y. 92 ......Theodora Brebenel............Glen Head, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 5 ........Vihar Shah..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7 ........Noah Rubin........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 9 ........Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 11 ......Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 13 ......Aidan Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 14 ......Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 19 ......Ethan Bogard ....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 27 ......Conor Dauer ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 33 ......Alex Sacher........................Glen Head, N.Y. 45 ......Dylan Appel........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 48 ......Tyler J. Hoffman ................Sayville, N.Y. 49 ......Zachary Lessen ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 58 ......John D’Alessandro............Northport, N.Y. 65 ......Jonathan Paris ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 71 ......Conor Mullins ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 72 ......Brandon Stone ..................Melville, N.Y. 74 ......Matthew Demichiel............Hewlett, N.Y. 81 ......Jared R. Halstrom..............Bellmore, N.Y. 83 ......Philip Daniel Antohi............Glen Head, N.Y. 88 ......Douglas Notaris ................Wantagh, N.Y. 91 ......Lubomir Cuba....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 97 ......Zain Ali................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 100 ....Sander Brenner..................Port Washington, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 18 ......Alexa Susan Goetz............Greenlawn, N.Y. 26 ......Rachel Arbitman................Hewlett, N.Y. 29 ......Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 33 ......Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 40 ......Maryam Beshir Ahmad ....Albertson, N.Y. 41 ......Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 62 ......Ivanna Nikolic ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 66 ......Denise Lai ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 69 ......Madison Jane Williams ....Glen Cove, N.Y.

3 ........Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 5 ........Amber Policare ..................East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 16 ......Madison Battaglia..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 20 ......Bridget Elaine Harding ......Northport, N.Y. 34 ......Taylor Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 35 ......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 42 ......Danielle Giannetti ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 43 ......Aimee N. Manfredo ..........Shoreham, N.Y. 47 ......Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 51 ......Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 52 ......Lauren Ann Livingston ......Sands Point, N.Y. 57 ......Olivia Funk ........................Hicksville, N.Y. 59 ......Michele Sheila Lehat ........Great Neck, N.Y. 62 ......Esther Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 78 ......Celeste Rose Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 79 ......Rhea Malhotra ..................Syosset, N.Y. 86 ......Katie Jane Cirella ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 89 ......Vanessa Scott....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 98 ......Stephanie Nakash ............Great Neck, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 7 ........Aleksandra Mally ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 12 ......Sophie Barnard..................Mill Neck, N.Y. 17 ......Vivian Cheng......................Woodbury, N.Y. 27 ......Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 34 ......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 35 ......Paulina Tafler......................Oceanside, N.Y. 37 ......Sunaina Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 39 ......Hannah L. Camhi ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 44 ......Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 45 ......Amber Nicole Policare ......East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 47 ......Bridget Elaine Harding ......Northport, N.Y. 48 ......Claudia Ruiz ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 55 ......Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 61 ......Rithika Reddy ....................Syosset, N.Y. 79 ......Emma Brezel......................Port Washington, N.Y. 81 ......Sara Finger ........................Saint James, N.Y. 89 ......Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 90 ......Laura Torsiello....................Bayport, N.Y.

91 ......Yuliya Astapova ................Port Washington, N.Y. 93 ......Esther Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 94 ......Zenat Rashidzada ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 95 ......Alexandra Linder................Sands Point, N.Y. 99 ......Olivia Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 04/10/13)

BOYS

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 11 ......Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 21 ......Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 24 ......Ronald P.Hohmann............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 28 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito............Syosset, N.Y. 95 ......Neel Raj..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 97 ......Billy Suarez ........................Huntington, N.Y. 158 ....Michael Medvedev............Oceanside, N.Y. 162 ....Abhinav Raj Srivastava ....Melville, N.Y. 169 ....Benjamin Grossman..........Sands Point, N.Y. 390 ....Niles Ghaffar ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 417 ....Spencer Brachman ..........Commack, N.Y. 491 ....Sujay Sharma ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 527 ....Logan Paik Chang ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 600 ....Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 622 ....Kabir Rajpal........................Syosset, N.Y. 675 ....Maxwell Moadel ................Brookville, N.Y. 677 ....Karan Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 700 ....Jack Flores ........................Huntington, N.Y. 980 ....Benjamin Reichbach ........Syosset, N.Y. 990 ....Sol Yoon ............................Commack, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 65 ......Athell Patrick Bennett........Valley Stream, N.Y. 117 ....Sean Patrick ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 152 ....Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 174 ....Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 195 ....Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 201 ....Brian Shi ............................Jericho, N.Y. 224 ....Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 227 ....Keegan James Morris ......Franklin Square, N.Y. 279 ....Alan Delman ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 472 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito............Syosset, N.Y. 500 ....Rajan Jai Vohra..................Glen Head, N.Y. 744 ....Patrick Maloney ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 763 ....Yuval Solomon ..................Plainview, N.Y. 771 ....Steven Well Sun ................Glen Cove, N.Y. 772 ....Daniel Shleimovich............Merrick, N.Y. 782 ....Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 790 ....Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 876 ....Nicolas Demaria ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 879 ....Gardner Howe ..................Locust Valley, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 16 ......Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 24 ......Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 26 ......Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 31 ......Dennis Uspensky ..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 152 ....Brenden Andrew Volk........Dix Hills, N.Y. 284 ....Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 352 ....Bryant Born........................Manhasset, N.Y. 402 ....Lubomir Cuba....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 422 ....Jared Halstrom ..................Bellmore, N.Y. 673 ....Jesse Levitin ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 692 ....Justin Park ........................Huntington, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG 751 ....Benjamin Rosen ................Port Washington, N.Y. 808 ....Sean Mullins ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 836 ....Palmer Clare ......................North Bellmore, N.Y. 840 ....Dylan Granat......................Woodbury, N.Y. 907 ....Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 996 ....Athell Patrick Bennett........Valley Stream, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 2 ........Noah B. Rubin ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 173 ....Daniel Grundberger ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 177 ....Samuel Lam ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 199 ....Josh Silverstein..................Great Neck, N.Y. 250 ....Lamar Remy ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 272 ....Vihar Shah..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 326 ....Aidan Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 362 ....Dennis Uspensky ..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 498 ....Conor Dauer ......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 524 ....Ethan Bogard ....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 604 ....Alex Sacher........................Glen Head, N.Y.

ISLAND

700 ....Philip Daniel Antohi............Glen Head, N.Y. 843 ....John P. D’Alessandro ........Northport, N.Y. 906 ....Brandon T. Stone ..............Melville, N.Y. 1037 ..Eric Wagner........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 1092 ..Dylan Hobbs Appel ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 1130 ..Jared Halstrom ..................Bellmore, N.Y. 1143 ..Zain Ali................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1146 ..Jonathan Paris ..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 1197 ..Brian Slivonik ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

GIRLS

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 16 ......Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 189 ....Alexa Goetz........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 264 ....Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 274 ....Merri Kelly ..........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 474 ....Rachel Arbitman................Hewlett, N.Y. 527 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ....Albertson, N.Y. 531 ....Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 700 ....Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y.

RANKINGS

806 ....Kimberly Liao ....................Commack, N.Y. 880 ....Denise Lai ..........................Setauket, N.Y. 1017 ..Madison Jane Williams ....Glen Cove, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 67 ......Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 139 ....Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 320 ....Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 388 ....Celeste Rose Matute ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 568 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 572 ....Ashley Lessen....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 790 ....Courtney Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 828 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin......Manorville, N.Y. 868 ....Dominique Woinarowski ..Syosset, N.Y. 1079 ..Amanda Allison Foo ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 1128 ..Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Melville, N.Y. 1143 ..Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1212 ..Theodora Brebenel............Glen Head, N.Y. 1244 ..Stephanie Anne Petras ....Manhasset, N.Y. 1392 ..Adele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 160 ....Madison Battaglia..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 223 ....Alexa Graham....................Garden City, N.Y. 227 ....Bridget Harding ................Northport, N.Y. 286 ....Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 289 ....Amber Policare ..................East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 333 ....Danielle Giannetti ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 588 ....Taylor Cosme ....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 703 ....Olivia Funk ........................Hicksville, N.Y. 830 ....Julia Khan ..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 918 ....Mia Vecchio........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 969 ....Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 1019 ..Lauren Ann ........................Livingston, N.Y. 1154 ..Rhea Malhotra ..................Syosset, N.Y. 1242 ..Katie Jane Cirella ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 1303 ..Esther Chikvashvili ............Melville, N.Y. 1324 ..Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 1522 ..Karen Serina ......................Islip Terrace, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City

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USTA/Long Island Region 2013

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. MAY 2013 Saturday, May 4 L3 10U & 8U May UPS at Sportime Syosset Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball],8 [36’Court/Red Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, May 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, May 10-12 L1B Sportime Bethpage May Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(16-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, April 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, May 10-12 L1B Sportime Massapequa May Challenger Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18)sd, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, April 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550. Friday-Sunday, May 10-12 L3 Lynbrook Sportime Eastern UPS Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(12)s, RR; Novice: BG(14)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, May 10-12 L2O LBTC Mid-May Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(16-14)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28.00 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Wednesday, May 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, May 17-19 & Friday-Monday, May 24-27 +L1 RWTTC Eastern Designated Closed Championship L3 FIC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: G(16)s, FIC; G(16)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28.00 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, May 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505.

Saturday-Sunday, May 18-19 L3 Sportime Massapequa May UPS Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(14-12)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, May 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550.

Friday-Sunday, May 17-19 & Friday-Monday, May 24-27 +L1 PWTA Eastern Designated Closed Championship L3 FIC Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: G(14)s, FIC; G(14)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28.00 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, May 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, May 24-26 L1B Eastern Athletic’s Memorial Weekend Challenger Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(14)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 17 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, May 17-19 L2O EAC May Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, May 11 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, May 24-26 L1B Sportime Hamptons Summer Kickoff Challenger Sportime of The Hamptons PO Box 965 Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18-16,12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 20 at 2:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 653-6767.

Friday-Sunday, May 17-19 L2R Sportime Syosset’s May LI Regional Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18-16)s, SE; Quick Start Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, May 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, May 24-26 L1B LBTC Late Spring Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18-16)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28.00 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, May 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, May 17-19 L1 Anuj Agarwal Memorial Championships at Deer Park Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: BG(14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, May 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Saturday, May 25 L3 8U & 10U QuickStart Sportime Syosset UPS Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball],8 [36’Court/Red Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

LITennisMag.com • May/June 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2013

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, May 31-June 2 L1B Sportime Lynbrook June Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, June 7-9 L2O Sportime Hamptons June Open Sportime of The Hamptons 2571 Quogue Riverhead Road East Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 653-6767.

Friday-Sunday, June 7-9 L1B LBTC June Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18-16)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28.00 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, June 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, May 31-June 2 L2O LBTC June Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18,12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, May 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, June 7-9 L1B Sportime Bethpage June Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, May 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, June 14-16 L1B Old Westbury June Challenger Racquet Club at Old Westbury 24 Quail Run Old Westbury, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, June 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 626-1625.

JUNE 2013 Friday-Sunday, June 7-9 & June 14-16 L2R RWTTC Long Island Regional Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, June 7-9 L1B Sportime Lynbrook June Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(10 [78’Court/Green Ball])s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, May 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, June 14-16 L2O Sportime Syosset June Open Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, June 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • May/June 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, June 14-16 L3 Sportime Lynbrook June UPS Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(12)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, June 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Saturday, June 15 L3 Sportime Massapequa Summer UPS Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(14-12)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, June 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550.


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Long Island Tennis Magazine - May/June 2013  

Long Island Tennis Magazine - May/June 2013

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