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LongAnnual Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2012 • LITennisMag.com First New York Tennis Expo I Sunday, April 28, 2013

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center I Flushing Meadows, New York


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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


By Luke Jensen e are seeing the game on the ATP Tour better than at any other time in the history of men’s tennis. The historic accomplishments of The Big Four—Fed, Rafa, Djoker and Murray the Scott—have promoted the game to levels of interest never seen before. The game has always had its ups and downs, driven by the star power of the top players. The main difference is the complete global nature of the sport of tennis. When I played in the 1990s, there were massive stars like Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Boris Becker and many others, but the tour’s stars came from only a few nations. Today’s stars come from countries like Serbia that did not exist just 20 years ago. The popularity of tennis around the world is tied directly to the instant ability of social media that allows the player to show the off-the-court side of themselves. The many amazing stories of great white shark hunting with Agassi in Australia or parasailing with Sampras in Qatar stayed in my tennis journal and photo albums, but today, the experience would be shared live as it happened to tennis fans around the world. The game is evolving at supersonic speed. The strings with the ability to add amazing amounts of spin and now racquets specifically developed to add even more production through spin. The game of tomorrow is going on today! What we see on the WTA Tour is a tour in transition. The ATP went through this early on in the last decade. Agassi and Sampras were handing the game over to Fed, Roddick and Rafa. The Williams Sisters are

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doing the same thing to stars like American Sloane Stephens, a semifinalist at this year’s Aussie Open with a win over Serena Williams. Stephens is a hybrid player between power and control—the ability to strike fast with offense like Serena and counter with redirected absorption of the opponent’s power like Martina Hingis. Stephens is a superstar at her core. I have seen her handle media, sponsors and fans with confidence and poise. Her game is just starting to explode. Like all young stars, she will make her mistakes, but as her selfconfidence grows, so will her poise in big pressure moments. Until her run at the Aussie Open, I did not see a “can’t miss� Grand Slam American prospect. I even saw Stevens as a very emotional underachiever, but what I saw from her in the first major of the year changed everything. As long as injury, wealth and fame do not slow her down, I believe we are going to see Miss

Sloane Stephens fill her trophy case with a bunch of Grand Slam titles. Until next time ‌ keep going for the lines! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen is head coach of the Syracuse University Women’s Tennis Team. Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.â€? He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lbjensen@syr.edu.

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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March/April 2013 Volume 5, Number 2 Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover story 4

On Sunday, April 28 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, the area’s tennis world will converge for one of New York’s largest grassroots tennis events to date, the First Annual New York Tennis Expo.

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Jon Blake Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • jonb@usptennis.com

LongAnnual Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2012 • LITennisMag.com First New York Tennis Expo I Sunday, April 28, 2013

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center I Flushing Meadows, New York

Feature Stories 12 2013 Guide to Long Island’s Top Court Builders & Suppliers Need a court or repairs on your current playing surface? We have assembled the area’s top court builders and suppliers, including Century Tennis Inc., DecoTurf, SportProsUSA and VelveTop Products.

40 2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide

Adam Wolfthal Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 330 • adam@usptennis.com Daisy Schwartz Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • daisy@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel Administrative Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Beverly Koondel Office Administrator (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Brent Shearer Editorial Contributor Michael Cervantes Editorial Contributor

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com.

Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue.

Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. Copyright © 2013 United Sports Publications Ltd. 2

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The First Annual New York Tennis Expo

Long Island Tennis Magazine helps you chart the course for your summer camp plans by highlighting some of the top summer programs in the area.

57 2013 High School Boys Preview A look at the upcoming 2013 boy’s high school tennis season in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties.

Additional Features 10 14 18 20 26 28 35 38 54 59 61 64

The Keys to Mental Mastery By Tina Greenbaum, LCS Work Hard and Have Fun: Your Program Will Thrive By Tim Mayotte Winning Concentration: Focus on What You Can Control By Rob Polishook Where Can I and Should I Play College Tennis? By Eric Rebhuhn Is Men’s Tennis Too Predictable These Days? By David Cox A Coaching Philosophy: The CORE 4 By Lonnie Mitchel Is the Number One-Ranked Player the Best Player? By Miguel Cervantes III Tennis Professionals: Guardians of the Tennis Community By Brett Bothwell The Biofile: Luke Jensen By Scoop Malinowski Long Beach Tennis Center Officially Re-Opens By Gary Simeone Turbo-Charged Learning of Shot Selection and Court Positioning By Tonny van de Pieterman A Closer Look at the Tennis Industry Association: An Exclusive Chat With Executive Director Jolyn de Boer By Adam Wolfthal

Columns 1 3 6 16 22 27 30 58 66 67 70

The Jensen Zone By Luke Jensen Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … By Ricky Becker Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Tips From the Tennis Pro: Zone Practice … The Perfect One-Hour Workout By Lisa Dodson Building Game Equity and Personal Humility By Steven Kaplan Fitness and Nutrition: De-Mystifying the Gluten-Free Diet By Irina Belfer-Lehat Dr. Tom on the Traits of a Champion By Dr. Tom Ferraro Long Island Tennis Club Directory Long Island Rankings USTA/Long Island Region 2013 Tournament Schedule


B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

he Mixed-Doubles League continues match play with League playoffs beginning in May. The winning Long Island teams will advance to the Section Championship in Schenectady, N.Y. the weekend of May 31-June 2. Teams are registering for the men’s and women’s 18 & Over, 40 & Over, 55 & Over and 65 & Over Leagues. All teams must have a registration number and five to eight players registered by March 25. Schedules are then started and new teams will not be able to be added at that point. Please be sure you make me aware of your team no later than March 25 by e-mailing me at kathym65@aol.com. Match play will begin mid-May with the 18 & Over and the 40 & Over Divisions playing until the end of July. The 55 & Over and 65 & Over Divisions will play through August. Region Championships

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for the 18 & Over and the 40 & Over Leagues will be the weekend of Aug. 2-4, with local playoffs the week leading to the Regional Championships. The Section Championships for all levels of the 18 & Over are the weekend of Aug. 9-11. The 40 & Over Division at the 3.5 and 4.5-Plus Divisions are the weekend of Aug. 16-18 and the weekend of Aug. 23-25 for the 40 & Over Division at the 3.0 and 4.0 Levels. The 55 & Over League will have its Section Championship the weekend of Sept. 20-22, and the weekend of Sept. 28-29 will be the 65 & Over League. All of these championships will be played in Schenectady, N.Y. National Championship dates and locations can be found on the USTA Web site. I would like to take this opportunity to wish Ginny Kieler a wonderful retirement in Las Vegas. Ginny and I started coordinating the USTA League together on Long Island more than 25 years ago. We

worked together for five years or so until Ginny decided to give her full attention to running her leagues at Glen Head Racquet Club which she continued to do until her recent retirement. I have great memories of the two of us working together and going to the Concord Resort to work the Section Championships together so many years ago … hard to believe just how many! Ginny is well-known on Long Island for the great leagues she organized and ran at Glen Head Racquet Club and was an avid tennis player herself for many years. I want to thank Ginny for her guidance, and I wish her all the best in this exciting new chapter of her life! Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Sunday, April 28, 2013 10:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Brought to You by New York Tennis Magazine and Long Island Tennis Magazine AT

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FREE EVENT Join us for speaking panels headlined by World Renowned Tennis Coach Nick Bollettieri, along with tennis pros, college coaches, top juniors and tennis industry insiders. The discussions and sessions will be hosted by television host, author and political commentator, Sean Hannity.

INTERACTIVE DISCUSSIONS Session I—11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Session II—1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

Exhibitors To Include: n New York and Long Island Tennis Clubs n Experts in the field of Sports Medicine n The Industry’s Top Manufacturers displaying the latest in: u Apparel u Racquets u Equipment u Tennis Courts n Tennis and Summer Camp Programs

Activities To Include: n Indoor Three-Court Activity Zone Featuring: u Speed Serve Booth u Racquet Demos u 10 & Under Tennis u Beat The Streak u Hit For Prizes u And Much More … n Kid Zone Featuring: u Face Painting u Prizes And More ... u Balloon Animals n Tours of Arthur Ashe Stadium Court

n College Scholarship Advisors and College Coaches

n Parent/Child Sports Deck Play Area

n Tennis Travel Destinations

n Table Tennis Area

For exhibitor and sponsorship opportunities, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April January/February 2013 2013 • LITennisMag.com • LITennisMag.com

Visit NYTennisExpo.Eventbrite.com to pre-register for raffle and door prizes.


F I R S T

A N N U A L

EXPO The Ultimate Event for New York Tennis

Free Tennis Expo for Tennis Enthusiasts of All Ages New York Tennis Magazine and Long Island Tennis Magazine, the Ultimate Guides for New York and Long Island Tennis, have announced that the First Annual New York Tennis Expo will take place Sunday, April 28, 2013 at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. The event will be free to attendees of all ages, and brought to you by New York Tennis Magazine and Long Island Tennis Magazine. With more than 750 pre-registrants as of late February and still two months to go until the Expo, more than 1,500 attendees are expected to take part in the event. In 2009 and 2011, the Long Island Tennis Expo attracted more than 1,200 attendees, and the First Annual New York Tennis Expo will surpass that total and will go down as one of the largest grassroots tennis events ever held in New York. Tennis enthusiasts and their families will be able to enjoy interactive discussions and presentations, headlined by world-renowned tennis coach Nick Bollettieri. Sean Hannity, television personality, author and political commentator, will emcee the discussion and presentation portion of the event. The panel of experts assembled will feature former top 10 player Tim Mayotte, former top 50 player Robert Kendrick, as well as highly respected coaches from the New York and Long Island regions. There will be on-court tennis demonstrations featuring a 10 & Under Tennis area run by Nick Bollettieri, a Speed Serve Booth, a table tennis area, racquet demos, a Hit for Prizes court and much more. The Kids Zone will feature a parent-child tennis deck, face painting and other fun games with great prizes. Tours of Arthur Ashe Stadium Court will give a behind-the-scenes look at the U.S. Open’s famous stadium facility. Exhibitors will be set up throughout the day, displaying the latest and greatest tennis-related products and services. Food and drink will be available. The New York Tennis Expo is an incredible opportunity for local and national businesses and professionals to expose their products and services to the ever-important New York market. Using this event as a base, all companies that deal with tennis players, tennis families, coaches or the sport of tennis in any way can use the New York Tennis Expo to showcase their products and services in a one-day, one-stop location. The First Annual New York Tennis Expo will highlight the leaders in tennis clubs, summer camps, training techniques, manufacturers, experts in the field of sports medicine, college scholarship advisors, training facilities, reps from colleges and universities, health food and energy drinks, tennis travel destinations, and much more. The New York Tennis Expo has a limited number of exhibitor and sponsorship opportunities available. As of late February, more than 75 percent of the exhibitor spaces have been filled. For more information on the First Annual New York Tennis Expo, e-mail info@usptennis.com or call (516) 409-4444 for information on the many available sponsorship packages. For free pre-registration to the event, log on to http://nytennisexpo.eventbrite.com.

Visit NYTennisExpo.Eventbrite.com to pre-register for raffle and door prizes.

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Mythbusters: Will There be Enough American College Tennis Players in 10 Years? By Ricky Becker ate in 2012, Winthrop University Basketball Coach Pat Kelsey took advantage of the fact that his team just played the number four team in the country. He had more microphones in front of him after the game than ever before and a voice that he didn’t usually get. He seized the opportunity and gave a beautiful, impassioned speech about a nationwide topic unrelated to college basketball about the Sandy Hook tragedy. Albeit, not nearly as important a topic as addressed by Coach Kelsey, I want to take this platform to voice my opinion on two topics that are costing tennis young athletes. I also have a couple of ideas on how to solve these two problems.

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1. Problem number one: Mandatory QuickStart Tournaments in the 10 & Unders Scenario: A talented eight-year old player has been using regular tennis balls. This child is ready and anxious to start tournaments. The young player looks up eight-and-under, as well as 10 & Under tournaments and sees that they are played with a slower ball and a smaller court than they are used to playing. This is already a downer because this is perceived as a “step down” and almost not even tennis. Then, when the child goes to sign up, there are barely any other kids playing in the 10 & Under tournaments. I twice signed my own child up for a tournament only to be told that there weren’t enough kids to even hold the tournament. If the intention of “quickstarting” the 10s was to get more kids to participate … it’s clearly not working. Draw sizes are

commonly less than four kids and genders and ages are often mixed just to get enough kids. This is a far cry from years ago when the 10s had draws of 32 with yellow balls. So now what you have is a choice for younger kids. Play in a “dead” event with “baby” equipment (this is how it feels to the kid at least), or play with regular balls and legitimate draws in the 12s. The problem with the latter is that most eight- and nine-yearolds aren’t ready to play “up” nor is it good for them. If the child’s club doesn’t have a good match play program, there is nowhere for the child to really compete, and inevitably, we can lose that child to a sport that they can compete in with kids who are their age. There are a whole slew of kids in the talent gap between 12-and-under Level 2 tournaments and 10 & Under QuickStart equipment whose needs are not being met.

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Solution: Simple … to make the format of the tournament optional. I understand (but disagree with) why USTA National is trying to push the softer equipment. They feel it will develop the next generation of champions, as well as retain young players. It is really not their place to strong arm everybody into training and practicing the way they see fit and very few kids sign up for QuickStart. I have been in tennis for nearly 30 years now and I have yet to hear a respected voice wax poetic about USTA player development. 2. Problem number two: Unofficiated matches My impression in talking to other coaches, unfortunately is that bad line calls and scorechanging is worse than it has ever been, especially in the higher levels of the younger age groups. Maybe honest mistakes are being made, maybe the younger kids feel pressure from their parents, maybe the respect level between opponents isn’t there yet. What makes this especially frustrating is that there is very little an honest child can do about it. Compared to the team sports and most youth sports that I can think of, junior

tennis is the only sport where young kids officiate themselves. I know for a fact that over the years, talented young athletes who have tried playing tennis tournaments have been driven away by bad “cheating” experiences. Parents of these kids have been as well. In other sports, the officiating is not at the forefront when summarizing an athletic competition. When getting a summary of a tennis match from a parent, one of the regular themes is the line calls of the opponent. This simply does not happen in other sports. It is a major deterrent and it must be stopped. Solution: According to The Wall Street Journal, the 2012 Open generated $215 million dollars in revenue for USTA National. Besides building grassroots tennis, I have heard from USTA officials that getting American players into the second weekend of Grand Slams is a top priority because Americans draw better television ratings, which puts more money into the USTA’s pockets which goes back tennis. I would argue that it would be in the best interest for USTA player development and in the best interest of fairness to give the money to each of the USTA sections to put towards more referees and umpires, especially for the

12s and 14s. I honestly think this would go a long way in us developing and retaining players. If someone says the USTA doesn’t have that money, I would say the USTA should use the money that is spent on giving free coaching to the very top kids of the youngest age groups. It certainly would make me feel better knowing that the money I spent on my U.S. Open tickets was used in the name of sportsmanship, fairness, retention of players and for a greater allotment of players. This seems to me to make a lot more sense than having U.S. Open ticket revenue go to free coaching for a young child who has played a lot more than the other kids or to a child that is subjectively chosen to be a USTA favorite. Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, director of Tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and high-performance manager at Glen Head Racquet Club. Ricky was named the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and was a top-five nationally-ranked junior. He can be reached by e-mail at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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U.S. to Host Two Upcoming International Pro Events in April The USTA and U.S. Davis Cup Captain Jim Courier have announced that Boise, Idaho has been selected as the site for the 2013 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas quarterfinal match between the United States and Serbia, April 5-7. The matches will be played at the Taco Bell Arena on the campus of Boise State University, which will have an expected capacity of approximately 11,700. The best-of-five match series begins Friday, April 5, with two singles matches, featuring each country’s number one player against the other country’s number to player. Saturday’s schedule features the pivotal doubles match, and the final day of play on Sunday includes two “reverse singles” matches, where the number one players square off followed by the number two players going headto-head. All matches are best-of-five sets until one country wins three matches.

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This will be the second consecutive home tie for the U.S. Davis Cup team after winning the 2013 World Group First Round in Jacksonville, Fla., against Brazil. This will be just the third home match as U.S. Davis Cup Captain for Courier and just the fourth home tie for the U.S. since 2009. In that time, the U.S. team has played seven road matches–all on clay. The U.S. is 110-16 all-time in Davis Cup ties played at home. Idaho is the 34th state to host a U.S. Davis Cup tie. This match will mark just the second meeting between the U.S. and Serbia in Davis Cup competition. Serbia won the only meeting, 3-2, in the 2010 World Group First Round in Belgrade by a Novak Djokovic-led team. Serbia is only one of three countries to have a winning record against the U.S. Davis Cup Team. The winner of the United States and Serbia tie will play in the semifinals,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Sept. 13-15. The United States Fed Cup Team has also announced that it will host Sweden in the 2013 Fed Cup by BNP Paribas World Group Playoff, April 20-21 at the Delray Beach Tennis Center in Delray Beach, Fla. Winning nations in the 2013 World Group Playoff qualify for the 2014 World Group to compete for a Fed Cup title. The U.S. fell to Italy, 3-2, in the 2013 World Group first round in Rimini Feb. 910 despite two singles victories by world number 21 Varvara Lepchenko (Allentown, Pa.) over seventh-ranked Sara Errani and number 16 Roberta Vinci in Lepchenko’s Fed Cup debut. Fed Cup by BNP Paribas is the world’s largest annual international women’s team competition with 97 countries entering in 2013. The United States leads all nations with 17 Fed Cup titles, the last coming in 2000.


LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Keys to

Mental Mastery By Tina Greenbaum, LCSW It’s important to understand that one’s mental attitude affects not only their tennis performance, but every aspect of their lives. The challenge in both tennis and life is to have the skills and strategies to turn a losing situation into a winning one—which may or may not actually mean winning the match. Considering that tennis is really just a game, we want it to be fun. How many times have you walked off the court feeling badly about yourself, when you have played (in your own mind) poorly? We frequently have our identity as worthy people wrapped up in our tennis performance. In order to separate these two very distinct elements, let’s look at what constitutes a player who has a “winning attitude.” Flexibility This means that the player’s mind can adapt to change very quickly. Whatever 10

occurred during the last point is over and the outcome of the match is in the future. So the only moment he or she has any control over is the one they are executing at the present time. As you watch the professional players, you can often see how they manage this mental challenge. In the 2013 Australian Open, you might have seen and heard how Victoria Azarenka talked about the pressure of almost losing to Sloane Stephens. She mentioned that she realized she might be sabotaging her chance of advancing into the finals and that the pressure was overwhelming. We’ll never know exactly why she took the 10 minute hiatus, but her words were quite revealing. How successful are you at letting go of past mistakes and keeping your focus off of “having to win?” The ability to be flexible on the court shows up in other ways as well. Imagine you have been matched with someone who clearly is a stronger player than you. How quickly can you adjust to the situation so that you end up feeling like a winner, even though the score might not reflect it?

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Confidence I heard a very experienced coach tell his young high school player to “Go out and play with confidence and be aggressive.” He was giving him exactly the right advice, but the young man, most likely, had no idea how to do it. A confident player knows his game and plays it. He is realistic about his level of skill and has practiced not only the technical and tactical part of their game, but has put time and effort in becoming skillful with the mental aspect of their game. With this type of overall training, he has an arsenal of options to deal with the pressure of competition that most other recreational and more experienced competitive players do not. Non-judgmental awareness Tennis is a social game and with that comes our characteristic ways of dealing with social relationships. A coach once said to me, “The way we do something is the way we do everything.” That means we take our attitude towards others and how we relate


to them on to the court with us. I’ve heard many stories from players, whether playing singles or doubles, about how they are affected by their tennis partners. There’s the one who wants to give their doubles partner a good game, and when they cannot maintain a quality level of play, they start feeling badly, and consequently, start playing worse. Then there’s the player who didn’t like being beaten by older players when he was younger, so when he became the older player, felt sorry for the younger player and began to give away the match. Still another example is the spouse who cannot stop correcting their partner’s technique because they think it’s helpful … and any other number of variations on the theme. Most of these scenarios are carried out with the best of intentions, but without real awareness as to how to correct the errors. It’s important that we take the time to become conscious of our behavior and the underlying causes that influence us. It’s not always easy to do on our own, but the more knowledge we have of our own emotional patterns that show up on the court, the more power we have to control the outcome of game. Acceptance This is not really a separate element, but one that encompasses all that is described above. Tennis is a game that is designed to have a winner and a loser of every point— which happens very quickly. We are being challenged at every level to respond quickly and accurately. The more we accept the reality of our own abilities at the present time, and the parameters of the game itself, the more we will enjoy the game we love to hate! Tina Greenbaum, LCSW is a sport psychology consultant and a holistic psychotherapist. She works with tennis players of all levels in learning how to manage their emotions on the court. She shares this passion with her partner, Fred Sperber, a professional tennis instructor of 28 years in a six-week program called Tennis to the Max where they combine mental skills training with on court execution. She may be reached by e-mail at tina@tennistothemax.com or visit www.tennistothemax.com.

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Century Tennis Inc. DecoTurf 56 Brook Avenue Contact: Tom Magner, Deer Park, N.Y. Eastern Regional Manager, Contacts: Kevin J. Healion DecoTurf at (978) 664-3244 & Timothy S. Healion Contact: Bill Walsh, Velvetop Products at (631) 427-5904 sales@centurytennis.com t.magner@decoturf.com www.centurytennis.com www.decoturf.com (631) 242-0220 (978) 664-3244 In 1965, Michael J. Healion, president of Century Tennis, began DecoTurf’s acrylic tennis court surfaces are regularly chosen servicing tennis courts at Long Island’s Shelter Rock Tennis Club. for use at the world’s most prestigious events. Our tennis surSoon, with the understanding of the construction techniques and faces have been selected for the U.S. Open since 1978, the the need for quality tennis courts in a growing sport, Century Tentwo most recent Olympic Games, New York City Parks, the nis Inc. began constructing Har-Tru tennis courts. Building one NCAA Championships and countless other notable venues tennis court after another, virtually by word of mouth, Michael around the world. It’s no wonder that DecoTurf is the top-sellHealion and Company started to build a reputation for great tening brand on Long Island, having been installed at clubs, nis courts and satisfied customers. With hard work, perseverance schools and residences from Queens to Orient Point. and the support of the industry, Century Tennis Inc. has survived. We offer numerous surfacing options for athletic courts: Today, Mike’s sons, Kevin J. Healion, CTCB, Century Tennis From multi-layered tennis court surfaces to basketball court president, and Timothy S. Healion, Century Tennis vice president, surfaces to multi-use sports surfaces, we accommodate all continue the tradition of delivering the very best quality tennis types of play at competitive pricing. Whether you are a tourcourts on Long Island and the New York area. Century Tennis nament director or a college coach, an architect or a homeInc. has become an expert in building not only Har-Tru tennis owner, demand DecoTurf for your court. If you want to play courts, but also hard courts with surfaces such as Deco-Turf, Relike a pro, make sure you are playing on a DecoTurf surface. bound Ace, Classic Turf, Nova Pro Synthetic Turf and the HyIf you have an existing court that was damaged in the redroCourt Modified system. We pride ourselves with having the cent storms or an older court that simply needs to be freshmost dedicated staff, including our construction teams and servened up, we can help. From patching products to line paint, ice teams. we make your courts look like new and ready for the upcomIn addition to our great staff, it is equally important for us to reing tennis season. view and implement the latest technologies in the field. It remains DecoTurf has a well-established network of authorized apour goal to deliver the very best tennis courts for our most deplicators across New York and is distributed on Long Island manding players and tennis club owners. through Velvetop Products in Huntington, N.Y. For more inWe are members of the formation, please American Sports Builders Ascontact Velvetop at sociation, Better Business Bu(631) 427-5904 or reau and the Long Island DecoTurf at (978) Builders Institute. 664-3244. Our goal is simple, “Provide our customers with a great playing experience.” March/April 2013 2013 • LITennisMag.com • LITennisMag.com 12 Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February


SportProsUSA 500 West Main Street, Suite 19 • Wyckoff, N.J. coach@sportprosusa.com www.sportprosusa.com (877) 466-7765 As the Sport Court Tennis distributor for metropolitan New York, Long Island and New Jersey, SportProsUSA offers a full-line of tennis court surfaces, accessories and amenities. Since 2006, Thomas Petersen, owner of SportProsUSA, has overseen more than 300 court installations, refurbishing and retrofits throughout the region. Whether you are interested in a modular surface like PowerGame, a suspended surface like PREMIER COURT, premium crack repair systems like Guardian, or a cushioned or sanded acrylic surface for your all-weather court, SportProsUSA is where to look first. In addition to tennis, SportProsUSA offers event management for unique sports themed events and temporary court installation services. Our construction division also distributes and installs a full-range of products and surfaces for basketball, baseball, volleyball, futsal, soccer, team handball and more. Residential, commercial and institutional clients look to us for advice when planning and executing small and large scale projects. From concept to execution we cover the full range of services to meet your needs. We work each day to earn our clients trust with hard work and dedication to the project. From customers like the Brooklyn Nets and the CBS Morning Show, to resurfacing tennis courts at a club or park, to a court in your backyard, we treat each client’s project with the same care and commitment. Choosing the right product is important, but choosing the right team is critical. Don’t let just anyone handle your project; choose the best … choose SportProsUSA! To reach SportProsUSA, call (877) 466-7765. You can also visit www.sportprosusa.com or visit us.

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Call Bill Walsh at (631) 427-5904 or e-mail bwalsh@velvetop.com, or visit www.velvetop.com for expert advice and great service.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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work hard and have fun:

YOUR PROGRAM WILL THRIVE By Tim Mayotte We were sad to see our wonderful and colorful Hungarian fitness trainer Beci Ilyes move back to Europe last month. Besides doing a great job motivating and working our players, the kids had grown quite attached to him. Instead of letting him slip out of our minds, we decided to say goodbye formally and have a gas doing it! Beci wears his hair in the most impeccable fashion, sporting a sharp spiked Mohawk kept in place by quarts of hair gel. When he demonstrated an exercise, he would move powerfully, often using his signature phrase, “Like this … Boom Boom!” knowing that not a hair on his head would move and inch. To have some fun and bind the group of coaches together and create a team feeling, we decided to have a “Beci

Hair Day.” All of the kids will be styling like the man himself and say “Boom Boom!” We will give prizes for the best look and then send some photos back to Hungry to let Beci know that he is not forgotten. Great programs get kids to work hard, learn to compete intensely, but also make sure it’s fun. I have been fortunate enough to have a number of talks with famed coach and motivator extraordinaire Wayne Bryan, father of the Bryan Brothers. He advocates taking your players to see events like Davis and Fed Cups, Futures and college matches. My group, for example, will be taking our kids to the 2013 BNP Paribas Showdown at Madison Square Garden on March 4. Wayne feels that such an event is equal to 30 days of practice, as the kids will be animated and motivated by the tennis. Above all, he preaches that watching great tennis brings joy, the driver to greatness. Wayne also suggests unconventional

events to get the kids jacked up. He tells of a program in Las Vegas that had a talent show. According to the program director, the tennis improved significantly, and after working together made the time spent together a blast. Some of the coaches I have been lucky enough to work with have tried some offbeat things as well. When coach Carl Thorsen worked with me at the USTA Player Development Center, he agreed to let the court of girls he was training cut his overgrown hair, if they worked hard for the whole week. Carl’s haircut looked awful, but that group worked like crazy for that week, all the kids, not just the ones on his court, laughed hysterically during the styling session, and we giggled about it for days to follow. So, we are looking forward to Beci Hair Day and I know that the laughs will make the hard work a lot of fun and a good friend of the program will be truly honored. I would love to hear of any tales of other programs doing fun stuff and having a great time while doing it. Tim Mayotte was one of the nation’s best tennis players during the 1980s. Twice during the 80s, he finished the year ranked in the world’s top 10. Besides reaching the semifinals of Wimbledon and the Australian Open, he also won a Silver Medal in the Olympics and represented his nation in Davis Cup action. For the last decade, Tim has shifted his focus to developing top American players and is currently running 360 Tennis at the Cunningham Tennis Center with his partners, Lee Hurst and Carl Thorsen. He may be reached by phone at (917) 596-0746 or visit 360Tennis.net.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


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BY Kirilenko and the Great 8 Washington Capitals star Alex Ovechkin and tennis star Maria Kirilenko, are planning to get married. The Washington Capitals forward and two-time NHL MVP took to Twitter and announced: “We are engaged !!!!!!! )))))))))” Ovechkin is 27 and Kirilenko is 25 and is currently ranked 15th in the WTA Women’s Singles Rankings and with doubles partner Lucie Hradeka, is ranked sixth in the world in Women’s Doubles.

E M I L I E

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when Sharapova was first seen walking with Dimitrov and her team in Milan, where Sharapova was scheduled to play an exhibition.

Murray purchases hotel in Scotland World number three Andy Murray has purchased a hotel near his hometown in Scotland. He plans to transform the Cromlix House Hotel into a 15room, five-star property. The U.S. Open champ and Olympic Gold Medalist says he is “Pleased to be able to give something back to the community I grew up in.’’ The project is expected to be completed by 2014

A good boyfriend Caroline Wozniacki’s kept her golf star boyfriend Rory McIlroy awake late into the night during her matches at the Australian Open. The former number oneranked Wozniacki came back from 3-0 down in the final set to win the last six games of the match against big-hitting Lisicki 2-6, 6-3, 6-3. McIlroy got up at 3:00 a.m. to watch from Abu Dhabi, where he was preparing to play in the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championships. He was coming off a busy time himself after an announcement of a lucrative multi-year contract with Nike. Of course, the multimillion dollar golf contract became a topic of conversation. “It wasn’t really a big surprise to me. I kind of knew,” Wozniacki said to laughter in her post-match press conference. “I felt bad for him because I think he went to bed at midnight their time and woke up at 3:00 and watched me and then back to sleep for a couple of hours … that’s a true fan.”

Tennis stars make a match World number three Maria Sharapova is dating Bulg a r i a ’s t o p player, Grigor Dimitrov. Speculation about the possible pairing began in November

Stephens meets Ellen After defeating Serena Williams at the Australian Open, young American Sloane Stephens has seen her celebrity status grow. The 19-year-old sat down with Ellen

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DeGeneres on “The Ellen Show” and the TV host presented her with a poster to put up in her bedroom, to replace the one of Serena Williams that she may or may not have truly had up before. Stephens also did a whirlwind tour of major media, talking to major outlets such as CNN and more. Happy birthday down under Rennae Stubbs presented a cake to Ang e l i q u e Kerber after she defeated Madison Keys, and the Aussie Open crowd serenaded her with a “Happy Birthday” rendition kick-started by Stubbs herself. Kerber was unfortunately upended in the next round by Ekaterina Makarova, who fell to Maria Sharapova in the quarterfinals. Meanwhile, Laura Robson, turned all of 19 years young while in Melbourne. Robson defeated Melanie Oudin and then Petra Kvitova (11-9 in the third set, no less) before falling to American Sloane Stephens. Ex-soccer star wants to coach del Potro Former soccer star Diego Maradona, who is an ambassador for Dubai Sports Council and attended WTA matches in Dubai, joked that he will take charge of a fellow Argentine next week, when the ATP begins its tournament there. “Next week, I’ll be the one training [Juan Martin] del Potro myself,” he told Gulf


News. “I will ask Franco Davin to step aside and Diego will train del Potro.” Tweets from the tennis pros John Isner (@JohnIsner): Who’s gonna face the #Undertaker at #Wrestlemania this year? I say #Lesnar

Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Good day today! Celebrated with Brad Drewett and Roger Federer 40 years of the ATP rankings and rich tennis history. Proud to be part of it! Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76): Finally back watching my second favorite sport live. It’s been too long @anahiemducks.

Justin Gimelstob (@justingimelstob): Always fun reconnecting with long time friend @TommyHaas13 He drinks from the Fountain of Youth!

Laura Robson (@laurarobson5): Guy on the treadmill next to me has sunglasses on. Not sure why as the gym has tinted windows and they’re falling down his face every 2 secs.

Amer Delic (@AmerDelic): I was hoping #Oscars would honor Michael Jordan & #SpaceJam. After all, this is his birthday month. Seemed appropriate.

Maria Kirilenko (@MKirilenko): We were playing pool and my opponent Monica hit the light ball instead of pool ball!

Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): My wife wants to meet Giuliana Rancic so badly. How can I make this happen?

The Academy at Centercourt Athletic Club is the Northeast’s premiere High Performance Tennis Academy. As a USTA Certified Regional Training Center, we embrace our role as a member of the USTA coaching team and the mission to develop top student athletes. We offer a junior player pathway that can satisfy the high performance needs of nationally ranked juniors. The Academy offers an afterschool program, high performance summer programs, full-time homeschooling program and an Academy travel team.

Kim Clijsters (@ClijstersKim): Hi everyone, we have some exiting news to tell you … Jada is going to be a big sister :-) ! Xxx Kim, Brian and Jada

The Centercourt Academy Summer Tennis Camp Why choose the Centercourt Tennis Academy:

! Train in a world class environment with high performance level coaching ! Achieve significant individual improvement in all facets of your game; technically, physically, and mentally ! We are dedicated to meeting the individual needs of each and every one of our students ! Our Academy players are among some of the top section, national, and ITF ranked players from around the world ! We put the needs of the player first, in a developmentfocused model of training ! Each camp will be tailored to the skill level and goals of all players; featuring small group training, match play, individualized fitness plans, mental coaching and video analysis ! Tournament coaching and travel ! Players who commit to our training will see themselves develop life skills that will enable them to become champions on and off the court

The Centercourt Academy Summer Tennis Camp offers three distinct levels: Academy I, Academy II, and Centercourt Advantage. The Camp also features an Overnight Camp option for those interested in the complete summer camp experience. For more information, contact Clay Bibbee at clay@centercourtclub.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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winning concentration F O C U S O N W H AT Y O U C A N C O N T R O L

By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC t has happened to us all … one moment you are concentrating on playing the point—everything feels smooth, relaxed and in control. Seemingly, the next moment, you find yourself in another place, feeling tense and each step you take feels like a challenge. Add to that a stunned concern with how the match became so close, and a fear of where it is going, and your mind is now clouded over with doubt. Or perhaps you have experienced this in a different way: One moment you are leading 64, 5-2, and the thought comes up that you are only four points from the trophy. You begin to press, your heart rate increases, you begin rushing and the next thing you know, you are battling in the third set, struggling just to stay even. You are left to wonder how your concentration strayed from “one point at a time” to seemingly everywhere except the present!

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Concentration is probably one of the most important and misunderstood mental skills in an athlete’s tool box. Stan Smith once said, “Good concentration separates champions from almost champions.” The dictionary defines concentration in a couple ways: First, giving something your undivided attention, and second, narrowing a focus. These are fine written definitions, but a bit limited for an athlete. The competitive athlete needs to create an action plan, and even more-so, apply it to the sport and situation. A colleague of mine, Dr. Alan Goldberg, a nationally-known mental training coach, said “Concentration is the ability to focus on what’s important, and let go of everything else.” This definition implies that an athlete may be concentrating, but if it’s on the wrong thing, it won’t be helpful. Stroll by any court or field in the country and you might hear a coach or parents prompting their players to concentrate! Firstly, the athlete probably is concentrating, but maybe not on the right thing. Secondly, this oft-repeated advice is not specific enough. For example, a player

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

may be reflecting on the previous game, or anticipating what may happen in the future, while the coach is prodding them to concentrate on what’s happening in the present. Taking Dr. Goldberg’s definition of concentration a step further, let’s define concentration as: “The choice to focus on what you can control, and let go of what you can’t control.” Have you ever found yourself focusing on something you had no control over? What did it do to your anxiety level? How did it affect your level of play? Focusing on something we cannot control almost always takes us off course and creates a sense of helplessness and unease, ultimately, leading to a downward spiral. Conversely, focusing on something you can control, such as your energy level, your attitude and how you react to game or match situations will yield more confidence and sense of control over your destiny. There is a helpful strategy which competitors can use to help them concentrate on what they can control before a match. Try this exercise: On the left side of a sheet of paper, list behaviors and strategies that you


can control during a game or match and label it ‘controllables.’ Your list might include attitude, preparation, staying positive, following a strategy and bouncing back from adversity, to name a few things. On the right side of the paper, list what you are unable to control such as the weather, match or facility conditions, winning or losing (you cannot directly control this or you would simply always win!), and your opponent’s attitude or ability. Simply by labeling what you can and cannot control, you will have a heightened awareness of where you want your focus to be. For example, a player cannot control the wind, but they can control how they react to it, and recognize that the opponent must contend with the same challenge. Similarly, they cannot control that their opponent has a huge forehand, but they can control their strategy in the way they set up points to avoid it during crucial situations. With an understanding of what can be controlled and what cannot, it’s important to note, an athlete will inevitably lose focus. Rather than getting angry at him or herself, the key response is simple awareness and

acceptance. This non-judgmental process will help the athlete reframe their focus. Without this awareness, the athlete will continue to focus on the wrong thing. During competition, the act of refocusing can be as important as maintaining your focus in the first place. Another element of proper concentration is to understand that a strong focus on something 100 percent of the time is not always necessary. In fact, it can be exhausting, and even lead to burnout. Knowing when to let go and release focus and the accompanying pressure is a skill. This may be anytime prior to, during, and post-competition. For example, Michael Phelps was constantly listening to music pre-race, and Roger Federer often simply observes what is playing on the Jumbotron between games during the match. These gestures are short releases which allow the competitor to regain their concentration and return to the task at hand refreshed. In summary, when viewing concentration through the lens of what you can control and what you cannot, it becomes

much more manageable for the player. Further, a player can benefit from learning to refocus effectively rather than attempting to maintain a laser-like concentration at all times. Lastly, knowing that there are times when you can and should let your guard down is empowering. In fact, this letting go will perpetuate even stronger concentration by providing a more relaxed focus, and will lead to more consistent performance every match. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach he works with athletes and teams of all levels. His work focuses on helping athletes gain the mental edge and letting go of blocks which get in the way of peak performance. He is a USTA Zonal Coach and has spoken and been published for the USTA, USPTA and ITA. Additionally, he has conducted workshops nationally and internationally in India and Israel. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email rob@insidethezone or visit www.insidethezone.com.

Do You Want to Win More Tennis Games? “The Making of a Winner” and “Opening Hearts and Minds” by David E. Moe are “must reads” for anyone who aspires to be a great tennis player.

“…an interesting book, and one which has plenty of relevance these days as young tennis players are certainly coming apart at the seams.” – Arthur Ashe, Jr., Professional Tennis Player

info@motivater.com | Phone: 360-531-1180

www.Motivater.com

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Where Can I and Should I Play College Tennis? The five factors that will help you decide By Eric Rebhuhn 1. Location, location, location As with everything, the location of the university where you want to play college tennis is important. Playing college tennis in the south is a lot different than playing in the north where the entire winter you are playing indoor tennis. Other aspects of location are whether you want a school in the city or in a traditional college town, close to or far from home. Overall, it is important that as you are selecting your potential schools where you want to spend the next four years of your life. 2. The size of the school The size of the school is another factor that needs to be considered. Most high schools have less than 1,000 students, while most universities have many more. This is a major change in your life and this

factor can be overwhelming. It is very important that you visit the universities during the middle of a semester to see what campus life is like. If you have a chance to spend an evening on campus that too is very helpful. 3. Cost of attending This could be the single most important factor in deciding where you can attend college. For the last 17 years, your parents have either saved enough money for your education or have spent lots of money trying to get you to a high enough level in tennis to get a partial or even a full scholarship. Once you narrow your choices to a few schools and see what kind of financial aid package the university puts together, you are closer to making your choice. Remember to look for all types of financial opportunities including but not limited to academic scholarships, student loans, work/study, community service scholarships, etc.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

4. Coaching staff Now that you have decided in general where you want to go to school and have worked out a budget the next area to consider should be the coach. Find out as much as you can about the coaches from current and former players. Read the coaches’ biographies and do as much research as possible to further educate yourself on the coaching styles. Will you be a good fit into the team culture that has been created by a particular coach? 5. Academic reputation and opportunities You want your college tennis experience to be the best possible, but in most cases, it will not become your profession. The main goal of your college education is to establish your life’s work doing something to support yourself, a family and loving what you do. Two of the most important considerations by college admissions are your grades and your SAT scores. Start early in middle school to elevate those as high as possible. During high school, try to narrow your professional options so that the university you choose can give you that very important opportunity and support in the field of your choice. With more than 100 career wins and the 2011 Big East Coach of the Year Award under his belt, head men’s tennis coach Eric Rebhuhn has solidified himself as one of the most successful coaches in St. John’s tennis history. Last season, Rebhuhn’s squad finished with a 17-9 record, while peaking at number 50 in the national polls during the season, the highest ranking in school history. He may be reached by phone at (718) 990-5549 or e-mail rebhuhne@stjohns.edu.


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Distribution scheduled for 04/28/13 This edition will feature: • Guide to the First Annual New York Tennis Expo • Guide to Top Tennis Apparel Stores • 2013 French Open Preview • USTA Long Island Awards Dinner Program

Distribution across Long Island at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Restaurants and health food stores • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the next edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine May/June 2013! Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by• Long April 1, Tennis 2013Magazine 21 LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 Island For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com


Zone Practice: The Perfect One-Hour Workout By Lisa Dodson Can you really make huge strides in your game in just one hour? Absolutely. The key is to be organized, have a plan and don’t waste time. In this article, I am going to provide a foolproof workout that, done regularly, will make you a better player in a very short period of time. It may be tough going at first but you will soon find improvement. First, let’s consider a few concepts and ideas that will make the workout effective and something that you like and want to do. Most players, whether “social” or competitive, do a combination of hitting, drilling and playing for practice. We’re going to merge hitting and drilling and call this Zone Practice. Why? Honestly, just hitting the ball with no purpose represents random hitting and is a huge waste of the time that players spend on court. “Drilling” sounds like a chore and is often not successful so players give up and don’t do it. Zone Prac-

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tice is user-friendly and can be done with a ball machine, practice partner, feeder or tennis professional. Practice doesn’t have to be a chore or boring if you know what to do. Intensity, variety and a constant challenge are key to improvement. Take a few seconds to digest this statement: Tennis is NOT a random game. The sooner players understand this fact the faster they will improve. Every hit potentially causes a certain response or at least narrows down what can be hit in return. If your hits are random, then you will find no pattern in response and you will have no understanding of whether the shots you are choosing are easy, difficult or impossible (known as playing percentage tennis). You will also continue to make the same mistakes over and over again without understanding why. Consequently, Zone Practice and patterning are essential to success and to attaining our personal goals on the court. Tennis demands physical, mental and emotional skills. Zone Practice and goal-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

setting develop all of these factors. Physically, we need to pattern our body into specific stroke and footwork patterns and we need to develop strength and endurance. Mentally, we need to lengthen the time that we can stay in a point and not be impulsive. We need to be able to think on our feet and make good shot selection decisions. Physical and mental aspects combine to create a strong or weak emotional balance. For example if you get tired (physical) you make sloppy errors (mental) which makes you sad, angry or want to give up. If you are fit you can focus more on how to play the game than how to hit the ball. You will be happier and more confident and win more matches. Why is it important to hit to Zones? In order to play good tennis, you have to be able to hit certain areas of the court consistently. Certain areas are more important than others. If you can hit those zones better than your opponent can, then you will


win. When you are hitting to a zone, you are aiming for a specific target area. Practice should ALWAYS be done with targets. A player’s perception of where a ball lands may be vastly different from where it is actually landing because of the visual distance between the hitter, the ball and the lines on the opposite side of the court. For example, a cone line that is 6’ inside the opposing baseline looks like 2’ from the hitter’s baseline. So, a ball that lands 12’ from the baseline looks like 6’. We think we are hitting with depth, but we’re really hitting a non-forcing and attackable ball. A specific place to aim for will tell your body what modifications it needs to make in order to actually hit the zone. It’s amazing how intuitive your body can be in its ability to make adjustments given the chance. If you can hit zones at will you will be in command and control of play. That is the ultimate goal of playing tennis. Why should I set a goal? If you set goals with Zone Practice, you’ll be able to measure your improvement and dramatically strengthen your concentration and focus. In order to understand what focus or concentration is on the tennis court we must be able to measure it. For example, if you hit three balls in your target zone and then miss, you might find that you were thinking about what to have for lunch instead of what you are doing in the moment. Or, if your goal is 10 hits in a row and at the eighth ball, you start hoping you

won’t miss, you’ll realize that you were focusing on not missing and not on succeeding (commonly known as fear). Focus and concentration need to be practiced as much as strokes do. Sometimes the best way to find focus is to understand our lack of it. The One-Hour Zone Practice Workout … keep it simple!

n Ten minutes: Crosscourt Backhand: Hit from crosscourt side to Zone 2 n Five minutes: Inside Out Forehand: Hit forehand from backhand side to Zone 2 n Five minutes: Crosscourt Forehand Volley: To Zone 1 n Five minutes: Crosscourt Backhand Volley: To Zone 2 n Five minutes: Overhead to Zone 4 & 5: Concentrating on hitting the top of the ball. Progress to hitting deeper into court to Zones 1, 2 & 3 and replace with extra serving if using a ball machine. The Set-Up Serve Zone 4 & 5 is formed by placing a line 2’ in-

Zones 1 & 2 form a square with cones in the forehand and backhand corners. For singles, make the square 8’x8’ inside the baseline and inside alley lines. For doubles, make a 12’long x10’deep square inside the baseline and outside alley line. Zone 3 is the deep space between zone 1 & 2. This is always a safe place to hit. With a feeder, pro or ball machine: Set a realistic goal for the number of consecutive hits in target area. Score a point for each time the ball lands in the confines of the zone or hits a cone marker. Start over when you miss. Lefties need to reverse some of the information. n Ten minutes: Crosscourt Forehand: Hit from crosscourt side to Zone 1

side the service line. n Fifteen minutes: Serve for depth and concentrate on direction later. Aim for the area between the 2’ line and the service line. Depth is primary for success of the serve. Even if you cannot place the serve in various parts of the service box you will alcontinued on page 24

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ways be safe with a ball that lands deep in the box. As you practice and improve make the baseline zones smaller by 1 ft. increments and narrow the serve box zone by a few inches at a time. When you are finding success stay with it until you have mastered the area before you increase the difficulty. This is actually a 55-minute workout which leaves time for ball pickup, rest and water. If you are working hard, you will need a few short breaks between sections. With a practice partner: Set up zones as above on both sides of the court. Now you are playing a live ball from an unpredictable source. Your job is to do YOUR job. Get the ball to your intended destination while working WITH your practice partner. HINT: The longer you keep a ball going the less you have to pick up! The drills are basically the same, but we will add a few things:

service boxes for controlled under spin and topspin rally. Concentrate on footwork, movement, compact swing and longevity of rally Five minutes: Close Volley: Start inside the service line and keep continuous volley going. The ball must remain in the air, no swinging. Ten minutes: Crosscourt Forehands: To Zone 1 playing a live ball Ten minutes: Crosscourt Backhand: To Zone 2 playing a live ball Five minutes: Inside-Out Forehand: To Zone 2 playing a live ball Ten minutes: Overhead/Lob Drill (Five minutes each player): Player 1 stands on crosscourt side and feeds lob. Player 2 hits overhead to deuce court crosscourt direction keeping overhead/lob ball going as long as possible. Switch to ad court half way through. One player lobs for five minutes and the other hits overheads for five minutes. If you are good at this you may need to switch sooner than the five minutes because it is a real workout!

n

n n n n

n Five minutes: Short Court: Use the

n Fifteen minutes: Serve and Return: This is simply serving and returning. One player will serve for 7.5 minutes switching half way through from deuce to ad court. The returner will hit returns only to Zone 1 and Zone 2. Switch server and returner. Do NOT play out points. Each player hits and concentrates on only one shot. In summary, even if you have more than one hour to practice, it’s good to get into an organized routine that you can pound out for a complete and thorough workout. Be as productive as time will allow. This goes for ALL levels of play! Play practice matches in equal proportion to Zone Practice and you will begin getting great results! Look for more Zone Practice ideas and how to get the most from your practice matches in the next issue! Lisa Dodson is owner of The Total Serve, a USPTA Pro 1, and a formerly WTA worldranked player. She may be reached by email at ldodson57@yahoo.com or visit www.thetotalserve.com.

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Is Men’s Tennis Too Predictable These Days? By David Cox Most news stories on men’s tennis in the past two years have been scraping the thesaurus for new ways to eulogize the current state of the game. And fair enough, it’s undeniable that in Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic, we are privileged to be witnessing three of the greatest players of all time doing battle on the biggest stages of all. But after witnessing the Australian Open this year, I couldn’t help but wind back the clock a decade and think that in January 2003, things were altogether more exciting for tennis fans. Back then, we had a whole host of players capable of lifting the game’s biggest titles. Lleyton Hewitt was world number one, but was by no means dominant. Andre Agassi was still winning Grand Slams, Andy Roddick was breaking onto the scene, Tim Henman was a genuine threat on grass, Marat Safin was up there in the rankings, Juan Carlos Ferrero ruled the clay, and in Federer, there was a mercurial young talent waiting to mature and blossom into a serial major winner. Nowadays, the Grand Slams are dominated by a select elite group of four players.

It’s been the case since Juan Martin del Potro managed to break through and win the U.S. Open in 2009. Before del Potro’s triumph, you had to look back to Safin’s 2005 Australian Open win to find the last time someone not named Federer, Nadal or Djokovic won a ‘big one.’ Yes we’ve marveled at the standards the ‘Big Four’ have pushed the game to and the myriad of rivalries have been intriguing, but unfortunately, it’s made everything a little too predictable and it’s robbed tennis of the very essence of what makes the sport exciting. The Premier League (the English professional league for association football clubs) would be ridiculous if Manchester United, Manchester City, Chelsea and Arsenal won every single game apart from the ones between themselves and the title race was decided by a select handful of weekends. The fact that even the most dominant clubs slip up every so often keeps us watching. Formula One suffered a little in 2012 because Sebastian Vettel was so brilliant, he had the title sewn up halfway through the season. With men’s tennis at the moment, it almost feels like a waste of time tuning in before the semifinals because you know who’s going to be there and that’s often reflected in much

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

lower viewing totals during the first week as the top seeds go through the motions without breaking sweat. The first 10 days is one grand warm-up before the real event gets underway in the final three days. The appetite for both quality and unpredictability was reflected by the media interest in November’s Paris Masters when qualifier Jerzy Janowicz came through nowhere to beat four top 20 players on the way to the final. Unfortunately in the Slams, it seems like many in the draw don’t really believe they can beat the very best players. Just look at the easy ride Andy Murray had on the way to the semifinals of the Australian Open. And the most disappointing match of the tournament was to see David Ferrer get brushed aside so comprehensively in the semis. While Djokovic in full flow is great to watch, he didn’t even need to be close to his best to win that match and Ferrer’s comments after the match suggested that he’d been a beaten man before he even walked on court … not the kind of attitude you want to hear from the fourth seed. I find myself hankering for the days when a player ranked outside the top 10 could have a genuine shot at winning a major. The problem is partly the ATP’s decision to make the surfaces for the four slams more uniform and so it’s not too hard for the very best players to succeed wherever they go. This probably all sounds a little pessimistic, but you have to wonder, would tennis be more entertaining if it was a little more unpredictable? David Cox’s earliest tennis memory was watching Tim Henman save match points to beat Yevgeny Kafelnikov back at Wimbledon 1996. He’s been in love with the game ever since and sports journalism seemed like a natural career path. David has been working for Live-Tennis.com since 2009 and became site editor in 2010. Since then he’s had the opportunity to report from courtside on ATP events like the ATP World Tour Finals and has conducted many player interviews with some of the biggest stars in the game.


Building Game Equity and Personal Humility By Steve Kaplan I have an idea for what could be the most boring video game of all time … imagine a large blob that doesn’t move, cannot fire back and you get unlimited opportunities to shoot it. Unfortunately, young players tell me that this game is not in the same league as Mortal Kombat because it presents no obstacle to success. They further explain that the fun of video games is in the thrill of challenge so it’s silly if you know you are going to win. Learning the process of understanding and welcoming challenge is a wise and productive outlook, and I wish more tennis players would internalize this developmental message and embrace the struggle as much as the thrill of victory. Winning is great, but the rewards of tennis can also be found in managing crisis, understanding strengths, overcoming weaknesses, recognizing opportunities and solving problems. Tennis is a game of crisis management and the best players are calm and skillful managers. This is a necessary skill since the margin of success and failure in most matches is remarkably narrow. A negative change in the outcome of just one of every 35 points, for example, would drop Novak Djokovic out of the top 100 in the world. Your play is defined by your ability to rise to the defining moments that turn failures into triumphs. If I had to identify the single most important developmental skill in tennis, it would not be a stroke, tactic or mental approach. The most vital, and perhaps most difficult, skill in the education of a rising player is the development and construction of game equity. Have the humility and courage to risk

failure now in order to build a game for the future. A healthy forward outlook requires motivation and passion. It is nearly impossible to stay focused and positive in the long run if you are not true to yourself and develop a style that reflects your personality. It is vital, therefore, to personalize the experience without taking the experience too personally or too seriously. Tennis is a great way to practice how to overcome challenges in life, and the consequences of failure are not so grave. It’s only a tennis match after all, and you have an almost limitless opportunity to both succeed and fail if you persevere. Tennis is part of a developing player’s education. It provides the opportunity to expand your understanding of yourself and the world, but also the danger of being a selflimiting dead end road. Surely it can help make you who are and define you as a person. Why not define yourself as a person who is not limited by fear and ego.

I often repeat the lesson of humility given to one of my long-time students, a then 10year-old Sandra Birch by her father Bryan, over 30 years ago. He explained to his future two-time NCAA champion daughter, “You might be a better tennis player than many people, but that does not make you any better or more entitled than anyone.” To this day, I don’t think I’ve heard better advice. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Reebok Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 33 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 500 nationally-ranked junior players, 15 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $7 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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A COACHING PHILOSOPHY:

The CORE 4 By Lonnie Mitchel fter many years of teaching and working in the business world, I learned you must develop a philosophy and live by it and be true to it. If you are about to embark on a search for the best instructor, ask him/her what is their teaching/coaching philosophy? You need a mission statement as a professional and the student should be agreeable to that mission statement. Learning from my mentors and my experience, you must brand yourself in everything you do and be true to your philosophy and mission. If you visit my office at SUNY Oneonta, on my door you will see the slogan and components of The CORE 4. The CORE 4 is a constant reminder to my players as to my expectations during practice and matches. This

A

guides me in almost everything I do as a teacher and coach. CORE 4 may be catchy, it rhymes and can be considered as a device to augment my beliefs and I don’t deny it. When I worked for the Walt Disney Company, I was reminded of one the greatest men of the 20th century and how he branded Mickey Mouse as the icon of the company. A cartoon mouse skyrocketed this company to “The” entertainment company five decades even

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after the death of Walt Disney. Disney said, “If you can dream it, you can do it. Always remember that this whole thing was started with a dream and a mouse.” I try to look at the habits of some of the most successful people and emulate their habits and learn something from them. Use the tools that are available to you through their knowledge, experience and combine it to fit your own goals. CORE 4 in tennis My players walk into my office and they recite back The CORE 4. They know it

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


and live up to it on the tennis court or they will be behind the eight ball on my team. You are likely at this point wondering just exactly what the CORE 4 is. On the tennis court, you better have: 1. Great footwork: Nick Bollettieri will not consider a student for his IMG Academy without good footwork translating to good body language which can tell a lot about a person and as a tennis competitor. 2. Poise: You better have poise or develop some and be receptive to my coaching of it. I want you to keep your composure, both while winning and losing and in practice when you are working to improve. Poise in the classroom separates you from the rest. 3. Consistency: Not just being able to hit the ball back and forth more than your opponent, but doing all the right things on and off the court consistently. From the six pillars of character are Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring and Citizenship.

Being persistent to perform in those areas repeatedly is vital. 4. Focus … you and the ball: One of my mentors became one of the most successful amateur players in the world by embracing the components of focus in everything he did. The great champions all have it and I want my players to have it on the court and in the classroom. What about technique? If you are a competent instructor, you are teaching it. If you are taking a lesson, you will want to attain it. A teacher can teach good technique and strategy, but getting students to do well for a long period of time is necessary for long-term growth. Microsoft, one of the most successful companies in the world, has a very simple mission statement: “To enable people and businesses throughout the world to realize their full potential.” Microsoft continues to realize their mission. In my journey to be a successful collegiate tennis coach and role model, my mission is to be true to my CORE 4 beliefs and teach my

players the components of such on the court and in life. Are you a teacher and do you have a philosophy or mission? You will be successful if you do. Get your mission written down and it becomes real and your chance for success increases dramatically. Or, you can be just one of those people existing and not knowing where to go or what to do on the tennis court or in life. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. He has produced many high school and collegiate level tennis players, including his own children, Wayne (who plays at Muhlenberg College) and Trevor (who competes regularly on the USTA Long Island Junior Circuit, gaining the number one ranking in the 14s). Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the Maccabiah Games in Israel this summer for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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De-Mystifying the Gluten-Free Diet By Irina Belfer-Lehat Why is everyone talking about “The Gluten-Free Diet?” How did that miracle diet change Novak Djokovic’s game and help him to climb the ladder to number one in the world? Do we all need to follow this diet to miraculously improve our tennis game? Here is some educational information and a brief overview of the gluten-free diet that can help you to decide for yourself, if you can benefit from eating gluten-free. The origins The gluten-free diet was originally designed for individuals diagnosed with Celiac Disease. Celiac sufferers can develop headaches, tingling, fatigue, muscle

pain, skin rashes and joint pain because the autoimmune attack at the root of the disease gradually erodes the wall of the intestine, leading to poor absorption of iron, folate and other nutrients that affect everything from the body’s energy to brain function. While it is very difficult to diagnose this disease, many who experience the above symptoms may be sensitive to gluten and hence, benefit from a gluten-free diet. What is gluten? Gluten (from the Latin “gluten” or “glue”) is a protein composite found in foods processed from wheat and related grain types, including barley and rye. Gluten gives elasticity to dough, thus helping it rise and keep its shape and often gives the final product a chewy texture. The restriction list of this diet is very long, due to the

fact that most of the foods that we consume are processed in some way. People who are not severely allergic to gluten might not find the need to eliminate all of the foods containing gluten, but perhaps avoid some. People with Celiac Disease, usually are very strict and often work with the nutritionist to create a complete meal plan. What is allowed on a gluten-free diet? Some of the items that are allowed on a gluten-free diet include: n Beans, seeds, nuts in their natural, unprocessed form n Fresh eggs n Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated)

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


n Fruits and vegetables n Most dairy products It’s important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diets, including amaranth, arrowroot, buckwheat, corn and corn meal, flax, gluten-free flours, millet, quinoa, rice, soy, tapioca and teff. Those on a gluten-free diet must avoid all food and drinks containing: n Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley) n Rye, triticale (a cross between wheat and rye) n Wheat

Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves—bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. Here are some other wheat products to avoid: n Bulgur, durum flour, farina, graham flour, kamut, semolina n Beer, breads, cakes and pies, candies, cereals, croutons, cookies, French fries, gravies, imitational meat or seafood, matzo, pastas and salad dressings There are some risks associated with this diet, if not followed properly. People who follow a gluten-free diet may have

Does your schedule make it difficult to play on a USTA League team? Are you looking for people to play with, but don’t know where to go? Do you want to work on your singles game, without affecting your USTA rating? USTA’s Flex League may be for you. Flex Leagues allow you to play when it’s convenient for you. You arrange a mutually agreeable match day, time and location with your opponent. The home player covers the court costs, if any. Registration is completed online at www.ustaflex.com. Once

low levels of certain vitamins and nutrients in their diets. Many grains are enriched with vitamins. Avoiding grains with a gluten-free diet may mean eating fewer of these enriched products. Ask your dietitian to review your diet to see that you are getting enough of these key nutrients: Iron, calcium, fiber, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and folate. Cutting out gluten is the most reliable way to determine if you are, in fact, sensitive to the protein—and if you are sensitive, it’s the only treatment. Irina Belfer-Lehat is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. She may be reached by phone at (917) 769-8031 or e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com.

registration is closed, a schedule will be generated. You will receive a list of opponents and suggested “play by” dates. Once the match is played, the scores are recorded online. Additionally, all players registered for the USTA Flex League are entered into the USTA Flex League Sweepstakes where the grand prize is a trip for two to the U.S. Open. Spring registration is open until Monday, March 25. For more information, e-mail flexleague@live.com.

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA EASTERN LONG ISLAND REGION

USTA Eastern Section Honors Long Islanders Long Island award winners made a strong showing at the Annual USTA Eastern Section 2012 Awards Dinner in White Plains, with seven local volunteers taking home prizes including the evening’s top award, the Leslie J. FitzGibbon Tennis Man of the Year given to Ed Wolfarth. Additional award winners were Sunny Fishkind, Clinician of the Ed Wolfarth, the Leslie J. FitzGibbon Tennis Man of the Year

Year; Michael Pavlides, Virginia and Chuck Landis High School Coach of the Year; Jacki Binder, Press Service Award; Lori D’Antonio, Special Service Award; and Melanie Rubin, Long Island Regional Volunteer of the Year. Darius Yaraghi received the Ron Smyth Parent Sportsmanship Award at the Eastern Section Junior Awards Luncheon.

Melanie Rubin (center) was presented with the Long Island Regional Volunteer of the Year Award

Darius Yaraghi received the Ron Smyth Parent Sportsmanship Award, established in memory of Mr. Ron Smyth, an exceptional tennis parent and a respected human being

Sunny Fishkind was named Clinician of the Year

Jacki Binder, winner of the Press Service Award

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Lori D’Antonio of Long Beach Tennis Center, was named Special Service Awardee for helping grow the area’s 10 & Under Tennis program

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Michael Pavlides (center) was presented with the Virginia and Chuck Landis High School Coach of the Year for his service coaching boys and girls tennis at Massapequa High School for the last 15 years


USTA EASTERN LONG ISLAND REGION

LI Region Annual Awards Dinner Approaches For more information on the awards, please visit www.longisland.usta.com. Please e-mail your awards nominations in any other above categories to ustaonlongisland@gmail.com. We’ll need the nominee’s name, address, phone, email and reasons why you think they deserve an award. In addition, we will need volunteers to help the night of the dinner. Show your support for Long Island tennis and help celebrate our winners by volunteering that night. Volunteers can email their contact information to ustaonlongisland@gmail.com and put “awards dinner volunteer” in the subject line.

The 23rd Annual LI Region Awards Dinner is scheduled for Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at the Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y. Once again, the evening will be a great celebration of Long Island talent and volunteerism as we recognize many terrific volunteers and players. Awards will be given in categories including topscoring league and high school players, lifetime achievement, sportsmanship, tennis pro, junior team tennis, family participation, volunteerism, tennis facilities, community service and innovative programming, among others.

Long Island Region Officers Re-Elected successful initiatives including:

The USTA Eastern Long Island Region is pleased to announce that its slate of executive officers, headed by Daniel Burgess, president, has been re-elected to a second two-year term by the members of the Long Island Region. All officers and members of the Regional Board are volunteers. In addition to Burgess, the Executive Board includes Mike Pavlides, vice president (as well as co-Web site manager and scholastic representative chair/Nassau); Craig Fligstein, secretary/treasurer; and Scott Axler, immediate past president, who also serves as boys ranking chair, junior competition. Burgess said that within the past two years, the Long Island Region has accomplished many goals and launched several

n Coordinated 10 & Under workshops at several street fairs and community events n Made the annual Long Island Awards Dinner the envy of not only the Eastern Section, but all of USTA n Increased grant opportunities for member organizations n Provided financial and other support to facilities devastated by Superstorm Sandy n Recognized and thanked members of our U.S. military and their families through fundraisers and other events n Expanded the Long Island Region board and made it more diverse n Re-Designed the Region’s Web site and made it more inclusive of all member organizations, resulting in much higher Web traffic to the site n Improved communication with member organizations and the tennis community through the establishment of a quarterly newsletter n Hosted several hundred kids at Rally Day, featuring lessons from world pro Chanda Rubin n Collected gently used tennis clothing and equipment for children in need n Conducted training in CPR and the use of Automated External Defibrillators at several facilities

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA EASTERN LONG ISLAND REGION

Long Island Adds League Appeals Position to Volunteer Board The USTA Eastern Long Island Region board has added a new volunteer position, League Liaison/League Appeals and Inquiries, and appointed Jonathan Klee to manage the inquiry process. An active USTA league player, Klee previously served in the same role with the USTA Eastern Section board. He will be working with Kathy Miller,

League Coordinator. The League Liaison/League Appeals and Inquiries position was created to simplify the process for league players who want to appeal a rating or a ruling or who have questions or need guidance with appeals. Klee is well-acquainted with the appeals process through his volunteer work with the Section. To contact Jonathan for assistance with the appeals process, please e-mail ustaonlongisland@gmail.com and put League Appeals in the subject line.

Junior and Adult Tennis Scholarships Offered in Westhampton Westhampton Beach Tennis will be again offering partial and full scholarships to both adults and juniors at its tennis academy. These scholarships are for beginning tennis players who have made contributions to their community. The scholarships are in the names of two of owner Peter Kaplan’s roommates at Cornell University. Jay Gallagher was an All-Big North lacrosse player and captain of the 1974 Cornell lacrosse squad. He went on to coach at UNC, Syracuse and Cornell. Jay passed away from skin cancer. Eamon McEneaney is considered one of the all-time great lacrosse players. He played on great Cornell teams from 19741977, including the team that won a still-record 42 consecutive

games including two national championships. Eamon was Player of the Year. Unfortunately, he perished on 9/11, leaving his wife Bonnie with four children. “What was not very well known is that Eamon led 65 people to safety in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing,” Kaplan said. “Both Jay and Eamon were wonderful humanitarians, family men and friends.” For more information on the Westhampton Beach Tennis scholarships and to learn how to apply for one, please visit www.westhamptonbeachtennis.com or e-mail peterkaplan2002@yahoo.com.

Seawolves Tennis to Host Fundraiser The Stony Brook University Seawolves Tennis Team will hold a Family FunFest on Saturday, March 23 from 6:00 p.m.-9:30 p.m. to raise money to support the team and its activities. The event will take place at Eastern Athletic Blue Point and preregistration is required. The FunFest includes a tennis clinic, court time, gift bag and light food. Seawolves Tennis is headed by Coach Gary Glassman who is entering his 14th season as head coach of the Stony Brook’s men’s and women’s tennis teams. During his tenure, Seawolves tennis has become not only one of the top programs in the America East but one of the top programs in the Northeast Region. Last season, 34

Glassman led the women’s team to their first America East championship in program history. Glassman and his staff earned Coaching Staff of the Year honors and junior Nini Lagvilava was named America East Player of the Year. In addition, freshman Polina Movchan earned the conference’s Rookie of the Year award and was selected as the Most Outstanding Player of the America East championships. Bob Coburn, Membership/ Marketing Chair for the USTA Eastern Long Island Regional Board, serves as an Assistant Coach with Glassman. For more information on the Seawolves Family FunFest, visit www.goseawolves.org or e-mail susan.abbott@stonybrook.edu.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


?

Is the

Number One-Ranked Player

Best Player

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By Miguel Cervantes III The title of this article is a hotly debated topic between me and my friend Jean. The conversation always begins the same way, with him singing the praises of Serena Williams. With her impressive list of accomplishments, it is easy to argue her case as being the best female player of all time, but is she the best at the moment? Jean gets upset when I play devil’s advocate in suggesting that the number one-ranked player should get the title of the best player, if only for the time being. Serena may not always be ranked number one, but she is always treated as such when playing. Few players, if any, can illicit the respect, fear and admiration of other players the way she does. Whether at the top of the rankings or not, Serena could be said to, at the very least, have an honorary number one ranking in the minds of the commentators at every major. This begs the question: Is the number one ranked player the best player, or does the title require more justification? Before trying to make an argument as to who is the best, we must first ask ourselves how are we going to define “the best.� There are many criteria that must be considered. Should the best player be the one who has won the most money in the year? Should the best player be the one who has won the most matches? Should the best player be the player that has won the most, big matches? Realistically, I believe that to call someone the best, they have to be the favorite to win in any match they play. I certainly would not bet against Serena in any match (barring any injuries). Ranking is used to seed players in tournaments and reflects an estimation as to

who should have the highest percentage chance of winning the event, but things rarely turn out that way. Part of the reason this occurs is because several things go into how a player is ranked. One example is consistency and frequency. A player may arrive at a major with a 50/50 winloss ratio, ranked higher than their opponent because they have played more events in the year and thus, have accumulated more ranking points. Their opponent, on the other hand, although being ranked lower, has an 80/20 win/loss ratio and proceeds to demolish our first player. No ranking system is perfect, nor can it account for every variable (especially off the court variables.) The system we have in professional tennis, I feel, is as fair and balanced as we can expect. Going back to the center of my debate with Jean, I am inclined to agree with my friend. Serena does not necessarily need to obtain the number one ranking to be con-

sidered the best player in the world, nor does anyone else. Ranking cannot tell you with certainty what the outcome of a match will be. A more interesting question for debate would be, if Serena played more events, would she be able to perform as well as she does at the majors. Part of a player’s skill is shown not just on the court but off the court, finding that balance of dozens of variables to perform at your absolute best. Serena has, in her career, done things her own way. She might be the object of criticism for this, but her results suggest that she knows what works for her, to perform at her absolute best despite her rank at any given moment. Miguel Cervantes III teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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SERIOUS TENNIS, S

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Photo credits: Adam Wolfthal

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This offer is valid at the SPORTIME Tennis and EXCEL Tennis Camp locations listed above. May not be combined with any other offer or discount. Offer expires March 26, 2012. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine 37


Tennis Professionals: Guardians of the Tennis Community By Brett Bothwell recent article by Fritz Buehning in the January/February 2013 issue of New York Tennis Magazine on string technology was a refreshing reminder of how important it is for tennis professionals and coaches at the grassroots level to stay informed and to take a lead in educating the tennis community regarding equipment and technological advances. Strings, racquets, balls and even sneakers have become very player-specific, and it’s essential for professionals to take an active role in matching players up with the appropriate “tools” to play. Injuries can occur and even player retention/participation can suffer greatly if players aren’t given proper guidance. The role of “educator” is an obvious

A

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one for teaching professionals, and it’s a role pros must embrace with as much regard for equipment as for stroke production. There are lots of ways to hit a tennis ball and pros serve as information filters everyday when considering how to teach. In this same manner, pros can serve as filters regarding equipment and technical information as well. It’s not enough for pros to be merely vehicles of commerce. The tennis community needs more precise guidance and the natural place to get it is from tennis professionals. Ideally, pros are continually sifting through the latest information, in fact are seeking it out, in order to help players find the “best fit” possible. Players who are mismatched with their equipment, particularly a racquet or string, are far more susceptible to injury. Thoughtless recommendations can be dangerous, making the tennis industry it-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

“According to the Tennis Industry Association (TIA), approximately 30 percent of frequent player participation is lost each year due to injury.” self vulnerable to harm. According to the Tennis Industry Association (TIA), approximately 30 percent of frequent player participation is lost each year due to injury. For the industry as a whole, that’s a big number: less court time sold, fewer balls sold, etc. Pros can form the last line of defense at the grass-roots level, and just as a coach on the court must be alert to a problematic stroke technique, a coach must also be alert to an equipmentplayer mismatch. Should a 3.5 Level player swinging a racquet at a fraction of Rafa’s swing speed, and who is half the weight of Rafa, and who is a mortal being unlike Rafa, use the same string and the same type of racquet as Rafa? Most of the time the answer should be “No,” yet this combination of player and equipment can be found on tennis courts everywhere. This is inexcusable, and it’s the responsibility of teachers and coaches to intervene and to open up a conversation which leads to smarter consumer decisions, for the benefit of all. There are certainly instances when a player will insist on using inappropriate equipment in spite of a credible recommendation otherwise, but the frequency of mismatches suggests the lack of an active dialogue. There is no doubt that players can be persuaded by direct ap-


peals from manufacturers, but more often than not, tennis pros and/or stringers are the final customer consultation regarding an equipment purchase, and if the pro is armed with a solid knowledge base, then a sound recommendation is likely to hit home. A proper equipment fit can make tennis easier to play and making the game easier leads to a greater conversion rate of casual participants to frequent players. A good example of this is 10 & Under tennis. The equipment has been scaled down to fit the small scale of the children making the game much more engaging and enjoyable. It’s not an accident that the conversion rate of 10 & Under kids to frequently playing juniors is significantly on the rise. The same principle applies

to fitting adults for equipment. The likelihood of a beginning adult enjoying the game and embracing it as a game for life is much greater if they’re using an appropriate beginner racquet and string, and maybe even a special ball. These are decisions that pros must actively engage in for the greater good of the game. In order to maximize everyone’s enjoyment of tennis and to grow the game, coaches and teaching professionals must embrace their role as guardians of

the tennis community. It’s not enough to sell the latest stuff because it’s readily available. Pros must seize the opportunity to do more, and to make themselves an even greater asset to the game by taking responsibility for fitting players with appropriate equipment. Just as pros and coaches spend time training to play and to teach, they must take time as well to understand the impact and implications of new products and technologies in order to make sound recommendations to the playing community. Brett Bothwell is founder and director of BOLT Sports, and senior staff pro, USPTA for Roosevelt Island Racquet Club. He may be reached by phone at (877) 430-BOLT, email contact@bolt-sports.com or visit www.boltadvance.com.

Learn & Play & Drills 3.0, 3.5 & 4.0 for Adults Monday, Tuesday & Friday

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

camp guide

2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

25th Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla. June 16-20, 2013 University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Va. July 6-10, 2013 Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa. July 14-19, July 21-26 & July 28-August 2, 2013 (813) 684-9031 www.collegetennis.com Coach Ed Krass’ 25th Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp is the nation’s only training camp taught exclusively by head college coaches. The camp is open to all players, ages 15-18, who are interested in playing college tennis. Players receive instruction and training from head coaches representing every level of the college game. Ed Krass coached varsity tennis teams at Harvard University, Clemson University and University of Central Florida prior to founding the College Tennis Exposure Camp. Under the skillful eyes of top college coaches, players showcase their singles, doubles and One-on-One Doubles skills, and receive specific feedback on their game. Instructional drills and match play competitions are conducted in the same style and intensity as collegiate practice sessions. Players have the opportunity to sample various coaching styles and receive on-court coaching during team competitions. Classroom seminars with college coaches motivate and educate players about college tennis preparation. The camp is offered at University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla. from June 1640

20; University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Va. from July 6-10 and at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., from July 14-19, July 21-26 and July 28-Aug. 2. Air-conditioned dormitory accommodations, cafeteria meals and 24-hour adult supervision are provided. For more information, call (813) 684-9031 or visit www.collegetennis.com.

360Tennis Cunningham Tennis in Cunningham Park, Queens 196-00 Union Turnpike Fresh Meadows, N.Y. (917) 596-0746 www.360Tennis.net “Only for the most motivated”

360Tennis is running its summer programming at Cunningham Tennis in Cunningham Park, Queens, N.Y. Former top 10 player Tim Mayotte and expert developmental and pro coach Lee Hurst (who has developed a number of tour-level players) bring years of experience in getting players on track to be top players. These two coaches will be on-court leading the work with their expert staff. Sessions begin June 24 and end Aug. 30 with two sessions daily (10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.). Because of 360Tennis’ low coach-player ratio and the extraordinary training of its coaches, the competitors receive worldclass training in technique, tactics and fitness and mental training. 360Tennis is singular in that its players develop technically in the group settings. The five hours of daily work include: Technical skill building, tactical work, daily fitness, and on-court mental skill building. The indoor courts will be utilized on rainy

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

days. Our junior players often train next to our pros when they are not on Tour. A limited number of spots are available! For younger players, there is 360Development (programming hours will be determined). For more information, visit 360Tennis.net, or call (973) 626-5236 or (917) 596-0746.

adidas Tennis Camps at Stony Brook University Sunday-Friday, July 14-19 & July 21-26 Director: Gary Glassman (800) 944-7112 TennisCamper.com support@tenniscamper.com adidas Tennis Camps have been held at Stony Brook University since 2005, helping hundreds of kids in the tri-state area improve their tennis game. The Stony Brook camp will once again be directed by Stony Brook University Head Men’s and Women’s Tennis Coach Gary Glassman. Entering his 11th season as the men’s and women’s coach, Glassman has compiled a combined 251 wins, setting single season records in wins for both programs, while leading the men’s program to their first ever national ranking in 2005. Coach Glassman’s camp staff is comprised of area teaching professionals, assistant coaches and college tennis players. adidas Tennis Camps has something to offer to junior tennis players of all abilities. The curriculum is tailored to help each camper improve their game in a positive, fun atmosphere. Each staff pro is dedicated to the personal development and improvement of every camper, from beginners to top tournament players. They


camp guide

encourage high school teams to come together—keeping them on the same courts to help them become stronger as a whole. Finally, adidas Tennis Camps offers tournament training which provides a challenging atmosphere for juniors to improve their USTA rankings. Players will train with other motivated tournament players and compete against each other in a constructive, fun and well-organized camp setting. Campers who choose to take part in tournament training will be put through a rigorous training regimen that will help improve their physical and mental endurance as well. adidas Tennis Camps offer three different options for campers: 1. Overnight campers: Campers sleep on campus in dormitories and eat their meals in the dining hall. The staff lives in the dorms and chaperon all the off court/evening activities to provide supervision. Evening activities last year included a swim party, movie night, karaoke contest and a tennis fun night! 2. Extended day campers: Included is lunch and dinner, tennis and evening activities. 3. Day campers: Includes lunch and a week’s worth of tennis instruction from the finest

coaches in the Northeast. All ability levels are welcome! Boys and girls ages eight through 18 … tournament training is available … overnight and day options. It’s your summer. It’s your game. Advanced High Performance Tennis Academy by Maurice Trail (516) 302-5613 advancedtennis@verizon.net

Advanced High Performance Tennis Academy is a personalized program. Each day, students receive individual instruction, with a small student to pro ratio for drilling, point play, group fitness and athletic enhancement. Often, the student will play the coaches in points and matches. A key to junior development is playing matches and competing daily. All students, depending on skill level, will compete every day in sets

and matches, both independently and supervised. The situations will duplicate a tournament environment, a key to handling pressure situations and delivering when it counts the most in tournaments. The toughest game is the mind … and it is you against you.

The Centercourt Academy Summer Tennis Camp Centercourt Athletic Club 222 North Passaic Avenue Chatham, N.J. (973) 635-1222 www.centercourtclub.com Contact: Clay Bibbee clay@centercourtclub.com “Where champions come to train!” The Academy at Centercourt Athletic Club is the Northeast’s premiere High Performance Tennis Academy. As a USTA-Certified Regional Training Center, we embrace our role as a member of the USTA coaching team and the mission to develop top student athletes. We offer a junior player pathway that

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Contact former Stanford University and Roslyn High School MVP Ricky Becker today at 516-605-0420 or rbecker06@yahoo.com.

www.juniortennisconsulting.com LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine


2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

can satisfy the high performance needs of nationally ranked juniors. The Academy offers an after-school program, high performance summer programs, full-time home-schooling program and an Academy travel team. Why choose the Centercourt Tennis Academy: n Train in a world class environment with high-performance level coaching n Achieve significant individual improvement in all facets of your game; technically, physically and mentally n We are dedicated to meeting the individual needs of each and every one of our students n Our Academy players are among some of the top section, national, and ITF ranked players from around the world n We put the needs of the player first, in a development-focused model of training n Each camp will be tailored to the skill level and goals of all players; featuring small group training, match play, individualized fitness plans, mental coaching and video analysis n Tournament coaching and travel n Players who commit to our training will

see themselves develop life skills that will enable them to become champions on and off the court The Centercourt Academy Summer Tennis Camp offers three distinct levels: Academy I, Academy II and Centercourt Advantage. The Camp also features an Overnight Camp option for those interested in the complete summer camp experience. For more information, contact Clay Bibbee by phone at (973) 6351222 or e-mail clay@centercourtclub.com.

Bethpage Park Tennis Center Summer Tennis Camp 99 Quaker Meeting House Road, Building #4 Farmingdale, N.Y. (516) 777-1358 To be your best, you need the best program, facilities and players! Bethpage Park Tennis Center’s Summer Tennis Camp is designed for maximum time efficiency and productiveness. Our wealth of tennis

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1-1 consultations, phone consults, family counseling, on site visits Dr. Tom Ferraro (516) 248-7189 • 2 Hillside Avenue, Ste. E • Williston Pk, NY 11596 Drtomferraro.com • drtferraro@aol.com

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

courts enables us to provide indoor and outdoor courts, hard courts and clay courts. No camp provides a more favorable camper to court ratio than us. This means campers can play singles and doubles matches daily. These opportunities for match play are most beneficial because they are with the finest players the East Coast has to offer. To be the best, you need the best staff! We train players to excel with greater success than any other eastern camp because of our unique staff. Since we conduct a year-round program, we employ proven, full-time professionals to oversee our camp. The rest of our staff is comprised of our top-ranked students, many of whom are college standouts, to ensure quality, enthusiasm and continuity of instruction. We are very flexible, with nine oneweek, as well as partial-week, sessions so that tournament players can design a schedule that accommodates their individual needs. We believe that the summer is a great time to drill skills, get match tough and develop fitness habits that will help year-round. Is this program right for you? At Bethpage Park Tennis Center’s Summer Tennis Camp, our standards are high, our prerequisites are not! We encourage and value our beginners equally with our nationally-ranked players. All we require is the desire to attend a serious tennis camp to … to learn in an intensive, personal and fun environment … and the drive to achieve your personal best! Transportation is available, and a daily deli or pizza lunch is included.


camp guide

Carefree Racquet Club 1414 Jerusalem Avenue North Merrick, N.Y. (516) 489-9005 www.carefreeracquetclub.com

Where can you find a junior summer tennis camp highlighting the excitement of competition, highstructured instruction and plenty of allaround play time? At Carefree Racquet Club, complete with seven air-conditioned indoor tennis courts, two racquetball courts that can convert to walleyball, a half-court basketball court, a cozy lounge and snack area … that’s where! At Carefree’s summer camp, we encourage the social aspect of loving the game just for the fun of it. We stress the positive approach to competition which gives our juniors perspective both on and off the court. In the long run, this brings out the confidence to succeed in whatever our students venture into later in life. The key is to develop behavioral characteristics of success for all of our students: Vision, action, responsibility and independence. The staff is comprised of knowledgeable and caring counselors some of who were or currently are, college players who were also trained at Carefree Racquet Club. The program is directed by Louis Vallejo, with 27 years of teaching experience and 17 years of sectional, national and international playing experience. He has coached juniors of all levels of play. Along with his head pros, the tutelage of our students is unsurpassed. Carefree Racquet Club is proud to celebrate its 22nd year of our Junior Summer

Tennis Camp. The success of our summer program comes from our outstanding facility, fun to win attitude and our superior pro staff. Our camp hours are from noon to 5:00 p.m. Our students come in fresh and relaxed with energy, ready for action. We warm up on the courts with the physical part of our training: Stretching, cardio, core and strength exercises. Stroke development and analysis is structured yet simplified to ensure our students keep their enthusiasm for on-court playing action. After warm-up, we begin drilling, instruction and point simulation. After a half-hour lunch/snack break at 2:00 p.m., the students are back on-court for an hour of cardio tennis drilling. Match play begins at 3:30 p.m. where there is singles and doubles competition. We are also able to offer cross-training with the basketball and walleyball courts, which teaches our students team effort and sportsmanship. After a quick juice break, we end the day with fun games for the final 20-30 min. Carefree’s Junior Summer Tennis Camp is the most flexible on Long Island. You can attend full-time (nine weeks, five days a

week) or a fewer number of weeks. You can also attend just two or three days a week if you’d like. You can even come just once a week, but we bet if you come once, you’ll want to come twice! So come on down and see for yourself … we will be waiting!

Deer Park Tennis & Fitness Camp 30 Burt Drive Deer Park N.Y. (631) 667-3476 www.deerparktennis.com The name of the game … in a fun, positive atmosphere. The main ingredient at Deer Park Tennis & Fitness Camp is great tennis instruction. We have five solid hours of tennis each day, rain or shine. Tennis instruction is tailored to the intermediate and advanced junior players who enjoy the game, work hard at it and want to improve their game. In just two to four weeks of time, your game will show more

NY ♥’s Hilton Head Island Come for the Weekend Adult Weekend Tennis Clinic Packages starting at $377 includes 2 night stay*

Sign up using code NYCHHI and receive a free pair of HEAD shoes ($100 value) *Feb 15-May 31, 2013. Subject to availability. Rates are per person based on double occupacy plus tax.

VAN DER MEER TENNIS vandermeertennis.com Hilton Head Island, SC 1.800.845.6138 LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine


2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

camp guide

2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

improvement than it would with months of weekly lessons. We focus on correcting your technique and point out how to play smarter tennis. You will make great shots, show improved concentration and become an overall better player. A typical day at Deer Park Tennis & Fitness Camp is as follows: Stretching from 10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.; Instruction from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Lunch from 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.; Footwork and Technique Training from 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.; and Match Play caps off the day from 2:30 p.m.4:00 p.m. For more information, call (631) 667-3476 or visit www.deerparktennis.com.

The Early Hit Training Center Junior Summer Tennis Camp at Glen Head Racquet Club Contact: Carl Barnett 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net

Our comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his or her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our complete program. We begin each session with a nutritionally-complete and balanced shake from Court 7, our on-premise restaurant and smoothie bar. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production, drilling and physical fitness training before breaking for a healthy lunch. We then move on to playing dynamics and strat44

egy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A thorough cool-down and stretching session completes a worldclass day of tennis for your child. With our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, experienced physical conditioning trainers, movement experts and on-site chef, the Early Hit Training Center offers a unique and total tennis experience.

Future Stars Summer Camps The College at Old Westbury 223 Store Hill Road Old Westbury, N.Y. Weekly Programs (June 24-Aug. 10) (516) 876-3490 Farmingdale State College 2530 Broadhollow Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Weekly Programs (June 24-Aug. 10) (631) 609-0438 Future Stars Tennis Club 1370 Majors Path • Southampton, N.Y. Weekly Programs (June 24-Aug. 23) (631) 287-6707 Future Stars Summer Camps offer the finest weekly tennis day camps at three convenient locations: The College at Old Westbury, Farmingdale State College, and Future Stars Tennis Club in Southampton, N.Y. Programs are directed by experienced and qualified teachers and coaches who share a passion for working with children. Weekly programs are offered for boys and girls entering grades K-12. Tennis camps offer the perfect mix of match play, drill work, strategy sessions and off-court activities to challenge players of all levels. The program is designed to improve

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

every facet of the game, including technical, tactical, physical and mental components under the guidance of our experienced and enthusiastic tennis professionals. Campers will be carefully grouped according to skill level and age and will be encouraged to enhance their strokes and strategies via group lessons, skill building drills organized play, target training, fitness routines and more. At Future Stars Summer Camps we play with confidence, enthusiasm and a genuine love of the game! Stop by our regular oncampus open house events to view the facilities, meet the directors, and take advantage of enrollment savings!

Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp (516) 463-CAMP www.hofstra.edu/camp A great tennis experience for 2, 4 or 6 weeks The Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp is suitable for both the beginning player through the advanced player interested in tournament play or wishing to participate on high school tennis teams. Basic techniques are taught to beginners and we offer the experienced player advanced skills and game strategy. Each child is instructed according to his or her ability and previous training is not required. Most lessons are taught in the form of a game. Additionally, all of our instructors have been trained in the 10 & Under Tennis/Quick Start program. This is the newest approach to teaching tennis to youngsters 10 years of age and younger. It is sanctioned by the USTA and its format takes a new approach to introducing kids to the game. Campers spend half the day in tennis and the other half participating in swimming, recreation and special events. Transportation and


camp guide

lunch are included in tuition. No instructors are below college age. Tennis Camp Directors Sunny and Eddie Fishkind have been running the camp for 28 years and have won many awards. Our philosophy is that you cannot make a child a great tennis player in two weeks, but you can make them love the game for life! For additional information about Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp, call (516) 463 CAMP or visit www.hofstra.edu/camp.

IMG Academy Bollettieri (800) 872-6425 www.imgacademy.com/sports/tennis silvia.fiumara@imgworld.com madora.mak@imgworld.com

Since its inception more than 30 years ago, the IMG Academy Bollettieri tennis program has earned the reputation as the sport’s premier destination for tennis improvement by developing complete players who can perform in any match situation. Coaching n Guided by founder Nick Bollettieri, who has coached 10 worldwide number oneranked players n Directed by Rohan Goetzke, former technical director of the Dutch Tennis Federation, who oversees approximately 60 experienced coaches. Facilities n More than 50 tennis courts (hard, clay and indoor) n Stroke analysis by V1, the sport’s most respected video system n The “Mission Room� provides an inspirational setting for “classroom� match play strategy and instruction. Notable Alumni/Trainees n Dozens of international tennis champi-

ons, including 10 number one players in the world: Andre Agassi, Boris Becker, Jim Courier, Tommy Haas, Ryan Harrison, Martina Hingis, Jelena Jankovic, Sabine Lisicki, Xavier Malisse, Max Mirnyi, Kei Nishikori, Marcelo Rios, Monica Seles, Maria Sharapova, Heather Watson, Serena Williams and Venus Williams. Features n Skill level-specific camps available for all abilities n Age 10 and under tennis camps available n Learn the keys to successful match play n Low student-to-coach ratios n Recruiting education n Train and compete like athletes in our renowned Academy program (Ascender Camp) n Get one-on-one coaching from our expert coaches (Game Changer Camp) n Improve mental toughness, speed/agility, nutrition, hand-eye coordination and leadership ability (TOTAL ATHLETE Camp) n Improve agility, endurance, power and confidence with group Mental and Physical Conditioning (Core Camp)

Joel Ross Tennis & Golf Camp info@joelrosstennis.com www.joelrosstennis.com (914) 723-2165 Joel Ross, owner and director of Joel Ross Tennis & Golf Camp in Kent, Conn., is a native Long Islander, having grown up in Westbury, N.Y. He won the New York State High School Singles Championships two consecutive years and earned a full tennis scholarship to the University of Michigan, where he captained the team and played number one singles. In 1971, Joel was Big 10 Singles Champion and was featured on the cover of Tennis Magazine. His best circuit wins include John McEnroe and Tom Gullikson. He currently resides in New Rochelle, N.Y. with his wife, Ellen, and four children. Joel Ross Tennis & Golf Camp, located only 90 minutes from the Whitestone Bridge, is located in beautiful Kent, Conn.,

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine


2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

camp guide

2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

at the base of Mt. Algo, alongside the Housatonic River. The camp facilities include 17 on-campus tennis courts, including four indoor in our own steel building. We do not have to bus the campers to tennis facilities! Our swimming pool and squash courts are also on-campus. We have recently added a golf program. We have a 300-yard driving range/mini course right on campus! Our tennis campers can even do one week of golf! Joel is a hands-on director, in attendance 24/7. His program of instruction and fitness in the morning and ladder play in the afternoon and evening has endured for 20 years since the inception of the camp in 1991. Our campers play

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ladder matches daily and our tennis groups change two to three times each week, based on the ladder results. The afternoon/evening ladder is the glue of the camp. All of our campers and staff are residents. Our tuition covers everything: Private lessons, laundry, snacks, trips, etc. Our campers can also participate in many electives, including archery, squash, canoeing, kayaking, basketball, soccer, football and more! We have a multi-tiered “Bully Prevention Program” in place as well. Our campers can canoe and kayak in the Housatonic River! Give us a call at (914) 723-2165 and find out why Joel Ross Tennis & Golf Camp is a keeper!

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Long Beach Tennis Center Club Director: Sid Siddiqui Camp Directors: Jared Berse & Chuck Russell 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. (516) 432-6060 www.longbeachtenniscenter.com

“We are not a factory, we are not a resort… we are your home for tennis.” At Long Beach Tennis Center, we develop tennis champions! Summer is when the real training is done.


camp guide

We’re very excited about our upcoming indoor summer tennis season with our USTA teams, new camp programs and daily workshops. The Academy For the serious tennis player, the best way to improve your game is to immerse yourself in training during the important summer months. Our Junior Tournament Training Camp provides each student the opportunity to train with the best world class coaches and other students who have similar goals. We promote development of the whole athlete. Long Beach Tennis Center’s specialized programs are a careful balance of technical, tactical, mental, and physical training. Whether you are training to play the Nationals or wanting to improve your rank on a team, you will have received the right training and instruction to achieve your goals. Tournament training programs are also available for adults wanting to take their game to the next level. CMBC Mini-Camps For junior players looking for more than just tennis, our “Tennis Plus” and “Sports Plus” camps are for you! Through our partnership with Cure Mommy’s Breast Cancer (CMBC), we are offering mini sessions for campers’ ages five- through 13-years-old. Both camps operate Monday-Friday, from 9:00 a.m.-Noon for a total of 10 weeks. Single day attendance is available, along with three-day week and weekly packages. Our Tennis Plus Camp includes mostly tennis (90 minutes to two hours daily); along with different sports each day. These sports and games include: Ping-pong, basketball, soccer, foam ball dodge ball, arts and crafts and more! Our low teaching ratios, fun curriculum and comfortable environment, along with a qualified, trained staff, provide for the ultimate half day tennis camp experience. Sports Plus is our multi-sport camp, which includes 90 minutes to two hours daily of sports and some regular tennis. The sports include basketball, soccer, tennis and more. Our lineup of games rotates daily, and in-

cludes T-ball, Whiffle Ball, ping-pong, foam ball dodge ball, arts and crafts, and more. We are a fully air-conditioned facility with indoor and outdoor game space. We also offer after-camp programs throughout the summer.

New York Tennis at Shelter Rock Tennis and Country Club Summer Camp 100 Long Island Expressway Manhasset, N.Y. Contact: Howie Arons (516) 233-2790 The New York Tennis Academy was formed more than 25 years ago and has since produced more than 250 ranked junior players and more than 75 Division I collegiate tennis players. In addition, we have trained more than 1,000 high school and

LI’s first Tennis Academy devoted to the USTA’s 10 & under Initiative.

Private, Semi-Private and Small Group Lessons for Boys and Girls Ages 5-9.

middle school scholastic players. Our intermediate and advanced programs integrate match play into most sessions. Parents and students can expect consistently high standards of coaching and dedication to excellence. Our camp facilities are among the finest on Long Island. The Shelter Rock Tennis and Racquet Club is undoubtedly at the top of the tennis club ladder. Many of Long Island’s top players are members there because of the beautiful amenities that the club has to offer. With an Olympic-sized swimming pool, three indoor courts and more than 20 outdoor Har-Tru tennis courts, Shelter Rock is the ideal place for a junior tennis player to spend their summer and develop their tennis skills. The New York Tennis Academy is under the direction of Howie Arons. For more than 35 years, Howie has developed and coached some of the top junior players in the area. Both as the coach of the BN Cardozo Boys High School Boys Tennis Team and director of junior tennis at Great Neck Estates Tennis Club, Howie has consistently directed programs that continue to

Butch Seewagen is a former varsity coach at Columbia University. He holds over 15 national and international titles and is the owner/program director of the Children’s Athletic Training Schools. For Boys and Girls 5 – 9 years old.

188 Maple Avenue Rockville Center Phone: 516-753-1299

www.catsny.com LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine


2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

camp guide

2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

challenge top juniors. In addition to Howie, Brian Stein and Rob Weidenbaum will serve as directors of the camp. They will be sure to look after every junior’s personal needs at camp. Brian and Rob currently coach many top juniors and will instill a real competitive presence at camp. Our staff will be completed with top college players who were once juniors in our program and fully understand our Hard Work Philosophy. Finally, we want every junior player to love going to camp and have a great summer tennis experience. Our entire staff will be dedicated to giving our players a great summer of tennis. What makes us different? n Early drop-off for working parents

n Individualized attention—meeting each students’ needs n Experienced and accomplished coaching staff n Flexibility—accommodating students’ and parents’ busy schedules Why choose us: n Programs for all levels—from beginners through tournament training n Daily singles ladders with weekly camp champions—trophies weekly n Olympic-sized heated swimming pool for those 90 degree days n Campers can order from a wide menu for lunch (we have country club food and Kosher food upon request) n Sports drinks and water readily available all day

n Indoor courts available for inclement weather Our philosophy: We grow champions from the ground up. We believe that tennis is the best way to grow the person, as well as the athlete. The rewards of tennis are many: Greater confidence, focus and persistence. Starting young, students will develop skills and friendships that will last a lifetime. We emphasize the fundamentals of proper technique and form. Our coaching staff will insure that your child learns and enjoys the game of tennis. Whether your child is wielding their first racquet or is already competing in tournaments, we have the ability and experience to support their growth.

Call for an appointment for free estimate

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


camp guide

Nike Tennis Camps (800) NIKE-CAMP (645-3226) www.ussportscamps.com

Come join the fun and get better this summer at a Nike Tennis Camp! With more than 80 locations nationwide, both overnight and day options, there is a camp for everyone. Nike Tennis Camps provide young players the opportunity to improve their tennis skills, work hard, make new friends and have a lot of fun. Our dedicated camp directors have a passion for teaching and a gift for helping you take your game to the next level. This summer, Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Camp in Glen Cove, N.Y. is offering four weeks of overnight and day camp (8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) for ages nine through 18 and an additional six weeks of day camp only (8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) for ages nine through 18 with half day (9:00 a.m.-Noon or 1:00 p.m.4:00 p.m.) options for ages five through 10. Other locations in the Northeast include: Lawrenceville School (Lawrenceville, N.J.), Peddie School (Princeton, N.J.), Colgate University (Hamilton, N.Y.), Elizabethtown College (Elizabethtown, Pa.), Chirico-Cohen Tournament Training at Chestnut Hill College (Chestnut Hill, Pa.), Sacred Heart University (Fairfield, Conn.), Amherst College (Amherst, Mass.), and Curry College (Milton, Mass.). Who says that only kids can go to camp? The Nike Adult Tennis Camp at Amherst College has hosted more than 30,000 adult tennis players since 1972. Camp Directors Reiny Maier and Maureen Rankine are outstanding teachers and passionate coaches who inspire all players to get better and love the game. Multiple camp options and dates offered throughout June and July. Visit

www.ussportscamps.com for details. Another great option, The Lawrenceville School offers an adult weekend clinic, the weekend of June 14-16.

Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy Contact: Peter Kaplan (631) 288-4021 or (914) 234-9462 peterkaplan2002@yahoo.com www.westhamptonbeachtennis.com

Peter

Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy

Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy, and the affiliated Grassmere Inn, is a wonderful destination for beginners to nationally-ranked players of all ages. Private instruction and 90minute clinics are offered daily. Camps and one- through seven-day programs are available. The flexibility of the programming

enables participants to enjoy the nearby beautiful ocean beaches, charming village, Performing Arts Center, movie theatre, wine country, flower farms, shopping, cafes, restaurants, water park and other East End attractions. Peter Kaplan, an attorney, former New York State Tennis Champion, and a graduate of Cornell University, is on-site every day. Resident students/families/teams stay at the historic Grassmere Inn, located on quiet, tree-lined Beach Lane in Westhampton Beach, N.Y., only 50 yards from the beginning of the charming village, yet less than one mile from a beautiful ocean beach. The location could not be better. The Grassmere has 22 guest rooms, all with air conditioning, WiFi, cable television and private bathrooms. Ideal for families, are two suites or interconnected rooms. A delicious breakfast of fresh muffins, bagels, cereal, fruit, juice, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt is included daily. The Tennis Academy, located three miles away, is primarily a teaching center featuring 12 soft courts. We have welcomed participants from over 25 countries and 30

Irina Belfer-Lehat RD., CDN Registered Dietitian. Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist. Improve Your Game With the Right Nutrition! Specializing in: • Sports nutrition • General nutrition • Pediatric nutrition Private, group lessons and tennis clubs in services are available.

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

states since 2000. The Academy features an enthusiastic staff, renowned for its highquality instruction and low student-to-staff ratio. The maximum ratio is 4:1, but the average ratio is 2:1. Thirty-five Japanese juniors have been coming for three weeks annually, for the last eight years. They run three miles before breakfast and then 10 hours of instruction, running and matches. However, most participants seek a less intensive program, taking three to five hours of instruction daily. The staff is always accommodating and happy to tailor programs to fit the needs of the customer. Frequently, an adult team will come at the beginning of the season and return for a family vacation. There are also tennis pros who bring groups. The Academy’s staff is available to supplement visiting pros staff. The groups always have an incredible time, some having returned for 10 consecutive years. Tennis during the day, a trip to the beach in the late afternoon, perhaps a glass of wine at sunset, and then dining at a great restaurant, a movie or a show at the Performing Arts Center. Occasionally, guests are coaxed into karaoke with the international staff!

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Point Set Tennis Camp 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. www.pointsettennis.com brett@pointsettennis.com (516) 536-2323

Look no further for the most exciting new summer tennis camp experience! Point Set Tennis announces Summer Camp at Oceanside High School! Brett Nisenson, junior director at Point Set Tennis, will manage a dynamic and fun summer camp reflecting the best winter tournament training program! Point Set Camp at Oceanside High School is for juniors of all ages and all levels. Camp runs from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. daily with lunch. A fun-filled day of competitive tennis: How to construct points, how to win baseline exchanges, when to attack or defend! We want you to win and stand behind your game-style in all aspects: Stroke production, footwork, fitness and mental tough-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

ness. Each day’s program varies to challenge players’ potential. Drills are specifically designed to work on your service game, your return game, your overall baseline game, your net game, court positioning and strategy. The fitness program will develop power, speed, stamina and flexibility. Mental toughness training will address your overall concentration, dealing with errors, dealing with the “unjust,” emotional control and confidence! Match play is included. To accommodate every family’s busy summer schedule, Point Set Camp at Oceanside High School can be reserved daily or weekly. Please inquire if you need transportation. During inclement weather, Camp will be held at the all new indoor facility at Point Set. If you want it ALL—action-packed program, the best teaching Pros, FUN—you’ll find it at Point Set Camp at Oceanside High School.

Ross School Tennis Center 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. (631) 907-5162 www.ross.org/tennis The Ross School Tennis Center, located on the Upper School campus in East Hampton, N.Y., is a wonderful resource in the Hamptons open to seasonal and year-round residents. The Center features six Har-Tru tennis courts that are enclosed by a bubble from mid-fall through mid-spring, allowing for year-round play. The courts are directly adjacent to the beautiful, state-of-the-art Fieldhouse where players can take advantage of its many amenities, including locker rooms, lounge,


camp guide

snack bar, and ping pong tables. The Fieldhouse is also used for a variety of special events and is available for private parties. Junior Programs: n Jump Start Program allows children to develop spatial awareness, movement and locomotor skills using appropriately sized rackets. They learn how to volley, throw, catch, and rally, building a foundation not only for tennis but for any future athletic activities. n Junior Development Program offers games and level-specific drills and training for building a strong foundation. Designed with having fun in mind, the program improves skills and motivates young players into continuing the sport.

n Accelerated Tournament Preparation features drills, tennis-specific conditioning, and game strategy designed specifically to prepare advanced players for junior tournaments and match play. n High Performance (summer only) for ages 10-17, is offered to players who are current USTA members and have some tournament experience (tryout is required). n The Ross School Tennis Academy (RSTA) offers an unusual and dynamic program for national and international junior players that combines an engaging, global curriculum with the highest level of competitive tennis training available. Designed for USTA/ITF players in grades 7-12 and post-graduates, the

Academy is the first in the New York City area to have a full academic program with a complete physical and mental conditioning program. Students who attend the Academy experience high-performance tennis training while studying alongside their peers in a stimulating, college preparatory, learning community following a regular academic year. RSTA Summer is an invitation only program for USTA/ITF and professional players. Boarding options are available. Adult Programs n Adults have many programs to choose from at the Ross School Tennis Center, including Adult Clinics for all levels in the mornings and evenings, as well as

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2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

the Pro-Am Doubles League on Tuesday nights, which allows advanced players to compete with and against the pros in a competitive, high-level game. Private instruction is available for all levels of play. The Tennis Center staff provides a fun and supportive atmosphere that allows for the greatest amount of success. Guests can also rent courts during the weekday, weekend, or seasonally. Call (631) 907-5162 for more information or to make reservations.

SPORTIME Excel Tennis Camps “Getting Better Keeps Getting Better!” Locations: Bethpage (516) 933-8500, Kings Park (631) 269-6300, Massapequa (516) 799-3550, Roslyn (516) 484-9222, Syosset (516) 364-2727, Amagansett (631) 267-3460, Manhattan (John McEnroe Tennis Academy at Randall’s Island) (212) 427-6150, Quogue (631)-653-6767, Lynbrook (516) 887-1330 www.sportimeny.com (and click on the “Excel Summer Tennis Camp” tab) SPORTIME’s Tennis & Multi-Sport and Excel Tennis Camps are where you live and play! With multiple SPORTIME Tennis Camp locations, including the Excel Summer Tennis Camp at SPORTIME Randall’s Island, home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy, players across Long Island and in New York City can experience SPORTIME’s premier tennis programs for recreational and aspiring junior players of all ages and abilities. SPORTIME training methods are fun and fast-paced, featuring stroke pro52

duction, competitive games, and tactical training for match play. Our innovative tennis training techniques and tennisspecific conditioning regimens help newer players learn and enjoy and prepares serious juniors for the physical, mental and emotional demands of the sport of tennis. SPORTIME campers develop positive self-esteem and laser-like focus. Our program is dedicated to turning weaknesses into strengths, and strengths into a winning game. Your child will get better at tennis That’s a guarantee! We take pride in our commitment to helping every camper make serious progress, regardless of his or her level, ability or experience. At SPORTIME, we assess and discuss each camper’s goals and aspirations, and we waste no time in setting out to meet and surpass them. From the total beginner, to the top five nationally ranked superstar, our campers show significant improvement in all phases of the sport. And they will leave stronger and more physically fit than they were when they started! Your child will make friends Aren’t most experiences better when you have friends and buddies to share them with? At SPORTIME Tennis Camps, we believe that an important part of camp is providing a mutually supportive atmosphere where participants respect each other and develop friendships. This positive social opportunity is a big part of what makes tennis “the sport of a lifetime,” and at SPORTIME, we try our best to foster “friendships for a lifetime.” Your child will be safe The supervision at SPORTIME Camps is better than at any other tennis camp. That is a bold statement to make, but we back up that statement up by working incredibly hard to train our entire staff on every aspect of safety, both on and off the court. Senior staff at every

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

SPORTIME Camp location implement and oversee our campers’ well-being and assure that safety procedures are followed during every hour of the camp day. Your child will have a blast! Having a lot of fun while you are improving is just better! And kids get better faster when they are having fun. SPORTIME campers and parents are amazed at how much fun can be had while working hard to improve one’s tennis game. We make every part of our curriculum challenging, fulfilling and fun. Even our conditioning element is fun! Doesn’t your child deserve to have fun this summer?

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Summer Camps Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Corona Park (718) 760-6200 www.ntc.usta.com

The USTA Billie Jean National Tennis Center will once again offer seven weeks of fun in the sun tennis camps starting in June 2013. Enrollment is available online and you may choose to registration for one, two or as many as seven weeks. The weekly program runs from Mondays through Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., with a one-hour lunch break or a twilight session from 4:30 p.m.7:00 p.m. Campers work on development of tennis techniques, tactics, sports conditioning,


Van Der Meer Tennis Camp tennis@vdmtennis.com www.vdmtennis.com (800) 845-6138

Van Der Meer Tennis Camp offers junior clinics every week of the summer from June 2-Aug. 31. These are 27 hours of clinic instruction. They begin Sunday from 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m., followed with a daily schedule of 9:00 a.m.-Noon, a lunch break and then 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m., finishing on Friday from 9:00 a.m.-Noon. The junior clinics are for ages 10 to 18, with placement into Van Der Meer’s Academy level with ranked tournament players. Boarding is offered for ages 13 to 18 years in townhouse style apartments. The cost is $675 for the clinic and $1,010 to include room and board. All clinics are led by Van Der Meer Academy Director Marcos Ondruska, formerly ranked 27th in the world in the ATP World Tour Rankings.

cally designed for children nine and under who are new to the game. Our goal is to welcome new players to tennis with a fun filled introduction using age specific games, drills and equipment. Everything will be provided including racquets and water. Our day begins at 9:00 a.m. with stretching and warm-up activities to get the kids loose and ready for tennis. Breaking off into small groups with a 3:1 student to pro ratio, our staff is specifically trained to work with younger children and will be sure to put your child’s safety first and their happiness a close second. During this time, the instructors will teach the basics making sure to cover technique as well the rules. After warm-ups and drills, the children will be provided with snack and drinks and then we are right back out on the court for more tennis activities. Our day ends with some wind down time in the craft room where the kids are encouraged to let their creative side come out. It’s very important to our staff that your child enjoys themselves and associates the fun they have at our program with the game of tennis. The program runs five days a week from 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and begins the week of June 24 and continues until Aug. 30.

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World Gym Bay Shore 225 Howells Road Bay Shore, N.Y. (631) 968-8668 www.worldgym.com/bayshore

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and strategy geared to maximizing the learning experience in a fun presentation. As the juniors develop, they are advanced to more challenging groups. Tennis activities include Stroke-of the Day, team games and Competitive Match Play. The camp also offers cross-training activities such as soccer, softball and basketball in the park or at the Corona park multipurpose recreational facility, swimming at the nearby FMCP Aquatics Center, off-site field trips include ice skating, Mets games, etc., and full access to the many fun activities on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. We accept junior players, ages four through 10 for the 10 & Under programs (visit www.quickstarttennis.com for information about this new tennis learning format). Children 10-years-old and up are enrolled in the Junior Camps (8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. or 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m.). Advanced High Performance Tournament training campers will be invited to participate in an intensive Tennis Academy training program which runs Monday-Friday, from 10:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. We have 22 outdoor courts, 12 indoor courts, and four stadium courts. We have available on-site Ping-Pong tables, ball machines, fitness center, arts and crafts, and other engaging sporting activities. Our primary focus will be on developing tennis skills while offering other activities to enhance the learning and camp experience. Detailed information will be available soon at www.ntc.usta.com. We are located in Flushing Meadow Corona Park. You may contact the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center at (718) 760-6200 for more information about year round and summer camp programs.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2013 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2013 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE CAMP GUIDE

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2013 Long Island Tennis Magazine


The Biofile: Luke Jensen By Scoop Malinowski Status: Former ATP Tennis Professional. Former French Open doubles champ. Currently serves as head coach of Syracuse University women’s tennis team. Date of birth: June 18, 1966 in Grayling, Mich. First tennis memory: Playing the Firecracker Open at the court in Luddington, Mich. My dad was the high school tennis coach and he always had the Firecracker Open during the Fourth of July, and the Cannonball Classic on Labor Day and during the U.S. Open. Just going out there and competing for the first time, figuring out what the score meant and trying to get the ball in the box and rallying with a wood racquet with the white tennis balls.� Tennis inspirations: Honestly, probably watching the 1979 Wimbledon on TV live, Bud Collins calling it with Bjorn Borg and Roscoe Tanner. Tanner had the perm going. Left-handed. Goes five sets and him hitting the match point into the side fence, basically

into the front row and Borg going down on his knees. And then saying to myself, “I don’t know what I have to do to become a professional tennis player but this is what I want to do. This is just the coolest thing.� Bud Collins’ calls of “Net cord!� And “Chalk dust!� And he just elevated live tennis. The Ice Man Borg and the lefty American, red, white and blue. And then McEnroe-Connors and the whole thing. Tennis was just in a zenith. Greatest sports moment: I would say it’s a slam dunk—winning the French Open with my brother (Murphy Jensen). But internally— being in the 1996 Australian Open with my brother and sisters (twins Rachel, Rebecca), to be a family of four that come from really nothing in terms of tennis, in Luddington, Mich., and now all four of us were in the main draw in the Australian Open in doubles. That was, as a team, we were always a team, the Jensens was about a team concept. And we were all going be on the Tour and do it. That was our real pinnacle.� Most painful moment: Blowing out my knee and never being able to play again. Going through that, on a daily basis, that when I’m at a major and watching professional tennis,

knowing that I can still be there. But you blow your knee out, you have surgery and do everything you can to come back ‌ you just have to move on. I blew my knee out at Coral Springs playing Jonas Bjorkman, going out for a forehand, and split out. It just basically crumbled, annihilated and imploded and I was never the same. Closest tennis friends: My brother Murphy. We were fishing buddies growing up as munchkins. We got into sports and got into tennis, got a chance to play at the highest level of the game. Still today, we get to travel around and be this thing called “The Jensen Brothersâ€? ‌ whatever we created is through our own energy and enthusiasm. He’s definitely the closest. Outside of my family, I would say probably Richey Reneberg. He used to always get me in trouble, he was the instigator. He would tell me to do something, I’d do it. From winging water balloons at Pete Sampras and doing other crazy stuff ‌ Richey was the instigator and we were really close. Funniest players encountered: I really had a lot of fun with Andre Agassi before he got serious ‌ that was a lot of fun. Because

RACQUET CLUB +FSVTBMFN"WFOVF /PSUI.FSSJDL /:t         SUMMER JUNIOR TENNIS CAMP Beautiful indoor air conditioned courts June 24th – August 23rd 12 noon to 5pm              GPSBGVMMmWFEBZXFFLtGPSBGVMMUXPXFFLT Daily rate: $65.00 per day. Transportation available at an additional cost. Pre Camp Program also available May 20th – June 17th. 8FFLEBZTQN    2 hours a week for four weeks‌‌just $120.00 IPVSGPSXFFLTyyKVTU     

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

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when he said, “Hey, let’s take off and do something,” it was in a private plane and it was with some celebrity … he paid for everything! It was a shark trip in Australia when he was going to give me $50,000 to take a lap around a shark-infested boat. I mean, it was always something. To me, he was always the funniest guy to be around. Toughest competitors encountered: The guy I felt never gave me a point in practice or anything was always Jimmy Connors. My first year here as a junior in 1983, Connors took me out basically as a sacrificial lamb and beat the living snot out of me. He didn’t give me any points, but taught me so many things as he continues to do to this day. Whenever I see him, I learn so much from him just based on his philosophy of “You don’t play this to win, you play this to compete.” He just never lets up. He never let up on the media, he never let up on his opponents. Even now, he just wants someone to play against and battle against. Why you love playing tennis: To be honest, whether it’s a park or whether it’s a final of a Grand Slam or anything … I just like winning. I like going out there and knowing that someone is going to win and someone is going to lose. It doesn’t matter where you are ranked, and it doesn’t matter what your age is … spin the racquet and it starts up zero-zero. Someone is going to serve and someone is going to return the ball. At the end of the contest, if you’ve put in a full effort and have put in the right tactics and have executed correctly, you have a solid shot to win. To me, it’s about putting it on the line. No one can pull you off the court, there are no politics … it’s raw … it’s out there and it’s real. It’s the best thing of all time. Once you leave that arena, it’s political. Either you are out there winning or losing. Strangest match: I think every match we ever played is kind of out of the ordinary. The first thing that jumps out of my mind, and it’s a match I didn’t even play in, was dealing with Murphy’s disappearance in 1995 at the Wimbledon Championships. We were out of the doubles and we were staying at a house at Wimbledon. And Murphy is playing with Brenda Schultz and

they were in the quarters of the mixed-doubles draw, and he honestly just disappears and leaves. And dealing with all the media and it was reality TV. He was running away from the media and they were trying to chase him up in Scotland. It wasn’t a match, but it was a situation … and to do it at Wimbledon. Coming from our humble tennis beginnings, and now you are this center of attention because your brother is a knucklehead and just doesn’t want to play Wimbledon? How do you not want to play Wimbledon? But Murphy was just being Murphy. Most embarrassing tennis memory: I know there are lots of them. When I was a junior player, I went out and I had on my warm up gear. One time, I pulled my warm up gear down and didn’t have any shorts on. Favorite players to watch: Number one, to be perfectly honest, I could watch Rafael Nadal practice, I could watch him in the player’s lounge … the man is so intense. He is so focused and has so much purpose and drive that he’s truly such an overachiever because he doesn’t have the biggest guns and he doesn’t have the most talent. This is all self-made. He’s like one of those self-made millionaires. He came from nothing really. He plays with his opposite hand. He’s not left-handed, he’s righthanded. He’s not a hard court player, but he became one. He’s not a grass court

player, but he became one. He has evolved. Many players get to a point and it becomes too hard and they don’t evolve. They just kind of sit in the same spot. They drop and they come back, but Nadal continues to get better. His new challenge is Djokovic, truly is, another kind of chapter in his life where he’s going to figure it out, it may be the next tournament, it may be next year, I don’t know, but the guy is not going away, and I have so much respect for that type of attitude. Which match were you at your very best: In 1996 against Agassi … playing him in Memphis. I played completely out of my mind. Playing that good should have been illegal … I should have been arrested after that match. I had to play a certain way against him … I couldn’t play any other way. It was all-out, two first serves, there was no second serve. Nothing under 100 miles an hour. It was as hard as I could hit … every single point and everything went in. It was one match, one time the stars were aligned and it was a Supernova time. I was just so on Cloud Nine. I’ve seen it on video since then a bunch of times. I still cannot believe that person who won that match is actually me! Scoop Malinowski is the co-owner of Tennisprose.com. His book, Marcelo Rios: The Man We Barely Knew, is available at Amazon.com. He may be reached by e-mail at mrbiofile@aol.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


2013 High School Tennis

boys preview

The 2013 boys high school season is set to begin Monday, March 11. Defending Long Island and Nassau County Champion Cold Spring Harbor returns with a strong team, but will be without 2012 State Champion Josh Levine who has now graduated and is playing at Duke University. Cold Spring Harbor will be looking for their sixth consecutive Long Island Championship, but that won’t be easy, as defending Suffolk County Champion Half Hollow Hills East returns with first singles player Zain Ali and has a strong team that will look to finally break through to capture the Long Island Championship this year. Last season’s State Championship match was a battle of two Long Islanders, as Josh Levine defeated Andrew Yaraghi in the finals. Both players have since moved on to the college tennis ranks, but that does not mean the crop of high school players on Long Island Gunning for the state title this season isn’t strong. Long Island Tennis Magazine is looking forward to bringing you coverage, promotion and publicity of the area’s high school matches throughout the 2013 season.

Players to watch ... Singles Zain Ali • Junior Half Hollow Hills East With last year’s Suffolk County Champion Jeremy Dubin off to college, Zain is one of the favorites to win this year’s title. Ali lost in the second round of last year’s State Championship. Ethan Bogard • Senor Long Beach High School Ethan and his teammate Matt Barry (who has since graduated), won the Nassau Doubles Title in 2012 and finished fourth in the State Championships. Back for senior year, Bogard will try to make it a memorable one. Alex Sacher • Senior North Shore High School Alex teamed with Austin Davidow to finish second in the 2012 Nassau County Doubles event. Davidow graduated, but Sacher returns to lead North Shore for his senior season.

Vihar Shah • Senior Herricks High School Vihar finished third in Nassau County’s and fourth at the State Championship. With the 2012 Champions off to college, Shah is one of the favorites to have a big year at both the state and county levels. Brandon Stone • Senior Walt Whitman High School Brandon was a quarterfinalist at last year’s State Championships. Along with Zain Ali, he is considered one of the favorites for this year’s Suffolk Championship. He will try to go out on top as a senior. Doubles Conor Mullins • Junior Jonathan Paris • Junior Cold Spring Harbor High School Conor & Jonathan finished fourth in the Nassau County Doubles Championship and are back for their junior season. Jeffrey Cherkin • Senior Kyle Alper • Junior Half Hollow Hills East Won the 2012 Suffolk County Section XI individuals doubles championship. Cherkin & Alper defeated Westhampton’s Cooper

Lacetera & JD Sipala, 6-3, 7-5. The defending champions will be looking to repeat. Cooper Lacetera • Junior JD Sipala • Junior Westhampton Beach Runner-up at the Suffolk County Section XI Individuals Doubles Championship a year ago, the team of Cooper & JD will be looking to take the next step this season.

Key dates for the 2013 Boys High School Tennis Season n Monday, March 11 Boys High School Season Begins n Saturday-Sunday, May 11-12 2013 Nassau County Individual Championships at Oceanside High School n Wednesday, May 29 2013 Long Island Championship Match (Nassau County Champion vs. Suffolk County Champion) n Thursday-Saturday, May 30-June 1 New York State Individual Championships at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

Hofstra Specialty Camps

For each two-week camp session, your child chooses one specialty. Half the day consists of your child’s chosen specialty; for the other half of the day, your child is placed in a recreation group of 8-10 campers of the same grade and gender, for lunch, instructional swim and recreational sports. Tuition Includes Lunch And Transportation.

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The Traits of the Champion By Tom Ferraro, Ph.D. very coach and every parent wants to know one thing. What are the characteristics of a champion? Whether it’s in tennis or in any other field or endeavor, what are the inner traits of the true winner? I sought out a tennis coach who has worked with some of the best and brightest kids in the nation to talk to her about exactly what makes a champion. I found Carol Watson right her in our own backyard. Carol is currently director of programs at Alley Pond Tennis Center in Queens Village, N.Y. She is an open and bright woman who was a tour player and then a coach on the national team in Key Biscayne, Fla. for 20 years. She has coached players like Lindsay Davenport, so she knows a few things about spotting talent and developing it. She told me that on the elite level they all have the requisite physical tools to play great tennis. What separates them at the highest level is the mental game. This is what she said:

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1) The first thing you see about the future 58

champion is that they have more drive than their peers. They seem to want to win more than others. They eat, drink and breathe tennis all day long. 2) They are very fast thinkers and very good problem-solvers. In a tennis match, many surprises and distractions will come at you in a hurry. The great young players seem to know how to get around this and problem-solve solutions in quick fashion. 3) They have more focus and this focus goes on for a longer period of time. I think they see the big picture better and realize that they must maintain their focus over many hours, days, weeks and years to obtain their goals. They are unrelenting. She then explained to me how she handles the young ones who are just starting out in this game. “Many of the young ones are a little scared and nervous on the court and I make sure they learn to have fun out there,” said Watson. “We do playful drills

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

so they grow to love the game of tennis.” So if you’re a parent who has a young one starting out in the game and you have hopes they will achieve great things the formula is simple: Start them out so that they learn to have fun. If they seem to enjoy the game for a while and you determine it is time to get more serious, and then find yourself a good tennis coach. Look to see how much drive and focus the young player has. It’s like in thoroughbred racing when the horse “takes the bit.” You must teach them to be good problemsolvers and to expect distractions in every game and to always have a plan to master this problem. If they show these traits of focus, passion and good problem-solving, you need to support their tennis for the long haul and get yourself ready for a fun ride all the way to the top. And who knows … we may see you at Wimbledon. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.


Long Beach Tennis Center Officially Re-Opens BY GARY SIMEONE

diqui. “County Executive Mangano ong Beach Tennis Center came down to practice a little tenhad their official grand nis and we had the Girl Scouts opening on Feb. 24 after here as well.” being closed for three and a half Siddiqui added that now that months due to damage from the Tennis Center is up and runHurricane Sandy. It was a spening he is seeking funding from cial day with free tennis lessons the Small Business Administrafor people of all ages, a host of tion (SBA) to reimburse repair vendors, and a carnival with costs. prizes. “We are still in need of a sub“We were basically wiped out after Sandy,” said Ellen Siddiqui, Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano joins Ellen and Sid Siddiqui stantial loan, but the important in the grand re-opening of Long Beach Tennis Center thing is we’re back in business,” who runs the facility along with her husband Sid. “All of the courts were grand opening produced a wonderful said Ellen. “I just want to thank the comruined and the bubble was completely turnout with an appearance from Nassau munity for being so patient with us and I’m so happy we’re back.” shredded. We had over $1 million in County Executive Ed Mangano. damage.” “We invited our community down and The tennis community patiently waited we had a wonderful turnout today with all Gary Simeone is an intern with Long Island for the facility to be repaired and Sunday’s of the food, fun and prizes,” said Sid Sid- Tennis Magazine.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Literary Corner

By Brent Shearer The Tennis Player From Bermuda by Fiona Hodgkin By Brent Shearer

oy, does this novel lay it on thick. It is full of references to the island in the title, the history of Wimbledon especially in the early 1960s and what could be construed to be a rather naive, worshipful take on the mating rituals of upper class Brits and colonials

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during that period. One chapter begins, “Winning Wimbledon certainly increases the invitations a girl has to lunch and dinner dances.� Another starts off: “Harold drove Mark and me to Brown’s in the Bentley.� It’s a long way from Serena hanging out with Kim Kardashian. The book’s heroine, who goes by the same name as the author (Fiona), has two boyfriends, both of them tall, dashing Englishmen, older and more sophisticated than she is. The first boyfriend, revealed to be a cad, zooms around London in a sports car. One of the heroine’s female friendmentors, the previous year’s Wimbledon champ, also bombs around town in a sports car. The second boyfriend, the husband-to-be, turns out to be the brother of the title holder. His wheels are a “little silver Porsche 356.� It’s all parties and respectful servants and centerfolds from “Car & Driver� magazine as the heroine plays her way from qualifying to becoming the Wimbledon champ.

The Tennis Player From Bermuda is a beautifully-written book, which totally succeeds as a work of art. Three short chapters into it and the reader is moved by the relationship between the ingÊnue Fiona and her Bermuda-based coach, the taciturn, but slyly supportive Rachel Martin. The emotional sureness of the writing, the characterization and the dialogue make The Tennis Player From Bermuda a success. One way to look at Hodgkin’s story is as a coming-of-age tale by a young woman who overcomes a number of obstacles to win Wimbledon and find the man of her dreams. Okay ‌ it is kind of hard to make the second accomplishment not sound hackneyed even though the book is set a long time ago, but Hodgkin pulls it off. And despite the fact that the heroine ends up with Mr. Right, it is a feminist story in a way as the character Fiona is guided by two strong, female coaches. She must reject the constraints of the

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com


early 1960s to follow her passion for the game. She also scores the husband and produces offspring that are themselves tennis champs. It is a period romance and an enjoyable one at that. The very traditional nature of the story and distance in time left me sometimes tired of the Anglophilia and thinking, “Enough with the rain, give me some sunshine and a clay court,” happen to be the materials the author has chosen to work with. She wields them artfully and

her well-constructed book succeeds on every level. Since fiction is all about imagining other people’s lives and if it is done well, enabling the reader to get some feel for what it would be like to be one of these characters, the perfect reader for any excellent novel, which is what this book is, is anybody with a drop of imagination. Still, given the specific contours of this book, if you could find a teenage girl, who is into tennis and interested in the history of Wimbledon and you

could drag her away from watching videos on YouTube, she might be the perfect reader for The Tennis Player From Bermuda. But, then, so am I. You don’t have to remember wood frames and white balls and have a bit of a sports car fetish to enjoy this book because the author flawlessly transports the reader into the world she has created. Brent Shearer may be reached by e-mail at bbshearer@gmail.com.

Turbo-Charged Learning of Shot Selection and Court Positioning By Tonny van de Pieterman An interesting thing happened to me a little while ago that I want to let you in on. I had bought an Apple iPad and I was excited exploring all its options. One of my friends suggested I should play the free video game that was automatically installed. Since I am not much of a gamer (as far as video games are concerned), I didn’t really want to, but she insisted, and I figured I’d give it a try. Since I had no idea how to play, I thought I would lose interest right away, but something interesting happened. Usually I need a set of rules or at least a user manual to start something new. However, Angry Birds hooked me in. I started playing the game without much difficulty, and every time I screwed up, it allowed me to start the level over and try again. Since I wasn’t going to make the same mistake again, I screwed up on a different mistake and started over again. Soon enough, I had exhausted my mistakes and conquered the first field and I had graduated to the next field! The next

field I conquered faster than I did the first field, after which I conquered the next field, and the next field, and the next field … I had improved my play enormously without knowing any of the rules at first! This is how kids are learning nowadays. We need to incorporate this into our teaching as much as we can. Whether we are teaching beginning adults or juniors, we need to stimulate this type of intuitive learning. As teaching professionals, we should be the facilitators to forming productive unconscious habits and proper automatic reactions. I am sure you agree that shot selection and strategy are the toughest aspects of the game to teach. So instead of explaining to our students that a cross-court shot has much more room to land in the court than a down the line shot (pure geometry), a student will learn the difference in this risk/reward choice of shots much quicker by playing a game of full speed singles points limited

to the two service boxes only. On this smaller playing field, the risk/reward factor is even more skewed in favor of a cross-court shot (have you ever hit a down the line shot in mini tennis while running?). As an added bonus, the players instantly learn the lesson of proper court positioning as they will be forced to guard against more crosscourt shots and will favor that side more by positioning themselves on the proper side of the T. A-ha!!! Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail tonny@pointsettennis.com.

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A Closer Look at the Tennis Industry Association

An exclusive chat with TIA Executive Director Jolyn de Boer

BY ADAM WOLFTHAL Jolyn de Boer got her start in tennis through her older cousin. It was getting to be the time of year when tennis is a nonoptional part of physical education class in school. Jolyn did not want to be embarrassed as the only person in her class who had never picked up a racquet before, and her cousin saw this fear, so she was invited out for a practice session to get her ready for

gym class. One hour later, she was hooked. Any place there was a wall, she would take her racquet and tennis ball and hit it repeatedly until her arm was sore. As a youngster, it was the movement of the game that made her fall in love. The physicality of the sport was like nothing else she had ever done, and sometimes when she was sprinting after a short ball, it felt as if she was taking flight. Her path to the business end of the sport was much more convoluted. After completing college, having always been

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

a tennis player up until this point, she moved to New York, looking for what everyone comes to New York for, purpose. It was in New York she met her newly unemployed, future husband. The two of them loved two things, tennis and each other. Taking a page from the generation Y guidance counselor manual, they decided to “follow their passion” and ended up in Hilton Head working for the Van Der Meer Tennis University, he as a tennis pro and she in the marketing department. The Tennis Industry Association (TIA) had its beginnings as a sect of the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA). The first remnants of what we know it as today came together in 1993, when the leadership met at the first TIA forum at the Super Show and began a campaign to unify the industry and build tennis participation together. The following spring and summer, the TIA worked with the USTA introducing programs such as “Play Tennis America” to help attract new players. During this same time, the TIA began polling and tracking attitudes about the sport with children and young adults, immediately recognizing the need to alter the way that youth viewed the sport. Following the 1994 U.S. Open where


the board of the TIA met, representatives from the major tennis organizations came together to launch the “Initiative to Grow the Game.” As time went on, the TIA and USTA worked in unison to raise awareness for the sport and develop the “Try-Learn-Play and Compete” opportunities at local clubs so anyone looking to participate in tennis could get on a court hassle-free. In 2003, they moved forward with their campaign bringing it online with TennisWelcomeCenter.com and TennisConnect, an online business tool for tennis facilities and retailers. In 2007, the TIA helped bring the “36/60” (named such for the size of the courts to be used) program, which was a precursor to what was known as QuickStart Tennis and now 10 & Under Tennis. The TIA focused on collaborating with facilities directly through programs such as the Tennis Service Representative program helping providers with ideas to boost participation, but also collecting data from around the country. The Better Your Business Workshops (now called TWC Business and Technology workshops) were developed to offer key markets ideas to boost business using technology and other resources. In 2007, improvements in the way data was collected and presented began taking shape, using indicators such as the Tennis Health Index, compiling data from key surveys to measure the state of tennis and playing trends. This was also the first year that the TIA hosted the TIA Tennis Forum at the USTA Tennis Teachers Conference in New York City during the U.S. Open. The TIA compiles more than 70 market research reports, producing trends of the industry. Many of these market research reports are presented at the annual TIA Tennis Forum, but all of them are available to members of the TIA. Speaking of its members, the membership of the TIA includes a veritable alphabet soup of organizations representing all facets of the tennis industry, from manufacturers and facilities to players and trainers. Although the different groups may have differing opinions on what is best for the sport of Tennis, all differences are left at the

door, and everyone truly collaborates to grow the game as a whole. The TIA has neutrality like Sweden, in that all outside forces are ignored for the greater good of the sport. Once the board members of the TIA come together for a meeting of the minds, they leave all personal and firm-specific thoughts outside and work together to grow the game as a whole. The one line about this phenomenon that stuck with me is that if you grow the whole pie, everyone’s slice gets bigger. This keeps the thought of ‘gaining market share’ out of the room, and ensures that all the manufacturers and facilities and governing bodies have truly aligned goals. Jolyn De Boer has become the new executive director of the TIA, in great respect due to her love of synergies. What the TIA does so well is bring together groups from all facets of the industry and putting ideas together focusing solely on driving the participation and economy of the game as a whole. Holding the annual “Tennis Show” as part of the USTA Tennis Teachers Conference which included the TIA Tennis Forum, allowed the TIA to exhibit their relationships with the major players in the industry as well as the ability to get them all in the same room working toward the same goal. Through great events like this, the TIA is providing platforms for growth and opportunities to create synergy where it had been

absent in the past. The TIA also offers the tools and resources needed to create infrastructure to grow the game, and analysis of the trends in order to properly situate one’s self to be prepared for what the future holds for Tennis. Bringing together companies outside of tennis (i.e. Nickelodeon) to help us compete with the likes soccer, baseball and basketball. Jolyn and her associates are looking to the future with great things in store to grow the 10 & Under Tennis game. She hopes to have a road show in the works soon with regional events tied into professional tournaments held throughout the United States. What will continue for certainty, will be the unending amount of research of trends and analysis of the game, initiating workshops for club owners and general managers to improve bottom lines and use tools and resources provided to follow best practices in the industry. Before the TIA, no one was there to define “best practices” in a niche industry like tennis. Now, it is the duty of the TIA and Jolyn DeBoer to spread the word of what has been found, and help bring the game to new levels in the years to come. Adam Wolfthal is director of business development for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by e-mail at adam@usptennis.com.

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Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 516-777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com

Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 516-883-6425 • www.pwta.com tennis@pwta.com

Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11570 516-763-1299, ext. 10 • CATSRVC@gmail.com

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Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 516-489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 516-676-9107 • www.rwtt.com

Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Manager 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, NY 11729 631-667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com Eastern Athletic Club Cira Jones—Manager 9 Montauk Highway #A • Blue Point, NY 11715 631-363-2882 • easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike • Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-271-6616 • easternathleticclubs.com Eastern Athletic Club Gary Jones—Manager 100 Ruland Road • Melville, NY 11747 631-753-3696 • easternathleticclubs.com Glen Head Racquet Club Karl Sommer: 516-676-9849 Home of Early Hit Training Center glenheadrc@verizon.net Carl Barnett: 516-455-1225 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 earlyhit@optonline.net Long Beach Tennis Center Sid Siddiqui—Director of Tennis 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, NY 11561 516-432-6060 • www.longbeachtenniscenter.com info@longbeachtenniscenter.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive • Great Neck, NY 11021 516-233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 516-536-2323 www.pointsettennis.com • tonny@pointsettennis.com

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Rockville Racquet Club Colleen Woods—Manager 80 North Centre Avenue • Rockville Center, NY 11570 516-764-5350 • rockvilletennis@optonline.net Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, NY 11937 631-907-5162 www.ross.org/tennis • hli@Ross.org SPORTIME Amagansett Sue De Lara—Co-General Manager Hana Sromova—Director of Tennis/Co-General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 631-267-3460 www.SportimeNY.com/Amagansett amagansett@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis John McEnroe Tennis Academy Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 516-933-8500 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Tennis mkossoff@sportimeny.com SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike Bethpage, NY 11714 516-731-4432 www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Multi-Sport rlouie@sportimeny.com SPORTIME Quogue Will Van Rensburg—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead, Route 104 East Quogue, NY 11959 631-653-6767 www.SportimeNY.com/Quogue tdhamptons@sportimeny.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

SPORTIME Kings Park Bea Bielik—Regional Manager 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, NY 11754 631-269-6300 www.SportimeNY.com/Kings-Park SPORTIME Lynbrook Jeff Morys—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-1330 www.SportimeNY.com/Lynbrook jmorys@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Massapequa Jordie Dolberg—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 516-799-3550 www.SportimeNY.com/Massapequa jdolberg@sportimetfm.com SPORTIME Randall’s Island Felix Alvarado—Assistant Director of Tennis 1 Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 212-427-6150 www.SportimeNY.com/Manhattan falvarado@sportimeny.com SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—Regional Manager Landing Road, PO Box 1 Roslyn, NY 11576 516-484-9222 www.SportimeNY.com/Roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Robert Kendrick—Director of Tennis 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 516-364-2727 www.SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Tennis USTA National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 718-760-6200 www.usta.com World Gym Bay Shore Tracie Forsythe—Director of Tennis 225 Howells Road Bay Shore, NY 11706 631-456-0994 www.WorldGymBayShore.com tracieforsythe@yahoo.com


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 01/23/13)

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Abhinav Raj Srivastava ....Melville, N.Y. 2 ........Tommy George Srisuro ....Garden City, N.Y. 3 ........Connor Leaf ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Cameron Klepper ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 5 ........Aman Sharma ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 6 ........Luke Karniewich ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 7 ........Maxwell Moadel................Brookville, N.Y. 8 ........Louie Kotler ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 9 ........Jack Flores........................Huntington, N.Y. 10 ......Arjun Sharma ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 11 ......Daniel Meinster ................South Setauket, N.Y. 12 ......Logan Paik Chang............Old Westbury, N.Y. 13 ......Preet Rajpal ......................Syosset, N.Y. 14 ......David Ammendola ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 15 ......Kian Louis Ghazvini ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 16 ......Daniel Chikvashvili............Melville, N.Y. 17 ......Sohrob Yavari....................Syosset, N.Y. 18 ......Sangjin Song ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 19 ......Alexander Roti ..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 20 ......Bradford Lin ......................Kings Point, N.Y. 21 ......Sol Yoon ............................Commack, N.Y. 22 ......Sujay Sharma....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 23 ......Matthew Terlovsky............Merrick, N.Y. 24 ......Daniel Chang ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 25 ......Alexander Karmen............Port Washington, N.Y. 26 ......Evan Kirsh ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 27 ......William Sepanski ..............Huntington, N.Y. 28 ......Benjamin Reichbach ........Syosset, N.Y. 29 ......Michael Wexler..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 30 ......Karan Amin ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 31 ......Christopher Grisham ........Huntington, N.Y. 32 ......Justin Benjamin Oresky....Syosset, N.Y. 33 ......Adam Bradley Wilck ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 34 ......Kabir Rajpal ......................Syosset, N.Y. 35 ......Rohan Gaddam Reddy ....Glen Head, N.Y. 36 ......Tyler Nierman ..................Dix Hills, N. Y. 37 ......Justin McMackin ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 38 ......Michael Weitz....................Roslyn, N.Y. 39 ......Ethan Ertel ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 40 ......Sam Reichbach ................Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Zachary Khazzam ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 2 ........Serge Ushkevich-Zezulin ..Sands Point, N.Y. 3 ........Connor Leaf ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Curran Varma....................Manhasset, N.Y. 5 ........Jake Spencer Grossman..Sands Point, NY 6 ........Matthew T. Roberts ..........Setauket, N.Y. 7 ........Jay Burkett........................Syosset, N.Y. 8 ........Christian Esposito ............Port Washington, N.Y. 9 ........Marco Ammirati ................Halesite, N.Y. 10 ......George Carmi....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 11 ......Nicholas Troiano ..............Oakdale, N.Y. 12 ......Spencer Lowitt..................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ......Kenneth Francis Chiu ......Holtsville, N.Y. 14 ......Jack Cameron Goldman..Old Westbury, N.Y. 15 ......Joonho Ko ........................Huntington, N.Y. 16 ......Ian Mitchell Capell ............Woodbury, N.Y. 17 ......Ian Bank ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 18 ......Sangjin Song ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 19 ......Matthew Lee Catton ........Woodbury, N.Y.

ISLAND

20 ......George Kaslow ................Port Washington, N.Y. 21 ......Daniel Meinster ................South Setauket, N.Y. 22 ......Lucas Larese DeSanto ....Southampton, N.Y. 23 ......Peter Yu ............................Smithtown, N.Y. 24 ......Vincent Tozzi ....................North Babylon, N.Y. 25 ......Jordan Diamond ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 26 ......Carl Grant..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 27 ......Jeremy Carlos ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 28 ......Evan Nierman ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 29 ......Robert Sangirardi..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 30 ......Daniel Hyunjae Chang......Manhasset, N.Y. 31 ......Jackson Weisbrot ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 32 ......Evan Kirsh ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 33 ......David Ammendola............Massapequa, N.Y. 34 ......Simar Sawhney ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 35 ......Maxwell Moadel................Brookville, N.Y. 36 ......Matthew Kolkhorst ..........Sea Cliff, N.Y. 37 ......Aaron Askowitz ................Great Neck, N.Y. 38 ......Timothy Serignese............Port Washington, N.Y. 39 ......Vincent Chen ....................Hauppauge, N.Y. 40 ......Evan Lander......................Old Bethpage, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Arnav Srivastava ..............Melville, N.Y. 2 ........Matthew Bahar ................Woodbury, N.Y. 3 ........Harris Durkovic ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Jake Sandler ....................Lynbrook, N.Y. 5 ........Dylan Granat ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 6 ........Nick John Stamatos ........Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 7 ........Evan Kober ......................Wantagh, N.Y. 8 ........Kenneth Fox......................Smithown, N.Y. 9 ........Mitchell Berger..................Lake Grove, N.Y. 10 ......George Carmi....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 11 ......Ankur Kejriwal ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 12 ......Nicholas Troiano ..............Oakdale, N.Y. 13 ......Chirag Doshi ....................Sands Point, N.Y. 14 ......Faran Nazir........................Deer Park, N.Y. 15 ......Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 16 ......Jason Gerber ....................Commack, N.Y. 17 ......Connor Dove ....................Baldwin, N.Y. 18 ......Evan Lowitt ......................Syosset, N.Y. 19 ......Vincent Tozzi ....................North Babylon, N.Y. 20 ......Mark Julian Baker ............North Baldwin, N.Y. 21 ......Ryan Diaz..........................Jericho, N.Y. 22 ......Zane Siddiqui....................Long Beach, N.Y. 23 ......Eric Ravens ......................Merrick, N.Y. 24 ......Austin Ash ........................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ......Braddock Chow................Glen Cove, N.Y. 26 ......Cole Laffitte ......................East Setauket, N.Y. 27 ......Jordan Diamond ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 28 ......Jack Ian Lindenman ........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 29 ......Zachary Chang ................Massapequa, N.Y. 30 ......Francis Chiu......................Holtsville, N.Y. 31 ......Evan Nierman ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 32 ......Jeremy Grossman ............Woodbury, N.Y. 33 ......Joshua Fried ....................Plainview, N.Y. 34 ....Matthew Holweger ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 35 ......Roger Cheng ....................Melville, N.Y. 36 ......Zachary Fu ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 37 ......Brandon Nomberg............Deer Park, N.Y. 38 ......Joshua Simoncic ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 39 ......Sam Kramer......................Westhampton, N.Y. 40 ......Garrett Malave ..................Laurel, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Richard Liell ......................Nesconset, N.Y. 2 ........Michael Vera......................Bethpage, N.Y. 3 ........Anton Averin......................South Setauket, N.Y. 4 ........Brett Titcomb ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

RANKINGS

5 ........Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 6 ........Connor Gehrke ................Miller Place, N.Y. 7 ........Adam Diaz ........................Bellerose Village, N.Y. 8 ........John Stamatos..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 9 ........Jonathan Ochoa ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 10 ......Craig Cusano....................Bellmore, N.Y. 11 ......Julian Koby Adler..............Roslyn, N.Y. 12 ......Brian Heinze......................Garden City, N.Y. 13 ......Rajan Vohra ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 14 ......Jeremy Morgenbesser ....Bayport, N.Y. 15 ......James Heaney..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 16 ......Ronald Spinelli ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ......Zane Siddiqui....................Long Beach, N.Y. 18 ......Brett Edelblum ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 19 ......Marco Betito ....................Floral Park, N.Y. 20 ......Joshua Sydney ................East Northport, N.Y. 21 ......Henry Tell ..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 22 ......Roger Young ....................Brookhaven, N.Y. 23 ......David Kim..........................Commack, N.Y 24 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ......Massapequa, N.Y. 25 ......Kush Dave ........................Syosset, N.Y. 26 ......Daniel Baruch ..................East Meadow, N.Y. 27 ......Samuel Hajibai..................Kings Point, N.Y. 28 ......Anurag Thotkura ..............Hicksville, N.Y. 29 ......Cory Harris Weinstein ......Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 30 ......Zachary Romanzi..............Brightwaters, N.Y. 31 ......Troy Michael Haas ............Huntington Station, N.Y. 32 ......Matthew Kantor ................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 33 ......Michael LeMonda ............Garden City, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Ivanna Nikolic....................Glen Head, N.Y. 2 ........Denise Lai..........................Setauket, N.Y. 3 ........Kaitlyn Byrnes ..................Massapequa, N.Y. 4 ........Madeline Clinton ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 5 ........Lucia Hu ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 6 ........Samantha Galu ................Jericho, N.Y. 7 ........Madison Williams..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 8 ........Evangelia Frankis..............Manhasset, N.Y. 9 ........Alexis Madison Huber ......Melville, N.Y. 10 ......Madelyn Kay Germano ....Islip, N.Y. 11 ......Sofia Anzalone..................Center Moriches, N.Y. 12 ......Julieta Eulau......................Long Beach, N.Y. 13 ......Marina Hilbert....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 14 ......Elena Vlamakis..................Garden City, N.Y. 15 ......Julia Gentile ......................Rockville Center, N.Y. 16 ......Allison Cooney..................Locust Valley, N.Y. 17 ......Giuliana Gibson ................Westbury, N.Y. 18 ......Morgan Voulo....................East Setauket, N.Y. 19 ......Calista Sha........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 20 ......Brooke Ann Fernandez ....Shirley, N.Y. 21 ......Madison Li ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 22 ......Kerri Goldfuss ..................Westbury, N.Y. 23 ......Mina Sarcevic ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ......Ally Friedman ....................East Hampton, N.Y. 25 ......Gabriela Sciarrotta............Woodmere, N.Y. 26 ......Lauren Bishop ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 27 ......Madeline Richmond ........Syosset, N.Y. 28 ......Alexa Bracco ....................Freeport, N.Y. 29 ......Grace Riviezzo..................Syosset, N.Y. 30 ......Katie Dzialga ....................Southampton, N.Y. 31 ......Kimilya Egalite ..................West Hempstead, N.Y. 32 ......Jill Lawrence ....................Hauppauge, N.Y. 33 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ................Oceanside, N.Y. 34 ......Brianna Loeffler ................Syosset, N.Y. 35 ......Ashley Mannetta ..............Islip, N.Y. 36 ......Rebecca Leigh..................East Hampton, N.Y. 37 ......Rebecca Suarez ..............Huntington, N.Y. 38 ......Julia Kepczynska..............Southampton, N.Y.

39 ......Morena DeVito..................Syosset, N.Y. 40 ......Gabrielle Sklar ..................Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Danielle Mirabella..............Wantagh, N.Y. 2 ........Katherine Changtroraleke ..Greenvale, N.Y. 3 ........Sabrina Ferretti ................Setauket, N.Y. 4 ........Michelle N. Carnovale ......Massapequa, N.Y. 5 ........Adele Sukhov....................Westbury, N.Y. 6 ........Brooke Digia ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 7 ........Rachel Weiss ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 8 ........Ellen Huhulea ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 9 ........Trinity Chow ......................Glen Cove, N.Y. 10 ......Nikaylah Williams..............Wheatley Heights, N.Y. 11 ......Jennifer Berman ..............Jericho, N.Y. 12 ......Grace Graham ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 13 ......Christina Jud ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 14 ......Julieta Eulau......................Oceanside, N.Y. 15 ......Elizabeth Sossan ..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 16 ......Emily Feingold ..................Roslyn, N.Y. 17 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes ..................Massapequa, N.Y. 18 ......Rosa LaCorte....................Merrick, N.Y. 19 ......Morgan Voulo....................East Setauket, N.Y. 20 ......Emily Fernandez ..............Shirley, N.Y. 21 ......Gabrielle Raziel ................Melville, N.Y. 22 ......Victoria Bialczak................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 23 ......Courtney Connors ............Manhasset, N.Y. 24 ......Lauren Gold ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 25 ......Rachel Collins ..................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 26 ......Emma Rosenberg ............Port Washington, N.Y. 27 ......Elena Vlamakis..................Garden City, N.Y. 28 ......Jacqueline Guidice ..........E Northport, N.Y. 29 ......Rachel Hirschheimer ........Jericho, N.Y. 30 ......Nicole Vassalle..................Port Washington, N.Y. 31 ......Stephanie Cole ................Manhasset, N.Y. 32 ......Kerri Leah Goldfuss..........Westbury, N.Y. 33 ......Kimilya Egalite ..................West Hempstead, N.Y. 34 ......Theodora Brebenel ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 35 ......Francesca Karman ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 36 ......Mara Stewart ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 37 ......Olivia Rose Scordo ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 38 ......Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo..Lynbrook, N.Y. 39 ......Laura Halsey ....................Westhampton, N.Y. 40 ......Marina Hilbert....................Locust Valley, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Danielle Mirabella..............Wantagh, N.Y. 2 ........Katherine Changtroraleke ..Greenvale, N.Y. 3 ........Rebecca Stern..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ........Sabrina Ferretti ................Setauket, N.Y. 5 ........Sarah Seeman ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 6 ........Michelle Carnovale ..........Massapequa, N.Y. 7 ........Elena Nastasi ....................Bayville, N.Y. 8 ........Julia Khan..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 9 ........Cameron Moskol ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 10 ......Lauren Difazio ..................Greenlawn, N.Y. 11 ......Michelle Haykin ................Great Neck, N.Y. 12 ......Stacy Denbaum................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ......Grace Graham ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 14 ......Allison Gabrielle Huber ....Melville, N.Y. 15 ......Alexandra Lipps................Roslyn, N.Y. 16 ......Claudia Ruiz......................Glen Head, N.Y. 17 ......Emily Shutman..................Huntington, N.Y. 18 ......Angelika Rothberg ............Centerport, N.Y. 19 ......Stefanie Ebo......................Sayville, N.Y. 20 ......Rosa LaCorte....................Merrick, N.Y. 21 ......Victoria Makulik ................Medford, N.Y. 22 ......Caitlin Falvey ....................Setauket, N.Y. 23 ......Taylor Cosme....................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

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LONG 24 ......Rini Halder ........................Huntington, N.Y. 25 ......Gina Ciliberti......................West Islip, N.Y. 26 ......Elizabeth Kallenberg ........Port Washington, N.Y. 27 ......Courtney Connors ............Manhasset, N.Y. 28 ......Lindsay Haley ..................Hicksville, N.Y. 29 ......Sophie Grace Wilson........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 30 ......Alana Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 31 ......Gina Paprella ....................Saint James, N.Y. 32 ......Celeste Rose Matute........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 33 ......Jamie Brown ....................Huntington, N.Y. 34 ......Teresa Dorothy Pinnola ....Islip, N.Y. 35 ......Elizabeth Gee....................Garden City, N.Y. 36 ......Campbell Howe................Locust Valley, N.Y. 37 ......Kathryn Sinicropi ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 38 ......Ellen Nicole Huhulea ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 39 ......Jacqueline Ann Buzaid ....Lake Grove, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Olivia Ammirati..................Halesite, N.Y. 2 ........Kerrin Toner ......................West Babylon, N.Y. 3 ........Veronika Paikin..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4 ........Cameron Leigh Moskol....Wantagh, N.Y. 5 ........Emma Brezel ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 6 ........Katherine Changtroraleke ..Greenvale, N.Y. 7 ........Elena Nitsa Nastasi ..........Bayville, N.Y. 8 ........Jennifer A. Carnovale ......Massapequa, N.Y. 9 ........Laura Torsiello ..................Bayport, N.Y. 10 ......Kaitlyn Mead ....................Manorville, N.Y. 11 ......Amanda Gaimaro..............Lynbrook, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 02/06/13)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 3 ........Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 4 ........Daniel Eric Pellerito ..........Syosset, N.Y. 5 ........Steven Well Sun................Glen Cove, N.Y. 6 ........Ronald P. Hohmann..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12 ......Michael Medvedev ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 14 ......Billy G. Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 18 ......Neel Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 22 ......Abhinav Srivastava ..........Melville, N.Y. 24 ......Spencer Brachman ..........Commack, N.Y. 27 ......Benjamin Grossman ........Sands Point, N.Y. 45 ......Sujay Sharma....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 48 ......Niles Ghaffar ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 50 ......Kabir Rajpal ......................Syosset, N.Y. 55 ......Logan Paik Chang............Old Westbury, N.Y. 67 ......Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 71 ......Jack Flores........................Huntington, N.Y. 72 ......Karan Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 79 ......Jeffrey McDonnell ............Glen Cove, N.Y. 84 ......Jack Louchheim ..............Sagaponack, N.Y. 93 ......Luke Louchheim ..............Sagaponack, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 3 ........Brenden Andrew Volk ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 8 ........Keegan Morris ..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 10 ......Athell Bennett....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 13 ......Alan Delman......................Great Neck, N.Y. 15 ......Chris Kuhnle......................Shoreham, N.Y.

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ISLAND

17 ......Sean Patrick......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 18 ......Sean Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 19 ......Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 32 ......Ryan Goetz ......................Greenlawn, N.Y. 35 ......Daniel Shleimovich ..........Merrick, N.Y. 39 ......Rajan Vohra ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 40 ......Yuval Solomon..................Plainview, N.Y. 47 ......Colin Francis Sacco ........Brightwaters, N.Y. 49 ......Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 51 ......Nicolas Demaria................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 63 ......Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 66 ......Patrick Maloney................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 69 ......Ben Snow..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 71 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito ..........Syosset, N.Y. 85 ......Brian Shi............................Jericho, N.Y. 90 ......Austin Egna ......................Port Washington, N.Y. 95 ......Daniel Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 98 ......Ronald Hohmann..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 99 ......Mark Julian Baker ............North Baldwin, N.Y. 104 ....Matthew Porges ..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 105 ....Carl Grant..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 109 ....Michael Medvedev ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 112 ....Lucas Larese DeSanto ....Southampton, N.Y. 114 ....Daniel Meinster ................South Setauket, N.Y. 115 ....Jack Briamonte ................Great Neck, N.Y. 117 ....Timothy Serignese ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 119 ....Max Egna..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 123 ....Joonho Ko ........................Huntington, N.Y. 132 ....George Kaslow ................Port Washington, N.Y. 136 ....Steven Sun........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 143 ....Andy Zhou ........................Commack, N.Y. 145 ....Curran Varma....................Manhasset, N.Y. 146 ....Zachary Khazzam ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 148 ....Julian Thomas MacGurn..Amagansett, N.Y. 152 ....Neel Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 153 ....Benjamin Grossman ........Sands Point, N.Y. 154 ....Matthew Roberts..............Setauket, N.Y. 159 ....Serge Ushkevich-Zezulin ..Sands Point, N.Y. 172 ....James Kyrkanides ............Stony Brook, N.Y. 181 ....Peter Yu ............................Smithtown, N.Y. 190 ....Zane Siddiqui....................Long Beach, N.Y. 195 ....Brady Berman ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 199 ....Connor Leaf ......................Dix Hills, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Josh Silverstein ................Great Neck, N.Y. 2 ........Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 7 ........Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 17 ......Brenden Volk ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26 ......Dennis Uspensky..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 31 ......Lubomir Cuba ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 35 ......Eric Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 40 ......Bryant Born ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 45 ......Jesse Levitin ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 51 ......Jonathan Paris..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 54 ......Justin Park ........................Huntington, N.Y. 58 ......Kyle Alper..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 60 ......Jared R. Halstrom ............Bellmore, N.Y. 61 ......Tripp Tuff............................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 63 ......Fernando Filho ................East Hampton, N.Y. 78 ......Benjamin Rosen ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 83 ......Colin Francis Sacco ........Brightwaters, N.Y. 87 ......Conor Mullins....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 89 ......Dylan Granat ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 91 ......Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 93 ......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ......Massapequa, N.Y. 98 ......Palmer Clare ....................North Bellmore, N.Y. 99 ......Sean Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

RANKINGS

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region

Rank Name ............................City

Rank Name ............................City

3 ........Vihar Shah ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 5 ........Noah Rubin ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 7 ........Samuel Lam......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 9 ........Aidan Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 13 ......Josh Silverstein ................Great Neck, N.Y. 16 ......Ethan Bogard....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 24 ......Conor Dauer ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 32 ......Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 33 ......Alex Sacher ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 38 ......Zachary Lessen ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 39 ......Dylan Appel ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 44 ......Tyler J. Hoffman................Sayville, N.Y. 58 ......Austin Davidow ................Glen Head, N.Y. 60 ......John D’Alessandro ..........Northport, N.Y. 71 ......Jonathan Paris..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 73 ......Matthew Demichiel ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 84 ......Brandon Stone..................Melville, N.Y. 85 ......Sander Brenner ................Port Washington, N.Y. 87 ......Eric Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 94 ......Brian Slivonik ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 96 ......Jeffrey Cherkin..................Melville, N.Y.

9 ........Amber Policare ................East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 15 ......Alexa Graham ..................Garden City, N.Y. 18 ....Madison Battaglia ............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 20 ......Bridget Elaine Harding......Northport, N.Y. 27 ......Aimee N. Manfredo ..........Shoreham, N.Y. 30 ......Danielle Giannetti..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 32 ......Mia M. Vecchio ................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 40 ....Taylor Cosme....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 43 ......Paulina Tafler ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 47 ......Claire Handa ....................Point Lookout, N.Y. 48 ......Lauren Ann Livingston......Sands Point, N.Y. 53 ......Olivia Funk ........................Hicksville, N.Y. 58 ......Nicole Koskovolis ............Manhasset, N.Y. 59 ......Michele Lehat ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 60 ......Claudia Ruiz......................Glen Head, N.Y. 62 ......Esther Chikvashvili............Melville, N.Y. 85 ......Alexandra Linder ..............Sands Point, N.Y. 89 ......Katie Jane Cirella..............Woodbury, N.Y. 92 ......Vanessa Scott ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 94 ......Rhea Malhotra ..................Syosset, N.Y. 98 ......Julia Khan..........................Port Washington, N.Y.

GIRLS

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region

Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 1 ........Hannah Zhao ....................Syosset, N.Y. 3 ........Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 20 ......Alexa Susan Goetz ..........Greenlawn, N.Y. 34 ......Francesca Karman ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 35 ......Merri Kelly ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 36 ......Katelyn Walker..................Sands Point, N.Y. 41 ......Rachel Arbitman ..............Hewlett, N.Y. 43 ......Maryam Beshir Ahmad ....Albertson, N.Y. 47 ......Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 72 ......Ivanna Nikolic....................Glen Head, N.Y. 79 ......Madison Williams..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 82 ......Gabriela Sciarrotta............Woodmere, N.Y. 89 ......Denise Lai..........................Setauket, N.Y. 91 ......Kimberly Liao ....................Commack, N.Y. 92 ......Amy Delman ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 95 ......Lucia Hu ............................Roslyn, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name ............................City 2 ........Amber Nicole Policare......East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 6 ........Alexa Graham ..................Garden City, N.Y. 8 ........Claire Handa ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 26 ......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ....Manorville, N.Y. 29 ......Ashley Lessen ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 37 ......Stephanie Chikvashvili ....Melville, N.Y. 43 ......Celeste Rose Matute........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 46 ......Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 53 ......Amanda Allison Foo ........Manhasset, N.Y. 55 ......Courtney Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 61 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ........Glen Head, N.Y. 66 ......Olivia Rose Scordo ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 73 ......Dominique Woinarowski ..Syosset, N.Y. 79 ......Adele Sukhov....................Westbury, N.Y. 83 ......Brynn Maris April ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 85 ......Stephanie Nakash ............Great Neck, N.Y. 89 ......Ellen Huhulea ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 97 ......Dasha Dlin ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 98 ......Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

Rank Name ............................City 12 ......Sophie Barnard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 14 ......Aleksandra Mally ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 16 ......Vivian Cheng ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 17 ......Hannah L. Camhi..............Woodbury, N.Y. 22 ......Katherine Yau....................Manhasset, N.Y. 27 ......Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 34 ......Mia Vecchio ......................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 35 ......Sunaina Vohra ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 42 ......Aimee Manfredo ..............Shoreham, N.Y. 44 ......Paulina Tafler ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 50 ......Claudia Ruiz......................Glen Head, N.Y. 52 ......Alexa Graham ..................Garden City, N.Y. 67 ......Julia Elbaba ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 69 ......Rithika Reddy....................Syosset, N.Y. 71 ......Sara Finger........................Saint James, N.Y. 76 ......Yuliya Astapova ................Port Washington, N.Y. 79 ......Laura Torsiello ..................Bayport, N.Y. 84 ......Bridget Elaine Harding......Northport, N.Y. 89 ......Claire Handa ....................Point Lookout, N.Y. 90 ......Esther Chikvashvili............Melville, N.Y. 92 ......Zenat Rashidzada ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 95 ......Emma Brezel ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 98 ......Melissa Carlay ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 100 ....Olivia Ammirati..................Halesite, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 02/13/13)

BOYS

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 15 ......Steven Well Sun................Glen Cove, N.Y. 31 ......Ronald P.Hohmann ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 34 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito ..........Syosset, N.Y. 47 ......Cannon Kingsley ..............Northport, N.Y. 131 ....Neel Raj ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 144 ....Billy Suarez........................Huntington, N.Y. 177 ....Michael Medvedev ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 226 ....Abhinav Raj Srivastava ....Melville, N.Y. 232 ....Benjamin Grossman ........Sands Point, N.Y.


1484 ..Joseph James D’orazio....Saint James, N.Y. 1545 ..Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ......Massapequa, N.Y. 1742 ..Zacarias Imperial ..............Garden City Park, N.Y. 1790 ..Chris Kuhnle......................Shoreham, N.Y. 1791 ..Del Schunk........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 1814 ..Tripp Tuff............................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 1830 ..Alex Brebenel....................Glen Head, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City

43 ......Brenden Andrew Volk ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 91 ......Athell Patrick Bennett ......Valley Stream, N.Y. 145 ....Sean Patrick......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 149 ....Chris Kuhnle......................Shoreham, N.Y. 195 ....Sean Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 243 ....Colin Sacco ......................Brightwaters, N.Y. 247 ....Ryan Goetz ......................Greenlawn, N.Y. 257 ....Keegan Morris ..................Franklin Square, N.Y. 259 ....Finbar Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 326 ....Brian Shi............................Jericho, N.Y. 329 ....Alan Delman......................Great Neck, N.Y. 671 ....Rajan Jai Vohra ................Glen Head, N.Y. 724 ....Daniel Pellerito ..................Syosset, N.Y. 737 ....Daniel Shleimovich ..........Merrick, N.Y. 809 ....Steven Well Sun................Glen Cove, N.Y. 915 ....Nicolas Demaria................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 1055 ..Andy Zhou ........................Commack, N.Y. 1080 ..Patrick Maloney................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 1153 ..Pete Siozios ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 1162 ..Carl Grant..........................Water Mill, N.Y. 1482 ..Noah Reisch ....................Floral Park, N.Y. 1487 ..Michael Medvedev ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 1509 ..Jack Aaron Briamonte......Great Neck, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

GIRLS

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 14 ......Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 26 ......Lea Ma ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 215 ....Alexa Goetz ......................Greenlawn, N.Y. 260 ....Francesca Karman ..........Port Washington, N.Y. 306 ....Merri Kelly ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 433 ....Katelyn Walker..................Sands Point, N.Y. 633 ....Julia Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 667 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ....Albertson, N.Y. 668 ....Rachel Arbitman ..............Hewlett, N.Y. 719 ....Rebecca Suarez ..............Huntington, N.Y. 818 ....Kimberly Liao ....................Commack, N.Y. 1018 ..Madison Williams..............Glen Cove, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 122 ....Hannah L. Camhi..............Woodbury, N.Y. 139 ....Sophie Barnard ................Mill Neck, N.Y. 167 ....Katherine Yau....................Manhasset, N.Y. 172 ....Julia Elbaba ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 205 ....Vivan Cheng......................Woodbury, N.Y. 580 ....Aleksandra Mally ..............Franklin Square, N.Y. 654 ....Nicholle Torres ..................North Hills, N.Y. 883 ....Rithika Reddy....................Syosset, N.Y. 891 ....Sunaina Vohra ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 935 ....Claudia Ruiz......................Glen Head, N.Y. 1024 ..Morgan Feldman ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 1067 ..Paulina Tafler ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 1134 ..Zenat Rashidzada ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 1254 ..Amber Nicole Policare......East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 1524 ..Alison Wang ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 1526 ..Stephanie Loutsenko ......Bellmore, N.Y. 1562 ..Melissa G. Carlay..............New Hyde Park, N.Y. 1566 ..Sara Finger........................Saint James, N.Y. 1680 ..Mia Vecchio ......................Manhasset Hills, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players

Uni

ted Sports

P

USP

ions, Lt

ions, Lt

licat

d.

65 ......Alexa Graham ..................Garden City, N.Y. 78 ......Amber Nicole Policare......East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 147 ....Claire Handa ....................Point Lookout, N.Y. 412 ....Celeste Rose Matute........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 436 ....Hannah Zhao ....................Melville, N.Y. 616 ....Ashley Lessen ..................Roslyn Hts, N.Y. 738 ....Courtney Kowalsky ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 760 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi ........Glen Head, N.Y. 894 ....Dominique Woinarowski ..Syosset, N.Y. 982 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ....Manorville, N.Y.

d.

Rank Name ............................City

ub

21 ......Josh Silverstein ................Great Neck, N.Y. 30 ......Daniel Grunberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 34 ......Dennis Uspensky..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 43 ......Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 216 ....Brenden Andrew Volk ......Dix Hills, N.Y. 306 ....Eric Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 366 ....Jonathan Paris..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 390 ....Bryant Born ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 438 ....Lubomir Cuba ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 505 ....Jared Halstrom ................Bellmore, N.Y. 801 ....Benjamin Rosen ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 840 ....Jesse Levitin ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 873 ....Justin Park ........................Huntington, N.Y. 908 ....Kyle Alper..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 928 ....Dylan Granat ....................Woodbury, N.Y. 1143 ..Palmer Clare ....................North Bellmore, N.Y. 1153 ..Sean Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 1206 ..Travis Leaf ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1262 ..Dylan Davis ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1322 ..Sean Patrick......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 1338 ..Henry Tell ..........................Woodbury, N.Y. 1342 ..Andy Zhou ........................Commack, N.Y. 1348 ..Fernando Filho..................East Hampton, N.Y. 1354 ..Scott Kim ..........................Melville, N.Y. 1359 ..Brian Shi............................Jericho, N.Y. 1390 ..Cory Seltman ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1392 ..Cooper Lacetera ..............Speonk, N.Y. 1431 ..Colin Francis Sacco ........Brightwaters, N.Y.

190 ....Madison Battaglia ............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 230 ....Bridget Harding ................Northport, N.Y. 300 ....Aimee Manfredo ..............Shoreham, N.Y. 311 ....Amber Policare ................ 318 ....Alexa Graham ..................Garden City, N.Y. 351 ....Danielle Giannetti..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 608 ....Paulina Tafler ....................Oceanside, N.Y. 674 ....Taylor Cosme....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 698 ....Olivia Funk ........................Hicksville, N.Y. 735 ....Claudia Ruiz......................Glen Head, N.Y. 860 ....Julia Khan..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 883 ....Mia Vecchio ......................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 1051 ..Nicole Koskovolis ............Manhasset, N.Y. 1232 ..Lauren Ann ......................Livingston, N.Y. 1279 ..Katie Jane Cirella..............Woodbury, N.Y. 1350 ..Claire Handa ....................Point Lookout, N.Y. 1555 ..Karen Serina......................Islip Terrace, N.Y.

licat

Rank Name ............................City

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players

ub

Rank Name ............................City

1098 ..Amanda Allison Foo ........Manhasset, N.Y. 1159 ..Stephanie Chikvashvili ....Melville, N.Y. 1236 ..Theodora Brebenel ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 1270 ..Stephanie Petras ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 1386 ..Adele Sukhov....................Westbury, N.Y.

Rank Name ............................City

4 ........Noah B. Rubin ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 179 ....Samuel Lam......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 204 ....Daniel Grundberger ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 239 ....Howard J. Weiss ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 252 ....Vihar Shah ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 254 ....Josh Silverstein ................Great Neck, N.Y. 272 ....Lamar Remy......................Roslyn, N.Y. 310 ....Aidan Talcott ....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 363 ....Dennis Uspensky..............Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 497 ....Conor Dauer ....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 604 ....Ethan Bogard....................Lido Beach, N.Y. 616 ....Alex Sacher ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 809 ....Philip Daniel Antohi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 919 ....Brandon T. Stone..............Melville, N.Y. 1035 ..John P. D’Alessandro ......Northport, N.Y. 1054 ..Eric Wagner ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 1107 ..Ofir Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 1126 ..Austin Davidow ................Glen Head, N.Y. 1152 ..Dylan Hobbs Appel ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 1168 ..Zain Ali ..............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1218 ..Brian Slivonik ....................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 1224 ..Jeremy Dubin....................Southampton, N.Y. 1379 ..Zachary Lessen ................Old Westbury, N.Y. 1471 ..Matthew Demichiel ..........Hewlett, N.Y. 1501 ..Kyle Alper..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 1620 ..Alexander Lebedev ..........Island Park, N.Y. 1694 ..Jared Halstrom ................Bellmore, N.Y. 1759 ..Jeffrey Cherkin..................Melville, N.Y. 1871 ..Benjamin Rosen ..............Port Washington, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

RANKINGS

nited Sports P

419 ....Niles Ghaffar ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 508 ....Spencer Brachman ..........Commack, N.Y. 621 ....Sujay Sharma....................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 637 ....Logan Paik Chang............Old Westbury, N.Y. 724 ....Oliver Worth ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 765 ....Karan Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 834 ....Kabir Rajpal ......................Syosset, N.Y. 851 ....Maxwell Moadel................Brookville, N.Y. 989 ....Benjamin Reichbach ........Syosset, N.Y. 1000 ..Sol Yoon ............................Commack, N.Y. 1233 ..Zachary Khazzam ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 1242 ..Daniel Chikvashvili............Melville, N.Y. 1261 ..Sam Reichbach ................Syosset, N.Y.

ISLAND

•U

LONG

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TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. MARCH 2013 Friday-Sunday, March 1-3 & Friday-Sunday, March 8-10 +L1 Sportime Bethpage Eastern Designated Closed Championship L5 SE 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: G(14)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $70.38 per player per player, $71 for two events (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, March 1-3 & Friday-Sunday, March 8-10 +L1 Sportime Roslyn Eastern Designated Closed Championships L5 SE Sportime Roslyn 1 Landing Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: B(12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $70.38 per player, $71 for two events (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Monday, March 1-4 & Friday-Monday, March 8-10 L1B Glen Head Racquet Club March Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18-16)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Feb. 23 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 676-9849.

Friday-Monday, March 8-10 L1 LBTC March Doubles Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: BG(18-12)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $28 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 7 at 11:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, March 1-3 L1B Sportime Syosset March Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: B(12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, March 8-10 L2R Huntington March Long Island Regional Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Feb. 26 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, March 8-10 L2R Deer Park March Long Island Regional Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Feb. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Saturday, March 9 L3 Sportime Bethpage March UPS Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(14-12)s, RR Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Saturday, March 9 8U PlayDay & 10U L3 Sportime Syosset March UPS Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball])s, RR; QuickStart: BG [8 (36’Court/Red Ball)]s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, March 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, March 15-17 & Friday-Sunday, March 22-24 +L1 Bethpage Designated Closed Championships L4 FIC Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: B(12)s, FIC Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, March 15-17 & Friday-Sunday, March 22-24 +L1 RWTTC Eastern Designated Closed Championships L4 FIC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: B(16)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.24 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505.

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TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, March 15-17 & Friday-Sunday, March 22-24 +L1 World Gym Eastern Designated Closed Championships L4 FIC World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road • East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: B(14)s, FIC Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 751-6100. Friday-Sunday, March 15-17 L2O EAC St. Patty’s Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A • Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18-16)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, March 8 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, March 15-17 & Friday-Sunday, March 22-24 +L1 Point Set Eastern Designated Closed Championships L4 FIC Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: B(18)s, FIC Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 536-2323. Friday-Sunday, March 15-17 LBTC Men’s March Senior Championship Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: M(Op)sd, SE; NMW(3.0-4.0)s, SE; NM(4.0)d, SE; NW(3.0-4.0)d, SE; NX(Op,3.5-4.0)d, SE Surface Type: Clay, Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles and $28 for doubles (deadline for entries is Wednesday, March 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, March 15-17 & Friday-Sunday, March 22-24 +L1 Roslyn Eastern Designated Closed Championships L4 FIC Sportime Roslyn Landing Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix: G(12)s, FIC Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 484-9222.

Saturday, March 15-17 L2R Long Beach Tennis Center’s April Regional Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18-14)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles (deadline for entries is Friday, March 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Monday, March 22-25 L1B Glen Head Racquet Club March Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Mar. 15 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, March 22-24 L2R Huntington March Regional Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(16-14)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 12 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 423-3207. Saturday-Sunday, March 23-24 L3 Sportime Massapequa March UPS Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(14-12)s, RR Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550. Friday-Sunday, March 29-31 L1B Sportime Massapequa’s March Challenger Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(14-12)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550.

Friday-Sunday, March 29-31 L1B LBTC Spring Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18-16)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, March 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, March 29-31 Huntington Men’s 25 Singles Championship Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Street • Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: M(25)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Mar. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 423-3207. Friday-Sunday, March 29-31 L3 Sportime Syosset March UPS Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(14-12)s, RR; Quick Start: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727. APRIL 2013 Friday-Sunday, April 5-7 L1 RWTTC Doubles Championships-USTA L5 Robbie Wagner Training Center Glen Cove • 60 Sea Cliff, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: BG(16)d, SE; Championships: BG(16)s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, March 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Monday, April 5-8 & Friday-Sunday, April 12-14 +RR Memorial Jericho Amazing April Jericho Westbury Tennis 44 Jericho Turnpike • Jericho, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: M(25, 35, 45, 55, 70-75)sd, FMLC Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Open: $65 per player for M(25, 35, 45, 55, 70-75)s, FMLC, Ranked. $35.50 per player for M(25, 35, 45, 55, 7075)d, FMLC, Ranked Entry Fee: Maximum fee charged per player is $60 plus the processing fees for the number of events you select (deadline for entry is Thursday, Feb. 28) For more information, call (516) 997-4060.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2013

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2013 • LITennisMag.com

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Friday-Sunday, April 19-21 L2O LBTC April Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(18-16)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Wednesday, April 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

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Friday-Sunday, April 12-14 L1 RSTA Spring Championships Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger: BG(18-14)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 907-5162.

Friday-Sunday, April 26-28 LBTC NTRP Spring Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: M(Op)d, SE; NM(Op,3.0-4.0)s, SE; NW(3.0-4.0)s, SE; NM(3.5-4.0)d, SE; NW(3.0-3.5)d, SE; NX(3.5-4.0)d, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles; $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, April 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

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Friday-Sunday, April 19-21 L3 Deer Park Eastern April UPS Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(18-12)s, RR; Quick Start: Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player singles (deadline for entries is Friday, April 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 667-3476.

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Friday-Sunday, April 5-7 L1 LBTC March Championship + National L5 Doubles Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: G(14)sd, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, March 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, April 26-28 L3 LBTC’s April Eastern UPS Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(18-12)s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player singles (deadline for entries is Wednesday, April 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 432-6060.

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Friday-Sunday, April 12-14 L2R World Gym April Regional World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(14)s, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 751-6100.

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Friday-Sunday, April 5-7 L2O Eastern Athletic Spring Fling Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(16-14)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, March 30 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, April 26-28 & Friday-Sunday, May 3-5 L2R Ryan Kelly Memorial Regional at Huntington Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: Intermediate: BG(18-12)s, SE; Intermediate: BG(10 [78’Court/Green Ball])s, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles (deadline for entries is Friday, April 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

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Friday-Sunday, April 12-14 L3 Huntington’s Eastern April UPS Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Novice: BG(18-12)s, RR; QuickStart: BG(10 [60’Court/Orange Ball])s, RR Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player singles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, April 2 at 8:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

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Friday-Sunday, April 5-7 L1 Sportime Massapequa Championship + National L5 Doubles Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: G(12)sd, SE Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 799-3550.

Friday-Monday, April 26-29 & Friday-Sunday, May 3-5 +Marvelous May The Tennis King 25 The Tulips Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Ranked: M(30, 40, 50, 60, 70)sd, FRLC Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $70.38 per player for M(30, 40, 50, 60, 70)sd, FRLC, Ranked. (deadline for entries is Monday, April 22 at noon) For more information, call (516) 621-2009.

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Friday-Sunday, April 12-14 L2O EAC’s April Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate: BG(16,12)s, SE Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player singles (deadline for entries is Friday, April 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 363-2882.

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Friday-Sunday, April 5-7 L1 Sportime Syosset Championship + National L5 Doubles Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Championships: B(12)sd, SE Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 364-2727.


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Long Island Tennis Magazine - March/April 2013  

Long Island Tennis Magazine - March/April 2013

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