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SUMMER 2014

Summer Camp 2014 FROM JUNE 30TH - AUGUST 22ND $125/DAY • $495/WEEK he Early Hit Training Center is pleased to announce its 11th Annual Junior Summer Tennis Camp. Our comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his/her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our complete program. We begin each session with a nutritionally complete and balanced shake from Court 7, our on-premises restaurant and smoothie bar. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production, drilling and physical fitness tranining, before breaking for a healthy lunch. We then move onto playing dynamics and strategy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A thorough cool-down and stretching session completes a world-class day of tennis for your child. With our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, experienced physical conditioning trainers, movement experts and on-site chef, the Early Hit Training Center offers a unique and total tennis experience.

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Junior Alps Program STARTS IN SEPTEMBER "ALPS" is a program for High Aptitude Learners. he Early Hit Training Center is pleased to announce it's 12th season of group training. This comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his/her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our complete program. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production and drilling. We then move onto playing dynamics and strategy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A session starts or finishes with an hour of conditioning. Come experience our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, conditioning trainers and movement experts. TUESDAY 6:00pm - 8:30pm • 7:30pm - 10:00 pm SATURDAY 8:00am - 10:30am SUNDAY 8:00 am - 10:30am • 3:30pm - 6:00 pm

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Saturday, July 26th 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Engineers Country Club 55 Glenwood Rd., Roslyn, NY 11576

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For more information, contact Info@usptennis.com


Table Of Contents 8

Tough as Nails: Resilient Sharapova Fi Both on and Off the Court

A closer look at the career of Maria Sharapova, as she looks to the mid-point of 201 court, and her entrepreneurial spirit off the court in this article by Miguel Cervantes II

Feature Stories 8

Nearly 3,400 Take Part in Groundbreaking Second Annual New York Tennis Expo National Tennis Center hosts the largest grassroots tennis event in the nation, the Second Annual NY Tennis Expo.

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14 Locals Take Center Stage to Advance at U.S. Open Qualifiers Gary Simeone takes a look at locals moving on to the U.S. Open National Playoffs Championships in New Haven, Conn. for a shot at the main draw of the 2014 U.S. Open.

18 Grow Tennis New York: KidsFest Takes Over Engineers Country Club Engineers Country Club hosts a day of fun for all ages as Long Island Tennis Magazine continues its Summer Series.

52 2014 Boy’s High School Recap From the County Championships, to a strong run at the States, Long Island’s finest enjoyed a great deal of success this past season, as some prepare for the jump to the collegiate ranks, while others prep for another strong run in 2015.

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Additional Features 16 27 28 29 34 35 35

USTA to Break Ground on New 100-Court Facility in Orlando Local Tennis Community Remembers Charles H. Hurme: 1912-2014 Locals Make Impact for U.S. in World Junior Tennis Manhasset’s Katherine Yau Named Dartmouth Co-Captain Inaugural American Collegiate Invitational to be Held at 2014 U.S. Open Lux-Craft Breaking new Ground With Energy-Efficient LED Systems TV’s Impractical Jokers Take Their Act to Bethpage Park Tennis Center

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Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports


litennis

JUL/AUG 2014 Vol 6, No 4

Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

ights Back

4 on a strong point on the II. See page 22

41 46 50 57 58 60 62 63

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com

Cover photo credit: Thomas Niedermueller

An Interview With Christina Bracken of ZEMgear Unifying for a Greater Cause By Hannah Camhi Serena Set to Storm Into the Summer By Andrew Eichenholz Injury Prevention: Avoid Overuse Injuries By Dr. Kenneth Kearns The Ugly Side of Tennis By Miguel Cervantes III Making the Cut at the U.S. Open Ballperson Tryouts By Michele Lehat P.I.N.R.W.C.I.O. By Tonny van de Pieterman See Me When You Are Ready for the Real Collegiate Tennis Experience By Lonnie Mitchel

Columns 4 6 13 21 26 30 32 38 42 44 48 64 66 69

College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters By Ricky Becker The Pink Elephant on the Court: Five Things Your Child Won’t Tell You By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC Hidden Secrets of the Greats: The Insouciance of Pete Sampras By Dr. Tom Ferraro A Focus on Sports Medicine: Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group The Jensen Zone: Properly Seeing the Game of Tennis By Luke Jensen Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives Fitness & Nutrition: Tennis, Diet and Proper Hydration By Irina Belfer-Lehat, RD, CDN Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller Tips From the Tennis Pro By Steven Kaplan Long Island Tennis Club Directory Long Island Rankings USTA/Long Island Region 2014 Tournament Schedule

s Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2014 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Brian Coleman Editorial Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 314 • brianc@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Beverly Bolnick National Sales Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Scott Koondel Office Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Andrew Eichenholz Editorial Contributor

Kelly Keenan Intern

Michael Cervantes Editorial Contributor

Michele Lehat Intern

Calvin Rhoden Staff Photographer

Michael Liebman Intern Samantha Sklar Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication3of any articles, information or data.


college tennis spotlight

MYTHBUSTERS Instant Impressions on the Way Out From a Top Eastern Junior Who Graduated From a D3 School By Ricky Becker Skidmore graduate Oliver Loutsenko left Skidmore with three All-American years under his belt, as well as being named Liberty Conference Player of the Year. Not just MVP of his team, but of the entire league. As a junior tennis player, Oliver had the opportunity to go D3 instead of D1. We asked him about that decision and his overall impression of the Division III landscape. I really like his answer to the last question about advice he would give to players looking for a college, especially in Division III.

I’m sure you had opportunities to play Division I tennis coming out of the juniors, why did you decide on Division III? Oliver Loutsenko: Growing up and planning for college, there was always a huge priority placed on education. While there are a fair amount of good academic D1 schools, I felt like going to a good D3 program that would give me the best opportunity to enjoy my college tennis experience, while making sure I had more than enough time to focus on academics and not missing out on the other

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

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Did you have a preference of playing juniors versus college? Loutsenko: I’d have to say I prefer college. Having constant support from teammates makes it a lot more fun to compete. Also, traveling with your friends and hanging out makes going to matches and tournaments a lot more fun as well. Was there anything you didn’t expect about your college tennis experience? Loutsenko: I wouldn’t say there was a whole lot I didn’t expect. There was a lot of practicing, training, tough matches, lengthy road trips, and other things I grew accustomed to in junior tennis. The one thing I will say about D3 tennis is that the sportsmanship is generally at another level from junior tournaments— far less cheating, more gamesmanship, etc. One thing that was a bit difficult to get used to was playing on a team. In juniors, with the exception of a couple tournaments like Zonals and Intersectionals, you play exclusively for yourself (and some people for their parents). Playing on a team is a totally different

mindset when you have teammates on adjacent courts who are cheering for you, and at the same time, are relying on you for motivation and support. What was the highlight of your college tennis career? Loutsenko: I think it would be appropriate to give two highlights, a team highlight and individual highlight as the fall season is generally considered individual, while the spring is team. My best individual moment was my senior year, winning our regional tournament in both singles and doubles with one of my best friends on the team, in the same day. By far the highlight of my career as a player on the team was beating Williams 5-4 my senior year in my first singles match back from a fractured wrist. What advice would you give someone going to college as far as choosing between various schools? Loutsenko: I’d say that anyone going to a D3 school in the northeast should place a high importance of how well they get

along with members of the team on their recruiting visit that will be around in the future. Many of the schools are very close to each other in terms of academics and tennis team pedigree, and you’re generally not going to get a genuine feel for whether you’ll like the coaching staff just based off a recruiting visit. In my opinion, whether or not you like the team and how well you get along with them will decide whether you stay at that school for four years. It can make or break your college experience because your teammates will almost definitely be amongst your best friends at school. Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, director of Tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors year-round. Ricky was named the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and was a top-five nationally-ranked junior. He can be reached by e-mail at rbecker06@yahoo.com, by phone at (516) 605-0420 or via JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Pink Elephant on the Court: Five Things Your C By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC s parents, how many times have you asked your child, “How was your day?” The response is usually a one word answer, “Good!” Of course, this only leaves you wanting to hear more. Whenever I hear that response, I ask a follow-up question, “Huh, I see … ‘good’ can mean a lot of things to different people, so tell me what you mean by that? Or what specifically made your day good?” Similarly, there are many things your kids don’t tell you regarding their tennis game and your involvement. As always, it’s usually the words that are between the lines that are of the most important. Or the unspoken words that your child might be hesitant to tell you because they are not sure of your response. As a mental training coach, I work individually and in groups with kids ages 12-25. I have heard it all! What kids like, what they don’t like, and what they would like to say but just don’t. In fact there are common themes to things that kids don’t share with their parents. I could probably write a book, maybe I will? But for now, here are the top five things your child won’t tell you regarding their tennis game and your involvement.

A

1. “When I lose … it feels like I’m disappointing you!” This is one of the most common statements kids make. What’s most important is not to conditionally judge them based upon their winning or losing, but rather, support them no matter the outcome. It would be great to just let your child know how much you enjoy watching them play tennis, with no strings attached. They feel bad enough when they lose. However, if they feel like they are disappointing a parent when they lose, it only makes the loss harder and bouncing back harder as well. Curiously, sometimes this is the cause of cheating. Kids don’t want to disappoint parents, coaches or be seen as a “loser” to themselves or their friends. Therefore, they make dishonest calls. 2. “When I scream or throw my racket, it’s a way of showing you I care!” Certainly an interesting reaction. Many times when this happens, the player is simply overwhelmed and doesn’t know who to handle a particular situation. Other times, they act out to show you they care! You might ask, “What do you mean?” Well, if they don’t act out it, will it appear as if they don’t care? They worry that it might be perceived as accepting defeat. They certainly don’t want to be perceived as rolling over. 3. “When you talk about money … it puts extra pressure on me!” Kids are very perceptive about how much lessons cost, and the sacrifices that parents may be making for their lessons. In reality, it’s important to know that tennis is not a good investment. However, it is a great sport and an opportunity for your child to learn life’s lessons, push themselves to be their personal best, and get exercise. Don’t put extra pressure on your kids by sharing the monetary aspects of their lessons. This only makes them 6

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com


Child Won’t Tell You nervous and tight on the court. It’s important that they are able to play loose and relaxed, not worrying about the cost of a lesson!

of communication with your kids, not just solely about tennis. 5. “If I don’t want to play today, it doesn’t mean I don’t care!” Today, more than ever, kids have very little down time as they go at breakneck speed from one activity to another. Sometimes kids need a break, a day or even few days to rest and recharge their batteries. Going to that party or being with friends is just

and whatever else makes them happy. If they have a healthy balance, their time on the court will be more productive. As parents, I suspect that some of these statements listed in this top five are hard for you to believe. However, in the confines of my office, when kids feel safe and unconditionally accepted, these statements come up time and time again. The pink elephant is now out of the room!

4. “When you talk about tennis … It seems you Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the “ I T W O U L D B E G R E AT T O care more than me!” founder and director of Inside the JUST LET YOUR CHILD KNOW In order for a player to play well Zone Sports Performance Group. HOW MUCH YOU ENJOY and feel empowered, they have to As a mental training coach, he W AT C H I N G T H E M P L AY have their own “Big Y.” The “Big Y” works with athletes and teams in all is an intrinsic reason that motivates sports and levels, helping them to TENNIS, WITH NO STRINGS or inspires them to play. It’s imporgain the mental edge. He has spoAT T A C H E D . ” tant that you help cultivate that reaken nationally and internationally son and support your kids during and has been quoted by ESPN, their process. If a parent’s support is over- what they need. The break will serve to Sports Illustrated, The New York Times and whelming, the child will often feel suffo- make them hungrier and come back revi- other major media publications. His new cated. They will feel pressure and feel as talized with more energy. It will also give book, Tennis Inside the Zone has just been though they are not playing for them- their bodies some much needed rest and released. He may be reached by phone at selves but for the approval of their par- recovery time. It’s important they have a (973) 723-0314, e-mail rob@insidethezone or ents. It’s important to establish many lines balance between tennis, school, friends visit www.insidethezone.com.

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Nearly 3,400 Take Part in Groundbreaking Second An New York Tennis Expo “In my travels across the country, this event is one-of-a-kind.” —Nick Bollettieri, World-Renown Tennis Coach

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ll eyes were on the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on Sunday, June 1, as Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine hosted the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo. One may have mistaken that the U.S. Open was in town, as cars lined the streets and the National Tennis Center’s parking lots filled to capacity, while shuttle buses escorted patrons to the facility. The Second Annual New York Tennis Expo was designed as a grassroots tennis movement for the New York tennis community, and it brought out the largest crowd ever for such an event, with just shy of 3,400 attendees on hand throughout the day. The buzz for the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo began in late 2013 as a chance to create a greater platform for the businesses that support both Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine. The origin of the Expo was a grounds for the local tennis community to join together to help further grow the sport. The event offered something for everyone, as participation was strong from all areas of the sport, from 10 & Under Tennis, to juniors, to high school and college players, and even Special Olympians. Attendees had the chance to win raffles to famous resorts such as Sea Colony, tickets to the 2014 U.S. Open and to the prestigious “Party With the Pros” event 8

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

continued on page 10

“It’s been a really great event for us. We couldn’t imagine a better place to launch our app.” —Eliot Jenkins, Zogo Tennis

“Great job! The best trade I’ve ever done.”

—Bill Walsh, Owner, Velve


nnual

“The staff of Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine are so sincere and do an amazing job. I wouldn’t miss this event. I’m just excited to be a part of it.” —Peter Kaplan, Founder, Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Tennis Camp

“Tennis needs more events like this. What Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine are doing in a community that is tennis hungry is critical.” —Sol Schwartz, Manager & Buyer, Holabird Sports

e show

eTop

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Credit all photos to Samantha Sklar & Calvin Rhoden

Sean Hannity moderates the Speaker Panel Discussions during the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo

the week before the U.S. Open. Lining the main hallway of the National Tennis Center were 60 of the sport’s top exhibitors, displaying everything from tennis apparel, training aids, new tennis apps and the latest rackets, to programs and clubs, and summer camp offerings. Also on hand was world-renown Tennis Coach Nick Bollettieri at the IMG Academy booth, posing for pictures and signing copies of his newest book, Changing the Game. “I had a great day at the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo, meeting fans and chatting with attendees and look forward to the same next year,” said Bollettieri. Also part of the event were two informative Speaker Sessions. The first Session, “The Road to College Scholarships,” featured Bollettieri headlining a panel of the area’s top coaches that also featured emcee

Steven Kaplan and Taylor Goetz demonstrate proper form during the Panel Discussions

Shoshana Bennett enjoying the Hit for Prizes court indoors at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

and Fox News Political Analyst Sean Hannity. The second Session, “Taking Your Game to the Next

Level,” was again headlined by Mr. Bollettieri, as panelists discussed the mental and physical sides of tennis. Panelists included Jay Harris, general manager of Sportime Roslyn; Steven Kaplan, owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center; Lawrence Kleger, director of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy; Whitney Kraft, director of tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and director of player operations for the U.S. Open; Xavier Luna, director of junior tennis for the Advantage All-City Junior Tennis Programs; Sam Miller, founder of ProgressiveWellnessLLC; Lonnie Mitchel, head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta; Eric Rebhuhn, head men’s tennis coach for St. John’s University; and former Queens College Coach Chris Tasso. At the conclusion of the sessions, attendees flocked to the speakers for autographs and photos.

“I thought last year was hard to top, but this year is even better. The organizers have done a phenomenal job in putting on this event, and I’m hoping to be a part of it for years to come.” —Lawrence Kleger, Flagship Director, John McEnroe Tennis Academy


World-renowned Tennis Coach Nick Bollettieri, here with Steve Shulla, was on hand signing his new book, Changing the Game

“It is a great Expo, and great for exposure,” said Sam Miller, founder of Progressive Wellness LLC. “My favorite part is that everyone is chill, nice and willing to share what they are all about. I will definitely return next year.” The three indoor courts that comprised The Activity Zone were packed all day long, as kids and adults alike took part in on-court activities. From the 10 & Under Tennis demo, to the Speed Serve Booth, the “Beat the College Player,” and Hit for Prizes Court, all were hot spots as DJ CMNY was spinning music as Sportimes mascot “Tennis the Menace” introduced himself and entertained the youngsters in attendance. “Thank you to Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine for organizing this terrific event,” said Eliot Jenkins of ZOGOtennis. Dave Berman, also of ZOGOtennis, said, “We got some

Megan Broderick conducting interviews in the crowded Expo Hall during the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo

Kids enjoying the outdoor Carnival Area at the National Tennis Center

incredibly positive feedback from the hundreds of tennis players we spoke to, and we couldn’t be more excited

to get our App out to the tennis community here in NYC.” With the gorgeous spring weather, another main highlight was the outdoor Kids Zone, featuring carnival games, snow cone and popcorn machines, and an inflatable hockey station featuring an appearance by the New York Islanders Ice Girls. On the roof of the National Tennis Center was the Parent/Child Sports Deck for open play on mini-courts, where kids played friendly games against one another, and families shared in matches as well on the NTC’s sport courts. The success of the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo has jumpstarted ideas and an outpouring of requests for a third event. Plans are already underway for next year’s event, as Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine continue to grow the game at the grassroots level.

“I enjoy getting together with the tennis community and making tennis fun again. There were kids playing on the court with loud music and even adults as well. The knowledge shared by the speakers was amazing, and this event really does grow the sport of tennis.” —Xavier Luna, Director, Advantage All-City Junior Programs


THANK YOU TO THE

Second Annual New York Tennis Expo Sponsors PREMIER PLATINUM SPONSOR

The New York Times PLATINUM SPONSORS

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SILVER SPONSORS

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com


Hidden Secrets of the Greats The Insouciance of Pete Sampras By Tom Ferraro, Ph.D. Pete Sampras is considered by many to be the greatest tennis player of all time. He owns 16 Grand Slam titles and was ranked the ATP Number One Player of the Year six consecutive times. He won the U.S. Open at the age of 19 and earned $43,280,000 over the course of his career in prize money. The list goes on and on. Ironically and sadly, the public never embraced Sampras. He has amazing power, finesse, grace, speed and a devastating serve, yet people described him as cool, deadpan and robotic. Whenever I saw him play, I always thought of him as being a combination of an NFL wide receiver and a ballet dancer. So what was the secret to Sampras’ rise to the top? He was the third sibling and both of his parents were Greek. His dad worked as an engineer for NASA. Pete discovered a tennis racket in the basement of their Maryland home at the age of three and he spent hours alone in the basement hitting balls against the wall. The family moved to sunny California when he was seven-years-old and he had a chance to play tennis more often. They enrolled him in the Jack Kramer Tennis Club where he was put under the tutelage of Jack Fischer who was a local pediatrician and tennis buff. Under Fischer’s guidance, Sampras was placed with various tennis gurus to work on various aspect of his game. Fischer saw greatness in Sampras and instilled a belief that he was destined to win Grand Slam titles. And little Pete listened and learned well. Pete was also taught to control all of his emotions at all times. Under Fischer’s coaching, Sampras won his first U.S. Open at the age of 19. As I usually do, I put in my call to Steven Kaplan, director of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, and asked him what he thought was Sampras’ secret weapon. “Sampras had great court presence and vision, was vey calculating and cunning … very smart on the court,” said Kaplan. “He never reveled in victory, but hated to lose. He was a very distant, invisible and disconnected person to meet.”

And as Steve spoke, I thought of how Sampras followed on the heels of the McEnroe-Connors Era, the kings of vulgarity and how unnerving that must have been for the tennis fan to see when they had grown so use to screaming and cursing champions. Sampras was routinely criticized for being dull. Paul Annacone was Sampras’ coach for many years and described Pete as a very normal guy with low-key tastes. He liked to get up every morning, have his cereal and play tennis for three hours. Then, he would have lunch and go play a round of golf. Then, it was home to bed and time to do it all again the next day. A very simple, non-flamboyant and steady lifestyle. The anti-Agassi. So after all my research, what is my conclusion about the Sampras secret? It is very simple. He displays the profile of the gifted child. Solitary, obsessed with one thing, curious about learning, alone, smart, isolated and driven. Sampras’ cool demeanor is a sign of being highly focused and also serves as his defense against being overwhelmed by too much attention. And in his case, this cool and focused defense is a perfect attitude to have when playing tennis. It is not for everyone, but it works for the highly gifted

child. Tiger Woods is exactly the same way both publicly and privately. The very intelligent child withdraws into him or herself where they work on their ambitions in private, thus you see little Pete spending hours every day throughout his childhood hitting balls against his basement wall. Tip: If you have a child who likes to play his or her sport alone and with intense focus for long hours each day, you may have a gifted child on your hands. If this is so, your job is to facilitate their growth in whatever domain they are interested in pursuing. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

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www.israeltenniscenters.org LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Credit all photos to Kelly Keenan

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com


Locals Take Center Stage to Advance at U.S. Open Qualifiers By Gary Simeone

The sun finally came out for the finalists of the U.S. Open National Playoffs Qualifiers event at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, and after a week of rain and matches being played indoors, the players returned outside to play in the warm weather. The Men’s Final featured Phillip Simmonds, a pro at John McEnroe Tennis Academy/Sportime Randall’s Island, and Brooklyn, N.Y.’s Gary Kushnirovich in a highly anticipated battle. “After playing inside for a few days, we were out in the sun and the wind, and I had to adjust my game a little,” said Simmonds who noted that it was difficult to pass his opponent, Kushnirovich, in the windy conditions. “I just tried to hit a lot of slices and told myself to stay calm with the elements,” said Simmonds. “I got some early breaks and was also able to get a lot of first serves in.” The strategy worked for Simmonds, as he defeated Kushnirovich in straight sets, 6-3, 6-2 to earn a spot in the U.S. Open Men’s National Playoffs Championship. In the Women’s Singles Final, 18-yearold Rima Asatrian of Tenafly, N.J. fought back to win her match after losing the opening set 0-6 to Petra Januskova of Canada. Asatrian got off to a shaky first set, filled with errors, to beat the 22-yearold Januskova, 0-6, 7-5, 6-4. “I got off to a slow start and was very nervous,” said Asatrian, who was defeated in the women’s final two years ago. “I told myself to be more aggressive and take advantage of opportunities, and it worked for me.” Asatrian, who will attend Columbia University in the fall, was all smiles after her match win. “I am so excited, and am really looking forward to playing in the next qualifier to hopefully get to the U.S. Open,” said Asatrian. The Mixed-Doubles Final featured four players from Long Island, as Cory Parr and

his partner Elizabeth Kobak, both Jericho High School graduates, faced off against Southampton’s Hleb Maslau & Simona Weymar. After losing a competitive first set 4-6, Parr & Kobak gave it their all in the second, but Maslau & Weymar held steady and were able to pull out the 6-4, 6-3 win. “I think we communicated well with each other on the court and picked up each other’s energy level,” said Maslau, who is a teaching pro at the Ross School Tennis Academy in East Hampton, N.Y. “I felt we made a lot of the important points throughout the match, and there were a couple of deuce points that we got lucky on.” The U.S. Open National Playoffs is a series of tournaments that gives any player 14 years of age or older who meets eligibility requirements the opportunity to qualify for

the 2014 U.S. Open. The winner of each Sectional Qualifying Tournament in each division (Men’s Singles, Women’s Singles and Mixed-Doubles) will advance to the U.S. Open National Playoffs Championships in their respective division. The winner of each Singles Championship (one male and one female) will receive a wild card entry to compete in the 2014 U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament (Aug. 19-22) and the winner of the Mixed-Doubles Championship (one team) will receive a wild card entry to compete in the 2014 U.S. Open Mixed-Doubles Championship (commencing Aug. 27) at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Gary Simeone is writing intern/public relations associate for Long Island Tennis Magazine.

1-Women’s Singles Final winner, 18-year-old Rima Asatrian of Tenafly, N.J. 2-Brooklyn, N.Y.’s Gary Kushnirovich was runner-up in the men’s singles draw 3-The team of Cory Parr & Liz Kobak, both graduates of Jericho High School, finished runners-up in the mixed-doubles qualifiers draw 4-Phillip Simmonds, a pro at John McEnroe Tennis Academy/Sportime Randall’s Island, was victorious in the Men’s Singles Final

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USTA to Break Ground on New 100-Court Facility in Orlando

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he USTA has announced its plans to create a new home for American tennis, a state-of-theart facility at Lake Nona area in Orlando, Fla., that will enhance the sport at every level. The 100-plus court tennis center, which will house the USTA’s Community Tennis and Player Development divisions, will be divided into dedicated areas that will focus on the complete tennis pathway—from the youngest players, to recreational players, to collegians, to future professional players, and to professional tour level players. The target completion date is the fourth quarter of 2016. “This new home for American tennis

will truly be a game-changer for our sport,” said USTA Chairman of the Board and President Dave Haggerty. “This world-class facility will be an inclusive gathering place for American tennis and will allow us to impact our sport at every level, from the grassroots to the professional ranks.” The USTA is partnering with Lake Nona and Tavistock Group, along with a consortium of regional and state partners, to construct a facility in a hotbed for tennis and in the nation’s top destination city. The complex will be located on 63 acres of land and will include: l Tournament and League Area: This area will include 24 clay courts and 16

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

hard courts. The space will include two player pavilions and a tournament administration office which will include trainer rooms, a stringer area, player lounge, public restrooms, and a check-in area. It will let the USTA deliver events like never before and will set a new functional standard for the sport. l Collegiate Tennis Area: This area will feature 12 hard courts and one future tournament show court, and will serve as the home of the University of Central Florida’s Men’s and Women’s Varsity Tennis Program. The courts will be equipped with high mast lighting for televised events and have elevated seating for 1,200 people with room on the north and south end for additional seating. The area will allow two collegiate matches to be played simultaneously. Additionally, it will feature a two-story pavilion for concessions, public restrooms, team locker rooms, and areas for trainers and officials. l Team USA Area: This area will include eight hard courts and eight clay courts. The courts will be utilized by the 17 USTA Sections, along with coaches and their players throughout the country to work collaboratively with USTA Player Development. l High Performance and Player Development Area: This area will include eight hard courts, eight red clay courts, and six covered courts for the USTA


Player Development division. The space includes dormitories that can house 32 boys and girls. The strength and conditioning area will include a sand and workout area. In addition, the area will be utilized for Team USA Events. l 36/60’ Tennis: This area will include eight 36’ and eight 60’ courts enabling youth and adults to develop their games. l USTA Office Building: The ground floor will include a tennis pro shop, fitness area, locker rooms, player lounge, and cafeteria with USTA offices occupying the second and third floors. l Technology: The facility will be an epicenter for tennis innovation and education. It will incorporate the latest technology to provide an unparalleled playing, training and educational experience for players, coaches and spectators. “Our goal is simple, continue to raise the bar for our sport,” said Gordon Smith, USTA executive director and chief operating officer. “Our new facility in Orlando will help ensure we develop the next generation of players, coaches, tennis providers, officials and volunteers.” The USTA Player Development division will move its national headquarters from Boca Raton, Fla. to Orlando, aiming to provide the best opportunities to succeed for the next generation of American tennis champions. Lake Nona is an innovative community in southeast Orlando, driving more than $7 billion in economic activity in Central Florida. Highlighted by a life sciences cluster known as Medical City, Lake Nona has become home to some of the nation’s top hospitals, universities, research institutions and health and life science companies. Tavistock Group, the international private investment organization behind the 7,000-acre masterplanned development at Lake Nona and the 650-acre Lake Nona Medical City healthcare cluster, provided an innovative structure to acquire the land for the new state-of-the-art facility and will act as lead developer on the 270,000-squarefoot complex and its more than 100 tennis courts.

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Credit photo to Bas Photography

Credit photo to Bas Photography

Credit photo to Bas Photography

Credit photo to Bas Photography

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com


GROW TENNIS

Grow Tennis New York KidsFest Takes Over Engineers Country Club Long Island Tennis Magazine’s second Summer Series event brings fun for all ages s part of Long Island Tennis Magazine’s “Summer Series,” kids and parents gathered at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. on June 22 for The Long Tennis Magazine KidsFest.

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The event provided kids with a great deal of fun-filled activities, both on and off the court, to enjoy their tennis experience, which, for some, was their first. Long Island Tennis Magazine put together tennis clinics for all ages, outdoor carnival games, a dance competition, an array of prizes, and even a very popular dunk tank. Food and drinks were supplied by Engineers Country Club. With parents surrounding the courts and taking in the action, more than 100 kids of all ages and abilities took to the outdoor courts of Engineers Country Club to receive lessons and clinics given by top continued on page 20 19 Credit photo to Calvin Rhoden


grow tennis new york continued from page 19

Credit photo to Bas Photography

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water as kids nailed the bull’s-eye. “Today was a really good time for everyone,” said Dana Torres, who was on hand with her two children. “Between the tennis and the carnival activities, they were busy all day long.” Dean Nogrady, Emilie Katz and the staff of Engineers Country Club were fantastic in helping to set up the event, collaborating with Long Island Tennis Magazine to get details in order, working on-court with kids, and making sure the event ran professionally. They have great personal relationships with their club members and were extremely attentive with all the attendees who came in for the day. “Wow! What an absolute success,” said Engineers Country Club Board President Kal Dolgin. “It far exceeded my wildest imagination and everyone was commenting on it throughout the BBQ we

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Credit photo to Calvin Rhoden

tennis pros from Sportime Roslyn. The pros worked with the kids, fully engaging with them while supplying the necessary insights on the basics of the game. Sportime’s pros seperated the kids by level and worked with them on strokes, while also supplying a Hit for Prizes Court and a Speed Serve Radar Gun Court. “I played tennis with my daughter for the first time today,” said proud father Lance Cohen. “The event was great, and seeing the amazing pictures afterwards meant the world to me.” There was something for everyone, as DJ Curtis McCalla kept everybody entertained with music, dancing and prizes. For those who wanted to take a break from the tennis courts, lawn games such as horseshoes, corn hole and ring-toss were a perfect way to get out of the sun and relax. “I came here with my four-year-old son and he is having a great time,” said attendee Melissa Shamsian. “It is a really good tennis experience for the both of us.” The biggest hit of the afternoon off the court was the dunk tank, which kept everybody entertained as staffers from both Long Island Tennis Magazine and Sportime continuously dropped into the

had after the event. Kudos to everyone involved.” KidsFest was the second part of the eight-part Summer Series hosted by Long Island Tennis Magazine and served as a great way to kick off the summer. This was the Magazine’s second straight extremely successful and highly attended event, coming off the heels of the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo, with 3,374 attendees on hand at the National Tennis Center. These events continue to grow tennis in a grassroots way not seen anywhere else in the country, with well-attended events, unmatched press and marketing of our local players, coaches and businesses. The key to it all is the Magazine’s great relationships within the tennis community. Hosting these events is a way to get face-to-face with the Magazine’s readership and be on the court with them. Long Island Tennis Magazine will be back at Engineers Country Club for another segment of its Summer Series, The Long Island Tennis Challenge on Saturday, July 26. Don’t miss out!


A Focus on Sports Medicine

Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group Locations in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Lynbrook, Merrick, Massapequa, Woodbury and Bohemia

(516) 536-2800 • www.orlincohen.com Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group is Long Island’s leading private orthopedic practice with a team of 37 board-certified and board-eligible physicians. The group features orthopedic subspecialists who have completed advanced fellowship training, focusing solely on a single area of concern. This focused approach results in optimum patient outcomes as the doctors are on top of the latest advances for each specific area of expertise. The group’s highly trained and experienced orthopedists cover the entire spectrum of subspecialty needs, including sports medicine, hip, knee, shoulder, elbow, joint replacements, foot and ankle, spine, neck and back, hand and upper extremities, and general orthopedics. In August, the following five fellowship-trained subspecialists will be joining the practice: l Dr. Andrew Tarleton: A fellowshiptrained spine subspecialist who has experience with minimally invasive XLIF, anterior cervical fusion and

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lumbar decompression. Dr. Joshua Mitgang: A fellowship-trained hand and upper extremities subspecialist with experience in minimally invasive hand surgery, as well as acute traumatic and sports-related hand and upper extremity injuries. Dr. Daniel Woods: A fellowship-trained sports medicine subspecialist who has experience in knee and shoulder arthroscopy, ACL, labral and UCL reconstruction, and rotator cuff repair. Dr. Charles Milchteim: A fellowshiptrained sports medicine subspecialist who specializes in arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder, elbow and knees. Dr. Cheryl Daves: A fellowship-trained pain management subspecialist with experience in pain management techniques, such as epidural steroid injections and facet injections, radiofrequency ablation, peripheral joint injections and ultrasoundguided injections.

Orlin & Cohen has multiple offices in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties, with a recently-opened new office on the North Shore in Woodbury, N.Y. This new state-of-the-art, full-service facility addresses all of your orthopedic related needs including in-house diagnostic testing, digital x-ray, MRI, physical rehabilitation and a fully-accredited pain management/fluoroscopy suite. This site is part of the Orlin & Cohen network, which consists of seven orthopedic offices, five physical rehabilitation centers, four MRI centers and two fully accredited fluoroscopy suites for pain management. Conveniently located at 45 Crossways Park Drive, the Woodbury office is a natural extension for the Orlin & Cohen team of board-certified, fellowship-trained subspecialists with offices in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Lynbrook, Merrick, Massapequa and Bohemia.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Credit photo to Kevin Winter

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Tough as Nails Resilient Sharapova fights back both on and off the court

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aying that you’re a New Yorker is both a privilege and a point of pride. If you’re reading this, chances are you’re a New Yorker. Whether you were born here or you were adopted as a New Yorker, we all share some common characteristics: We’re sharp, we’re hungry and we’re some of the toughest people out there. We think fast, we move fast, and we act fast. When we get knocked down, we get up and keep going. It’s this mentality that makes us tough and it’s this mentality that makes us appreciate toughness. Watching Maria Sharapova move through all challengers at the French Open this year to eventually win the Roland Garros title helped me to realize, recognize and appreciate that New York level of toughness that she displayed there and throughout her career. This is me, your humble writer, eating his words. Earlier this year, before the French Open, I wrote that Maria Sharapova had little to no chance at Roland Garros. Maria had lost a match to Serena Williams, her long time rival, at the Sony Open and fallen to her less notable Russian counterpart, Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, in February. I also wrote that Maria lacked the mental toughness of Serena and that with such a

BY MIGUEL CERVANTES III

diverse field of competitors, she would no doubt fall prey to one. How wrong I was. I underestimated her spirit, and have obviously come to realize that no matter what comes her way, Sharapova will be able to bounce back and overcome all obstacles to achieve success, both on the court and off. Maria did an amazing job retiring her opponents in her pursuit of the 2014 French Open championship, but that doesn’t mean that her path was without trial. She needed three sets to finish off her opponents in the last four rounds, beginning with Samantha Stosur. Her fourth round match against the Aussie saw the tenacious Russian find her best form, putting together nine games to get the win. Stosur seemed somewhat perplexed by the reversal of fortune after having won the first set without much issue. Her quarterfinal match went quite the same way. After losing the first set quickly, Maria found her form through sheer determination and grit. The second set win at 7-5 gave her the confidence to steamroll the third 6-1. The mental challenge here was to beat the woman that beat her rival. Garbine Muguruza had, earlier in the tournament, defeated world number one and the topseeded Serena Williams easily, 6-2, 6-2. Had she not stayed mentally strong, the match could have easily slipped away. Her young Canadian semifinal opponent,

Eugenie Bouchard, also tested Sharapova’s mettle. Maria was quoted as saying that although she’d like to win those types of matches in two sets, she’s ready to stay out there for as long as it takes. Finally arriving in the finals, Maria was presented with a chance to win a second French Open. Once again, your humble writer did not give Maria much of a chance. She had just come off of three consecutive three setters, while her opponent, 22year-old Romanian Simona Halep, had finished off all of hers in two sets. Only in the semifinal did Halep get an opponent who pushed her to a second set tiebreaker. I honestly believed Halep would have an easy time in the finals with fresh legs and a confident swagger. Sharapova’s force of will though would help her repeat her 2012 result with a huge win in a titanic match. The occasion was full of momentum shifts, breaks of serve, an incredible second set tiebreak and enough action to fill an HBO miniseries. Sharapova once again proved that she’ll do what it takes to come out victorious. The case for Maria’s toughness and determination is well substantiated by her performance at the 2014 French Open, but one has only to look at her entire career to see that as the overarching theme. The continued on page 24

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tough as nails continued from page 23

Credit photo to Ronald Martinez

women’s game has seen a great deal more volatility in the top 10 than the men’s game, but Maria has consistently risen to the top, achieving the number one ranking five times. She has won a major five times in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2012, and now 2014. Had Maria won five major tournaments over the course of two or three years, a critic could say that she just had a good run and was consistent for that period of time, but that’s not the case. Maria is ever present in the women’s game and contin-

ues to find success through her efforts. She’s been able to battle back even from shoulder injuries which forced her to modify her game. Both in late 2008 and mid 2013, shoulder issues benched Sharapova from play. Her response … a return to form. Sharapova has, as a testament to her indomitable spirit, the record for highest winning percentage on clay (81.8 percent) of all active female players, a staggering achievement considering that earlier in her career, she was uncomfortable on clay.

Much like Rafael Nadal, she has changed and improved her game again and again to become better. Sharapova’s level of focus and die-hard approach to the game is all the more impressive when you count all the off court activities she is involved with. We all know her from her presence on court, but she’s also the face of several product endorsements, modeling events, and of course she has expanded her brand to the realm of candy magnate with the launch of Sugarpova. Whether it be Maria as the face of such worldwide brands as Nike, Prince and Canon, or the face of fashion, she maintained a strong balance between her offthe-court interests and the pro tennis career that put her on the map. In 2006 at the age of 19, she was named the topgrossing female athlete by Forbes, earning over $18 million. One thing you might not know about her though is that she is also a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador. International aid is an issue close to Maria’s heart, having moved at an early age due to the Chernobyl disaster. While Sharapova’s will and toughness is without question now in my mind, the elephant in the room should be addressed. Maria has yet to find an answer to Serena. Her first three meetings with Serena went well, having beat her two out of the three times. Since then, her record stands at 015. What is it about Serena’s game that eludes Maria? Perhaps the fact that they have so much in common is what hampers the ability to find a solution. Both women have a powerful game, both women do a fair amount of grunting, both women have consistently been in the Top 10 for the past decade, and the pair are two of the toughest women I’ve ever seen play the game. Nick Bollettieri described Maria Sharapova as being tough as nails. I agree with Nick’s assessment wholeheartedly, and as a New Yorker, there no quality I appreciate more than that. Miguel Cervantes III now teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com


COMING IN SEPTEMBER

Distribution scheduled for 08/25/14

This 2014 U.S. OPEN edition will feature: • 2014 U.S. Open Preview • LITM Summer Series Recap • Summer Camp/Summer Events Recap • 2014 Girls High School Season Preview

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Properly Seeing the Game of Tennis By Luke Jensen I was recently working with a group of skilled tennis players at Sea Island and we were in game mode. These players were of different age and skill levels, but all were tournament players. A doubles game I like to play is what the Jensen Brothers call “Bump the Chump.” It is a number of variations of what you play at your courts called “King or Queen of the Court.” In this variation of the game, one team had the net and the other had the baseline. I just want to remind you that ALL the players on the court were tournament players! I fed the ball across the net to the baseline team and POW! The baseliner hitting

the ball HIT the back fence … okay … Out! If you lose, you cruise to the back of the line. Next team … Another feed and bam! A new team and another shot to the back FENCE! Whoa … hey Godzillas! What’s going on here? There was this long blank look on their faces. Then there was a whimper of an answer … hitting passing shots. After my clinics and lessons, I self-evaluate my approach and how I connected with my players. I was taught to perform the same process as a player after every practice and match. The fact that these talented players were really just hitters and not players at all. Give them a rocket ship for a racket and string some big banger in the frame … Game on! They might as well be shoot-

ing at clay pigeons at the shooting school. I often see too much hitting and too little playing. Smart players with high tennis IQs really see the game for what it is. Whoever makes the fewest amount of errors … WINS! If you truly watch the greats, there are so many layers to their game. They work the point using the entire court with a variety of speeds, acute shot placement and with a purpose behind all shots. I told Team Godzilla to take the first ball and dip the shot at the feet of the net players to force a tough volley for them and maybe a short ball to have an easier passing shot on the second ball. Really just the basics … There are complicated approaches also like this singles baseline play I like called

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the “Three and One Game.” No matter where the ball comes to you, play three of let’s say cross-courts and the one down the line. If the ball comes back after your fourth shot, run the three and one play again. I saw a buddy of mine beat Andre Agassi with that formula. I won’t name him because he is extremely LOW key, but I will only say that, “He ain’t afraid of ya.” There is your only hint. Anyway, if that pattern is not for you, try the Roger Federer pattern. The 17-time Grand Slam champion has something

right. Federer likes the one for one pattern. Basically hit every shot to the open court with extreme placement to find the opening and slide a winner to that opening. Fed stresses to keep it simple and execute the plan. So go out and become a smarter tennis player and fill up your confidence with victories! Keep going for the lines!!!!!! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles

and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. He was also a member of the 1991 and 1992 Davis Cup Teams. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lbjensen@syr.edu.

Local Tennis Community Remembers Charles H. Hurme 1912-2014 Charles H. Hurme, 101, of Huntington Station, N.Y., passed away May 8, 2014 at the Northport VA Hospital following a brief illness. Born Nov. 5, 1912 in New York City and raised in Brooklyn, friendships started in the Finntown area of Brooklyn lasted seven to eight decades. It was at McKinley Park where Charles began his life-long love for the game of tennis. Following his retirement in 1975, he actively pursued his tennis career playing on the Super Senior Tennis circuit. For more than 30 years, he traveled all around the country playing in numerous tournaments. At the age of 90, he won the USTA National Hardcourt Championship in Palm Springs, Calif. Remarkably, he had injured his shoulder just four months prior while wind surfing at Club Med in Cancun, Mexico. Charles was still not ready to stop, and at the age of 95, won the first-ever USTA Doubles Championship for Men 95 & over. Charles was active at the Huntington YMCA, the Senior Center and at the Northport Tennis Club for more than 50 years

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Contact former Stanford University and Roslyn High School MVP Ricky Becker today at 516-605-0420 or rbecker06@yahoo.com. LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Locals Make Impact for U.S. in

World Junior Tennis he United States recently qualified for the world finals in all four junior team events—The Junior Davis Cup and Junior Fed Cup by BNP Paribas (16 & Under) and Boys and Girls World Junior Tennis (14 & Under) —at the North/Central American and Caribbean Final in Montreal, Canada. The U.S. will now go on to compete in the Junior Davis Cup and Junior Fed Cup world finals, held Sept. 23-28 in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, and the Boys and Girls World Junior Tennis finals, held Aug. 4-9 in Prostejov, Czech Republic. The Junior Davis Cup team of William Blumberg (16, Greenwich, Conn.), John McNally (15, Cincinnati) and Nathan Ponwith (16, Scottsdale, Ariz.) took the top qualifying position, going 3-0 against

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Mexico, Guatemala and Canada, with Blumberg winning all three of his singles matches. The U.S. Junior Fed Cup team of Usue Arconada (15, College Park, Md.), Sofia Kenin (15, Pembroke Pines, Fla.) and Raveena Kingsley (15, Parkton, Md.), also won all three of its matches to finish first among the same countries, with Kenin and Kingsley each winning their two singles matches. In World Junior Tennis, Elysia Bolton (14, Lake Forest, Ill.), Rachel Lim (14, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y.) and Claire Liu (13, Thousand Oaks, Calif.) went undefeated against Canada, Guatemala and Mexico, to take the girls’ top qualifying position. Liu and Lim each won three singles matches, while Liu added three doubles victories. On the boys’ side, Andrew Fenty (14, Washington,

D.C.), Keenan Mayo (14, Roseville, Calif.) and Steven Sun (13, Glen Cove, N.Y.) went 2-1 to grab the second qualifying spot, beating the Dominican Republic and Mexico and but losing to first-place Canada, with Sun going 3-0 in singles. Overall, the U.S. has won six World Junior Tennis girls’ titles (1992, 2007-10, 2013), four World Junior Tennis boys’ titles (2002-03, 2008, 2012), two Junior Davis Cup titles (1999, 2008) and two Junior Fed cup titles (2008, 2012). Former U.S. junior international team members include: Jim Courier, Andy Roddick, James Blake, Lindsay Davenport and Sloane Stephens. Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic have also represented their countries in junior international team competition.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com


Manhasset’s Katherine Yau Named Dartmouth Co-Captain Dartmouth Women’s Tennis Head Coach Bob Dallis has named Manhasset, N.Y.’s Katherine Yau and Akiko Okuda from Tenafly, N.J. team co-captains for the upcoming 2014-2015 season. Yau, who played all but one match at number one singles, was 9-7 overall and was 8-7 at number one doubles with Taylor Ng. The Manhasset, N.Y. native is majoring in neuroscience. Yau came to Dartmouth after an excellent high school career on Long Island. She was ranked as high as number one in the USTA/Eastern Section and won a National Open title. Yau made her impact felt immediately upon walking on the Dart-

mouth campus, receiving All-Ivy League honors in singles play in her freshman cam-

paign, and will now be a co-captain in her upcoming junior season. Okuda, playing mostly at fourth and fifth singles, was 10-7 during the spring and 8-8 at second doubles with Melissa Matsuoka. The Tenafly, N.J. native is an environmental studies major modified with geography and a minor in engineering. Dartmouth finished the Ivy League with a 4-3 record. The Big Green wrapped up the year with a 4-3 victory over number 54 Harvard. It was an exceptionally strong campaign for Ivy League tennis, as two teams qualified for the NCAA Team Championship—Princeton and number 39, Columbia.

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BY

Ernests Gulbis uncensored On the distraction of women during tournaments … “When I’m in a tournament, I don’t pay attention to those things. As strange as it sounds, I go to dinner with my team, I stay with them. What happens around the girls, that’s … I don’t want to lose energy for that. If you meet a new person, it takes energy, you know? If you meet a girl, I’m not ready to go in relationship with her straight away, so it’s like, what is in my mind? For every normal guy, in your mind is to get the girl in bed as soon as possible. It all takes energy. In a tournament, I don’t do that.”

E M I L I E

KAT Z

On Novak Djokovic ... “I don’t like Djokovic that much. We have known each other since I’m 12. He was a normal guy then, but since his first big success, he has changed, his eyes changed.”

what I like. I prefer to stay in my friends’ company, invite girls over, we have drinks in a normal quiet environment.”

On what a night out on the town with him is like ... “What do people do when they go out? To go out and not drink? I don’t understand it. If you go to a nightclub, what is to enjoy there? Nothing. The music is too loud, everybody’s sweating, everybody’s dancing, it’s dark, everybody’s pushing, everybody’s drunk. And if you’re the only guy sober in the nightclub, you don’t enjoy it at all. If you’re into the groove, you know, you have a couple drinks, you’re on the same level as the club, you can sometimes get something positive out of it. But it’s not

“We’re not friends, so there is that,” Eugenie Bouchard said of her relationship, or lack thereof, with Maria Sharapova. “Of course as a child I looked up to her, and I remember watching her in the finals of Wimbledon and, you know, thought what she was doing was so cool. I wanted to do the same thing. We’re in the semis of a Grand Slam, so I’m going to respect her, but not put her too high on a pedestal and really just battle.”

Can’t we all just get along?

Serena the wedding crasher

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Serena Williams wasn’t expecting to have so much free time on her hands. But an early exit from the 2014 French Open freed up her schedule. So how did Serena decide to spend her leisure time in Miami one


Saturday afternoon? By hitting the beach and crashing a wedding of course. Serena also enjoyed herself by watching the Miami Heat eliminate the Indiana Pacers in the NBA’s Eastern Conference Finals. Perhaps losing early on in the French Open isn’t so bad after all.

Maybe you should watch the match?

ers, it might still seem a hidebound relic ensconced behind ivy-covered walls. With tennis’ most prestigious tournament progress, 60 Minutes Sports takes a look inside this tennis mecca and finds some signs that things may be changing. One of them is the virtual image of former star player and now tennis commentator John McEnroe. As a young phenom, his on-court tantrums drew boos at the exalted event. Now, he fronts a museum exhibit at Wimbledon. It’s an about-face for the club that once denied him the honorary membership it gives to all its winners. Mark Phillips reported from Wimbledon and interviewed McEnroe inside its famed Centre Court.

l Boris Becker (@TheBorisBecker): Being a #father is certainly the most rewarding, challenging, difficult, loving and most important part of my #life #family #4 #kids l Chris Evert (@ChrissieEvert): I love the tears and humbleness of @RafaelNadal and @DjokerNole l Andy Murray (@Andy_Murray): Tennis needs a commissioner l Caroline Wozniacki (@Carowozniacki): Getting ready to watch the World Cup! Who else is excited?!! #worldcup2014 l Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): Getting my French Open fix this morning before golf. My guy @JohnIsner going to work … l Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): #GoSpursGo get that bling #NBAFinals l Bob Bryan (@BryanBros): Always fun being greeted by a 6am needle. #drugtesting #keepingithonest #ouchie l Justin Gimelstob (@JustinGimelstob): I’m not much of a hockey guy, but WOW, riveting stuff, AMAZING athletes, congrats @LAKings well played @NYRangers glad hockey gets some LOVE! l Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Always a pleasure looking at the Eiffel tower, on my way back from @rolandgarros had a good hit with #Hewitt l Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): A fan just asked me to take a ‘duckface selfie’ with her. #lol l Gael Monfils (@Gael_Monfils): Sorry Twitter, tonight it’s on Instagram :-)

The following is a transcript from a post-match interview conducted with France’s Nicholas Mahut after Mahut’s early exit at the 2014 French Open at the hands of Kazakhstan’s Mikhail Kukushkin … Reporter: Congratulations. Mahut: Congratulations? I lost. Reporter: You lost? OK. So what hapTweets from the pros pened out there? Mahut: Are you serious? Did you watch the l Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Grass courts with legend of Wimbledon MR. match? BB :-) Enjoyed hitting a few volleys with Reporter: No, I didn’t. I was told that you the man himself. @TheBorisBecker won. I’m sorry. l Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): Nine titles on this special clay. Honored Splitsville @NikeTennis have made me from the It wasn’t utterly sursame stuff. #endlesstennis #RG14! prising that Rory l Venus Williams (@Venuseswilliams): McIlroy broke off his @CBSSunday asked “How much engagement to longer do you expect to play?” The anCaroline Wozniacki. swer: “As long as I can, I will.” #comIt was shocking, mitted #loveofthegame #tennis however, that he would do so over the telephone—and that’s just what happened. “It’s a hard time for me right now,” said Wozniacki. “Thanks for all the sweet messages! I support Liverpool right now because I know I’ll never walk alone!” Discover new friends and ways to PLAY at the home of the US Open! 60 Minutes sheds the

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USTA Eastern Lo College Bound Student/athletes who will be playing collegiate tennis in the fall model their new USTA Eastern LI Region sweatshirts, and are joined by (at left) USTA Eastern LI Region President Daniel Burgess and some of their high school coaches (from left), Massapequa High School Coach and USTA Eastern LI Region Vice President Mike Pavlides, Syosset High School Coach Shai Fisher, Philip Williamson of The Ross Academy, and Bellmore JFK Coach Steven Hartman

Nearly 40 high school seniors from Nassau and Suffolk Counties have committed to play collegiate tennis this fall, at Division I, II, III and other schools. While we will miss seeing them on our local courts, we wish them luck as they move on to the next phase of their academic and tennis careers. The USTA Eastern Long Island Region

was pleased to host its inaugural College Send-Off event recognizing and celebrating these terrific student athletes. Participants attended the event with their parents, siblings and high school coaches, and were treated to a question-and-answer session with Cory Parr, coach at Christopher Morley Tennis and former world tennis pro.

LI Awards Dinner Congratulations to all of the wonderful awardees at the USTA Eastern Long Island Region’ 24th Annual Awards Dinner! We were pleased to have special guest Patrick McEnroe on hand to say a few words and present trophies and plaques to the deserving winners. Thank you to all of the hard-working volunteers who made the evening a success. All photographs and videos from the Awards Dinner can be viewed at www.longisland.usta.com.

Cory was a three-time All-American at Wake Forest University and was ranked as high as ninth in college tennis singles and first nationally in doubles. The students also heard from Daniel Burgess, president of the USTA Eastern Long Island Region, and received sweatshirts courtesy of the LI Region. Claude Okin, CEO of Sportime, addresses the audience in accepting the evening’s biggest honor, the Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award

Clement Stancik accepts the Arthur Ashe Multicultural Award from USTA Eastern LI Region President Daniel Burgess

Nassau Community College Crowned National Champs The NJCAA Division III Men’s Champs from Nassau Community College: (seated) Raul Celleri, Coach Cheryl Novins, Assistant Coach Kristina Rossano and Stephen Cumberbatch, with (back row, from left): Donnell Slay, Mike Nelson, Andrew Neter, Jace Koretz, Keith Vargas, Roey Heymann and Dan Baruch

Congratulations to the Nassau Community College Men’s Tennis Team, which claimed 32

the 2014 NJCAA Division III National Championship in Plano, Texas. The Lions were undefeated in match play again this season. They won the first NJCAA Division III Men’s Tennis Championship for Nassau since 2001, and the first for Head Coach Cheryl Novins. While the entire team played well and earned points throughout the tournament, the All-American First Team players from

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Nassau are: Mike Nelson (second singles), Jace Koretz (third singles), Roey Heymann & Mike Nelson (first doubles), and Jace Koretz & Dan Baruch (second doubles). Nassau’s Roey Heymann was named the NJCAA Division III Coaches Association Player of the Year, while Nassau CC Head Coach Cheryl Novins was named the Max Grubbs NJCAA Division III National Coach of the Year.


ng Island Region High School Boys Head to States Long Island’s top boy’s high school tennis players recently represented their schools at the New York High School Tennis Championships at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. Nassau and Suffolk County each sent nine boys (three singles players and three doubles teams) to compete. Zain Ali of Half Hollow Hills East High School took third place in the main draw, while the doubles team of Dylan & Duane Davis of Half Hol-

low Hills West High School finished fifth in the doubles draw. In the consolation tournament, Ben Gordon of Port Washington High School defeated Yuval Solomon of Plainview JFK High School in the finals. The doubles team of Ross Reiffman & Travis Leaf of Half Hollow Hills East High School won the doubles consolation. Zain Ali and Ben Gordon were selected as the Sportsmanship Winners for their respective counties.

The USTA Eastern Long Island Region presented team sweatshirts to all Regional participants in the 2014 State Championship

USTA League Winners The USTA Eastern Long Island Region is proud to have two USTA Mixed-Doubles League teams representing the Region and Eastern Section at Nationals in November. The 8.0 Mixed-Doubles USTA League Team out of Long Beach Tennis Center took home the Gold Medal at the Eastern Sectional Championships in Schenectady, N.Y. The team, captained by Andrew Camacho, will head to the National Championships in Tucson, Ariz., Nov. 21-23. Team members include Adam Jaskowski, Cristina Camacho, Casey M. Schnabel, Andrew Camacho, Shahzeb Mirza, Evelyne Le Goupil, Terry P. Kossegi, Elizabeth Ingrassia, Jared Berse, Amy L. Bernstein, Paul F. Schnabel, Oksana Aivazian, Jean Tanklowitz, Adele Mancuso, Nancy Wisniewski, Lori M. D’Antonio, Brian Vincent Connor and Mindy Reed.

The Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis 6.0 Mixed Doubles team of (back row): Lori Stone, Adam Moramarco, Steven Waters, Anthony Cristi and Gary Spector; (middle row): Maria Gonzales, Darlene Sotomayor, Shanon Blue, Allie Spector, Marley Spector and Todd Greenwald, with (front row): Shaun Willis and Deena Mavroudis

The Long Beach 8.0 team celebrates its win at Sectionals, including (back row): Evelyne Le Goupil, Nancy Wisniewski, Adam Jaskowski, Casey Schnabel and Lori D’Antonio; and (front row): Cristina Camacho, Andrew Camacho, Paul Schnabel, Jean Tanklowitz and Brian Connor (not pictured: Terry Kossegi)

The USTA League 6.0 Mixed-Doubles out of Hempstead Lake Indoor Tennis also will be heading to Tucson in November to play for the National Championship. The Eastern Section champs, captained by Darlene Sotomayor, had a great season. Team members include Gary Spector, Jeffrey Ross

Miller, Lori Stone, Marley Anna Spector, Deena Mavroudis, Shanon Blue, Matthew Vota, Anthony Cristi, Maria Cristina Gonzales, Allie Spector, John Cuevo, Shaun Edward Willis, Karen E. Groeger, Steven E. Waters, Adam Moramarco and Todd Greenwald.

Kids ... Save the Date! It’s that time of year again, kids, time for Long Island Region Kids Day! This year’s event will again take place at Baldwin High School on Friday, July 18.

Visit www.longisland.usta.com for more information. LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Inaugural American Collegiate Invitational to be Held at 2014 U.S. Open he USTA has announced that the U.S. Open will feature a college tennis competition for the first time ever in 2014, inviting top American college players to compete in the inaugural American Collegiate Invitational, set for Thursday-Saturday, Sept. 4-6 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. Eight men and eight women will be invited to play in a singles tournament during the second week of the U.S. Open, with the winners receiving a wild card into a future pro event. The American Collegiate Invitational is open only to American players, using the objective selection criteria listed below. “College tennis plays such a significant role in the vitality of American tennis, and it’s important that we are able to highlight some of America’s best college players on a worldwide stage at the U.S. Open,” said USTA Chairman, CEO and President Dave Haggerty. The men’s and women’s fields will in-

eligibility this year, as determined by the following criteria: l The six members of the USTA Collegiate Team, who are selected based on results, Intercollegiate Tennis Association honors and pro rankings. l The top two graduating seniors or the top two players who turned professional/have exhausted their college eligibility in 2013-2014, according to the ITA’s final singles rankings. l If the top two players who have exhausted their college eligibility are already on the USTA Collegiate Team, or if the six spots reserved for players still in college have not been filled, invitations will be extended based on the ITA’s final singles rankings.

T

clude six players who are still in college, and two who have exhausted their college

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

“We are excited to make college tennis a bigger part of the U.S. Open,” said U.S. Open Tournament Director David Brewer. “Many collegians continue on to successful pro careers, so we look forward to showcasing some very talented players.”

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Lux-Craft Breaking New Ground With Energy-Efficient LED Systems Last year as the 2013 U.S. Open was just starting, New York-based Lux-Craft Inc. was working to complete the installation of first ever LED-based lighting system at Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center in Glenwood Landing, N.Y. Coincidence or not, the two historic events were taking place at the same time. After years of research and development, it all came down to two weeks in August. By the time U.S. Open Finals were played, the new lighting installation was complete, and all involved were anxiously waiting for the results. The road for Lux-Craft’s engineers was not easy, and there were many sceptics who were convinced that the technology

was simply not ready and that the system would not produce the needed results. From the day the new lighting system was operational at Robbie Wagner’s, it became obvious that a new lighting revolution had begun. During the next few days and weeks as more coaches and players experienced the LED lighting, the impact of an improved lighting environment became clearer and impressive. The quality of the light amazed everyone who experienced playing under the LEDs, as vivid colors and clarity of the ball made practice much more enjoyable. Robbie Wagner was looking to improve his club’s lighting, and was extremely pleased as more and more players and coaches complimented him. The real surprise came with ar-

rival of first electrical bill … a 60 percent overall savings over the old lighting system. Lux-Craft is continuously working to make improvements and advances in LED lighting technology. The company is determined to manufacture high-quality luminaires for sports facilities, as they have dedicated thousands of hours in seeking out researching the best materials. All assembly and testing is done locally in New York, and with a five-year standard guarantee, the company is confident that they can vastly improve the lighting systems at tennis clubs. All of that, combined with substantial energy savings, is guaranteeing that we are going to see more LED technology in the future of the tennis industry.

TV’s Impractical Jokers Take Their Act to Bethpage Park Tennis Center The truTV show “Impractical Jokers” came to Long Island recently and filmed some footage at Bethpage Park Tennis Center. For those not familiar with the program, Brian “Q” Quinn, James “Murr” Murray, Joe Gatto and Sal Vulcano have entertained each other for years with hilarious practical jokes. And now, these real-life best friends challenge each other to outrageous dares and stunts … all caught on hidden camera. In their latest stunt, Andrew Berman of Oceanside, N.Y. was among those caught on camera. Berman had this to say after his 30 minutes on the courts of Bethpage Park Tennis Center with the Impractical Jokers crew: “I was very excited to have my first lesson at one of the premier training centers on Long Island, Bethpage Park Tennis Center. I was a little skeptical when the ‘tennis pro’ said he was a semi-pro from Australia, and I figured something was not right. It turned out that I, who cannot serve nor volley, was better than this ‘pro.’ Lo and behold, it turns out that the ‘pro’ was a comedian/actor named Joe Gatto from the truTV show, ‘Impractical Jokers.’ I had a great time though and cannot wait to watch the episode.” LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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L O N G

I S L A N D

charitabl Hitting for MS BY JASON GERBER

On June 7, I had the pleasure of organizing a Mixed-Doubles Tennis 4 MS Tournament to benefit Multiple Sclerosis research. My aunt was stricken with this disease and passed away when I was just a one-yearold. I wanted to figure out a way to incorporate tennis into a community service project to raise money for MS. So far, I

raised more than $800 for the cause, all of which will be donated to the Multiple Sclerosis Society. There were two different brackets in the tournament, each grouped according to age. The winners of the young division (aka the “Federer Division”) was the team of Drew Gordon & Emma Matz. The win-

ners of the older division (aka the “Nadal Division”) was the team of Cory Seltman & Jackie Inzalaco. I would like to thank Grand Slam Tennis for making a generous donation towards a basket to raffle off. I look forward to organizing a similar event next year for the same cause in combating MS.

Commack HS Hosts Tennis Autism Awareness Event BY GARY SIMEONE

The weather may have been questionable, but the sun managed to stay out for the boy’s tennis annual charity event at Commack High School to benefit Nassau Suffolk Services for Autism (NSSA). The event, hosted by Commack High School Boy’s and Girl’s Tennis Coach Shane Helfner, had players and teachers teamed up in a double elimination, three-game pro set to help raise money for NSSA. At the end of the day, $1,152 was raised for NSSA by participants. “It is a great way to include the school 38

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com


T E N N I S

M A G A Z I N E ’ S

le initiatives

and our tennis program with the community,” said Helfner, who helped start the event four years ago. “The whole event is for a good cause, and it also lets kids see what their teachers are like outside of the classroom.” Cory Seltman, a senior and captain of the Commack Boy’s Varsity Tennis Team, said that he enjoys participating in the event because of the money it raises for the foundation and because it brings everyone together in the community. “It is a good event for the community and it lets us students see what our teachers are like outside the classroom setting,” said Seltman. “It is just a fun atmosphere all around.” Cory teamed up with his high school guidance counselor and president of the USTA Eastern Metro Region, Jackie Clark. Josh Zweig, who regularly teams up with Cory in doubles, played with his World Language teacher, Margaret Krone, for the event. “I just think it is a good way to support the community. And like Cory said, it’s a fun event,” said Zweig. There were 24 baskets with prizes donated from stores throughout the community and trophies were awarded to all

players and teachers at the event. “Everyone was a winner yesterday who participated,” said Helfner. “While we always strive for success on the court, our Commack program knows how important it is to give back to the community.” The following is the list of winners on the day: l First Place: Jackie Clark (Commack Guidance Counselor) & Cory Seltman

l Second Place: Derek Pope (Commack Math Teacher) & Gabe Green l Third Place: Bobby Varughese (Commack Math Teacher) & Brandon Kramer l Fourth Place: Joseph Pugh (Physical Education Teacher) & Jason Gerber continued on page 40

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charitable initiatives continued from page 39

Hundreds Turn Out to Honor the Memory of Sydne Jacoby

The Second Annual “Ace It for Syd” Tennis Tournament was held at Oceanside High School on June 7 to pay tribute to Sydne Jacoby. There were hundreds in attendance to compete in the tournament, get lessons from a professional instructor and to donate money to the Sydne Jacoby Foundation, which raises money for a scholarship for an Oceanside High School senior, Autism Speaks and other charitable outlets. Sydne Jacoby was a graduate of Oceanside High School who tragically passed away in November 2012 while attending the University of Massachusetts, a school and community she loved dearly. The turnout at Oceanside High School

was outstanding for second-year event. There were about 45 total teams in the tournament, all of whom donated $50 to the Foundation, but the love and support from the community was the true reward for the Jacoby family. “The event was definitely warming to each one of the Jacoby hearts,” said Nadine Jacoby, Sydne’s mother. “We didn’t think going into this year would be as good as last year’s but the event has grown.” There were players of all ages who came out to enjoy some quality tennis and show support for the Sydne Jacoby Foundation, but the tournament also featured some extremely competitive tennis as well. Sydne earned a scholarship to the Uni-

versity of Massachusetts where she was studying psychology and special education. She felt extremely fortunate to be able to pursue her education on a scholarship, and always had a desire to give back and help others. “It was a very big part of her life,” said Nadine. “She taught tennis at the Hempstead Country Club for the last four summers. She never felt entitled and loved giving back.” Sydne would have turned 21 on June 7. When asked what was one thing she wanted people to remember about Sydne, her mother Nadine said, “That’s easy. Her warm and gracious smile.” If you would like to donate to the Sydne Jacoby Foundation, please visit www.sydnejacoby.com or e-mail aceforsyd@verizon.net. The following are some of the winners of the Second Annual “Ace It for Syd” Tennis Tournament: l Men’s 4.5-5.0: Rob Zola & Panus Romsaitong l Men’s 3.5-4.0: The team of Green & Kiley l Women’s 3.5-4.0: Nancy & Kaitlin Schwarz l Women’s 2.5-3.0: Sabrina Wolkoff & Jenny Schneider l Mixed 4.5-5.0: Joyce Narciso & Chris Colesanti l Mixed Recreational Doubles: Emily Carlisi & Kevin McMahon

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An Interview With Christina Bracken of ZEMgear

Where did the idea for ZEMgear come from? Christina Bracken: Today’s ZEM Collection of Wind, Water, Sand and Land shoes have a unique history. In the beginning, a group of beach volleyball athletes asked us to solve a problem. They wanted a shoe to protect them from hot and cold sand, and debris that could injure them. We designed a shoe that combined natural motion, protection and had the WOW factor of total flexibility. Our product and performance testing is done during a top notch sports camp with about 250 athletes to ensure that the product works as it should. The ‘Original Ninja’ design was created through this research. We took the intense feedback and suggestions of our participating athletes and developed a unique collection of high-performance, sand sports shoes. What’s unique about your product? Bracken: We make high performance footwear that doesn’t follow the traditional idea of thick midsoles with inserts either in the heel area or mid-foot. We believe that a

naturally functioning and articulating foot delivers more benefits to the user, and offers a lightweight solution to many of the problems that our feet encounter. We developed a unique tech-band technology that allows us to deliver a super lightweight and stabile product without the bulk and weight of a traditional shoe. We have already received two Industry Awards for Innovative Footwear Design. Not to mention, our designs are colorful and simply look cool. What has the consumer reaction been? Bracken: “Wow!” is usually what we hear when people encounter a pair of ZEMs for the first time. People who try our shoes on find them very comfortable, functional and fun.

What have been the most popular products/styles? Bracken: For beach tennis, beach volleyball and soccer, we recommend the Original Ninja and Playa styles. Split and round toes, and high and low styles are available. Our Sand Collection is very popular with top athletes who look for top performance and lateral stability you cannot get from “sand sock brands.” For SUP’ing (Stand-Up Paddling), the O2 and the H20 are most popular due to their easy-on/easy-off uppers and the award-winning outsole. Of course we have many other styles for all activities revolving around wind, water, sand and land. Find us at www.ZEMgear.com for more information. “ZEM” stands for the Zone of Endless Motion. Born in Miami, it’s a place where we believe anything is possible. Through our creations, we reflect Miami’s culture, diversity, fun-and-sun side, and of course, the activities that surround life in and around Miami, the ocean and the beaches.

Find more ZEMtastic products at www.zemgear.com and get free products, tips and more on ZEM’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ZEMgear. LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Tennis, Diet and Proper Hydration By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN Tennis is a unique sport that involves intense physical activity for a prolonged period of time. Nobody knows how long one’s match will last until the final point is won. Thus, it is vital for every tennis player to have the aerobic capacity to have the proper endurance and tolerance. Nutrition plays a very important role and should be part of every athlete’s preparation. It’s no secret that most of the professional tennis players on the ATP and WTA Tours have their nutritionists working with

them as a part of their team—evaluating, calculating and personalizing a meal plan is a major part of their job. Three things can occur during your match if you are not prepared: l Cramping l Dizziness and fatigue l Loss of concentration Cramping A diet, complete in specific vitamins and minerals, can prevent muscle cramping. Here are some nutrients that can prevent muscle cramping. If properly incorporated in proper amounts into one’s diet, your chances of being cramp-free during

a long match can greatly improve. l Sodium: Sodium is one of the main positively-charged mineral ions or electrolytes in body fluid. The body needs sodium to help maintain normal body-fluid balance and blood pressure, and in conjunction with several other electrolytes, it is critical for nerve impulse generation and muscle contraction. An athlete should not consume a low sodium diet and should always drink regular Gatorade to prevent sodium deficiency. l Potassium: Potassium is the major electrolyte found inside all body cells, including muscle and nerve cells. It

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works in close association with sodium and chloride in the generation of electrical impulses in the nerves and the muscles, including the heart. Potassium is found in most foods, but is especially abundant in fresh vegetables, potatoes, certain fruits (melons, bananas, berries and citrus fruits), milk and meat. l Calcium: Calcium found in the body is found in the skeleton where it gives strength to bone. Calcium is involved in muscle contractions, including that of the heart, skeletal muscles, and smooth muscle found in blood vessels and intestines, as well as the generation of nerve impulses. Blood calcium is tightly controlled and regulated by several hormones, including parathyroid hormone and Vitamin D. Adding an extra glass of milk and yogurt for breakfast will assist in helping prevent cramping as well. l Magnesium: Muscle weakness, muscle twitching and muscle cramps are common symptoms of magnesium deficiency. For example, three ounces

of broiled halibut has 91 milligrams of magnesium, and a serving of an artichoke has 101 milligrams, but the grains are the richest in magnesium, with one cup of grain, ranging from 100-300 milligrams of magnesium l Fluids: Water is the number one ingredient every cell and tissue of the body needs in order to survive. The fluids that circulate throughout your body dissolve minerals known as electrolytes. Electrolytes help properly regulate the fluid levels inside and between cells, and are vital for the proper functioning of your cells, tissues and muscles. It is very important for a tennis player to know how much to drink before, during and after the match. Dehydration can force your heart to work harder, your core body temperature rises, and as a result, your performance will fall dramatically. Over-hydration is the other extreme, and it can decrease your athletic performance. Too much fluid will cause the electrolyte concentration in the

body to become overly diluted, thus compromising athletic performance. Finding your fluid/electrolyte balance is key to sustaining long and multiple matches. Your hydration zone is the perfect level at which you perform your best. Consult a professional A registered dietitian, specializing in sports nutrition, can help you to calculate the exact amount and type of fluid needed for optimum athletic performance. Personal pre- and post-tournament meal plan suggestions will help you to play your match better. Visit www.irinalehat.com for classes, workshops and private consultations. Call (917) 769-8031 for an appointment, and mention my article in Long Island Tennis Magazine to receive 20 percent off. Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solution Co. is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. She may be reached by phone at (917) 769-8031 or email irinalehat@gmail.com.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

C

ongratulations to the 6.0 Mixed-Doubles team from Hempstead Lake Tennis, captained by Darlene Sotomayor and Adam Moramarco, and the 8.0 Mixed-Doubles team from Long Beach Tennis Center, captained by Andrew Camacho. Both teams are off to the National Championships! Good luck to both teams! The Men’s and Women’s Leagues are underway. The schedule for Regional Championships are as follows: l Friday, July 18 at 7:00 p.m. at Carefree Racquet Club (Women’s 3.0–40 & Over) l Saturday, July 19 at 9:00 a.m. at Carefree Racquet Club (Women’s 3.5–40 & Over) l Saturday, July 19 at 11:00 a.m. at Carefree Racquet Club (Women’s 4.0–40 & Over) l Tuesday, July 29 at 7:00 p.m. at Carefree Racquet Club (Women’s 2.5–18 & Over) l Tuesday, Aug. 5 at 7:00 p.m. at Sportime Bethpage (Women’s 4.0–18 & Over) l Tuesday, Aug. 5 at 9:00 p.m. at Sportime Bethpage (Men’s 4.0–18 & Over) l Monday, Aug. 11 at 7:00 p.m. at Carefree Racquet Club (Women’s 3.5–18 & Over) l Tuesday, Aug. 12 at 7:00 p.m. at Carefree Racquet Club (Women’s 3.0–18 & Over)

The Long Island winning teams will advance to the Sectional Championships which are: August 8-10 40 & Over (3.0, 4.0) • 18 & Over (2.5, 5.0+) Schenectady, N.Y./Albany Marriott August 15-17 40 & Over (3.5, 4.5+) • 18 & Over (4.0) Schenectady, N.Y./Albany Marriott August 22-24 18 & Over (3.0, 3.5, 4.5) Schenectady, N.Y./Albany Marriott September 19-21 65 & Over (6.0, 7.0, 8.0) • 40 & Over (Mixed) Schenectady, N.Y./Albany Marriott September 26-28 55 & Over (6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0) Schenectady, N.Y./Albany Marriott Good luck to all teams and remember, this is supposed to be fun! Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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BY HANNAH CAMHI or as long as I can remember, I saw a group of challenged athletes entering Bethpage Park Tennis Center as I was leaving, wary from three hours of Sunday practice. Intrigued, I stayed one afternoon and was delighted to watch these Special Olympians play and laugh with able volunteers. They were all having so much fun … wait, tennis is fun? Hours of cross-courts

F

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are hard work for me, but these athletes recognized nothing but excitement with each hit. I needed to be a part of this! Sunday after Sunday flew by and there was always a tournament or homework, usually both. So many problematic sets and so little time. I regretted leaving for college without having really experienced this program for the Special Olympians.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Last summer while meeting up with my coach, Steve Kaplan’s former student Ali McDonough, I learned about the Unified Games. Ali is a role model and mentor to me, so when she talks, I listen. She told me about a program that Steve once conducted in which she and other tournament girls at Bethpage Park Tennis Center trained together with challenged athletes for a few months to prepare for a Unified Tournament. Ali loved this program and she motivated me to take action. While on winter break from Brown University in December, I asked Steve if he would help me run another Unified Program in the spring. He agreed, as long as I did most of the organization. I contacted seven girls from Bethpage Park Tennis Center and was happily surprised that every one of them enthusiastically signed on … Lauren Bishop, Jackie Bukzin, Kaitlin Byrnes, Aimee Manfredo, Gabby and Julia Raziel, and Vanessa Scott, you are all stars! The icing on the cake, thanks to David Sickmen of New York Tennis Magazine and Long Island Tennis Magazine, Whitney Kraft of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, and Mike Silverman of City

Credit all photos to Sharon Raziel

Unifying for a Greater Cause


Parks Foundation, was that the Unified Games tournament would be held as part of the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo. Tim Flynn of the Special Olympics of New York sent an e-mail that said, “Show the world what you CAN do.” We did show the world! It was a wonderful event held on a perfect June day. I was so proud of each and every competitor. Ken Walker, who has run the program for the last 15 years at Bethpage Park Ten-

nis Center, beamed with pride as he watched his daughter, Sabrina, put a volley away as Diane Colonna, regional director of The Special Olympics, cheered. As I ran into the indoor building at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center to use the restrooms after the matches, I spotted one of the adult Olympians slowly walking with his father. They were both exhausted from the excitement. He turned with anticipation and

asked, “So, how did I do dad?” “You did great,” said the father. “I loved your forehand.” He beamed and reached out for his dad, as they walked away together holding hands, while I ran for the restroom crying with tears of joy. Hannah Camhi of Woodbury, N.Y. is a member of the Brown University Women’s Tennis team.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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tips from the

tennis pro Good to Great: A Complete Start Developing Athletic Balance and Coordination in Young Tennis Players By Steve Kaplan Below is the text of my talk at the Second Annual New York Tennis Expo. It was a great day, with recordbreaking attendance and a great time had by all. Many thanks to Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine for organizing an amazing event. Also, thank you to eight-year-old Taylor Goetz who helped me demonstrate balance and coordination skills … she was a true star! Tennis is increasingly becoming a sport of enormous foot and racket speed. As the modern game evolves, so must our teaching methods. I’ve been fortunate to work with some of the best fitness trainers in the

country in my 35 years of coaching tennis, and I’ve learned three valuable lessons I’d like to share. First, the best place to develop some athletic skills is off the court, second the process starts early, and third coaches should be a part of it. The background As a young player, I often heard conflicting instruction about how to set up to hit a tennis ball. Most instruction explained to “run as fast as possible then stop and set” but others suggested to “move thru the shot” which is the style now in vogue. I noticed the best players did both, depending on the situation, but always with balance. We all know balance when we see it. It’s the ballet like grace of Roger Federer, the catlike quickness of Novak

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Djokovic and the explosive power of Serena Williams. Unfortunately, knowing what balance looks like is not enough to effectively teach it, In fact, coaches often talk about balance before undermining young players by teaching adult racket skills. To instruct this skill, I knew that I needed to fully understand it. Balance is defined as “The ability to control weight and equilibrium in relation to the force of gravity to achieve zero acceleration.” Simply said, it’s constant movement or constant stillness. Today, there’s a disturbing movement towards early tennis specialization, and this singular focus is the enemy of developing balance. Tennis is the sport of a lifetime, but a lifetime’s worth of cross-courts by the age of nine is excessive. Maybe Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule for mastery of a skill is being taken too literally by some. The modern game emphasizes power, but power without stability results in movement compensation, correcting mistakes and injury. “With great power comes great responsibility,” I think Spiderman’s Uncle Ben said that and tennis coaches have a responsibility to learn the language of movement specialists to safely train players both on and off the court as a team. The problem America dominated the world tennis stage for generations, but times have changed and the 800-pound gorilla in the room is


now “How do we successfully create the next generation of champions?” The industry solution has been a shift in core philosophy to “10 & Under Tennis.” QuickStart is a much-needed developmentally appropriate program because it recognizes that children are not little adults. It makes the game more interesting for children, but critics suggest that it’s not a complete start because it doesn’t do enough to develop a foundation of body awareness and athletic IQ. We can look to the progressive practices of China, Russia and Eastern Europe to understand the importance of developing body control with coordination and balance before teaching racket skills. Clearly, resized courts and equipment are not game-changers if young players cannot first support their body weight. Programs that focus on correct movement posture with steep forward shin angles, strong lower to upper body connection and explosive starts with precise stops will truly be a quick start. Optimum athletic balance can be trained by focusing on speed, fitness, conditioning and injury resistance. The language that coaches need to learn with demonstration The components of speed: 1. Coordination: The ability to control your body rhythmically. Specifically, the

arms must work in harmony with the legs to move efficiently. Poor arm movement is the limitation to speed in non-Olympic sprinters. 2. Agility: The ability to coordinate quickly. 3. Spatial orientation: Awareness of the position of the body in space. It is where both rhythm and synchronization come from. 4. Rhythm: The ability to create efficient movement in time to performance. 5. Synchronization: The coordination of movements of two or more body parts. 6. Speed of reaction: The ability to respond to stimulus. Then components of fitness: 1. Flexibility: The range of motion around your joints. 2. Mobility: The ability to control this range of motion under force. In the real world, it’s the ability to move. 3. Strength: The ability to displace at a maximum effort. 4. Power: The ability to express your force quickly to adapt to the changing environment. 5. Stability: The ability to hold still and resist force. 6. Neurological sequencing: The ability to fire muscles in the most efficient order. The components of conditioning: 1. Conditioning: The ability to perform efficiently with an elevated heart rate and greater oxygen demands.

2. Endurance: The ability to repeat submaximal efforts and the stronger you are, the greater the ease in repeating these efforts. 3. Movement adequacy: The efficiency of movement and strong efficacy will help reaction time provide greater endurance and be less taxing to your conditioning. It is closely related to kinesthetic awareness with the application of appropriate muscle tension. Injury resistance 1. Symmetry: Front and back, right and left, lower and upper body equivalent function. It is a balance of mobility and stability which allows you to move with high function. This comes from training as tennis makes us lopsided (front over rear, dominant over non dominant) and a lack of symmetry is highly correlated to injury potential. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 34 years, Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Serena Set to S

Photo credit: Adam Wolfthal

By Andrew Eichenholz Seventeen Grand Slam titles … 60 total championships and more than 600 career wins … Serena Williams, a four-time Gold Medal winner from three separate Olympic Games has suffered shocking losses early in tournaments this year, leaving fans, coaches and players alike left wondering if anybody will step up to challenge the queen’s throne on top of the game. Not a chance. In fact, blips on Serena’s resumé are quite normal for the 32-year old. History dictates that whenever the most feared ball striker in recent history suffers an early setback, she comes back with a vengeance for the foreseeable future. After her most recent disappointment, a loss in the second round of the French Open to Spaniard Garbine Muguruza, Serena made a bold claim: “You can’t be on every day. I’m going to go home and 50

work five times as hard to make sure I never lose again.” However absurd her statement may seem, the past has shown that nobody should doubt Serena Williams in the face of adversity. Last season, the sixth winningest Grand Slam player in history dropped a tight match at Wimbledon to eventual finalist Sabine Lisicki, an extremely dangerous opponent on any surface. How did Serena respond? She won the U.S. Open later in the summer without yielding a set closer than 6-4 until the final, where she beat Victoria Azarenka. The year before, Williams had a start to the season eerily similar to how she has started her current campaign. A fourth round loss Down Under at the Australian Open may have been a disappointment. A first round exit at Roland Garros proved the impossible possible. “There’s no excuse,” Serena said after her loss to Virginie Razzano, making sure the press knew that, in the end, the events

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

of that day only happened on a tennis court. “It’s life.” The simplest way to summarize the rest of her season is that the great champion made a statement. She could face challenges, but whatever came her way, she would meet them head on. A trio of three-setters at Wimbledon in 2012 tested Serena’s nerve, but she started a historical end-of-season run by taking that title over the always pesky Agnieszka Radwanska. Never before had Serena taken the Olympic Gold Medal in singles. Not only did she emphatically do so at the London Games, but Serena dropped a total of 17 games in six matches against the best of the best in the world in the process. If that wasn’t enough, she teamed with her sister Venus to take the Gold Medal in doubles as well, dominating the field without dropping a set. Every great athlete has had letdowns, allowing a major accomplishment to cloud their focus. That year’s U.S. Open showed that Serena would never allow it. After a rel-


Storm Into the Summer “No matter how shocking it is, every tennis player loses matches on every stage, even Serena Williams.” atively routine tournament, her biggest rival at the time, Azarenka, played the best match of her career. Serving at 5-3 in the final set, the Belarusian had a chance to cap the season with a huge headline. Would David complete the slaying of Goliath? Not a chance. In typical Serena fashion, she clawed her way back and fought to another Grand Slam title. Only two other players in the history of the game had ever won Wimbledon, the Olympics and the U.S. Open in the same year. That is how Serena responded to disappointing losses. Did anybody sit down in January and predict that arguably the greatest player to ever touch a racket would lose to Ana Ivanovic and Garbine Muguruza in the first two majors of the season? Absolutely not. That doesn’t mean that Serena lost to two players from the nearest club. Ivanovic, although inconsistent, has won a Grand Slam, and Muguruza is one of the up and coming players on the WTA Tour, arguably one of the biggest hitters out there. No matter how shocking it is, every tennis

Every great champion finds a way, no matter how ugly it may look. Many doubt Rafael Nadal when he suffers a surprising loss. What does he do? He responds. Many have ruled out the greatest male of all time, Roger Federer. Don’t be surprised if he comes back to win another major title himself. The bottom line is, it is best not to wake a sleeping giant. Unfortunately for the WTA Tour, Muguruza might have done just that. Look out for the rest of the season, the name Serena Williams will be back.

player loses matches on every stage, even Serena Williams. Does that mean that she is going to keep doing so? Probably not.

T E N N I S

Andrew Eichenholz is a journalism student at Stony Brook University, where he currently is a staff writer for The Statesman, covering tennis amongst many sports. He grew up playing tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where he learned to love the game, eventually becoming a part-time tennis instructor, working for the most part with the QuickStart 10 & Under Program. Andrew has also served as a ballperson at the U.S. Open. He may be reached by e-mail at andrew.eichenholz@stonybrook.edu.

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Recap 2014 Boy’s High School

Cold Spring Harbor Edges Syosset to Win Nassau County Championship By Gary Simeone Credit photos to Gary Simeone

The 2014 Nassau County Champion Cold Spring Harbor Seahawks gather for a team photo

Two familiar foes met in the Nassau County Boy’s High School Tennis Finals at Garden City High School, as the Cold Spring Harbor Seahawks and the Syosset Braves, who were both undefeated this season, met to decide who would be the 2014 Nassau County Champion. In the end, Cold Spring Harbor edged Syosset for the 4-3 victory. “Every game in many of our matches today were very tight,” said Cold Spring Harbor Coach Ben Marks, who added that his team beat Syosset by the same exact score last season. “We just pulled out some key points, and in the end, we were able to come away with a victory.” 52

Members of the Cold Spring Harbor Seahawks are presented with their championship plaque

The Seahawks took an early 2-1 lead as the singles matches wrapped up with the Mullins Brothers, Conor & Sean, defeating their opponents in straight sets. Conor knocked off Syosset’s Dan Shleimovich 6-2, 6-2 in first singles, and Sean defeated Henry Tell, 6-0, 6-1 in second singles. Syosset’s Dylan Granat beat Jay Burkett 6-3, 6-0 in third singles. The crowd of spectators moved to the doubles courts to see who would pull out victories to help their team in their quest for the County title. First doubles was the next match to wrap up with CSH’s JP Paris & George

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Carmi winning a tightly contested 6-4, 64 battle over Austin Ash & Rihi Ishikawa. Down 3-1, Syosset needed three straight victories to pull off the comeback. After losing 6-0 in the first set, CSH’s third doubles team of George Muller & Greg Kaplan held their ground to win a tough second set, 6-3 and pull out a hard fought third set, 6-3 to seal the win for the Seahawks. In second doubles, Syosset’s Nikhil Raj & Spencer Lowitt beat A.J Arena & Nick Stamatos 6-1, 6-7, 6-2. In fourth doubles, Chad Kagan & Adam Canarick of the Braves defeated CSH’s Eli Reid & Chase Delancourt 6-1, 6-3.


Hills East Beats Hills West for Fifth Consecutive Suffolk County Championship

Credit photo to Calvin Rhoden

Zain Ali helped lead half Hollow Hills East to its fifth straight Suffolk County Championship

The Half Hollow Hills East Boy’s Varsity Tennis team won its 100th straight match against Suffolk County opponents in the finals of the Suffolk County Championship, defeating the Half Hollow Hills West Bulls 4.5-2.5 to capture its fifth straight Suffolk County team title. The Thunderbirds were led by its outstanding singles play, as teammates Zain Ali and Kyle Alper, who played each other in the Suffolk County Individual Championship just a few days prior, each set the tone with victories. The two teammates disposed of their respective opponents, Alper with a 6-1, 6-1 win over West’s Evan Nierman at second singles, while Ali was a 6-0, 4-4 winner at first singles after Half Hollow Hills West’s Aziz Rashidzada

was forced to retire with an ankle injury. The third and fourth singles players did their part as well. Travis Leaf won his match at third singles 6-2, 6-3, and Ross Reiffman cruised to a 6-2, 6-1 victory at fourth to round out the singles matches. “With Zain and Kyle at the top of the lineup and then Travis and Ross playing singles today we were pretty confident,” Hills East coach Tom Depelteau told Newsday. “We knew we would compete in doubles but singles was going to be our key.” Hills West hung tough as it picked up wins in first and second doubles, but was unable to overcome the dominant singles play of Hills East. It was only the third loss of the season for the Bulls, all three coming at the hands of the Thunderbirds.

Davis Brothers and Ali Claim 2014 Suffolk County Individual Championships By Brian Coleman Credit photo to Calvin Rhoden

The team of Dylan & Duane Davis of Half Hollow Hills West captured the 2014 Suffolk County Doubles Championship

The Suffolk County Individual Championships were completed and in the end, it was Zain Ali of Half Hollow Hills East who won his second straight singles title, defending his crown from last year. Ali faced off with his friend and Hills East teammate, Kyle Apler, in the championship match at Half Hollow East High School. Ali controlled the match from the onset, cruising to a 6-1 victory in the first, and jumped out to a 3-0 lead in the second. The second-seeded Apler hung tough for a bit, winning four of the next six games to bring it to 5-4. From there, the defending champion and

top-seeded Ali closed it out and won the final game to secure the 6-1, 6-4 victory. The two seniors helped lead Half Hollow East to an incredibly successful season, and both competed in the New York State High School Championship. On the doubles side, twins Dylan & Duane Davis of Half Hollow Hills West captured the Suffolk County doubles championship with their victory over Commack’s Nick Fox & Cory Seltman 1-6, 6-4, 7-6(8-6).

The Davis Twins came out of the gate slow, as the pair from Commack raced out to a 6-1 victory in the first set. With their backs against the wall, the Davis’ fought back to win the second, 6-4, forcing a tie-breaker. The third would go back and forth, needing a tie-breaker of its own to decide the doubles champions. The Davis Twins eventually outlasted Fox & Seltman, securing the match victory and the 2014 Boy’s Suffolk County Doubles Championship.

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www.catsny.com LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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4 BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 B

Cold Spring Harbor Duo Wins Second Consecutive Doubles Championship By Gary Simeone Port Washington’s Ben Rosen was a winner in straight sets to capture the 2014 Nassau County Singles Championship

Credit photos to Gary Simeone

Andrew Bentz & Nasser Ghaffar of the Massapequa Chiefs, Tim Nacca & Rob Gavigan of Garden City, Henry Tell & Dylan Granat of the Syosset Braves, and the 2014 Nassau County Boy’s Doubles Champions, Conor Mullins & JP Paris of Cold Spring Harbor

The Cold Spring Harbor doubles team of Conor Mullins & JP Paris were in familiar territory at the Nassau County Boy’s Tennis Championship at Oceanside High School. The two seniors, who won the finals last season, were squared up against the tough Syosset Braves duo of Henry Tell & Dylan Granat. After winning the opening set 6-0 and dropping the next set, 3-6, Mullins & Paris picked up the pace to win the final set, 6-3 and take their second straight County Championship. “We opened up with a strong first set, and to their credit, they played well in the second,” said Mullins. “In the third, we just tried to focus on making shots and tried to hit

one more ball on the court than they did.” Paris, who said he was running on an hour’s sleep after attending the prom the previous night, wanted to get off to a strong start against the Braves. “We played really well to start out and had a little letdown in the second,” said Paris. “Like Conor said, we just focused on trying to make our shots in the third.” Cold Spring Harbor’s duo beat the Garden City duo of Tim Nacca & Rob Gavigan in the semifinals, 6-1, 6-1 to earn their berth in the finals. Syosset’s tandem beat Massapequa’s team of Andrew Bentz & Nasser Ghaffar, 6-4, 6-3 in the semis. The singles final was not nearly as com-

petitive as the doubles, with Port Washington’s Ben Rosen defeating Plainview-JFK’s Yuval Solomon in straight sets, 6-1, 6-1. “We had a lot of really close games, and I had to grind it out with him out there,” said Rosen, who was playing in his final county championship as a senior. “Yuval is a great retriever, and I had to be smart with my shot selection against him.” Despite losing in straight sets, Solomon is only a freshman and will have plenty of opportunities ahead to redeem himself over the next few years. Rosen beat Sewanhaka’s Keegan Morris 6-0, 6-1 in the semifinal round and Solomon knocked off Locust Valley’s Dylan Appel, 6-0, 6-2. In the consolation matches for third place and a slot in the State Championships, Appel defeated Morris 6-1, 6-3 in singles, while Bentz & Ghaffar knocked off Nacca & Gavigan in a tightly contested doubles match, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4. Rosen, Solomon and Appel all qualified for the State Finals in the singles draw, and on the doubles side, Mullins & Paris, Tell & Granat, and Bentz & Ghaffar all qualified for states as well.

Long Islanders Advance Deep at State Tennis Tourney Credit photo to Calvin Rhoden

Commack High School’s Fox & Cory Seltman at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center during the 2014 NYSPHSAA Boy’s Tennis Tournament 54

The 2014 New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) Boy’s Tennis Championship ended in early June, as a number of Long Islanders found themselves advancing deep into the tournament. Half Hollow Hills East senior Zain Ali finished third in the State Championships, falling to eventual champion Matt Gamble of Webster Schroeder High School, 3-6, 6-7(7-2) in the semifinals. “It had been a goal of mine to at least get back to the semifinals,” said Ali. “I’ve

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

been doing a lot of conditioning and practicing to prepare for the long tournament.” In the semis, Ali fell behind early in the first set, as he trailed 1-5 out of the gate. After battling back to bring it to 3-5, Ali lost a long, tightly-contested game that clinched the opening set for Gamble. The Hills East senior then led 4-2 in the second set, but let it slip away as Gamble came back to win in a tie-breaker to clinch the victory and a spot in the state finals. Ali reached the semifinals of last year’s


BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BO

Half Hollow Hills East Senior Zain Ali advanced to the semifinals of the 2014 State Championships

state tournament as well, becoming the first Suffolk County player to reach the

semifinals in back-to-back years since 2005. He was making his fifth overall appearance in the state tournament having started as an eighth grader. Half Hollow Hills West’s team of Dylan & Duane Davis finished fifth in the doubles bracket, as they fell 2-6, 3-6 to the team of Danny Miron & Nicholai Westergaard of Fayetteville-Manilus. “We have been training since September, going to the gym and working out,” said Dillon Davis. “We also have been eating right. Overall, it was a battle.” The twins captured the 2014 Suffolk County Doubles Championship, and are prepared to make a deeper run at the NYSPHSAA tournament next season. “Our first time here, going to the quarterfinals is great,” added Dillon Davis. “There were a lot of seniors graduating so next

year is ours to take it.” Syosset’s Dylan Granat & Henry Tell won their first two matches, before losing to the top seeds in the quarterfinals. They played well throughout, as Tell will be headed to Delaware to begin his college freshman season in the fall, while Granat will return to Syosset for his senior season. In the consolation bracket of singles play, two Long Islanders faced off as Port Washington’s Ben Rosen took on Plainview JFK’s Yuval Solomon. Rosen beat Solomon for the third time this season, cruising to the 6-2, 6-3 win over his fellow Nassau County native. Hills East double’s tandem Ross Reiffman & Travis Leaf won the double’s consolation bracket, defeating Phillip Raytburg & William Trang of Brooklyn Tech, 3-6, 7-5, 10-6.

Bellmore JFK Reaches Great Heights in 2014 By Steve Hartmann, Bellmore JFK Tennis Coach

Bellmore JFK Coach Steve Hartmann with Ross Binder at the USTA Eastern Long Island Region College Send-Off event in June

It’s a great accomplishment when a team goes undefeated during the regular season. It’s something even more special when the team goes undefeated and wins its conference. That’s exactly what the Bellmore JFK tennis team did this season. The team was anchored by three cocaptains who have been playing together for the past four years. Cooper Richman is a standout player who relied on knowledge of the game and positioning to beat his opponents. He has worked his way up from

The 2014 Nassau County Conference III Champions from Bellmore JFK

part of a fourth doubles team as a freshman to third singles as a senior. Cooper has represented JFK in the Nassau County Tennis Tournament for two years. With a 10-4 record, Cooper earned All-Conference Honors. He will be attending Indiana University this fall. Co-Captain Ross Binder has made the biggest improvement in his game of any player during my tenure as coach. He went from an alternate who barely played as a ninth grader, to second singles as a senior.

He capped off his season with an undefeated record of 14-0, and as the only undefeated player in the conference, Ross earned All-Conference honors. Ross was recruited to play for Oneonta State, and I’m sure he will be an asset to their program. I am pleased to say that Ross is the first player during my tenure as coach to be recruited for and commit to play collegiate tennis. It was my pleasure to join Ross and continued on page 56

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GH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP • 2014 BOY’S HIGH

bellmore jfk reaches great heights in 2014 continued from page 55

Seniors Jared Halstrom, Cooper Richman and Ross Binder from Bellmore JFK are all off to college in the fall and ended their high school careers in strong fashion, capturing the Conference III title

his parents at the USTA Long Island Region’s College Send-Off Event in June, which recognized outstanding local stu-

dent athletes who will be playing for college teams this fall. It’s unique when a coach has an opportunity to work with a player for six years. That’s exactly how long Jared Halstrom has been part of the Bellmore JFK tennis team. As an undersized seventh grader, he did everything that a coach could ask. I can admit it now, but six years ago, I was apprehensive about having a seventh grader on the team. Jared quickly eased my concerns during our first match when he beat his opponent in straight sets. After his victory, Jared came to the sideline to watch and cheer for his teammates, give them points of instruction and complete his homework. It was then that I knew I had a winner on my team. Jared solidified his high school tennis career by earning a record fifth team MVP and three-time AllConference honors. Jared will be attending

the University of Alabama on an academic scholarship this fall. There will be high expectations for Bellmore JFK next season, even though we will be missing our three graduating seniors. I am certain that current juniors Jared Nossen, Zach Goldman, David Glaser, Jordan Fessler, Rob Freed and Josh Goldman will be chomping at the bit to earn a singles spot on next year’s team. I also anticipate current sophomore twin brothers Josh & Harris Bauman to challenge next year’s seniors for one of these coveted spots. Rookie ninth grade standout Andrew Smith was a pleasant surprise who started all matches this year as a member of a doubles team. He will be looking to smash his way into a singles spot as well. I am extremely proud of my team’s accomplishments, and look forward to building on this year’s success.

Suffolk County Players and Coaches Honored at Annual Awards Event Credit all photos to Samantha Sklar

Matt and Frank of East Islip showing off their copies of Long Island Tennis Magazine

Suffolk County High School players and coaches held their Annual Awards Dinner at Villa Lombardi’s in Holbrook, N.Y. The event was attended by more than 300 players and families, as more than 200 awards for regular season and post-season accomplishments were presented over the course of the evening. The awards presented included the 56

The Half Hollow Hills East team was recognized for capturing the 2014 Boy’s Championship

Team Awards for Division Champs, Coach of the Year, and Big Four County Champs, and the Individual Post-Season Awards for All-League, All-Division, All-County, AllState and Team Sportsmanship. Long Island Tennis Magazine was on hand to distribute magazines to all attendees and had a chance to speak with president of the Suffolk County High School

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Coaches Association and Commack Head Coach, Shane Helfner. “Tonight was about honoring and celebrating the accomplishments of our Suffolk County players,” said Helfner. “Numerous awards were given to individuals and teams as a whole—all of whom were remarkably deserving. We take great pride in our athletes, as should the entirety of Suffolk County.”


Injury Prevention: Avoid Overuse Injuries By Dr. Kenneth Kearns The shoulder has the greatest range of motion of any joint in the body. A full range of motion is essential to normal shoulder mechanics and a painfree reproducible tennis stroke. While it’s common for players to hit just a few warmup shots before a match, stretching and a proper pre-match routine is vital to avoid injury. Failure to implement these warm-ups can result in overuse injuries and is a common reason why players seek medical care. Tennis players are susceptible to overuse injuries due to the repetitive nature of the game. An un-warmed shoulder is at increased risk to injury, specifically the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is a confluence of four muscles that surround the shoulder joint, a ball and socket joint, which is stabilized by keeping the humerus (ball) centered on the glenoid (socket). Not stretching or hitting the appropriate number of warm-up shots can lead to rotator cuff dysfunction and superior elevation of the humerus and impingement on the rotator cuff, causing pain and a limited range of motion. In addition, the overhead serve exerts a significant force on the shoulder. Microtrauma to the posterior shoulder capsule

can result from the stress loads associated with the follow-through. The capsule is a thickened band of tissue that surrounds the shoulder joint and adds stability. The posterior capsule is subjected to repetitive high tensile forces that can lead to capsular hypertrophy and contracture. This leads to a loss of shoulder internal rotation, abnormal shoulder mechanics and can result in injury to the labrum (a soft tissue extension of the shoulder socket that adds stability) and/or rotator cuff. To prevent an overuse injury, a thorough stretching and warm-up routine should be implemented with every match. However, if symptoms are present, the first response is rest, ice and anti-inflammatory medicines, as directed by your doctor. If these treatments fail to relieve the pain, you should consult an orthopaedic surgeon who specializes in the shoulder. Conservative management is usually the first line of treatment and consists of a varied combination of physical therapy, prescription anti-inflammatories and a cortisone injection. Physical therapy will focus on improving range of motion, synchronizing the rotator cuff and shoulder muscles and re-establishing normal shoulder kinematics. If these measures fail, arthroscopic surgery may be necessary to repair a torn labrum or rotator cuff

or release a contracted capsule that fails to respond to therapy. Stretching and warming-up is often overlooked and perceived as a mundane part of tennis. However, imagine taking a rubber band out of the freezer and stretching it to its max while still cold. It will snap. The shoulder functions similarly and needs to be stretched and warmed up in order to avoid overuse injuries and enjoy a pain-free enduring tennis career. Dr. Kenneth Kearns is a board-eligible, fellowship-trained shoulder and elbow surgeon at Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group who specializes in arthroscopic surgery, minimally invasive surgery, joint replacement and fracture care. Dr. Kearns is an award-winning researcher who has published and presented extensively in the areas of shoulder and elbow as well as adult reconstruction. An avid athlete who played varsity ice hockey throughout his undergraduate years, Dr. Kearns brings a special affinity to patients who are counting on his expertise to help them return to their active lives. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call (516) 5362800 or visit www.orlincohen.com.

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The Ugly Side By Miguel Cervantes III

T

here are several beautiful aspects to tennis. The graceful swings, the elegant clothes, and the trophy ceremonies at the end of a competition. Tennis is supposed to be a gentleman’s game, a sport of high culture and affluence, but it has an ugly side. This is a side we have all seen. People whine, complain, throw and smash rackets, curse and threaten umpires, and even make derogatory racial remarks. A good friend of mine was recently on the receiving end of the uglier side of tennis, which made me ask the question … why? Why does this happen? What is it specifically about tennis that brings out the worst in people at times? The conclusion I came to is that people feel more secure showing the worst sides of themselves in tennis because it is a non-contact sport. Contact sports are a far cry from our gentle game of tennis. I remember playing several contact sports in high school with immense enjoyment. My mother, on the other hand, was less of a fan, not because she was worried I would be injured, but because the cost of new glasses was always a bit overwhelming. Hopefully, there are some readers here who also know the plight of the myopic athlete. Contact sports, by nature, involve a high level of physical contact. That being the case, there are certain consequences for acting unreasonably, such as excessive trash-talking, cheating and/or poor gamesmanship. When a player decides to talk trash in basketball or perhaps blow in the defender’s ear, they have to be ready to be on the receiving end of some extra physical contact. They may find a stray elbow to the face, or perhaps an ambitiously hard pick. Football has the same 58

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of Tennis situation as does any contact sport. The argument could be made that the more contact a sport has, the more gentlemanly the players. Rugby, a sport renowned for its physical nature, is also known to be a sport with some of the nicest most gentlemanly players. Those guys know that if they cross a certain line, they’re going to feel the pain. Tennis is non-contact sport, there is no actual physical contact between opponents. What recourse does a person have when the opponent is cheating, trash-talking, or bending the rules? What motivation do they have to observe a certain level of sportsmanship? Unfortunately, there is nothing really keeping anyone in check in tennis. For example, if someone is habitually making bad line calls, there is nothing you can do. If someone decides to curse at you, there is nothing you can do about it. The best recourse is usually to just walk away from the situation, but in tennis, if you do this, then you lose for walking off the court. The alternative is to suffer through a match you’ll probably lose because all you

“ You never want your emotions to turn you into someone you’re not.” can think about is getting off the court as fast as you can. Poor sportsmanship and poor conduct is toxic and makes players want to leave the sport. Life off the court is different though right? Not really. Off the court we could divide human interaction into two types: Online and Offline. You can observe some of the worst in terms of human behavior when looking online at the Internet. The reason that happens is because there is no real consequence, similar to non-contact sports like tennis. People tend to exercise a bit more discretion offline because they know there will be consequences if they cross certain lines. Cursing and threats of physical violence will be met with a call to the police at best, and a fast track to the hospital at worst. The safety of anonymity online is akin to the safety a non-contact sport provides certain players who display certain poor behavior. No one can stop you. How much of a challenge is it to keep your cool in competition and observe a certain level of sportsmanship. I would argue

that it’s not much of a challenge. Sports are about testing yourself and your skills against the skills of another, and that endeavor is supposed to bring us a certain level of enjoyment. Personally, I find I play my best when people I know come and watch me. I don’t care if I lose in front of a student, my family or my girlfriend, but what I cannot stand for is making a fool of myself from poor behavior. You never want your emotions to turn you into someone you’re not. When you’re out there playing a match, try to ask yourself if you would want your children or parents to see you that way. Hopefully you won’t be bullied by another player pursuing you after a match, antagonizing you for a reaction, and then threatening you with physical violence, the way my friend was threatened. Miguel Cervantes III now teaches at Carefree Racquet Club and privately outdoors. Miguel specializes in teaching beginners, training juniors and coaching doubles. He may be reached by e-mail at understandingtennis@gmail.com.

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Making the Cut at the

U.S. Open Ballperson Tryouts By Michele Lehat

The U.S. Open is one of the most anticipated events in the New York area, serving as a mecca for all tennis fanatics worldwide. Without the help of close to 2,000 employees on the sidelines and behind the scenes, the Open would not run as smoothly as it does. From the chair umpires, to the line judges, to court attendants and ballboys and girls, every worker plays a crucial role in the overall success of the event. The skies were a bit cloudy, but the weather held up perfectly for the Annual U.S. Open Ballperson Tryouts on June 19th as hundreds of young hopefuls sat anxiously in the stands of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, waiting to be called onto the courts to be evaluated. As U.S. Open Ballperson Director Tina Tapps stood in front of the crowd, warning them of possible hot weather conditions, and the importance of vigor and animation on the job, it was evident that the hundreds of teens were truly excited. Of course, this was understandable for performing a series of practice runs, catches and throws in front of the judges for their approval is always a bit intimidating. Considering what goes into the selection process of becoming a ballperson, including good hand-eye coordination, perfect posture, faultless court etiquette, and of course, complete awareness of every point during a match, it’s only logical that there is a series of three rigorous tryout rounds. The first round involves a crew of evaluators, assessing throwing and running skills to determine the few make the cut and advance to the second round. Then, a small interview follows, as the hopefuls are asked various questions. When that carefully selected batch moves onward, a couple of training sessions follows as they become acquainted with the proper on-court routine. The final determination of becoming a U.S. Open ballperson is doing a good job during the qualification rounds. 60

being a ballgirl last year. It’s one of the most amazing experiences because we get to be really up close and personal with the professional tennis players we see on TV.” l Stephanie Chikvashvili, when asked of her assessment of the tryouts, “It was a little intimidating. I had to run a few times, pick up balls, and throw them back to the players. They asked me to stand straight with my arms behind my back. I really hope I make it.” l Alex Chu on the day’s events, “It was a great experience, and overall, I think I did pretty well.” l Darnell Forrester on his chances of making the cut, “Hopefully I’m a finalist this year. I think I did very well. I kind of knew what to expect and what they were looking for, so I think it went real well.”

Last year, nearly 600 hopefuls tried out for one of these coveted spots, and only around 200 made it. The tryouts were not to be taken lightly either, as those selected are eventually trusted to rub shoulders with some of the greatest athletes in the world, not to mention in front of enormous crowds. I had a chance to chat with a few of those trying out to get their take on the overall experience … l Esther Chikvashvili, who served as a ballperson for one year, but must go through another tryout round like all the other one-year ballpeople. When asked is she was nervous, she replied, “Not really, because I have the experience of

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

l Mark Gakin was a U.S. Open ballboy for 11 years and was on hand helping out with this year’s tryouts. When asked what keeps him coming back, Mark replied, “I’m in love with the atmosphere and tennis of course. It’s an unbelievable opportunity to work with players. It’s a good time … there are really a tight knit group.” l Maya Simone on her first trip to the U.S. Open Ballpersons tryouts, “This was my first year. The experience was fun, as my friend and I tried out together. When we had to run across the court to pick up the ball, I think I did well. I think I could of did better throwing the ball across the court.” Michelle Lehat is an intern with Long Island Tennis Magazine.


Credit all photos to Calvin Rhoden


P.I.N.R.W.C.I.O. By Tonny van de Pieterman I was stringing a tennis racquet for one of my clients when I noticed the letters “P.I.N.R.W.C.I.O.” handwritten on the white grip of the racquet. I instantly knew it was a reminder of some sorts, and was curious to find out what it stood for. “Pressure Is Not Real, We Create It Ourselves,” Tim Sr. responded to my inquiry. “I try to remind myself of that when I play competitively,” he added. I admit to being somewhat of a stickler when it comes to language. I also enjoy the opportunity to discuss competition and the behavioral effects of competition on us, so I countered by asking, “But Tim, if we create something, doesn’t that make it real by definition?”

An interesting discussion followed. I knew that he was on the right path, but sometimes a devil’s advocate can help you along with some interesting counter questions. Intellectually, we know that certain things are not “real,” but they certainly feel real! Have you ever watched a horror movie late at night by yourself? Everyone knows the difference between reality and the TV screen, yet surely you can relate to the person switching all the lights on after the movie, looking under their bed for monsters, or any other ritual to create a sense of “safety” before going to sleep. In a tennis match, you are never really fighting for your life, but it can certainly feel that way! The emotions we experience in competition are real, but have to be placed in perspective. Preparation goes a long way in making sure that our

behavior results in winning tennis. My advice to Tim therefore: l Have a little plan for pressure situations l Welcome pressure situations as opportunities to learn l Analyze your reactions to pressure with compassion and adjust the plan accordingly Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/EasternLong Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail tonny@pointsettennis.com.

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“Are you going to represent our program with dignity and class and graduate?”

See Me When You Are Ready for the Real Collegiate Tennis Experience By Lonnie Mitchel One predominant trait I see in the world of USTA Junior Tennis is that an overwhelming percentage of juniors are looking to experience collegiate tennis after their junior and high school tennis career is complete. What I also see is coaches, junior academies and parents who pretend to know what the collegiate tennis experience is and what coaches are really looking for. Tennis skill, rankings and wins and losses of course … well, not really. At the end of the day, here is what I look for in a collegiate athlete. Are you going to represent our program with dignity and class and graduate? Case closed … end of story! Do I want a person who has had good results in USTA tournaments? Of course. Do I want a person who can play a high level of tennis and has the opportunity to win and help the team to victory? Yes I do. Is the young person coachable, has good strokes, has the will to win and is committed to working hard on the court and is willing to work hard during off-season training? You bet. Now here is truth and in the most frank way I can deliver this message … When I sit down at the end of the season with my athletic director and examine the successes and failures of our tennis program, here is what we are held accountable to and what is expected of a head coach of a collegiate team. What is the average Grade Point Average (GPA) of the team? Do we represent the school and the state well by doing things like community service and fundraising? Did we grow our players incrementally in terms of maturity? One of the last things on the list is how was the won/loss record? If you watched one on my practices that normally

last two to three hours a day during the season, you would think differently. We work hard to improve our tennis game by working on all elements of the sport, as well as focusing on individual areas of improvement for each player. So what happens when we are not on the courts or doing our off the court workouts? This coach is making sure that we are doing all the right things in terms of studying and attending workshops as it relates to student/athlete leadership. We are doing some fundraising and community service. We are encouraging our students to have a balanced lifestyle and a good social life. We have team study halls and are acutely focused on getting a high team GPA. We often have team off-season gatherings to maintain a sense of team unity. I have written this before, but will remind you again … the last New Yorker who won Wimbledon and the U.S. Open was a guy by the name of John McEnroe and that was 30 years ago. We should also probably talk about the failures of American tennis on the international scene in recent years. However, that is a conversation for another day. My job is to help players prepare for life beyond the classroom and tennis court. Parents and players who aspire to play collegiate tennis, don’t lose perspective as to why you are in college. You are there to get an education! Being a student/athlete collegiate tennis player will resonate with you forever and pay dividends well beyond your time as a collegiate athlete. You may have seen me at some USTA Tournaments throughout the New York Metro area, as well as upstate New York. You may have seen me at a showcase or a high school tournament looking for talent. You may have seen me speak at the Second An-

nual New York Tennis Expo as a panelist and your initial thoughts are you probably thought I was just looking at your tennis game. Well, I will let you in on a secret … I am looking at how you behave during the match. I am looking at how you treat your parents and/or coaches when you are finished with the match. Did you treat your opponent with respect? How did you handle yourself after a loss? I have potential student/athletes come to the school and spend some time with our current rostered players and get to know the parents. I will make it crystal clear what we want from our student/athletes: Effort and commitment both in the classroom and to the sport of tennis. You will be asked to bond with and support your teammates, because unlike USTA and high school tennis, you spend a great deal of time with your teammates. Collegiate tennis is a team sport. I am lurking at the tennis tournaments where you compete, and am watching you, scrutinizing your every move. Listen to me clearly, your character counts disproportionately more than your tennis skill itself. The world beyond college will judge you on your character, your work experiences and how you performed in the classroom. Tennis will be the last thing you will be judged on. That is the reality of it all. Get every priority in order before you communicate with a college coach. The chance of life success will increase drastically when you commit to the traits I describe in this article. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or email lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

directory Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 • catsrvc@gmail.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue • Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 271-6616 • www.easternathleticclubs.com Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 • earlyhit@optonline.net Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Stephanie Leo: (516) 676-9849 glenheadrc@verizon.net Huntington Indoor Tennis Club Richard Rottkamp—Manager/Owner 100 Broadway Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 421-0040 hitennis@myway.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 tonny@pointsettennis.com www.pointsettennis.com

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Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 • tennis@pwta.com • www.pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 • www.rwtt.com

SPORTIME Kings Park Jeff Morys—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 • jmorys@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/kings-park SPORTIME Lynbrook Danny Caseas—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 • dcaseas@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lynbrook

Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center @ Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 (516) 676-9107 • www.rwtt.com

SPORTIME Massapequa Chris Leahy—General Manager 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, NY 11758 (516) 799-3550 • cleahy@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/massapequa

Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 • hli@ross.org • www.ross.org/tennis

SPORTIME Quogue Greg Bolitsky—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead • East Quogue, NY 11959 (631) 653-6767 • gbolitsky@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/quogue

Shinnecock Tennis Club 125 Sandy Hollow Road • Southhampton, NY 11968 (631) 283-3422 • www.shinnecocktennisclub.com Southampton Racquet Club & Camp 665 Majors Path • Southampton, N.Y. 11968 (516) 953-5176 www.southamptonrcc.com SPORTIME Amagansett Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • amagansett@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett Eric Scoppetta-Camp Director (631) 267-2267 (CAMP) • ehsc@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/ehsc SPORTIME Amagansett Multi-Sport Mike Ritsi—General Manager 385 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • mritsi@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett-multi-sport

SPORTIME Randall’s Island Manhattan Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Allison Hodgkins—Director of Tennis Central One Randall’s Island • New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 • ahodgkins@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—General Manager Landing Road, PO Box 1 • Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 • jharris@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Wendi Enright—General Manager 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 • wenright@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/syosset-tennis SPORTIME Lake Isle Westchester Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Harel Srugo—General Manager 660 White Plains Road • Eastchester, NY 10709 (914) 777-5151 • hsrugo@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lake-isle

SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Long Island Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Mike Kossoff—General Manager 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 • mkossoff@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-tennis

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11568 (718) 760-6200 • www.usta.com

SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 731-4432 • rlouie@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-multi-sport

World Gym Bay Shore Tracie Forsythe—Director of Tennis 225 Howells Road • Bay Shore, NY 11706 (631) 456-0994 • tracieforsythe@yahoo.com www.worldgymbayshore.com

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LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 04/01/14)

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Luke Karniewich ................Glen Head, N.Y. 2........Aryan Kumar Sethi..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 3........Timothy Lewis Chiu............Holtsville, N.Y. 4........Robert Steven Bellino ........Huntington, N.Y. 5........Adrian Kristofer Tsui............Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 6........Mark Ryan Taranov ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 7........Max Daniel Safir..................Old Westbury, N. Y. 8........Sohrob Yavari......................Syosset, N.Y. 9........Gunnar S. Overstrom ........Locust Valley, N.Y. 10......Brandon Zhu ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 11......Brandon Lee ......................Valley Stream, N.Y 12......Joseph Monticciolo............Coram, N.Y. 13......Alexander Hom ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 14......Bradford J. Lin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 15......Brandon Lin ........................Great Neck, N.Y 16......Amani Siddiqui....................West Babylon, N.Y. 17......Justin McMackin ................North Baldwin, N.Y. 18......Arin Siriamonthep ..............Greenvale, N.Y. 19......Justin Benjamin Oresky ....Syosset, N.Y. 20......Michael Hayden Singer......Greenlawn, N.Y. 21......Daniel Chikvashvili..............Melville, N.Y. 22......Kian Louis Ghazvini ............Glen Head, N.Y. 23......Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 24......Valentine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 25......Joshua Elenowitz................Syosset, N.Y. 26......Maximillian Wreidt ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 27......Ethan Sims..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 28......Ravi MacGurn ....................Amagansett, N.Y. 29......Sujay Alluri ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 30......Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 31......Alexander Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 32......Peter Lau ............................Great Neck, N.Y. 33......Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 34......Peter Albert Bukary ............Jericho, N.Y. 35......Justin Shen ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 36......Torin Suner Bograd ............Huntington, N.Y. 37......Christopher Lall ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 38......Alex Eli Vinsky ....................Westbury, N.Y. 39......Yoel Andre Yamus ..............Deer Park, N.Y. 40......Jacob Buchbinder..............Roslyn, N.Y

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 2........Matthew Kolkhorst ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 3........Rohan Mathur ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 4........Sol Yoon ..............................Commack, N.Y. 5........Alexander Roti ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 6........Tyler London........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 7........Jagger Gillman....................Glen Head, N.Y. 8........Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 9........Samir Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 10......Michael Kaydin ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 11......Nicholas Gajda....................Smithtown, N.Y. 12......Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 13......Adam M. Canarick..............Woodbury, N.Y. 14......Matthew T. Roberts ............Setauket, N.Y. 15......George Kaslow ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 16......Christopher Grisham ..........Huntington, N.Y. 17......Matthew Reid Zapken........Roslyn, N.Y.

66

ISLAND

18......Jack Cameron Goldman....Old Westbury, N.Y. 19......Julian Thomas MacGurn....Amagansett, N.Y. 20......David Ammendola..............Massapequa, N.Y. 21......Connor Leaf ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 22......Matthew Terlovsky..............Merrick, N.Y. 23......Adam Bradley Wilck ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 24......Peter Leonard Fahy............Huntington, N.Y. 25......Evan Kirsh ..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 26......Yash Samantaray................Syosset, N.Y. 27......Ethan Bradford....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 28......Aditya Dave ........................Syosset, N.Y. 29......Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y. 30......Justin Lempert....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 31......Preet Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 32......Andrew Marc Nakhjavan....Dix Hills, N.Y. 33......Jeffrey M. McDonnell ........Glen Cove, N.Y. 34......Adrian Kristofer Tsui............Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 35......Luke Karniewich ................Glen Head, N.Y. 36......George Rettaliata................Bay Shore, N.Y. 37......Josh A. Antell ......................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 38......Sanford Greenberg ............Dix Hills, N.Y. 39......Sohrob Yavari......................Syosset, N.Y. 40......Cameron Klepper ..............Dix Hills, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Matthew Kolkhorst ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 2........Faran Nazir..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 3........Evan Lander........................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 4........Christopher McGorty..........Bellmore, N.Y. 5........Patrick Sean Lombardi ......Halesite, N.Y. 6........Simar Deep Sawhney ........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7........Saiteja Damineni ................Albertson, N.Y. 8........Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 9........Jason Gerber ......................Commack, N.Y. 10......Drew Greenberg ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11......Kenneth Francis Chiu ........Holtsville, N.Y. 12......Nicholas Gajda....................Smithtown, N.Y. 13......Joshua Samuel Simoncic ..Glen Head, N.Y. 14......Jack Cameron Goldman....Old Westbury, N.Y. 15......Julian Thomas MacGurn....Amagansett, N.Y. 16......Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 17......George Kaslow ..................Port Washington, N.Y. 18......Aaron Askowitz ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 19......Benjamin Craddock............Stony Brook, N.Y. 20......Spencer Kirschman............Dix Hills, N.Y. 21......Jay Burkett..........................Syosset, N.Y. 22......David Seth Zuckerman ......Valley Stream, N.Y. 23......Evan Lowitt..........................Syosset, N.Y. 24......Zane Siddiqui......................Long Beach, N.Y. 25......Jordan Michael Bennett ....Valley Stream, N.Y. 26......Jonathan Eisenson ............Saint James, N.Y. 27......Kyle Hudson Gower ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 28......Connor Wright ....................Commack, N.Y. 29......Kenneth Michael Wang......Manhasset, N.Y. 30......Austin Egna ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 31......Jake Parker Cohen ............Oceanside, N.Y. 32......Vincent Tozzi ......................North Babylon, N.Y. 33......Curran Varma......................Manhasset, N.Y. 34......Kevin Kucharczyk ..............Rocky Point, N.Y. 35......Derek Menker......................Great Neck, N.Y. 36......Jordan Diamond ................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 37......Timothy Nacca....................Garden City, N.Y. 38......Robert Sangirardi................Lynbrook, N.Y. 39......Brandon Nomberg..............Deer Park, N.Y. 40......Ian Blank..............................Old Westbury, N.Y.

RANKINGS

Long Island Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Matthew Bahar ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 2........Christopher McGorty..........Bellmore, N.Y. 3........Evan Kober..........................Wantagh, N.Y. 4........Steven Kucharczyk ............Rocky Point, N.Y. 5........Faran Nazir..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 6........Sebastian Alvarez ..............Mastic Beach, N.Y. 7........Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 8........Luke Douglas Johnston ....Port Washington, N.Y. 9........Kenneth Michael Wang......Manhasset, N.Y. 10......Florimond Le Goupil ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 11......Jordan Diamond ................Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 12......Vincent Thompson ............Massapequa, N.Y. 13......David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 14......Tyler Grosse ........................Bayport, N.Y. 15......Evan Lowitt..........................Syosset, N.Y. 16......Cole Laffitte ........................East Setauket, N.Y. 17......Jason Gerber ......................Commack, N.Y. 18......Chirag A. Doshi ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 19......Cameron Posillico ..............Bayville, N.Y. 20......Ankur Kejriwal ....................Hewlett, N.Y. 21......Connor Gould ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 22......Cory Seltman ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 23......Timothy Sorenson ..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 24......Chris Buckley......................Bohemia, N.Y. 25......Troy Michael Haas ..............Huntington Station, N.Y. 26......Christopher Kramer............Valley Stream, N.Y. 27......Vinny Sciortino....................Merrick, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 2........Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 3........Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 4........Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 5........Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 6........Alina Rebeca Lyakhov........Great Neck, N.Y. 7........Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppauge, N.Y. 8........Lauren Zola ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 9........Daniela J. Benigno..............Shoreham, N.Y. 10......Janelle Chen ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11......Julianna Marie Romeo ......Massapequa, N.Y. 12......Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 13......Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 14......Gabriela Sciarrotta..............Woodmere, N.Y. 15......Ida Nicole Poulos................Manhasset, N.Y. 16......Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 17......Lauren Hutton ....................Huntington, N.Y. 18......Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 19......Kavina Amin........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 20......Annaliese Zola ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 21......Madeline Richmond ..........Syosset, N.Y. 22......Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 23......Margaret Esther Haykin......Great Neck, N.Y. 24......Morena DeVito....................Syosset, N.Y. 25......Grace Isabel Riviezzo ........Syosset, N.Y. 26......Sarah Gabrielle Faber ........Roslyn, N.Y. 27......Olivia Broder........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 28......Daniela Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y. 29......Anna Vanessa Malin ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 30......Sophia Elizabeth Schutte ..Great Neck, N.Y. 31......Kaya Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32......Kristina Pali..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 33......Lauren Jordana Druz..........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34......Jolie Nemshin ....................Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

35......Andrea Irta Brazyte ............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 36......Remi Berlent ......................Huntington, N.Y. 37......Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 38......Sarah Gunasekera..............Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 39......Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 40......Sarah Jayne Lubow............Locust Valley, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Michelle Roitgarts ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 2........Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 3........Madeline A. Clinton ............Manhasset, N.Y. 4........Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 5........Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppague, N.Y. 6........Kaitlyn Byrnes ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 7........Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 8........Evangelia Maria Frankis ....Manhasset, N.Y. 9........Carly Menker ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 10......Samantha Lena Galu..........Jericho, N.Y. 11......Brooke Ann Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 12......Ann Sophia Kogosov ........Syosset, N.Y. 13......Emily Rose Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 14......Haley Raphael ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 15......Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Huntington, N.Y. 16......Daniela J. Benigno..............Shoreham, N.Y. 17......Jade Fixon-Owoo ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 18......Riley Elizabeth Katzman ....Halesite, N.Y. 19......Rachel Flynn Collins ..........Port Jefferson, N.Y. 20......Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 21......Isabelle Policarpio ..............Rocky Point, N.Y. 22......Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ..Lynbrook, N.Y. 23......Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 24......Elena Artemis Vlamakis......Garden City, N.Y. 25......Madeline Lane ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 26......Stephanie Margaret Cole ..Manhasset, N.Y. 27......Bryn Schlussler ..................Bay Shore, N.Y. 28......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 29......Victoria Anna Bialczak........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 30......Rachel Bernstein ................Plainview, N.Y. 31......Joelle Ann Benigno ............Shoreham, N.Y. 32......Christina Lorraine Jud ........Glen Head, N.Y. 33......Lauren Gold ........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 34......Danah Han ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 35......Ariana Malik ........................Melville, N.Y. 36......Stephanie Zelenetz ............Sea Cliff, N.Y. 37......Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 38......Fallon Berger ......................Syosset, N.Y. 39......Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 40......Olivia Faulhaber ..................Saint James, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 2........Danielle Mirabella................Wantagh, N.Y. 3........Sabrina Ferretti....................Setauket, N.Y. 4........Elena Nitsa Maria Nastasi ..Bayville, N.Y. 5........Rebecca Elizabeth Stern....Dix Hills, N.Y. 6........Emily Kate Shutman ..........Huntington, N.Y. 7........Ann Sophia Kogosov ........Syosset, N.Y. 8........Michelle Carnovale ............Massapequa, N.Y. 9........Rachel Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 10......Brooke Emily Digia ............Manhasset, N.Y. 11......Rini Halder ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 12......Nicole Lin Chin....................Selden, N.Y. 13......Laura Jean Halsey..............Westhampton, N.Y. 14......Courtney Connors ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 15......Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y. 16......Michelle Roitgarts ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 17......Lindsay Jane Haley ............Hicksville, N.Y.


LONG 18......Emily Rose Fernandez ......Shirley, N.Y. 19......Emma Kate Rosenberg......Port Washington, N.Y. 20......Taylor Bradford....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 21......Ellen Huhulea ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 22......Montaine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 23......Grace Graham ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 24......Juliana Shenker ..................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 25......Nia Gilliam ..........................Central Islip, N.Y. 26......Victoria Evelyn Villalba........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 27......Gabrielle Raziel ..................Melville, N.Y. 28......Rachel Flynn Collins ..........Port Jefferson, N.Y. 29......Lakshmi Babureddy ..........Dix Hills, N.Y. 30......Amanda Ress-Liere............Yaphank, N.Y. 31......Mara Danielle Stewart ........Oceanside, N.Y. 32......Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Huntington, N.Y. 33......Hannah Vimod Abraham....Syosset, N.Y. 34......Sophie Grace Wilson..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 35......Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 36......Mina Sarcevic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 37......Elinor Simek ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 38......Fiona Stocks-Lyon..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 39......Adele Sukhov......................Westbury, N.Y. 40......Kendall Julia Kutner............Rockville Centre, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank Name ..................................City 1........Rebecca Elizabeth Stern....Dix Hills, N.Y. 2........Bridget Connors ................East Quogue, N.Y. 3........Julia Khan............................Port Washington, N.Y. 4........Suzanne C. Silecchia..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 5........Cameron Leigh Moskol......Wantagh, N.Y. 6........Tayler Bradford....................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 7........Elena Nastasi ......................Bayville, N.Y. 8........Ellen Huhulea ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 9........Claudia Ruiz........................Glen Head, N.Y. 10......Eirini Margarita Kontaki ......West Islip, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 05/28/14)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name..................................City 1........Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 4........Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 8........Ronald P. Hohmann............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 9........Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 10......Sujay Sharma......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 11......Jack Flores..........................Huntington, N.Y. 17......Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y. 18......Maxwell Moadel..................Brookville, N.Y. 25......Logan Paik Chang..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 26......Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 27......Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 40......Rohan Gaddam Reddy ......Glen Head, N.Y. 42......Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 44......Isaac Smith ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 46......Alexander Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 53......Richard James Kelly ..........Manhasset, N.Y 64......Daniel Chikvashvili..............Melville, N.Y. 67......Justin Benjamin Oresky ....Syosset, N.Y. 72......Amani Siddiqui....................West Babylon, N.Y. 85......Brandon Lee ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 86......Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 90......Aryan Kumar Sethi..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 93......Ravi MacGurn ....................Amagansett, N.Y. 96......Michael Weitz......................Roslyn, N.Y. 97......Jared M Phillips ..................Plainview, N.Y.

102 103 104 111 119 120 134 137 140 145 148

ISLAND

..Kian Louis Ghazvini ............Glen Head, N.Y. ..Sohrob Yavari......................Syosset, N.Y. ..Luke Louchheim ................Sagaponack, N.Y. ..Gunner Overstrom..............Locust Valley, N.Y. ..Adam Lammers ..................Central Islip, N.Y. ..Brandon Zhu ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. ..Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. ..Brando J Lin........................Great Neck, N.Y. ..Mark Ryan Taranov ............Valley Stream, N.Y. ..Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. ..Peter Anastasakis ..............East Norwich, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name..................................City 2........Steven Well Sun..................Glen Cove, N.Y. 6........Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 7........Daniel Eric Pellerito ............Syosset, N.Y. 11......Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 13......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 14......Neel Raj ..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 16......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 18......Ronald Hohmann ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23......Patrick Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 31......Alan Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 34......Michael Medvedev ............Oceanside, N.Y. 38......Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 55......Abinhav Srivastava ............Melville, N.Y. 60......Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 61......Matthew Porges ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 63......Benjamin Cole Grossman..Sands Point, N.Y. 69......Jack Flores..........................Huntington, N.Y. 78......Zachary Ian Khazzam ........Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 88......Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 89......Maxwell Moadel..................Brookville, N.Y. 92......Nicolas Demaria..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 97......Karan Amin..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 105 ..Matthew Terlovsky..............Merrick, N.Y. 110 ..Logan Paik Chang..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 111 ..Alexander Roti ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 115 ..Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 118 ..Jeffrey McDonnell ..............Glen Cove, N.Y. 119 ..Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 121 ..Michael Kaydin ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 123 ..Sujay Sharma......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 127 ..Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 134 ..Andrew Marc Nakhjavan....Dix Hills, N.Y. 143 ..Timothy Hayden Nacca ....Garden City, N.Y. 145 ..David Ammendola..............Massapequa, N.Y. 150 ..Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name..................................City 2........Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 5........Athell Patrick Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 11......Sean Mullins........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 21......Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 27......Daniel Shleimovich ............Syosset, N.Y. 30......Sean Patrick........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 31......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 32......Yuval Solomon....................Plainview, N.Y. 33......Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 40......Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 41......Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 42......Stephen Gruppuso ............Bayport, N.Y. 43......Alan Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 46......Brian Hoffarth......................Fort Salonga, N.Y.

RANKINGS

47......Aziz Rashidzada ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 48......Chris Kuhnle........................Shoreham, N.Y. 49......Tyler Ng................................Great Neck, N.Y. 58......Dylan Granat ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 61......David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 65......Alex Grossman ..................Sands Point, N.Y. 67......Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 68......Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 69......Palmer Clare........................North Bellmore, N.Y. 71......Rajan Vohra ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 76......Daniel Khodosh ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 78......Kyle Hudson Gower ..........Oceanside, N.Y. 85......Nasser Abdel Ghaffar ........Massapequa, N.Y. 89......Ross Reiffman ....................Melville, N.Y. 93......Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 101 ..Del Schunk..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 103 ..Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 115 ..Michael Medvedev ............Albertson, N.Y. 118 ..Andy Zhou ..........................Commack, N.Y. 123 ..Noah Reisch........................Floral Park, N.Y. 128 ..Matthew Holweger ............Manhasset, N.Y. 134 ..Julian Thomas MacGurn....Amagansett, N.Y. 142 ..Patrick Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 144 ..Garrett Malave ....................Laurel, N.Y. 149 ..Jake Parker Cohen ............Oceanside, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name..................................City 1........Daniel Grunberger ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 8........Josh Silverstein ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 13......Lubomir Cuba ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 17......Phillip Antohi ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 20......Brendan Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26......Bryant J. Born ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 28......Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 31......Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 38......Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 41......Dylan Appel ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 43......Conor Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 46......Kyle Alper ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 52......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 59......Justin Park ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 60......Noah Rubin ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 62......Zain Ali ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 64......Julian Zlobinsky ..................Greenvale, N.Y. 68......Benjamin Rosen..................Port Washington, N.Y. 70......Jonathan Paris....................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 72......Cooper Francis Lacertera ..Speonk, N.Y. 74......Brian Hoffarth......................Fort Salonga, N.Y 78......Athell Bennett......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 81......Cory Seltman ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 82......Michael James DeNigris ....Islip, N.Y. 84......Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 88......Fernando Filho....................East Hampton, N.Y. 99......William Bader......................Water Mill, N.Y. 101 ..Henry Tell ............................Woodbury, N.Y. 104 ..Jared R. Halstrom ..............Bellmore, N.Y. 105 ..Ross Reiffman ....................Melville, N.Y. 114 ..Kevin Cino ..........................East Quogue, N.Y. 116 ..Matthew Bahar ..................Woodbury, N.Y. 129 ..Mark Julian Baker ..............North Baldwin, N.Y. 131 ..Sean Mullins........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 134 ..Joseph James D’Orazio ....Saint James, N.Y. 143 ..Alex Brebenel......................Glen Head, N.Y. 146 ..Florimond Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name..................................City 5........Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 6........Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 8........Merri Kelly............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 12......Steffi Antao..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 23......Alexa Susan Goetz ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 26......Amy Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 28......Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 39......Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 50......Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 62......Janae Fouche ....................Freeport, N.Y. 70......Madeline Richmond ..........Syosset, N.Y. 71......Gabriela Sciarrotta..............Woodmere, N.Y. 77......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 82......Alina Rebeca Lyakhov........Great Neck, N.Y. 87......Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 95......Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 98......Ida Nicole Poulos................Manhasset, N.Y. 99......Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 105 ..Julianna Romeo..................Massapequa, N.Y. 112 ..Kaya Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 113 ..Rose Hayes ........................East Moriches, N.Y. 116 ..Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 124 ..Kavina Amin........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 127 ..Janelle Chen ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 134 ..Lauren Zola ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 137 ..Lauren Hutton ....................Huntington, N.Y. 141 ..Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 147 ..Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 149 ..Sydney Simmons ..............East Northport, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name..................................City 2........Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 13......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 20......Ashley Lessen ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 21......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 28......Merri Kelly............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 38......Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y. 50......Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 56......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 57......Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 73......Samantha Lena Galu..........Jericho, N.Y. 78......Alexa Susan Goetz ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 80......Julieta Eulau........................Oceanside, N.Y. 82......Denise Lai............................Setauket, N.Y. 85......Evangelina Maria Frankis ..Manhasset, N.Y. 91......Risha Malhotra....................Syosset, N.Y. 94......Madeline Clinton ................Manhasset, N.Y. 99......Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 103 ..Kaitlyn Byrnes ....................Massapequa, N.Y. 105 ..Hannah Vinod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 116 ..Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 122 ..Jill Lawrence ......................Hauppauge, N.Y. 123 ..Cara Becker ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 133 ..Jade Fixon-Owoo ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 134 ..Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 138 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 148 ..Mina Sarcevic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 149 ..Steffi Antao..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG

ISLAND

RANKINGS

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Region

Boys & Girls National Rankings

Rank Name..................................City

(as of 06/18/14)

Rank Name ............................City

Rank Name ............................City

3........Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 5........Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 7........Taylor Cosme ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 15......Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 20......Celeste Rose Matute..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23......Ashley Lessen ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 29......Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 37......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 42......Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 44......Esther Chikvashvili..............Melville, N.Y. 57......Courtney B. Kowalsky........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 59......Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 65......Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 71......Vanessa Scott ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 75......Amber Nicole Policare........East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 83......Amanda Allison Foo ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 90......Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 91......Dominique Woinarowski ....Syosset, N.Y. 94......Danielle Mirabella................Wantagh, N.Y. 99......Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y. 100 ..Rachel Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 107 ..Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 109 ..Michelle Carnovale ............Massapequa, N.Y. 110 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 115 ..Stephanie Chikvashvili ......Melville, N.Y. 122 ..Michelle Roitgarts ..............Roslyn, N.Y. 128 ..Emily Shutman....................Huntington, N.Y. 130 ..Olivia Faulhaber ..................Saint James, N.Y. 131 ..Montaine Le Goupil-Maier Oceanside, N.Y. 136 ..Brynn Maris April ................Dix Hill, N.Y. 139 ..Morgan Wilkins ..................Huntington, N.Y. 146 ..Courtney Connors ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 147 ..Alexandra Waldman ..........East Hampton, N.Y.

BOYS

10......Daniel Grundberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 18......Josh Silverstein ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 108 ..Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 144 ..Noah B. Rubin ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 209 ..Julian Zlobinski ..................Greenvale, N.Y. 352 ..Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 386 ..Lubomir Cuba ....................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 443 ..Bryant Born ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 563 ..Dylan Hobbs Appel ............Locust Valley, N.Y. 678 ..Lamar Remy........................Roslyn, N.Y. 727 ..Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 747 ..Zain Ali ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 752 ..Billy Suarez..........................Huntington, N.Y. 762 ..Conor Mullins......................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 800 ..Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 854 ..Sean M. Mullins ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 906 ..Jesse Levitin........................Manhasset, N.Y.

94......Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 153 ..Aleksandra Mally ................Franklin Square, N.Y. 197 ..Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 373 ..Amber Nicole Policare........East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 592 ..Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 631 ..Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 661 ..Mia Vecchio ........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 671 ..Sunaina Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 854 ..Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 870 ..Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 968 ..Madison Courtney Appel ..Locust Valley, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Region Rank Name..................................City 3........Aleksandra Mally ................Franklin Square, N.Y. 5........Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 9........Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 27......Nicole Koskovolis ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 31......Mia M. Vecchio ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 32......Aimee Manfredo ................Shoreham, N.Y. 40......Eirini Margarita Kontaki ......West Islip, N.Y. 49......Taylor S. Cosme..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 50......Sunaina Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 54......Lauren Ann Livingston........Sands Points, N.Y. 64......Madison Courtney Appel ..Locust Valley, N.Y. 68......Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 75......Amber Nicole Policare........East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 82......Bridget Elaine Harding........Northport, N.Y. 93......Nicole Kielan ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 98......Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 100 ..Rebecca Elizabeth Stern....Dix Hills, N.Y. 102 ..Claudia Ruiz........................Glen Head, N.Y. 103 ..Allison Gabrielle Huber ......Melville, N.Y. 107 ..Katie Jane Cirella ................Woodbury, N.Y. 111 ..Alexandra Linder ................Sands Point, N.Y. 113 ..Julia Khan............................Port Washington, N.Y. 122 ..Paulina Tafler ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 128 ..Bridget Connors ................East Quogue, N.Y. 136 ..Cameron Leigh Moskol......Wantagh, N.Y. 137 ..Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 142 ..Danielle Giannetti................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 149 ..Vanessa Scott ....................Dix Hills, N.Y.

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National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 14......Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 25......Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 51......Ronald P. Hohmann............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 110 ..Logan Paik Chang..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 114 ..Sujay Sharma......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 135 ..Kabir Rajpal ........................Syosset, N.Y. 148 ..Jack Flores..........................Huntington, N.Y. 181 ..Niles Ghaffar........................Massapequa, N.Y. 360 ..Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 378 ..Oliver Worth ........................Locust Valley, N.Y. 403 ..Maxwell Moadel..................Brookville, N.Y. 406 ..Rohan Reddy......................Glen Head, N.Y. 782 ..Richard James Kelly ..........Manhasset, N.Y. 795 ..Isaac Smith ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 891 ..Alexander Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 981 ..Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 24......Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 71......Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 100 ..Patrick Maloney..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 101 ..Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 118 ..Daniel Eric Pellerito ............Syosset, N.Y. 141 ..Neel Raj ..............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 152 ..Ronald P. Hohmann............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 184 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 253 ..Michael Medvedev ............Oceanside, N.Y. 325 ..Alan Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 500 ..Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 593 ..Billy Suarez..........................Huntington, N.Y. 686 ..Matthew Franklin Porges ..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 969 ..Nicolas Demaria..................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 30......Brenden Andrew Volk ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 107 ..Patrick Athell Bennett ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 116 ..Sean Mullins........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 184 ..Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 253 ..Brian Shi..............................Jericho, N.Y. 335 ..Sean Patrick........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 476 ..Travis Leaf ..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 500 ..Yuval Solomon....................Plainview, N.Y. 517 ..Brian Hoffarth......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 597 ..Ryan Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 643 ..Daniel Shleimovich ............Syosset, N.Y. 659 ..Stephen Grappusso ..........Bayport, N.Y. 733 ..Colin Francis Sacco ..........Brightwaters, N.Y. 976 ..Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 982 ..Chris Kuhnle........................Shoreham, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 51......Rachel Arbitman ................Hewlett, N.Y. 62......Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 96......Merri Kelly............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 107 ..Alexa Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 195 ..Amy Delman........................Great Neck, N.Y. 278 ..Steffi Antao..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 290 ..Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 664 ..Rebecca Suarez ................Huntington, N.Y. 727 ..Ivanna Nikolic......................Glen Head, N.Y. 990 ..Madison Smith....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 996 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City 15......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 227 ..Jasmine Olivia Abidi ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 231 ..Ashley Lessen ....................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 270 ..Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ......Manorville, N.Y. 400 ..Merri Kelly............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 731 ..Olivia Rose Scordo ............Glen Head, N.Y. 985 ..Francesca Karman ............Port Washington, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ............................City Rank Name ..................................City 49......Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 61......Alexa Graham ....................Garden City, N.Y. 141 ..Taylor S. Cosme..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 232 ..Claire Handa ......................Point Lookout, N.Y. 313 ..Amber Nicole Policare........East Atlantic Beach, N.Y. 554 ..Celeste Rose Matute..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 703 ..Ashley Lessen ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 779 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 798 ..Vanessa L. Scott ................Dix Hills, N.Y. 968 ..Jasmine Abidi ....................Glen Head, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players


USTA/Long Island Region 2014

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. JULY 2014 Friday-Thursday, July 11-17 L1B Bethpage July Challenger Sportime Bethpage • 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, July 11-13 L1B Advantage Tennis Strategies July Challenger Cedarbrook Club • 32 Oak Lane • Old Brookville, N.Y. Divisions Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 6 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Monday-Friday, July 14-18 L1B Sportime Quogue July Challenger Sportime of The Hamptons 2571 Quogue Riverhead Road • East Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12,18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 1) For more information, call (631) 653-6767.

Friday-Sunday, July 11-13 L1B Sportime Amagansett Summer Challenger Sportime Amagansett PO Box 778 • Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Girls Singles 78 Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, July 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail amagansett@sportimeny.com or call (631) 267-3460.

Monday-Sunday, July 14-20 L1B Gotham at Napeague July Challenger Gotham Tennis Academy at Napeague 2155 Montauk Highway Amaganesett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail andy@gothamtennis.com or call (917) 723-5064.

Friday-Sunday, July 18-20 L1B Sportime Lynbrook Summer Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Quick Start Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 13 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, July 11-13 L2O Sportime Lynbrook Summer Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 for first singles, $23 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 7 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, July 11-13 L2O Sportime Syosset Summer Open Sportime Syosset • 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, July 11-13 L3 July UPS at Sportime Kings Park Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: QuickStart Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 6 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Monday-Friday, July 14-18 L1B Christopher Morley July Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, July 18-20 L2R Sportime Bethpage July Regional Sportime Bethpage Elite Tennis Center 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

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69


USTA/Long Island Region 2014

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, July 18-20 L2O Kings Park Sportime Summer Open Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE), Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 13 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, July 18-20 L2O Long Beach Water Lily Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles and $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 14 at 2:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Monday, July 18-21 L1B Port Washington Dana DeCarlo Commemorative Challenger Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail manny@pwta.com or call (516) 883-6425. Saturday-Sunday, July 19-20 L3 RWTTC July UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 81 Round Hill Road Roslyn Heights, N.Y. Divisions: Novice Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

70

Monday-Sunday, July 21-27 L1B Gotham at Napeague July Challenger Gotham Tennis Academy at Napeague 2155 Montauk Highway Amaganesett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail andy@gothamtennis.com or call (917) 723-5064. Friday-Sunday, July 25-27 L2O Sportime Lynbrook July Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 21 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, July 25-27 L2R Sportime Bethpage July LI Regional Sportime Bethpage Elite Tennis Center 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC), QuickStart Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, July 25-27 L1B Sportime Syosset Challenger Sportime Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, July 25-27 L1B Sportime Kings Park July Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, July 25-27 L1B RWTTC July Challenger Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center 81 Round Hill Road Roslyn Heights, N.Y. Divisions: Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, July 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Sunday-Thursday, July 26-31 L1 RSTA July Championships Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls’ Singles 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail pstankevich@ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. AUGUST 2014 Friday-Sunday, August 1-3 L2O Sportime Lynbrook Eastern August Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE), Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 28 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.


USTA/Long Island Region 2014

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, August 1-3 L1B Kings Park Sportime August Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, August 1-3 L1B CMTC August Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 27 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, August 1-3 L1B Huntington August Challenger Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040. Saturday, August 2 L3 Sportime Bethpage August UPS Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Novice Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR), QuickStart Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 36’ Red Ball 8, 60’ Orange Ball 10 (RR) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, August 8-10 L3 Lynbrook Sportime Eastern UPS Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Novice Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 4 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, August 8-10 L1B Sportime Amagansett August Challenger Sportime Amagansett PO Box 778 Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail amagansett@sportimeny.com or call (631) 267-3460. Friday-Sunday, August 8-10 & Friday-Monday, August 15-18 +L1 Bethpage Eastern Grand Prix Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (FICQ) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Monday, August 8-11 L1 Bethpage August Championships Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, July 31 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tdbethpageten@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Monday, August 8-11 L1 Huntington August Championships Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, July 31 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040. Friday-Sunday, August 8-10 & Friday-Monday, August 15-18 +L1 Point Set Eastern Grand Prix Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (FICQ) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 536-2323. Monday-Friday, August 11-15 L1B Sportime Quogue August Classic Sportime of The Hamptons 2571 Quogue Riverhead Road East Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $48.88 per player For more information, call (631) 653-6767. Monday-Sunday, August 11-17 L1B Gotham at Napeague August Challenger Gotham Tennis Academy at Napeague 2155 Montauk Highway Amaganesett, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Aug. 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail andy@gothamtennis.com or call (917) 723-5064.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2014

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, August 15-17 L2O Sportime Amagansett Summer Open Sportime Amagansett 320 Abrahams Path Amagansett, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE), Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Aug. 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail amagansett@sportimeny.com or call (631) 267-3460. Friday-Sunday, August 15-17 L2O Sportime Kings Park August Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE), Intermediate Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 10 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, August 15-17 L1B CMTC August Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, August 15-17 L1B ATS Cedarbrook Summer Challenger Cedarbrook Club • 32 Oak Lane • Old Brookville, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles, $28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Monday-Sunday, August 18-24 L1B Dan Dwyer Memorial Challenger Point Set Indoor Racquet 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Aug. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 536-2323.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, August 22-24 L2O Sportime Lynbrook Summer Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE), Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 18 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, August 22-24 L2O Eastern Athletic Club August Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE), Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Saturday, Aug. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail mbhoffner@gmail.com or call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, August 22-24 L1B CMTC August Challenger Christopher Morley Tennis Center 500 Searingtown Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’& Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 17 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, August 29-31 L1B Sportime Kings Park August Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 24 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.


LITennisMag.com • July/August 2014 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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When it’s match point and you’ve met your match, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED with our team of orthopedic subspecialists. Shoulder Jonathan Ticker, M.D. Eric Price, M.D. Eric Keefer, M.D. Craig Levitz, M.D. Kenneth Kearns, M.D.

Spine Michael Shapiro, M.D. Alfred Faust, M.D. Seth Grossman, M.D.

Hip Bradley Gerber, M.D. James Germano, M.D. Peter Lementowski, M.D.

Foot & Ankle John Feder, M.D. David Zaret, M.D. Omar Saleem, M.D.

Hand, Upper Extremities Walter Rho, M.D. Bennett Brown, M.D.

Knee Craig Levitz, M.D. Eric Keefer, M.D. Gregory Lieberman, M.D. Robert Garroway, M.D. Eric Price, M.D.

Orlin & Cohen is Long Island’s leading orthopedic practice. Our subspecialty focus means that athletes – and all patients – get the very best care from nationally renowned orthopedists who specialize exclusively in your area of concern: hand, shoulder, neck and back, elbow, knee, foot and ankle, and more. Our board-certified, fellowship-trained team features some of the country’s top Sports Medicine subspecialists for expert care of all tennis and other sportsrelated injuries. Available by appointment six days a week, we offer the most advanced orthopedic treatment with comprehensive diagnostic services, including the latest in digital X-ray and MRI technology. Additionally, our pain management and physical therapy and rehabilitation programs will help relieve your pain fast.

Offices in Rockville Centre, Lynbrook, Cedarhurst, Merrick, Massapequa, Woodbury and Bohemia. To schedule an appointment, visit www.orlincohen.com or call 516.536.2800. 76 Long Island Tennis Magazine • July/August 2014 • LITennisMag.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine July/August 2014  

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