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This 2015 U.S. OPEN edition will feature: • 2015 U.S. Open Preview • LITM Summer Series Recap • Summer Camp/Summer Events Recap • 2015 Girls High School Season Preview

Distributionacross Long Island at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Restaurants and health food stores • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the next edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine September/October 2015!

2015 U.S. OPEN EDITION Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by August 1, 2015 1 1 For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com


Table Of Contents

LI’s Noah Rubin Makes Leap to the Pros By Brian

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Long Island native Noah Rubin had a great freshman year at Wake Forest, winning t and now takes the leap to join the ranks of the ATP Tour. See page 32

Featured Stories 4

Players Battle It Out at Long Island Tennis Challenge By Jacob Mishkin & Trevor Mitchel Roslyn’s Engineer’s Country Club played host to a day of fun and competition at the Long Island Tennis Challenge.

26 Your 2015 Guide to Sports Medicine Some of the best in the area at keeping you in shape and on the court, including: Dr. Tom Ferraro, NY Bone and Joint Specialists, Orin & Cohen, Peak Performance, Dr. Arnold Sherman, and Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine.

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38 Second Annual KidsFest Hits Engineers CC for a Day of Tennis and Fun By Trevor Mitchel 52 2015 Boys High School Recap Celebrating the tops in 2015 in Nassau and Suffolk Counties and who moved on to make an impact at the State Championships.

Features

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8 18 22 23 25 29 37 64

Sportime Roslyn Rolls Out Roland Garros By Brian Coleman Oyster Bay’s Elbaba Headlines USTA Eastern Section National Open Playoffs Winners By Brian Coleman Arthur Ashe Stadium Roof Project Takes Another Step Toward Completion Har-Tru Sports: Developing Champions Around the World Saddlebrook Tennis Academy: A Premier Destination for Aspiring Athletes Thrive Your Way to a Better Life Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group: Paving the Path to Recovery The Late Bloomer: Long Island Product Bob Litwin Carves Unique Path to the Court By Brian Coleman

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Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports


JUL/AUG 2015 Vol 7, No 4

litennis MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff

n Coleman

the ITF Rookie of the Year,

David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com

Featured Columns 10

14 16 24 30 42 44 46 50 60

62 67 69 70 72 73 74 77

College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … Former Long Island Standouts Give Their Post-Recruiting Opinions on Proper College Selection By Ricky Becker Tips From the Tennis Pro: How to Play Your Best Outdoor Tennis This Summer By Steven Kaplan Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz The Jensen Zone: Keeping a Cool Head in Tight-Pressure Situations By Luke Jensen Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community Tennis Medicine: Rotator Cuff Tears By Dr. Eric Price USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update More Than an Athlete: The Seven Biggest Fears That Fake You Out of the Zone By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC Tennis Injury Prevention: Three Things Tennis Players Should Know About Shoulder Instability By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS Fitness & Nutrition: Omega 3-Fatty Acids and Athletes By Irina Belfer-Lehat, RD, CDN & Finding Your Breath and Finding Acceptance By Carl Barnett Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller A Celebration of Tennis History and the Ripple Effect By Lonnie Mitchel Your Post-Match Routine and Why It’s the Only Way to Improve By Dr. Tom Ferraro Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives The Uninvited Guest By Tonny van de Pieterman Long Island Tennis Club Directory Long Island Rankings USTA/Long Island Region 2015 Tournament Schedule

s Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2015 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Matthew Cohen Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 306 • matt@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Andrew Eichenholz Editorial Contributor

Calvin Rhoden Staff Photographer

Julia Raziel Intern

Trevor Mitchel Intern

Gabby Raziel Intern

Jessica Haverlin Intern

Jacob Mishkin Intern

Samantha Sklar Intern

Alyssa Gorman Intern

Sarah Sklar Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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Tennis CHALLENGE The Long Island

Players Battle It Out at Long Island Tennis Challenge BY JACOB MISHKIN & TREVOR MITCHEL ong Island Tennis Magazine hosted the Long Island Tennis Challenge, which brought together some of the top tennis players in the area on a beautiful afternoon at Engineer’s Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. As the day went on, it wasn’t only the weather that heated up, but also the competition, as the many spectators looking on took in some highly competitive tennis. In the Men’s Pro Division, the team of Dimitar Pamukchiyan & Cory Seltman defeated Jay Harris & Jordie Dolberg 5-0 in the final to be crowned champions. The pair defeated Julien Klein & Alex Pop-Moldovan

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5-4(8-6) in a tie-breaker in the semifinals, fighting off two match points in the process, to ride some momentum into the championship match. Pamukchiyan & Seltman had to dig deep to break serve and send the semifinal into a tie-break, eventually closing it out 8-6. After holding serve to start the title match, Pamukchiyan & Seltman broke the serve of Harris & Dolberg to take a 2-0 lead. Another break in the fourth game put them ahead 40 as they were on their way to the title and the $500 cash prize. “My partner played really well, and that was a

Gear Up For Summer Tennis

big strength for us,” Pamukchiyan said of Seltman. “We served really well all day. We were able to hold serve in almost all of our games, so that was big for us.” Seltman, a Dix Hills native who just completed his freshman campaign for Sacred Heart, said he took a lot away from the experience of playing in the Long Island Tennis Challenge. “It’s a great experience to play in the Pro Division,” said Seltman of the competition. “Just the experience level they have, and you can learn a lot from playing against them.”

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When asked what he would do with the prize money, Pamukchiyan said: “I haven’t thought about it. But I’m definitely going out tonight.” In the Men’s “B” Division, Jonathan Klee & Lionel Goldberg outlasted Bob Kessler & Jim Brady 7-6(7-3) to win the title. The pair fought off two match points while down 4-5, and eventually took the match in a tie-breaker. “We tried to just keep the ball on the court and stay calm,” said Goldberg. “We’re used to being in this position.” Klee & Goldberg have been playing doubles together for the better part of 15 years and say they have seen every type of situation on the court, allowing them to stay focused while trailing. “They played terrific in the finals. Kessler & Brady really hit a lot of shots, a lot of straight winners,” Goldberg said. “We just kept doing

what we were doing and a few breaks fell our way.” The pair made a key adjustment as the match went on, which helped them in the tiebreaker. “We were lobbing a little bit in the beginning,” said Klee. “But they kept getting to everything, so we started to drive the ball instead of pushing it and made our shots. It was very competitive, but we stayed calm. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, and today, we won.” The duo said they will definitely be back for the second installment of the 2015 Long Island Tennis Challenge. The Women’s “A” Division was competitive throughout, but when the dust settled, it came down to two teams. Sharon Rappaport & Alyssa Bonadona faced the team of Simone Craimes & Lisa Goldstein in the

Women’s “A” Division Finals. Craimes & Goldstein opened up the match quickly by breaking Bonadona’s serve at love and jumped out to a 1-0 lead. Craimes held serve to go up 2-0, and Rappaport & Bonadona were quickly in the hole, down a break. After a long day and lots of matches in the sun, the duo had trouble mustering enough offense to recover. Rappaport’s turn to serve was up next and they needed to hold to get back in the set. With the score at deuce (no ad scoring in effect) the foursome played an entertaining point lasting several exchanges and finding all four players up at the net. Each player hit several quick volleys, but Rappaport and Bonadona lost the crucial point and went down two breaks 0-3. continued on page 6

Scenes From the Long Island Tennis Challenge E N G I N E E R ’ S C O U N T R Y C L U B I N R O S LY N , N . Y. Credit all photos Nicole Sussman and Sarah Sklar

Cory Seltman & Dimitar Pamukchiyan were crowned champs at the Long Island Tennis Challenge in the Men’s Pro Division

The team of Jen Leggio & Dawn Hellman were crowned winners in the Women’s “B” Division

Jordie Dolberg returns a serve in the Men’s Pro Division Finals

The team of Julien Klein & Alex Pop-Moldovan pause for a photo

Men’s “B” Division champs Jonathan Klee & Lionel Goldberg with their prizes

Stu Horowitz in action during the Long Island Tennis Challenge

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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long island tennis challenge continued from page 5 With the momentum on their side, Goldstein was able to hold serve, going up 4-0. Down two breaks, Rappaport & Bonadona started to play more aggressively, and it briefly worked as they got to the net and held serve, but Craimes & Goldstein took control again and finished off the set, winning the championship. “It’s not about our strengths, it’s about finding their weaknesses on the court,” said Craimes. “And they don’t have many weaknesses. So consistency was the key. I know that Alyssa has one of the biggest overheads on this little circuit of mothers we have, so we tried to avoid hitting anything too high that she could tee-off on.” Craimes & Goldstein have been friends for a long time, ever since the two were little kids. Despite Goldstein playing singles and Craimes playing doubles, the two had a strong chemistry that make them a formidable doubles tandem. “She’s been my partner for quite some time,” said Craimes. “When I asked her to partner up, she was a bit tentative, but I told her I’m not in

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it to win it, I’m in it just to be with you and have a great day. And the bonus was we won!” After a morning of round-robin matches, and the elimination rounds, the Women’s “B” Final was set. After getting through their opening round matches, the team of Jen Leggio & Dawn Hellman and the duo of Lacey Lazar & Rachael Liebman met in the championship match. The match was a war from the start, well actually, a color war. The team of Leggio & Hellman sported colorful pink attire, while Lazar & Liebman were all decked out in black. Leggio served to start the match. The game went to deuce and since the rules were established as “no ad scoring,” the next point following deuce decided who won the game. After a 12-shot, deuce point rally, Leggio hit a clean overhead from the middle of the court. Recounting the shot after the match, Leggio said, “I think we were pretty good on our overheads.” Leggio and Hellman took the 1-0 lead. Liebman & Lazar had been extremely solid at

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

the net throughout the tournament, but in the final their volleys let them down. As a team they went 5/13 on volleys and ended up only making 38 percent during the final. The team of Leggio & Hellman were offensive-minded from the initial stages to the closing moments. The team was especially effective at the net, winning nine of 10 points when they both got to the net. “I think our net game was definitely a key factor, said Hellman. “And, closing in on short balls.” Liebman & Lazar won first place in pool play, but Leggio & Hellman were able to turn the tide in the championship match winning five straight games and were up 5-0 before surrendering their first game. Ahead 5-1, Hellman held serve at love to win the match for her and her partner. After the match was over, Hellman & Leggio credited their coach Garry McNulty for their win that day. “He taught us where to be on the court, that’s what it comes down to,” said Hellman. The next Long Island Tennis Challenge is set for July 11th, and the third is set for Aug. 8, both at Engineer’s Country Club.


 

  

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


ut ARoland Garros fter stopping in Indian Wells, Calif., the S p o r t i m e World Tour made its way across the Atlantic Ocean and into Paris for a French Open-themed event at Sportime Roslyn. The fourth stop of the Sportime World Tour brought in a Parisian theme, with five courts of play available where Sportime instructors conducted a number of drills, lessons and games, as the kids in attendance made their way from station to station. “It was a pretty amazing turnout,” said Jordie Dolberg, director of tennis at Sportime Roslyn. “It was great to see this … many kinds enjoying themselves playing tennis. This is why I do what I do.” Going along with the theme of the French Open, each participant received an exclusive French passport upon arrival and was greeted by the Eiffel Tower

By Brian Coleman

which stood outside the playing courts. With the weather being nicer than the previous Sportime World Tour events, a dunk tank and bounce house were set up outside for some fun in the beautiful summer weather. All in attendance were able to enjoy the French-style cuisine that included a chocolate fountain for desert. “To have this many kids here in Roslyn is really exciting for us here at the club,” said Jay Harris, general manager of

Sportime Roslyn. “It’s just a great experience for our staff and for all the kids. Taking part in different tennis workouts, the bounce house and the dunk tank … it’s a carnival atmosphere at the tennis level. We loved, and I think the kids loved it too.” Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 or email brianc@usptennis.com.

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LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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college tennis spotlight

MYTHBUSTERS Former Long Island Standouts Give Their Post-Recruiting Opinions on Proper College Selection

Sarah Landsman

Oliver Loutsenko

By Ricky Becker uch of my coaching staff at Pine Hollow Country Club in East Norwich, N.Y. are former Long Island tennis stars who were recruited by numerous colleges. Sarah Landsman (University of Arizona), Oliver Loutsenko (Skidmore) and Sunaina Vohra (Johns Hopkins) are good players, good coaches and have some interesting insights on college tennis and being recruited.

M

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Sunaina Vohra

All three recently took a moment to give their opinions on the college recruiting process. Do you feel it is important to like your coach when choosing a college? Sarah Landsman: I think it is extremely important. You will spend day in and day out with that person and it will make the environment for training much better. Oliver Loutsenko: I think it’s important to have respect for

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


your coach in college, you may not necessarily like them, but being able to respect their tennis knowledge is important. Sunaina Vohra: It is definitely important to like your coach in college. You will be spending a lot of time with your coach and they will determine how practices are run. This is nearly two to three hours a day so, choose wisely! How much importance do you put on your visit to the school when you were a potential recruit? Sarah Landsman: I had an idea where I wanted to go before even going on my visit, but there is still a lot of importance to the school visit. I was able to see how amazing the facilities were, where you will be spending most of your time, the type of people working there and the area that you will be living in. Who wants to transfer? You want to pick a school in which you are happy with multiple aspects. Oliver Loutsenko: Personally, I put more importance into the caliber of the school, both academically and in terms of tennis, rather than the visit. But in hindsight, I think the visit is really important to figure out if you like the guys on the team and you have an opportunity to check out the school’s facilities. Sunaina Vohra: As a potential recruit, I actually put a lot of importance on the official visit. However, now that I’ve hosted several times, at least in my case, it didn’t matter as much as I thought it did. You all went to colleges a different distance from Long Island. Now that you have all had varying college experiences and you are back on Long Island, how much do you think the distance mattered? Sarah Landsman: I chose to go far from home, the University of Arizona, because I really wanted to play Pac-12 tennis and be in the warmer weather year-round. Most people struggle with the distance from home, but I personally didn’t have a problem with it. Even if you weren’t able to start on the team, it’s incredible just to be part of a team. Everyone is in-

cluded in everything together, and everyone helps each other every day. Oliver Loutsenko: I don’t think the distance really matters. College is almost like an escape from reality for four years. Once everyone is back, it doesn’t feel much different. Sunaina Vohra: I think it is important to choose a school that is far enough way to escape the bubble that you live in, but still close enough to your home just in case your parents need to see you or you are feeling homesick. That’s why I chose to go to a school that was within driving distance, rather than a flight. What advice do you wish someone older gave you when you were a Long Island college recruit? Sarah Landsman: I cannot think of anything that I wish someone would have told me, but my advice to college recruits would be to be sure of what kind of environment you want to be in for the next four or five years. Do you want a school that is centered around sports and your teams, or do you want a school more focused on academics? I loved the spirit and school’s sport-centered atmosphere at the University of Arizona. Oliver Loutsenko: From a tennis recruiting perspective, I would say getting a feel for the coach’s personality in the recruiting process is an important thing to pay attention to. In junior tennis, I had a bunch of different coaches, and at the end of the day, I never had a coach I didn’t like on a personal level. Some may have been more or less enjoyable to work with, but we got along on a personal level for the most part. In college, my coach was someone I couldn’t relate to at all and that made the experience less enjoyable. Although people did tell me this and I didn’t take it seriously, it’s really important to enjoy all aspects of college because it does go by very quickly. Sunaina Vohra: I would have told myself to not stress as much for each and every match that I played. Losing one match I should have won is not going to break me. Less stress would have probably helped my overall performance. continued on page 12

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college tennis spotlight continued from page 11 How important do you think college showcases are? What about camps where college coaches get offers to come and scout potential recruits? Sarah Landsman: Having camps where college coaches come and scout can be very beneficial if coaches are not able to get to the tournaments. Oliver Loutsenko: I actually never went to a single college showcase, but any exposure you could get to college coaches is extremely beneficial. Any time you can have a one-on-one conversation with the head coach of a team you want to be on is also a good thing. Sunaina Vohra: Depending on your USTA or Tennis-Recruiting.com ranking, college showcases can either help you or hurt you. If you are a borderline four-star player or lower, I would definitely recommend going to a showcase and talking to the school coaches you’re interested in. It’s a good way to show them how you really play, or a chance to show off. But on the off chance you are not playing well, it may turn off the coach you’re interested in. This is why I would be cautious if you want to enter a showcase. So make sure you are ready to play if you sign up. Do you think starting at a school as a freshman is essential to happiness? Sarah Landsman: I don’t think starting on the team is essen-

tial for college tennis happiness. This all depends on your interest in the game and where you want to see yourself going with it. Oliver Loutsenko: If you are a very competitive person, not starting would bother you a lot. If you are someone who wants to have a great time in college, while enjoying all of the social perks of being on a team, not starting works out much better. I wouldn’t say that it’s essential. Sunaina Vohra: Starting for your college team is not important to college happiness, at least for a D3 school. My advice would be to assess how much of the sport, and how much of the school— the academics, activities and social life—you want to get involved in. Especially in D3 since you’re not on an athletic scholarship, you get to choose how involved you want to be in the sport or on the campus. Ricky Becker is the director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors year-round. As a player, Becker was ranked number four in the United States in the 18-and-Unders and was awarded the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and the 1989-1992 Roslyn High School teams. He can be reached by email at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or visit JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

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LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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tips from the tennis pro How to Play Your Best Outdoor Tennis This Summer By Steve Kaplan t may not be the heat or humidity that marks the start of summer tennis in the local area. For me, the French Open brings the unofficial start of summer and the beginning of several months of outdoor tennis, while the U.S. Open ushers in the fall. Here are some simple and valuable tips for having your best summer of tennis ever.

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l Great outdoor tennis starts with a little preparation for a lot of perspiration. Hydrate well before you play and drink every 10 minutes or so, especially on hot and humid days. Cold

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water is absorbed faster so bring some ice. l Sunscreen is an important part of preparation for play and is most effective when applied 30 minutes or so before exposure to the sun. Keep bug spray handy as well. l Practical attire to manage the sun and heat can often be the difference between comfort and misery. Light-colored clothes absorb less heat and perforated undershirts (my favorite is made by Craft) keep you cooler. l Many players like to bring a hat or visor and sunglasses to manage bright sunshine. My college coach,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

the great George Seewagen, would always remind us to try to warm up looking into the sun to help our eyes adjust. l The legendary Australians of the Harry Hopman era loved to wear a wet bandana around their neck to lower their body temperature. Wristbands, rosin and a towel can help with sweaty hands. l Finally, pay close attention to your sneakers. Many young players like to kick their sneakers off when they return home from a hard day of outdoor play. The problem is that by not airing your sneakers out, you may be putting on sopping wet sneakers the next


day, which is uncomfortable and can lead to blisters. Outdoor tennis can be technically and tactically different from indoor tennis, and the most successful players are ready to fluidly make quick adjustments to manage changeable conditions. Practice a slightly lower service toss to handle very windy conditions. As the pace of the ball can be slower outdoors, also consider increasing the frequency of body serves to get a consistent small edge rather than relying as often on service pace. Savvy outdoor players will have the option to shorten their take back on groundstrokes to decrease the distance between the commitment of the racket path and the ball, for windy days and erratic outdoor bounces. The greater the rotation of the ball, the less the wind will impact its flight. Conversely, a ball with little rotation will be greatly impacted by the wind. That’s why a good knuckleball in baseball is so difficult to hit. Great outdoor players have the ability to modulate the amount of both

“Outdoor tennis can be technically and tactically different from indoor tennis, and the most successful players are ready to fluidly make quick adjustments to manage changeable conditions.” topspin and slice they can generate. Perhaps the most undervalued issue with outdoor play is sound. We react to the sound of the strike of the ball for a tremendous amount of our feedback on

tracking the speed, spin and direction of opponent’s shots. Indoors, the sound of the hit is amplified, but outdoor sound is diffused. Therefore, the best outdoor players are very attentive and careful listeners to cues from the ball strike. Great outdoor play requires planning and a willingness to be flexible in play. Be prepared, attentive to details and invest in the equipment and skillset that helps to win in the hot sun. Think of it as tennis sweat equity. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

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Li Na gives birth to baby girl Former tennis player Li Na and her husband Dennis had their first child, Alisa, in June. Li Na retired from tennis last year due to recurring knee injuries, following a stellar career that saw her become the first Asian Grand Slam champion.

Nadal sports $525,000 watch during French Open

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Andy Roddick joins BBC’s coverage of Wimbledon British Broadcasting Channel (BBC) announced that American Andy Roddick joined the network for its coverage of Wimbledon. Roddick is a three-time finalist at the Grand Slam tournament. “I’m honored to join the BBC team for Wimbledon,” said Roddick. “The Championships will always have a special place in my heart, and I’m excited to cover them.”

Federer and Sharapova among top earning athletes in the world Not only was Rafael Nadal trying to win at the 2015 French Open, but he also wanted to look good. The nine-time Roland Garros champion donned a $525,000 RM 027 Tourbillon timepiece. The watch weighed just 20 grams as to not affect the Spaniard’s play. He lost in the quarterfinals to eventual French Open runner-up Novak Djokovic. 16

grossing among men’s and women’s tennis players, respectively. Federer came in at number five overall on the list, while Sharapova was listed at 26th. Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams, Andy Murray and Kei Nishikori all made their way onto the list as well.

Wozniacki visits the Dr. Oz Show

Caroline Wozniacki recently visited the Dr. Oz show to talk about fitness and healthy living. Wozniacki discussed eating right, her relationship with Serena Williams and how she has learned to bounce back from tough times.

Tweets from the pros

Forbes released its list of the “100 HighestPaid Athletes in the World,” and Roger Federer and Maria Sharapova were the top

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

l Andy Roddick (@AndyRoddick): Just insane how clutch that 3 wood was ... Unreal #speith l Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): Happy Father’s Day to all incredible men who inspire and help their kids achieve their dreams and love unconditionally! My dad is my hero


l Nicholas Kyrgios (@NickKyrgios): Too good to be true, doing bunny hops on my scooter, phone falls out, screen cracked l Angelique Kerber (@AngeliqueKerber): Pierogi Time #bestpolishfood l Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): Working hard to make our #RafaNadalAcademy a reality in 2016. l Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): I want @stanwawrinka backhand. Crazy how he played today l Stanislas Wawrinka (@StanWawrinka): Happy to be part of ESPN #BodyIssue !! It was fun @espn l Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): Gael Monfils such a fickle player … In my opinion the best pure athlete to ever play tennis … l Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): Elevators are a little small in Europe, I’m no small person you see ...! l Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Thank u all for believing in me and cheering for me. Congrats @stanwawrinka on an amazing performance! Well deserved. l CoCo Vandeweghe (@CoCoVandey):

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The moment when people that have cooler shades than you could ever dream of follow you! You know who you are #Pimpin’ Noah Rubin (@Noahrubin33): First tourney as a pro here in Tulsa, Oklahoma. First step in a long journey. #NoahsArk Serena Williams (@SerenaWilliams): No one gets there alone. #Gratitude to all my friends and partners who helped me get this far on the journey. Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Love that @andyroddick is going to be commentating @Wimbledon this year. A-Rod is the man Sabine Lisicki (@SabineLisicki): Yeess ...with my 27 aces I’ve got another record. Too bad I missed the 131mph serve by a few inches ... Milos Raonic (@MilosRaonic): I will continue my rehab and proceed with preparations for a 100 percent strong Wimbledon and Queens run. Thank you for the love and support Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): Stuff on the Internet is weird. John Isner (@JohnIsner): Life is good

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when you can golf cart to practice with coach @justingimelstob #neighborhoodpractice Justin Gimelstob (@JustinGimelstob): Fun and productive first practice @wimbledon Truly a special place Chris Evert (@ChrissieEvert): Guilty pleasure watching @BacheloretteABC ... Boy, is SHE confused … Grigor Dimitrov (@GrigorDimitrov): Doesn’t get better than that! #grasscourtseason Lindsay Davenport (@LDavenport76): Because who doesn’t want to spend a Sunday at a trampoline place Jack Sock (@JackSock): Spieth is a legend Tomas Berdych (@TomasBerdych): #gettingready All white ... it’s alright #HMSport Madison Keys (@Madison_Keys): I am not okay with @GameOfThrones right now Sloane Stephens (@SloaneTweets): Shout out to this guy, who doesn’t get nearly enough credit for putting up w/ me on a daily basis! Happy Father’s Day!

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Oyster Bay

Headlines USTA Eastern Section he finals of the USTA Eastern Sectional Qualifying Tournament of the U.S. Open National Playoffs recently came to a close, as local players battled it out for a chance to qualify for the U.S. Open in late August. The Sectionals consisted of five divisions, with the winners of each moving on to play in the U.S. Open National Playoffs Championships in New Haven, Conn. In Women’s Singles, Oyster Bay’s Julia Elbaba defeated Brooklyn’s Malika Rose 6-0, 6-1 to capture the title. Elbaba started the match by doublefaulting the first point in her opening service game, but played nearly flawless after that, winning 12 of the match’s 13 games. Despite the lopsided score, this match was played at a very high level. There were a number of deuce points that could have swung either way, but Elbaba was able to pull the majority of those out.

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“I think playing my game worked really well,” said Elbaba, who also happened to be celebrating her 21st birthday. “I was just playing aggressive and using my favorite shots. The score didn’t reflect the level and intensity of the match. Almost every game was deuce. It was a very competitive match. I’m just happy to have won it.” For the third straight year, Flushing’s Nikita Kryvonos won the Men’s Runner-up Malika Rose from Brooklyn with Women’s Singles Singles Tournament. He winner Julia Elbaba from Oyster Bay, N.Y. downed second-seeded Max Wennakoski 6-1, 3-6, 6-1 to win the sive shots and going for my shots he section and book his spot in the National was missing more,” said Kryvonos. “In Playoff Championships in August. the second set, I got a little tight and “I started well and was pretty confi- started making some more errors and dent in the beginning. I think from the he got more confident. In the third, I rebaseline when I was hitting my aggres- focused and started going for my shots again. That was the difference.” Kryvonos has come up just short in New Haven the last couple of years, but hopes that the third time is the charm. Regain Confidence, Learn How To Win “Right now, I just need to stay healthy and play more matches, that’s Dr. Tom Ferraro is a noted Sport Psychologist who has the main thing,” Kryvonos said. “It’s worked with professional and Olympic level athletes in more about mental consistency for me. many fields. He publishes internationally and appears both I think if I play more matches and work on television and radio. on my mental strength I’ll be good. I feel good physically and I’m hitting the • Control anger • Cope with anxiety • Re-establish confidence ball well now. This is my third time win• Learn how to focus • Get proper diagnosis and treatment for your emotions ning this tournament so hopefully this 1-1 consultations, phone consults, family counseling, on site visits time I can go all the way. I live 20 minutes from [the National Tennis Center] Dr. Tom Ferraro so this is my court, it would be amazing (516) 248-7189 • 2 Hillside Avenue, Ste. E • Williston Pk, NY 11596 to play here [in the U.S. Open].” Drtomferraro.com • drtferraro@aol.com Daniel Cochrane & Phillip Simmonds .

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


y’s Elbaba National Open Playoffs Winners BY BRIAN COLEMAN

“We just kept our calm,” said Simmonds. “It was windy and really sunny. But we tried to just control what we could control and not worry about the elements.” The pair is still trying to develop chemistry, as they entered this event after playing just Flushing, N.Y.’s Nikita Kryvonos won the Men’s Singles Division over Max three tournaments together, but this Wennakoski win went a long won the Men’s Doubles Division with a 7- way in figuring out how their games com5, 7-6(6) victory over Gary Kushnerovic plement each other. & Keith Kessler. “Dan’s really aggressive at the net and Cochrane & Simmonds were able to it helps me out a ton because I don’t feel pull out the tie-breaker in the second set the pressure of having to hit first volleys after falling down a break early. and other things that most doubles play-

ers have to do,” added Simmonds. “I’m a little bit older so I have a little more experience. It’s nice to play doubles so you can help each other out and talk each other through some points.” A pair of sisters captured the Women’s Doubles Title as Magda & Ketevan Okruashvili knocked off Olga Kalodzitsa & Linda Templefelde 3-6, 6-2, 10-7. After splitting the first two sets, the Okruashvili’s were able to outlast their opponents in a super tie-breaker to take home the victory. “When you play outside it is usually windy so you need to make sure you control the ball,” said Magda Okruashvili. “The girls played very well and we just had to try harder to get our balls in.” The two have recently come back from college and are eager to play some continued on page 20

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The team of Hleb Maslau & Simona Weymar, both who train at the Ross School in East Hampton, N.Y., were crowned Mixed-Doubles champs at the USTA New England Sectional Playoffs

Women’s Doubles Title winners Magda & Ketevan Okruashvili defeated the team of Olga Kalodzitsa & Linda Templefelde 3-6, 6-2, 10-7

oyster bay’s elbaba continued from page 19

Mixed-Doubles Division runners-up Alison Adamski & Keith Kessler with winners Ilia Shatasvili & Rima Astarian

more tournaments together before heading up to the National Championships. “We can work on our serves and getting a little stronger,” added Magda. “We didn’t play tournaments while we were away at school, so we need to play more and continue to improve.” The final match of the afternoon was the final of the Mixed Doubles Division, as Rima Astarian & Ilia Shatashvili defeated Alison Adamski & Keith Kessler 20

6-3, 6-4. “I thought we served really well. We held all of our service games,” said Shatashvili when asked what the difference in the match was. “I started the match serving and they chose their return side so that she [Astarian] would be serving against the sun, and she just served like a champ despite that.” The two had played very little tennis together coming into the tournament. In fact, they barely even knew each other

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Daniel Cochrane & Ph 5, 7-6(6) victory over

until the assistant coach of the women’s tennis team at Columbia suggested they pair up. “I asked the assistant coach if she had anybody who would be interested and she gave me Rima,” said Shatashvili. “It was almost like an arranged marriage.” It worked out though as the two have quickly developed a very nice tennis chemistry, going through the sectional tournament without dropping a set. “We got better and better each match,” said Astarian. “Learning each other’s game and where we would be on the court so I think we developed a rhythm as it went on.” Nearby, at the USTA New England Sectional Playoffs, Hleb Maslau, who trains at Ross School in East Hampton, N.Y., won all three of the divisions he was eligible to compete for: Men’s Singles, Men’s Doubles and Mixed Doubles. In Men’s Doubles, Maslau partnered with his former college teammate at North Florida, Daniel Sotomarino, as the duo reached the final without dropping a set, and in the finals, defeated the Ivy League duo of Joseph Haig of Dartmouth & Benjamin Tso of Princeton 6-4, 6-4. He then partnered with Simona Weymar, who also trains at the Ross School, in the Mixed-Doubles Tournament, as the


hillip Simmonds won the Men’s Doubles Division with a 7r Gary Kushnerovic & Keith Kessler

two defeated Taylor Fay & Diego Valdenegro 6-2, 7-5 in the finals. “In the first round, I started playing badly and my partner Simona [Weymar] always has that unique ability to perform when it matters most,” said Maslau. “She was able to pull us through after losing the first set and being match points down to win in the super tie-breaker.” Maslau met former world number 311 Blake Strode, who won the entire National Playoffs tournament back in 2010 and 2011, in the Men’s Singles Final, and beat him 6-3, 3-6, 6-2. “I knew I had my hands full, but the match was moved indoors and I knew that this would help my game,” said Maslau. “I was able to win a tough three-setter, relying on my backhand down the line and my fitness.” Maslau heads up to New Haven, Conn. in late August to compete in the U.S. Open National Playoffs in three different divisions. The U.S. Open National Open Playoffs Championships will run from Aug. 21-24 in conjunction with the Connecticut Open in New Haven, Conn. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 4094444, ext. 326 or e-mail brianc@usptennis.com. LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Arthur Ashe Stadium Roof Project Takes Another Step Toward Completion The final piece of steel has been placed in the superstructure that will support the retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. In all, 5,000 tons of steel were needed to complete the project. The roof will be fully operational for the 2016 U.S. Open. The retractable roof is the centerpiece of a complete re-imagining of the National Tennis Center. The transformation of the site will include the roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, a new 8,000-seat Grandstand Stadium, a new 14.000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium, and the reconfiguration of the entire southern campus of the site. Construction on the new Grandstand Stadium has begun, with 90,000-cubic yards of fill removed from the site. The steel shell of the new stadium will begin to rise as foundation work is ongoing. The Grandstand Stadium will open for the 2016 U.S. Open. 22

Credit photos: USTA/Michael LeBrecht II

The USTA began the first phase of upgrades last year when the organization re-designed and rebuilt the West Stadium Courts and Practice Gallery. Platform seating for 3,000 people was constructed so that, for the first time, fans could enjoy unobstructed views of U.S. Open seeded players practicing. The structure also provided a prime viewing location for the three tournament courts to the west of Arthur Ashe Stadium. “We are redefining ‘spectacular’ at the

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and this transformation will allow the U.S. Open to maintain its place at the pinnacle of sporting experiences in the U.S. and around the world,” said Gordon Smith, USTA chief operating officer. “With a retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium, two new stadiums and an expanded southern campus, the National Tennis Center will become the best tennis venue in the world.” This transformation of the National Tennis Center, a $500 million project that is privately funded by the USTA, will include: A retractable roof over Arthur Ashe Stadium (operational in 2016); a new Grandstand Stadium (slated to open in 2016); a new Food Village adjacent to Grandstand Stadium (2016); an expanded southern campus that will include new tournament courts and enhanced fan amenities (2016); and a new Louis Armstrong Stadium (scheduled completion date 2018).


Har-Tru Sports: Developing Champions Around the World The first Har-Tru court was constructed in Hagerstown, Md. in 1932 and a brand was born. Har-Tru is consistent, timeless and intimately acquainted with some of the greatest moments in the history of the game. Har-Tru Sports is a global, values-based, sports company with its roots in the tennis industry. Our expertise in tennis includes more than 200 years of collective experience on our team. Based in Charlottesville, Va., Har-Tru is the leading provider of clay courts, court consultation, court accessories and maintenance

equipment in the tennis industry. We are proud of our legacy of developing innovative tennis products, dating back to the 1970s, when Har-Tru developed our first complete line of brushes and line sweepers and the first tennis court roller. From court maintenance products, to shoe cleaners, to court organizers and products that enhance the player experience, the company continues to evolve its existing products and develop new ones. With a focus on developing champions worldwide through innovative products, Har-

Tru Sports, one of the business divisions operated by Luck Companies, is best known for its Har-Tru brand of clay courts and uses its products, knowledge, advocacy and passion to further the development of tennis champions around the world. The company ships products around the world and its global reach includes courts in Canada, Australia and China, with a focus on innovative green technology to provide world-class products. For more information about Har-Tru Sports, visit www.hartru.com.

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Keeping a Cool Head in Tight-Pressure Situations By Luke Jensen Jensen Zone fans! I hope this finds your summer filled with aces and winners! If you are a tennis player who likes the sting of competition, this is your season. From hard to grass court with some clay action sprinkled in, the summer is a time for the competitive player to shine. I receive more questions about mental approaches to pressure than any other technical or tactical part of the game. For the inner champion in us all, we all compete to win. We compete to see who is the best on any given day. At some point in your competitive journey, a player clicks into an understanding that the best player or favorite does not always finish on top. It is at this point where I begin with an approach to being a tougher competitor between the ears.

Ask yourself what kind of competitor you currently are and then ask yourself what type of competitor you would like to be. This is not outcome-based. I’m not asking what kind of mental approach you want to bring into the fight. This is what I call your competitive character. I always wanted my opponents to know that I would run down every ball, and emotionally, stay in every match no matter how far I was down. This was the cornerstone of any Jensen’s approach to competition. I believe this armed all four of us Jensens—Murphy, Rebecca, Rachel and I— to play in Grand Slams. The emotional swings of a fragile emotional state takes players out of the match, where modern day warriors like Rafael Nadal and Maria Sharapova tap into their fighting spirit when things are looking their worst. My tennis idols were Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe. Three Hall of

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Fame competitors, but with three different approaches to the game. Borg was quiet in his approach, where Connors was engaged in the conflict, and Johnny Mac was enraged with the chaos of the battle. I was a player that used all three of these traits in my mental game. What my tennis idols taught me was to have a fearless approach to my matches. The more I welcomed the pressure, the more I wanted to play on the stadium court and win that big point … the better I played! I didn’t win all of those matches, but I never had to worry that I wouldn’t have the guts to attack a pressure-packed moment. My advice to you is to make the choice, make the change and take charge of your mental approach to any situation that you will face under pressure. The pressure of the moment will measure the very best you can be if you allow yourself to engage fearlessly into the big points. Until next time … step into that ball and go for the winner! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” Luke is currently director of tennis at Sea Island Tennis Center in Georgia. He may be reached by phone at (315) 4433552 or e-mail lukejensen84@yahoo.com.


Saddlebrook Tennis Academy: A Premier Destination for Aspiring Athletes The Saddlebrook Tennis Academy, located on the 480acre property of Saddlebrook Resort, was acquired in 1986 from the legendary Harry Hopman. Harry’s philosophy and focus on fitness made Hopman one of the most successful tennis coaches in history, and became the foundation of the Saddlebrook program. The Hopman Tennis Program at Saddlebrook offers programs for players of all ages and ability levels. Our renowned facilities attract enthusiasts from across the globe, and are home to 45 courts, including all four Grand Slam surfaces. Saddlebrook Tennis has the ability to cater to the true tennis fanatics who choose to participate in our demanding five-hour a day program, offered 365 days a year, while also providing corporate meeting attendees with an opportunity to fit in a quick lesson or a few sets of competitive play. The combination of tranquility, privacy and exclusivity on property, coupled with the energy of the world’s top players training to reach their goals of ATP and WTA success has made Saddlebrook a historic and legendary training ground. In fact, guests have enjoyed watching some of the world’s best players during their training at Saddlebrook, including in the past: Jim Courier, Pete Sampras, Martina Hingis, James Blake, and currently, John Isner, Jack Sock, and Bob and Mike Bryan. Hundreds of talented players come to Saddlebrook each year to vastly improve their game through training, hard work, discipline and motivation. Saddlebrook’s program includes on- and off-court performance routines, including specialized drills for consistency and accuracy, as well

as supervised match-play under the supervision of a professional coaching staff. After years of experience and proven success with professional players, Saddlebrook’s junior program has been designed to improve each camper’s technical, tactical and mental games. Juniors train up to five hours daily, in addition to making new friends and enjoying fun social activities with other campers.

In addition to the tennis facilities, Saddlebrook boasts 95,000-square-feet of versatile meeting space, two Arnold Palmer Golf courses, a newly renovated golf training area, a half-million gallon pool, stateof-the-art fitness center and an international boarding school. Saddlebrook Preparatory is a premier destination for education and aspiring junior golf and tennis athletes who wish to get the intensive training offered at Saddlebrook, whilst enjoying the luxuries of a world-class resort year-round. Some of the schools past alumni include Andy Roddick, Jennifer Capriati and Ashley Harkleroad. Receive 20 percent off Camps Weeks in July and August by using the promo code “Isner” when you book your Junior Camp by Wednesday, July 15. For more information, call (813) 907-4200.

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(844) 855-3441 LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Dr. Tom Ferraro (516) 248-7189 drtferraro@aol.com www.drtomferraro.com Dr. Tom Ferraro is an internationally known sport psychologist designated as one of “the nation’s top mental game gurus” by Golf Digest. He has a full-time sport psychology practice in Nassau County, working with elite and professional athletes, including top-ranked tennis players. He is also affiliated with the Winthrop University Hospital Psychiatry Department, where he teaches resident doctors about the history of psychotherapy. He has also worked with professional teams in the New York area as their team psychologist. Dr. Ferraro remains one of the few sport psychologists in the nation who is also a senior level, fully-credentialed psychoanalyst. This allows him to not only use standard behavioral techniques to help tennis players control emotions, but also enables him to diagnose accurately and fully treat underlying issues, such as depression, anxiety or attention deficit disorders that can plague an athlete’s career. He publishes columns and feature articles in the U.S., Asia and Europe, and has appeared on major television networks. His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The London Times, Newsday, The Daily News and The New York Post. He can be reached by phone at (516) 248-7189 or e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com. Dr. Ferraro’s office is located in Williston Park, which is in Mid-Nassau County.

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NY Bone and Joint Specialists (646) 741-7723 ww.nyboneandjoint.com NY Bone and Joint Specialists is an elite orthopedic practice in New York City. Dr. Leon Popovitz and Dr. Michael Mizhiritsky, globally-recognized in sports medicine, built a premier team to treat all orthopedic conditions, including: Shoulder Labrum/ SLAP tears, rotator cuff tears, shoulder dislocations, tennis elbow, elbow cartilage damage, knee ACL tears, knee cartilage damage, knee meniscus tears, knee patella instability, ankle sprains and strains, and back and neck injuries. NY Bone and Joint Specialists practice a systems-based approach to treating patients, providing the highest safety and quality of patient care in orthopedic surgery, sports medicine and rehabilitation. l Dr. Leon Popovitz: Orthopedic surgery and sports medicine, specializing in arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and knee. l Dr. Michael Mizhiritsky: Rehabilitation specialist and EMG testing. l Dr. Roman Issac: Hand and general orthopedic surgeon. l Dr. Allyson Shrikhande: Rehabilitation specialist and pelvic pain expert. l Dr. Nickhil Gupta: Interventional pain management. l Dr. Christine Ellie: Podiatric surgeon. l All Sports Physical Therapy: Specializing in all sports injuries. Dr. Popovitz, ranked among the top orthopedic surgeons in America since 2004, and who had the honor of being a team physician for the U.S. Open Tennis Championships, says: “As specialists in sports medicine, we take a team approach to treating our patients. We return all types of recreational or professional athletes to their optimal physical condition and help make healthy adjustments to prevent future injuries.” Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group (516) 536-2800 www.orlincohen.com Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group is Long Island’s leading private orthopedic practice with a team of 37 board-certified and board-eligible physicians. The group features orthopedic subspecialists who have completed advanced fellowship training, focusing solely on a single area of concern. This focused approach results in optimum patient outcomes, as the doctors are on top of the latest advances for each specific area of expertise. The group’s highly trained and experienced orthopedists cover the entire spectrum of subspecialty needs, including sports medicine, hip, knee, shoulder, elbow, joint replacements, foot and ankle, spine, neck and back, hand and upper extremities, and general orthopedics. Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group has multiple offices in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties, with a recently-opened new office on the North Shore in Woodbury, N.Y. This new state-of-the-art, full-service facility addresses all of your orthopedic related needs, including in-house diagnostic testing, digital x-ray, MRI, physical rehabilitation and a fully-accredited pain management/fluoroscopy suite. This site is part of the Orlin & Cohen network, which consists of seven orthopedic offices, five physical rehabilitation centers, four MRI centers and two fully accredited fluoroscopy suites for pain management. Conveniently located at 45 Crossways Park Drive, the Woodbury office is a natural extension for the Orlin & Cohen team of board-certified, fellowship-trained subspecialists with offices in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Lynbrook, Merrick, Massapequa and Bohemia. For more information, call (516) 536-2800 or visit www.orlincohen.com.

Peak Performance Physical Therapy (516) 599-8734 info@peakptfit.com www.peakptfit.com Don’t let pain keep you from your passion … Peak Performance Physical Therapy has been keeping Nassau County on the tennis court for more than 25 years. With four locations and 21 physical therapists, Peak Performance is one of Nassau County’s largest physical therapy groups, offering personal care, while maintaining a direct relationship with referring doctors. Orthopedic and sports therapy is one of Peak Performance’s specialties, featuring a combination of physical therapy modalities, hands-on manual therapy and a full range of exercise equipment. Whether you suffer from tennis elbow, a torn rotator cuff or total knee replacement, Peak Performance’s facilities are designed to meet your healing needs. Renowned for its state-of-the-art HydroWorx Therapy Pool, Peak Performance understands that Aquatic Therapy reduces pain and increases flexibility. The water’s buoyancy lessens pressure on knees, ankles and hips, as well as decreases post-operative swelling, accelerating the rehabilitation process, and in turn, a quicker recovery. From its Aquatic Therapy Pool to an area dedicated to sports conditioning and an in-house fitness center, Peak Performance’s facilities offer cutting-edge equipment and a caring staff to help you achieve the results you deserve. For more information, visit www.peakptfit.com.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Maga-

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Dr. Arnold Sherman 227 Merrick Avenue Merrick, N.Y. (516) 868-2266 www.optometrists.org/ArnoldSherman Vision that is 20/20 is not enough for tennis players. Tracking and hitting a tennis ball well requires vision speed, dynamic eyesight, precise eye-hand coordination, depth perception, peripheral vision and many other vision skills that are not tested in an examination limited to reading an eye chart while sitting in a darkened room. Dr. Arnold Sherman specializes in diagnosing and improving the specific vision skills necessary for optimal sports performance. He has worked with more than 30 professional tennis players, 60 players in the USTA’s Junior Development Program, numerous NCAA players, as well as many young players who hope to improve their tennis game. Dr. Sherman has vast experience in the world of sports vision and is currently a consultant to Major League Baseball’s Scouting Unit. He was the director of Visual Performance for the U.S. Olympic Committee’s Elite Athlete Program, including the 1980 “Miracle on Ice” hockey team, as well as a consultant to the NFL’s Jets, NHL’s Rangers, NBA’s Knicks and St. John’s University. Dr. Sherman was the founder of the American Optometric Association’s Sports Vision Section, recipient of the Outstanding Sports Vision Optometrist Award, and a professor at SUNY College of Optometry.

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Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (855) 321-ORTHO www.totalorthosportsmed.com Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is comprised of the most respected and experienced surgeons in Long Island. At Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, treatments range from the conservative to surgical. Total Orthopedics believes in an individualized approach to treatment determine each patient’s treatment protocol based on their health, lifestyle and goals. The team of specialists collaborates to determine the most effective treatment plan for each patient. For those who do require surgery, the surgeons of Total Orthopedics provide the most innovative and minimally-invasive procedures at some of Long Island’s most esteemed medical centers. Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine has locations throughout Long Island, and treats athletes from amateur to professional. Specialties include: l Shoulder injuries l Spinal conditions l Elbow injuries l Hip injuries l Knee injuries l Foot and ankle injuries l Hand/wrist injuries l Sports medicine The goal of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is to get all of its patients back to an active and healthy lifestyle as quickly and effectively as possible. For more information, call (855) 321-ORTHO or visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.

Dr. Arnold Sherman Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


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LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Across Long Isla Massapequa’s Ammendola helps lead Bryant to Northeast Conference Championship Devlin-Ann Ammendola of Massapequa, N.Y. helped lead the Bryant Women’s Tennis Team to the Northeast Conference championship and reach the Division I NCAA Championships for the first time in program history.

Point Set concludes Rookie and Futures Leagues Point Set Tennis Club recently finished its Rookie and Futures Leagues. The winners of the Futures League were Rachel Halpert and Paige Vesley (pictured here), while Josh Levy, Patrik Kana, Dean Eigen and Mateo Barreocanal won the Rookie League.

Great Neck North’s Delman & Kashfi make waves at State Championships Great Neck North’s duo of Alan Delman & Simon Kashfi finished third in Nassau County and went on to reach the Round of 16 in the New York state championships. The two train at Great Neck Estates. Pictured here is Delman & Kashfi with Great Neck North head coach Mike Kazin (center).

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


and

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

Roslyn JV and Varsity teams host clinics for local kids

Boys and girls from the Roslyn’s Junior Varsity and Varsity Tennis teams recently hosted two clinics for kids in the Roslyn community. “The clinics exceeded expectations due to the enthusiastic involvement of the players. Everyone involved with Roslyn tennis truly loves the sport and wants to see the sport grow in our area. It’s always nice to see the high school players show their commitment to the sport and to their community by giving their time to volunteer at these clinics,” said Roslyn Head Coach Kerri Jannotte-Hinkley. “The younger players are excited to play tennis with ‘the big kids’ and it makes everyone feel as though they are part of something great. We are very proud of all of the players that participate in these clinics and hope to hold many more in the future.”

Syosset’s Levine leads Duke to Sweet 16

Columbia Coach Endelman presents clinic at Bethpage Park Tennis Center

Josh Levine of Syosset, N.Y. led Duke University to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Championships. As a junior, Levine went 19-14 in his singles matches, including a 6-0, 6-3 win over South Carolina State’s Stanislav Baco in the first round of the NCAA Tournament.

Columbia University Associate Head Coach Howard Endelman recently hosted a clinic at Bethpage Park Tennis Center, working with the club’s junior and college players as a part of their June training program.

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LI’s Noah Rubin Makes Leap to the Pros By Bri a n C ol e m a n

rom an early age, Noah Rubin had a strong connection to the sport of tennis. The Long Island native had a racquet in his hands before he could walk, and was hitting balls while still in diapers. Hailing from a family of tennis players, he was born with the sport in his blood. “My grandfather loved the sport 10 times as much as I do and taught my father,” said Rubin. “And then he taught me and I’ve just enjoyed it ever since.” Rubin’s passion and love for the game stems from his relationship with his dad, Eric Rubin, who would get up with a young Noah at 6:00 a.m. to feed him balls and hit. Even at such a young age, he took to the game quicker than most. He began training at Freeport Indoor Racquet Club, where he would get up at 5:00 a.m. for lessons. Following his time there and at Carefree Racquet Club in Merrick, Rubin took his game to Sportime when he was seven-years-old. “When you start with someone very young, you first assess them,” said Lawrence Kleger, Academy director for the John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA) and Rubin’s coach since he was seven. “When you get someone who is seven-years-old, you’re not expecting that much. He had a very good base al-

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ready. He worked with his dad who did a really good job. The thing that really stuck out to me was how fast he picked up all the tactical stuff I started teaching him. I would show him something once and he got it.” Rubin’s decision to stay local and attend the Sportime academies was different than the route most top juniors take. Some choose to attend prestigious academies in warm weather climates, but Noah decided to stay home, a decision that he is thankful he made. “I heard a lot of people say that you have to be outside all the time and surrounded by other tennis players,” recalls Rubin. “I made a commitment to work as hard as I can, and I just loved the balance of having a social life and friends outside of tennis … just enjoying those aspects which would motivate me in tennis. If I went to an academy and had to play six hours a day, went back to a dorm, and then played six hours again and doing that same thing for five years. It just wouldn’t have been beneficial at all.” Staying home and being able to have a social life outside of tennis was crucial to Rubin, and training out of Sportime and the John McEnroe Tennis Academy was the perfect fit.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

continued on page 34


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noah rubin continued from page 32 After his freshman year of high school at Bellmore JFK, his training and travel schedule became so much that him, his family and his coaches decided it would be better to be home-schooled in order to accommodate his tennis schedule. “Home school is what you make of it,” said Rubin. “I needed to do this because I just couldn’t train and travel as much as I needed to without doing it. It’s nice to be able to do work on your own schedule with no specific due date. It just made all the training and traveling much easier.” A few months into his homeschooling, Rubin captured the title at the Coffee Bowl in Costa Rica, a Grade 1 ITF tournament. It was one of those moments that he and his whole team realized that he might be something special, as he continued to show he could have success at every level. “He was really professional at a very young age,” said Kleger. “That has taken him through his development as a player. If you look at every stage he has gone through, he sees the level and he’s there. If he’s not there right away, he works at it and he is there in a very short time.” Then, in 2014, Rubin traveled to London to compete in Junior Wimbledon. As he had done throughout his junior career, the Long Island native rose to the challenge, and raised the trophy at one of the most prestigious tennis clubs in the world. “It was incredible,” said Rubin. “Just the whole tradition behind it. Even just playing there you can feel it. You get a different feeling on the court. I truly believe I didn’t even play my best tennis throughout the tournament and I found that if I just played solid tennis, I could play with anybody.” Rubin became the first American male to

win a boys Grand Slam title since Bjorn Fratangelo won the French Open in 2011. The win put a lot of people on notice that he was at the top of the junior circuit. Instead of turning pro, however, the Long Island native decided to attend college. His decision came down to either Wake Forest or Virginia, and Noah ended up a Demon Deacon. “We just felt that the coaching staff had my best interest in mind,” said Rubin. “It was a safe environment, a small campus and it had a personal feel to it. I felt that the coaches, Tony Bresky, Alex Emery and Jeremy Feldman, were there for me. If I needed them at 5:00 a.m. to ask them something, they would be there. It was just great to know that I could trust the coaching. I don’t regret my decision at all.” Rubin enjoyed a stellar freshman campaign at Wake Forest this past season, being named Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Player of the Year and ACC Freshman of the Year, the first time anybody has done that in the Conference. He led the Demon Deacons to the ACC Championship and the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament, just the third time the program has gotten there. He also reached the finals of the NCAA Singles Championships before falling to Virginia’s Ryan Shane. Following his dominant season, Rubin decided it was time he make the leap to the professional level, and made the announcement on his Twitter account.

“The thing that really stuck out to me was how fast he picked up all the tactical stuff I started teaching him. I would show him something once and he got it.” —Lawrence Kleger, Academy Director, John McEnroe Tennis Academy 34

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


“After much contemplation, I have decided to turn pro. It’s been an unforgettable year at Wake Forest due to the amazing people I was surrounded by,” he tweeted. “I am nervous, yet excited, for the journey I am about to embark on, but with the support of my family and friends everything is possible.” His time at Wake Forest went a long way in his development. “Wake Forest was a great stepping stone in my pursuit of playing professional tennis,” said Rubin. “The coaching staff helped me feel ready to take the next step. My favorite part by far was traveling with the team. There were a lot of nice people at the school, but the best friends I made were on the tennis team. You don’t get to travel as a team that often in tennis, so you just have to really enjoy those moments.” The culture of Sportime, the John McEnroe Tennis Academy and Kleger’s coaching has been preparing him for the leap to pro status for a long time. “If you went to Sportime back in the day, you would not see a single kid say something negative or throw a racquet without a negative reaction from Lawrence,” said Rubin. “It just wasn’t allowed. That was the culture of Sportime. To this day, I owe him everything for that because that is what being a professional is all about. If you learn it at a young age, you tend to carry it with you for your whole career.” Rubin’s professionalism and composure has always been one of his best assets on the tennis court. Physically, he is lighting quick, going baseline to baseline and hits the ball with more power than some might expect from his stature. While he knows his journey is just beginning, the 19-year-old already has some short-term goals in mind. “I want to be around top-250 in about a year,” Noah said. “I just need to keep playing tennis and enjoying it like I have done my whole life and hopefully it will come naturally. But if it doesn’t,

then I’ll just keep working harder.” The people around Rubin know that he is destined for great things as they have seen the growth and progress over the course of the last decade. “It’s been a magical journey,” said Eric Rubin. “From feeding balls to Noah at 6:00 a.m. when he was a youngster to being with Noah in the Roehampton University dorms during his junior Wimbledon run last year, it’s been a joy and honor to partake in this journey with Noah, and it’s just the start for him.” Training at John McEnroe Tennis Academy has offered Rubin a unique perspective into the mind of a professional tennis player. McEnroe was a former world number one and is one of the greatest players in the history of the sport.

“It’s a different perspective. He’s been in all sorts of situations and he knows how the top players think,” said Rubin of being able to work with McEnroe. “It’s tough sometimes because things that came natural to him don’t necessarily come natural to me. But just the way he looks at the game and thinks has helped me a lot.” McEnroe has seen the development of Rubin over the years, and says he will be successful if he continues to do what he has done his whole life. “Noah is going to grow and be his own man, and that is what he should be,” said McEnroe. “My best advice would be for him to go out and give his best every time continued on page 36

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noah rubin continued from page 35

“I am nervous, yet excited, for the journey I am about to embark on, but with the support of my family and friends everything is possible.” —Noah Rubin he plays, as I was inspired to do by the likes of Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors. If he does that, and I can convince him to follow his path, he will be successful and will never have to think ‘What if?’” Rubin will continue to train and practice at the facility he has been at for over a decade. He has become the poster child for the Academy and embodies everything they try to teach their players. “He was basically our system. Everything we believe in coaching and building character is what he went through,” said Kleger. “As he got older, he became the perfect role model for our entire Academy. For us, having him be who he is as a person was actually more beneficial than his results. I wouldn’t take anybody over him in terms of character. He’s great at recognizing that he has a team behind him. A lot of coaches and people that have

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helped him along the way, and he doesn’t forget that.” Those coaches and people will continue to be behind him as he embarks on his professional career. “As a world-class player and an incredibly well-rounded young man, Noah personifies and affirms the JMTA philosophy of training and life,” said Ben Schlansky, managing director of Sportime Randall’s Island and JMTA. “Along the same lines, I think Sportime and JMTA have given Noah the opportunity to train at a world-class Academy without having to leave home or sacrifice his teenage years. We are pleased to continue to support Noah as he embarks on his pro career. We believe that his work ethic, his tennis IQ and his love of the game will carry him far, and are very excited to see what the future holds.” The Long Island tennis community will

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

be watching and rooting on Rubin as his career progresses, continuing to make local tennis aficionados proud Islandwide. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email brianc@usptennis.com.


Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group: Paving the Path to Recovery Locations in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Lynbrook, Merrick, Massapequa, Woodbury and Bohemia (516) 536-2800 • www.orlincohen.com rlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group is Long Island’s leading private orthopedic practice with a team of 37 board-certified and board-eligible physicians. The group features orthopedic subspecialists who have completed advanced fellowship training, focusing solely on a single area of concern. This focused approach results in optimum patient outcomes, as the doctors are on top of the latest advances for each specific area of expertise. The group’s highly trained and experienced orthopedists cover the entire spectrum of subspecialty needs, including sports medicine, hip, knee, shoulder, elbow, joint replacements, foot and ankle, spine, neck and back, hand and upper extremities, and general orthopedics. Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group has multiple offices in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties, with a recently-opened new office on the North Shore in Woodbury, N.Y. This new state-of-the-art, fullservice facility addresses all of your orthopedic related needs, including inhouse diagnostic testing, digital x-ray,

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MRI, physical rehabilitation and a fully-accredited pain management/fluoroscopy suite. This site is part of the Orlin & Cohen network, which consists of seven orthopedic offices, five physical rehabilitation centers, four MRI centers and two fully accredited fluoroscopy suites for pain management.

Conveniently located at 45 Crossways Park Drive, the Woodbury office is a natural extension for the Orlin & Cohen team of board-certified, fellowship-trained subspecialists with offices in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Lynbrook, Merrick, Massapequa and Bohemia. For more information, call (516) 536-2800 or visit www.orlincohen.com.

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LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Second Annual KidsFest Hits Engineers CC for a Day of Tennis and Fun BY TREVOR MITCHEL s part of Long Island Tennis Magazine’s 2015 Summer Series, kids and parents recently gathered at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. for the 2nd Annual Long Tennis Magazine KidsFest. The event provided kids with a day of fun-filled activities, both on and off the court, to enjoy their tennis experience, which, for some, was their first. Long Island Tennis Magazine put together tennis clinics for all ages, outdoor carnival games, a dance competition, a very popular dunk tank, face-painting, and an array of prizes. Food and drinks were supplied by Engineers Country Club. With parents surrounding the courts and taking in the action, more than 100 kids of

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all ages and skill took to the courts to receive lessons and clinics given by top tennis pros from Sportime Roslyn. The pros worked with the kids, fully engaging with them, while supplying the necessary insights on the basics of the game. Sportime’s pros spread the kids out by skill level and worked with them on strokes, while also supplying a Hit for Prizes Court. “These prizes are awesome … I’m having so much fun,” said seven-year-old Cooper Gold as he ran by with his tennis racket in hand and a smile on his face. There was something for everyone at KidsFest, as DJ Curtis McCalla kept everybody entertained with music, dancing and prizes. “DJ Curtis kept the party going all after-

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noon … it was a great day.” said Nancy Krosser. For those who wanted to take a break from the tennis courts, lawn games such as horse shoes, corn hole and ring-toss were a perfect way to get out of the sun and relax. “I love KidsFest,” said Randy Thompson. “It’s a terrific event as the kids are active, they love the dunk tank, and they love the tennis. They have a chance at lots of prizes which keeps them motivated.” The biggest hit of the afternoon off the court was the dunk tank, which kept everybody entertained as staffers from both Long Island Tennis Magazine and Engineers CC continuously dropped into the water as kids hit the bull’s-eye and enjoyed their accuracy. “My son is having a fabulous time with the dunk tank and he keeps trying to get the girl in the water, and now, we are going to play a


little tennis and get some prizes.” said Joanna Cepler, one of the parents. Emilie Katz and the staff of Engineers Country Club were fantastic in helping to set up the event, collaborating with Long Island Tennis Magazine to get details in order, working on-court with the kids, and making sure the event ran smoothly. The Engineers staff was extremely attentive to all of the attendees who came in for the day. Engineers Country Club member Rob Greenberg, whose son Madden took part in the event, said, “KidsFest was a fun and exciting way to get my son talking about play-

ing tennis while at home. The instructors did a great job of getting every child involved and boosting their confidence regardless of skill level. Madden is already excited for next year’s event.” KidsFest was the second part of the eightpart Summer Series hosted by Long Island and New York Tennis Magazines, and served as a great way to get face-to-face with the publication’s readership and be on the court with them. These events continue to grow grassroots tennis in the area and further enhances the magazine’s relationships within the tennis community. Lani and Ally Miller enjoyed their time at

KidsFest. On their way out, carrying bags of prizes, they were asked how they liked the event with Ally saying, “It was awesome” and Lani just gave a big smile and a thumbs up. As she was leaving, another child yelled out, “I have too many prizes! I can’t hold them all!” Long Island Tennis Magazine will return to Engineers Country Club for another segment of its Summer Series, The Long Island Tennis Challenge on Saturday, July 11. Don’t miss out! Trevor Mitchel is an intern with Long Island Tennis Magazine.

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LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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TENNIS MEDICINE

Rotator Cuff Tears

Fig 1—The rotator cuff Fig 2—Torn rotator cuff

By Dr. Eric Price The rotator cuff (see Fig. 1) is a group of muscles that originates on the shoulder blade (the scapula) and insert on the top of the arm bone (the humerus). The function of the rotator cuff is to move the shoulder. Often, the rotator cuff is inflamed or torn in people with painful shoulders. People typically complain of difficulty with overhead activities, like reaching for items off a high shelf, brushing the back of the hair or fastening a bra. Often, people have dif42

ficulty sleeping on the painful shoulder. Torn rotator cuff To evaluate for a rotator cuff tear (see Fig. 2), a doctor will perform an examination after a history is taken. X-rays are performed, and often an MRI is ordered. The X-rays will evaluate the bones in the shoulder, but not the rotator cuff itself. The MRI will show the muscles and tendons around the shoulder and allow the doctor to see the rotator cuff. If the MRI shows a tear in the rotator cuff, then surgery may be recommended.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Fig 3—The bursa is a fluid filled sac on top of the rotator cuff

Bursitis If no tear is present, an MRI may show rotator cuff “tendonitis.” Tendonitis is inflammation of the rotator cuff without tearing. This can be responsible for producing shoulder pain. Tendonitis often occurs with “bursitis.” Bursitis (see Fig. 3) is inflammation of a fluid filled sac (bursa) on top of the rotator cuff that serves to lubricate the movement of the shoulder. The inflamed bursa can be pinched with overhead activities, causing pain. Bursitis is very common among tennis players. Many factors contribute to bursitis, or rotator cuff inflammation, including poor


Fig 4—Arthroscopic camera and tools in the shoulder

form, a weak core or overuse, among others. Physical therapy, rest, and anti-inflammatory medications like Ibuprofen are key components of treatment for an inflamed rotator cuff. Surgery If surgery is recommended, it is usually performed arthroscopically. Arthroscopic surgery (see Fig. 4) uses small incisions and small tools, about the size of a pencil, to perform the procedure. All the work is visualized with a small camera, the arthroscope. The surgeon sees inside the shoulder with the arthroscope and its images are projected on a video screen.

Fig 5—The rotator cuff is repaired back to its normal position

During surgery, rotator cuff tears are repaired (see Fig. 5) by stitching the torn tendon back to the bone by using an anchor inserted into the bone. Patients usually go home the same day, often in a sling (see Fig. 6). Recovery after rotator cuff surgery is gradual. Several months of physical therapy will be required for a proper recovery. Activity restrictions will apply after surgery until appropriate rehabilitation goals have been achieved. Eventually, return to sports will be permitted. Dr. Eric Price is a board-certified, fellowshiptrained sports medicine specialist with Orlin &

Fig 6—A typical post-operative sling

Cohen Orthopedic Group. He takes care of all types of athletes, from pee-wee league players to pros and from weekend warriors to triathletes. As an athlete himself, he understands the need to get people back in their game. Dr. Price’s expertise includes shoulder arthroscopy for repair of rotator cuff tears, dislocations, knee arthroscopy, including ACL and meniscus surgery. He also teaches shoulder arthroscopy as an Associate Master Instructor for the Arthroscopy Association of North America and as a Laboratory Instructor at several shoulder surgery conferences. For more information, call (516) 536-2800 or visit www.orlincohen.com.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Eastern Lo Kids Days on the way

Get ready kids! The USTA Long Island Region is planning twice the fun for you this summer with two Kids Days on the calen-

dar! This year, for the first time, the LI Region will host Kids Day events in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties to enable many more young players to participate. At each free Kids Day event, children of all ages will enjoy tennis learning, games, contests, food and fun with lessons taught by local pros. Tennis newcomers will be introduced to the basics of 10 & Under play, while those with more expe-

rience can play matches with their peers. Nassau Kids Day will be held on Tuesday, July 21 (rain date is Wednesday, July 22) from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. at Inwood Country Club, located at 50 Peppe Road in Inwood, N.Y. For information and to register, please e-mail terry196@optonline.net. Suffolk Kids Day will take place at World Gym Setauket, located at 384 Mark Tree Road in Setauket, N.Y. on Tuesday, Aug. 4 (rain date Thursday, Aug. 6) from 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. For information and to register, please e-mail suffolkcountykidsday@gmail.com.

Opportunities for new junior players Looking for a fun activity to start this summer with benefits that will last a lifetime? The USTA offers many programs designed to help new junior tennis players learn and grow. Local play and competition includes Play Days, Junior Team Tennis and Entry-Level Tournaments. All three allow kids to learn, play and compete at the appropriate level. These events all have a set start and end time,

making them manageable to host and attend. The events are family-friendly and welcome a new generation of players to transition from Play Days to Junior Team Tennis and Entry-Level Tournaments. Open to any junior ready to begin sanctioned competitive play, the USTA’s PSP3 Entry-Level Tournaments embody the goals of Participation, Sportsmanship and Performance. Upcoming PSP competition

is scheduled locally on Saturday, July 11 at Huntington Indoor Tennis (#100072215), Saturday, Aug. 15 at Sportime Kings Park (#100057615) and Saturday, Oct. 17 at Sportime Lynbrook (#100072815). To register, visit www.tennislink.usta.com and enter the event code number. For more information on junior tennis learning and playing opportunities, please e-mail ustaonlongisland@gmail.com.

Happening locally Please join us at some or all of these great upcoming events. For more information on these events or any others, please visit www.longisland.usta.com. You can also keep current on happenings in the Eastern LI Region by subscribing to the quarterly digital newsletter, “On the Ball: News from LI.” Just send an e-mail to ustaonlongisland@gmail.com with the subject line “Newsletter.” July l Wednesday, July 11: 10 & Under Orange Ball Junior Tournament Series 44

l Monday-Friday, July 13-17: Girls Inc. of LI Summer Tennis Camp l Monday-Friday, July 13-17: Nassau County’s 8th Annual Tennis in the Parks l Tuesday, July 21: Nassau County Kids Day l Sunday-Thursday, July, 26-30: Camp Eastern August l Saturday, Aug. 1: LI High School Team Tennis Day l Tuesday, Aug. 4: Suffolk County Kids Day

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

l Saturday, Aug. 15: 10 & Under Orange Ball Junior Tournament Series September l Saturday, Sept. 19: Bellmore Family Street Fair l Saturday, Sept. 26: Merrick Festival l Saturday-Sunday, Sept. 26-27: Lido Beach Family Festival by the Sea October l Saturday, Oct. 17: 10 & Under Orange Ball Junior Tournament Series


ng Island Region USTA LI Region 25th Annual Awards Dinner recap

Thank you to everyone who attended the 25th Annual USTA Long Island Region Awards Dinner. Your support will help the Junior Tennis Foundation to further its goals. Congratulations to all of the deserving award winners! Nominations are now open for the 2016 Awards Dinner. Please visit www.longisland.usta.com and click on “Awards Dinner” to submit your choices. All portraits and candid photos from the April awards dinner are now available online at www.longisland.usta.com. Check out all of the fun and feel free to download, print and enjoy your photos. A special thanks to all the wonderful

companies and organizations that helped make the USTA LI region Awards Dinner a success. We hope you will support our sponsors: Advantage Tennis, Astoria Bank, A Taste of Home Bakery, Bagel Plaza, Bertucci’s Restaurant, Mary Frances Boyd/Beauty Counter, Rosa Cabral-Karp, Carefree Racquet Club, Cradle of Aviation Museum, Donnay Tennis, Eastern Athletic Clubs, Equinox (Roslyn), Fanatico Italian Restaurant, Glam Slam, Grand Slam Tennis, Hicksville Community Tennis Association, Imperial Diner, Junior Tennis Foundation, Kimera Salon, Long Beach Tennis Center, Long

Island Ducks, Martha Clara Vineyards, Metropolitan Opera, Modell’s Sporting Goods, New Victory Theatre, Old Westbury Gardens, Point Set Racquet Club, Pole Position Raceway, Port Washington Tennis Academy, Robbie Wagner Tennis Academy, Setauket Tennis & Fitness, Skurnik Wines, Sportime Clubs, Spumante Restaurant, Theatre Three, Top Spin Pro Shop, Total Tennis, USPTA Eastern Division, USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Home of the U.S. Open, USTA Eastern Section, Westhampton Indoor Tennis and Woodbury Sports.

After-school fun at Robbie Wagner’s Students at several North Shore-area schools are getting active and learning to have fun playing tennis, thanks to a special program provided by Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center in Glen Cove and the USTA LI Region. During the 2014-2015 school year, the Robbie Wagner’s team brought the USTA’s 10 & Under Tennis (TAUT) program to Temple Sinai/Roslyn, The North Shore School District (Glenwood Landing School, Sea Cliff Elementary School), The Greenvale School and The Portledge School as part of the schools’ afternoon activities. “We set up after-school programs in

the school gyms to educate elementary school children about the sport of tennis,” said Hilary Bressler, sales manager at Robbie Wagner’s. “We provide the pros and some high-performance junior players who go to each site and help the children.” Instructors follow the USTA’s TAUT format, in which equipment and courts are sized for children. “Tennis is fun, easy and will get students of all ages active,” said Daniel Burgess, USTA LI Region president. “The USTA Long Island Region supports tennis in schools and we can provide many re-

sources for launching and coordinating school programs that are fun for kids and easy for PE teachers to start and operate. No courts are required!” The USTA’s Tennis in the Schools includes training; an easy-to-follow curriculum; kid-sized equipment; teacher in-service workshops; equipment loan and discount programs; and information and resources for organizing both in-class and after-school tennis programs. For more information on School Tennis Programs available through the USTA, visit www.usta.com or e-mail ustaonlongisland@gmail.com.

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More Than an Athlete The Seven Biggest Fears That Fake You Out of the Zone By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC How many times have you heard kids cajole each other and say these two words: “Bring It!”? The problem is that no one really knows what that “It” is! It’s actually worth knowing, so let me explain. Ultimately your “It” will be the key to sustained peak performance. “Bring it!” Means to bring your whole self, it’s really another way of saying “more than an athlete.” When we watch tennis or any sporting event, it is clear what is on the athlete’s outside: Their talent, technique and skill. But bringing your whole self means to bring what’s on the inside, too: Spirit, inspiration, story and soul. By bringing your whole self, you are not only bringing your “It,” you are bringing your “More.” Think about Rafael Nadal … he brings his deep determination and grit. Serena Williams brings her feisty spirit and neversay-die attitude. At the French Open, Jack Sock talked about bringing the inspiration

“Society views vulnerability as weakness, whereas in reality, awareness of vulnerability equates to true strength.” of his brother’s bravery in the face of illness. All of these players are bringing their own “It.” This “It” is what people cannot see but what drives and motivates the performer. This “It” is the athlete’s X Factor that makes him or her more than an athlete. In an ideal world, everyone would be loose and relaxed enough to bring their whole self to the court and play inside the zone. But what gets in the way of bringing “It” to the court? Our fears and every day experiences can throw us off balance when we least expect it. They can be emotional, physical or both. We often say “everything is fine,” but carry stress around from one activity to the next. Simulating dominos,

the stress picks up steam. Then, when the nervous system is overwhelmed, we feel blocked. We can no longer bring “It” to the court because we are dealing with excess nervousness, anxiety, chokes and tightness. One of my clients described it as, “The body shuts down, it’s overwhelmed and says ‘no more.’ The body knows and recognizes this internal state of extreme chaos, before your head and heart do.” So, how do you get back “Home?” How do you bring your whole self to the court? Your biggest tool is to be able to recognize, identify and understand your fears. Below, I’ve listed seven of the biggest fears that can take us out of the zone. When you are feeling blocked, you can come to this list, and just by identifying your fear, you can begin to move through it. 1. The fear of not being good enough: This fear rears its head all the time, both on and off the court. In fact, just thinking about it may trigger an “ah-ha” moment. We all want to believe in ourselves and feel that we have the ability and intelligence to be successful, and anything short of that can be disheartening. In match play, players sometimes get discouraged and begin to fear that they are not good enough to compete with an opponent. They then lose their will and compete at less than optimal levels. Sometimes both in life and in tennis,

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setbacks may seem like validation of not being good enough. However, while we may have setbacks, what really determines our strength is how we respond to them. 2. The fear of failure: This fear usually rears its head during a close match, especially when a player is perceived as being better than their opponent. The seemingly lesser player plays without expectations, but the favored player seems to be playing with a weight on their shoulders. The favored player is afraid to fail because they tie their identity and self-worth to their performance. Additionally, they may be afraid of what others will think and the subsequent reaction if they perform below expectations. Oftentimes when a player is afraid to experiment, afraid to try new techniques, or afraid to take a risk, their fear of failure is the cause. 3. Fear of the unknown: This fear often rears its head in preparation for a big match. The player cannot possibly

know for sure whether they will win or lose. This “fear of the unknown” creates a high level of anxiety about what’s going to happen, and then “if that happens” what “will happen” after that. Along with this is the fear of not being in control. This can be seen when a player is on the defensive. This player may over-hit, perhaps attempting a low percentage winner, because they are so uncomfortable with their opponent dictating the point. However, being aware of their defensive positioning and accepting the situation will allow them to play in the present and play solid defense, eventually working their way back to neutral or the offensive. 4. The fear of being judged: This often comes up when a player is thinking about what their parents, coach, friends or teammates are thinking as they are playing. The simple act of this thought takes the player away from their present situation on the court, towards something they cannot control off the court. It is here that unconditional acceptance

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from the support system is so important. When such support is provided, the player can feel calm, relaxed and safe. Thus, the player can play free without any worry of the results. 5. The fear of not meeting expectations: This is similar to the fear of being judged, in that the player cannot control what someone else expects. Often, the expectations of parents, coaches and friends are a moving target in which only wins and losses are taken into account, and the process (their journey) is completely dismissed. For a player to play their best, they must be in the present and focus directly on the experience. Focusing on expectations creates a mental distraction, not to mention enhanced feelings of pressure on the court. 6. The fear of success: This fear manifests itself when a player has a lead and then begins to think things like, “I continued on page 48

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more than an athlete continued from page 47 shouldn’t be beating this person, they are ranked higher than me.” Or a player may not view themself at a certain level, and therefore, does not feel deserving of a victory. Other times, the uncertainty and subsequent anxiousness of putting themselves on the line for a possible victory is too much to handle. The certainty of losing, while disappointing, is well-known and a familiar road already traveled. 7. The fear of injury or re-injury: This fear is referred to as the “silent epidemic.” It is often driven by our macho sports culture’s unwillingness to deal with the emotional stress and traumalike experiences that may result from injuries. Specifically neglected is the athlete’s uncertainty about recovery, alienation from the team, fear of not being able to return at full strength, and even the anxiety about what might

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happen should the situation recur. It’s important to note, while the athlete may be cleared physically by doctors, emotionally, they still may not have processed through the fear. Anyone who has experienced an injury understands how psychologically the injury doesn’t just disappear when the doctor says “You’re cleared to play.” In today’s sporting society, exhibiting any sign of weakness or fear is difficult for a player. Society views vulnerability as weakness, whereas in reality, awareness of vulnerability equates to true strength. It is from this platform of awareness that change and improvement are best triggered. Fears like the seven mentioned above pop up all the time, especially in pressure situations. They are a defense mechanism to prevent us from trying something which may make us uncomfortable. Yet recognizing such fears and

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

having the courage and support system to work through them is what truly enables us to grow and reach our individual sustained peak potential. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob has spoken to athletes, coaches, parents both nationally at USTA, USPTA, ITA conferences, and has conducted international workshops and has worked with top-ranked juniors in United States, India and Israel. Rob is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions is an experiential book for all players looking to take their mental game to the next level. He was awarded the 2008 USPTA-Eastern Division High School Coach of the Year Award and has coached USTA Zonals numerous years. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail rob@insidethezone.com or visit www.insidethezone.com.


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TENNIS INJURY PREVENTION

Three Things Tennis Players Should Know About Shoulder Instability By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS f all of the joints in the body, the shoulder joint is one of the most mobile, and the ability to move in almost any direction is vital for those who play tennis. The shoulder must be able to rotate and extend so that players can generate power and accuracy in their shots. As a result of this mobility and the stress put on the shoulder joint, it is also the joint most frequently dislocated. The shoulder joint can be dislocated in several directions, but the most common is a dislocation in the front of the shoulder. In most cases, the shoulder is manually placed back into the socket by a physician. Once the shoulder is returned to its normal position, it is important to consult a specialist to evaluate possible damage to ligaments, tendons or the cartilage surrounding the shoulder. If the ligaments, tendons or cartilage have been damaged,

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the shoulder may continue to dislocate and cause Recurrent Shoulder Instability. Below are three things you should know about shoulder instability. 1. The signs of Recurrent Shoulder Instability In most cases, Recurrent Shoulder Instability is brought on by an initial shoulder dislocation. However, in some instances, it can be a result of a repetitive strain and injury to the ligaments of the shoulder. The most common symptoms of Recurrent Shoulder Instability include: l Pain in the shoulder l The shoulder repeatedly dislocates or subluxates (where the shoulder only partially dislocates) l Weakness in the shoulder l “Clicking,” “popping” or “catching” in the shoulder 2. The risks of Untreated Shoulder Instability Once the warning signs above are evi-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

dent, it is important to consult an expert. When left untreated, there is a significant risk of damage to the cartilage and ligaments of the shoulder. This is primarily a result of the shoulder continuing to dislocate. Each time the shoulder manipulated in and out of its correct position, the ligaments that hold the shoulder in place become stretched and cartilage is scuffed and damaged. In fact, for young athletes, the rate of Recurrent Dislocation can be up to 95 percent after a first-time dislocation. In patients over the age of 30, the rate of Recurrent Dislocation can be up to 60 percent. One of the most common results of Recurrent Shoulder Instability is Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder. In fact, patients with a history of repeated shoulder dislocations are 19 times more likely to develop an arthritic condition in the shoulder. Furthermore, for patients who dislocate their shoulder once, the risk of moderate to severe Osteoarthritis 25 years later is 18 per-


cent. For those with Recurrent Instability, the rate of moderate to severe Osteoarthritis is 39 percent. Other injuries as a result of Shoulder Instability can include: l l l l

Nerve injury Shoulder fractures Rotator cuff tears Post-traumatic stiffness

3. Treatment options For many patients, conservative treatments (physical therapy) can help strengthen the joints of the shoulder and help relieve pain. For those who have not seen improvement after conservative treatments, the damaged cartilage or joints may need to be treated surgically in an effort to stabilize and repair the damage. By utilizing the arthroscopic approach, a surgeon can maneuver around the muscles of the shoulder, without significant muscle injury. In a more traditional surgery, a large dissection of the

“The shoulder must be able to rotate and extend so that players can generate power and accuracy in their shots.” muscle and tissue is needed to access the shoulder joint. This large dissection significantly increase both post-operative pain and post-surgical recovery time. Incredibly, all patients return home the same day as these procedures are always carried out as outpatient procedures. Patients are given a nerve block that numbs the shoulder prior to surgery, allowing the patient to be discharged free of pain to recuperate in the comfort of

their own home. Dr. Charles Ruotolo is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and the founder of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with locations in Massapequa, East Meadow and the Bronx, N.Y. Dr. Ruotolo completed his orthopedic residency program at SUNY Stony Brook in 2000. After his residency, he underwent fellowship training in sports medicine and shoulder surgery at the prestigious Sports Clinic of Laguna Hills, Calif. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. As an Associate Master Instructor of Arthroscopy for the Arthroscopy Association of North America, Dr. Ruotolo actively teaches other orthopedic surgeons advanced arthroscopic skills in shoulder surgery. As an avid researcher he has also published multiple articles on shoulder injuries and shoulder surgery in the peer review journals of Arthroscopic Surgery and of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. For more information, visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.

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2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Nassau County Syosset Ends Cold Spring Harbor’s Reign to Capture Nassau County Championship Cold Spring Harbor’s Sean Mullins gets ready to hit a forehand during his first singles win over Syosset’s Daniel Shleimovich

The Syosset Braves went a perfect 15-0 en route to the 2015 Nassau County Conference I Championship Cold Spring Harbor’s Patrick Hannity rips a forehand in his second singles match Daniel Shleimovich of Syosset chases down a baseline return The two best teams in Nassau County converged onto the neutral site courts of Garden City High School, as the Syosset Braves and Cold Spring Harbor Seahawks met in the Nassau County Conference I Championship. Cold Spring Harbor was looking to win its eighth consecutive Nassau County Championship, but ran into a Syosset squad that was eager to play the role of spoiler, as the Braves won 5-2 to clinch its first title since 2007. “I think the first feeling was shock,” said Syosset Head Coach Shai Fisher. “It happened and no one really knew how to react, myself included.” With wins already at third singles, fourth doubles and third doubles, Syosset needed just one win to clinch the 52

Dylan Granat pumps his fist after a big point in his second singles match championship. It came on the second doubles court with Evan Lowitt & Preet Rajpal upending Greg Kaplan & Nicholas Sica of Cold Spring Harbor 6-1, 6-3. Not only did the win give Syosset the championship, but it also clinched an undefeated season, as the Braves finished up at a perfect 15-0. “Even though we lost six seniors from last year, our expectations were to win a county championship,” said Fisher. “The kids put in the time from last year to this year. Each of them worked hard, played group play and tournaments. I think it’s a testament to the kids who have graduated and come through the program, they set the bar.” The Syosset team got better and better as the season went on. From first singles

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

all the way to down, each member of the team had the same goal: Bring Syosset a County Championship. Playing in a tough Conference 1-B, the Braves were battle-tested heading into the showdown with Cold Spring Harbor. “The guys were just focused from the very first point,” said Fisher. “When it comes to game time, we’re all there for each other. It’s one big family.” Senior Dylan Granat, who defeated Patrick Hannity 6-0, 7-5 at second singles, was fired up about his team’s victory. “This was my last match ever playing for Syosset so I came out really aggressive. I came out firing,” said Granat, who will be playing at Bentley University next season. “It’s just awesome. I’m so happy … just so happy for all of these guys.”


2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Massapequa Downs Oceanside for Nassau Conference II Title

Nassau County Conference II champs, the Massapequa Chiefs, celebrate their victory over Oceanside

The Massapequa Chiefs captured the Nassau County Conference II championship, defeating the Oceanside Sailors 5-2 at Baldwin High School. Much like the previous two matches between these two squads, the conference title was extremely close. The four doubles matches were finished before any of the three singles matches, and with Oceanside and Massapequa winning two doubles matches apiece, it would come down to singles play. With plenty of spectators looking on, the singles matches did not disappoint. The first to finish up was second singles, as Massapequa’s Thomas DaCosta hung on to beat Oceanside’s Mitch Pleasser 6-2, 57, 6-4. Needing just one win to clinch the Conference Championship, Matthew Musalo clinched the title for the Chiefs, attacking the net for a gorgeous backhand winner on match point to down Oceanside’s Kyle Cohen 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. “I am very proud of this team because we set a goal for ourselves at the start of the season, and achieved it,” said Massapequa Head Coach Michael Pavlides. “We didn’t know we would win the Conference, but we

knew we could compete for the title.” At first singles, Nasser Ghaffar of Massapequa and Jake Cohen of Oceanside were last to finish up. Despite Massapequa having already won the overall match, Ghaffar and Cohen continued to battle and play exciting tennis with everyone looking on. Ghaffar would outlast Cohen 6-7(5), 6-3, 6-4 in a hard-fought and competitive match. “I always remind the players that we win and lose as a team, and that every court, singles or doubles, is as important as the other,” Pavlides added. “The season began with my belief that the strength of our team was our depth at doubles. It was very rewarding in the playoffs to see our singles players be the ones that made the difference, and fight to win all six of their matches, all of which were decided in three sets.” Massapequa’s three singles players also won their three respective matches in their semifinal win over Herricks. The Chiefs finished the season at 15-1 overall, while Oceanside ended its 2015 campaign with a final record of 12-4. LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Calhoun Beats Locust Valley for Conference III Title In the Nassau County Conference III Championship, it was the Calhoun Colts who defeated the Locust Valley Falcons 4-3. The clinching match came at second singles, with

Calhoun’s Nick Moehringer beating Carscen Bressel of Locust Valley, 0-6, 6-3, 6-3. The Colts also got wins from Pat Horn at first singles, Omar Ibrahim at third singles

and the team of Louis Goldstein & Sam Egert at third doubles. Calhoun finished the season at 11-4, while top-seeded Locust Valley ended the 2015 campaign at 12-2.

Plainview’s Solomon Takes Nassau County Title as Syosset’s Shleimovich & Granat Win Doubles Crown Nassau County 2015 Doubles Champions Dylan Granat & Daniel Shleimovich of Syosset advanced to the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) Championships

Sewanhaka’s Keegan Morris rips a forehand during the 2015 Nassau County Singles Championship Nassau County Singles Finalists Keegan Morris of Sewanhaka and Plainview’s Yuval Solomon hold a copy of Long Island Tennis Magazine

Plainview’s Yuval Solomon tracks down a ball en route to his Singles Championship victory

Cold Spring Harbor’s Patrick Hannity & Sean Mullins await a return in the Nassau County Doubles Championship As a freshman last spring, Plainview JFK’s Yuval Solomon reached the Nassau County final before falling to Port Washington’s Ben Rosen. This time around, now a sophomore, Solomon would not be denied, fighting off some tough competition and multiple rain delays to win the 2015 Nassau County Singles Title, beating another sophomore, Sewanhaka’s Keegan Morris, 6-1, 6-1 in the finals at Oceanside High School. The Nassau County Tournament was played on three different days over the course of a week due to multiple interruptions from 54

Mother Nature. Despite the delays, Solomon never missed a beat, using his reach and athleticism to frustrate Morris in the final. After the two exchanged holds through the first three games of the opening set, Solomon notched the match’s first break to jump ahead 3-1. He would break again in the sixth game to take a commanding 5-1 lead, and consolidated it with a hold of serve to take the first set 6-1. Solomon opened the second set by breaking Morris yet again, and another break in the third game gave him a 3-0 advantage. The Sewanhaka sophomore tried to work himself back into the match, breaking Solomon to cut

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

the deficit to 1-3, but momentum shifted to the Plainview sophomore as he broke right back to go ahead 4-1. One more break in the final game gave Solomon the county title as he moved to 180 on the season in singles matches. “Of course, last year was tough,” Solomon said of his loss in the County Finals last year. “I was very happy to win this year. And I’m proud. My coach and I worked very hard this season, so I’m definitely happy.” While the score line would imply that Solomon won the match easily, a lot of the points could have went either way. Morris


2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP played solid tennis throughout, firing what seemed to be a lot of winners down the lines, but each time Solomon was able to track balls down and get them back, forcing Morris into some unforced errors. “I know it’s frustrating for opponents,” said Solomon. “That’s why my coach always tells me, to run for every ball. We work hard, we run on the beach, we run on the court. I just try to run after every ball and it pays off.” Both Solomon and Morris advanced to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center to compete in the 2015 New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) Championships. Brady Berman of Jericho, the third-place winner, also represented Long Island at the States. In the doubles final, Syosset’s Daniel Shleimovich & Dylan Granat outlasted Cold Spring Harbor’s Sean Mullins & Patrick Hannity 2-6, 6-2, 7-5 to win the Nassau County championship.

The final two sets of this match were fiery and intense as each point became more and more meaningful. The turning point came as Syosset was up 2-1 in the second set when a backhand by Hannity sailed long, giving Shleimovich and Granat a crucial break. Another break point in the fifth game put the Syosset pair up 4-1, and they eventually served out the remainder of the set to force the county championship into a deciding third set. “Every game is important, especially when the team is as good as Sean & Patrick,” Shleimovich said of the key break in the second set. “I feel that the fact that we were able to break and consolidate it with our serve was very important.” As expected, the third set was extremely tight and bared witness to some fantastic tennis. Both squads traded holds to bring the set to 3-3 until Cold Spring Harbor nailed down the first break point of the set to take a 4-3 lead. Cold Spring Harbor gave the break right

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back to Syosset thanks to a couple of doublefaults, evening the set at 4-4. With the momentum back to Shleimovich & Granat, they outlasted the Cold Spring Harbor pair in a long rally to break their serve and clinch the county championship. Granat was in a familiar position last year when he paired up with then senior Henry Tell. The two lost a tough three-set match in the county tournament, an experience that helped him this time around. “I think I’ve matured from that for this year,” said Granat. “I was able to calm Daniel down a little bit. He was getting frustrated. We both calmed down, got down to it and did what we needed to do.” Along with the duos from Syosset and Cold Spring Harbor, Great Neck North’s Alan Delman & Simon Kashfi also advanced to states. Delman & Kashfi beat Syosset’s Spencer Lowitt & Nikhil Rajesh 7-5, 7-6(3) in the third-place match.

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2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Suffolk County Hills West Defeats Hills East for Suffolk County Title

The seniors from Half Hollow Hills West celebrate being crowned 2015 Suffolk County Champions after their victory over Half Hollow Hills East

For the past two seasons, the Half Hollow Hills West Boys Tennis team has been knocking on the door of the Suffolk County Championship. This year, they busted that door down. After back to back years of falling to its cross-town rivals Hills East in the Suffolk County finals, Hills West broke through, defeating Hills East 5-2 on a sunny but windy afternoon at Hills West High School. Jackson Weisbrot got things going for the Hills West Colts early on, defeating Tyler London of Hills East 6-0, 6-1 at fourth singles, nailing down the first victory of the match. Hills East countered as first singles player Travis Leaf defeated Hills West’s Aziz Rashidzada 6-4, 6-1 to knot the championship at 1-1. The big swing came on the courts of first doubles and second singles, which played adjacent to one another. Seniors Dylan & Duane Davis, who won the Suffolk County In56

dividual Doubles Title, split up, with Duane playing second singles and Dylan pairing up with Evan Nierman at first doubles. Duane Davis beat Hills East’s Ross Reiffman 6-2, 6-4 to give the Colts the advantage. Soon after, Dylan Davis & Nierman followed suit, coming back from a set down to beat Hills East’s Brian Rhee & Sahil Varma 3-6, 6-0, 6-2. “It’s always a little different,” Dylan Davis said of playing with a new partner. “But it’s good to play with someone different and develop that chemistry. Especially when playing with a lefty, our serve placement is a little different. And communication-wise too … Duane and I just know where one another is going and with Evan it is a little different, but we played well together.” After dropping the first set, the Hills West duo found their rhythm and was able to complete the comeback. “It took a little time to adjust,” added Davis. “But then we kept on doing what we needed

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

to do and stuck to the basics. Our serving and volleying was good and we got to the net and played aggressively.” With three wins in the book, Hills West needed just one more victory to capture the 2015 County Championship. That win would come at fourth doubles, as Zachary Mollo & Brandon Nomberg beat Eric Handleman & Adam Wilck 6-0, 6-1 in front of many onlookers, who let out a huge ovation after match point was won. “They had the drive, dedication and determination,” said Hills West Head Coach Kim Langendorfer. “They worked really hard and they wanted it—and they did it.” Cameron Klepper added to the win with a 6-2, 3-6, 6-4 victory over Abhinav Srivastava at third singles after the County Title was clinched. Hills West finished the season at 15-0. Hills East concluded its season at 16-3, with all three losses dished out by Hills West.


2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP SWR’s Kuhnle Takes Suffolk Singles Title as Hills West’s Davis Brothers Defend Doubles Crown Shoreham-Wading River junior Chris Kuhnle won the 2015 Suffolk County Individual Title, defeating second-seeded Stephen Gruppuso of Bayport-Blue Point 6-4, 6-0 in finals. Kuhnle and Gruppuso both entered the final with unblemished records in singles on the season. At 4-4 in the opening set, Kuhnle secured a key break point to go up 5-4, and consolidated it with a hold to take the first set 6-4. With momentum on his side, Kuhnle took control in the second, winning all six games en route to the straight set victory. Kuhnle and Gruppuso both represented Suffolk County and Long Island at the State Championships, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Cannon Kingsley of Northport also

advanced to the States, defeating East Islip’s Emmanuel Vacalares 6-2, 6-2 in the third-place matchup. In doubles, the Suffolk County final was an all-Half Hollow Hills West affair as Dylan & Duane Davis met teammates Jackson Weisbrot & Evan Nierman, with the Davis Brothers defending their title from a year ago, beating Weisbrot & Nierman 6-2, 6-2. Joining both Hills West pairs at the state tournament were Ross Reiffman & Tyler London of Half Hollow Hills East. Reiffman & Lon-

don defeated Alex Amadio & Nick Gajda of Smithtown West in the third place match.

   

   



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2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP NYSPHSAA/NYSFSSAA Boys Tennis Championships Gamble Defends His Title at State Championships Shorehan Wading River’s Christopher Kuhnle was a 6-0, 6-1 winner over Highland’s Darshan Rammohan in the opening round

Plainview JFK’s Yuval Solomon, 2015 Nassau County Singles champ, was runner-up at the 2015 NYSPHSAA/NYS FSSAA Singles Championship

Jericho’s Brady Berman during his round one victory over Ithica’s Justin Milner

Webster Schroeder Junior Matt Gamble won his second consecutive singles title at the 2015 NYSPHSAA/NYSFSSAA Boys Tennis Championships at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, defeating Plainview-Old Bethpage JFK’s Yuval Solomon 6-3, 6-1. “I think I played my best match of the tournament today,” said Gamble. “I felt like this one was one of my best serving matches and that I was hitting my forehands really well. I felt in control the whole time out there.” In control was an understatement, as Gamble got out to a 4-1 lead in the first set by using his powerful forehand to work Solomon back and forth on the court. He 58

Suffolk County Doubles Champs Dylan Davis & Duane Davis from Half Hollow Hills West celebrate during their opening round win over Brighton’s Joshua Marvald & Ryan Gao

kept the sophomore from Plainview JFK on the defensive the whole match using a combination of power and placement and hitting key volleys at opportune times. “He is a solid player. I think he had a little too much power for me,” said Solomon, who was ranked third in the tournament. “I thought I played the first set pretty well against him, but overall, I needed to be more consistent.” Solomon, who won the Nassau County Singles Title earlier, said that he will work hard to get back to the NYSPHSAA/NYSFSSAA Championship in 2016. In the doubles finals match, Hope & Courage Crawford of Mamaroneck High School defeated Cold Spring Harbor’s

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Sean Mullins & Patrick Hannity 7-5 6-3. Serving was an issue for both sides, as there were multiple breaks throughout the match. In the first set, momentum shifted back-and-forth as the Crawford Brothers went up 5-3, but Mullins & Hannity rebounded to even the set at 5-5. After holding to go up 6-5, the Crawfords were able to secure their third break of the set to take the set 7-5. In the second set, the teams held serve for the first three games, giving the Crawfords a 2-1 lead. In the fourth game, the first break of the set was secured and the Crawfords took a 3-1 lead. From there, they stayed in the lead, and up 5-3, tried to serve it out. Mullins & Hannity fought off three match


2015

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP

Cold Spring Harbor’s Sean Mullins & Patrick Hannity finished as runners-up at the 2015 NYSPHSAA/NYSFSSAA Boys Tennis Doubles Championships points in the final game showing the heart they exemplified throughout the tournament, but the Crawfords were not to be denied, and on match point number four, they closed out the win. Cold Spring Harbor Junior Sean Mullins said that serving and communication was an issue for him and his partner. “I did not think we were serving great today … we were both a little off,” said Mullins. “Also, our communication was not as good as it could have been, particularly

Northport’s Cannon Kingsley during the 2015 NYSPHSAA Boy’s Singles Tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

at the net.” Hannity, a sophomore at CSH, credited the Crawford Brothers for a well-played match, but wished his serve was a little more on point. “I had chances on my serve, but at key points, I felt like I did not serve as well as I could have,” said Hannity. The Crawfords also had their issues with serving early on in the match. “Serving was a big issue, especially in the first game of the match,” said Courage,

who is a freshman at Mamaroneck. “We dropped that game, but after that, we had hold after hold.” Courage also said he and his brother kept their composure, didn’t get mad and supported each other throughout the match. “We’ve had times where we’d start fighting with each other and we start losing our focus on the match,” said Courage. “But today, we didn’t get mad at each other and had each other’s back the entire time.”

Plainedge Coach Amato Named Long Island Tennis Magazine Coach of the Year Plainedge High School Head Coach Lorraine Amato was awarded the Long Island Tennis Magazine Coach of the Year Award at the Nassau County Individual Championships. Coach Amato led the Plainedge team to the Conference IV Championship with a 12-0 record in 2013-2014. Despite losing many starters and moving up to Conference III-B this past season, Lorraine energized her team to a 9-5 record and made the playoffs. Amato also serves as the Conference IIIB Coordinator and has represented her Conference at the seeding meeting and as a liaison to the Boys’ Coordinator.

Plainedge High School Head Coach Lorraine Amato (center) is congratulated on her honor by members of the Plainedge High School Boys Tennis Team LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Omega 3-Fatty Acids and Athletes By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN While many of us think of Omega-3 Fatty Acids as being good for heart health, new research shows Omega-3s also provide benefits for athletes. What are Fatty Acids? Fatty acids, which are long chains of carbon, are classified as saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. Polyunsaturated fats contain Omega-3s and Omega-6s. Although there is wide variability between people, most Americans consume 10 times more Omega-6s than

Omega-3s. Most experts agree a healthier ratio would be closer to 2:1. How can Omega-3s benefit athletes? l Faster recovery: Fish oil supplementation consistently results in lower levels of inflammation. If inflammation remains elevated after exercise, this can negatively impact muscle soreness, tissue repair and other aspects of recovery. l Reduce muscle soreness: Omega-3 Fats have also been shown to augment blood flow to muscles during exercise, decrease muscle soreness by 35 percent, reduce swelling and increase the range of motion after damaging exercise.

l Burn fat and slow muscle loss: Studies also show that increasing Omega-3 levels enhances insulin sensitivity, which improves fat burning in muscles and inhibits fat storage. Omega-3s may regulate muscle growth and help during extended periods of rest by slowing the loss in both muscle and bone. This could apply to athletes during breaks in training or layoffs due to injury where muscle loss could be significant. Where to find Omega 3s? l Salmon: Salmon is an excellent source of protein, vitamins, and Omega-3 Fatty Acids. Eat baked salmon one to two times per week.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


l Chia seeds: Chia seeds provide many health benefits, providing Omega-3s, carbohydrates, protein and fiber. Chia seeds are an unprocessed, whole grain food that can be absorbed by the body as seed. Chia expands in your stomach, helping you feel full and eat less. Chia seeds can be added to any food, such as water, yogurt or a smoothie.

l Walnuts: Out of all the nuts, walnuts are the highest in Omega-3 Fatty Acids. Being high in antioxidants, walnuts have cancer-fighting properties and are good for heart health. Walnuts are the perfect addition to any green salad. Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solutions PC in Great Neck, N.Y. is a New York State-li-

censed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. Irina Lehat RD Nutrition Solutions offers group classes starting in September, for kids in kindergarten through high school. Small groups, affordable prices! Mention this article and receive 20 percent off any services. For more information, call (917) 7698031, e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com or visit www.irinalehat.com.

Finding Your Breath and Finding Acceptance By Carl Barnett Anyone who has had to speak publicly to a large assembly of people has experienced the uncertainty of performance. The average person stumbles through the “ums” and “aahs” between thoughts until they find their comfort zone and begin to breathe a bit more regularly. This is the same thing Junior is going to go through during USTA matches at all levels. They may rush when they should slow down, or slow down when they have an opponent who is unfit. They may be upset by an opponent’s slow tempo or bad line calls. They may even fail to see opportunities or explore pre-planned strategies. Finding one’s breath is the key to relaxation. When your heartbeat is in excess of 150 beats per minute at the start of a point, you will lose 95 percent of those points. You also will lack the ability to see the trees from the forest. Little details will seem obscure and leave you little chance for adjustment. You will miss the big picture. Recently, while listening to an interview with a leading golfer during a rain delay of a PGA event, he was asked what he would be working on when he got back on the course in the final round. His response was, “I will be working on my breathing, that’s what everyone on the pro tour is working on these days.” Paul Annacone, former player, coach and current commentator for the Tennis Channel, spoke recently of his use of breathing meditation as a method of staying calm, regulating his heartbeat and being clear on task during matches. As an introduction to these breathing techniques, you can find many tutorials on YouTube. You must look for focus methods because there are many other techniques, including those for sleep, which may only be appropriate for the night prior to a match. As you will hear me say again, these techniques must be practiced just like your serve in order

to be effective. After finding one’s breath, the second most important technique is the use of the 20-second rule. Coupled with breathing techniques, the slowing of one’s tempo of play could have a positive effect on the game of most junior players. Patrick Allen of the Serious & Persistent Mental illness (SPMI), the New York State Office of Mental Heath, has written a wonderful article at Tennis Recruiting.com regarding practicing the 20-second rule. Players experience a multitude of emotions, including negative ones. “A critical skill that a tennis player must learn in emotionally challenging situations is acceptance,” said Allen. “Acceptance is defined as the ability to see things as they are and not as they should be. When players learn how to accept, they are able to stay more emotionally in control and win points they may otherwise lose. The challenge with acceptance is that it is a skill that must be practiced.” As I have said here before, Allen goes on to say: “These skills must be practiced often, and in many cases, does not work like a simple

light switch that can be turned on and off.” The best way to slow a player down is have two matches on the same court playing concurrently. When the players have to wait to alternate their points with another, they experience that tempo without having it enforced. Remember, these are techniques to eliminate negative emotions, but not positive emotions. We are not looking for a blank slate. The recent obituary of a Hall of Fame runner who was known as being very emotionally detached quoted his coach as saying, “When he came up against men with spirit, he let them beat him.” We are looking for positive emotions that are void of negatives which undermine or diminish the results our players have worked so hard to achieve. Good luck! Carl Barnett started the Early Hit Training Center over 10 years ago. He has coached countless ranked pre-college tennis players. He may be reached by phone at (516) 455-1225 or email at earlyhit@optonline.net.

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B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

ongratulations to Long Island’s 6.0 and 8.0 Mixed-Doubles teams who both won at Sectionals and will be advancing to the National Championships. The 6.0 team played out of Christopher Morley and is captained by Darlene Sotomayor. The 8.0 team played out of Long Beach Tennis and is captained by Andrew Camacho. Good luck to both teams! The 18 & Over League, 40 & Over League and the 55 & Over League are all underway. A few things to keep in mind that have come up in the first couple of weeks of play:

C

1. When entering scores, you are not done until you click on the “Finish” tab. If you do not, the scores do not show up in the standings. 2. Now that it is after June 1, all matches should be set. Any team now asking for a reschedule, automatically forfeits third doubles.

3. In timed matches, all bathroom breaks, injury timeouts, etc. must be completed with everyone back on court ready to play with at least 15 minutes left before the end of the match. There are no bathroom breaks or injury timeouts in the last 15 minutes of a timed match. 4. Sportsmanship, sportsmanship, sportsmanship! Yes, it’s nice to win your match, but have that win be based on your playing ability. Does it feel good to win a timed match based on stalling? I would think not yet it is the number one complaint. 5. Decide on match ending devices before the start of the match. Try not to have it be the home captain calling the match. Set a cellphone alarm, have the front desk flash the lights, etc. 6. Please do not have your spectators or teammates assist in making line calls from wherever they are watching from. There should not be any outside involvement.

I think that covers the things that have come up so far! Captains have all playoff, Regional, Sectional and National Championship information. Below are the Playoff, Regional and Sectional (all to be played in Greenburg, N.Y.) and National Championship dates: 18 & Over l Ladies 2.5: Playoffs: Day & Night First vs. Second between July 13-17 & Regionals: Monday, July 20 at 7:00 p.m. at Point Set. Sectionals: Aug. 7-9 & Nationals: Oct. 16-18 at Indian Wells, Calif. l Ladies 3.0: Day Playoffs: First vs. Fourth & Second vs. Third, then Winner vs. Winner playing between July 22-29 & Night Playoffs: Same format as the day playing between July 26-31 & Regionals: Sunday, Aug. 2 at Carefree Racquet Club. Sectionals: Aug. 14-16 & Nationals: Oct. 2-4 in Tucson, Ariz.

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l Ladies 3.5: Day & Night Playoffs: Same format as 3.0, playing between July 27Aug. 7, & Regionals: Aug. 10 at 7:00 p.m. at Carefree Racquet Club. Sectionals: Aug. 21-23 & Nationals: Oct. 911 at Indian Wells, Calif. l Ladies 4.0: Day Playoffs: First vs. Second between July 27-31 & Night: First vs. Fourth & Second vs. Third, then Winner vs. Winner between July 27Aug. 1 & Regionals: Aug. 4 at 7:00 p.m. at Sportime Lynbrook. Sectionals: Aug. 14-16 & Nationals: Oct. 2-4 at Rancho Mirage, Calif. l Ladies 4.5: Playoffs: First vs. Second between Aug. 3-10 & Sectionals: Aug. 21-23 & Nationals: Oct. 9-11 at Rancho Mirage, Calif. l Ladies 5.0: Sectionals: Aug. 7-9 & Nationals: Oct. 2-4 at Indian Wells, Calif. 18 & Over l Men’s 3.0: Sectionals: Aug. 14-16 & Nationals: Oct. 2-4 at Tucson, Ariz. l Men’s 3.5: Playoffs: First vs. Second to be played the week of Aug. 3. Sectionals: Aug. 21-23 & Nationals: Oct. 9-11 at Indian Wells, Calif. l Men’s 4.0: Playoffs: First vs. Second week of July 27. Sectionals: Aug. 1416 & Nationals: Oct. 2-4 at Rancho Mirage, Calif. l Men’s 4.5: Playoffs: First vs. Second, week of Aug. 10. Sectionals: Aug. 2123 & Nationals: Oct. 9-11 at Rancho Mirage, Calif. l Men’s 5.0: Playoffs: Round One, the week of July 20. Round Two week of July 27. Sectionals: Aug: 7-9 & Nationals: Oct. 2-4 at Indian Wells, Calif. 40 & Over League l Women’s 3.0: Playoffs: Day First vs. Fourth & Second vs. Third, then Winner vs. Winner between July 19-July 22. Night is First Place Nassau vs. Second Place Suffolk and vice-versa between July 19-July 24. Regionals: July 26 at 9:00 a.m. at Carefree Racquet Club. Sectionals: Aug 7-9 & Nationals: Oct. 16-18 in Tucson, Ariz. l Women’s 3.5: Playoffs: Day First Place Nassau vs. Second Place Suffolk and vice-versa between Aug. 5-12. Night: Same format between Aug. 7-14. Re-

gionals: Aug. 16 at 9:00 a.m. at Carefree Racquet Club. Sectionals: Aug. 28-30 & Nationals: Oct. 23-25 in Tucson, Ariz. l Women’s 4.0: Playoffs: Day 1 First vs. Fourth & Second vs. Third, then Winner vs. Winner between July 20-23. Night: First Place Nassau vs. Second Place Suffolk and vice-versa, then Winner vs. Winner between July 19-24. Regionals: July 26 at 11:00 a.m. at Carefree Racquet Club. Sectionals: Aug. 7-9 & Nationals: Oct. 30-Nov. 1 in Indian Wells, Calif. l Women’s 4.5: Sectionals: Aug. 28-30 & Nationals: Oct. 23-25 at Indian Wells, Calif. 40 & Over League l Men’s 3.0: Playoffs: First vs. Second week of Aug. 10. Sectionals: Aug. 2830 & Nationals: Oct. 16-18 at Tucson, Ariz. l Men’s 3.5: Playoffs: First vs. Fourth & Second vs. Third week of July 27 and Winner vs. Winner the week of Aug. 3. Sectionals: Aug. 28-30 & Nationals: Oct. 23-25 at Tucson, Ariz. l Men’s 4.0: Playoffs: First vs. Fourth & Second vs. Third, Winner vs. Winner between July 26-31. Sectionals: Aug. 7-9 & Nationals: Oct. 30-Nov. 1 in Indian Wells, Calif. l Men’ s 4.5: Playoffs: First vs. Second, the week of Aug 10. Sectionals: Aug. 28-30 & Nationals: Oct. 23-25 in Indian Wells, Calif.

55 & Over League l All Sectionals will be held Sept. 18-20 in Greenburg, N.Y. All Nationals are in Surprise, Ariz. l Women’s 6.0: Playoffs: First vs. Second, the week of Aug. 17. Nationals: Oct. 23-25 l Women’s 7.0: Playoffs: First vs. Fourth and Second vs. Third, the week of Aug. 17, and Winner vs. Winner, the week of Aug. 24. Nationals: Oct. 30-Nov. 1. l Women’s 8.0: Playoffs: First vs. Second, the week of Aug. 24. Nationals: Oct. 23-25. 55 & Over League l All Sectionals will be held Sept. 18-20 in Greenburg, N.Y. All Nationals are in Surprise, Ariz. l Men’s 7.0: Playoffs: First vs. Second, the week of Aug. 24. Nationals: Oct. 30-Nov. 1. l Men’s 8.0: Playoffs First vs. Fourth & Second vs. Third, the week of Aug. 10, Winner vs. Winner, the week of Aug. 17. Nationals: Oct. 23-25. l Men’s 9.0: Playoffs: First vs. Second, the week of Aug. 17. Nationals: Oct. 30-Nov. 1. Good luck in the remainder of your matches! Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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The

Late

Long Island product Bob Litwin carves unique path to the court

By Brian Coleman ob Litwin’s tennis journey was the road less traveled. He didn’t start playing at a very young age and didn’t fall in love with the sport when he was a youngster, but the Great Neck native carved his own path into the tennis

B

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world that took him to places even he never imagined. “I started to play the game when I was 12 or 13, and I was just a good athlete who happened to play tennis,” said Litwin. “But it wasn’t my love … my love was basketball.” Litwin only started playing tennis thanks in part to his father, who was a college athlete himself. The elder Litwin

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

met some people in the area who played tennis and began getting into a weekly game on the courts of Great Neck Estates Park. Young Bob would walk around the courts just hitting the balls around which would be his first exposure to the game that became a huge part of his life. In high school, Litwin went out for the tennis team, primarily because he needed something to keep him busy during the spring season. “I played high school tennis mainly because I needed something to play outside of the basketball season,” said Litwin. “I had no real specific training or skills, but as an athlete with a tennis racquet, I could run around and hit the ball. I was decent, and played number one singles on my team, but I had no real interest in it.” After high school, Litwin attended the University of Michigan, with the hopes of making its basketball team. A fellow Long Islander, Peter Fishbach, urged him to go out for the tennis team there, but on the first day of tryouts, he lost to the school’s top recruit 6-0, 6-0. The loss discouraged him from the


e

Bloomer sport and he put his racquet down for the next few years. It wasn’t until after he graduated and moved back to Long Island that his tennis career really began to pick up. He got a job working for Peter’s father, Joe, at Tennis Enterprises in Great Neck, one of the few indoor tennis clubs on Long Island at that time. When Fishbach was unable to make a lesson, some of the parents and students asked Litwin if he could hit with them. Without any specific tennis training under his belt, Litwin had to do some research. “The night before my first lesson, I went to the library and took out the Sports Illustrated Book of Tennis,” said Litwin. “I started to study grips and other things. My head was spinning. But what I found when I started teaching was that I did a better job when I asked the students what they did on a particular shot and learned from them, rather than trying to tell them exactly what to do.” This was a huge eye-opener for Litwin, as it would shape his coaching philosophy. He began to try and work with people on focus, patience and the overall mental side of the sport, as opposed to just specialized technique. After working at a number of other clubs and growing tennis programs all over the Island, Litwin would pick up his racquet again and began playing tournaments while in his 30s. “When I hit my 30s, I decided I was going to start playing tournaments. I entered some local events and got crushed, but realized that I did have some skill,” said Litwin. “But I was negative and angry on the court and I realized that I was doing all the things I was teaching players not to do. I told myself that if I was really going to be good at teaching, I would have to go through this process myself.” And he did. Step by step, Litwin’s own tennis

game began to form and he continued to improve. Despite some speed bumps along the way, Litwin climbed his way up the rankings in the 35 and Over Division, until he finally broke through at a national tournament in Southampton. He would go on to play for the Senior Davis Cup team eight times and ended the 2005 season as the number one player in the world in his age division. A far cry from the player who was unable to play for Michigan’s college team. At the world championships in Australia that same year, Litwin would reach the final after upending fellow American Brian Cheney, arguably the top player in the world at that time. He then beat Lito Alvarez in the final and was able to call himself a world champion. “I was on top of the world,” Litwin said of that victory. But Litwin says his game grew even more from there. Not because of winning results, but because of the way he viewed the game. “From that time on, my game grew a lot more, my sense of self was more solid,” said Litwin. “I believed that I was a good player, but it wasn’t about the validation of winning. I stayed the course, did the work, kept my mind right and didn’t worry about results. It was a

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nice thing to have on my resume, but what was more important was the validation of all the work I put into my game despite starting late.” Litwin has taken his philosophy and applied it to more than just tennis. He now serves as a performance coach and helps people of all fields, from Wall Street recreational players to high school athletes. “Find a way to be free, it doesn’t have to be based on a series of different results,” Litwin said. “I urge people to train themselves within their day to day life to stay free of what people are thinking of them, external results.” Over the course of his playing career, Litwin was a 17-time USTA National Champion, a world champion and is currently a member of the USTA Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame. Litwin’s journey has now taken him to Colorado after being one of the key tennis pioneers on Long Island for decades. He still plays tournaments and is still teaching and coaching people the things that has made him successful. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or e-mail brianc@usptennis.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com


A Celebration of

Tennis History and the Ripple Effect By Lonnie Mitchel As I pondered what to write about as the publication deadline for submission rapidly approached, the light bulb went off in my head. Politics, religion and civil rights really do not belong as subject material in Long Island Tennis Magazine or does it? After all, in Long Island and New York City, a melting pot of people of varying backgrounds this magazine caters to is the audience. What can I write about that concerns our audience? In terms of politics or history, what exists that can be so important that it transcends the game of tennis? So, I did some research and share with you in no particular historical timeline, some people who made our game what it is today, and at the same time, transcended the sports world. Billie Jean King who worked tirelessly for equality of women and equal prize money became one of the most influential people of the 20th Century. Our National Tennis Center here in New York bears her name. Arthur Ashe, an inspiring role model for African-Americans, social activist and highprofile campaigner for the HIV and AIDS communities, died in 1993. His measure of influence 22 years after his death legacy burns as brightly as ever. A former U.S. Open and Wimbledon Champion, U.S. Davis Cup participant and Davis Cup captain, Ashe has the main stadium court at the National Tennis Center named in his honor,

along with a striking statue of his likeness adorning the grounds. Eighteen-time Grand Slam champion, Martina Navratilova, and one of the greatest women players ever, is a lesbian. Navratilova expanded the dialogue on issues of gender and sexuality in sports. Then there was Richard Raskind, born in New York City in 1934, as she put it, was raised “a nice Jewish boy.” Who is Richard Raskind you may ask? As Renee Richards, she was denied entry into the 1976 U.S. Open by the USTA, citing an unprecedented women-born-women policy. She disputed the ban, and the New York Supreme Court ruled in her favor in 1977. This was a landmark decision in favor of transsexual rights. Through her fight to play tennis as a woman, she challenged gender roles and became a role model and spokesperson for the transgender community. She later went on to coach Martina Navratilova from 1981-1983. Althea Gibson was an American tennis player and professional golfer, as well as being the first African-American athlete to cross the color line of international tennis. In 1956, she became the first person of color to win a Grand Slam title (the French Open) followed by Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in 1957 and again in 1958. She was given a ticker-tape parade down Broadway in Manhattan in July of 1957 after her first Wimbledon Championships. All of the above examples are great people who are rooted in tennis and helped make the world a better place for all people and all

athletes in all sports. Once Jackie Robinson broke the baseball color barrier, the foundation was formulated which paved the way for many of these individuals to accomplish great things beyond just winning some tennis matches. I was recently appointed head coach for USA’s tennis team in the Berlin European Maccabi Games, in partnership with the United States Olympic Committee, that coincides with the 70th anniversary of the ending of World War II. I am just Lonnie Mitchel, a guy who loves to coach and give back to the game of tennis under the auspices of my heritage. I realized that this opportunity would have never come my way without the efforts of those great men and women who came before me. However, more than the honor itself to represent my country and heritage is that this assignment helped me understand the importance of their pioneering efforts. Their greatness proves that no matter the obstacles in your path, you can conquer and achieve enormous things. In Germany in the spring of 1933, an “Aryans Only” policy was instituted in all German athletic organizations. “NonAryans”—Jewish or part-Jewish athletes— were systematically excluded from German sports facilities and associations. The German Boxing Association expelled amateur champion Erich Seelig in April 1933 because he was Jewish (Seelig later resumed his boxing career in the United States). Another continued on page 68

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a celebration of tennis history continued from page 67 Jewish athlete, Daniel Prenn—Germany’s top-ranked tennis player—was removed from Germany’s Davis Cup Team. Gretel Bergmann, a world-class high-jumper, was expelled from her German club in 1933 and from the German Olympic team in 1936. In 1931, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) foolishly awarded the 1936 Summer Olympics to Berlin. The choice was to have signaled Germany’s return to the world community after its isolation in the aftermath of defeat in World War I. Two years later, Nazi party leader Adolf Hitler became chancellor and turned the nation’s fragile democracy into a one-party dictatorship that persecuted Jews in particular and all political opponents, no matter the denomination. The Nazi claim to control all aspects of German life also extended to sports. Members of the U.S. American Olympic Team were not immune to such discrimination as U.S. sprinters and Jewish athletes Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller were pre-

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vented from participating in the 1936 Olympic Games having been pulled from the 4x100 meter shortly before the event was to take place simply to not offend Adolf Hitler and his policies. There was already a lot of controversy with Jesse Owens competing in that Olympics in that he represented an obstacle to Aryan superiority. Yet, the United States saw fit for Owens to compete, but the two young Jewish men were pulled from competition well after qualifying for those events in the U.S. Trials. On the 70th anniversary of the USA’s victory over Germany in WW II, the largest contingent of people of the Jewish faith since that time will come to Berlin, the site of the 1936 Olympics. The United States will send a delegation of 200 athletes with 20 of those individuals being tennis players from various parts of the USA joining more than 2,300 Jewish athletes from 30 countries to compete in a variety of sports in the European Maccabi Games. On July 28, the athletes will

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march in the opening ceremonies on the grounds of the 1936 Olympics, the same grounds where Adolf Hitler so proudly thought he would be showcasing Aryan supremacy. Our game of tennis has done so much to close the differences between many. Although there is still so much war and political unrest in the world, maybe in my idealistic view of tennis beyond the courts has done its share to make the world a little better. It is unlikely the European Maccabi Games of 2015 in Berlin will get any television or newspaper coverage. However, names like Billie Jean King, Renee Richards, Arthur Ashe, Martina Navratilova and Althea Gibson may have a little something to do with the expansion of sports in competitions and venues such as this. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or email lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.


Your Post-Match Routine and Why It’s the Only Way to Improve By Dr. Tom Ferraro In the last issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine, we spoke of the value of a good prematch routine and mentioned how important physical and mental preparation was to the tennis player. In this issue, we will discuss what you do following the match. The most important skill a tennis player can possess is the ability to learn from their losses. If they can work through disappointment and despair and forgive themselves, then they can have an enormous opportunity to learn about the game and what needs improvement. As the saying goes: “The only way to learn is to fail.� The following article will discuss the importance of a post-match routine and the six steps every touring player uses in order to improve. 1. After a big loss, the feeling of anger, despair and disappointment are great and one ought to feel these emotions. It may take a few hours to recover from the emotion, and though painful, this should trigger an awareness to learn and grow. This phase ends with forgiveness to oneself. This is a mature defense and a good one.

rate. This needs to be followed by scheduling an oncourt lesson to reinforce the new move. 4. During the lesson, you need to exchange dialogue with the coach and demonstrate the new move so that it becomes engrained in the body and the mind. 5. Finally, in Phase V, you need to use the new move in a match. At the beginning, the new move will not be natural, so one needs to be patient and allot time to commit to this. 6. As time goes on, this will produce more wins and then your job during the postmatch routine is to again review the new move so that it becomes refreshed and not forgotten. If you can manage to instill this post-match routine into your tennis career, you will actually learn and improve in ways you could never do alone. It takes the courage to face your losses. Review your flaws and pinpoint the biggest one, and then have the humility

to realize you need help with this matter. Then, have the trust in your coach so that they can help you make the changes necessary. You also need the verbal skills to engage in dialogue with your coach during the playing lesson. Finally, you must have the fortitude, memory and patience in order to put the new move into action. This is what we call a post-match routine and something all of the top players in the world do after every match. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

2. This is then followed by Phase II, which is a careful review of where one went wrong. Review each point and identify the biggest flaws in your game. Maybe it’s a weak backhand, failure to attack, playing it too safe, getting too angry, a weak serve, etc. You must pick the one big flaw that caused the loss. Memorize this mistake and write it down. And do not think you can figure the solution out on your own because you cannot. 3. Go to your coach the next day and share the flaws with him and detail what occurred during the match. The coach will listen and will know what caused the flaw. This will be followed by an answer, which, in all likelihood, be both simple and accu-

  

  

 

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LONG

ISLAND

TENNIS

MAGAZINE’S

charitable initiatives Commack HS Tennis Hosts Sixth Annual Autism Awareness Event By Jacob Mishkin

Credit all photos to Jacob Mishkin

The Commack Boys Varsity Tennis team recently took their talents to the courts to bring awareness and raise money for Nassau/Suffolk Services for Autism (NSSA). The Annual Autism Awareness Event, “Play With the Teachers Doubles Tournament” was an event where Commack High School teachers and students teamed up to raise money for autism research, while playing the sport of tennis. Before the event began, Commack Boys Varsity Tennis Coach Shane Helfner made it clear what the day was all about: “Today is all about giving back.” Noting that this has been the sixth consecutive year the event has been held, Helfner was enthusiastic and showed how important the event was to him and to everyone involved. “When I originally planned this, I wanted to find a way to bring more people to the tennis courts, and have the community be involved 70

in what we do here. Everyone enjoys seeing their teachers outside the classroom, and I think this is the best way to combine school, tennis, and the community together for a great cause,” said Helfner. “The best part of this event is that NSSA is right here in Commack. It is always nice to donate money to a corporation, but we’re truly giving back to the Commack community.” Commack Boys Varsity Tennis Captain Nick Fox and Commack High School math teacher Christina Pawlowski also shared their thoughts on the event. Fox, a junior, noted that raising money for charity helped bring the team together. “We are all great friends on the court and also outside of school, so it’s like another day of practice, but now we have all these people here and we are raising all of this money,” said Fox. For Pawlowski, this marks her third time participating in the event. Pawlowski showed

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nothing but praise for the event and was thrilled when she was asked by a student to team up with him. “Being asked by a student is a huge honor, it is the biggest compliment you can get,” said Pawlowski. “The event is a relaxed atmosphere and a great way to bring attention to autism, Shane Helfner does a really nice job every single year, you can tell he puts his heart and soul into it.” Though the friendly tournament was about bringing awareness and raising money, participation medals, gift baskets and trophies were prizes for those who came out and helped bring the school, tennis program and the community together for a worthy cause. Jacob Mishkin is an intern with Long Island Tennis Magazine. The Woodbury, N.Y. native is currently a junior at St. Bonaventure University where he plays for the Men’s Tennis Team.


Third Annual Ace it for Syd Tournament Pays It Forward

The Third Annual Ace It for Syd Tennis Tournament brought together a number of friends, family and tennis enthusiasts to Oceanside High School to honor the memory of Sydne Jacoby. The tournament happened to fall on a special day, as Sydne was celebrating her 22nd birthday the same day the tournament was happening. There were five different divisions for tennis, as well as food, drinks, raffles, t-shirts and much more on a sunny Sunday afternoon. In its third year, the theme of this year’s Ace It for Syd event was “Paying It Forward.” “I’ve always felt the warmth, I’ve always felt the love,” said Nadine Jacoby, Sydne’s mother. “But this year, I really wanted to figure out what I wanted the premise of the Sydne Jacoby Foundation to be. And it’s all about paying it forward. We’re only here for a short period of time, and the important thing is helping each other while we’re here.” The event and Foundation have both grown significantly in its three years of existence, and for the second year in a row, gave out a scholarship to a deserving high school student. It was given this year to Oceanside High School’s Rebecca Klein, who will be attending SUNY New Paltz in the fall to play volleyball. “I’m so excited and grateful … thank you,” Klein said of the honor. In addition to the fantastic raffle prizes, great food and music, the day also saw some highly competitive tennis out on the courts. “The tournament is so well-organized,” said Nancy Schwarz. “Being a three-year participant, I’ve watched this event evolve so much. This takes a tragedy and turns it into

tion to Memorial Sloan Kettering. The following are the winners from the tournament: l Women’s “A” Doubles: Nancy & Kaitlyn Wisniewski l Women’s “B: Doubles: Debbie Cohen & Sabrina Wolkoff l Men’s “B” Doubles: Glen Steinberg & Kevin Kowalsky l Mixed-Doubles: David Merkov & Allison Greenberg

a way to pay it forward.” As a continued part of the “Pay It Forward” theme, the foundation also presented the family of Susan Alvy, long-time manager of Rockville Racquet and a staple of the Long Island tennis community, with a dona-

Special thanks to Lisa Carlisi, Kathy Miller, Maureen McFadzen, Jamie Dellarocca and all of the Jacoby friends and family who have made the growth of the Sydne Jacoby Foundation possible. If you would like to learn more, or to donate to the Sydne Jacoby foundation, visit www. sydnejacoby.com or e-mail aceitforsyd@verizon.net.

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The Uninvited Guest By Tonny van de Pieterman n Holland, where I grew up, the interclub spring league matches are played on Sundays all over the country. For several years, I played for a club in Amsterdam called Joy Mozaik, a unique tennis club located near the Olympic Stadium with many interesting people. For instance, one of my teammates lived on a houseboat in the canals of the city. To this day, this remains an alternative way of living. I remember a hot day in May, which is pretty unique in Holland. Our league season starts around April 1 and is played exclusively on outdoor red clay courts. I remember many matches in frigid conditions, but this was a hot day in late May. A team match consisted of six matches, often only played on one or two available courts at a time. An all-day affair! On this particular day, I had played an away match with my team and we had finished relatively

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early at around 5:00 p.m. I could not wait to get back to our home club. At Joy Mozaik, we had a large terrace with lots of tables and chairs. To me, there was nothing better than watching and cheering on our other club teams while they were finishing their matches, after a full day of tennis. On courts one and two, our second-ranked club team was playing its mixed-doubles matches. This was my favorite team to watch. The team was made up of four true Amsterdammers which means they were nuts! It was not rare that, after the matches were over and darkness had set in, that some of these characters would run a lap outside around a jampacked clubhouse buck naked, with shampoo still in their hair. Anyway, the male player on court one was Bas (short for Sebastian). He was 6”3’, thin and extremely flexible. His nickname was “Snakeman,” as he would often come up with some incredible shots from seemingly impossible positions. The terrace was filled to capacity for this match, which was going down to the wire. The crowd was “ooh-ing” and

“aah-ing” with every point. It was 6-5 in the third set, when an incredible rally ensued. Back-and-forth volley exchanges until finally, it looked like the home team was going to win the point after a pop up. Bas had his tall frame under the ball, his racquet was up as he looked ready to spike the ball when inexplicably, he ducked, barely avoiding the ball as he ducked below the net. The crowd moaned as his partner made an unsuccessful attempt to save the ball from bouncing twice. In a flat Amsterdam accent, the gentle giant known for his dry wit uttered, “Oh man, this can ONLY happen to me … as I am about to smash the ball for a winner, a fly comes by and lands on my NOSE!” Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/Eastern Long Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or email tonny@pointsettennis.com.

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

directory

Alley Pond Tennis Center 79-20 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. (718) 264-2600 www.alleypondtenniscenter.com Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 • catsrvc@gmail.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 271-6616 • www.easternathleticclubs.com Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net

Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 • tonny@pointsettennis.com www.pointsettennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 • tennis@pwta.com www.pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 • www.rwtt.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 (516) 676-9107 • www.rwtt.com Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 • hli@ross.org www.ross.org/tennis Southampton Racquet Club & Camp 665 Majors Path Southampton, N.Y. (631) 488-4700 www.southamptonrcc.com

Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Stephanie Leo: (516) 676-9849 glenheadrc@verizon.net

SPORTIME Amagansett Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • amagansett@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett Eric Scoppetta—Camp Director (631) 267-2267 • ehsc@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/ehsc

Huntington Indoor Tennis Club Richard Rottkamp—Manager/Owner 100 Broadway Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 421-0040 • hitennis@myway.com

SPORTIME Amagansett Multi-Sport Mike Ritsi—General Manager 385 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • mritsi@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett-multi-sport

New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com

SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Joe Siegel—General Manager 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 • jsiegel@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-tennis

SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 731-4432 • rlouie@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-multi-sport SPORTIME Kings Park Bea Bielik—General Manager Jeff Morys—Co-Director of Tennis Jason Wass–Co-Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 • bbielik@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/kings-park SPORTIME Lynbrook Bea Bielik–General Manager Danny Casesa—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 • dcasesa@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lynbrook SPORTIME Massapequa Chris Leahy—General Manager Emanuel Ponce—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, NY 11758 (516) 799-3550 • cleahy@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/massapequa SPORTIME Quogue Rene Bond—General Manager Greg Meyer—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead Road • East Quogue, NY 11942 (631) 653-6767 • rbond@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/quogue SPORTIME Randall’s Island Flagship Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Allison Hodgkins—Assistant General Manager Jared Karlebach—Assistant General Manager One Randall’s Island • New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 • ahodgkins@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—General Manager Jordan Dolberg—Director of Tennis 1 Landing Road • Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 • jharris@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Long Island Annex of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Joe Siegel—General Manager Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis JMTA 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 • mkossoff@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/syosset-tennis

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11568 LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine 73 (718) 760-6200 • www.usta.com


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 06/15/15)

ISLAND

38 ....Lucas Leston ......................Island Park, N.Y. 39 ....Charlie DiPaolo....................Sag Harbor, N.Y. 40 ....Ethan Rabinowitz ................Great Neck, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ......................................City

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Dylan D’agate ......................Melville, N.Y. 2 ......Jeremy Levine......................Woodbury, N.Y. 3 ......Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 4 ......Peter Anastasakis................East Norwich, N.Y. 5 ......Ryan Shayani ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 6 ......Matthew Evan Kronenberg East Setauket, N.Y. 7 ......Bilal Rashidzada..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 8 ......Evan Joseph Rupolo ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 9 ......Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y. 10 ....Azim Gangat........................Syosset, N.Y. 11 ....Justin Shen ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 12 ....Candrin Chris ......................Port Washington, N.Y. 13 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 14 ....Aiden Patel ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 15 ....Kyle Zhou ............................Commack, N.Y. 16 ....Ian Kaish ..............................Northport, N.Y. 17 ....Alejandro Pablo Perez ........Selden, N.Y. 18 ....Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 19 ....Peter Albert Bukary ............Jericho, N.Y. 20 ....Matthew Strogach ..............Commack, N.Y. 21 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 22 ....Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 23 ....Pius Lo ................................Massapequa, N.Y. 24 ....Brandon Gicquel ................Huntington, N.Y. 25 ....Samuel Perlman ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 26 ....Ryan Carlos ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 27 ....Sujay Alluri ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 28 ....Dion Park ............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 29 ....Taylor Brooks Thomas ........Water Mill, N.Y. 30 ....Harrison Maxwell Tucker ....Huntington, N.Y. 31 ....Andrew Thaler......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 32 ....Benjamin Grushkovskiy ......Woodmere, N.Y. 33 ....Gavin Park ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34 ....Aron Bursztyn ......................South Setauket, N.Y. 35......Johnny Donohue ......................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 36 ....Michael Han ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 37 ....Dylan Siegman ....................Melville, N.Y.

1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Griffin Schlesinger ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 3 ......Zachary David Gruber ........Port Washington, N.Y. 4 ......Aaron Marcos Vinsky ..........Westbury, N.Y. 5 ......Timothy Lewis Chiu ............Holtsville, N.Y. 6 ......Josh Gelfond ......................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 7 ......Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 8 ......Samir Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 9 ......Zachary Emmanuel Stern ..Dix Hills, N.Y. 10 ....Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 11 ....Adrian Kristofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 12 ....Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 13 ....Ruskikesh Patel ..................Albertson, N.Y. 14 ....Zachary Chan ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 15 ....Alexander Benanti ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 16 ....Valentine LeGoupil-Maier....Oceanside, N.Y. 17 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 18 ....Azim Gangat........................Syosset, N.Y. 19 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 20 ....Aryan Kumar Sethi ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 21 ....Martin Charles Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 22 ....Danny Tocco........................East Quogue, N.Y. 23 ....Liam Thomas Schmidt........Wantagh, N.Y. 24 ....Nicholas Harbans Sathi ......Port Jefferson, N.Y. 25 ....Putimet Inroon ....................Greenvale, N.Y. 26 ....Zakir Siddiqui ......................Huntington, N.Y. 27 ....Richard Martin Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 28 ....Alexander Rzehak ..............Centerport, N.Y. 29 ....Ishan G. Varma ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 30 ....Bradford J. Lin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 31 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 32 ....Alex Childs ..........................East Setauket, N.Y. 33 ....Neil Edward Sathi................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 34 ....Dion Park ............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 35 ....Edward Brambil ..................Halesite, N.Y. 36 ....Michael Wexler ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 37 ....Richard James Kelly............Manhasset, N.Y. 38 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 39 ....David Ammendola ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 40 ....Andre Kun Kirkorian ............Woodbury, N.Y.

RANKINGS

Long Island Boys 16 Singles

Long Island Boys 18 Singles

Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 3 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Matthew G. Levine ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 5 ......Samir Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 6 ......Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 7 ......Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 8 ......Varun Gaddam Reddy ........Glen Head, N.Y. 9 ......Alexander Hazarian ............Garden City, N.Y. 10 ....Matthew T. Roberts ............Setauket, N.Y. 11 ....Matthew Musalo..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 12 ....Alex B. Fried ........................Plainview, N.Y. 13 ....Shane Darius Terry ..............Southampton, N.Y. 14 ....Jonathan E. Brill ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 15 ....Evan Kirsh............................Roslyn, N.Y. 16 ....Matthew Ramsay ................Bay Shore, N.Y. 17 ....Neil Edward Sathi................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 18 ....Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 19 ....Edward Brambil ..................Halesite, N.Y. 20 ....Ian Mitchell Capell ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 21 ....Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 22 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 23 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ....Preet Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ....Evan Hirsch..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 26 ....Nicholas Goldman ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 27 ....Nicholas Mark Newell ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 28 ....Justin Alec Blicht ................Woodbury, N.Y. 29 ....James P. Ryan ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 30 ....Jake William Buckley ..........Sound Beach, N.Y. 31 ....Hunter M. Pomerantz..........Old Westbury, N.Y. 32 ....Rohan Dayal ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 33 ....Yash Samantaray ................Syosset, N.Y. 34 ....Chase Greenberg ................Roslyn, N.Y. 35 ....Curran Varma ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 36 ....Martin Charles Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 37 ....Timothy Lewis Chiu ............Holtsville, N.Y. 38 ....Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 39 ....Rohan Mathur......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 40 ....Andrew Thomas Wood ......Garden City, N.Y.

1 ......Christopher McGorty ..........Bellmore, N.Y. 2 ......Benjamin Doron ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 3 ......Harris Durkovic....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ......Nicholas Gajda ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 5 ......Mitchell Reid Berger............Lake Grove, N.Y. 6 ......Samuel R. Yuen ..................Selden, N.Y. 7 ......Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 8 ......Simon Adler ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 9 ......Roberto Sangirardi ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 10 ....Faran Nazir ..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 11 ....George Kaslow....................Port Washington, N.Y. 12 ....Jordan Diamond..................Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 13 ....Justin Matthew Scuderi ......Smithtown, N.Y. 14 ....Jonathan Gruberg ..............Setauket, N.Y. 15 ....Elias D. Tsalatsanis..............Smithtown, N.Y. 16 ....Tyler Ancona ........................East Setauket, N.Y.

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GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 2 ......Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 3 ......Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 4 ......Sadhana Sridhar..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 5 ......Ariana Pursoo ......................Westbury, N.Y. 6 ......Anna Vanessa Malin............Oceanside, N.Y. 7 ......Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 8 ......Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 9 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y. 10 ....Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 11 ....Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y. 12 ....Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y. 13 ....Sophia Elizabeth Schutte....Great Neck, N.Y. 14 ....Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 15 ....Isabella Sha..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 16 ....Ava Thunder Scordo ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 17 ....Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 18 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 19 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 20 ....Remi Berlent ........................Huntington, N.Y. 21 ....Skylor Wong ........................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 22 ....Alysson Dawn Pierro ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 23 ....Sydney Simmons ................East Northport, N.Y. 24 ....Nicolette Loeffler..................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ....Ella Griffiths..........................East Hampton, N.Y. 26 ....Anna J. Martorella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 27 ....Vivian Wu ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 28 ....Skylar Blake Semon............Melville, N.Y. 29 ....Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 30 ....Kaitlyn Gerstin ....................Hewlett, N.Y. 31 ....Jacqueline Zambrotto ........Kings Park, N.Y. 32 ....Taylor Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 33 ....Bianca Banilivi ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 34 ....Serena Li ..............................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 35 ....Emily Moran ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 36 ....Alexandra Kaylee Ho ..........Syosset, N.Y. 37 ....Kiera Agic ............................Miller Place, N.Y. 38 ....Kady Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 39 ....Elle Brignati..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 40 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 2 ......Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 3 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 4 ......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 5 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y.


LONG 6 ......Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 7 ......Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 8 ......Ashley Yu ............................Great Neck, N.Y. 9 ......Kristen D. Cassidy ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 10 ....Lauren Hutton......................Huntington, N.Y. 11 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 12 ....Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 13 ....Elena Gabriela Hull..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 14 ....Jillian Rebecca Shulder ......Setauket, N.Y. 15 ....Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 16 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 17 ....Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 18 ....Grace Isabel Riviezzo..........Syosset, N.Y. 19 ....Alexa Villez ..........................West Sayville, N.Y. 20 ....Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppague, N.Y. 21 ....Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 22 ....Bryn Schlussler....................Bay Shore, N.Y. 23 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 24 ....Hannah Rose Niggemeier ..Sayville, N.Y. 25 ....Natalia Caroline Krol............Greenvale, N.Y. 26 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 27 ....Emma Rae Matz..................Commack, N.Y. 28 ....Olivia Anne Nakhjavan ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 29 ....Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 30 ....Cecilia H. Scheuer ..............Southampton, N.Y. 31 ....Erica Silver ..........................Plainview, N.Y. 32 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 33 ....Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 34 ....Jean Woon ..........................Commack, N.Y. 35 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 36 ....Sophia Elizabeth Schutte....Great Neck, N.Y. 37 ....Emily Moran ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 38 ....Julia Amelie Raziel ..............Melville, N.Y. 39 ....Anna J. Martorella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 40 ....Taylor Grave Hanscom........Patchogue, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Hannah Vimod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 2 ......Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y. 3 ......Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 5 ......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 6 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 7 ......Taryn Roche ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 8 ......Jillian Rebecca Shulder ......Setauket, N.Y. 9 ......Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 10 ....Elinor Simek ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 11 ....Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 12 ....Alexandra Waldman............East Hampton, N.Y. 13 ....Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ....Lynbrook, N.Y. 14 ....Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppauge, N.Y. 15 ....Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 16 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 17 ....Kristen D. Cassidy ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 18 ....Sarah Bunk ..........................Sayville, N.Y. 19 ....Eleni Markopoulos ..............Seaford, N.Y. 20 ....Elizabeth Leigh Dwyer ........Cutchogue, N.Y. 21 ....Montaine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 22 ....Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Huntington, N.Y. 23 ....Bryn N. Schlussler ..............Bay Shore, N.Y. 24 ....Gabrielle Vaillant ..................East Moriches, N.Y. 25 ....Christina Lorraine Jud ........Glen Head, N.Y. 26 ....Natalia Caroline Krol............Greenvale, N.Y. 27 ....Carly Menker ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 28 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 29 ....Adhele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 30 ....Madeline Lane ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 31 ....Morgan Voulo ......................East Setauket, N.Y. 32 ....Riley Elizabeth Katzman ....Halesite, N.Y. 33 ....Sarah Khan ..........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y.

ISLAND

34 ....Emily R. Victorson ..............Northport, N.Y. 35 ....Lauren Hutton......................Huntington, N.Y. 36 ....Rachel Bernstein ................Plainview, N.Y. 37 ....Fallon Berger........................Syosset, N.Y. 38 ....Amy Schlussler....................Bay Shore, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Larissa Danovitch................Sagaponack, N.Y. 2 ......Ellen Huhulea ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 3 ......Eleni Markopoulos ..............Seaford, N.Y. 4 ......Victoria Evelyn Villalba ........Oyster Bay, N.Y.

RANKINGS

106 ..Jack Louchheim..................Sagaponack, N.Y. 126 ..Brandon Zhu........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 131 ..Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 133 ..Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 135 ..Richard James Kelly............Manhasset, N.Y. 137 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 140 ..Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 145 ..Griffin Schlesinger ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 146 ..Aaron Marcos Vinsky ..........Westbury, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 06/18/15)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 5 ......Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 7 ......Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 17 ....Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 21 ....Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 36 ....Peter Anastasakis................East Norwich, N.Y. 46 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 50 ....Mark Ryan Taranov ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 56 ....Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 67 ....Michael Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 71 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 80 ....Ryan E. Shayani ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 84 ....Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y. 89 ....Ty Nisenson ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 100 ..Michael Hayden Singer ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 110 ..Brandon J. Lin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 111 ..Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 114 ..Dylan D’Agate......................Melville, N.Y. 115 ..Arin Siriamonthep................Greenvale, N.Y. 120 ..Evan Joseph Rupolo ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 122 ..Jared M Phillips ..................Plainview, N.Y. 126 ..Matthew Kronenberg ..........East Setauket, N.Y. 128 ..Jeremy Levine......................Woodbury, N.Y. 133 ..Justin Y. Shen ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 137 ..Sohrob Yavari ......................Syosset, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

3 ......Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 11 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 13 ....Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 19 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23 ....Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 25 ....Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ....Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 31 ....Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 34 ....Daniel Shleimovich..............Syosset, N.Y. 38 ....Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 41 ....Rajan Vohra..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 42 ....Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 48 ....Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 50 ....Michael Medvedev..............Albertson, N.Y. 54 ....Athanasios Bilis ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 56 ....Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 61 ....Emmanuel V. Vacalares ......Hicksville, N.Y. 79 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 86 ....Abhinav Raj Srivastava ......Melville, N.Y. 88 ....Sangjin Song ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 93 ....Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 97 ....Julian Thomas MacGurn ....Amagansett, N.Y. 98 ....Timothy Hayden Nacca ......Garden City, N.Y. 106 ..Matthew Franklin Porges....Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 108 ..Daniel Meinster....................South Setauket, N.Y. 113 ..George Kaslow....................Port Washington, N.Y. 117 ..Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 126 ..Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 130 ..Austin Egna..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 131 ..Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 134 ..Xin Eric Yu............................Manhasset, N.Y. 135 ..Nicolas Demaria ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 139 ..Daniel Hyunjae Chang ........Manhasset, N.Y. 141 ..Carl Grant ............................Sagaponack, N.Y. 142 ..Alexander Roti ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 148 ..Jonas Erdmann ..................East Hampton, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 2 ......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 3 ......Ronald Hohmann ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12 ....Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 18 ....Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 22 ....Abinhav Srivastava..............Melville, N.Y. 28 ....Karan Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 30 ....Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 31 ....Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 33 ....David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 34 ....Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 46 ....Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 57 ....Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 66 ....Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 79 ....Adrian Krisofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 84 ....Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y. 87 ....Luke Karniewich..................Glen Head, N.Y. 89 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 91 ....Benjamin Reichbach ..........Syosset, N.Y. 92 ....Rohan Gaddam Reddy ......Glen Head, N.Y. 98 ....Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 8 ......Lubomir T. Cuba..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 10 ....Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11 ....Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 15 ....Athell Bennett ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 17 ....Bryant J. Born......................Manhasset, N.Y. 19 ....Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 22 ....Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 29 ....Daniel Grunberger ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 33 ....Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 43 ....Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 48 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 49 ....Travis Leaf............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 56 ....Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 59 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 61 ....Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 66 ....Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 69 ....Dylan Granat........................Woodbury, N.Y. 70 ....Stephen Gruppuso..............Bayport, N.Y.

76 ....Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 85 ....Michael James DeNigris ....Islip, N.Y. 89 ....Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 93 ....David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 96 ....Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 109 ..Duane Davis ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 110 ..William Bader ......................Water Mill, N.Y. 111 ..Jake Sandler........................Lynbrook, N.Y. 116 ..Palmer T. Clare ....................North Bellmore, N.Y. 123 ..Daniel Khodosh ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 126 ..Joseph James D’Orazio ....Saint James, N.Y. 130 ..Florimond Le Goupil-Maier..Oceanside, N.Y. 133 ..Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 142 ..Dylan Davis..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 143 ..Daniel Shleimovich..............Syosset, N.Y. 145 ..Nicholas Braden Gunther ..East Hampton, N.Y. 146 ..Aziz Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 6 ......Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 20 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 32 ....Madison Smith ....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 36 ....Rose Hayes..........................East Moriches, N.Y. 49 ....Rebecca Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 50 ....Kaya Amin............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 52 ....Alina Rebeca Lyakhov ........Great Neck, N.Y. 54 ....Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 58 ....Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y. 60 ....Tatiana Robotham Barnett..Port Washington, N.Y. 61 ....Kavina Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 65 ....Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 82 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 90 ....Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 92 ....Hailey Stoerback ................Saint James, N.Y. 96 ....Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 98 ....Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 100 ..Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 104 ..Sadhana Sridhar..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 107 ..Ariana O. Pursoo ................Westbury, N.Y. 109 ..Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 116 ..Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 121 ..Anna Vanessa Malin............Oceanside, N.Y. 130 ..Daniella Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y. 142 ..Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y. 144 ..Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 146 ..Lauren Zola..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 2 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 16 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 20 ....Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 26 ....Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 27 ....Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 35 ....Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 37 ....Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 49 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 53 ....Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 61 ....Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 67 ....Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 82 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 85 ....Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 90 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 93 ....Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 101 ..Madeline Richmond............Syosset, N.Y.

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LONG 109 ..Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 121 ..Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 133 ..Gabriela Sciarrotta ..............Woodmere, N.Y. 138 ..Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 140 ..Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 143 ..Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 148 ..Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 6 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 14 ....Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 16 ....Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 18 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi............Glen Head, N.Y. 27 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 31 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 34 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin........Manorville, N.Y. 40 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 44 ....Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 67 ....Oliva Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 69 ....Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 73 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili........Melville, N.Y. 76 ....Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 87 ....Amanda Allison Foo............Manhasset, N.Y. 100 ..Theodora Brebenel..............Glen Head, N.Y. 103 ..Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 104 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 113 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 117 ..Michelle Roitgarts................Roslyn, N.Y. 120 ..Abigail Carrie Okin ..............Amagansett, N.Y. 124 ..Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 134 ..Emily Shutman ....................Huntington, N.Y. 136 ..Morgan Wilkins....................Huntington, N.Y. 144 ..Nicole Rezak........................Merrick, N.Y. 145 ..Dominique Wojnarowski ....Syosset, N.Y. 150 ..Julieta Eulau ........................Oceanside, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 8 ......Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 9 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 11 ....Madison Courtney Appel....Locust Valley, N.Y. 31 ....Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y.

ISLAND

43 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 48 ....Mia M. Vecchio....................Manhasset, N.Y. 67 ....Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 71 ....Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 75 ....Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 80 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur..........Glen Head, N.Y. 81 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 91 ....Claire Handa ........................Westbury, N.Y. 93 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 94 ....Danielle Mirabella ................Wantagh, N.Y. 104 ..Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 112 ..Michelle Carnovale..............Massapequa, N.Y. 113 ..Amanda Allison Foo............Manhasset, N.Y. 129 ..Michele Sheila Lehat ..........Great Neck, N.Y. 132 ..Montaine Le Goupil-Maier..Oceanside, N.Y. 136 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 137 ..Mara Danielle Stewart ........Oceanside, N.Y. 138 ..Katie Jane Cirella ................Woodbury, N.Y. 142 ..Dominique Woinarowski ....Syosset, N.Y. 143 ..Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 149 ..Aimee Manfredo..................Shoreham, N.Y. 150 ..Ester Chikvashvili ................Melville, N.Y.

RANKINGS

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 11 ....Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 32 ....Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 43 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 75 ....Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 111 ..Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 204 ..Karan K. Amin......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 247 ..Abhinav Raj Srivastava ......Melville, N.Y. 393 ..Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 406 ..Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 443 ..Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 471 ..Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 537 ..Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 547 ..David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 700 ..Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 788 ..Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 855 ..Adrian Kristofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 06/17/15)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 26 ....Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 29 ....Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 35 ....Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 93 ....Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 151 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 319 ..Peter Vasilios Anastasakis ..East Norwich, N.Y. 483 ..Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 488 ..Mark R. Taranov ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 887 ..Ty Nisenson ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 891 ..Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y.

31 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 110 ..Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 255 ..Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 261 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 294 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 305 ..Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 324 ..Daniel Shleimovich..............Syosset, N.Y. 325 ..Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 366 ..Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 495 ..Patrick F. Maloney ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 554 ..Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y 663 ..Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 772 ..Michael Medvedev..............Albertson, N.Y. 782 ..Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 831 ..Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 853 ..Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y.

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 38 ....Lubomir Cuba......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 67 ....Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 112 ..Jesse Levitin ........................Manhasset, N.Y.

132 ..Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 167 ..Daniel Grundberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 179 ..Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 197 ..Bryant Born..........................Manhasset, N.Y. 247 ..Sean M. Mullins ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 250 ..Athell Patrick Bennett..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 423 ..Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 441 ..Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 611 ..Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 747 ..Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 886 ..Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 960 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 24 ....Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 268 ..Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 448 ..Madison Smith ....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 545 ..Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 668 ..Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 812 ..Rebecca E. Suarez..............Huntington, N.Y. 858 ..Kaya Amin............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 977 ..Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 8 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 117 ..Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 122 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 203 ..Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 276 ..Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 333 ..Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 431 ..Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 585 ..Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 591 ..Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 808 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 28 ....Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 60 ....Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 192 ..Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 265 ..Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 274 ..Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 301 ..Jasmine Abidi ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 363 ..Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 525 ..Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 632 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 714 ..Jacqueline Rae Buzkin........Manorville, N.Y. 784 ..Olivia Rose Scordo..............Glen Head, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 42 ....Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 63 ....Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 160 ..Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 170 ..Madison Courtney Appel....Locust Valley, N.Y. 523 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 588 ..Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 692 ..Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 887 ..Aimee N. Manfredo ............Shoreham, N.Y. 889 ..Ester Chikvashvili ................Melville, N.Y.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. JULY Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L1B Sportime Lynbrook Summer Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC); and Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 12 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330 Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L2O Long Beach Water Lily Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE); and Intermediate Mixed-Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles/$28 for additional doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 13 at 2:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L1B Christopher Morley July Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L1B Sportime Kings Park July Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 12 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L2R Sportime Bethpage July Regional Sportime Bethpage • 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, July 17-19 L1B Sportime Amagansett July Challenger Sportime Amagansett 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hsromova@sportimeny.com or call (631) 267-3460. Friday-Monday, July 17-20 L1 RWTTC July Championships Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, July 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Monday, July 17-20 L1 RSTA July Championship Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, July 8 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail pstankevich@ross.org or call (631) 875-2161. Friday-Monday, July 17-20 L1 Point Set Tennis July Championships Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1618 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, July 8 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Monday, July 24-27 L1 Sportime Bethpage Summertime Championships Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, July 15 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 L2O Sportime Lynbrook July Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 20 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 L1B CMTC Summer Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 L1B Point Set Summertime Challenger Point Set Tennis • 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 L1B Sportime Syosset Challenger Sportime Syosset • 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, July 24-26 L2O Westhampton Beach II Open Westhampton Beach Tennis and Sport 86 Depot Road • Westhampton Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE); Intermediate Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 18 (FMLC); Intermediate Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail joreiley@gmail.com or call (631) 288-6060. Saturday-Thursday, July 25-30 L1B Huntington Heat Wave Challenger Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Monday-Thursday, July 27-30 L1B Bethpage State Park Summer Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Monday-Thursday, July 27-30 L1B Sportime Syosset Summertime Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Monday-Thursday, July 27-30 L1B Port Washington Dana DeCarlo Commemorative Challenger Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1218 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, July 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail manny@pwta.com or call (516) 883-6425. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L2O Sportime Lynbrook Summertime Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 27 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.


USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L1B CMTC August Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L1B Huntington Summer Challenger Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L1B Bethpage August Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L1B Point Set Summer Challenger Point Set Tennis • 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

AUGUST 2015 Saturday, August 1 L3 Sportime Bethpage August UPS Sportime Bethpage • 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR); and Entry Level Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (RR) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L1B RSTA August Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1218 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail pstankevich@ross.org or call (631) 875-2161.

Friday-Monday, August 7-10 L1B Huntington August Challenger Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 31 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L1B CMTC August Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 2 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L1B Kings Park Sportime Summer Challenge Sportime-Kings Park • 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC); and Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L3 RWTTC July UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, July 31-August 2 L1B BBP Community Tennis Fundraising Outdoor Challenger Bayport-Blue Point High School 150 Academy Street • Bayport, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$23 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail autofix04@verizon.net or call (516) 524-2971.

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www.catsny.com LITennisMag.com • July/August 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, August 7-9 L2O Point Set Summer Open Point Set Tennis • 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L2O Sportime Syosset Summer Open Sportime Syosset • 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727

Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L1B Sportime Amagansett August Challenger Sportime Amagansett 320 Abrahams Path Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hsromova@sportimeny.com or call (631) 267-3460.

Saturday-Sunday, August 8-9 L3 RWTTC August UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Aug. 4 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L1B Sportime Kings Park August Challenger Sportime-Kings Park • 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Saturday, August 15 PSP L3; Sportime King’s Park LI Orange Series #4 Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $28 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 9 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Monday-Thursday, August 10-13 L1B Pine Hollow Country Club Summer Challenger Pine Hollow Country Club 6601 Northern Boulevard • East Norwich, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 922-0300.

Friday-Sunday, August 14-16 L1B CMTC August Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12,16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, August 21-23 L2O Sportime Lynbrook Summer Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 17 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, August 21-23 L1B RSTA August Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $58.82 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 17 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail pstankevich@ross.org or call (631) 875-2161.


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Hand, Upper Extremities Walter Rho, M.D. Bennett Brown, M.D. Joshua Mitgang, M.D.

Knee Craig Levitz, M.D. Eric Keefer, M.D. Gregory Lieberman, M.D. Robert Garroway, M.D. Eric Price, M.D. Charles Milchteim, M.D. Daniel Woods, M.D.

O Orlin rlin & C Cohen ohen iiss LLong ong IIsland’s sland’s lleading e a d in g o orthopedic r t h o p e di c p practice. ractice. O Our ur subspecialty subspecialty ffocus ocus m means eans tthat hat aathletes thletes – and and all all patients patient s – get get tthe he vvery er y b best est ccare are ffrom ro m n nationally ationally renowned renowned o orthopedists r thopedist s who who specialize specialize exclusively exclusively in in your your area area of of concern: concern: hand, hand, shoulder, shoulder, n neck eck and and ba back, ck, eelbow, lbow, kknee, nee, foot foot and and aankle, nkle, aand nd m more. ore. O Our ur b board-certified, oard-certified, fellowship-trained fellowship-trained team team ffeatures eatures some some of of the the country’s country’s top top Sports Sports Medicine Medicine subspecialists subspecialists ffor or expert expert care care of of all all tennis tennis and and o other ther ssportsportsrelated related injuries. injuries. Available Available by by appointment appointment ssix ix d days ays a week, week, we we offer offer the the m most ost advanced advanced orthopedic orthopedic treatment treatment with with comprehensive comprehensive diagnostic diagnostic services, ser vices, including including the the latest latest in in digital digital X X-ray -ray aand nd M MRI RI ttechnology. echnology. A Additionally, dditionally, o our ur pa pain in m management anagement aand nd physical physical therapy therapy and and rrehabilitation ehabilitation programs programs w will ill he help lp rrelieve elieve yyour our pa pain in ffast. ast.

O Offices f fices iin nR Rockville ockville Centre, Centre, Lynbrook, Lynbrook , Cedarhurst, Cedarhurst , Merrick, M e rri c k , Ma Massapequa, ssapequa, W Woodbury oodbur y and and Bohemia. Bohemia. To T o sschedule chedule an ap appointment, pointment , visit visit www.orlincohen.com w w w.orlincohen.com o orr ccall a ll 5 516.536.2800. 16.536. 28 0 0. 94 Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine July / August 2015  
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