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Getting the Most Out of Your Tennis Camp Experience By Luke Jensen It is time to thaw out from the winter freeze and start planning ahead for a summer tennis camp for your little tennis champs. Attending a tennis camp can be one of the best experiences a young player has in their lifetime. When I was 14-years-old, I went to a Nick Bollettieri tennis camp in Wisconsin. Then, at the age of 15, I was given a great summer opportunity to travel with Tennis Europe and play tournaments in a bunch of European countries. I competed against all levels of players and played on red clay for the very first time. I found that the tennis camp and tournament experience helped lay the foundation for the person I am today. Even after all of these years, I still have lasting friendships and memories as a young teenager exploring a new world through the game of tennis. When you are looking into tennis camps for your tennis champs, my advice would be to find the right balance of tennis and social growth for your child. I have seen so many high-end tennis camps that offer a positive range of tennis experiences. I would check out the reviews from previous campers. Look into the number of players on court per instructor. I found a more personal experience was beneficial to the camper. A good number is six players on court per instructor, but eight players can be a manageable number. Anything over that is too much standing around between balls hit. I am also a big fan of camps that have

more than just tennis. I have worked at camps with fishing, boating and a great balance of fun. A former WTA top 10 player, Brenda Schultz-McCarthy has a Virginia mountain tennis experience that is amazing! You never wanted to leave and the coaching was first-class. I caught a ton of trout on the trip. There is a massive amount of tennis and other activities out there if you do your homework to find the right fit. You will be amazed at just how much your little tennis star improves and is inspired by a new tennis experience. I recommend teaming with a buddy and sharing the camp experience. It will give them some individual confidence and self-esteem to be on their own. I recently ran into my tennis camp buddy Jeff “Cowboy” Slaggert and we had some great laughs about our summer tennis camp some 30 years after

the experience. Look at all your options and believe me, the tennis camp is a massive winner that can be a life-long game changer for every little tennis champion! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lbjensen@syr.edu.

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Table Of Contents The Keys to Success By Andrew Eichenholz

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Young American Madison Keys looks to prove her run at the 2015 Australian Open high in 2015. See page 8

Feature Stories 20 Your 2015 Guide to Court Builders & Suppliers As the spring thaw begins, it’s time to prep those courts for the spring and summer as we present the area’s top court maintenance companies available to service your surface’s needs.

38 2015 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide

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With summer right around the corner, we present the area’s top tennis camp destinations and what they have to offer your child for the summer of 2015.

52 Long Island Tennis Magazine’s 2015 Boys High School Preview With the boys high school season on the horizon, we take a look at who to watch in the 2015 season and who is gunning for bragging rights in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties.

Features 7

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11 12 16 17 24 27

Tennis Community Unites for Long Island Tennis Magazine Holiday Brunch Tennis Travel Destinations: Sports Travel Experts Sportime World Tour Celebrates the Aussie Open in Bethpage Modern Technology Improving Tennis Coaching By Brian Coleman Spotlight on Total Orthopedic and Sports Medicine 2015 Australian Open Recap By Andrew Eichenholz Think and Talk Like a Child By Tonny van de Pieterman

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Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports


litennis

MAR./APR. 2015 Vol 7, No 2

Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com

was no fluke as she aims

Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com

Cover photo credit: Jag Gundu

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director

Featured Columns 1 4 14 18 28 30 32 34 57 58 60 63 64

66 67 70

The Jensen Zone: Getting the Most Out of Your Tennis Camp Experience By Luke Jensen Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz College Tennis Spotlight By Ricky Becker USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update The Game Inside the Game: Five Licenses Top Tennis Players Have By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC The Myths of Tennis Movement (Part II) By Steven Kaplan Tennis Injury Prevention: The Importance of ACL Injury Prevention for the Female Tennis Player By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller Branding Yourself in Tennis and in Life By Lonnie Mitchel How Many Pros Does It Take to Give the Ideal Tennis Lesson? By Lisa Dodson The Difference Between Male and Female Tennis Players By Dr. Tom Ferraro Fitness & Nutrition: Are Carbohydrates Really Bad for You? By Irina Belfer-Lehat, RD, CDN and The Delicate Connection Between Fitness and Focus (Part II) By Carl Barnett Long Island Tennis Club Directory Long Island Rankings USTA/Long Island Region 2015 Tournament Schedule

s Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2015 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Matthew Cohen Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 306 Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • brianc@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Beverly Bolnick National Sales Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Scott Koondel Operations Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Andrew Eichenholz Editorial Contributor

Calvin Rhoden Staff Photographer

Michael Cervantes Editorial Contributor

Samantha Sklar Intern

Gary Simeone Editorial Contributor

Sarah Sklar Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication3of any articles, information or data.


Across Long Isla Point Set’s Claudio Eulau hosts successful Future League Congratulations to Team Navy who won the championship of the Future Leagues at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club in Oceanside, N.Y. Organized by Point Set Coach Claudio Eulau, the League is put together three times per season for fourth, fifth and sixth graders. The kids are organized into teams and compete over the course of a five-week season. It introduces the kids to competitive play, but the team concept makes the season less intimidating. The winners get their names put on a giant trophy that stays at the club while all the participants get a smaller sized commemorative at a pizza party.

Inaugural Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament held at Carefree Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick, N.Y. recently hosted the First Annual Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament in honor of longtime Rockville Racquet Club Manager Susan Alvy. “The First Annual Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament was a great success,” said Kathy Miller, manager of Carefree Racquet Club and close friend of Alvy. “It was a great tournament and we hope we did Susan proud!” “Susan ran a holiday tournament every winter break,” explained Miller. “My son-in-law, Keith Mattes, played in it for many years, and also developed a friendship with Susan. A day or two after she passed, Keith and I were talking, and he pointed out how much Susan loved that tournament. He said she truly loved tennis, loved watching the guys play and also loved talking with all of the competitors afterwards. I spoke to Susan’s sister Judy and we decided we would continue the tournament, re-naming it the ‘Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament.’” The winners in Division “A” of the first annual event was the team of Adam Kolenberg & Dean Jacoby, with Eric Chaffer & Keith Lopez as runners-up. Congrats also to Division “B” winners Paul Schnabel & Brian Connor, with Ed Harrigan & Brian Kessler runners-up. Pictured here, “A” Division winners Adam Kolenberg (left), and Dean Jacoby (right), with Susan Alvy’s sister Judy Weiss (second from right) and her husband, Barry Weiss (second from left).

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and

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

Sportime Massapequa celebrates tourney winners Congratulations to Gigi Hunt (pictured left), winner of the Massapequa L3 Girls 12s tournament, held Jan. 10 at Sportime Massapequa. Congrats are also in order to David Ammendola (pictured right), winner of the Massapequa L2 Boys 14s event, held Jan. 19.

Syosset’s Levine recognized as ACC Player of the Week Two match-clinching points against top-30 opponents propelled Duke junior and Long Island native Josh Levine to receive ACC Player of the Week accolades. It is the initial league weekly honor of Levine’s career and another great accomplishment for the former Cold Spring Harbor standout and New York State Champion. Levine won both of his singles matches to help Duke to a 2-0 week, with both victories coming on the road against top-30 teams. He tallied the deciding point for the Blue Devils with his two comeback three-set wins at number six. Duke downed number eight Illinois 4-3 before coming back to defeat number 30 Northwestern 5-2. Levine came all the way back for a 0-6, 76 (3), 6-4 victory against Ross Guignon. Levine trailed 5-1 in the second set before forcing a 5-5 tie and winning in the tie-breaker. The victory snapped Illinois’ 17-match home

winning streak and marked the fifth consecutive year Duke has defeated a top-10 opponent on the road or at a neutral site. At number 30 Northwestern, Levine worked his three-set magic again to clinch the victory, downing Alp Horoz 2-6, 6-3, 62. Horoz cruised in the first set and held a 2-1 lead in the second set before Levine

stormed back, winning 11 of the next 14 games to take the match and clinch the contest for Duke. The win was the ninth straight in singles for Levine. Levine has played a key role in Duke’s 60 start, going 5-0 in dual match play and posting a 3-1 mark with partner John Tahir from Rochester, N.Y. in doubles.

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Across Long Island

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

National Tennis Center hosts screening of Althea Gibson documentary In early February, the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center hosted a special fundraiser screening of the film “Althea.” Filmmaker Rex Miller was on hand to discuss and answer questions about the film, a documentary based on the life of Althea Gibson, the first African-American to compete and win Wimbledon and Forest Hills. All event donations went to the Wheelchair Sports Federation, host of the annual Jana Hunsaker Memorial ITF Wheelchair Tennis Tournament held at the National Tennis Center.

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Tennis Community Unites for Long Island Tennis Magazine Holiday Brunch

ong Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine recently hosted the Second Annual Holiday Gourmet Brunch at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. The event brought together members from all sides of the tennis community in

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New York and Long Island, and kicked off the 2015 tennis season in style. Long Island Tennis Magazine wanted to extend its thanks to everybody on hand for the event, as well as to the staff at Engineers Country Club who provided guests with excellent service and delicious food and drinks.

Over the past six years, one of Long Island Tennis Magazine’s proudest accomplishments has been the many fantastic relationships that have been built within the tennis community and the Annual Holiday Gourmet Brunch was a great way to kick off 2015.

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com


The Keys to Success

Madison Keys begins rise to stardom By A n dre w Ei che nhol z

t the 2013 Australian Open, Sloane Stephens, 19-years-old at the time, beat Serena Williams in a tense quarterfinals match, leading everyone to believe she had a huge opportunity ahead of her. Stephens has not lived up to those expectations so far. At this year’s Aussie Open, another American, 19-year-old Madison Keys, stepped into the spotlight and staked her claim as “The Next Great American Women’s Player.” Keys got by Australian crowd favorite Casey Dellacqua, the 29th seed, in the second round. She followed that up by upsetting two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova in round three. Against Madison Brengle in the fourth round, another young American, Keys showed her class. In a performance that one would expect from a veteran, she did exactly what she had to do. She played solid tennis, playing patiently and aggressively to overpower her opponent and hit her way into the quarterfinals against Venus Williams. Venus, a former world number one and seven-time Grand Slam champion, is still one of the best on the Tour, and is always

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difficult to deal with given her still-big serve. That is where a future prospect became a current star. Keys did not play her best match, as she would have hoped for in such a big match. Under the world’s watchful eye, she made 45 unforced errors, compared to 34 winners. On a normal day, those numbers would signify a loss. On this day, the Rock Island, Ill. native was victorious over Venus in three hard fought

sets, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, to achieve her first career major semifinals appearance. The teenager did not play particularly well against one of the hottest players on the WTA Tour, yet she managed to find a way to win. That is the mark of a champion, and that is why Keys will eventually become the face of the circuit and presumably win many, many titles. In the semifinals, Keys forced Serena to scratch and claw in a neck-and-neck first set of their encounter, but did not have enough in her arsenal to overcome the eventual 2015 Aussie Open champion, falling to Serena 6-7, 2-6. What shone through, however, was her will to win on one of the grandest of stages. John Evert is the founder and managing partner of the Evert Tennis Academy (ETA), brother of ETA co-owner Chris Evert, and coached Keys from the ages of 10-17. “She came to us when she was 10 as a summer camper,” said John Evert. “I met with her parents and her parents told me she had watched Venus Williams on TV. She liked Venus’ outfit and she decided continued on page 10

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keys to success continued from page 9 then she wanted to be a tennis player because of the outfits.” By the time she was in the final year of the 12s, Madison won both the Eddie Herr and the Orange Bowl. She went from not being on the radar at all, to the top of her age bracket. “She was probably two to three levels behind when she came to us, not even in the top 50 in the country in her age group when she started,” said Evert. “I saw a big, tall and strong explosive athlete. I think her physical tools were obvious from the beginning, and an emotional and mental growth has taken place. Her hand-eye coordination wasn’t quite there, but she was only 10 when she first came to us and was taller than everybody else there. There was explosiveness … a big and tall athlete, but sometimes it takes a little while to develop that handeye coordination.” Madison Keys, as she continues to de-

“The sky’s the limit for Madison, and I think she’s right there.” —John Evert, founder and managing partner of the Evert Tennis Academy (ETA)

velop under the tutelage of coach Lindsay Davenport, who was a top player herself for many years, will end up having the biggest groundstrokes in the game. Owning one of the better serves on the WTA Tour is pretty nice to put in her pocket as well. “I think Madison can walk on the WTA Tour with anyone right now, and if she’s playing well, can beat anyone,” said Evert. “I think she is going to take a lot away from her performance at the Australian Open. The next step is finishing and winning those last four sets to finish

a tournament. I think once she does it once, there is no limitation. The sky’s the limit for Madison, and I think she’s right there.” But, no matter how hard she will be able to hit the ball and where she will be able to place it, nothing will be able to replicate the characteristics of a natural competitor. If she continues to reproduce what she showed in Australia, that will be what distinguishes Madison Keys from the rest of her WTA Tour counterparts in 2015 and beyond. Andrew Eichenholz is a journalism student at Stony Brook University, where he currently is a staff writer for The Statesman, covering tennis amongst many sports. He grew up playing tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where he learned to love the game, eventually becoming a part time tennis instructor, working for the most part with the QuickStart 10 & Under Program. Andrew has also served as a ballperson at the U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at andrew.eichenholz@stonybrook.edu.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com


Tennis Travel Destinations

S P ORTS TRAVE L E X PE RTS Sports Travel Experts was founded by Karl Hale, one of the leaders in the tennis industry, to provide quality service and experiences at numerous tennis sporting events around the world. We combine some of the world’s best resorts and destinations, along with the biggest tennis stars, to provide the most unique tennis sporting travel experiences and events for our guests. Sports Travel Experts also provides tailored travel packages to the world’s top tennis tournaments. Following the success of numerous events in 2014, we are proud to announce the very first Cayman Island ITF Senior Tennis Championships 2015 at the beautiful Sunshine Suites Resort. Guests at our events have become accustomed to stun-

ning landscapes, top quality resorts, firstclass tennis instruction, and an atmosphere that is unmatched! The Cayman Island ITF Senior Tennis Championships will run Nov. 4-8, 2015 and is supported by the Cayman Island Tennis Club, as well as the Cayman Island Federation. The tournament package will include ac-

commodation for four nights at Sunshine Suites Resort, welcome cocktails, 10 hours of first-class tennis instruction, the Senior ITF Tournament entry fee, t-shirt, gift bag, and an amazing closing party! Players can expect to wake up to the soothing sounds of water, have breakfast on beautiful white sandy beaches, roast under the sun playing their favorite sport, and enjoy the cool evenings with cocktails watching the sun go down. WOW that sounds like an unforgettable week! If you are ready to commit to the tennis trip of a lifetime or are looking for more information, please visit www.sportstravelexperts.com, email info@sportstravelexperts.com or call (800) 677-5295. We look forward to hearing from you and hope to see you on one of our breathtaking travel experiences.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Sportime World Tour Celebrates


s the Aussie Open in Bethpage he Sportime World Tour made a stop in Melbourne, Australia in late January, as Sportime Bethpage hosted the second installment of the four-part event that combined 10 & Under Tennis with a splash of the professional tour. Kids from all Sportime locations gathered in Bethpage for a taste of life Down Under. The day included tennis clinics and games for kids of all ages, music, food and a bouncy castle. The overall experience took everybody out of a New York winter and dropped them into an Australian summer. “My favorite part of the day was playing tennis and running around,” said sevenyear-old Tucker Brown, whose favorite player is Rafael Nadal. “I loved all the pizza and the blow up obstacle course.” The activities offered at the Sportime World Tour go beyond tennis and featured something for everyone. “I think it’s a great way for all of our Sportime Clubs across New York to get together and expose a tournament atmosphere for some of our kids who have never experienced that,” said Mike Kossoff, director of tennis at Sportime Bethpage. “I think word is starting to spread that the

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Under-10 program is an amazing product. Frankly, kids are starting to tell all their friends and it is really growing.” The 10 & Under Tennis program is something that has taken off in recent years and has done so primarily because of organized events like this. Mike Barrell, widely known as the leader of Under-10 Tennis, was in attendance for the Melbourne event and was able to see first-hand how successful it was.

T E N N I S

“I’m always doing work with Sportime when I’m in town,” said Barrell, who hails from the United Kingdom. “This World Tour, I am trying to implement into all my programs because it mirrors the professional game. The challenge of the event is simply the number of kids who want to play, and we have 150 kids here today. As you can see on the courts, these kids can actually play.” A little over a decade ago, Barrell came up with the idea of the red, orange and green balls to help train younger players. “I spent a lot of time working on existing models, in lots of different countries with these balls, and to different degrees, different things were happening,” recalls Barrell. “After sitting down with a number of key Sportime people, I said I would be interested in creating a self-sustaining, longterm project here in the United States. It’s about finding good people within the company who can lead the program.” As it continues its path around the world, the 2015 Sportime World Tour will make its next stop in Indian Wells, Calif. for the BNP Paribas Open, the third installment of the event series set for Saturday, March 14 at Sportime Lynbrook.

R U S H

Come play where the surf applauds every shot. The Seaside Tennis Club at the legendary Mauna Kea Beach Hotel on Hawaii Island. 1.866.977.4589 I MaunaKeaBeachHotel.com

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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BY

Wedding bells Andy Murray will marry his fiancée Kim Sears at Murray’s luxury Cromlix House Hotel on April 11 at the hotel near Murray’s home town of Dunblane. The Wimbledon champion bought the venue in 2013, which has its own chapel. Murray and Sears got engaged in November after being together for nine years.

E M I L I E

KAT Z

sen. Last year, four tennis players made the list, including Serena Williams, Li Na, Victoria Azarenka and Rafael Nadal.

Tying the knot Tomas Berdych and his girlfriend of twoand-a-half years, Ester Satorova, are now engaged. Berdych and Satorova, a Czech model, began dating in the fall of 2012 after his long-time relationship with WTA player Lucie Safarova ended.

Fine sportsmanship

Forbes list Novak Djokovic has been announced as one of Forbes’s “30 Under 30” in the sports realm. He was the lone tennis player cho-

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Cibulkova’s Aussie Open finals match in 2014 and the Victoria Azarenka-Li Na finals showdown in 2013 (0.5 both years). The next morning, the Novak Djokovic-Andy Murray Men’s Singles Final drew a 0.5 overnight rating—down a tick from the 2014 Men’s Singles Finals match between Stanislas Wawrinka and Rafael Nadal (0.6 rating), but even with the Djokovic-Murray finals match in 2013 (a 0.5 rating).

Aussie Open ratings The Serena Williams-Maria Sharapova 2015 Australian Open Women’s Final match drew a 0.7 overnight rating on ESPN, up 40 percent from both Li Na-Dominika

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Third-ranked Rafael Nadal was facing 27year-old American Tim Smyczek in the second round of the


Aussie Open. In the fifth set, Nadal was l Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): Maybe I’m l Tomas Berdych (@tomasberdych): serving, leading 6-5 and 30-0 when a fan ignorant, but can’t the footballs lose “Sometimes, things may not go your way, screamed and Nadal faulted. Smyczek told pressure in cold weather? Is that but the effort should be there every single the chair umpire to grant Nadal another possible? night” Michael Jordan #motivation first serve because of the scream. Nadal l Gael Monfils (@Gael_Monfils): What a l Angelique Kerber (@angeliquekerwent on to win the match, but acknowlunique experience with u guys @Mirzaber): Amazing weekend with a great edged the gesture following the match. Sania @AnaIvanovic @rohanbopanna team and an unbelievable atmosphere! “What he did at the end of the fifth … very @fabsantoro72 #Cedric @rogerfederer Playing in Stuttgart @PorscheArena is few players would do that after four hours,” #Pete GeeeeeeOoooO #aces always special! said Nadal. l Madison Keys (@Madison_Keys): l Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): Time for Honored to be @WTA Rising Star of the me to go to sleep after a tough day. Month :) thank you to everyone who Thanks all for the support. Love being voted for me! here in Australia. See you next year! l Milos Raonic (@MilosRaonic): Tom l CoCo Vandeweghe (@cocovandey): Brady and the @Patriots “Boom-ShakaFirst Fed Cup win for @taylortownsend Tweets from the pros laka” and myself! #usa #fedcup l Sabine Lisicki (@SabineLisicki): Won l Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): l Grigor Dimitrov (@grigordimitrov): I my match in straight sets today! Enjoy“Faith without work is dead. So you loved every moment I spent in Australia! ing my time in Dubai on and off the have to have faith, but you have to work, Thank you all for the support! Time to fly court #Dubai #sunshine too.” Venus @nytimes #AusOpen home! #backtowork #getbetter l John Isner (@JohnIsner): Question. l Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Just l Serena Williams (@SerenaWilliams): Why does @Panthers vs. Patriots saw someone take a 360 selfie from all So proud of my team. Great job ladies. Super Bowl never get any play as one angles #Really? #DontMissASpot All of you and Captain Mary Joe. Way to of the greatest games ever? @nfl l Sloane Stephens (@SloaneTweets): hold me up and help me when I’m l Chris Evert (@ChrissieEvert): Had a fun I’m learning more & more daily that no down! Love you guys #TeamUSA time tonight with these characters matter how bad a situation ends, I was l Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Deterat @Martina and Julia’s wedding put through it for a reason. mination. Focus. Spirit. #AUSOpen party! @BrookeShields @Kyle_MacLachlan l Justin Gimelstob (@JustinGimelstob): l Monica Puig (@monicaace93): Enjoyl Andy Roddick (@andyroddick): Tough to wake up to the news of both ing our day off from work with some jet Couldn’t be more proud of my brother Billy Casper and Dean Smith passing skis and parasailing later!!!! #Pattaya John, the @OU_MTennis team, and away. Really sad news, 2 incredible men l Jack Sock (@jacksock): Cannot wait staff for winning national indoor title from what I’ve heard, RIP for SNL 40 in 20 minutes JT, Fallon, Will today!!! Great stuff boys!! Ferrell l Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): Paris I fall l Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): Watching Grease for the first time (I know) l Andrea Petkovic (@andreapetkovic): in love with you every time more and and developing a crush on young John “Do you wanna share dessert?” #Fivemore. Till next time! Travolta #canigobackintime WordsToRuinADate l Noah Rubin (@Noahrubin33): Just remember to say thank you to all the people who tried to knock you down, all they did was show you how good you can truly be. l Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Just ordered cookies with milk from the “Long Island’s Tennis Store” kids menu. #noshame l Nicholas Kyrgios (@NickKyrgios): Kids Apparel & Sneakers t Great Prices On Racquets Workout Apparel t 1 Hour Stringing Congrats on hitting your 19th slam tTennis & Running Shoes @serenawilliams @AustralianOpen you were awesome as usual!! #Legend Open 7 Days t Demos Available USTA Long Island #Sudoku #Numbers Shipping Available Retailer of ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED the Year l Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76): AT CHRISTOPHER Someone is no longer a teenager. Happy 218 JERICHO TURNPIKE birthday @Madison_Keys! MORLEY TENNIS SYOSSET t 516-364-9470 ACROSS FROM SYOSSET HOSPITAL IN l Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): ROSLYN/MANHASSET! Home sweet home to Kraków for me TopSpinTennisLI.com and Fed Cup. Thanks for the all the 516-484-4200 support down under. G’day mate!

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LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Modern Technology Improving Tennis Coaching By Brian Coleman

There is no doubt that technological developments are always at the center of change, and that is no more evident than in coaching and teaching. Over the last couple of decades, advances in technology have changed and shaped the way some of the top tennis coaches in the country teach their players. “One of the first ways I can remember was through the use of video,” said Ken DeHart, a Professional Tennis Registry international master pro and United States Professional Tennis Association Master Pro. “My dad built me a homemade camera unit on the court hitting. We were able to record players and play their favorite music next to the video so they could see themselves in their greatest hits and create a positive NLP (neuro-linguistic programming) anchor with the music.” DeHart has been a certified coach for more than 40 years and has seen how effective video analysis can be. “Pictures are worth 1,000 words,” said DeHart. “We cannot see ourselves play, so we think we look like the picture in our head. The coaches use their best choice of words to try

and create a word picture for the student. They are often amazed when they see the actual picture of what the coach has been trying to describe.” Using video to see yourself on the court has gone a step further with the development of tablets and apps. “Now on the iPad, I use a program called Vstrator which allows me to draw lines, arrows and diagrams right on the screen,” said DeHart. “From the video picture, you demonstrate, in super slow motion, the skill you were focused upon, put a voice over to it, and e-mail it to the player or parents so they can see it. The point is … instant feedback equaling instant performance is both meaningful and measurable.” Beyond the use of video, other products have come along to enhance on-court teaching, such as the radar gun. The days of using expensive radar guns may be gone because of new inexpensive and more accurate alternatives. “Things like Pocket Radar are great because it’s the size of a cellphone and fits right in your pocket,” said DeHart. “You can see

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

how fast your serves or groundstrokes are instantly. For example, if you’re hitting first serves at 90 miles per hour, but not accurate enough for the results you want. You drop the measured speed down to 80 or 85 miles per hour as measured by the Pocket Radar to become more consistent. When combined with your video you are able to demonstrate a technical adjustment and measure the results instantly.” They also provide more features and capabilities than your prototypical radar gun, and can be used from essentially any area on the court, and measure more than just serves. “I now use it to monitor all strokes, not just serves. I am able to compare things like groundstroke speeds of my players to the pros speeds,” said Mike Gennette, USPTA California immediate past president and current head coach at California Lutheran University. “I also noticed that the speed of an incoming ball affects the outgoing speeds too. All of that data can then be used to steer our practices.” The science and technology behind working out and training have also seen tremendous strides. Things like vision training and performance analysis isolate and specify your work out to increase its effectiveness as well as injury prevention. The technological innovations will continue to improve and enhance the way coaches engage with their players and students. The development of video analysis and the technological advances of radar guns are at the cornerstones of coaching change, and it will be interesting to see what new advances come along that continue to build on that as we move into the future of tennis technology. Brian Coleman is editorial coordinator for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 or e-mail brianc@usptennis.com.


SPOTLIGHT ON

Total Orthopedic and Sports Medicine

otal Orthopedics and Sports Medicine features one of the most prestigious sports medicine programs on Long Island. This program is led by our Orthopedic Surgery Sports Medicine Specialists Dr. Charles Ruotolo, Dr. Richard McCormack and Dr. Paul Pipitone. For those not in need of surgery, this program also features Primary Care Sports Medicine Specialist Dr. Brett Spain, alongside Musculoskeletal Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist Luis Alejo. The Sports Medicine Program treats all types of athletes with any injury that can occur in the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee or ankle. All three physicians are specially trained in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of overuse and acute sports injuries. This includes common injuries or conditions that a tennis player may suffer from, such as: l Shoulder dislocation l Labral injuries l Rotator cuff injuries l The evaluation and treatment of the overhand athlete

T

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Elbow tendonitis Elbow ligament injuries Osteochondritis of the elbow or knee Biceps and triceps tendon tears Hip labral tears and femoroacetabular impingement Anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears Meniscus tears Chondral injuries Patella chondromalacia Knee and hip osteoarthritis Patellar and quadriceps tendon tears and tendonitis Medial and lateral collateral ligament tears Ankle sprains Ankle osteochondral defects Achilles tendon tears and tendonitis Overuse injuries of the leg

In addition, Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine takes great pride in helping athletes prevent an injury before they even have a chance to occur. One of the most

notable is the ACL injury prevention program, which uses the most current neuromuscular techniques to significantly reduce the risk of an ACL injury. The main component of this program would be the use of plyometric exercises and balance training. The athlete will focus on proper foot and leg position while running, cutting, jumping and landing, while also improving their strength, balance, flexibility and speed. “As orthopedic specialists, our goal is to not only treat injuries when they occur but try to prevent them with advanced neuromuscular training. We believe that getting an athlete back to their sport is a team approach, which is why we create collaborative treatment programs with trainers, coaches, athletes and physical therapists.” said Dr. Charles Ruotolo who was recently voted the top orthopedist on Long Island. Our surgeons provide services at several hospitals, including Nassau University Medical Center, North Shore University Hospital at Syosset and South Shore Surgery Center.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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college tennis spotlight

MYTHBUSTERS

Tale of the Tape–Tournament Directors and Parents of Tournament Players

By Ricky Becker I’m going to take off my college consultant baseball cap and put on my ski cap for this issue. The ski cap says “Tournament Parent” on one side and “Tournament Director” on the other. With experience playing tournaments (30-plus years), coaching juniors who play tournaments (15-plus years) and being a parent of a child who started playing tournaments a couple years ago, I have formed some strong opinions on how tournaments should be run. Over the last three years, I have run almost 100 tournaments and have heard people start a sentence with “Tournament directors should … ” or “Parents should … ” I’m going to tackle both sides of some topics and award the advantage to the side of parent or tournament director. Tournament director says: “We can’t post the draws and times until we know what courts will be available.” Parent says: “We can’t plan our weekend because the draws and times don’t get posted until two days before the tournament. If families are required to leave a whole weekend open for their child to play, the tournament should be sympathetic to the fact that most families have other kids, warm-ups to schedule, etc. Clubs fill their empty court time with tournaments (tournaments don’t bring in as much revenue as regular programming) but can do this immediately after the deadline, not wait until the last minute. Advantage: Parents Tournament director says: “Our job is to administer the rules the way the USTA asks us, so we will be enforcing the code (point penalty system) and sending the violations to the USTA.” Parent says: “It is ridiculous to give my child a point penalty 18

for smashing the curtain. They don’t enforce that at other tournaments.” When I won the Eastern Sportsmanship Award and went out to California for college, my teammates joked that I won the “The Best of the Worst Award.” Simply put, the Eastern Section is known throughout the country as having the players with the shortest tempers. Just because other tournaments don’t enforce the code doesn’t make it right. There is also a large silent portion of parents who want tournaments to enforce the code. I always tell my umpires to give a “soft” warning first to a player when they do something that goes slightly over the line. Advantage: Tournament directors Tournament director says: “We had to change the surface for the event because of unforeseen circumstances.” Parent says: “I signed up my child for this tournament because of the surface, I should be able to pull my child out and get a refund.” Interestingly, it says in the USTA rules that a tournament is allowed to change the surface of a match at any time. With that said, that’s a crazy rule. If the surface change is announced after the deadline, and a player wants to withdraw, the tournament should give the courtesy of a refund if a player requests it and put “Tournament Administration Error” in the default code. Advantage: Parents Tournament director says: “Sorry, we are running late, a lot of matches ran long or there was a screw-up with the courts.” Parent says: “This is ridiculous! They are running an hour late!” The USTA recommends that tournament directors schedule matches one hour and 15 minutes apart. I admit, as a parent/coach, I hate the super tie-breaker with a passion. As a tournament director, I couldn’t live without it. With super tiebreakers, it shouldn’t be difficult to run somewhat on time. Don’t

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com


forget though that pros play on a “to be followed by” basis. If you are the fifth match of the day at the U.S. Open, you could go on at 3:00 p.m. or 8:00 p.m. With relatively limited indoor courts, it’s very difficult to run things perfectly on-time, but some clubs tournaments always run late which isn’t fair. Slight advantage: Parents Tournament director says: “You don’t need an umpire or court monitor roaming the courts. Come get someone at the desk if you have a problem.” Parent says: “It stinks that nobody is on the courts roaming around. My child is getting bad calls.” All tournaments are told by the USTA to have court monitors or umpires. Level 1, Sectionals and Super Six events are provided umpires by the USTA. Level 1B, Level 2 and Level 3 tournaments are required to provide their own umpires. Some tournaments do not have officials, presumably to save costs (cost of officials is the biggest expense to tournaments). I know of kids who left tennis because they felt like they were cheated in matches. Just having an extra set of eyes is the best preventative measure to having a conflict. Advantage: Parents Tournament director says: “Sorry, I can’t take your late entry.” Parent says: “I missed the deadline, can you please put my child in the tournament.” Interestingly, I have heard at national tournaments that Eastern parents account for a large majority of late entry requests. With that said, it doesn’t hurt anybody to put in someone else if the draw hasn’t been made. If the draw has been made, it cannot happen because the director is changing the whole randomness of the draw and one’s late entry affects others. I once had a student who has extremely responsible parents who booked the hotel, airline and made arrangements for me to travel with her and one other girl to the national hard courts in Kentucky. I noticed three days before the tournament that her parents forgot to enter her into the tournament! The draw hadn’t been made yet, but tournament director held her ground and couldn’t add her to the draw.

Those are pretty extenuating circumstances, but they were the right ones. It would be nice for a director to add someone before the draw is made, but be appreciative if they do … and never call their cell phone around midnight to enter your child after missing the deadline. That’s a surefire way not to get in. If draw is made: Advantage directors and if the draw is not made: Even Tournament director says: “The court monitors are impartial.” Parent says: “There must be some kind of connection between the court monitor and my child’s opponent because the court monitor was being very impartial.” From my experience, this is total paranoia from the parents. One might not like an overrule, a foot fault call or a decision the umpire made but rarely if ever is it because the umpire is favoring one child over another. Truth is, the goal of these officials is to have a fair match and avoid conflict with players and parents. Sometimes even to err on the side of doing nothing to avoid conflict. I got a handful of complaints this year from parents who contended the umpire favored their child’s opponent due to a conflict of interest. In every situation, the umpire didn’t know either child in the match. Over the last 30-years, I can remember calls I may not have liked but to my knowledge it was never because the umpire “liked” my opponent more than me. Advantage: Directors In the next issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine, I will continue along this theme. I’ll give the edge in topics regarding trophies, player time requests, spectator viewing, warming up at the facility before the match, arriving late and more. Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors year-round. Ricky was named the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and was a top-five nationally-ranked junior. He can be reached by e-mail at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

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Ace Tennis Builders

Century Tennis

PO Box 107 l Woodbury, Conn. (203) 263-0773 l www.acetennisbuilders.com The “Forever Court” Guaranteed Not to Crack We have developed the “Forever Court,” a post-tensioned concrete tennis court with a unique coating system that is “Guaranteed Not to Crack for 20 Years.” Available for residential or commercial courts, the “Forever Court” can be built as new or overlaid over existing asphalt or clay courts. Post-tensioned concrete is changing the way tennis courts are built by allowing slabs to be built without cut-joints or expansion joints. The durability is unsurpassed, and when you start with a base that won’t crack, heave or settle, whatever surface system you use on top will last longer and play better. We have been in the construction and concrete business for four generations. Michael Fortuna has also been project manager for several tennis court construction companies before he started Ace Tennis Builders in 2013. “My vision was to offer our customers the best tennis court on the market by improving the process of tennis court construction by using the best materials, the best methods and the best contractors we could find,” said Fortuna. “We believe we’ve done that.” We are certified by the Post-Tensioning Institute, are a member of the American Sports Builders Association and the American Concrete Institute, and are the “Official Post-Tension Concrete Tennis Court Builders Company of USTA New England.” Call us for more information or a quote over the phone at (203) 263-0773.

56 Brook Avenue Deer Park, N.Y. (631) 727-0097 Since 1965, Century Tennis has been dedicated to the growing sport of tennis by building quality tennis courts and providing a specialized service to the tennis club industry as well as the private community. Maintaining a high quality of service and customer satisfaction over the years, the owners and staff at Century Tennis have built, not only great tennis courts, but have built a trust that is ever so hard attain. “We simply want to be the best at what we do.” In order to build great tennis courts, you have to start at the bottom with an understanding of soil conditions and converting it to a good base. With a solid base, we can use our latest technologies, such as laser-controlled graders, to build the rest. Whether it is asphalt or the most durable post-tensioned concrete base, we offer the best solutions for longlasting play. Building the right surface that fits our client’s needs is an important part of our business. Whether it is a hard court with the softness of Deco-Turf or Classic Turf Rubber, or whether it is a soft court like Har-Tru or Hydro Court, or a surface that offers a little of both like Nova Synthetic Turfs, we can deliver. We are members, in good standing, with the American Sports Builders Association, Better Business Bureau and the Long Island Builders Institute. Our building techniques meet and or exceed those of the ASBA and the USTA and with our “Certified Tennis Court Builder” staff assures this quality. Our intention is to deliver the very best tennis courts for the most demanding players and tennis club owners. “Expanding the game of tennis, one court at a time.”

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com


Har-Tru Sports

Lux-Craft Inc.

2200 Old Ivy Road, Suite 100 Charlottesville, Va. (877) 442-7878 l www.hartru.com The first Har-Tru court was constructed in Hagerstown, Md. in 1932 and the brand was born. Har-Tru is consistent, timeless and intimately acquainted with some of the greatest moments in the history of the game. Har-Tru Sports is a global, values-based, sports company with its roots in the tennis industry. Our expertise in tennis includes well over 200 years of collective experience on our team. Based in Charlottesville, Va., Har-Tru is the leading provider of clay courts, court consultation, court accessories and maintenance equipment in the tennis industry. We are proud of our legacy of developing innovative tennis products, dating back to the 1970s when we developed our first complete line of brushes and line sweepers and the first tennis court roller. From court maintenance products to shoe cleaners to court organizers and products that enhance the player experience, the company continues to evolve its existing products and develop new ones. With a focus on developing champions worldwide through innovative products, Har-Tru Sports, one of the business divisions operated by Luck Companies, is best known for its Har-Tru brand of clay courts and uses its products, knowledge, advocacy and passion to further the development of tennis champions around the world. The company ships products around the world and its global reach includes courts in Canada, Australia and China, with a focus on innovative green technology to provide world-class products. For more information about Har-Tru Sports, visit www.hartru.com.

2220 Voorhies Avenue l Brooklyn N.Y. (718) 934-3600 l (917) 417-5361 luxcrafters@gmail.com l www.luxcrafters.com Since 2010, Lux-Craft Inc. has been involved in research and development of the newest LED technologies for sport facilities. In 2013, we had installed the first ever 100 percent LED system for indoor tennis at Robbie Wagner Tennis Academy. Building on successful installation with amazing results, our team continued the research in order to improve the product line even further. Today, through hard work and dedication we are the only company who is able to deliver indirect LED lighting with direct replacement capability of old HID systems. Our systems outperform old 1,000-watt HID systems by delivering crisp and clear lighting, while reducing electricity cost by as much as 70 percent. By utilizing the latest technologies with years of research and development we are able to make conventional light sources to become a thing of the past. No other lighting systems on the market today are comparable in quality and light level output. Currently, the company has a line of lighting for indoor arenas, but that line will soon be complimented with outdoor lighting. Early results indicate that new revolution in outdoor LED lighting for sports venues is just around the corner. Our new outdoor fixtures will minimize the glare and provide bright day-like lighting. In order to achieve consistent quality, only the latest technologically advanced components are used, and final assembly is completed in the United States. We provide a three-year full guarantee, with the option to extend the guarantee to five years. Since our systems deliver substantial energy savings, many of our clients qualify for government-sponsored rebate programs. We understand that anything new is met with skepticism, that is why we invite you to contact us. We would eagerly provide as much information as possible and facilitate the tour of completed installations at our home on Long Island, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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MBR Builders

Outdoor Living FX

Contact: John Conti (888) 852-0223 l www.mbrbuilders.com MBR Builders is a nationwide expert in all facets of construction and renovations of metal buildings for the indoor tennis market. With more than 50 years of combined experience of their highly qualified staff, MBR offers a full range of services for your tennis club. Besides being a Certified Butler Builder for new construction and re-roofing systems, MBR Builders also works closely with their clientele to provide easy and cost-efficient ways to lower operating costs of their existing buildings. With a multitude of high quality insulation and lighting systems, MBR Builders can match your individual club needs to the perfect energy-efficient system for your facility. MBR’s offers LED lighting systems, such as The Watt Slayer Series, which have been extremely successful in reducing energy consumption, while giving their clientele the light levels they desire. MBR Builders also offers a quality line of indoor tennis accessories, including custom backdrop curtains and divider nets. Check out MBR’s Web site at www.mbrbuilders.com to learn more about their services or request a free estimate. MBR’s services include: New construction, re-roofing, interior ceiling systems, lighting systems, curtains and wire work, and tennis accessories. Take that first step to the exceptional tennis facility of your dreams!

Mt. Sinai, N.Y. (631) 882-1932 l www.outdoorlivingfx.com How do you have fun? For more than 20 years, our talented staff has transformed the landscape of many Long Island homes. Whether you enjoy spending hours with friends on your multi-purpose game court, practicing your short game on your own putting green or entertaining around your outdoor living space, let our creative design team build it for you! Outdoor Living FX specializes in:

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

l l l l

Extreme Waterfalls/Grottos/Slides Multi-Purpose Courts/Putting Greens Outdoor Kitchens/Fireplaces/Pizza Ovens Adventure-Themed Landscapes

Call today to schedule your transformation at (631) 8821932.


RiteWay LLC

Velvetop Products

4 Sycamore Way, Suite 7A Branford, Conn. (203) 433-4791 l www.RiteWayTennis.com If you cannot afford to do it right … can you afford to do it again? You’ve heard that before, it’s not just a catchy rhyme, it’s our mantra. Traditional crack repair methods can leave unsightly patches that don’t last—resulting in frequent and costly repairs. The installation is so unique that many tennis court owners cannot believe its proven success until they see it for themselves. The RiteWay System utilizes exclusive technology that allows the existing cracks in your court to move without breaking the repair. Tennis court cracks expand and contract with changes in temperature, freezing, thawing and with use. To insure a long-lasting, durable and seamless repair, we use the Rite-Way Crack Repair System. RiteWay is a layered system that becomes an integral part of the tennis court and results in an invisible repair which is not affected by weather or temperature. It not only keeps cracks from coming back, but it eliminates dead spots, hollow sounds and bubbling common with other systems. No hollow-sounding areas. No dead spots. No bubbling. A true bounce … guaranteed. We’ve seen the other systems on the market, but no other overlay system can give you the RiteWay results or guarantee. A RiteWay repair comes with a two-year conditional warranty and is priced 50 percent to 75 percent below the cost of reconstruction. RiteWay will keep your court looking new and playing safe, year after year.

1455 New York Avenue Huntington Station, N.Y. (631) 427-5904 l www.velvetop.com Velvetop Products is a family-owned and operated business since 1968. We are a stocking distributor of a full line of tennis court materials and equipment. Our brands include: l l l l l l

Deco Turf: Cushioned Tennis Surface of Champions Har-Tru: Developing Champions Since 1932 Douglas Sports: Nets, Windscreens, Divider Nets RiteWay Crack Repair Systems Deep Root: Tree Root Barriers Hadeka Red Clay

For more information, call (631) 427-5904 or visit www.velvetop.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015 Austr By Andrew Eichenholz hen the players who are supposed to come out on top at a tennis tournament win, one would think that there would not be too many stories to go over. Yet, this Australian Open was different. While world number one Novak Djokovic and his counterpart on the women’s side, Serena Williams, both ended up taking home the big trophy and the even larger winner’s check that comes with it, there was a lot for onlookers to take note of. Whether it was those who surprised in a good way, or players who flopped, there was no lack of intrigue.

W

Three exceptional performers Many people in the tennis world, from writers to fans have gotten on Andy Murray since his big win at Wimbledon in 2013 to break the infamous British drought. It was warranted in a way, since he has never played at the same level since. But, people need to remember that the man has not lost before the quarterfinals of a major since, which means that he has not been playing bad tennis. He merely has just not hit quite the same level. At the Australian Open, he got as close as he could get, in nearly winning the entire thing. It is never easy to beat Novak Djokovic, especially when the champion is at his best, yet Murray seemingly took the final out of his hands for much of two sets. In the third set, only having managed to take one of the first two, Murray started off by playing some of the best tennis he ever has, but his mental game let him down. That was all it took for Djokovic to pounce and cruise the 24

rest of the way. But, to see Murray at or pretty close to his very best again is a good sign for his season. When Venus Williams was diagnosed with Sjogren’s Syndrome in 2011, things were on a d o w n w a rd s slope for the former world number one. Her results slowly deteriorated as she looked fatigued on the court. Yet, after showing moments of her former self at points last season, Venus amazingly showed that not only can she still play really good tennis, but she can compete with the best in the world. Venus took down the always tough Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland, and looked as if she could eventually be a legitimate threat to sister Serena in the semifinals if she made it that far. However, she did lose in the quarterfinals to up-and-coming American Madison Keys in a battle, one of the best of the tournament. What is exceptional is that she made the quarterfinals and nearly the semis of a major without really playing her very best. The match against Keys may very well have been her worst in Australia, yet she still almost won. That is a good sign. Finding a way to fend off Andy Murray’s best tennis is impressive enough. But, finding a way to win a Grand Slam semifinal against an elite ball striker in Stan Wawrinka while playing subpar tennis for Novak Djokovic’s standards should give the Serbian a ton of confidence heading into Roland Garros. It is not every day that somebody could win a major title without

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

really hitting their stride. In the final against Murray, one could argue that he never played the best that Djokovic could play. He showed heart and fight, which for every other player could mean a great run that comes to a close before raising a champion’s trophy. Yet, on the last day, it was Djokovic on top. Three lackluster performers Quite frankly, Roger Federer should never, ever lose in the third round of any tournament that he plays in. Arguably the greatest to ever step on a tennis court, he has proven time and time again that even his “off-game” could beat nearly everybody in the world. That includes Andreas Seppi, the Italian who beat him in the third round of the 2015 Aussie Open. What was most shocking was one of the most opportunistic players the sport has ever seen took almost no chances that he had in the match. He had more break points than Seppi, won more points than his opponent, yet still lost in four sets. His break before the spring hard court season comes just in time.

The Romanian has proven to the world that she is no fluke. There are few people in the world with as strong and sound of a groundstroke game as Simona Halep, who bludgeons the ball on both wings. Yet, she lost her match in Australia while winning a


ralian Open Recap total of four games. Not in a set, but the entire match. Better yet, her opponent was not Serena Williams. It was Ekaterina Makarova, a crafty Russian lefty. It is impossible to say that a quarterfinal showing coming off of the offseason is a bad showing, but it is the manner in which she lost. Committing more than double the unforced errors as she hit winners, Halep just did not have it, and that is what was disappointing. The best players in the world more often than not have a second gear that they can find in order to compete as hard as they can despite having an off day, but it just was not there. Again, a quarterfinal performance for almost anybody in the world is nothing to be ashamed of. But, people have been waiting for Milos Raonic to break through at a Grand Slam, and it is just not happening. One may argue that

it is impossible to critique a loss to eventual champion and the best player in the world, Djokovic, but there will always be a Djokovic around until Raonic becomes that guy. For him to become the next great thing that many believe the Canadian can be, he has to beat the best on the biggest stages. Ceding 11 break points to anybody, even the best returner out there, when Raonic has the biggest serve in the world, is disappointing. The big man will have to find a way to hang in there in his service games at the majors against the very best, because it will be at the end of sets that he will be able to make his moves. He earned no break points against Djokovic, which means that not only did he struggle on serve, his strength, but he found no opportunities on the return side of things, something he will need to develop in the future. Three important notes from Down Under 1. Stan Wawrinka played better than his new ranking shows More times than not, a player who makes a Grand Slam semifinal rockets up the rankings. Stan played arguably better than anybody else did in the en-

tire tournament to beat Kei Nishikori in a straight set quarterfinal win. However, after losing a five-setter against Djokovic in the semis, a match that he realistically could have and should have won given the quality of play, Stan saw his ranking plummet five spots to ninth in the world the following Monday. Again, people who take a look at the big movers of the week will think that the drop is a reflection on the Swiss’ current level of play. That simply is not the case. He may have played his worst match of the Australian Open in losing to the world number one in five sets, and can still lay claim to arguably the best shot in tennis, his one-handed backhand. 2. American tennis, anyone? If somebody had said before the first Grand Slam of the year that the top-ranked American male, John Isner, would lose in a straight sets third round match against an unseeded opponent, most people would probably start to write headlines about American tennis staying in the dungeons. But, the country enjoyed its finest tournacontinued on page 26

A Long Island local, James Christian has a well versed education and has trained under some of the top plastic surgeons of the metropolitan area. James specializes in the latest Dermal fillers, Botulinum toxins, Dermapen and Smart lipo and firmly believes in using Injectables as an art form to regress as well as preventing the aging process. Call/text to set up your FREE consultation 917-860-9003 or visit www.jameschristiancosmetics.com. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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match at hand, which happened to be a good one. Murray prevailed in four sets playing spectacular tennis, eventually reaching the final.

2015 australian open recap continued from page 25 ment in years. Donald Young showed signs of another resurgence, and Tim Smyczek showed that not only could a guy who has spent much of his career on the Challenger Circuit nearly beat Rafael Nadal, but that he is a class act as well, giving Nadal a free first serve as the Spaniard served for the match, because a fan in the crowd made noise. On the women’s side, results and performances were even more impressive. The runs of Serena winning the title, along with Venus and Madison Keys playing terrific tennis are one thing, but the rest of the bunch is another. Seven total American women made the third round, and Madison Brengle joined the other three in the fourth. 3. A coaching switch got more attention than a match Many people probably expected Federer to play Rafael Nadal in the semifinals of the tournament, and rightfully so. Federer had

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been playing great tennis leading into the year’s first major, and Nadal is, well, Nadal. But, it ended up being a clash between the number six and number seven players in the world, Andy Murray and Tomas Berdych. After staying with Murray for a short while after he hired Amelie Mauresmo as his coach, Dani Vallverdu, the Scot’s longtime friend and coach, moved over to Berdych’s camp to work with the Czech. There had been gossip going around that Vallverdu had left because of Mauresmo, which led to the match centering around player versus old coach rather than the

Andrew Eichenholz is a journalism student at Stony Brook University, where he currently is a staff writer for The Statesman, covering tennis amongst many sports. He grew up playing tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where he learned to love the game, eventually becoming a part time tennis instructor, working for the most part with the QuickStart 10 & Under Program. Andrew has also served as a ballperson at the U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at andrew.eichenholz@stonybrook.edu.

litennis Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

MAGAZINE

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Think and Talk Like a

Child By Tonny van de Pieterman

often monitor tennis lessons by the pros on my staff. In an effort to give some constructive feedback, I look at the interaction between the adult and the child, and try to think like a child. I look at how the children are experiencing the lesson. Are they inspired to give their best effort? Are they encouraged to experiment? The way coaches use language goes a long way to creating a great tennis experience. When I listen to the instructions of the pro, I simultaneously watch the children’s faces. The looks on their faces often tell the story. “Use your non-dominant hand,” I heard an instructor once say to a six-year-old in the middle of an exercise. I had to think myself which hand that was for me, and I am 45-years-old! That’s obviously too difficult for a young child. Even often heard commands like “Move your feet,” are too vague for a child (which foot should be moved and in which direction and why?). Some of the things I learned teaching the youngest tennis players:

I

l Use simple and direct language: “Chase the ball!” Even better, if you know the child has a dog named Toby, say, “Chase the ball like Toby!” l Rhyme to remember: Bend your knees, please (after net errors). l Reward good shots and effort: High-fives, low-fives, highand low-fives all around! l Speak at their level and with their tone to be heard: I spend a lot of time sitting on my knees when I talk to the kindergartners and first graders. l If you want them to listen, be ready to listen to their stories as well! Teaching the youngest of the youngest tennis players is very rewarding and great fun, especially if you allow your inner child to come out. If you are coaching kids, try to become one! We have nearly 200 children aged 10 and under playing at our club, and I love every minute of it. Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail tonny@pointsettennis.com.

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USTA Eastern Lo Region preps for Annual Awards Dinner Get ready for the 25th Annual USTA Long Regional Awards Celebration! The silver anniversary of this great event promises to be the biggest and best awards ceremony and dinner yet. The Annual Awards Dinner will celebrate the past year’s achievements, both on the court and off, of our members and

member organizations including: l High school champions l Top-ranked juniors l USTA League teams that played at their National competitions l Top-ranked adult players We’ll also be recognizing some fabulous long-time volunteers from across Nassau and Suffolk Counties and there will be some surprises too.

The 25th Annual Long Island Awards Dinner will be held at the Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y. Visit www.longisland.usta.com for information on attending the event, congratulating the awardees and more. There you’ll also find a complete list of past and present honorees, plus photos and video from past events. Any questions on the event, e-mail ustaonlongisland@gmail.com. We look forward to seeing you there!

Locals honored by Eastern Section The USTA Long Island Region is proud to congratulate several of our own who were recognized by the USTA Eastern Section for their accomplishments during 2014. Honorees were: Adult Awards l Kathy Miller (Merrick, N.Y.), Tennis Woman of the Year l Bob Coburn (West Islip, N.Y.), Regional Volunteer of the Year, Long Island l Tito Perez (East Setauket, N.Y.), 10 & Under Tennis Award l Pat Mosquera (Freeport, N.Y.), Junior Team Tennis Award Junior Awards l Ian Kaish (Northport, N.Y.), Richard D. Lynch II Boys 12 Sportsmanship Award l Ester Chikvashvili (Melville, N.Y.), Lawrence A. Miller Girls 16 Sportsmanship Award l Sean Hannity (Oyster Bay, N.Y.), Ron Smyth Parent Sportsmanship Award Kathy Miller Kathy Miller was named USTA Eastern’s Tennis Woman of the Year for her significant contribution to the game of tennis. Miller has served on the Long Island Regional Board for 20 years and has been a USTA League Coordinator for 30, providing approximately 4,000 Long Island tennis players with the opportunity to partici28

pate in USTA Adult, Mixed and Tri-Level Leagues. Heavily embedded in the tennis world, Miller is also the Manager at Carefree Racquet Club in Merrick. Along with programming a variety of leagues, running tournaments and managing a large junior program, Miller spearheads the Merrick Police Athletic League (PAL), which has been running for 15 years. The Merrick PAL offers three 10-week sessions a year and features tennis instruction for kids, conducted by high school seniors and college students. Each session provides more than 150 kids with hands-on tennis lessons. Miller’s success has not gone unnoticed, as she has earned multiple awards for her dedication to the game she began playing as a teenager. Tennis Woman of the Year is awarded to a female USTA Eastern volunteer in recognition of her outstanding service to tennis in the Section. Bob Coburn Bob Coburn, named Regional Volunteer of the Year (Long Island), is a longstanding volunteer for the Eastern Section and, for years, has been part of the Long Island Regional Board, where he is responsible for marketing and is on the dinner committee. In 2014, Coburn served as project manager and coordinator and spearheaded a Riker’s Island Tennis Clinic for young adult male inmates. He is now working on coordinating a similar clinic for female inmates at Riker’s. An

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com


ng Island Region assistant coach for Stony Brook University’s Seawolves tennis team, Coburn also helps out with the Long Island Tennis & Sports Foundation teaching at World Gym. The Regional Volunteer of the Year honors one volunteer from each of the Section’s six regions for his or her special service to the game of tennis. Tito Perez Recognized with the 10 & Under Tennis Award, Tito Perez is the director of tennis at World Gym Setauket. A true believer and leader in 10 & Under Tennis, he really understands how modified play works for kids. One of Eastern’s more progressive coordinators, Perez utilizes any space to run programming … he once ran a league in a hockey rink! As a 10 & Under League Coordinator for Suffolk County, Perez boasts more than 100 players. His World Gym teams won the Long Island Regionals in many of the different 10 & Under Tennis divisions, and he has presented at the National PTR Symposium about 10 & Under Tennis. Perez received the 2014 USTA Long Island Region Junior Team Tennis Award. The 10 & Under Tennis Award is presented to a person or organization who has done an outstanding job promoting 10 & Under Tennis in the Section. This includes consistently offering 10 & Under Tennis programming using red, orange and green tennis during Play Days, Play Events, 10 & Under tournaments and/or 10 & Under Junior Team Tennis.

Region at Eastern’s inaugural 10 & Under Team Tennis Sectionals. The Junior Team Tennis Award goes to a captain or coordinator who has made a significant contribution in the growth and development of USTA Junior Team Tennis in the Section. The USTA Eastern Section Junior awards are given as follows: The Sportsmanship Awards are presented to five girls and five boys for the respect and fair play they showed while participating in USTA sanctioned tournaments all year long. Tennis Parent of the Year is given to an individual who has made a significant impact and contribution toward USTA Eastern junior programming (tournaments or Junior Team Tennis), and has shown exceptional support of junior players and their families. This parent also must have a junior tennis player currently participating in USTA events. Congratulations to the following: Photo credit: James Alfalla

Ian Kaish of Northport, N.Y., winner of the Richard D. Lynch II Boys 12 Sportsmanship Award

Pat Mosquera Pat Mosquera, recipient of the Junior Team Tennis Award, is the Junior Team Tennis Coach at Sportime Lynbrook. He has been a consistent supporter of and has actively increased Junior Team Tennis participation on Long Island for the past 15 years. The Lynbrook teams regularly represent Nassau County and Long Island at the Eastern Sectionals. This past year, Mosquera fielded a team in the local 10 & Under Green Dot ball league, winning the Nassau County League and representing the

Ester Chikvashvili of Melville, N.Y., winner of the Lawrence A. Miller Girls 16 Sportsmanship Award Sean Hannity of Oyster Bay, N.Y., winner of the Ron Smyth Parent Sportsmanship Award

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The Game Inside the Game Five Licenses Top Tennis Players Have By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC In my last article, we discussed the secret to sustained peak performance, a principal called “More Than an Athlete: Person First. Athlete Second.” We also clarified that More Than an Athlete doesn’t require working harder, pushing or even pulling, it does require that the athlete, coach or parent shift their perspective so they can see the performer through a wider lens which includes the whole person, not just the athlete. More Than an Athlete gives the athlete five essential licenses that will help them feel more at ease with themselves as an athlete and as a person. Once they embrace this perspective, the performance becomes more authentic, the game becomes easier and the result shifts exponentially for the better. These licenses are as follows … 1. The license to just be yourself When we start with you, the person, rather

than just the athlete, we take the time to understand what it is that makes you who you are. We look at your attributes, experiences, and values that are the building blocks to your inner game. We look at your “More,” the inner fuel that drives you and doesn’t let you quit. Once you identify these qualities, you are able to bring your authentic self, spirit and story onto the court, and these characteristics will differentiate you from other players. Furthermore, you will feel encouraged and free, valued for being your authentic self (your “More”) rather than trying to be someone you’re not. Imagine Roger Federer trying to become Rafael Nadal? It wouldn’t work! 2. The license to let go When you recognize you are more than an athlete, you realize the game isn’t “Who you are” but “What you do.” Once you realize this essential fact, you are less apt to tie your self-worth and self-esteem to your results as an athlete. You won’t readily allow the attitudes of others about your results impact you. The process of letting go allows the athlete to unwind, unravel and

refocus on what they can control without getting distracted by outside noise. 3. The license to see the entire picture Most training is focused on technique, talent and skills, with little consideration to the mental game. However, in order for technique, talent and skill to fall into place, the entire picture must be seen, including the mental component. When you have the license to look at the entire picture, rather than just the game, you can view underlying issues which may have previously held you back. Experiences such as a bad day in school, an argument with significant other, trying to live up to expectations can get in the way of performance. It may be as complicated as an injury, personal trauma or past failures. Through the big picture lens, the whole story can be taken into account, not just the “missed shot” that is mistakenly seen as bad technique when an underlying stress is really tightening the body so the technique can’t happen. In Andrew Friedman’s book, Breaking Back, which chronicles former top 10 U.S. tennis

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player James Blake, he quotes Blake as saying, “If there is something wrong in your life, it’ll show up in your tennis game—not always in predictable ways, but in ways that are logical: Self-belief might be manifested in weak second serves, impatience can cause you to make low percentage gambles and so on.” 4. The license not to be perfect We all know that being perfect is impossible. Imagine if we stopped trying for perfection, but just tried to do our best? When we know we are “More Than an Athlete,” we understand we are human and therefore imperfect. The expectations of trying to be a superhero is no longer realistic. Now we can focus on one thing at a time: Our process, our choices, how we adapt, and what we can control versus what we cannot. 5. The license to be more and do less Pushing and pulling isn’t the only option. Letting go, taking a step back to rewind, recharging and rebooting are all also op-

tions. Metaphorically, it may feel similar to stepping out of your house in the morning and not being able to see 10 feet in front of you because of a dense layer of fog. Then you take a step back into the house. Twenty minutes later, you return outside to see that the fog has cleared. Only from this perspective of clarity are you able to take the next step. The mind works similarly. So often it’s not about “doing more,” learning another technique, or getting the next great piece of equipment. Rather, it’s about giving yourself a little time and space so you can see clearly. Sometimes, you have to step back to move forward. With these five licenses comes a more clear and relaxed perspective in which to adapt and adjust to what is happening during competition. From this place, the athlete will be more free to let go of what they cannot control, focus on what they can control, and consistently play their best. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. He works with athletes in

all sports at all levels helping them to break through mental barriers and be their best both as a person and an athlete. Rob has spoken to athletes, coaches, and parents both nationally at USTA, USPTA, ITA conferences, and internationally in India and Israel. Additionally, he is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. His work was recently featured in ESPN’s latest 30 for 30 film called Fields of Fear. In prior years, Rob received the USPTA-Eastern Division High School Coach of the Year Award and coached USTA’s 16 and under Zonals. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email rob@insidethezone.com or visit www.insidethezone.com.

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The Myths of Tennis Movement (Part II) A two-part guide to better tennis mobility By Steve Kaplan very year, players returning home from college tell me that they were “tested” in a two or three mile run for their teams. They were told, “Since you run several miles in a match, let’s test this on the track.” A three-mile run is a poor assessment for tennis, performance. In the past, I’ve called this “Dodgeball” logic (taken from the movie “Dodgeball” where it is noted, “If you can dodge a wrench, you can dodge a ball.”) The average run in tennis is just seven feet. It’s multi-directional, with an explosive start and precise stop. It’s about power, endurance, agility and coordina-

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tion. It has little in common with a longer, slower and straight ahead run. While court movement is one of the most important areas in the sport of tennis, mythology and misconceptions as described above can limit performance. We can start to take action by recognizing that great movement is not a talent, it’s the result of learning superior neuromotor control and function. Sure, some people have better body types and possess a stronger athletic background in movement development, but it’s never too late for any athlete to improve and develop. Tennis movements can be broken down into components of quickness, power, agility, speed and efficiency. In today’s lightning-fast game, these quali-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

ties are a requirement for achievement. Myths #9 through #15 Myth #9: You perform tennis movements on both feet. Reality: Tennis is mostly about single leg function. You make most movements in tennis with most or all of your weight on one of your legs, not both. Learn to jump and land on a single leg, forward and back, and side to side to move and play better. If you have never heard the acronym: RDL (Romanian Dead Lift), I suggest you learn it, live it and love it. You need strength, power, flexibility and mobility for tennis and single leg functional exercises are a great tool to develop these abilities.


Myth #10: Crunches and sit ups will help you move. Reality: Learn to rotate by learning to resist rotation. Your core muscles are stabilizers, not movers. Movement is about a stable core. Great movement maintains wanted force and resists unwanted force to move only those body parts you wish to move. Your core connects your upper body to your lower body. A weak core does not transmit force and power from the ground will not help you move if it does not find its way to your racket. Most of the force you create in tennis is rotational and a strong core stabilizes so that your upper and lower body work together to transfer power to the hit. Lumbar stability reduces low back injury risk and a stable pelvis will improve rapid directional changes. Work on stabilization of your core to play better. Myth #11: Try your hardest to move your fastest. Reality: Demonstrate movement adequacy ‌ it’s all about efficiency of effort. If your car is stuck in the snow, too much power will just spin your wheels. Efficiency or economy of movement will speed your reaction time and be less taxing on your power endurance systems. Too much effort and tension will inhibit performance and wear you out. Try to be very aware of your body so that you move with just the perfect amount of muscular tension (kinesthetic awareness). Don’t try your hardest, try your best. No wasted movement. Myth #12: Get your chin up on your serve. Reality: Great movement requires great posture. Poor posture results in weak power transfer, neural compensation, inefficient and slow movements with injury risk. Good posture will keep you strong, mobile and resistant to injury. I cringe when I hear the common instruction “Keep your chin up on your serveâ€? for example. It’s a cue that leads to poor posture. An over-elevated chin will unload your body mass and shift your hips forward putting your lower back in a very vulnerable position. You don’t believe me? Lift your chin when you perform a dead lift. See you at the orthopedist! Keep your chin neutral and still. Raise your body using your shins, knees and hips.

Myth #13: Movement practice makes perfect movements. Reality: Proper practice makes perfect movements. The most common footwork and movement mistakes result from poor practice habits. For example, do you serve great in practice from a basket, but not in a game? Consider that most player’s practice serves from a basket of balls, without recovery footwork after each serve. Recovery steps after serving requires both practice and reinforcement. Stop standing around after serving and practice readiness for the next shot. Myth #14: Court coverage limitations limit you. Reality: Movement is all about the right attitude. Never, ever, ever give up. Limitations change. The best players in the world believe they can get to every ball. They are often wrong every match. Lesser players acknowledge that they are often unable to get to the ball, so they give up. They are always right. Great players understand that it’s better to fail at succeeding than to succeed at failing. Myth #15: Jumping rope is a great way to train for tennis. Reality: Jumping rope is neurologically counter to tennis movements. This myth has caused controversy in the past because so many people believe it’s

  

  

the “Holy Grail of Tennis Training Methods.� I agree it’s a hard workout and I know many great players (mostly past generation players) who swear by jumping rope, but let’s face it, they also believed in salt pills, no water during workouts and copper bracelets. Jumping rope might be better than sitting on the couch and eating potato chips, but it’s not a “best practice� because it neurologically counters tennis movements. Jumping rope is outdated training and risky for younger players who risk shin injuries from the pounding. You can jump rope with linear acceleration movements, using your forefoot, but tennis is more about full-foot, full-force starting and stopping lateral movements. Lateral hops or a shuffle with a few small hurdles is vastly superior, and safer, to jumping rope for tennis movement. If you want to mover better, start by training smarter. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

 

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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TENNIS INJURY PREVENTION

The Importance of ACL Injury Prevention for the Female Tennis Player By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS As is the case for any athlete, taking care of the body is one of the most important things for a competitive tennis player. This means having all muscles, tendons and ligaments loose and strong before taking the court to play. The knee is considered the most important body part for the mobile athlete and injured knees have far and away derailed more collegiate and professional careers than any other injury. While tennis players may struggle with tendonitis in the knee (jumper’s knee) or meniscal tears, the injury that has become an epidemic to all athletes is the tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There has been a huge increase in the number of ACL reconstruction procedures in recent years, with more than 200,000 being performed in 2014 alone. The ACL is one of the two cruciate, or “crossing,” ligaments in the center of the knee, and while small in length, roughly the 34

size of the pinky finger, it plays an instrumental role in the process of stabilizing the knee. The ACL runs through the center of the knee connecting the thigh bone (femur) to the shin (tibia). When the ligament becomes torn it will cause the shin bone to slide forward in relation to the thigh bone. This abnormal motion can cause further injury to the meniscus and cartilage of the knee. Acute ACL tears typically are accompanied by a loud or audible pop followed by severe pain and swelling, which will immediately sideline any athlete. All tennis players are aware that their success is tied to their ability to change direction quickly and move their body weight on a dime. Unfortunately, this is the exact action that results in so many ACL injuries. Fifty to seventy percent of ACL tears are caused by non-contact injuries of twisting or suddenly stopping. Some athletes are at a higher risk than others for these tears. In fact, female athletes have a higher risk for an ACL injury, and studies have shown females to be four to eight times more likely to sustain this injury as compared to male athletes playing the same sport.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Females have been known to be ligament dominant, meaning the knee ligament in their dominant leg are stressed more as the limb plants on the ground prior to muscle activation. At the same time, females are also quadriceps dominant, meaning that their quadriceps muscle is stronger than their hamstring muscles in their dominant leg, which can put unnecessary stress on the ACL. Utilizing the most current neuromuscular training program significantly reduces the risk of an ACL injury for females, down to that of their male counterparts. The cornerstone of this program would be the use of plyometric exercises and balance training. One popular drill of the many featured in this extensive program, is a basic plyometric exercise called “hops.” To perform this exercise, lay an agility ladder out in a wide open space and stand at one end with your feet together. Slowly descend into a squatting position and hop down the length of the ladder. At first attempt, use both feet, being sure to touch


each space along the way without skipping any. Once you get to the other end, jog back to the other side and repeat. As you become comfortable with the drill and become warmed-up, try skipping a space or jumping off one foot. The goal for this exercise is to spend very little time touching the floor with each movement, as is the case with all plyometric drills in the program. These exercise programs do not only need to be applied to females and can be applied to all athletes playing cutting and pivoting sports such as soccer, basketball, and football. Professional athletes and teams across the country have developed similar training programs to be performed daily as part of a warm-up routine before practice or a training session. Physicians focus on injury prevention for athletes of all ages and all sports. If surgery is necessary, a multidisciplinary approach can be used to create a treatment plan that focuses on the patient’s lifestyle and activities and helps them get back to those activities quickly and effectively. Dr. Charles Ruotolo is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and the founder of Total

Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with locations in Massapequa, East Meadow and the Bronx, N.Y. Dr. Ruotolo completed his orthopedic residency program at SUNY Stony Brook in 2000. After his residency, he underwent fellowship training in sports medicine and shoulder surgery at the prestigious Sports Clinic of Laguna Hills, Calif. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. As an Associate Master Instructor of

Arthroscopy for the Arthroscopy Association of North America, Dr. Ruotolo actively teaches other orthopedic surgeons advanced arthroscopic skills in shoulder surgery. As an avid researcher he has also published multiple articles on shoulder injuries and shoulder surgery in the peer review journals of Arthroscopic Surgery and of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. For more information, visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Spots fill up fast. Call any www.SportimeCamps.com SPORTIME Camp location to Camp programs and services vary at each location. *Bethpage Multi-Sport offers ELITE Volleyball find out more. It’s going to and Roller Hockey only. be a great summer! LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine 37


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

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Alley Pond Tennis Center 79-20 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. (718) 264-2600 www.alleypondtenniscenter.com Our Mission: Learn the Game, Love the People! Our mission is to help every student realize his or her potential. Tennis is a sport of a life time and our goal at Alley Pond Tennis Center (APTC) is to give your child the best TENNIS EXPERIENCE. APTC is an all-year-around tennis facility. We have a newly renovated state-of-the-art new clubhouse, central air conditioning and heating, showers, lockers, snack bar, on-site stringing, beautiful lounge area, and a friendly and efficient staff. We offer private and group lessons, adult instructional classes, adult drop-in drills, children instructional classes, children’s birthday parties, junior drill sessions and a host of other services. APTC’s Summer Camps are for all level of players from beginners to advance. We offer Daytime Young Hitters Camps for children ages four- through seven-years-old and Full-Day Summer Camps for children ages eight- through 16-years-old and Late Afternoon Camps for ages four- through 16-years-old Our full five day campers will receive four hours and 45 minutes of intense tennis instruction, drills, fun games, point play and match play on a daily basis and a special 38

event during the week! Our Young Hitters Campers and Late Afternoon Campers will receive two hours of tennis geared for teaching hand/eye coordination skills, movement, fun informative skill games, and we use yellow, red, orange and green dot teaching balls to enhance their skills. All of our Summer Programs are supervised by USPTA- or PTR-certified tennis instructors who are dedicated to teaching this sport of a lifetime along with assistant college students. For more information on our rates and programs, please call (718) 264-2600 or you can visit www.alleypondtenniscenter.com.

Bethpage Park Tennis Center Summer Tennis Camp 99 Quaker Meeting House Road, Building #4 Farmingdale, N.Y. (516) 777-1358 www.bethpageparktennis.com To be your best, you need the best program, facilities and players Bethpage Park Tennis Center’s Summer Tennis Camp is designed for maximum time efficiency and productiveness. Our wealth of tennis courts enables us to provide indoor and outdoor courts, hard courts and clay courts. No camp provides a more favorable camper to court ratio than us. This means campers can play

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

singles and doubles matches daily. These opportunities for match play are most beneficial because they are with the finest players the East Coast has to offer. To be the best, you need the best staff! We train players to excel with greater success than any other eastern camp because of our unique staff. Since we conduct a year-round program, we employ proven, full-time professionals to oversee our camp. The rest of our staff is comprised of our top-ranked students, many of whom are college standouts, to ensure quality, enthusiasm and continuity of instruction. We are very flexible, with nine oneweek, as well as partial-week, sessions so that tournament players can design a schedule that accommodates their individual needs. We believe that the summer is a great time to drill skills, get match tough and develop fitness habits that will help year-round. Is this program right for you? At Bethpage Park Tennis Center’s Summer Tennis Camp, our standards are high, our prerequisites are not! We encourage and value our beginners equally with our nationally-ranked players. All we require is the desire to attend a serious tennis camp to … to learn in an intensive, personal and fun environment … and the drive to achieve your personal best! Transportation is available, and a daily deli or pizza lunch is included.


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

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Carefree Racquet Club 1414 Jerusalem Avenue North Merrick, N.Y. (516) 489-9005 www.carefreetennis.com Where can you find a junior summer multisport camp highlighting the excitement of competition, high-structured instruction and plenty of all-around play time? At Carefree Racquet Club, complete with seven air-conditioned indoor tennis courts, four pickleball courts, two racquetball courts that can convert to walleyball, a half-court basketball court, a cozy lounge and snack area … that’s where! At Carefree’s summer camp, we encourage the social and healthy aspect of loving sports just for the fun of it. We stress the positive approach to competition which gives our juniors perspective both on and off the playing field. In the long run, this brings out the confidence to succeed in whatever our students venture into later in life. The key is to develop behavioral characteristics of success for all of our students: Vision, action, responsibility and independence. The staff is comprised of knowledgeable and caring counselors some of who were or currently are, college players who were also trained at Carefree Racquet Club. The program is directed by Louis Vallejo, with 27 years of teaching experience and 17 years of sectional, national and international tennis playing experi-

ence. He has coached juniors of all levels of play. Along with his head pros, the tutelage of our students is unsurpassed. Carefree Racquet Club is proud to celebrate its 24th year of our Junior Summer Camp. The success of our summer program comes from our outstanding facility, fun to win attitude and our superior pro staff. Our camp hours are from noon to 5:00 p.m. Our students come in fresh and relaxed with energy, ready for action. We warm up with the physical part of our training: Stretching, cardio, core and strength exercises. Each participant then follows their schedule for the day of tennis, pickleball, basketball, and walleyball. Carefree’s Junior Summer Multi-Sport Camp is the most flexible on Long Island. You can attend full-time (eight weeks, five days a week) or a fewer number of weeks. You can also attend just two or three days a week if you’d like. You can even come just once a week, but we bet if you come once, you’ll want to come twice! So come on down and see for yourself … we will be waiting!

Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy 65 Columbia Road Morristown, N.J. (973) 539-2054 www.centercourtacademy.com Contact: Clay Bibbee at clay@centercourtclub.com “Our Mission: Create the Next American Champion!” Since its inception only three years ago, Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy has quickly earned the reputation as one of the sport’s premier destination for player development in the Northeast. With access to 50 tennis courts (hard, Har-Tru, red

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CAMPGUIDE class, and indoor hard), our 11-week tennis camps are a perfect opportunity for players to refine and develop their skills in a short period of time. Why choose Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy? l Train in a world-class environment with high-performance level coaches from around the world. l Achieve significant individual improvement in all facets of your game, including technical, physical and mental aspects. l We are dedicated to meeting the individual needs of each and every one of our students. l Our Academy players are among some of the top sectional, national and ITF ranked players from around the world. l We put the needs of the player first, in a development-focused model of training. l Each camp will be tailored to the skill levels and goals of our players; featuring small group training, match play, individualized fitness plans, mental coaching, and video analysis. l Tournament coaching and travel. l Players who commit to our training will see themselves develop life skills that will enable them to become champions both on and off the court. Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy provides a superior junior player pathway, which satisfies the needs of sectional and nationally ranked juniors. Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy offers programs with rolling admissions year round and an 11-week summer camp from June 15-Aug. 28, 2015.

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College Tennis Exposure Camps 27th Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp June 16-18 (University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla.) July 7-9 (University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Va.) July 20-24 (Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa.) July 26-30 (Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa.) July 31-August 2 (Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass.) (813) 684-9031 www.collegetennis.com Coach Ed Krass’ 27th Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp is the nation’s only training camp taught exclusively by head college coaches. The camp is open to all players, ages 15-18, who are interested in playing college tennis. Players receive instruction and training from head coaches representing every level of the college game. Ed Krass coached varsity tennis teams at Harvard University, Clemson University and University of Central Florida prior to founding the College Tennis Exposure Camp. Under the skillful eyes of top college coaches, players showcase their singles, doubles and One-on-One Doubles skills, and receive specific feedback on their game. Instructional drills and match play competitions are conducted in the same style and intensity as collegiate practice

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

sessions. Players have the opportunity to sample various coaching styles and receive on-court coaching during team competitions. Classroom seminars with college coaches motivate and educate players about college tennis preparation. The camp is offered at University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla. from June 1618; University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Va. from July 7-9; Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa. for two sessions, from July 20-24 and July 26-30; Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass. from July 31-Aug. 2. Dormitory accommodations, cafeteria meals and 24-hour adult supervision are provided. For more information, call (813) 6849031 or visit www.collegetennis.com.

The Early Hit Training Center Junior Summer Tennis Camp at Glen Head Racquet Club Contact: Carl Barnett 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net Our comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his or her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our com-


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

CAMPGUIDE plete program. We begin each session with a nutritionally-complete and balanced shake from Court 7, our on-premise restaurant and smoothie bar. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production, drilling and physical fitness training before breaking for a healthy lunch. We then move on to playing dynamics and strategy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A thorough cooldown and stretching session completes a world-class day of tennis for your child. With our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, experienced physical conditioning trainers, movement experts and on-site chef, the Early Hit Training Center offers a unique and total tennis experience.

Elite Tennis Travel Program (917) 713-5074 www.elitetennistravel.com Contact: Adriana Isaza at info@elitetennistravel.com Elite Tennis Travel Inc. builds exclusive tennis and cultural experiences in Spain. Ten-

nis training is provided by masters at renowned clubs in Barcelona and Valencia. Cultural activities include private cooking and flamenco classes, shows, concerts, kayaking in the Mediterranean Sea, Gaudi bike tours, and visits to interactive museums. Spanish language lessons are also provided. Programs are designed for small groups of high school students. One or two week programs in Barcelona for high school students include tennis and physical training, language lessons, cultural experiences, 24-hour supervision, accommodations, three meals and transportation. Tennis development Our coaches are former ATP players and will work on technical and tactical parts of the game. They are bilingual and able to offer instruction in either language. This

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CAMPGUIDE high performance program includes four hours of tennis instruction, and two ours of off-court training.

For more information, visit www.elitetennistravel.com or contact Adriana Isaza (917) 713-5074 or e-mail info@elitetennistravel.com.

Cultural program During the weekends, there are planned excursions to explore various facets of Barcelona, including its culture and traditions. Visits to local beaches, museums, and important historical sites enrich our program. Language program Our schools are accredited by National Independent Private Schools Association (NIPSA), and offer a variety of Spanish programs. Our teachers are licensed, native speakers who will target the areas that will improve the skill of each student, regardless of their level. Groups Elite Tennis Travel Inc. can accommodate groups of various sizes. From teams to tennis friends, Elite will design an experience to the required specifications. For some programs, homestay is available. Programs are in Barcelona and Valencia.

Evert Tennis Academy 10334 Diego Drive South Boca Raton, Fla. (561) 488-2001 or (800) 41SERVE www.evertacademy.com As the proud home to more than 15 Grand Slam participants and 100 Division I college athletes, Evert Tennis Academy (ETA) has a proven record of success in developing champions. Chris Evert, tennis legend and winner of 18 Grand Slam titles, and John

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1-1 consultations, phone consults, family counseling, on site visits Dr. Tom Ferraro (516) 248-7189 • 2 Hillside Avenue, Ste. E • Williston Pk, NY 11596 Drtomferraro.com • drtferraro@aol.com 42

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Evert, world-renowned developmental coach and ETA Director, believe in designing personalized programs that consist of a strategic balance between technical, tactical, mental, and physical training. Their unmatched expertise and experience with all facets of the junior, college, and professional ranks will provide students with the necessary tools to thrive in their tennis careers. Summer Camp Program The goal of the Summer Camp Program is to provide quality tennis instruction within an environment that is fun and exciting. ETA’s Summer Camp is a hybrid program affording the same expert coaching staff and championship philosophy to summer campers that is present throughout the year. Intermediate to advanced tournament players, who aspire to capture that last spot on the school team or even earn a college scholarship, achieve incredible results through ETA’s Summer Camps. Summer Camp sessions provide a melting pot of cultures, as students travel from all over the world to train with the country’s leading coaches. On Wednesday, boarding students have the opportunity to take advantage of the beautiful Florida beaches as a means of active rest. In addition, boarders have the option to practice Saturday mornings to improve their game. The schedule of each day varies to maximize the student’s improvement in all aspects of their training— technical, tactical, physical and mental. On and off-campus activities are organized daily in an effort to take advantage of the enjoyable Florida weather and area attractions. Facilities ETA’s location in Boca Raton puts it in the heart of the tennis capital of the United States. There’s not another area of the country than can boast as many tournaments or depth of tennis talent. When players are serious about maximizing their abilities, this is where they come to train


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

CAMPGUIDE and ETA’s facilities have everything to meet their demands. l On-campus dormitories. l Academic institutions on campus. l Twenty-three on-campus courts, including 12 Har-Tru (clay) and 11 hard courts. l Additional Har-Tru and hard courts offsite. l State-of-the-art strength and conditioning center. l Student lounge and game room. Spend two to three weeks at Evert Tennis Academy to improve your game! For more information, prices and promotions, call (561) 488-2001 or (800) 41SERVE, or visit www.evertacademy.com!

Our camp facilities are among the finest on Long Island. The Shelter Rock Tennis and Racquet Club is undoubtedly at the top of the tennis club ladder. Many of Long Island’s top players are members there. With an Olympic-sized swimming pool, three indoor courts and more than 20 outdoor HarTru tennis courts, Shelter Rock is the ideal place for a junior tennis player to spend their summer. New York Tennis Academy is under the direction of Howie Arons. For more than 35 years, Howie has developed and coached some of the top junior players in the area. In addition to Howie, Brian Stein and Rob Weidenbaum will serve as directors of the camp. They will be sure to look after every junior’s personal needs at camp. Brian and Rob currently coach many top juniors and will instill a real competitive presence at camp. Our staff will be completed with top college players who were once juniors in our program and fully understand our Hard Work Philosophy. Finally, we want every junior player to love going to camp and have a great summer tennis experience. Our entire staff will be dedicated to giving our players a great summer of tennis.

What makes us different? l Early drop-off for working parents l Individualized attention—meeting each students’ need l Flexibility—accommodating students’ and parents’ busy schedules Why choose us? l Programs for all levels—from beginners through tournament training l Daily singles ladders with weekly camp champions—trophies weekly l Olympic-sized heated swimming pool for those 90 degree days l Campers can order from a wide menu for lunch (we have country club food and Kosher food upon request) l Sports drinks and water readily available all day l Indoor courts available for inclement weather Our philosophy We grow champions from the ground up. We believe that tennis is the best way to grow the person, as well as the athlete. We emphasize the fundamentals of proper technique and form. Our coaching staff will insure that your child learns and enjoys the

New York Tennis at Shelter Rock Tennis and Country Club Summer Camp 100 Long Island Expressway Manhasset, N.Y. Contact: Howie Arons at (516) 233-2790 New York Tennis Academy was formed more than 25 years ago and has since produced more than 250 ranked junior players and more than 75 Division I collegiate tennis players. In addition, we have trained more than 1,000 high school and middle school scholastic players. Our intermediate and advanced programs integrate match play into most sessions. Parents and students can expect consistently high standards of coaching and dedication to excellence. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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CAMPGUIDE game of tennis. Whether your child is wielding their first racquet or is already competing in tournaments, we have the ability and experience to support their growth.

Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp (516) 463-CAMP www.hofstra.edu/camp A great tennis experience for two, four or six weeks The Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp is suitable for both the beginning player through the advanced player interested in tournament play or wishing to participate on high school tennis teams. Basic tech-

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niques are taught to beginners and we offer the experienced player advanced skills and game strategy. Each child is instructed according to his or her ability and previous training is not required. Most lessons are taught in the form of a game. Additionally, all of our instructors have been trained in the 10 & Under Tennis/Quick Start program. This is the newest approach to teaching tennis to youngsters 10 years of age and younger. It is sanctioned by the USTA and its format takes a new approach to introducing kids to the game. Campers spend half the day in tennis and the other half participating in swimming, recreation and special events. Transportation and lunch are included in tuition. No instructors are below college age. Tennis Camp Directors Sunny and Eddie Fishkind have been running the camp for 30 years and have won many awards. Our philosophy is that you cannot make a child a great tennis player in two weeks, but you can make them love the game for life! For additional information about Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp, call (516) 463CAMP or visit www.hofstra.edu/camp.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Julian Krinsky School of Tennis 610 South Henderson Road King of Prussia, Pa. (866) 879-5527 www.jkcp.com/tennis Julian Krinsky School of Tennis was created over 35 years ago by Julian Krinsky, who played at Wimbledon and the French Open. Over the years we have trained more than 20,000 tennis players. We know each player has unique goals, interests and strengths. This is why we have reimagined tennis camp and allowed you to choose the intensity you want to learn to achieve the best results for YOU! First, choose from five levels of tennis. Then, each day pick from a variety of concentrations so you can focus on the areas of your game that matter most to you. l Tennis Basic Training: We make the game easier and more fun; play games and build confidence in relaxed environment. l Tennis for Improvement: Increase your consistency, endurance, footwork, and compete in our weekly tournaments. l Tennis to Compete: Ideal for school team players to prep for next season tryouts or to improve your spot on the team. l Tennis for Tournaments: This is your turning point. Prepare for USTA Tournaments, step up your training, and learn to execute your best game every time. l Tennis for College: For the true competitors who want high performance and high


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

CAMPGUIDE intensity classes to prepare for college level tennis. Class that will push you past your limits to achieve greatness. No matter what your goal or level is, work with our professional tennis instructors to reinvent your tennis game. Plus, enjoy campus life at Haverford College or Villanova University, evening activities and weekend trips!

gate University (Hamilton, N.Y.), Elizabethtown College (Elizabethtown, Pa.), Chirico-Cohen Tournament Training at Chestnut Hill College (Chestnut Hill, Pa.), and Sacred Heart University (Fairfield, Conn.). With more than 80 locations and programs for all levels, there is a camp for everyone! Who says that only kids can go to camp? The Nike Adult Tennis Camp at Amherst College has hosted more than 30,000 adult tennis players since 1972. Camp Directors Reiny Maier and Maureen Rankine are outstanding teachers and passionate coaches who inspire all players to get better and love the game. Multiple camp options and dates offered throughout June and July. Visit www.ussportscamps.com/tennis for details. The Lawrenceville School and Curry College also offer adult weekend clinics.

Nike Tennis Camps (800) NIKE-CAMP (645-3226) www.ussportscamps.com Come join the fun and get better this summer at a Nike Tennis Camp! With more than 80 locations nationwide, both overnight and day options, there is a camp for everyone. Nike Tennis Camps provide young players the opportunity to improve their tennis skills, work hard, make new friends and have a lot of fun. Our dedicated camp directors have a passion for teaching and a gift for helping you take your game to the next level. This summer on Long Island, Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Camp in Glen Cove, N.Y. is offering nine weeks of day camp (8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) for ages nine through 18 and an additional six weeks of day camp only (8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) for ages nine through 18. Other locations in the area include: Lawrenceville School (Lawrenceville, N.J.), Randy Mani Tennis Academy at Hardscrabble Club (Brewster, NY), Col-

Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy Contact: Peter Kaplan at (631) 288-4021 or (914) 234-9462 peterkaplan2002@yahoo.com www.westhamptonbeachtennis.com Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy, and the affiliated Grassmere Inn, is a wonderful destination for beginners to nationally-ranked players of all ages. Private instruction and 90minute clinics are offered daily. Camps and one- through seven-day programs are available. The flexibility of the programming enables participants to enjoy the nearby beautiful ocean beaches, charming village,

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CAMPGUIDE Performing Arts Center, movie theatre, wine country, flower farms, shopping, cafes, restaurants, water park and other East End attractions. Peter Kaplan, an attorney, former New York State Tennis Champion, and a graduate of Cornell University, is on-site every day. Resident students/families/teams stay at the historic Grassmere Inn, located on quiet, tree-lined Beach Lane in Westhampton Beach, N.Y., only 50 yards from the beginning of the charming village, yet less than one mile from a beautiful ocean beach. The location could not be better. The Grassmere has 22 guest rooms, all with air conditioning, WiFi, cable television and private bathrooms. Ideal for families, are two suites or interconnected rooms. A delicious breakfast of fresh muffins, bagels, cereal, fruit, juice, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt is included daily. The Tennis Academy, located three miles away, is primarily a teaching center featuring 12 soft courts. We have welcomed participants from over 25 countries and 30 states since 2000. The Academy features an enthusiastic staff, renowned for its highquality instruction and low student-to-staff ratio. The maximum ratio is 4:1, but the av-

erage ratio is 2:1. Thirty-five Japanese juniors have been coming for three weeks annually, for the last eight years. They run three miles before breakfast and then 10 hours of instruction, running and matches. However, most participants seek a less intensive program, taking three to five hours of instruction daily. The staff is always accommodating and happy to tailor programs to fit the needs of the customer. Frequently, an adult team will come at the beginning of the season and return for a family vacation. There are also tennis pros who bring groups. The Academy’s staff is available to supplement visiting pros staff. The groups always have an incredible time, some having returned for 10 consecutive years. Tennis during the day, a trip to the beach in the late afternoon, perhaps a glass of wine at sunset, and then dining at a great restaurant, a movie or a show at the Performing Arts Center. Occasionally, guests are coaxed into karaoke with the international staff!

2013 ETA Recipient “Innovative Tennis Program of the Year” LI’s first Tennis Academy devoted to the USTA’s 10 & under Initiative. Butch Seewagen is a former varsity coach at Columbia University. He holds over 15 national and international titles and is the owner/program director of the Children’s Athletic Training Schools.

For Boys and Girls 3 – 10 years old.

188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Center Phone: 516-763-1299 catsrvc@gmail.com

www.catsny.com 46

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Port Washington Tennis Academy Camp Programs 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. (516) 883-6425 www.pwta.com Port Washington Tennis Academy’s Summer Camp and Year-End Camp There is a difference in tennis day camps. The “unique” concept at the Port Washington Tennis Academy starts with a limited enrollment of only 50 juniors (a maximum of four per court). Tournament players to beginners receive special concentrated training from an elite international staff of Academy-trained professionals. Specific additional training on our exclusive 1/4-mile indoor running track provides the unusual benefit of maximizing each student’s speed and endurance performance capability. At PWTA, 17 indoor courts guarantee 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. all-weather instruction. Our proven method includes intensive instruction, supervised practice and match play. Daily tennis-specific fitness drills provide for a super summer experience. Each camper will return home a much improved player. Luncheon (prepared in our own kitchen) and additional weekend and weekday playing time is available for our students at no extra cost. The Junior Summer Camp consists of two five-week sessions, held Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Mini-Camp and


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

CAMPGUIDE Junior Clinics are also held from 4:00 p.m.6:00 p.m., Monday to Friday. The End-ofYear Junior Camp takes place during the December school vacation period. Call (516) 883-6425 for additional information.

Saddlebrook Resort 5700 Saddlebrook Way Wesley Chapel, Fla. (813) 973-1111 www.saddlebrook.com Saddlebrook Resort is home to the Saddlebrook Tennis Program and is rated among the top student athlete training facilities in the world. With 45 tennis courts, Grand Slam surfaces, and with our world-class year-round coaches Saddlebrook Resort is truly a tennis mecca. Hundreds of talented athletes come to Saddlebrook’s tennis camp in Florida each year and improve their game through specialized training, discipline and motivation. Juniors train up to five hours daily at our resort, in addition to making new friends and enjoying fun social activities with other student athletes. After years of experience and proven success with professional players, such top American John Isner, Saddlebrook’s junior program has been designed to improve each athlete’s technical, tactical, and mental abilities. Our daily clinics and professional analysis includes a series of imaginative drills designed by the legendary Harry Hopman taught by our

coaches. Our tennis program also includes on- and off-court performance routines, including specialized drills for consistency and accuracy, and supervised match-play under the direction of our professional coaching staff. Altogether, the components of the program work to improve upon the student athlete’s physical and mental tournament match play. l Five days of instruction: Five hours each day l Maximum 4:1 student to instructor ratio l Video analysis l Refreshment and fruit breaks l Six nights shared and supervised accommodations in Junior Suites (unit contains two bedrooms, each with its own bathroom, living/dining area, kitchen and a patio or balcony) Sunday to Saturday weekly programs (extra nights and weeks are available upon request) l Three meals daily, per night of stay (starting with dinner Sunday and ending with breakfast Saturday) l Fitness center access and various fitness activities daily l Saddlebrook Tennis t-shirt and sport bag per visit

Southampton Racquet Club & Camp Directors: Thomas Coffey & Cindy Davidowitz Winter: 85 Crescent Beach Road Glen Cove, N.Y. (516) 953-5176 Summer: 665 Majors Path Southampton, N.Y. (631) 488-4700 FUN@SouthamptonRCC.com www.SouthamptonRCC.com Southampton Racquet Club & Camp (SRCC), part of the TLC Family of Camps, offers an extraordinary program at their Southampton, N.Y. location for children ages two-and-a-half through 16 years of age.

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CAMPGUIDE Tucked away in the heart of Southampton, SRCC offers an amazing Racquet Club & Camp experience in a truly unique setting. Situated on 17 idyllic acres of natural landscape, our SRCC facility provides an exceptional environment for campers to learn, have fun, and the perfect summer program for every camper. Our camp program, for campers aged 2.510, is truly unique and filled with a blend of age appropriate activities including tennis and swim instruction, athletics, creative arts and special events that help build a strong foundation of physical movement skills and cross-training, essential for the development of every child. Our tennis academy program, for campers aged 8-16, is facilitated by the nationallyrenowned Cliff Drysdale Tennis Company, and provides world class coaching from a

highly qualified national and international staff. With a well-balanced program of technique, strategy, game-play, and having lots of fun, our program is established to instill qualities on and off the tennis court. SRCC offers air-conditioned bus transportation, included in tuition, from Westhampton-Bridgehampton, flexible enrollment options, including full and mini-day, and is also committed to small groups with extensive staffing. Qualified teachers, coaches and activity specialists ensure that all campers have the best summer possible. We also offer membership benefits at our Racquet Club for all family members for every camper enrollment. Come and join us at Southampton Racquet Club & Camp and enjoy one of our perfect summer programs, building self-confidence, self-esteem and resilience in a safe and fun environment

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

CAMPGUIDE Camp locations, including the EXCEL Summer Tennis Camp at SPORTIME Randall’s Island, home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy, players across Long Island, in New York City and in Westchester can experience SPORTIME’s premier tennis programs for recreational and aspiring junior players of all ages and abilities. SPORTIME training methods are fun and fast-paced, featuring stroke production, competitive games and tactical training for match play. Our innovative tennis training techniques and tennis-specific conditioning regimens help newer players learn and enjoy and prepares serious juniors for the physical, mental and emotional demands of the sport of tennis. SPORTIME campers develop positive self-esteem and laser-like focus. Our program is dedicated to turning weaknesses into strengths and strengths into winning games.

That’s because at all SPORTIME summer camps, we make sure that every kid is safe, that every kid has fun and that every kid has positive experiences they will always remember. How do we do it? It’s really quite simple: l Our staff is experienced and skilled l Our programming is challenging, innovative and educational l Our facilities are state-of-the-art and safe l And … We know how to make camp fun! Here is a list of the summer camp programs we offer at SPORTIME. Each camp challenges a child’s abilities, while enhancing his/her self-esteem and providing positive social interaction. Programs may vary at each camp location.

niques and develop strategies and tactics to improve their level of play and enjoyment of the sport all while actually PLAYING. Our curriculum and groupings are carefully tailored to the age and level of each camper. And, if you can believe it, the other sports we play are just as much fun as the tennis!

Tennis & Sports Camps SPORTIME Tennis & Sports Camps are designed for youngsters who want to focus their camp days on PLAYING tennis while enjoying other sport activities. Our Tennis & Sports Campers don’t spend their time standing in line waiting to learn how to play tennis—they start PLAYING tennis right away. They learn proper stroking tech-

Multi-Sport Camps Our summer multi-sport curriculum offers campers instruction, recreation and friendly competition in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor sports, including basketball, tennis, floor hockey, soccer, volleyball, swimming, baseball and more. Multi-Sport campers also participate in exciting project adventure activities and cooperative

Preschool Multi-Sport Camps Supervised by certified early childhood teachers and experienced assistants, your child receives personalized and loving attention in a safe and age-appropriate learning environment. The camp day includes professional tennis and swimming instruction and a variety of multi-sport lessons and games, plus arts and crafts and other traditional camp activities. Our Pre-School Camps are truly unique!

SPORTIME Summer & Sports and Multi-Sport Camps Locations across Long Island, in Manhattan, Westchester and Schenectady www.SportimeCamps.com camps@sportimeny.com (888) 698-3664 “Last year, I had the best summer ever!” Who said that? Every kid who attended a SPORTIME Summer Camp last summer! LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE

CAMPGUIDE games that challenge them to work together as teams to solve problems and to achieve common goals. SPORTIME also offers Elite Sports Camps for volleyball and roller hockey at our flagship Multi-Sport Arena at Bethpage Multi-Sport www.SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Multi-Sport.

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. (718) 760-6200 www.ntc.usta.com The USTA Billie Jean National Tennis Cen-

ter will once again offer seven weeks of fun in the sun tennis camps starting in June 2015. Enrollment will soon be available online and you may choose to registration for one, two or as many as seven weeks. The weekly program runs from Mondays through Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., with a one-hour lunch break or a twilight session from 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Campers work on development of tennis techniques, tactics, sports conditioning and strategy geared to maximizing the learning experience in a fun presentation. As the juniors develop, they are advanced to more challenging groups. Tennis activities include Stroke-of the Day, team games and Competitive Match Play. The camp also offers cross-training activities such as soccer, softball and basketball in the park or at the Corona park multi-purpose recreational facility, off-site field trips include ice skating, Mets games, and much more, and full access to the many fun activities on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. We accept junior players four- through 10-years-old for the 10 & Under programs. Recreational players 10-years-old and up are enrolled in the Junior Camps (8:30

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

a.m.-5:30 p.m. or 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m.). Advanced High Performance Tournament training campers will be invited to participate in an intensive Tennis Academy training program which runs Monday-Friday, from 10:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. We have 22 outdoor courts, 12 indoor courts, and four stadium courts. We have available on-site Ping-Pong tables, ball machines, fitness center, and other age appropriate fun activities like arts and crafts, and other engaging sporting events. Our primary focus will be on developing tennis skills while offering other activities to enhance the learning and camp experience. Parents, we also offer adult daytime, weekday evening and weekend camps for you as well. Detailed information will be available soon at www.ntc.usta.com. We are located in Flushing Meadow Corona Park. You may contact the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center at (718) 760-6200 for more information about year round and summer camp programs.


LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

2015 Boys High School Preview B Y BR IA N C OLE MA N

s the winter months begin to fade into spring, it means that the start of high school spring sports is on the horizon. The boys high school tennis season here on Long Island carries with it a number of intriguing headlines in addition to a deep crop of talent, which should make for an action-packed spring in the tennis community. Last season, Cold Spring Harbor won yet another Nassau County Championship, defeating Syosset 4-3 for the second consecutive season in the Nassau County title match. In Suffolk, Half Hollow Hills East continued its dominance, beating cross-town rival Half Hollow Hills West 4.5-2.5 for its fifth consecutive title. Unfortunately, a difference in county rules prevented us from seeing a rematch of Cold Spring Harbor and Hills East, who battled it out for the Long Island Championship the year before. Both of those schools will be looking to defend their respective county titles as we head into the 2015 season. That task will not be easy as there is plenty of talent all across the island, which should make for an exciting spring of high school tennis.

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Nassau County Sophomore Solomon Ready to Lead Plainview

The Plainview JFK Hawks went just 4-8 last season in a tough Conference 1A, but should be an improved squad in 2015 that could disrupt the conference status quo. If it is going to become a contender in Conference IA, it will have to lean on its first singles player Yuval Solomon. The sophomore was an all-state player a year ago and is entering his fourth-season playing at the varsity level. “When I started my brother was a senior so that helped a lot,” said Solomon. “He showed me how to stay calm and be confident in my game, and to just have fun when you’re playing.” Solomon’s older brother, Ofir, is currently

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

the captain at Fairfield University. Yuval will be the captain of Plainview JFK this season. Despite only being a sophomore, Solomon can be considered a veteran. He finished sixth in the state in doubles as an eighth grader, and lost a tight opening round match in the state tournament a year ago. “It was a tough first round matchup. It was a good experience because I saw I could play with him,” said Solomon. “I lost in a third-set heartbreaker. And coming into this year I feel like I just have to play my game and think about how I lost that match and the things I did wrong. Just focus on going point by point and winning it.” Solomon says the experience of battling in the state tournament has made him a better player because it allowed him to zero in on the things he wanted to improve on in the offseason. He has been playing a bunch of indoor tennis this winter and competing in tournaments just about every weekend. “I’m feeling pretty good. I’m confident,” Solomon said as we get closer to the start of the season. “I like the way I’m playing right now and I’m trying to get better every day.” He said the main thing he wanted to work on over the winter months was his forehand and hitting his spots more ac-


LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

2015 Boys High School Preview curately on his serve to set up the rest of the point. “I definitely wanted to work on my forehand and my aggression,” said Solomon. “I also have been working on hitting my shots on serve so I can have an easier approach shot and win points that way.” Solomon leads an improved Plainview team into Conference IA action this season, and is confident in his team’s ability to make a run at a conference championship. “Knowing the kids who are coming in (from junior varsity), I’m feeling pretty good,” said Solomon. “The team is going to be better than last year. At all the singles positions, I think we have a good lineup, first and second doubles we are pretty solid. We just need to get that fourth match won and keep going. I feel like we can get those.”

Nassau County teams to watch Cold Spring Harbor The defending Nassau County Champions will look to continue its dominance over the rest of the county, but will have to do so with some new faces. Conor Mullins & J.P. Paris, who captured the Nassau Individual Doubles Championship last season, have since graduated, which leaves

big shoes to fill in doubles. Mullins’ younger brother, Sean, will be in charge of leading the Seahawks this season. The junior was integral last season at second singles and will take on a bigger role this year to replace some key seniors. Cold Spring Harbor is seeking its eighth consecutive Nassau County title. Syosset For two straight years, the Braves have come up one match short of being crowned Nassau County Champions. Despite losing six seniors from last year’s squad, Syosset should still be in the running for a team county title as we head closer to the end of the season. Two of Syosset’s best players from a year ago will be returning, senior Dylan Granat and junior Daniel Shlelmovich. Granat, along with partner Henry Tell, went all the way to the quarterfinals of last year’s state tournament, before losing to the eventual champions. Shlelmovich has been an All-County Singles player since his freshman campaign, and will look to break into the state tournament this season. The two will be tasked with leading a young, but talented, Syosset team. South Side The South Side Cyclones enter this season

with a ton of confidence coming off the school’s first Nassau County Conference II title. It will not have an opportunity to defend that Conference II title, however, as the Cyclones will be playing in Conference IA this season. The challenge of playing the county’s best teams is something that South Side will relish this year, led by the first and second singles duo of senior David Reinharz and junior Christian Ardito, both of whom are experienced and tournament tested. The Cyclones also return seven of its eight doubles starters, including the team’s top duo, juniors Ryan Chelius and Nolan Tiss. Plainview JFK Plainview enters 2015 with just three seniors on the roster, but has a deep cast of talented underclassmen that will make them a threat in Conference IA. The Hawks are led by sophomore captain Yuval Solomon, a fourth-year varsity starter who has competed at this level since he was a 12-year-old, and is one of the best players on Long Island. In addition to Solomon, Plainview is expecting big years out of junior Evan Lander and sophomore Alex Fried. Both players will be at the top of the Hawk’s singles card this spring and despite being young, have

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

2015 Boys High School Preview experience competing at this level. While last year was a bit of a struggle for Plainview, the young, talented cast makes them a threat in a deep Conference IA. Manhasset The Manhasset Indians are a team that could fly under a lot of people’s radar this season. It graduated just two seniors and brought back the majority of its roster from a year ago. Senior Jesse Levitin is one of the top players in the county and will be the key to Manhasset’s success this season. The first singles player is currently 17th in the USTA Boys 18 Eastern Sectional rankings and is a tough out for any opponent. In addition to Levitin, senior Matthew Holweger brings his experience to Manhasset’s singles card. The Indians junior varsity team was very good last season and a lot of that talent will jump to the varsity level this season, giving Manhasset a deep roster that is ready to make some noise in Conference IB.

Nassau County key dates l Individual Singles and Doubles Tournament: Saturday-Sunday, May 9-10 (rain dates: May 16-20)

l Team Conference Playoffs: Begin Monday, May 11 (semifinals and finals to be announced) l New York State Singles and Doubles Championships: Thursday-Saturday, May 28-30 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

Suffolk County Preview County Champion Gruppuso Ready for Senior Season

Photo credit: Steven Ryan

Stephen Gruppuso enjoyed a fantastic season for Bayport-Blue Point a year ago, winning the Suffolk County Division III Individual Singles crown and garnering allState honors.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

The junior went to the state tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and won his first-round match, reaching the round of 16 before losing to the fifth-seed. “Just reaching states last year was amazing, and winning my first-round made the experience that much better,” said Gruppuso. “I enjoyed the competitive atmosphere and it is my goal to make it states again this year. I am excited to jump into the season and show everyone that I will be a force to reckon with at states.” What made the season even more special for Gruppuso was that he had to deal with injuries in the months leading up to the start of it. He missed three months prior to the beginning of the season with an injury which made the success that much better. Now a senior, Gruppuso is fully healthy heading into his final high school season, and has been working on some specific things to enhance his game this spring. “This offseason, my coaches Simon Childs and Alex Weinum have been helping me establish a better transitional game; getting me to the net as fast as possible,” said Gruppuso. “I am also making a big push to improve my fitness. Everything that I have been working on this offseason will help me go from being a junior tennis player to a college competitor.” Gruppuso didn’t start playing the sport until he was 11 but has had some of the best tennis training since he began. He trained at the Bollettieri Academy in Florida early on and attributes a lot of his development to the facility. “Both Bollettieri and McEnroe (John McEnroe Tennis Academy) have contributed greatly to my success as a junior tennis player and have fostered my love for tennis,” said Gruppuso. “Being surrounded by world class coaches and players is inspiring. I didn’t start playing tennis until I was 11, so Bollettieri was able to help me catch up to my competitors who had been playing for far longer.” He currently trains at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy where he has fine-tuned his game this winter under Coach Simon


LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

2015 Boys High School Preview Childs. Beyond tennis, Gruppuso also took a small hiatus from the sport during the fall to play goalie for the Bayport-Blue Point Phantoms soccer team. Immediately following the end of that season, though, it was right back to five days a week tennis training and playing in USTA tournaments. “My tournament play has been successful and I am feeling more confident than ever,” said Gruppuso. The senior heads into the season with an improved, confident game that he hopes will help him repeat as county champion and get him back to the state tournament. “There is going to be a little more pressure on me this year, but I know my hard offseason training will help me lock down the title again,” added Gruppuso, who will be playing his college tennis next fall for the Yeoman at Oberlin College in Ohio. “I am a more refined and fluid player now and I can’t wait to use the skills my coach helped me develop against my competitors this season.” Gruppuso will lead a Bayport-Blue Point squad that finished in second place of League V last year. While he says his serve and net play are his biggest strengths, he didn’t want to fill in any future opponents in on his weaknesses. “I don’t think I will reveal my weaknesses,” he said. “But let’s just say I am working hard to fix them.”

Suffolk County teams to watch Half Hollow Hills East Half Hollow Hills East has dominated the Suffolk County landscape over the last several years, winning five consecutive county championships and 100 straight matches over Suffolk opponents heading into this season. This year could be a year that finds the Thunderbirds a bit vulnerable. It lost five starters from a year ago, including all-state singles’ players Zain Ali and Kyle Alper, which leaves some big shoes to fill at the top of the lineup card.

That being said, Hills East is returning a number of varsity starters from last year that will keep it a contender. Seniors Ross Reiffman and Travis Leaf, who have been an all-state doubles tandem for the past two years anchor the lineup. The Thunderbirds will need to lean on its returning starters this year as the gap between Hills East and the rest of the field will be narrowed. Half Hollow Hills West Half Hollow Hills West comes into this spring with a bit of a chip on its shoulder. The Colts have fallen short to cross town rivals Hills East in the Suffolk County Championship the previous two seasons, but the team is extremely confident heading into the spring. The Colts bring back the reigning Suffolk County Doubles Champions Dylan and Duane Davis. The twins won two matches on their way to the state quarterfinals a year ago and can be considered one of the best double duos on all of Long Island. Leading the charge for Hills West is first singles player Aziz Rashidzada. The junior has been the top singles player for the Colts for the last couple of seasons and anchors an experienced bunch of players who have been contributors on two straight county runner-up teams. Hills West has eight sen-

iors on its roster who are battle-tested, and could get the Colts over the hump. Commack The Commack Cougars have been one of the top teams in all of Suffolk County for the last several years, and brings an experienced group into the 2015 season. Commack, who won the county championship back in 2009, returns nine of its 10 starters from a year ago which should make it a viable threat this spring. At first singles, the Cougars will lean on junior Andy Zhou. An all-Division player last season, Zhou has been a varsity player since he was in seventh grade, and has improved in each of his four seasons at the top level. Joining him at the top of the singles card is another veteran, senior Nick Fox, who was an all-state player last season. Fox also plays first doubles. Commack also returns two experienced doubles tandems. Connor Burke & Brandon Kramer were all-Division last year, while Jason Gerber & Conor Wright were all-League. Sophomore Peter Yu and freshman Sol Yoon both return to solidify the bottom part of the singles card. With all the talent returning to the Commack squad this year, the team that finished third in Suffolk County last season could be a serious threat to win it in 2015.

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

2015 Boys High School Preview North Babylon The North Babylon Bulldogs come into 2015 coming off a bit of a rebuilding season last year. North Babylon finished third in League III, going 10-8 overall before bowing out to Walt Whitman in the county playoffs. North Babylon showed signs of promise last year, and were led by two young, talented singles players at the top. Now one year older, junior Tyree Grimsley and sophomore Lynus Fortaleza will look to lead the Bulldogs to a league title and a high seed in the county tournament. Last year, Fortaleza and Grimsley were the top two seeds in the Division II singles tournament, respectively, and wound up meeting each other in the tournament’s final. Grimsley came out on top, but having two North Babylon singles players compete in the final showed that the Bulldogs could be a threat this spring. Each brings a different style of tennis to the court, and will

lead a deep and experienced North Babylon bunch into Division 2 League III action. Bayport-Blue Point The Bayport-Blue Point Phantoms team has slowly improved in each of the last few seasons and is ready to make some serious noise this year. The Phantoms reached the county quarterfinals as the eighth seed in 2014, before falling to eventual champion Hills East, and return a number of key players from that team that should make it the favorite in League V. Stephen Gruppuso is the anchor of the Phantoms team. The senior was an all-State player in his junior campaign last year, even winning his first-round match at the state tournament. Gruppuso was the Division 3 singles champion last season and could lead Bayport-Blue Point to big things in 2015. The Phantoms have a deep roster that will make it tough for any team to win four of seven

matches against. Joining Gruppuso as seniors are Sean Gray, Timmy Darby and Kyle McCrosson. Gray, an all-League selection, played with Darby in doubles and the pair will only improve on their success last year with another year under their belt.

Suffolk County key dates l Division Individual Tournaments: Friday-Monday, May 8-11 (Division 1 at Smithtown East; Division II at East Islip; Division III at Patchogue-Medford; and Division IV at William Floyd) l Sectional Individual Tournament: Saturday, May 16 and Monday, May 18 at William Floyd l New York State Singles and Doubles Championships: Thursday-Saturday, May 28-30 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

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B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

The USTA season is quickly approaching! All teams had to have at least eight players registered by March 1st to be put into the schedules which are now being worked on. Schedules will be distributed at the Captains Cocktail Party, set for Thursday, April 16 at 6:30 p.m. at the Crest Hollow Country Club on Jericho Turnpike in Woodbury, N.Y. The 18 & Over League consists of 2.5 Level (plays one singles and two doubles courts), 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 Levels (plays two singles and three doubles courts), and 5.0+ Level which plays one singles and two doubles and may have two 5.5 rated players on their team. The 18 & Over League will run from May through August. The 40 & Over League consists of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5+ Level players which all play two singles and three doubles courts with the 4.5 Level being allowed to carry two 5.0 players on their team. The 40 & Over League also runs from May through August. The 55 & Over League consists of 6.0, 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 Levels which are combined ratings playing three courts of doubles. The 6.0 Level can have a 2.5 and 3.5 play together or two 3.0 players. The 7.0 Level can have a 3.0 and 4.0 play together and two 3.5 players, etc. We have not had the 65 & Over League in the past. A few people have asked about it and I would love to get it off the ground. The 65 & Over League is also three courts of doubles and combined ratings. If you are interested or know of people interested, let me know and we will see if we can get some matches played! To play in the League, you must be a USTA member, pay the team registration fee of $28 and then it is $20 for each match you play which is paid to the club. The USTA League is a great way to meet new people and to play some competitive,

yet friendly tennis. Please e-mail me if you are interested in joining a team! The mixed-doubles is presently playing with the season winding down. Matches will finish up in March, with level playoffs and Regional Championships (for 7.0 & 8.0) playing in April. The winning Long Island teams at the 6.0, 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 Levels will then advance to the Sectional Championship in Greenburgh, N.Y. the weekend of June 5. Good luck to all our mixed-doubles teams! The doubles is Tri-Level League was played in the fall with the Sectional Championship being played in January. Our ladies team, captained by Debbie Cichon, won and will be advancing to Nationals in Indian Wells, Calif., the weekend of March 18. The team consists of Adrian Corwin, Arethia Williams, Michelle Bergman, Joan Valente, Monika Moiellando, Diana Davis, Jill Cohen, Darlene Pergola-Appolant and team captain, Debbie Cichon. Have a great time and good luck! Lastly, people have been asking about a 40 & Over Mixed-Doubles League. To qual-

ify for the 2015 Sectional Championships, which play the weekend of Sept. 26, 2015, we can try to do a weekend event the end of April/beginning of May. If there is interest, let me know. I look forward to another successful year of USTA tennis and please, everyone remember, it is not about winning at all costs, it’s about good, fair tennis with good sportsmanship being the priority! The First Annual Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament was a great success. The “B” Division winners were Paul Schnabel & Brain Connor and the “A” Division winners were Adam Kolenberg & Dean Jacoby. Judy & Barry Weiss, Susan’s sister and brother-in-law came to watch the “A” Division finals and presented to trophies. It was a great tournament, and we hope we did Susan proud! Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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For more information, visit hofstra.edu/camp or call 516-463-CAMP. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Branding Yourself in Tennis and in Life By Lonnie Mitchel So you are in a competitive match and the score is 4-4 in the third set with your ranking on the line. Your parents, maybe a college coach, a friend or other adversaries are watching. Now is the time when the rubber hits the road. It does not matter if you win or lose, what matters is how you are going to complete the match. You are branding yourself. How are you going to act and behave? How are you going to compete? What will you do after the match is over? How will people perceive and remember you? Developing your own personal brand is similar to product branding. The overall goal with branding is to differentiate yourself in the tennis world so you can attain your objectives. By landing your dream college of choice or getting on that USTA 58

team you want to make, to simply just becoming known both on and off the court as the hardest worker are all keys to your own self-branding. The process includes defining your brand attributes, positioning yourself in a different way than your competitors and managing all aspects of that perception. John McEnroe branded himself as a tennis brat early in his career because of his inadequate behavior. As entertaining as it was, he was a winner as his overall talent helped him to triumph. However, the chances of you winning a Grand Slam title are slim, and a good majority of you will not play tennis in college. So what you are left with is your own personal brand. If you wish to portray yourself as something less than a person of integrity and honor, you will be known as just that type of person. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, we did not know John McEnroe as

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

a good person, a family man and somebody who really wants to give back to tennis in a meaningful way. We know better now, but it took him a very long time to break the perception of the brand that he initially portrayed. Have you ever sat in the tennis clubhouse and had a friendly chat about other people’s tennis game? Most have had these types of conversations, while asserting your own opinion about others. Things like, he or she works really hard on the court or he/she cheats and gives bad lines calls might be discussed. Those people have placed a personal brand on themselves. Your behaviors both on and off the court will follow you throughout life and affect your reputation possibly forever. A player who quits a team in the middle of a season could effectively be branded a quitter even though that person may believe there is good foundation be-


hind that decision. Someone who confuses hurt with injury could be branded as lazy (although you have to know your level of pain tolerance working with a medical professional). I am in the business of interpreting your brand. I talk with parents and players who are interested in playing tennis in college often. That first impression is the one you initially make and you do not get a second chance to make a first impression. The first impression, right or wrong, is the first attribute people see and the brand foundation has just been laid. Personally, I know I cannot hold a poker face and I tend to wear my emotions on my sleeve when competing. Maybe I shouldn’t, and I try very hard to overcome it so that I can be more successful and I work at it often. My perceived brand might be that I am emotional. Therefore, my opponents might try to unravel me while in the heat of competition. I have been branded and now have that obstacle to overcome. Knowing your own weakness or the bad brand within you is an invitation to

improve yourself; it is a work in progress all the time. However, when I coach, one of my priorities is making sure my players represent themselves as a person full of integrity and honor; character counts! This is the brand I am interested in creating as well as developing young people’s skills both on court and off the court. My players and the way they represent themselves will prove if I have been successful. This brand that I market on the court will speak volumes as to the team I want and the person that I strive to be every day. A brand is important because when you step back in the years to come asking yourself if you made the world a better place, what is the answer? Have I impacted young people to become better people and better tennis players? I use the game of tennis as a tool to augment a brand. On the tennis court, you can also make the playing environment better. Do you make the correct line calls? Did you treat your opponents with respect? Do you treat your doubles partner with dignity and all people similarly? Are you known as a

competitor who will work their hardest? Did you walk into the tennis club and treat the employees the way you want to be treated? Money in your pocket and the means to play tennis is not permission to act unruly! How did you brand yourself today and every day? Today, Facebook and other social media outlets play an important part in how we brand ourselves. It is said you would never want to do anything on the tennis court to help you lose. Why would you knowingly brand yourself poorly in the game of tennis and in life? For college recruits that is a strong message. Be a better tennis player by giving 1,000 percent effort and brand yourself accordingly … not just on the tennis court, but everywhere! Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

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How Many Pros Does It Take to Give the Ideal Tennis Lesson?

By Lisa Dodson f you wanted to take the most comprehensive tennis lesson possible, what would it include? First, you’d have to think outside of that rectangular court and venture into areas of the game that you’re really not good at. You’ll need to set some priorities, but you’re not sure what those are. You’re pretty good at hitting most shots although those could always use some work. You’re really not good at staying balanced and hitting every ball cleanly with a fear of getting ahead. Hmmm … what should you work on, where should you start? Maybe you should just hit more balls. Recently, I collaborated with two experts in their field, Lenny Schloss (www.howtoplaytennis.net) and Dr. Jay Granat (www.stayinthezone.com) to develop what we call “The world’s best tennis lesson”. We had some fun explaining our parts in this epic lesson, and we all know we would need each other in order to build our best

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player. It would be a team effort and we would have a heck of a great time doing it. What we know and agree upon is that Sight, Thought, Emotion Management and Feel would be the building blocks for this great time together. Let’s explain this a little. Lenny Schloss is a leader in his field in understanding how the eyes and brain rule us on the tennis court. Lenny is a wealth of scientific proof about the eye at point of contact and head shift. Think about this: Our head shifts eight out of 10 times on a hit. Wow! If POC (Point of Contact) is the moment that the ball is on the strings–only four milliseconds per shot–then the average player has a really slim chance of a clean hit and being balanced without some serious training on the subject. It only makes sense that strengthening this part of the game comes first. It doesn’t matter what our strokes are like if we don’t see the ball. Seeing the ball at the point of contact and focusing on that spot is fundamental to balance and … well, everything that you

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

are attempting to accomplish on the court. Dr. Jay Granat, psychotherapist and sports psychologist, is a renowned expert on many brain-related subjects. He has been instrumental in helping me discover what holds so many players back from overcoming common, but complex problems such as losing to players you should beat, pressure-point choking or nerves bringing you to ruin. These behaviors and many others are not ones to be solved with more ball hitting. These issues need to be acknowledged, discussed and a plan of action taken in order to change the outcome. Emotional management and stress reduction (our psychological perspective) is also, obviously, an above the neck function. The better we can manage our thoughts and emotions, the sooner we can shed any negative patterns on and off the court. The good news and the bad news is that problems begin and (hopefully) end with us but we generally need some help to figure them out. Feeling (the technical aspects of striking


a ball and movement) is where I come in. This is all the stuff that happens below the neck. Feeling what is correct, even if it feels wrong, is central to productive and accelerated learning. Your body is smart and it learns best by feeling physical cues and actions through repetition. I’m a big believer in tools, so I’d pull out a couple of my secret weapons and eliminate excessive talking and explanations to accelerate your learning by feel. When you feel an action your body acts instinctively. It is then able to string together a natural pattern of movement. Many of you know this as “muscle memory.” We are going to call this “body intelligence” instead. The power of this body intelligence cannot be underestimated. So, the answer to our question: How many pros does it take to give the ideal tennis lesson? It takes three professionals with distinctly different skill sets and focuses on some really effective physical and mental tools. One coach trains vision and brain perception skills, one trains technical

skills and movement, and one examines our mental/emotional development and stress management. If we all do our jobs well, you’ll be one heck of a player! Of course, the purpose of this information is to get you to open your eyes and consider taking a deeper look into what you need to be a better player. Realistically, the average player isn’t going to hire a staff of pros to work with them. What I’m attempting to do is to get you to look closely at your choices and to start thinking about what you can do now to become a better player and find out what options you have available to you. Here is a list of things that would be required (but not limited to) for this epic, three-pro tennis lesson. Take a look and see if you can choose two or three things that you think might really help you make a game-changing breakthrough: l Technical evaluation with detailed video analysis (technical/visual) l Shadow, dead ball and live ball evaluations (technical/visual)

l Mental toughness evaluation (mental/emotional) l Vision analysis through a three-step process: Still ball, moving ball, ball moving away (visual) l EPOC (Eye at Point of Contact) strengthening (visual) l Strategy evaluation (mental/emotional/technical) l Personality profile (mental/emotional) l Training in hypnosis, meditation and visualization (mental/emotional) l Match planning (mental/emotional & technical) l Training in stress management (mental/emotional) l Error/winner analysis (mental/emotional/technical/visual) l Confidence building techniques (mental/emotional & technical/visual) l Focus building techniques (mental/emotional/technical/visual) l Goal-setting (mental/emotional & technical) continued on page 62

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ideal tennis lesson continued from page 61 l Development of between point and between game strategies (mental/emotional) l Strategies and techniques for avoiding choking and fear (mental/emotional & technical) I bet this list includes ideas most of us wouldn’t even think of as something that we need to work on. As players, we tend to go heavy on the technical (if I hit enough balls, I will be KING!) and light on the mental/visual training. What we are probably most unaware of is how weak our vision and ballwatching skills are as well as our ability to cope under stress. We wonder why our concentration shifts or our mood swings at the drop of a hat and why we sometimes fall into patterns of failure. Let’s take a little quiz … for the statements below, decide whether this problem can be best remedied with a visual, technical or emo-

tional/mental improvement. There really is no right or wrong answer, but it will be worth your time to take a look. It may teach you something about how you perceive yourself and your game and how you attempt to improve. You just might begin to understand what is holding you back and open your mind to the things that will lead to real improvement. l I make too many unforced errors so cannot sustain a rally l I’m tired of losing to players that I should beat l I’m great in practice, but struggle in competition l I get so nervous before I compete l I’m sick of choking on pressure points l My approach shot is all over the place l I need to hit more topspin to keep my ball in the court l I always do better coming from behind l My hit doesn’t feel solid

Typically, players will try to fix these problems by hitting more balls. If I make too many unforced errors, then I need to hit more balls so that I don’t hit unforced errors. If my hit doesn’t feel solid, then I need to hit more balls to make it better. If I’m choking on pressure points, I need to hit more balls so I’m confident. You get the point. We know that hitting more balls really isn’t the answer, but it’s comfortable and secure and makes you feel like you’re doing something good. But, there are so many other things that need to be incorporated into the lesson that you may never even think of. Your poor tennis pro is good but she/he cannot wear as many hats as you demand. So, start thinking, be openminded about what you need and start asking some really good questions. Lisa Dodson is owner of Servemaster at The Total Serve, a USPTA Elite Pro, a formerly world ranked player and radio show host. She may be reached by e-mail at lisa@thetotalserve.com or visitwww.thetotalserve.com.

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The Difference Between Male and Female Tennis Players By Dr. Tom Ferraro I have often been asked during media interviews if there are differences between male and female athletes and the answer I give is “Yes.” Beyond the obvious differences in physiology, there are also subtle but real psychological differences as well. And the answer to what these differences are can be seen in the way boys and girls are raised. Girls are usually raised to be compassionate, cheerful, gentle, loyal, sensitive to the needs of others, tender, yielding and warm. They are taught these traits by parents, by teachers, by books and films. And the training starts at birth. Research shows that even as infants, parents pick up and handle girls differently than boys. Girls are given dolls and doll houses and toy tea sets and are encouraged to be sweet and giving, not the picture of a warrior athlete. Throughout childhood, boys are encouraged to be aggressive, ambitious, assertive, athletic, competitive, independent, strong, dominant and forceful. These traits are inculcated with toys like guns and tanks and soldiers. Parents are more apt to engage little boys in rough and tumble play. The combination of differences in physiology and upbringing results in a different mindset on the court. If you watch a tournament you see very fast that men tend to curse, throw rackets and generally behave badly. Too much aggression and too much

anger are the key flaws seen in male tennis players. Too much anger and aggression makes you over swing, become reckless, lose focus and finally lose the match. The opposite issue holds for women. Since they are trained to be gentle, sweet and compassionate they will repress or shut down their aggressive side when they get into the lead. They hesitate to dominate others and do not want to seem masculine so they soften up when leading and lose focus. To discover more about these sex differences in tennis, I contacted Mike Pavlides who is the Massapequa High School Varsity Tennis coach for boys and girls. He was the 2003 USTA Eastern Long Island Region Nassau County Coach of the Year and has plenty of experience observing the differences between the boys and the girls. To the question of differences, he said, “Male players never concede defeat which is good, but they can also become too aggressive and angry which is self-defeating.” He told me that they have a tendency to get angry with opponents rather than focusing simply on winning the match. And he felt that for females they show more resiliency and can let go of defeat after losses better. He added that their fatal flaw was in their compassion and fear that they ought not to be too aggressive. He remarked that they can sometimes have a tendency to give up leads based upon this issue. He went on to say that these issues are often not seen in the

champions since they have worked out these issues. The remedy? We can conclude that their probably are differences between the way the male and female play tennis. As Mike suggested the males’ Achilles Heel is his anger and the solution would be to try to play the match but not the opponent. Focusing on the point rather the man across the net would allow for one to control the anger better. For the female, we see that they are usually programed to be nice, sweet, giving and compassionate. These traits do not seem to be the emotional tools of the tennis champion. Giving often translates into giving away a match. I usually try to help the female athlete to create a new identity while on the court, one that is focused and aggressive and supportive only of herself. This means that she is trained to talk and smile less, while playing and she is told there is time enough to be sweet while off the court. So to the question of sex differences between male and female tennis players I think the answer is yes. The male is at times too much in love with aggression and the female doesn’t love aggression enough. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

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Are Carbohydrates Really Bad for You? By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN arbohydrates have gotten a bad reputation in recent years. They seem to be getting the blame for the obesity problem throughout the world. As a dietitian, I am asked frequently if carbohydrates are the reason for weight gain. The total calories a person consumes per day, high fat and a lack of physical activity is the reason for obesity and weight gain, not the carbohydrates. Most people are so scared of this food group that they just decided to avoid it al-

C

together! One of my clients, a top-ranked tennis player, was avoiding carbohydrates and just ate proteins all day long. This resulted in no energy, weakness and fatigue on the court. His problem was quickly fixed by adjusting his diet with the proper amounts of carbohydrates and fluids. To simplify, there are two types of carbohydrates. “Bad Carbs” are simple carbohydrates that are to be avoided. They have very little nutritional value and can impact your performance. Examples of Bad Carbs include: l Sodas l Flavored teas

l l l l l

Energy drinks Potato chips White bread Candy/ice cream/sweets Crackers or anything with enriched wheat flour

“Good Carbs” are complex carbohydrates and are slow-digesting carbohydrates. These carbohydrates are used by your body as a long-term energy source and are less likely to be stored as body fat. This is because they won’t spike your blood sugar like simple sugars and other bad carbohydrates may do. Complex carbohydrates are typically high in dietary

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fiber, so they are digested much slower and are able to be used as efficient fuel for your body. Examples of Good Carbs include: l l l l l l

Sweet potatoes Lentils Quinoa Whole wheat Rye Oatmeal

l l l l l

Rolled oats Fruit Whole grains Black beans or legumes Starchy vegetables

By consuming complex carbohydrates, you will greatly enhance your body’s energy levels and become a much healthier person. March is “National Nutrition Month.” It is

important for everyone to get a complete analysis and an individualized meal plan. Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solutions Co. is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. Irina Lehat RD Nutrition Solutions offers group classes starting in September, for kids in kindergarten through high school. For more information, call (917) 769-8031, e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com or visit www.irinalehat.com.

The Delicate Connection Between Fitness and Focus (Part II) By Carl Barnett n the January/February 2015 edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine, I wrote about our first Four Pillars in our Eight Pillars of a Champion. They are: l Mind First—Think Success l Dream Big—Achieve More l Endless Effort—The Desire to Improve l Make It Happen—Always Improve

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Over the President’s Day holiday, I was joined at an L1 tournament by a good friend, Bob Litwin, to see one of my students play. Bob is a legend on the court with championships too numerous to mention. Bob is also the gold standard resource on the subject of focus. My student had lost a very close first set and was behind 1-4 in the second set. Although one break was the difference in the set body language told us otherwise. Bob turned to me and said, “You know he is still in this match.” To which we said to each other in unison “But he doesn’t know it.” This brings us to the next pillar developed in training. I Can Do It—Everything Is Possible This also brings us to an additional issue.

Everyone will eventually lose focus. A champion will reel it back in. Hasn’t this happened to you? You play great in losing the first set and then fall behind immediately in the second set due to the disappointment from the first. The great opportunity in losing focus is exercising the practice of regaining it. The more often you regain focus, the more practice and better you become at regaining it. My student’s opportunity at 1-4 was if he came back from one break down, he would have the momentum going into the third set. The problem was his body language and demeanor told both of us, and his opponent, he was visualizing losing.

“The will to play every point at 100 percent when facing an imposing situation is best dealt with one point at a time.”

Give 100 Percent … Be Hungry to Succeed There are so many times in training where the work in front of you seems impossible, yet you get it done. Succeeding in these situations leaves us with the confidence and access to the effort to complete the task. Endless Effort: The Desire to Achieve The will to play every point at 100 percent when facing an imposing situation is best dealt with one point at a time. Visualize the next point only. Try not to look down the road. Just keep matriculating one point at a time. Embrace this task and it will cease LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

directory Alley Pond Tennis Center 79-20 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. (718) 264-2600 www.alleypondtenniscenter.com Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 • catsrvc@gmail.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 271-6616 • www.easternathleticclubs.com Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net

Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 • tonny@pointsettennis.com www.pointsettennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 • tennis@pwta.com www.pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 • www.rwtt.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 (516) 676-9107 • www.rwtt.com Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 • hli@ross.org www.ross.org/tennis Southampton Racquet Club & Camp 665 Majors Path Southampton, N.Y. (631) 488-4700 www.southamptonrcc.com

Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Stephanie Leo: (516) 676-9849 glenheadrc@verizon.net

SPORTIME Amagansett Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • amagansett@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett Eric Scoppetta—Camp Director (631) 267-2267 • ehsc@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/ehsc

Huntington Indoor Tennis Club Richard Rottkamp—Manager/Owner 100 Broadway Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 421-0040 • hitennis@myway.com

SPORTIME Amagansett Multi-Sport Mike Ritsi—General Manager 385 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • mritsi@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett-multi-sport

New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com

SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Joe Siegel—General Manager 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 • jsiegel@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-tennis

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SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 731-4432 • rlouie@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-multi-sport SPORTIME Kings Park Bea Bielik—General Manager Jeff Morys—Co-Director of Tennis Jason Wass–Co-Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 • bbielik@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/kings-park SPORTIME Lynbrook Bea Bielik–General Manager Danny Casesa—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 • dcasesa@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lynbrook SPORTIME Massapequa Chris Leahy—General Manager Emanuel Ponce—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, NY 11758 (516) 799-3550 • cleahy@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/massapequa SPORTIME Quogue Rene Bond—General Manager Greg Meyer—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead Road • East Quogue, NY 11942 (631) 653-6767 • rbond@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/quogue SPORTIME Randall’s Island Flagship Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Allison Hodgkins—Assistant General Manager Jared Karlebach—Assistant General Manager One Randall’s Island • New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 • ahodgkins@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—General Manager Jordan Dolberg—Director of Tennis 1 Landing Road • Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 • jharris@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Long Island Annex of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Joe Siegel—General Manager Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis JMTA 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 • mkossoff@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/syosset-tennis USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11568 (718) 760-6200 • www.usta.com


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 02/20/15

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles RankName..................................City 1 ......Peter Anastasakis................East Norwich, N.Y. 2 ......Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 3 ......Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4 ......Zachary David Gruber ........Port Washington, N.Y. 5 ......Dylan D’agate ......................Melville, N.Y. 6 ......Justin Shen ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 7 ......Peter Albert Bukary ............Jericho, N.Y. 8 ......Ryan Shayani ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 9 ......Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 10 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 11 ....Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 12 ....Azim Gangat........................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ....Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y. 14 ....Rushikesh Patel ..................Albertson, N.Y. 15 ....Brandon Lin ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 16 ....Sujay Alluri ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 17 ....Brandon Zhu........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 18 ....Bilal Rashidzada..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 19 ....Jeremy Levine......................Woodbury, N.Y. 20 ....Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 21 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 22 ....Ian Kaish ..............................Northport, N.Y. 23 ....Kyle Zhou ............................Commack, N.Y. 24 ....Samuel Perlman ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 25 ....Matthew Strogach ..............Commack, N.Y. 26 ....Michael Koscinski................Center Moriches, N.Y. 27 ....Pius Lo ................................Massapequa, N.Y. 28 ....Adam Lammers ..................Central Islip, N.Y. 29 ....Taylor Brooks Thomas ........Water Mill, N.Y. 30 ....Matthew Leonard Zeifman Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 31 ....Andrew Thaler......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 32 ....Blake Brown ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 33 ....Peter Lau..............................Great Neck, N.Y. 34 ....Matthew Kronenberg ..........East Setauket, N.Y. 35 ....Michael Han ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 36 ....Dylan Siegman ....................Melville, N.Y. 37 ....Vincent Sze..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 38 ....Lucas Leston ......................Island Park, N.Y. 39 ....Charlie DiPaolo....................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 40 ....Miles Capell ........................Woodbury, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles RankName..................................City 1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Josh Gelfond ......................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 3 ......Griffin Schlesinger ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 4 ......Aaron Marcos Vinsky ..........Westbury, N.Y. 5 ......Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 6 ......Adrian Kristofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 7 ......Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 8 ......Zachary David Gruber ........Port Washington, N.Y. 9 ......Zachary Emmanuel Stern ..Dix Hills, N.Y. 10 ....Nicholas Mark Newell ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 11 ....Luke Karniewich..................Glen Head, N.Y. 12 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 13 ....Ruskikesh Patel ..................Albertson, N.Y. 14 ....Alexander Benanti ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 15 ....Valentine LeGoupil-Maier....Oceanside, N.Y. 16 ....Sol Yoon ..............................Commack, N.Y. 17 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 18 ....Varun Gaddam Reddy ........Glen Head, N.Y.

ISLAND

19 ....Aryan Kumar Sethi ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 20 ....David Ammendola ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 21 ....Martin Charles Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 22 ....Jacob Buchbinder ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 23 ....Evan Kirsh............................Roslyn, N.Y. 24 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 25 ....Zachary Chan ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 26 ....Alex Childs ..........................East Setauket, N.Y. 27 ....Richard Martin Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 28 ....Alexander Rzehak ..............Centerport, N.Y. 29 ....Azim Gangat........................Syosset, N.Y. 30 ....Samir Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 31 ....Richard James Kelly............Manhasset, N.Y. 32 ....Bradford J. Lin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 33 ....Kyle Ress-Liere....................Yaphank, N.Y. 34 ....Michael Wexler ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 35 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 36 ....Christopher Grisham ..........Huntington, N.Y. 37 ....Brandon Zhu........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 38 ....Pranav Vallapragada ..........Nesconset, N.Y. 39 ....Ryan Ng ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 40 ....Pius Lo ................................Massapequa, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles RankName..................................City 1 ......Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 2 ......Matthew G. Levine ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 3 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 5 ......Matthew T. Roberts ............Setauket, N.Y. 6 ......Jagger Gillman ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 7 ......Shane Darius Terry ..............Southampton, N.Y. 8 ......Varun Gaddam Reddy ........Glen Head, N.Y. 9 ......Adrian Kristofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 10 ....Jonathan E. Brill ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 11 ....Alexander Hazarian ............Garden City, N.Y. 12 ....Evan Kirsh............................Roslyn, N.Y. 13 ....Alex B. Fried ........................Plainview, N.Y. 14 ....Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ....Matthew Ramsay ................Bay Shore, N.Y. 16 ....Matthew Musalo..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 17 ....Ian Mitchell Capell ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 18 ....Nicholas M. Sica..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 19 ....James Kyrkanides ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 20 ....Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 21 ....Christopher Kokkinos ........Manhasset, N.Y. 22 ....Matthew Kolkhorst..............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 23 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ....Jake Brandon Landsberg ..Huntington, N.Y. 25 ....Evan Hirsch..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 26 ....James P. Ryan ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 27 ....Saiteja Damineni..................Albertson, N.Y. 28 ....Hunter M. Pomerantz..........Old Westbury, N.Y. 29 ....Yash Samantaray ................Syosset, N.Y. 30 ....Curran Varma ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 31 ....Andrew Thomas Wood ......Garden City, N.Y. 32 ....Chase Greenberg ................Roslyn, N.Y. 33 ....Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 34 ....Rohan Mathur......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 35 ....Martin Charles Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 36 ....Nicholas Mark Newell ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 37 ....Ian Bank ..............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 38 ....Jacob Bauman ....................Merrick, N.Y. 39 ....Josh A. Antell ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 40 ....Richard Martin Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles RankName..................................City 1 ......Christopher McGorty ..........Bellmore, N.Y. 2 ......Jordan Diamond..................Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 3 ......Benjamin Doron ..................Hewlett, N.Y.

RANKINGS

4 ......James George Blatchly ......Locust Valley, N.Y. 5 ......Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 6 ......Nicholas Gajda ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 7 ......Mitchell Reid Berger............Lake Grove, N.Y. 8 ......Roberto Sangirardi ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 9 ......Faran Nazir ..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 10 ....George Kaslow....................Port Washington, N.Y. 11 ....Justin Matthew Scuderi ......Smithtown, N.Y. 12 ....Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 13 ....Steven Kucharczyk ............Rocky Point, N.Y. 14 ....Jonathan Gruberg ..............Setauket, N.Y. 15 ....Elias D. Tsalatsanis..............Smithtown, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles RankName..................................City 1 ......Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 2 ......Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 3 ......Sadhana Sridhar..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 4 ......Anna Vanessa Malin............Oceanside, N.Y. 5 ......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 6 ......Sydney Simmons ................East Northport, N.Y. 7 ......Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y. 8 ......Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 9 ......Isabella Sha..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 10 ....Sophia Elizabeth Schutte....Great Neck, N.Y. 11 ....Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 12 ....Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 13 ....Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 14 ....Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 15 ....Julianna Marie Romeo ........Massapequa, N.Y. 16 ....Ariana Pursoo ......................Westbury, N.Y. 17 ....Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 18 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 19 ....Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 20 ....Madeline Richmond............Syosset, N.Y. 21 ....Nicole Kyrkanides................East Setauket, N.Y. 22 ....Vivian Wu ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 23 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 24 ....Skylar Blake Semon............Melville, N.Y. 25 ....Kaitlyn Gerstin ....................Hewlett, N.Y. 26 ....Ava Thunder Scordo ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 27 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 28 ....Ella Griffiths..........................East Hampton, N.Y. 29 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 30 ....Nicolette Loeffler..................Syosset, N.Y. 31 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 32 ....Jessica Wang ......................Albertson, N.Y. 33 ....Jolie Nemshin ......................Syosset, N.Y. 34 ....Bianca Banilivi ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 35 ....Emily Moran ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 36 ....Michaela Liz Ben-Sorek......Great Neck, N.Y. 37 ....Remi Berlent ........................Huntington, N.Y. 38 ....Skylor Wong ........................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 39 ....Christasha McNeil ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 40 ....Serena Li ..............................Cold Spring Harbor

Long Island Girls 14 Singles RankName..................................City 1 ......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 3 ......Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 4 ......Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppague, N.Y. 5 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 6 ......Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 7 ......Ashley Yu ............................Great Neck, N.Y. 8 ......Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 9 ......Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 10 ....Daniella Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y.

11 ....Elena Gabriela Hull..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 12 ....Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 13 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 14 ....Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 15 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 16 ....Bryn Schlussler....................Bay Shore, N.Y. 17 ....Kristen D. Cassidy ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 18 ....Natalia Caroline Krol............Greenvale, N.Y. 19 ....Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 20 ....Lauren Hutton......................Huntington, N.Y. 21 ....Sofia Walzer ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 22 ....Emma Rae Matz..................Commack, N.Y. 23 ....Olivia Anne Nakhjavan ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ....Jillian Rebecca Shulder ......Setauket, N.Y. 25 ....Cecilia H. Scheuer ..............Southampton, N.Y. 26 ....Lauren Ann Bishop..............Woodbury, N.Y. 27 ....Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 28 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 29 ....Hannah Rose Niggemeier ..Sayville, N.Y. 30 ....Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 31 ....Grace Isabel Riviezzo..........Syosset, N.Y. 32 ....Jean Woon ..........................Commack, N.Y. 33 ....Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 34 ....Carly Menker ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 35 ....Alexa Villez ..........................West Sayville, N.Y. 36 ....Madeline Lane ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 37 ....Julia Kinalis ..........................Amity Harbor, N.Y. 38 ....Riley Elizabeth Katzman ....Halesite, N.Y. 39 ....Emily Moran ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 40 ....Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles RankName..................................City 1 ......Alexandra Grace Waldman East Hampton, N.Y. 2 ......Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y. 3 ......Elinor Simek ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 4 ......Hannah Vimod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 5 ......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 6 ......Christina Lorraine Jud ........Glen Head, N.Y. 7 ......Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 8 ......Montaine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 9 ......Emily Kate Shutman............Huntington, N.Y. 10 ....Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 11 ....Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 12 ....Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppauge, N.Y. 13 ....Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 14 ....Mina Sarcevic ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ....Amanda Ress-Liere ............Yaphank, N.Y. 16 ....Jessica Schwarz..................Oceanside, N.Y. 17 ....Bryn N Schlussler................Bay Shore, N.Y. 18 ....Lakshmi Babureddy............Dix Hills, N.Y. 19 ....Natalia Caroline Krol............Greenvale, N.Y. 20 ....Carly Menker ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 21 ....Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 22 ....Emily Davidow ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 23 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 24 ....Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 25 ....Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ....Lynbrook, N.Y. 26 ....Isabella Diane Dusanenko ..Massapequa, N.Y. 27 ....Madeline Lane ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 28 ....Rachel Bernstein ................Plainview, N.Y. 29 ....Emily R. Victorson ..............Northport, N.Y. 30 ....Fallon Berger........................Syosset, N.Y. 31 ....Amy Schlussler....................Bay Shore, N.Y. 32 ....Jennifer Rose Cox ..............West Islip, N.Y.

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LONG

ISLAND

1 ......Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Ellen Huhulea ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 3 ......Grace Graham ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 4 ......Claudia Ruiz ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 5 ......Larissa Danovitch................Sagaponack, N.Y. 6 ......Elena Nastasi ......................Bayville, N.Y. 7 ......Montaine Le Goupil-Maier..Oceanside, N.Y. 8 ......Julia Khan ............................Port Washington, N.Y. 9 ......Victoria Evelyn Villalba ........Oyster Bay, N.Y.

81 ....Zachary Ian Khazzam ........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 95 ....Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y. 102 ..Lazar Ivan Markovic ............Lattingtown, N.Y. 106 ..Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 107 ..Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 108 ..Luke Karniewich..................Glen Head, N.Y. 110 ..Benjamin Reichbach ..........Syosset, N.Y. 112 ..Adrian Krisofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 113 ..Jack Louchheim..................Sagaponack, N.Y. 120 ..Alexander Roti ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 131 ..Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 136 ..Matthew Terlovsky ..............Merrick, N.Y. 145 ..Richard James Kelly............Manhasset, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

Long Island Girls 18 Singles RankName..................................City

(as of 01/22/15)

Rank Name ......................................City

BOYS

4 ......Athell Patrick Bennett..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 10 ....Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 13 ....Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 14 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 20 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 25 ....Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 27 ....Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 32 ....Daniel Shleimovich..............Syosset, N.Y. 34 ....Dylan Granat........................Woodbury, N.Y. 38 ....Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 42 ....Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 45 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 46 ....Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 48 ....Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 53 ....Rajan Vohra..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 55 ....Stephen Gruppuso..............Bayport, N.Y. 60 ....Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 64 ....Michael Medvedev..............Albertson, N.Y. 65 ....David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 66 ....Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 76 ....Daniel Khodosh ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 78 ....Tyler Ng ................................Great Neck, N.Y. 82 ....Travis Leaf............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 87 ....Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 89 ....Aziz Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 98 ....Nasser Abdel Ghaffar..........Massapequa, N.Y. 112 ..Nicholas Braden Gunther ..East Hampton, N.Y. 113 ..Julian Thomas MacGurn ....Amagansett, N.Y. 114 ..Matthew Franklin Porges....Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 116 ..Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 118 ..Del Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 123 ..Brady Berman ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 128 ..Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 129 ..Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 131 ..Timothy Hayden Nacca ......Garden City, N.Y. 132 ..Matthew Holweger..............Manhasset, N.Y. 136 ..Xin Eric Yu............................Manhasset, N.Y. 138 ..Bruno Paolino Alves............East Hampton, N.Y. 141 ..George Kaslow....................Port Washington, N.Y. 143 ..Andy Zhou ..........................Commack, N.Y. 145 ..Nicolas Demaria ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 149 ..Emmanuel V. Vacalares ......Hicksville, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 8 ......Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 9 ......Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 13 ....Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 15 ....Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y 23 ....Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 30 ....Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 31 ....Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 32 ....Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 34 ....Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 38 ....Rohan Gaddam Reddy ......Glen Head, N.Y. 53 ....Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 62 ....Brandon Zhu........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 71 ....Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 79 ....Peter Anastasakis................East Norwich, N.Y. 80 ....Richard James Kelly............Manhasset, N.Y. 81 ....Sean Pesin ..........................Woodmere, N.Y. 93 ....Justin Benjamin Oresky ......Syosset, N.Y. 99 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 101 ..Mark Ryan Taranov ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 104 ..George Scribner Bader ......Water Mill, N.Y. 111 ..Daniel Chikvashvili ..............Melville, N.Y. 112 ..Michael Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 117 ..Aryan Kumar Sethi ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 118 ..Michael Hayden Singer ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 125 ..Adam Lammers ..................Central Islip, N.Y. 130 ..Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 134 ..Jared M Phillips ..................Plainview, N.Y. 141 ..Arin Siriamonthep................Greenvale, N.Y. 148 ..Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 4 ......Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 5 ......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 6 ......Ronald Hohmann ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 7 ......Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 8 ......Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 13 ....Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 17 ....Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 31 ....Michael Medvedev..............Oceanside, N.Y. 40 ....Abinhav Srivastava..............Melville, N.Y. 45 ....Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 47 ....Karan Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 56 ....Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 61 ....Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 65 ....Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 68 ....Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 78 ....Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y.

68

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 7 ......Lubomir T. Cuba..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 12 ....Josh Silverstein....................Great Neck, N.Y. 13 ....Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 14 ....Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 20 ....Philip Daniel Antohl ............Glen Head, N.Y. 22 ....Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 23 ....Bryant J. Born......................Manhasset, N.Y. 28 ....Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

RANKINGS

29 ....Athell Bennett ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 41 ....Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 45 ....Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 48 ....Dylan Appel..........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 53 ....Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 58 ....Kyle Alper ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 61 ....Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 65 ....Michael James DeNigris ....Islip, N.Y. 73 ....Dylan Granat........................Woodbury, N.Y. 81 ....Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 86 ....Travis Leaf............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 87 ....Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 89 ....Stephen Gruppuso..............Bayport, N.Y. 94 ....Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 97 ....Palmer T. Clare ....................North Bellmore, N.Y. 103 ..Justin Park ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 105 ..Fernando Fernandes Filho..East Hampton, N.Y. 112 ..David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 113 ..Jake Sandler........................Lynbrook, N.Y. 114 ..Joseph James D’Orazio ....Saint James, N.Y. 116 ..William Bader ......................Water Mill, N.Y. 124 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 126 ..Duane Davis ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 127 ..Daniel Khodosh ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 131 ..Florimond Le Goupil-Maier..Oceanside, N.Y. 134 ..Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 135 ..Ross Reiffman ....................Melville, N.Y. 142 ..Andy Zhou ..........................Commack, N.Y. 146 ..Michael J. Nelson................Manhasset, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 2 ......Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 10 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 17 ....Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 21 ....Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 23 ....Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 34 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 46 ....Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 54 ....Kaya Amin............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 55 ....Rose Hayes..........................East Moriches, N.Y. 56 ....Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 57 ....Kavina Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 70 ....Alina Rebeca Lyakhov ........Great Neck, N.Y. 77 ....Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 84 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 87 ....Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 90 ....Madison Smith ....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 92 ....Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y. 96 ....Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 106 ..Gabriela Sciarrotta ..............Woodmere, N.Y. 109 ..Madeline Richmond............Syosset, N.Y. 110 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 111 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 112 ..Julianna Romeo ..................Massapequa, N.Y. 114 ..Rebecca Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 117 ..Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 123 ..Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 126 ..Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 143 ..Tatiana Robotham Barnett..Port Washington, N.Y. 149 ..Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 10 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 19 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin........Manorville, N.Y. 25 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

30 ....Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 32 ....Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 33 ....Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 38 ....Olivia Rose Scordo..............Glen Head, N.Y. 43 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 58 ....Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 65 ....Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 74 ....Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 75 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 83 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 85 ....Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 93 ....Madeline Clinton..................Manhasset, N.Y. 94 ....Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 96 ....Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 99 ....Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 118 ..Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 123 ..Madeline Richmond............Syosset, N.Y. 124 ..Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 127 ..Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 132 ..Evangelia Maria Frankis......Manhasset, N.Y. 138 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 146 ..Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 8 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 9 ......Jasmine Olivia Abidi............Glen Head, N.Y. 10 ....Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 18 ....Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 21 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 26 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin........Manorville, N.Y. 28 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 35 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 42 ....Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 56 ....Ester Chikvashvili ................Melville, N.Y. 69 ....Amanda Allison Foo............Manhasset, N.Y. 71 ....Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 85 ....Oliva Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 101 ..Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 102 ..Michelle Roitgarts................Roslyn, N.Y. 106 ..Danielle Mirabella ................Wantagh, N.Y. 108 ..Morgan Wilkins....................Huntington, N.Y. 109 ..Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 111 ..Rachel Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 114 ..Stephanie Chikvashvili........Melville, N.Y. 115 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 116 ..Alexandra Waldman............East Hampton, N.Y. 118 ..Katie Jane Cirella ................Woodbury, N.Y. 119 ..Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 120 ..Emily Shutman ....................Huntington, N.Y. 129 ..Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 132 ..Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 136 ..Montaine Le Goupil-Maier..Oceanside, N.Y. 141 ..Julieta Eulau ........................Oceanside, N.Y. 143 ..Michelle Carnovale..............Massapequa, N.Y. 145 ..Olivia Faulhaber ..................Saint James, N.Y. 150 ..Courtney Connors ..............Manhasset, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 3 ......Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 10 ....Madison Courtney Appel....Locust Valley, N.Y. 13 ....Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 28 ....Mia M. Vecchio....................Manhasset, N.Y. 40 ....Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 50 ....Aimee Manfredo..................Shoreham, N.Y. 51 ....Nicole Koskovolis................Manhasset, N.Y. 52 ....Eirini Margarita Kontaki ......West Islip, N.Y.


LONG 60 ....Lauren Ann Livingston ........Sands Points, N.Y. 62 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur..........Glen Head, N.Y. 72 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 75 ....Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 83 ....Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 86 ....Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 93 ....Katie Jane Cirella ................Woodbury, N.Y. 94 ....Julia Khan ............................Port Washington, N.Y. 96 ....Dominique Woinarowski ....Syosset, N.Y. 98 ....Claudia Ruiz ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 100 ..Mara Danielle Stewart ........Oceanside, N.Y. 101 ..Vanessa Scott......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 103 ..Montaine Le Goupil-Maier..Oceanside, N.Y. 104 ..Michele Sheila Lehat ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 109 ..Michelle Carnovale..............Massapequa, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 02/05/15)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 4 ......Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 11 ....Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 66 ....Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 69 ....Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 105 ..Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 114 ..Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 190 ..Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y. 252 ..Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 253 ..Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 371 ..Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 382 ..Rohan Reddy ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 551 ..Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 568 ..Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 583 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

ISLAND

580 ..Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 587 ..Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 588 ..Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 649 ..Travis Leaf............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 662 ..Stephen Gruppuso..............Bayport, N.Y.

RANKINGS

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 30 ....Noah B. Rubin ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 40 ....Daniel Grundberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 48 ....Josh Silverstein....................Great Neck, N.Y. 153 ..Lubomir Cuba......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 163 ..Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 166 ..Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 195 ..Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 233 ..Jesse Levitin ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 284 ..Bryant Born..........................Manhasset, N.Y. 343 ..Julian Zlobinski....................Greenvale, N.Y. 370 ..Sean M. Mullins ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 658 ..Philip Daniel Antohi ............Glen Head, N.Y. 693 ..Athell Patrick Bennett..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 703 ..Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y.

20 ....Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 66 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 151 ..Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 183 ..Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 193 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 310 ..Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 432 ..Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 515 ..Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 525 ..Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 11 ....Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 145 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 213 ..Jasmine Olivia Abidi............Glen Head, N.Y. 318 ..Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 447 ..Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 518 ..Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 595 ..Olivia Rose Scordo..............Glen Head, N.Y. 644 ..Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 39 ....Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 183 ..Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 220 ..Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 221 ..Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 275 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 288 ..Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 304 ..Jasmine Abidi ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 313 ..Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 419 ..Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players

Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

30 ....Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 34 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 79 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 82 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 92 ....Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 103 ..Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 105 ..Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 203 ..Michael Medvedev..............Oceanside, N.Y. 231 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 345 ..Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 536 ..Karan K. Amin......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

64 ....Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 67 ....Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 170 ..Madison Courtney Appel....Locust Valley, N.Y. 224 ..Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 332 ..Aleksandra Mally ................Franklin Square, N.Y. 522 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 36 ....Brenden Andrew Volk ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 63 ....Patrick Athell Bennett..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 148 ..Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 189 ..Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 294 ..Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 350 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 352 ..Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 408 ..Lubomir T. Cuba..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 413 ..Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 466 ..Daniel Shleimovich..............Syosset, N.Y. 489 ..Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 556 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 570 ..Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. MARCH 2015 Friday-Sunday, March 20-22 L2O Sportime Kings Park March Open Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 15 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, March 20-22 L1B Sportime Lynbrook March Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE)) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 15 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, March 20-22 Eastern Super Six Point Set (National L4) Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Super 6 Event Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $116.60 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, March 20-22 Eastern Super Six PWTA (National L4) Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Super 6 Event Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $116.60 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tennis@pwta.com or call (516) 883-6425. 70

Friday-Sunday, March 20-22 L2R Huntington March Regional Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Saturday-Sunday, March 21-22 L3 Sportime Massapequa March UPS Sportime Massapequa 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail massapequatc@sportimeny.com or call (516) 799-3550. Friday-Sunday, March 27-29 L1B Sportime Kings Park March Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 22 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, March 27-29 L1B WG March Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail vtapr@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, March 27-29 L1B LBTC Spring Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE); and Challenger Mixed Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles and $28 for additional doubles (deadline for entries is Saturday, March 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, March 27-29 L2O Sportime Lynbrook March Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 for first singles/$23 for first doubles. (deadline for entries is Monday, March 23 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, March 27-29 L1B Bethpage State Park Spring Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 22 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, March 27-29 L1B Point Set Tennis March Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 22 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.


USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Saturday-Sunday, March 28-29 L3 Sportime Syosset March UPS Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, April 3-5 L1B Sportime Lynbrook Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 30 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, April 10-12 L1B Sportime Bethpage April Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Saturday-Sunday, March 28-29 PSP 3; Huntington LI Orange Series #1 Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Co-ed 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $28 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, March 20 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, April 3-5 L1B Huntington April Challenger Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, March 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, April 10-12 L1B Point Set April Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 5 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

APRIL 2015 Friday-Sunday, April 3-5 L2O Sportime Kings Park April Open Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); and Intermediate Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 29 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, April 3-5 L1B GHRC April Break Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC); and Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849.

Monday-Friday, April 6-10 L1B Port Washington Spring Classic Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, March 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tennis@pwta.com or call (516) 883-6425. Friday-Sunday, April 10-12 L1B GHRC April Break Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Saturday, April 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849.

Friday-Sunday, April 10-12 L1B Sportime Syosset Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, April 10-12 L3 Huntington’s Eastern April UPS Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR); and Entry Level Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (RR) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 5 at 8:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Saturday, April 17-18 L3 Sportime Lynbrook Eastern UPS Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, April 13 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, April 17-19 L2O Bethpage State Park Spring Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 12 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Friday-Sunday, April 24-26 L1B Point Set Spring Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 19 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, April 17-19 L1A Kings Park Spring Championships Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April, 12 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, April 17-19 L1B Sportime Syosset Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, April 24-26 L1B Sportime Syosset Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, April 24-26 L3 Kings Park Sportime April UPS Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player For more information, call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, April 24-26 L1B Sportime Bethpage Spring Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, April 17-19 L1A GHRC Spring Championships Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 12 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, April 17-19 L1A Sportime Bethpage Spring Championships Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 12 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

72

Friday-Sunday, April 24-26 L1B Bethpage State Park Spring Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 19 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, April 24-26 & May 1-3 L2R Ryan Kelly Memorial Regional at Huntington Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Thursday, April 16 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.


LITennisMag.com • March/April 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine March - April 2015  
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