Page 1

SUMMER 2016

Your Best Summer Ever

42

OF AMERICA’S GREATEST NATIONAL PARKS, CITIES, BEACHES AND ROAD TRIPS

+

Find your perfect island Discover insiders’ secret Europe Plan a dream African safari Enjoy weekend escapes to

Nova Scotia, Maui, Sausalito, Martinique, Colorado and more


What you see

is

almost as incredible

what you feel

Fiji feels like warm sun on your body and sand between your toes. But it also feels like conquering a spectacular hike, hitting your first hole-in-one on a world-class golf course, and being surrounded by some of the most mesmerising sea-life in the world. Fiji feels like happiness.

www.fiji.travel

as


editor’s letter

It’s time for a road trip!

Whether you’re planning to visit a specific destination or just thinking about a cross-country drive to experience the best, quaintest or quirkiest of what America has to offer, summer is the time to hit the road. Last summer, I took an epic road trip: a drive along Utah’s Scenic Byway 12, starting in Bryce Canyon and ending up in Boulder, Utah, at Hell’s Backbone Grill, where I had, unexpectedly, one of the best meals of my life: the “lemony cluck,” a simple chicken, veggies and rice meal taken to the next level by its freshness. My friend and I got to spend three leisurely days exploring Utah; while it was only about 100 miles or so on the byway, there was plenty for us to do as we drove from town to town. That’s what I love most about road trips: there’s always a unique experience just around the corner. A road trip is one of the best ways to explore America’s national parks. In this issue, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, we’re featuring several of the nation’s most popular parks (p. 40). We break them down (it was really tough to choose only 10, by the way!), linking up some with nearby NPS properties to create longer trips. We also have a drive to help you discover Nova Scotia’s coast – including pirates (p. 32) – and an itinerary to explore the white sand beaches of the Florida Panhandle (p. 38), one of my childhood favorites. If you’d rather fly or sail to a destination, we’re spotlighting some of our favorite islands (p. 62), and if you’re headed to Europe this summer, you’ll want to check out our concierges feature (p. 52), where six of Europe’s top hotel concierges – who know their cities inside and out – offer their curated suggestions. I particularly love the Paris tips and will take Jean-Claude’s advice to visit Guy Savoy’s restaurant during my next Paris adventure. One of my favorite pieces we worked on in this issue is “What to Eat in New Orleans” (p. 22). I recently dined at Alon Shaya’s restaurant on Magazine Street and I was simply blown away not only by the chef’s flavorful, beautiful Israeli food but also by his dedication to making sure that every one of his patrons has a memorable experience. When I was there, he walked around the dining room introducing himself, and you could just feel his energy and how much he wanted you to love the food that he grew up loving. New Orleans’s food scene stretches far beyond Cajun and Creole, and chef Shaya is definitely helping to redefine this vibrant city. If you haven’t been to New Orleans lately, I suggest adding it to your travel list. Whatever your summer plans, I hope you find some inspiration on our pages.

HEADSHOT: KATE DAVIS; PORTRAIT OF CHEF SHAYA: JODY HORTON

Happy travels,

Lauren @laurenrfinney

The “lemony cluck” at Hell’s Backbone Grill

Chef Alon Shaya, p. 22

Hiking through the Utah desert

Summer 2016

/ LONELY PLANET

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contents Summer 2016 Volume 2 / Number 2

PHILIP LEE HARVEY

FEATURES p. 40

p. 52

p. 62

p. 74

Celebrating National Parks On the 100th anniversary of America’s National Park Service, journey to some of the nation’s most spectacular destinations, from the majestic landscapes of Alaska's Denali to the rocky desert moonscape of South Dakota’s Badlands to Florida’s Everglades, America’s largest tropical wilderness.

Insider's Guide to Europe A secret speakeasy in Rome, a scenic Barcelona mountaintop, a perfect Parisian breakfast and more: concierges at some of Europe’s trendiest hotels reveal their favorite local spots.

10 Perfect Islands Find out which island matches your travel personality.

Animal Planet Travel along the Zambezi River and through northern Zimbabwe to encounter lions, bipedal elephants and the mighty “smoke that thunders.”

//A pride of lions rests in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe; an estimated 500 live in the region. All prices correct at press time. Prices for hotel rooms are for double, en suite rooms in low season, unless otherwise stated. Flight prices are for the least expensive round-trip ticket.


contents JODY HORTON

easy trips

// Cure Bar in New Orleans, known for its innovative cocktails, is one of chef Alon Shaya’s recommendations in our “What to Eat” feature.

Globetrotter p. 9

Great Escape p. 87

5 Spots A global list of the hot spots you need to know about now.

Discover Quebec, Canada’s French-speaking province, from the markets of Montreal to the waters of the mighty St. Lawrence, where migrating whales are the star attraction.

10 New Ways Experience London like a local.

Lonely Planet readers share their travel photos.

Gear Up All the gear you need for the perfect summer trip.

Mini Guides p. 101

Inside Knowledge Learn how to take advantage of a stopover. What to Eat Chef Alon Shaya takes us through New Orleans’s diverse culinary scene.

Easy Trips p. 31 Ideas for take-them-now trips to California, Martinique, Nova Scotia and more.

COVER PHOTO / VIEW OF YOSEMITE FALLS, YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA. PHOTO BY EARL ROBICHAUX

6

Postcards p. 97

Arrivals Travel info and happenings for the season.

LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

Boston / There’s plenty to do in Beantown this season. Warsaw / Learn all about Poland's capital and its place in history. Madrid / Be dazzled by the architectural delights of one of Spain’s top cities. Vancouver / British Columbia’s capital can keep a family busy all summer long. Scotland / Explore nine iconic Highlands castles. Rio de Janeiro / As the Summer Olympics looms large, find the best beaches to visit in Brazil.

DESTINATION INDEX BELIZE Caracol / 18 Caye Caulker / 64 BRAZIL Rio de Janeiro / 113 CANADA Baffin Island / 71 Clinton / 18 Vancouver / 11, 109 Halifax / 32 La Mauricie National Park / 90 Lac Saint-Jean / 92 Montreal / 88 Tadoussac / 94 CHILE Chiloé / 62 CROATIA Mljet / 66 CUBA Havana / 98 DENMARK Bornholm / 73 ENGLAND London / 14, 59 FRANCE Martinique / 34 Normandy / 97 Paris / 60 GERMANY Berlin / 54 GREECE Santorini / 68 ICELAND Reykjavík / 19 INDIA Jaipur / 99 Ladakh / 11 ITALY Rome / 53 JAMAICA Negril / 17 MADAGASCAR / 72 NEPAL Bhaktapur / 100 PERU

Colca Canyon / 99 Cuzco / 11 PHILIPPINES Boracay / 67 POLAND Warsaw / 105 RUSSIA St. Petersburg / 12 SCOTLAND Highlands / 111 SINGAPORE / 19 SPAIN Barcelona / 58 Madrid / 107 SOUTH AFRICA Kruger National Park / 11 ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES Union Island / 70 THE NETHERLANDS Amsterdam / 56 UNITED STATES California: Sausalito / 39 Colorado: Estes Park / 33 Florida Panhandle / 38 Hawaii: Maui / 16 Louisiana: New Orleans / 22 Maine: Chebeague Island / 18 Massachusetts: Boston / 103 New York: Finger Lakes / 35 North Carolina: Asheville / 11 Oregon: Portland / 36 Rhode Island: Block Island / 65 Texas: Marfa / 17 NATIONAL PARKS Arches / 51 Badlands / 45 Big Bend / 44 Denali / 47 Everglades / 45 Grand Canyon / 48 Great Smoky Mountains / 42 Hawaii Volcanoes / 46 Rocky Mountain / 33 Yellowstone / 50 Yosemite / 40, 50 ZIMBABWE / 74


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TURNS OUT THAT WHEN IT COMES TO FINDING GREAT TOURS AND ACTIVITIES AROUND THE GLOBE, IT’S NOT SUCH A SMALL WORLD AFTER ALL. THAT’S WHERE VIATOR COMES IN. WE’VE SCOURED THE GLOBE AND FOUND AMAZING THINGS TO DO, WITH INSIDER ACCESS AND THE BEST LOCAL TOUR GUIDES, ALL BACKED BY THOUSANDS OF RECENT TRAVELER REVIEWS.

viator.com

viator mobile


globetrotter A WORLD OF TRAVEL TRENDS & DISCOVERIES 5 SPOTS TO TALK ABOUT RIGHT NOW 10 NEW WAYS TO FALL IN LOVE WITH LONDON AMAZING PLACES TO STAY AND UNPLUG INSIDE KNOWLEDGE HOW TO DO A STOPOVER ARRIVALS TRAVEL NEWS WHAT TO EAT IN NEW ORLEANS

PHOTO BY CEDRIIC ANGELES

GEAR FOR A SUMMER ADVENTURE

// Crab season, which officially kicked off in April, is an especially popular way to taste the summer flavors of Chesapeake Bay. Try some at the Chesapeake Crab & Beer Festival on June 25 in Baltimore, or at the J. Millard Tawes Crab & Clam Bake on July 20 in Crisfield, Maryland. Find more food festivals in Maryland at visitmaryland.org.


globetrotter

Lonely Planet’s Destination Editors scour the globe looking for the most authentic, fun and inspiring places, events and trips. Here, they share their favorite hot spots for the season.

HOYO HOYO SAFARI LODGE, ON THE BANKS OF THE MLUWATI RIVER IN SOUTH AFRICA'S KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, FEATURES LUXURY ACCOMMODATIONS IN HUTS THAT RESEMBLE TRADITIONAL TSONGA DWELLINGS.

THIS PAGE: COURTESY OF HOYO HOYO SAFARI LODGE; OPPOSITE PAGE: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: QUYNH ANH NGUYEN; COURTESY OF EXPLOREASHEVILLE.COM; MARTOS HOFFMAN / MARTOSHOFFMAN / 500PX; JASON NICHOLLS

5

SPOTS TO TALK ABOUT RIGHT NOW


KRUGER NATIONAL PARK IN SOUTH AFRICA // During dry

1 3 5 2 4 season, animal concentrations reach epic proportions around water holes. The bush is thinner too, which further enhances the wildlife viewing, and the cold starry nights are great for sleeping and bush TVs (campfires). Matt Phillips @go2mattphillips @go2mattphillips

LADAKH, INDIA // The remote mountain valleys of

Ladakh, India, can be reached by road from June to September only, when the passes are free from

snow, but during this brief window, Ladakh truly

resembles the mythical Shangri-La. Laid-back Leh is the gateway to this serene Buddhist enclave, but to

really get a feel for the high Himalayas, don trekking boots and climb to remote monasteries in Zanskar

ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA //

and the Nubra Valley.

The art-filled, eclectic mountain

Joe Bindloss @joe_planet

town of Asheville offers something

VANCOUVER CRAFT BEER WEEK //

for everyone. The summer provides

This event (May 27–June 5) taps into

a wellspring of festivals and outdoor

over 400 of the best beers from

concerts, and is the perfect time to hit

Canada and beyond, showcasing rare

the trails in the nearby Great Smoky

brews from internationally acclaimed

Mountains National Park. Long, warm

breweries and cideries.

summer days with cool nights create

INTI RAYMI FESTIVAL // Celebrate the southern hemisphere’s winter solstice in Cuzco, Peru,

the perfect summer escape. Rebecca Warren @rebeccagwarren

during Inti Raymi (which means “Festival of the Sun” in Quechua) at the end of June. During the nine-day

event, revelers pay homage to Inti, the Inca sun god, with festive parades, dances and historical

reenactments in vibrantly colored costumes.

Alexander Howard @alexandermhoward @alexandermhoward

MaSovaida Morgan @masovaida @masovaida

Summer 2016

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globetrotter globetrotter

ST. PETERSBURG’S ‘WHITE NIGHTS’ // Visit St. Petersburg, Russia, in mid-June for the ultimate “white nights” experience. The sun barely sets and spirits in Russia’s former imperial capital are high. Locals indulge in all-night revelry, with classical music

PETE SEAWARD

concerts and other events. Make sure you book weeks in advance.


// A bridge opens to let boats pass during a luminous summer night in St. Petersburg.


globetrotter

10 NEW WAYS

TO FALL IN LOVE WITH . . .

London

// The Columbia Road Flower Market, in London's East End, is open every Sunday.

WITH THE EDITORS OF LONELY PLANET TRAVELLER, OUR AWARD-WINNING U.K. COUNTERPART, FOR SOME UNEXPECTED THINGS TO SEE AND DO ACROSS THE POND. HERE ARE SOME OF THEIR FAVORITE PASTIMES AND DESTINATIONS. // BY SOPHIE MCGRATH

14

1. WATCH THE SUNRISE FROM PARLIAMENT HILL. Hampstead Heath in north London is the capital’s very own slice of countryside – with some truly capital views to boot. Amble to its crowning point, Parliament Hill, to see dawn break over the city and its landmarks, including St. Paul’s Cathedral, the Houses of Parliament and the futuristic Shard, London’s tallest building. • Admission is free; cityoflondon.gov.uk.

2. GO ON A GIN DISCOVERY. Getting into the spirit of London is as simple as knocking back some gin. The city’s home-grown drink (and 18thcentury scourge) is having a resurgence. The London Gin Club runs a crash course in its history and craft, complete with a taster of five gin tipples – including the legendary gin and tonic – while its snug bar offers a choice of 200 more varieties. • Tasting sessions from $46; thelondonginclub.com

3. PEEP THE PELICANS AT ST. JAMES’S PARK. Possibly the last place you’d ever think to find these fowl

LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

roaming free is in a well-groomed English park, but pelicans have lived at St. James’s since 1664 – first introduced as a gift to King Charles II from the Russian ambassador. There are four great white pelicans currently making residence near Duck Island, tucked behind 10 Downing Street. It’s quite a spectacle during feeding time (2:30 to 3:00 p.m. daily). • Admission is free; royalparks.org.uk

4. TAKE A PLUNGE IN A POND. Hampstead Heath has three swimming ponds – yes, ponds – where Londoners regularly take a dip, as a form of exercise and perhaps as a test to that infamous British tolerance (temperatures can be chilly, to say the least). Head to the 790-acre green space just north of the city to take the plunge in the men’s pond, the women’s pond or the mixed pond; a suggested donation of £2 will give you access to outdoor swimming in the middle of one of the world’s biggest cities. If you prefer your pools chlorinated, there’s a traditional (unheated and uncovered) pool, the Parliament Hill Lido. ¥ About $2.85 donation for the ponds, $3.50 admission for the pool; cityoflondon.gov.uk

OLIVER STREWE/GETTY IMAGES

WE CHECKED IN


5. STROLL COLUMBIA ROAD FOR FLOWERS, ANTIQUES AND ECLECTIC GIFTS. Bursting with color, the weekly Columbia Road Flower Market in East London is the place to go for flowers, plants, seeds and any gardening needs. It’s great for people-watching too. Keep an ear out for the Cockney barrow-boy banter (“We got flowers cheap enough for ya muvver-in-law’s grave”). Dozens of independent shops line the street, including art galleries, antique and vintage clothing stores, bakeries, pubs and cafés. The flower market happens every Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; some shops are open during the week as well. • Admission is free; columbiaroad.info 6. SEE A SILENT FILM WITH A LIVE ORCHESTRA. Take a break from modern blockbusters and treat yourself to an afternoon of pure cinema. The Barbican Centre combines popular silent films with a live orchestra one Sunday each month. Recent performances included the 1920 German production of Hamlet and The Merchant of Venice. Round out the experience with a drink at the martini bar or one of the other bars and restaurants in the venue. • Admission varies; barbican.org.uk/film/series.asp

7. ENJOY A CLASSIC ENGLISH TEA TIME – WITH A MOROCCAN TWIST. Enjoy the typical fixings that accompany an afternoon tea, but take it with a dash of Moroccan flair at MoMo in Soho. From 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., seven days a week, you can dine in a North African-inspired courtyard while busy

London whizzes by outside. Enjoy Moroccan mint tea, paired with North African pastries, cheese briouats (puff pastry) and more alongside traditional fare, such as scones with clotted cream. Bonus: consider taking home a piece of the café as a souvenir; all furnishings are for sale. • Afternoon tea from $32; momoresto.com

8. SPEND THE WEEKEND GRAZING IN BERMONDSEY. Once a run-down part of south London, today Bermondsey is packed with restaurants, bars, and delis offering artisan produce and inventive food and drink. Go on the weekend, when Spanish jamon (ham) and gourmet brownies are among the treats available at Maltby and Druid Street markets, and the breweries of Bermondsey’s “Beer Mile” throw open their doors. • Brewery tours from $43; londonbrewerytour.com, maltby.st, druid.st

9. STEP INTO THE MIDDLE EAST WITHOUT LEAVING THE CITY. Tucked away on an ordinary, if affluent, street is one of London’ most remarkable buildings: the home and studio of Victorian artist Frederic Leighton. Inspired by the artist’s far-flung travels, Leighton House Museum packs rare paintings and treasures into palatial rooms that are themselves works of art – like the Arab Hall, where walls of azure mosaics and ornate Islamic tiles rise up to a glittering dome. • Admission from $14; rbkc.gov.uk

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SCALE A LONDON ICON. By night it encloses a top music venue, but by day the giant, river-hugging dome of the O2 offers thrills of a different kind. At Up at the O2, visitors don climbing suits and harnesses before taking to the roof of the iconic building on a guided ascent. Their reward: a 360-degree view of the city, spread out below in all its glory, as the Thames winds by just feet away.

COURTESY OF UP AT THE 02

• Climbs from $40; theo2.co.uk // At London’s O2 entertainment complex, thrill-seekers can take a guided 90-minute walk over the roof, stopping to take in spectacular views from the 170-foot-high summit.

Summer 2016

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globetrotter

Amazing Places to Stay AND UNPLUG

TRAVAASA HANA / HANA, MAUI

The thought of no A/C, no TV, no Wi-Fi and no signs of life after 9 p.m. might cause some to shudder, but you’ll forget all about those modern conveniences after a few hours of blissful Zen in Hana, on the Hawaiian island of Maui. Reachable by municipal airport or by driving the gorgeous “Road to Hana,” Travaasa Hana consistently tops lists as one of the most magical spots in the world. Built in 1944 and originally part of the family-run Hana Ranch, the resort is now the main point of interest in the town of 2,300. Leave your windows open for a cross breeze and you might hear the crashing ocean waves, or the sounds of laughter coming from the town’s baseball field. Spot wild horses down by the water’s edge early in the morning (and look for Oprah – she owns the land next door). Grab a piece of fruit right off the tree. Try not to cry when you leave. This is no bare-bones eco-resort. Soft, organic linens, locally made bath amenities and Hawaii’s famous Kona coffee are some of the special touches you’ll enjoy. You might never want to leave after visiting the black-sand beaches of nearby Waianapanapa State Park or hiking the bamboo forest of Haleakala National Park. From $500; travaasa.com/hana

// Waterfalls are abundant on Maui's east coast, where Hana is located.

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

ED FREEMAN/GETTY IMAGES

PLUS /


ARTISTS AND BUSINESS EXECUTIVES ALIKE BUNK DOWN IN THE UNCONVENTIONAL LODGINGS AT EL COSMICO IN MARFA, TEXAS (TOP AND BOTTOM LEFT). // ROCKHOUSE, IN NEGRIL, JAMAICA, IS GREEN GLOBE CERTIFIED, MAKING FOR A SUSTAINABLE AND EL COSMICO / MARFA, TEXAS

STYLISH ESCAPE

You might not expect a fashionable set to flock to vintage trailers in the middle of West Texas, but indeed they do, thanks to El Cosmico. There

(BELOW).

are stylishly refurbished trailers, yurts, tepees and tents, with a communal outdoor kitchen and a bathhouse. Creative types don’t have to worry about getting inspired: there are regular workshops focused on cooking, crafts, music, stargazing, biking and more. Nearby Marfa offers all sorts of art distractions as well, including galleries incorporating the Wild West landscape and experimental pieces.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: NICK SIMONITE, COREY HAMILTON, NICK SIMONITE

PLUS // If you need a little hit of email or Instagram, head to the communal lobby lounge, where you can connect, although you’ll be hard-pressed to even remember your devices once the stars come out and put on their nightly show. From $85; elcosmico.com

ROCKHOUSE / NEGRIL, JAMAICA

Named after the timber, stone and thatched-roof lodgings, this was one of the first peaceful retreats on Jamaica’s west side. Once a favorite haunt of Bob Marley, Bob Dylan and The Rolling Stones, Rockhouse is a sustainable, socially conscious hot spot. Guests can choose to enroll in the Passport Program, where they’ll be stripped of their devices and encouraged to “do nothing,” other than partake in cliffside yoga sessions, Jamaican cooking classes, snorkeling, a bathing ritual and other pleasant pursuits. Each reset of the mind or body is rewarded with a stamp in the booklet. PLUS // The Rockhouse Foundation, the nonprofit chari-

table arm of the resort, helps the local community out in a multitude of ways; it will finish its first early childhood education project for those with special needs later this year. From $95; rockhouse.com Summer 2016

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globetrotter // AMAZING PLACES CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: BLANCANEAUX LODGE, IN BELIZE'S JUNGLE, IS OWNED BY DIRECTOR FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA. // CHEBEAGUE ISLAND INN SOURCES THEIR PRODUCE FROM THE LOCAL SECOND WIND FARM. // ECHO VALLEY LODGE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

Fun fact: one of the most critically ac-

more properties to his portfolio, including Blancaneaux Lodge, tucked into Belize’s tropical and remote Maya mountains. You can visit ancient Mayan ruins, go bird-watching at sunrise, hike, explore caves and more. There are no TVs and Wi-Fi is spotty in the main lodge.

Set in a remote valley about four hours away from Vancouver, Echo Valley Ranch offers “real relaxation.” There is no A/C, no TVs and no cell service; you won’t mind once you breathe in the clean, crisp air and take in the jaw-dropping beauty of unspoiled Canada. Fly-fishing, horseback riding, panning for gold and more quintessentially Canadian activities will make you forget all about what you’ve left behind.

PLUS // If this total remoteness is making you

PLUS // If you’re desperate, you

jittery, indulge in one of the spa’s eco-luxury treatments, such as a papaya body polish or stress recovery wrap. The 20-room resort is also big on sustainability and conservation practices, and contributes money monthly to a local organization that helps children in the area. From $289; thefamilycoppolaresorts.com

can pick up the Wi-Fi password in the lobby. There are a few modern touches, such as electric car chargers – including two for Teslas. From $300; evranch.com

claimed directors in the world is also a hotelier. Francis Ford Coppola says he bought his first property in Belize in 2011 to remind him of his journeys in making Apocalypse Now. Since then, he’s added four

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ECHO VALLEY RANCH / CLINTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA

LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

IS SET ON 160 ACRES OF RANCH LAND.

CHEBEAGUE ISLAND INN / CHEBEAGUE ISLAND, MAINE

This delightful classic New England inn delivers on promises of provincial charm and going back to nature. No TVs and no phones help accomplish that, and you really won’t need them while exploring the 5-mile long Chebeague Island. Tennis, golf, kayaking, beach bumming and sunset sails are all available to guests at the 21-room Greek Revival property. PLUS // Tucked into the Casco Bay region, about an hour and a half north of Boston and a 30-minute ride from Portland, Maine’s airport, the island feels removed but not remote. There is Wi-Fi, if you really need to connect to the modern world. From $180; chebeagueislandinn.com

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: GUNDOLF PFOTENHAUER; JEFFREY STEVENSON; COURTESY OF ECHO VALLEY RANCH

BLANCANEAUX LODGE / CARACOL, BELIZE


Inside Knowledge If you’re curious about AIRLINE STOPOVERS, listen up: Lonely Planet Editorial Director Tom Hall breaks it down . The stopover is a great idea for smart travelers looking to see one city while on their way somewhere else, says Hall, who has taken advantage of many stopovers in his almost 20 years at Lonely Planet. With a little advance planning, anyone can have a bonus minibreak, as part of a regular vacation, or even a business trip. Here, we showcase two stopover leaders, Singapore Air and Icelandair, to help you plan.

KNOW THE LINGO // A layover is generally understood to be an intermediate stop of a few hours when you don’t leave the airport. A stopover is a longer break between flights, including at least one overnight stop, that is part of a deliberately planned itinerary.

SINGAPORE AIRLINES COST FOR STOPOVER

KNOW WHERE TO LOOK // You can generally create your own by simply searching online. The key is to look for the multicity flight search option on many airline websites. Add a stop in the airline’s hub city with a day or two in between flights. Generally the cost will be about the same, and in some instances you can even unlock a cheaper fare.

ICELANDAIR

Via prepaid package

No additional cost

No set limit

Up to 7 nights

CITIES SERVED

60 cities worldwide, plus 30 inter-Asian cities via their regional line, SilkAir

En route to 27 European cities, including Amsterdam, London and Paris

INCLUDED LODGING

Hotel add-ons booked through singaporeair.com start at $45 for rooms and transfers.

Not covered

SAMPLE FARE

A flight from San Francisco to Hong Kong with a two-night Singapore stopover in October is about $1,025.

A September flight from Minneapolis to London, including a two-night stopover in Rejkjavík, is about $1,000.

BENEFITS

Packages include access to meal discounts, return transfers and unlimited rides on an SIA Hop-On city bus, plus admission to more than 15 of Singapore's biggest tourist attractions.

Flying via Iceland gives you a few extra hours to adjust to European time, taking the sting out of a transatlantic red-eye.

NUMBER OF NIGHTS

KNOW WHEN TO GO // Avoid booking during peak times, such as July and August or around the holidays.

IF YOU HAVE ...

6 HOURS

Gardens by the Bay: Singapore’s unique city park

The National Museum: discover Iceland’s history

12 HOURS

add National Museum of Singapore: housed in a 19th-century library

add Reykjavík 871 +/- 2: one of the first houses in Iceland

add hawker street-food walkabout: taste satay and steamed buns

add whale watching: one of Europe’s best destinations for sightings

add Night Safari at the Singapore Zoo: the world’s first safari park for nocturnal animals

add the Blue Lagoon: a popular geothermal spa

1 DAY

2 DAYS

Summer 2016

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Arrivals

globetrotter

T RAV EL D I S COVER I ES

HOTEL NEWS / The popular European brand Generator, whose properties draw the design-driven traveler on a budget, is adding Stockholm and Rome to its stable of upscale hostels this summer. The new hostels join cheap and chic properties in nine other cities, including Paris, Amsterdam and Berlin (generatorhostels.com).

Moxy Hotels, a division of Marriott geared toward millennial travelers’ needs, has opened their first two U.S. properties, in New Orleans and Tempe, Arizona. The brand focuses on letting travelers help themselves without taking away efficiency and comfort. Look for tech touches such as plug-in zones and superfast Wi-Fi (moxyhotels.com).

DID YOU KNOW? For a spritz of luxury during your stay, Rosewood Hotels, whose properties include the famed Carlyle Hotel in New York City and the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek in Dallas, has a signature scent program allowing guests to borrow from a selection of perfumes and colognes. A butler will bring 10 designer fragrances for you to choose from, eliminating the pesky task of packing scents in carry-on luggage (rosewood hotels.com).

LONELY PLANETÕS

Best in Europe 2016

Looking to explore Europe beyond Paris, Rome or London? Try one of these noteworthy destinations. Find out more at lonelyplanet.com/best-in-europe.

1. THE PELOPONNESE, GREECE An affordable enclave of ancient sites

2. AARHUS, DENMARK Museums, architecture and cool neighborhoods

3. VENICE, ITALY 500 years of the Venetian ghetto, the island city’s historic Jewish quarter

4. THE DORDOGNE, FRANCE PLUCK OF THE IRISH // KENNEDY CENTER HONORS IRELAND In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising, the Irish

5. LVIV, UKRAINE

republican insurrection against British rule, the Kennedy Center for the

A budget-friendly, up-andcoming Eastern European city

Performing Arts is presenting “Ireland 100: Celebrating a Century of Irish

6. WARWICKSHIRE, ENGLAND

Arts & Culture.” Running through June 5, the festival will include performances

Commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death

from notable Irish talent, as well as a literature series, film screenings, educational and culinary activities, and workshops ( kennedy-center.org/festivals/Ireland).

// Irish band the Gloaming is set to perform June 4 as part of the Kennedy Center's �Ireland 100.�

7. EXTREMADURA, SPAIN Spain without the stereotypes

8. EAST COAST TENERIFE,

Get Social 20

LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

TAG US! WANT TO BE FEATURED IN THE MAGAZINE OR ON OUR SOCIAL CHANNELS? Snap a pic

of you and your copy of Lonely Planet magazine in your favorite location – including your own backyard! Then head over to @lonelyplanetusa on Twitter and tag us with #mylpmag.

CANARY ISLANDS Volcanic moonscapes and fishing villages

9. TEXEL, THE NETHERLANDS A dune-covered coastal escape 10. NORTHERN DALMATIA An undiscovered, rugged and wild Adriatic oasis

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF MOXY HOTELS; COURTESY OF THE KENNEDY CENTER

Local foodie scene, medieval towns, dreamy chateaux


OUT NOW

2

1

Lonely Planet’s 50 Bars to Blow Your Mind ($11.99) covers some of the most interesting watering holes in the world. Here are a few of our favorites.

1 SERIOUS

COCKTAILS: ACADEMIA DA CACHAÇA //

3

4

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

2 BREW BARS: T-ANKER //

Prague, Czech Republic

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF ACADEMIA DA CACHACA, PETR BONEK, LOUOGRAPHY, ERIK FULLER

OPENINGS INSIDE CHARLIE'S PLACE CHAPLIN’S WORLD, A MUSEUM SPOTLIGHTING SILENT FILM STAR CHARLIE CHAPLIN AND HIS LIFE’S WORK, is a new attraction in

of which is H.C. Porter’s “Blues @ Home: Mississippi’s Living Blues Legends,” on view through June 1 (nationalblues museum.org).

Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland. Part of the museum is located in Chaplin’s family home, which has never before been opened to visitors. Also on the property are a park, a bike path, a restaurant, a cultural center and, of course, a movie theater (chaplinmuseum.com/en).

LAS VEGAS GETS GREEN SPACE THE PARK, LAS VEGAS’S ANSWER TO A MULTIUSE, GREEN PEDESTRIAN SPACE, IS NOW OPEN. Shady spots, water features (including

SEEING THE BLUES THE NATIONAL BLUES MUSEUM HAS OPENED IN DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI. The museum will feature live perform-

ances, interactive galleries and traveling exhibits, the first

festival-hopping / Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival June 9–12 Manchester, Tennessee

Chicago Blues Festival June 10–12 Chicago, Illinois

a 100-foot-long water wall), and live music combine with restaurants, bars and retail shops on the Strip’s west side, between the New York-New York and Monte Carlo resorts. The entertainment district also includes new 20,000-seat T-Mobile Arena, where the concert lineup for 2016 includes Garth Brooks, the Dixie Chicks and Janet Jackson (theparkvegas.com).

3 HIDDEN DEN:

GALLOW GREEN //

New York City

4 PARTY SCENE:

LINDA’S TAVERN // Seattle, Washington

MUSIC FESTIVALS TO CELEBRATE SUMMER

Electric Daisy Carnival June 17–19 Las Vegas, Nevada

Glastonbury Festival June 22–26 Pilton, England

Pitchfork Music Festival July 15–17 Chicago, Illinois

Outside Lands Music & Arts Festival August 5–7 San Francisco, California Summer 2016

/ LONELY PLANET

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easy trips globetrotter

WHAT TO EAT

New Orleans . . . in

CHEF ALON SHAYA, WHOSE ISRAELI

CUISINE IS DAZZLING VISITORS, LOCALS AND THE FOOD ELITE, TAKES US AROUND HIS ADOPTED HOMETOWN AND MUSES ON THE SPIRIT THAT KEEPS THE CRESCENT CITY ALIVE. BY LAUREN FINNEY / PHOTOGRAPHS BY JODY HORTON

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016


opposite: chef alon shaya with his freshly made pita // he recommends starting the meal with a selection of small plates, including hummus and lutenitsa, a purĂŠe of peppers, eggplant, tomato and spices.

Summer 2016

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globetrotter // WHAT TO EAT PERHAPS THE BIGGEST, BEST SURPRISE TO NEW

and roasted lamb in ways that utilize our local

ORLEANS VISITORS THESE DAYS is that the city's repu-

Louisiana resources,” says Shaya, who moved to

tation as a foodie destination now goes well beyond

New Orleans in 2001 after stints in Las Vegas; Parma,

Cajun and Creole. Take, for example, what Alon

Italy; St. Louis; and Philly. “It’s really all about taking a

Shaya is doing at modern Israeli restaurant Shaya

cuisine that has a lot of history and influence around

(shayarestaurant.com), which has garnered all kinds

the world and elevating it by analyzing every flavor

of accolades in the year and a half it’s been open.

and texture.”

“It’s always been a diverse city, and people are

When visiting the light-filled Magazine Street

embracing that today,” says Shaya, who won the

restaurant, you might need a strategy to get through

2015 James Beard Award for best chef in the South.

the menu successfully. Shaya advises beginning

At Shaya, the chef’s Israeli heritage is artfully

with several salatim (small plates) for the table.

finessed into delectable, elegant dishes, such as

“Be sure to include the ikra, which is a paddlefish

the Israeli-inspired cauliflower, which Shaya began

caviar spread, and the lutenitsa, which is a recipe

sneaking onto the menu at his first New Orleans

from my grandmother that is made from roasted

restaurant, Italian joint Domenica (domenica

eggplants and pepper cooked down with garlic and

restaurant.com), serving it roasted with simple sea

tomato,” he says. “Definitely order a hummus or two;

salt and whipped feta. “At Shaya, we deep-fry it raw,

don’t be afraid to order something you’ve never had

then toss it in Yemenite curry spices with caramelized

before, either. It’s a chef’s dream to see people fall

onions, cilantro and parsley. That all goes on top of

in love with foods that they may have never

hummus with extra virgin olive oil, paired with a

had or liked before.” As for main courses, Shaya

little warm pita, fresh from the wood-burning oven.”

recommends the slow-cooked lamb shank and

He redefines hummus by incorporating butternut

Persian rice. “Plan on sharing all the food! It’s the best

squash, black garlic or walnuts into the simple

way to experience it.”

chickpea dish, in the process transforming it into a creamy concoction worthy of a meal in itself.

How his patrons experience the food is important to him. This is a chef who walks around

“Shaya is modern Israeli food. It seems like an

the dining room – “I’m in the hospitality business!’ he

exotic cuisine from a far-away land but many of the

exclaims – making sure everyone is happy. “Being

items on the menu people will recognize. We work

friendly is just as important to me as making sure

hard on trying to make foods like hummus, kebabs

your hummus is smooth.”

CHEF SHAYA’S CLASSIC CAJUN EATS PO BOY

GUMBO

TROUT AMANDINE

KING CAKE

BEIGNETS

MUFFULETTA

24

OLD SCHOOL

NEW SCHOOL

Parkway Bakery & Tavern 538 Hagan Ave.

Cochon Butcher 930 Tchoupitoulas St.

parkwaypoorboys.com

cochonbutcher.com

Brigtsen’s 732 Dante St.

Lüke 333 St. Charles Ave.

brigtsens.com

lukeneworleans.com

K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen 416 Chartres St.

Borgne 601 Loyola Ave.

kpauls.com

borgnerestaurant.com

Manny Randazzo King Cakes 3515 N. Hullen St., Metarie

Dong Phuong Bakery 14207 Chef Menteur Hwy.

randazzokingcake.com

dpbanhmi.com

Café du Monde 800 Decatur St.

Coquette 2800 Magazine St.

cafedumonde.com

coquettenola.com

DiMartino’s 700 S. Tyler St., Covington

Pizza Domenica 4933 Magazine St.

dimartinos.com

pizzadomenica.com

LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016


clockwise from top left: octopus carpaccio at domenica, shaya's sister restaurant; shaya's slowcooked lamb shank; cure bar; the kitchen at new orleans staple emeril's

Summer 2016

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globetrotter // WHAT TO EAT THE CHEF’S FAVORITES

as well as Cajun Mike’s (cajunmikes.tumblr.com) after

You’re going to want to eat at any place in New

nights working at Domenica. When looking for quin-

Orleans that Shaya suggests – this chef gets

tessential Big Easy fare, he’s partial to Brigtsen’s

seriously good food, without being too serious

(brigtsens.com), where “you won’t find a better shrimp

about it. So where should you go if you want to run

rémoulade or pecan pie,” Emeril's New Orleans

into one of the most personable, innovative chefs in

(emerilsrestaurants.com) for its classic dishes and

America? Try French Quarter staple Galatoire's,

Brennan’s (brennansneworleans.com) for its history.

(galatoires.com), where Shaya loves to go for Friday

He’s also a fan of the scene that’s exploding in

lunch. “There is no other dining experience that

the Warehouse District. “Chef Justin Devillier just

compares,” he claims. “Whole fish stuffed with

opened Balise (balisenola.com), and Chef Kelly Fields

crabmeat and souffléed potatoes pair really well

has Willa Jean (willajean.com), a crazy-good bakery

with champagne and sazeracs. The servers have all

and southern restaurant.” There’s also Borgne

been there for decades and know how to make you

(borgnerestaurant.com), which has “some of the best

feel special. We once celebrated my wife’s birthday

seafood you can get in Louisiana.”

there and it lasted for five hours, and a six-piece

When looking for Italian outside of Domenica,

brass band walked through the dining room and

he hits up Mosca’s (moscasrestaurant.com), a short

played ‘Happy Birthday’!”

“old-school mob-type hangout” about 30 minutes

He also loves taking visitors to Willie Mae’s Scotch

outside of New Orleans, where the best experience

House (504-822-9503) for fried chicken. “Right after

includes “chianti, Louis Prima on the jukebox, and

Hurricane Katrina, I cooked for the members of the

oysters and spaghetti.”

Southern Foodway Alliance, who were rebuilding the

Back at Shaya, it’s the chef’s family influences

restaurant for Willie Mae for free. I was cooking

and his experiences eating and cooking in Israel that

shrimp and making salad on the street while they

most inform the cuisine. “The key is to embrace every

hammered away building new walls. . . . It felt like a

moment and every opportunity to learn something

village coming together to make the place we all live

about food. When you do that, all of those special

a better place,” Shaya says.

moments, add up to who I am and how I cook,” he

There’s a large Vietnamese population in New

says. “It is important to cook the right food for the

Orleans, and Shaya’s favorite spot for Vietnamese food

right people and the right time. That is how magic is

is Tan Dinh Vietnamese (504-361-8008), where he enjoys

created, and there is no way for me to get my head

the beef spring rolls, crispy quail and spicy lemongrass

around how I do that. It just comes to me. As far as

tofu. He also frequents Toups' Meatery (toupsmeatery

what’s next for the city? “I think New Orleans is ready

.com) and Bud’s Broiler (budsbroiler.com) in Mid City,

for any cuisine that’s cooked and served with love.”


KATRINA’S INFLUENCE I was one of the staff that lived upstairs [above partner and mentor John Besh’s restaurant] for a while. Katrina changed my life, and inspired me to want to help rebuild the city. I really felt like I could make a difference to the people who lived here through cooking. It was a powerful and emotional time that made my cooking more honest, simple and comforting. We all had to come together and do what we knew how to do best: cook for people. We were here days after the storm, cooking red beans and rice for people who hadn’t had a hot meal in days. I knew I had to stay, cook for people and see the city return to its glory. I knew that I wanted to be a part of New Orleans for the rest of my life, I needed to make a difference that was really going to last. My dream of opening an Italian restaurant needed to happen, and it needed to happen in New Orleans. I decided I needed to go and study in Italy, so I could return to open Domenica [in 2009].” – Chef Alon Shaya

clockwise from top left: sazerac bar // spicy lemongrass tofu at tan dinh vietnamese // the dining room at brennan’s, open since 1946 // fried pork belly at toups' meatery // willa jean is one of the businesses making the warehouse district an eating destination.

Summer 2016

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easy trips globetrotter

GEAR UP for Summer Desert-bound? Hot, arid landscapes can turn cold

at night; be prepared for temperature swings. photographs // Carin Krasner styling // Kim Wong

Clockwise from top left: rain jacket, $89, landsend.com; mid-layer yellow hoodie, $159, patagonia.com; hat, $29, landsend.com; glasses, $110, spyoptic.com; blanket, $122, zigzagzurich.com; Xventure solar charger, $24.99, bracketron.com; 20-oz. infuse bottle, $14.99, waterbobble.com; trousers, $200, fjallraven.us; insect repellent, $20, zoeorganics.com; pocket cutlery set, $16; uncommongoods.com; BugsAway bandana, $12, exofďŹ cio.com; Philippines Project sunglasses, $120, iwantproof .com; All Good SPF 15 lip balm, $3.50, elementalherbs.com; solarpowered radio, $42, kikkerland.com; caribiner compass watch, $79, orvis.com; Amphib shoe, $110, eddiebauer.com; Hike+ light crew socks, $21.95, icebreaker.com.

sunglasses: Made from virtually indestructible material

solar charger: Provides two phone charges via solar power

bandana: Treated with insect repellent that lasts up to 20 machine washes

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

Tiled table courtesy of PottedStore.com; Dots tumblers from CrateandBarrel.com


GEAR UP for Summer Be prepared for anything on your next mountain trip – from hiking rugged terrain to coffee and games by the fire.

blanket: Has a waxed cotton backing and rolls up

Clockwise from top: National Parks backpack, $269, pendleton-usa.com; Boise wood sunglasses, $120, iwantproof.com; Hudson Bay axe, $139, llbean.com; travel coffee press, $34.95, esprocanada.com; VIRB XE camera, $399.99, garmin.com; Victorinox Rangerwood55 Swiss army knife, $90, swissarmy.com; headlamp, $90, ledlenserusa.com; Bananagrams Zip-It game, $12.99, amazon.com; Euro Hiker boots, $110, timberland.com; merino wool socks, $16.99 for 2-pack, llbean.com; men’s 4-season XL hiking poles, $99.95, llbean.com; Glacier National Park roll-up blanket, $299, pendleton-usa.com.

poles: Cork handle easily molds to your grip

headlamp: Automatically adjusts brightness to save battery life

Wooden bench and table courtesy of PottedStore.com

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easy trips // GEAR globetrotter

GEAR UP for Summer Whether you’re beach-bound or kicking back at the pool, keep these sunny-day waterproof essentials on hand.

Clockwise from top left: board shorts, $79, patagonia.com; Pantropic Panama hat, $95, travelsmith.com; Hopper cooler, $299.99, yeticoolers.com; floating half-pipe sunglasses retainer, $6.99, chums .com; portable charcoal grill, $85, kikkerland.com; sandals, $27, speedousa.com; Nikon waterproof CoolPix camera, $349, nikonusa .com; Kindle Paperwhite waterproof cover, $24.99, satechi.net; zip-up one piece, $95, nextbyathena.com; Rifles tide watch, $125, ripcurl.com; BoomBottle H2O mobile speaker, $99.99, scosche.com; turquoise speaker, $49, sunnylife.com; waterproof blanket, $39, alitedesigns .com; Luzon daypack, $35.95, cotopaxi.com.

cooler: Holds up to 18 cans

camera: Built-in Wi-Fi connectivity

mat: Rolls up to less than 4 inches thick

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

Hoop chair and table courtesy of PottedStore.com


easy trips QUICK ESCAPES FOR SUMMER

City weekends, surf and sand, mountain hikes – we’ve got it all for the perfect break. Featuring: Nova Scotia, Canada Martinique Portland, Oregon Finger Lakes, New York Estes Park, Colorado

© SIME / ESTOCK PHOTO

and more!

// Blue sea and skies are just two of the reasons to travel to Martinique, one of the easiest Caribbean islands to visit.


Easy Trips

VISIT MUSEUMS // EXPLORE TITANIC HISTORY // TAKE A SCENIC DRIVE

Hop up to HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA, and beyond to get in a maritime mood.

Nova Scotia overflows with charm: lupine-studded fields, gingerbread-like houses, picture-perfect lighthouses and lightly lapping waves on sandy shores. With influences from the British, French, Germans and Swiss, Halifax, the provincial capital, is a great alternative to New England coastal towns during high season. In Halifax the air is crisp and clean, and green spaces abound. There’s plenty of nightlife too, thanks to the student population at several universities. Halifax is home to several museums offering a sense of this region’s importance in history. The Maritime Museum of the Atlantic (maritimemuseum .novascotia.ca) provides a good overview. After the Titanic sank, the bodies of victims not buried at sea were buried at three Halifax graveyards; at one of them, Fairview Lawn Cemetery, you can find the grave of J. Dawson, whose name was the inspiration for Leonardo DiCaprio’s character, Jack, in the 1997 film Titanic. Stroll through some of the finest Victorian city gardens in North America at the Halifax Public Gardens, where you can catch impromptu concerts on summer Sunday afternoons. For the quintessential coastal Canadian experience, head southwest on the “Lighthouse Route,” aka Highway 3. You’ll spot lighthouses, glimpse forest coves with white sand beaches, and travel through old fishing-villages-turned-tourist-towns, such as Chester, Mahone Bay and Lunenburg; the latter is the region’s only UNESCO World Heritage Site, where at sunset the town’s brightly painted old buildings glow behind the ship-filled port.

STAY The Waverley Inn’s 34 rooms (from $135, including breakfast; waverleyinn.com) are outfitted with antiques, fit for previous guests such as Oscar Wilde and P.T. Barnum; the inn is situated downtown, within walking distance of major attractions. For more modernity with your quaintness, try The Halliburton (from $159; thehalliburton.com), offering 29 rooms and suites, also downtown.

See the “Nova Scotia” chapter of Lonely Planet’s Canada book or visit novascotia.com for more information.

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

DO Pirates! You can find remnants of them up and down the Nova Scotia coast, from historic Louisbourg to Lunenburg, the largest of the South Shore fishing villages. The town of Chester has a colorful history as a favorite of pirates and Prohibition-era gin-smugglers. A short ferry ride will take you to 104-acre Oak Island, rife with pirate lore and focus of the History Channel reality show The Curse of Oak Island.

APEXPHOTOS/ GETTY IMAGES

GET THERE Many airlines, including Air Canada, Delta and United, fly direct into Halifax Stanfield International Airport, located about 25 miles from downtown Halifax. There’s a Metro Transit public bus (about $2.50) that will take you downtown. If you’re coming in at night, it’s best to reserve a taxi before arriving (about $45). Most major car rental outlets are represented at the airport.

Peggy’s Point Lighthouse, in the fishing village of Peggy’s Cove, is one of 20 lighthouses along Nova Scotia’s south shore.


Easy Trips

HIKE THE ROCKIES // WATCH FOR WILDLIFE // TAKE THE (REALLY) HIGH ROAD

FROM TOP: MARK C STEVENS/GETTY IMAGES; ANDY NELSON/GETTY IMAGES

ESTES PARK, COLORADO, is the perfect base for summer visits to Rocky Mountain National Park.

Surrounded by Rocky Mountain National Park and Roosevelt National Forest, and just 70 miles from Denver, Estes Park is a popular summer destination for families looking for fun in the great outdoors. The town’s elevation is 7,522 feet, and some elevations within the national park exceed 10,000 feet. If you’re not accustomed to higher altitudes, plan to spend at least a day in town acclimating to the area before venturing to higher elevations. While acclimating, visit some of the attractions in Estes Park: Lake Estes Marina (evrpd.com), where you can rent canoes, pontoon boats and more; MacGregor Ranch (macgregorranch.org), one of the country’s oldest working cattle ranches; and Estes Park Memorial Observatory (angelsabove.org), where you can stargaze through a high-powered telescope. In the downtown area you’ll find hundreds of galleries, shops, restaurants and attractions. When you’re ready to tackle the national park’s trails, you’ll have 355 miles of them to choose from. Family-friendly hikes include the 0.8-mile, handicapped-accessible Lily Lake Loop (6 miles south of town on Highway 7), with a fishing pier and picnic spots, and the 6.4-mile Bridal Veil Falls trail, an easy walk through a lightly forested area. Elk, mule deer and bighorn sheep are frequently seen in the area; moose sightings happen most often on the park’s western side. Keep an eye out for black bears, mountain lions, bobcats and the rare Canadian lynx, too (though don’t be disappointed if you don’t see them). Prime wildlife viewing spots include Moraine Park, Estes Park Golf Course, Horseshoe Park and along Trail Ridge Road.

GET THERE The drive from Denver International Airport to Estes Park takes less than two hours via E-470 N, I-25 N, and state highways 66 W and 7 W. You can also get there via Boulder along U.S. Route 36, a scenic drive through rugged foothills and lush forest. Estes Park Shuttle (one-way $45 per person; estesparkshuttle.com) connects the airport and Estes Park several times daily.

Above: Scenic vistas await at every turn in and around Estes Park. Right: Columbine blooms along the trail near 14,259-foot-high Longs Peak, the highest point in Rocky Mountain National Park.

STAY In the heart of Estes Park, historic Stanley Hotel (from $189; stanleyhotel.com) has excellent service and spectacular views. A very kid-friendly option is the YMCA of the Rockies – Estes Park Center just outside of town, which offers upmarket motel-style accommodations and cabins on hundreds of acres of high alpine terrain (from $79; ymcarockies.org).

DO Drive Trail Ridge Road (U.S. Highway 34), America’s highest continuously paved road, from Estes Park to Grand Lake. On this unforgettable route you’ll climb from an elevation of 7,800 feet to more than 12,000 feet and cross the Continental Divide. Allow a full day for the trip. The road is usually open from Memorial Day through mid-October, depending on snowfall.

For more on Estes Park, pick up Lonely Planet’s Colorado guidebook or go to visitestespark.com. Summer 2016 / LONELY PLANET

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Easy Trips

HIT THE BEACH // EXPLORE CARIBBEAN ART // SAMPLE LOCAL SEAFOOD

While Martinique is noticeably more tropical than mainland France, there’s no denying the French rhythm of life here. If it’s beaches you’re after, concentrate your weekend around the south for a few days. Start in bustling Fort-de-France, the largest city in the French West Indies. While it’s a commercial center and has some decent shopping, most people just pass through. The new Fondation Clement (free admission; fondation -clement.org), a 25,000-square-foot Caribbean art museum on the grounds of Habitation Clément (a century old house of rum), might change that. Head south toward the small working town of Trois-Îlets. A former sugar estate outside of town was the birthplace of the Empress Josephine. You can glimpse her early life at the Musée de la Pagerie (troisilets-martinique.fr), including the marriage certificate that was doctored to make the bride, Napoleon’s elder by six years, appear to be the same age as her spouse. Les Anses-d’Arlet is a charming fishing village in southern Martinique; it retains an undiscovered feel. There’s a handsome coastal road crowned by an 18th-century Roman Catholic church whose doors open almost directly onto the beautiful beach, and the entire scene is framed with steep, verdant hills. The southernmost village on Martinique is SainteAnne, which has a sleepy air and an attractive seaside setting with painted wooden houses and trinket shops. At the island’s undeveloped southern tip is Les Salines, probably Martinique’s finest beach. The gorgeous long stretch of golden sand attracts scantily clad French tourists and local families alike.

GET THERE All visitors must have a valid passport. New nonstop flight routes are now available via Norwegian Air from New York, Boston and Baltimore/ Washington, D.C., and there is increased service on American Airlines from Miami. Renting a car is an inexpensive option; taxis are expensive and a 40 percent surcharge is added after 8 p.m.

Clockwise from top left: Fort-de-France Bay, on Martinique’s West Coast, has been deemed one of the world’s most beautiful bays. // St. Henry’s church in Les Anses-d’Arlet dates to the 18th century. // Northeast trade winds blow almost year-round, keeping the temperature in Martinique pleasant.

STAY Classic Martinican architecture makes for a colorful stay at the budget-friendly Bambou Hotel (from $95; hotelbambou.fr). The comfortable Hotel de la Pagerie (from $130, including breakfast; hotel-lapagerie .com) is one of the best values. If you’re looking to go full resort, try Hotel Bakoua (from $450; accorhotels .com), where many rooms are right on the beach.

For more, see the “Martinique” chapter of Lonely Planet’s Discover Caribbean Islands book or visit us.martinique.org.

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

EAT Here’s the lingo you’ll need to eat and drink well: acras is fish, seafood or vegetable tempura, a universally popular starter. Ti-punch, short for petit punch, is the normal aperitif, a mix of rum, lime and cane syrup. Crabes farcis are stuffed crabs, and blaff is the local term for white fish marinated in lime juice, garlic and peppers, then poached.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BRUNO DE HOGUES/GETTY IMAGES; STEVE SMITH/GETTY IMAGES; MATTEO COLOMBO/GETTY IMAGES

MARTINIQUE makes it easier than ever to unwind, French-style, in the Caribbean.


Easy Trips

VISIT WINERIES // GO HIKING & KAYAKING // SAMPLE CRAFT BEERS

Upstate New York’s FINGER LAKES region provides a picturesque alternative to California’s wine scene.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF: FINGERLAKES.ORG

Picture green, undulating hills dotted with vineyards, wineries and charming villages; throw in 11 scenic lakes, a great college town, and just enough industry to keep things real (along with a dose of savvy NYC sophistication, of course) and you’ve got the Finger Lakes. This is New York state’s premier wine-growing region, with enough variety for the most discerning oenophile. Start off in Ithaca, an idyllic home for Cornell University college students and older hippies who cherish elements of the traditional collegiate lifestyle. It’s a great home base for venturing out, perched on the southern shores of Cayuga Lake and close to Buttermilk Falls and Robert H. Treman State Parks, a respite from city life that’s heavy on scenic waterfalls. Follow a wine trail, such as the Seneca Lake Wine Trail (more than 30 wineries; senecalakewine.com), the Keuka Wine Trail (eight wineries; keukawinetrail .com) or the Cayuga Lake Wine Trail (16 wineries and one cidery; cayugawinetrail.com), and sample wines ranging from merlots and cabernet sauvignons to Rieslings. If you’re more of a beer connoisseur, the region boasts a growing number of craft breweries, including the Keuka Brewing Company (keukabrewingcom pany.com), Rooster Fish (roostefishbrewing.com), Seneca Lodge (senecalodge.com/brewery) and Two Goats (twogoatsbrewing.com). There’s also a Finger Lakes Beer Trail (fingerlakesbeertrail.com), with more than 80 points of interest and several mini-itineraries to help you plan your trip.

GET THERE It’s 152 miles, less than a three-hour-drive, from Buffalo to Ithaca via Interstate 90; from New York City to Ithaca, it’s 223 miles, about four hours via Interstates 80 and 81. The Ithaca Tompkins Airport has daily flights from Philadelphia, Detroit and Newark, New Jersey. Driving time around the lakes varies depending on your destination.

Above: Fox Run Vineyards is one of more than 30 wineries on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Right: Nearly two dozen wineries can be found along the shores of Cayuga Lake, the longest of the Finger Lakes.

STAY If you choose Ithaca as your launching point, try the Inn on Columbia (from $195, including breakfast; columbiabb.com), an updated historic inn, for those who dig the “tenured professor” vibe. Another option is the nine-room William Henry Miller Inn (from $185, including breakfast; millerinn.com), a restored historic home in the downtown area.

For more information, see Lonely Planet’s New York and the Mid-Atlantic’s Best Trips book or visit fingerlakes.org.

DO This is trail country. To supplement all your sipping with something outdoorsy, walk the Cayuga Waterfront Trail (cayugawaterfronttrail.com) in Ithaca, which will span 6 miles when completed, or paddle the new Blueway Trail on Cayuga Lake (cayugablueway.weebly.com), scheduled to open this summer.


Easy Trips

RIDE A BIKE // VISIT AN URBAN FOREST // STAY WEIRD

Call it what you want – PDX, Stumptown, City of Roses, Bridge City, Beervana or Portlandia – Portland rocks. It’s a city with a vibrant downtown, pretty residential neighborhoods, ultragreen ambitions and zany characters. Start by getting a few traditional sights out of the way, such as Pioneer Courthouse Square, downtown’s hub and Tom McCall Waterfront Park, which lunch-hour runners and cyclist commuters share. Then head east – the Central Eastside captures Portland’s true artisan vibe. There’s Ancient Heritage Dairy (ancientheritagedairy.com), which makes award-winning cheeses; Jacobsen Salt Co. (jacobsen salt.com), harvesting salt from the Oregon Coast; and Bee Local (beelocal.com), producing raw, single-origin honeys. Renata (renatapdx.com), a contemporary Italian restaurant, is also of note, as are urban winery Clay Pigeon Winery (claypigeonwinery.com) and ping-pong-and-beer spot Pips & Bounce (pipsand bounce.com). Not quirky enough for you? “Keep Portland Weird,” as the city’s unofficial slogan boasts, by visiting places such as the Freakybuttrue Peculiarium (peculiarium .com) to have a bug sundae, or stop by the International Rose Test Garden (rosegardenstore.org) to put your olfactory skills to use. Search for vintage cookbooks at Powell’s City of Books (powells.com), a local institution and tourist attraction occupying a whole city block. Hiking and kayaking are popular in Portland. The best hiking is found in 5,100-acre Forest Park, which harbors 80 miles of trails. Portland’s position close to the confluence of the Columbia and Willamette Rivers means the city has miles of navigable waterways.

GET THERE Portland International Airport is just a 20-minute taxi ride (about $34) from downtown. Tri-Met’s light-rail MAX line takes about 40 minutes one way. Blue Star buses offer shuttle services between the airport and several downtown stops. Car-sharing programs like Zipcar are also popular, and most major car rental agencies are represented.

Clockwise from top: Trendy Ace Hotel is in downtown Portland, a block from Powell’s Books. // Bee Local produces small-batch artisan honey. // Italian restaurant Renata was named 2015 Restaurant of the Year by The Oregonian, Portland’s daily newspaper.

STAY The Ace Hotel is Portland’s trendiest place to sleep; it has a photo booth in the lobby, and a Stumptown coffee shop (doubles with private bath, $185; acehotel.com). The Society Hotel (from $122; thesocietyhotel.com), which opened last year in the former Mariners Building, is a blend of hostel and hotel for the budget-conscious but design-eager.

DO Portland is known as a bike-friendly city; many streets cater specifically to bikes. Hometown hero Nike and the city will launch a Biketown bike share program in July, featuring a fleet of 1,000 orange smart bikes. Another option, Pedal Bike Tours (pedalbiketours.com), offers guided tours themed to topics such as history and beer.

For more information, download the “Portland” chapter from Lonely Planet’s Washington, Oregon & the Pacific Northwest book, or see travelportland.com.

36

LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TORSTEN KJELLSTRAND COURTESY OF THE ACE HOTEL; COURTESY OF BEE LOCAL; COURTESY OF RENATA

Eclectic and eccentric PORTLAND, OREGON, is home to artisans, doers and quirky creatives.


Find amazing experiences all year for only $8 With authentic storytelling and beautiful photography, each issue is filled with unique adventures, memorable landscapes and fascinating characters. Take advantage of our discounted rate and get a year of Lonely Planet magazine for 66% OFF* the newsstand price.

Return the card or visit lonelyplanet.com/usmagazine/summersaving *Savings based on annual newsstand price of $23.96. Offer expires September 5, 2016.


Easy Trips

DISCOVER SECLUDED BEACHES // RIDE A BIKE // EXPLORE SEASIDE TOWNS

Enjoy a road trip along the PANHANDLE, Florida’s softer, slower side.

Take the best bits of the Deep South – friendly people, a molasses-slow pace, oak-lined roads and fried green tomatoes – then add sugar-white beaches, clear natural springs and bountiful seafood and you’ll begin to conjure up the magnificently diverse Florida Panhandle. Often dubbed the “Forgotten Coast” thanks to south Florida’s bopping scene, this stretch of beaches from Pensacola down Highway 30A to Panama City Beach and beyond offers miles of stunning coastline. Starting in Pensacola, check out the National Museum of Naval Aviation (free; navalaviation museum.org), where you can often find the Blue Angles practicing their (also free) death-defying air show. From there, hit the road, heading east. Connect with Scenic Highway 30A, squished between Destin and Panama City, where the 15 unincorporated communities that make up the Beaches of South Walton have claimed their stake. Called “The Emerald Coast,” this collection of communities offers something for everyone. Grayton Beach feels like it’s been settled by old-school hippies, while Seaside is so picturesque it was used as a television Eden in the film The Truman Show. Allow at least two hours to drive the short stretch of 30A between Destin and Panama City Beach. Other resort communities along the Emerald Coast include romantic Rosemary Beach, eclectic Seagrove and historic Santa Rosa Beach. Although technically outside the bounds of the Emerald Coast, Apalachicola and St. George Island offer a quaint slice of peaceful, seaside living.

STAY Beachfront WaterColor Inn & Resort (from $250; watercolorresort.com) in Seaside sits on nearly 500 acres. In Grayton Beach, there’s the Hibiscus Coffee & Guesthouse (from $115; hibiscusflorida .com), a garden accommodation with a vintage, Old Florida feel. Rentals, such as those found at 30avacationrentals.com, are also popular.

For more on the Florida Panhandle, pick up Lonely Planet’s Florida guidebook or see visitflorida.com.

38

LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

DO With hundreds of miles of trails, the area is well suited for hikers and cyclists. Many trails are in the Santa Rosa Beach area, including the 10-mile paved Timpoochee Trail, which parallels Scenic Highway 30A, and the Longleaf Pine Greenway and Eastern Lake Trails (see visitsouthwalton.com for info on those trails and more).

CHERYL CASEY/GETTY IMAGES

GET THERE Daily flights arrive from major southern cities such as Charlotte, Atlanta and Houston to Pensacola International Airport; Delta, United and Southwest also fly into Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport in Panama City. Rental cars are available at either location. Without stops, driving time from Pensacola to Apalachicola is about 3½ hours.

The Florida Panhandle, including Destin, Fort Walton Beach and Okaloosa Island, is known for its white sand beaches.


Easy Trips

VISIT A BOHEMIAN ENCLAVE // BROWSE WATERFRONT SHOPS // WALK THE BRIDGE

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ELOJOTORPE/GETTY IMAGES; JUDY BELLAH/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF HEATH CERAMICS

Just across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco, picturesque SAUSALITO is the California dream embodied.

Perfectly situated on a secure little harbor on the bay, Sausalito is undeniably lovely. The small settlement of pretty houses tumbles neatly down a green hillside into a well-heeled downtown. Most of the town affords uninterrupted views of San Francisco and Angel Island, the largest natural island in the San Francisco Bay. All the classic California activities are available here, from kayaking (from $40 per hour for doubles; seatrek.com) to biking (from $15 per hour; sausalito bikerentals.com) to waterfront dining, but you’d be wise to stop by the Sausalito houseboat community at some point. Bohemia still thrives here, where quirky homes bob in the waves and range from psychedelic mural-splashed castles to salt-sprayed shacks and floating mansions. There are several popular art galleries and souvenir shops. Check out Heath Ceramics (heathceramics .com), one of the last remaining mid-century potters and a local landmark, and try your hand at creating California cuisine at ITK Culinary (itkculinary .com). Throughout the summer there’s Jazz and Blues by the Bay (ci.sausalito.ca.us), a concert series with free lawn seats. Walking or cycling across the Golden Gate Bridge is a fun way to get some great ocean views while basking in that refreshing Marin County air. It’s a fairly easy journey of about 3.5 miles and takes less than an hour. Pedestrians have access to the bridge’s east walkway between 5 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily. Cyclists have access to the bridge’s sidewalks at all times. Check the bridge’s website for updates (goldengate bridge.org).

GET THERE Sausalito is about a 45-minute drive from San Francisco International Airport. Golden Gate Transit (goldengatetransit.org) bus 10 runs daily from downtown S.F. ($5.25). A fun way to get there: a 30-minute journey on the Golden Gate Ferry (one-way, $11.25; goldengateferry.org), which leaves from the Ferry Building.

Clockwise from top right: Take a stroll along the docks to view Sausalito’s famed houseboat community. // There are more than 30 restaurants within walking distance from the center of town. // Heath Ceramics, founded in 1948, is a local landmark.

STAY There are plenty of accommodations in San Francisco, but if you’d like to stay in Sausalito, try Hotel Sausalito (from $175; hotelsausalito.com), a 1915 building in the middle of downtown, or upgrade to the luxurious waterfront Inn Above Tide (from $385, including breakfast; innabovetide .com), where you can snag a free loaner bicycle.

EAT Avatar’s “ethnic confusion” cuisine translates to Indian fusion dishes incorporating Mexican, Italian and Caribbean flavors with lots of creativity (main courses from $9; enjoyavatars.com). For waterfront dining, try Le Garage (legaragebistrosausalito.com), where weekend brunch items include salt cod brandade ($13) and a Muscovy duck confit ($22).

Pick up Lonely Planet’s Northern California guidebook for more on Sausalito or see sausalito.org. Summer 2016 / LONELY PLANET

39


NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CENTENNIAL


AMERICA

THE

BEAUTIFUL

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

As the National Park Service celebrates its centennial, there is no better time to explore America’s scenic parks. Here, we feature 10 of our favorites – from the Alaskan wilderness of Denali to the unique ecosystem of Florida’s Everglades.

// A lone hiker looks out over Yosemite Point, at Yosemite National Park in California. Yosemite’s beauty sparked the idea of setting aside land as a protected park. It inspired writers and artists like naturalist John Muir and photographer Ansel Adams to produce their finest work. And to the indigenous Miwok, it was a land of forest and river spirits and thousands of years of ancestral beauty.


// A view from 6,643-foot Clingmans Dome, the highest point in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. A steep half-mile hike at the end of 7-mile Clingmans Dome Road leads to an observation tower offering 360-degree views of the Smokies.


GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK / TENNESSEE & NORTH CAROLINA

EXTEND YOUR TRIP 30

miles from Great Smoky Mountains

PARK IN NUMBERS 816 SQUARE MILES 907 PLANT AND ANIMAL SPECIES

50 min.

BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY Take in the beauty of the Appalachian Highlands on a leisurely drive along this 469-mile route through North Carolina and Virginia. nps.gov/blri

discovered here

78

preserved historic buildings

98

miles from Great Smoky Mountains

Highlights

IMAGINE WATCHING THE SKY GO FROM INK-BLACK TO PERI-

PREVIOUS SPREAD: MICHAEL MARQUAND/GETTY IMAGES; OPPOSITE PAGE: JON SPAULL/GETTY IMAGES; THIS PAGE: ROBERT CABLE/GETTY IMAGES

WINKLE-BLUE as pink dawn clouds ripple across the endless,

1 DRIVE 30-MILE NEWFOUND GAP ROAD 2 STOP TO EXPLORE TRAILS & WATERFALLS 3 TAKE IN THE VIEW FROM CLINGMANS DOME 4 HIKE TO LAUREL FALLS 5 HIKE TO ABRAMS FALLS 6 CAMP IN CADES COVE 7 CYCLE THE 11-MILE CADES COVE LOOP ROAD 8 TAKE A DIP IN THE “Y” SWIMMING HOLE 9 VISIT THE MUSEUM OF THE CHEROKEE INDIAN 10 DON’T MISS GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE

wrinkled chain of peaks stretching toward the horizon. It’s like nowhere else on earth. From the fog-choked summit of Clingmans Dome to the photogenic ghost town of Cades Cove to the tinkling music of a dozen silvery waterfalls, there’s something deeply magical about these mountains. Experience it by hiking the park’s trails, sleeping in its many remote campgrounds, splashing in its icy swimming holes and driving its winding back roads. Unlike most national parks, Great Smoky Mountains charges no admission to visitors, thanks to a proviso in the park’s original charter as part of a grant from the Rockefeller family. Its lack of entry fee and its convenient location to many eastern cities make Great Smoky Mountains America’s most visited national park. More than 10 million people travel to the park each year. Most don’t stray far from their cars, though, which is their loss: once you get a few hundred steps away from the road, you’re in your own personal fairyland. nps.gov/grsm

2

hours

252

miles from Great Smoky Mountains

4

hours +

CUMBERLAND GAP NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK What was once a great gateway to the West, this historic site – spanning Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia – features a 19th century mountaintop settlement, spectacular overlooks, trails and a cave. nps.gov/cuga

CONGAREE NATIONAL PARK Canoeing through the black waters of South Carolina’s Congaree – Spanish moss dripping overhead, muffled bird-cries in the distance – is an unforgettable experience. nps.gov/cong

20 min.

ÿ

STAY HERE LeConte Lodge / LeConte is no ordinary hotel. Perched near the 6,593-foot summit of Mount LeConte, this electricity-free lodge, typically booked a year in advance, is reached on foot. Supplies are packed in on llamas (see them hoofing it up Trillium Gap Trail on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings). Hikers dine by the light of kerosene lamps before retiring to bunks to doze through the silent Appalachian night. lecontelodge.com

Summer 2016

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EXTEND YOUR TRIP

BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK / TEXAS

262

miles from Big Bend

PARK IN NUMBERS

1,252 SQUARE MILES 7,832 FEET

4

hours

GUADALUPE MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK Mountain, forest and desert intersect in this rugged wilderness. The few visitors who make it here each year come primarily for the 250-million-year-old fossil reef, soaring high above the desert floor. nps.gov/gumo

highest point

1,200

plant species

miles from Big Bend

4

hours +

Hidden beneath the Guadalupe Mountains is a sprawling, subterranean wonderland. It’s worth planning a trip around the nightly bat flights, which occur May to October. nps.gov/cave

20

min.

Highlights 1 STARGAZE 2 TAKE THE HOT SPRINGS TRAIL 3 DRIVE THE 30-MILE ROSS MAXWELL SCENIC DRIVE 4 HIKE TO BALANCED ROCK (ABOVE) 5 GO RAFTING DOWN THE RIO GRANDE 6 HIKE THE 5.6-MILE WINDOW TRAIL 7 GO BIRDING IN RIO GRANDE VILLAGE 8 JOURNEY TO BOQUILLAS 9 EXPLORE THE GHOST TOWN OF TERLINGUA 10 DINE AT CHISOS MOUNTAIN LODGE

IN THE HEART OF THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT, where summer

temperatures often top 100°F, Big Bend may appear at first glance like a barren, Far West Texas wasteland. But amid its steep-walled canyons, fertile river corridor, desert scrubland and forested ridges, you’ll find varied microclimates that support abundant wildlife – including more recorded bird species than any other national park in America. The area has a complicated geological history, with a mix of 500-million-year-old rocks and sand dunes still being shaped by desert winds. Home to a long stretch of the Rio Grande, a life-giving river system in these inhospitable lands, Big Bend has a deep connection to the region’s human history. Artifacts from Paleo-Indians who lived in the area date back 10,000 years. Following the Mexican-American War in the mid-1800s, Big Bend saw a succession of ranchers, miners, revolutionaries, outlaws and intrepid homesteaders. The area has long captivated those who journey to this remote corner of Texas. nps.gov/bibe

414

miles from Big Bend

6

hours +

20

WHITE SANDS NATIONAL MONUMENT The world’s largest gypsum dunefield – 275 square miles of beautiful, pristine white sand – is found in New Mexico. A portion of this unique landscape is preserved within White Sands National Monument. nps.gov/whsa

min.

HERE Posada Milagro / ÿ STAY laposadamilagro.net

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

THIS PAGE: WITOLD SKRYPCZAK/GETTY IMAGES; OPPOSITE PAGE (FROM TOP): C. FREDRICKSON PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES; ANDY ROSS/GETTY IMAGES

268

CARLSBAD CAVERNS NATIONAL PARK


BADLANDS NATIONAL PARK / SOUTH DAKOTA PARK IN NUMBERS

381 SQUARE MILES 1 INCH

annual landscape erosion

FRENCH TRAPPERS CALLED IT “BAD LANDS TO TRAVEL ACROSS.” Before them, the

Lakota held much the same opinion. It’s eerie, this rocky desert moonscape, with its weird, crinkly shapes and seeming absence of vegetation. But the longer you stay, the more you see. For starters, these seemingly barren rocks are actually full of life – and the evidence of life. The Badlands hold one of the most plentiful concentrations of fossils in the world. The study of fossils here has thrived since 1846, when paleontologist Hiram Prout dug up a mandible of a titanothere (an extinct mammal related to horses and rhinos). The other thing you might begin to notice is that the Badlands aren’t finished. The rocky formations consist of distinct layers that are the result of the accumulation of different kinds of sediment over different periods. It took ages – literally – to build the landscape, but for the past 500,000 years or so erosion has been unbuilding it: the Badlands erode at a rate of about an inch a year. nps.gov/bad

3,247 FEET highest point

Highlights 1 DRIVE THE 30-MILE BADLANDS LOOP SCENIC BYWAY 2 STOP AT THE BEN REIFEL VISITOR CENTER’S WORKING PALEONTOLOGY LAB 3 GET A LOOK AT THE STARS FROM THE CEDAR PASS CAMPGROUND 4 HIKE THE FOSSIL EXHIBIT TRAIL 5 WATCH FOR WILDLIFE HERE Badlands Inn / ÿ STAY cedarpasslodge.com/badlandsinn

VAST MARSHES OF SWAYING SAWGRASS stretching as far as the eye can see

EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK / FLORIDA PARK IN NUMBERS

2,400 SQUARE MILES 15 FEET maximum adult size for an American alligator INCHES 60 average yearly rainfall

have earned the Everglades its nickname: the River of Grass. Imagine strolling the Anhinga Trail, a 0.8-mile elevated boardwalk over the sawgrass marsh of Taylor Slough, broad-leafed marsh plants rippling gently in the brown water. You notice a large log, and then – wait! – the log moves! It’s a 7-foot gator, raising its primeval head for a yellow-eyed perusal of its surroundings before settling back into the mud. A minute later, a green snake whips its way through the water and disappears in the grass. A bubblegum-pink roseate spoonbill sticks its long, goofy beak into the water and yanks out a wriggling fish. This profusion of nature, in all its swampy, sticky, scaly glory, is what Everglades National Park is all about. nps.gov/ever

Highlights 1 WATCH FOR GATORS AND OTHER WILDLIFE 2 GO SLOGGING THROUGH THE WETLANDS 3 KAYAK AT TEN THOUSAND ISLANDS 4 RENT A BIKE AND CRUISE SHARK VALLEY TRAIL 5 DINE AT JOANIE’S BLUE CRAB CAFÉ HERE Everglades International Hostel / ÿ STAY evergladeshostel.com Summer 2016

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HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK / HAWAII

EXTEND YOUR TRIP 80

miles from Hawaii Volcanoes

PARK IN NUMBERS

505.4 SQUARE MILES 33 YEARS

1

PUUHONUA O HONAUNAU NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK This ceremonial site on Hawaii’s Big Island is the home of a puuhonua, or refuge, enclosed by a massive masonry wall. nps.gov/puho

hour +

40 min.

time that Kilauea Volcano has been erupting

500

acres of new land created since eruptions began

97

miles from Hawaii Volcanoes

2

hours

FOR MORE THAN 70 MILLION YEARS, VOLCANOES IN THE DEEP have been giving birth to the Hawaiian Islands. After

1 SEE KILAUEA’S LAVA FLOW 2 TAKE THE KILAUEA IKI TRAIL 3 DRIVE THE 18.8-MILE CHAIN OF CRATERS ROAD 4 HIKE TO THE PU‘U LOA PETROGLYPHS 5 TAKE A SPOOKY WALK THROUGH THURSTON LAVA TUBE 6 LOOK OFFSHORE FOR THE HOLEI SEA ARCH 7 HIKE THE 14-MILE NAPAU TRAIL 8 EXPLORE THE KAHUKU UNIT

emerging as bare rocks from under the sea, the islands later become oases for unique plant and animal life, then eventually tumble down into flat coral atolls flung over thousands of miles of open ocean. Today Hawaii, also known as the Big Island, sits directly atop a “hot spot” deep beneath the Earth’s crust, making it the only Hawaiian island that’s still volcanically active. Don’t be alarmed, though: Hawaiian volcanoes rarely explode – they usually just ooze streams of molten lava. And when that red-hot lava hits the ocean, you’ll witness apocalyptic plumes of steam billowing upward. Kilauea Volcano has been erupting continuously since 1983. Also here: 13,680-foot Mauna Loa, which is higher than Mount Everest when measured from the ocean floor and considered the world’s largest active volcano. Whether you come for a startling geology lesson or to get in touch with living Hawaiian traditions, this park doesn’t disappoint. nps.gov/havo

104

miles from Hawaii Volcanoes

2

Go back in time to follow in the footsteps of ancient Polynesian kings at this historical site. The temple of King Kamehameha the Great, Hawaii’s most majestic and beloved king, is found here. nps.gov/puhe

KALOKO-HONOKOHAU NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK Discover the culture and natural history of Hawaii at this park, located close to the town of Kona on the Big Island. Sea turtles are often seen basking in the sun nearby. nps.gov/kaho

hours

ÿ STAY HERE Volcano House Hotel / ÿ ÿ hawaiivolcanohouse.com

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LONELY PLANET / Summer 2016

TAN YILMAZ /GETTY IMAGES

Highlights

PUUKOHOLA HEIAU NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE


DENALI NATIONAL PARK & PRESERVE/ ALASKA

EXTEND YOUR TRIP 290

air miles from Anchorage

PARK IN NUMBERS

9,492 SQUARE MILES 169

1

hour +

20

species of birds

KATMAI NATIONAL PARK & PRESERVE Best accessed by plane or boat, this remote park is the place to see brown bears diving into streams to scoop up salmon. Visit Brooks Falls in July or September for prime viewing opportunities. nps.gov/katm

min.

39

species of mammals

360 miles from Denali

61/2

hours

Highlights

MICHAEL DEYOUNG /GETTY IMAGES

1 BOARD THE DENALI STAR TRAIN 2 STAY AT WONDER LAKE OR CAMP DENALI 3 HIKE THE 9.5-MILE TRIPLE LAKES TRAIL 4 TAKE THE MOUNT HEALY OVERLOOK TRAIL 5 BIKE ON PARK ROAD 6 RAFT THE NENANA RIVER

DENALI NATIONAL PARK ENCAPSULATES EVERYTHING THAT IS GREAT ABOUT THE ALASKAN WILDERNESS. Under the sheltering subarctic sky this majestic, 6-million-acre wild kingdom is vast, austere and exhilarating. Here you’ll discover nature in her most raw and at her most fierce. With even the shortest of adventures, you are likely to see bear, moose and caribou. Hovering above it all is the 20,310-foot Denali (above), known as Mount McKinley until a 2015 presidential decree restored its original Athabascan name, which means “The Great One.” This hulking peak is the highest in North America. Wait for a clear day to see the glacier-capped mountain at its best. Whether you plan to sightsee from the Denali Star train, take just a day to head up the Park Road or plan a 10-day tromp across the virgin spaces of tundra, taiga forest, meadows, streams and hillsides that make this park so unique, strap yourself in for an unforgettable adventure. nps.gov/dena

386 miles from Denali

6

hours +

KENAI FJORDS NATIONAL PARK If you love sea life, this is the place for you. Look for Orca, sea otters, whales and dolphins as well as signature bird species, including puffins and bald eagles. nps.gov/kefj

WRANGELL-ST. ELIAS NATIONAL PARK & PRESERVE This is America’s largest national park, covering more than 20,000 square miles of Alaska. It’s part of the world’s largest international protected wilderness. nps .gov/wrst

45

min.

ÿ STAY HERE Camp Denali / ÿ campdenali.com Summer 2016

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// The 3,000-foot sheer vertical drop of remote Toroweap Overlook, on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, creates a dramatic view of the Colorado River below.


GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK / ARIZONA

EXTEND YOUR TRIP 142

miles from Grand Canyon

PARK IN NUMBERS 1,902 SQUARE MILES

2 1/2

NAVAJO NATIONAL MONUMENT Step back in time – to AD 1250, to be precise – when you visit the well-preserved prehistoric cliff dwellings on Navajo land in northern Arizona. nps.gov/nava

hours

area covered

8,800 FEET

highest point (Point Imperial)

2 BILLION YEARS

age of oldest rocks in the canyon

Highlights

203

miles from Grand Canyon THE GRAND CANYON, WITH ITS HYPNOTIC FOLDS OF GOLD AND

THIS PAGE: FRANCESCO RICCARDO IACOMINO/GETTY IMAGES; OPPOSITE PAGE: PIRIYA PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES

RED CLIFFS, its mesas rippling endlessly toward the horizon, is

1 VISIT THE SOUTH RIM AT DAWN 2 HIKE THE BRIGHT ANGEL TRAIL 3 WATCH THE SUNSET AT HOPI POINT 4 TAKE IN THE PANORAMIC VISTAS OF LIPAN POINT 5 CRUISE THE 25-MILE DESERT VIEW DRIVE 6 TAKE A HALF-DAY MULE TRIP ALONG THE RIM 7 RAFT THE COLORADO RIVER 8 HIKE TO HAVASU FALLS (AT RIGHT) 9 SPEND THE NIGHT AT PHANTOM RANCH

one of the earth’s most magnificent wonders. The wild Colorado River has been sawing away at the Arizona landscape for some 6 million years. Along with wind, ice and continental drift, it has slowly cut through the earth, creating the vast chasm we see today. A mile deep, 18 miles wide and 277 miles long, its scope is truly hard to appreciate until you’ve seen it yourself. Come here to hike narrow trails down sandstone cliffs, to raft the roiling waters of the Colorado, to ride a mule through fragrant stands of piñon and sagebrush. Or just come to stand on the rim, camera in hand, marveling at the wonder of it all. Each year some 5 million people from all over the globe visit the Grand Canyon. About 90 percent of them go to the warmer South Rim, with its arid summers, silver falls, snowy fairyland winters and cool blue springs. The higher, colder North Rim is more difficult to access, but is rewarding for its crowd-free trails and silent nights powdered with stars. More far-flung areas are administered by Native American tribes, including the psychedelic blue falls of the Havasupai reservation and the vertiginous glass Skywalk of the Hualapai people. nps.gov/grca

3

hours

337

miles from Grand Canyon

5

hours

PETRIFIED FOREST NATIONAL PARK Time travelers from the Triassic Period, petrified trees now rest comfortably on windswept Arizona grasslands flanked by brilliant badlands and intricate petroglyphs. nps.gov/pefo

SAGUARO NATIONAL PARK The saguaro cactus thrives in its namesake park, where sunbaked trails meander through an Arizona desert wonderland of prickly cacti and wildlife, including roadrunners, gila monsters and javelinas. nps.gov/sagu

ÿ

STAY HERE El Tovar Hotel / Built in 1905 by celebrated architect Charles Whittlesey, this rimside chalet has quite a history. Luminaries from Albert Einstein to Paul McCartney have slept in the limestone and Oregon pine lodge, a National Historic Landmark. Wake to jaw-dropping views. grandcanyonlodges.com

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PARK IN NUMBERS 3,468 SQUARE MILES 300 FEET HIGH the highest geyser, Steamboat 674–839

grizzly bears

YELLOWSTONE IS THE NAME PEOPLE ARE MOST LIKELY TO ASSOCIATE WITH “NATIONAL PARK” – it's the very symbol of the American West. And, for many, to visit the

park is to cross a major item off their bucket list. Few who haven’t visited Yellowstone know how weird it is. It's weird in a good way – a fantastic way – but weird nonetheless. This isn’t all scenic mountains and wildflower meadows. This is fields of burbling mud, cracks in the earth that belch steam and howl, and pastel-blue hot springs that will boil an adult alive in three seconds flat. This is geysers that erupt without warning, sending sulfurous water hundreds of feet in the air. There are also scenic mountains and wildflower meadows – and an amazing, photogenic canyon, some grand glacial lakes and magnificent old park lodges. But first and foremost, Yellowstone is about its geothermal features, in all their bizarre glory. nps.gov/yell

Highlights 1 SEE OLD FAITHFUL 2 DRIVE 142-MILE GRAND LOOP ROAD 3 HIKE THE FAIRY FALLS TRAIL TO GRAND PRISMATIC SPRING 4 KAYAK, SWIM OR FLY-FISH IN YELLOWSTONE LAKE 5 TAKE AN EARLY MORNING DRIVE TO GRAND CANYON OF THE YELLOWSTONE

HERE Old Faithful Inn / ÿ STAY yellowstonenationalparklodges.com

UPON ENTERING YOSEMITE VALLEY, everyone gasps at the panoramas from

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK / CALIFORNIA PARK IN NUMBERS

1,190 SQUARE MILES 1890 year established 2,425 FEET

height of Yosemite Falls

the Tunnel View roadside overlook. Standing above the lush green valley floor carpeted with meadows and a meandering river, you’ll view a scene that’s been 10 million years in the making. On the right, Bridalveil Fall gushes over cliffs, while above it hang the pointed Cathedral Rocks. On the left, El Capitan towers more than 3,000 feet above the valley floor; it’s the largest granite monolith in the world, issuing a siren’s call to rock climbers. Far off in the distance is the curved tooth of the polished granite Half Dome (left), the park’s most famous landmark. Yet all this is only the beginning of Yosemite’s natural wonders. nps.gov/yose

Highlights 1 STROLL TO BRIDALVEIL FALL 2 SEE YOSEMITE FALLS 3 WATCH THE SUNSET FROM GLACIER POINT 4 TAKE AN EARLY MORNING WALK TO MIRROR LAKE 5 TAKE THE MIST TRAIL HIKE

ÿ STAY HERE The Majestic Yosemite Hotel / travelyosemite.com

LONELY PLANET / Spring 2016

THIS PAGE FROM TOP: ANNA GORIN/GETTY IMAGES; SANDY L. KIRKNER/GETTY IMAGES; OPPOSITE PAGE: GAVIN HELLIER/GETTY IMAGES

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK / WYOMING, MONTANA & IDAHO


EXTEND YOUR TRIP

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK / UTAH

133

miles from Arches

PARK IN NUMBERS

2

119.8 8 to 10 INCHES

hours

SQUARE MILES

CAPITOL REEF NATIONAL PARK This geologically diverse stretch of canyon country was once called the Land of the Sleeping Rainbow by its original Native American inhabitants. Chemical reactions to iron in the layers of rock produced the red and green colors. nps.gov/care

annual rainfall

3,577 POUNDS

weight of Balanced Rock

270

miles from Arches

4

hours +

10

BRYCE CANYON NATIONAL PARK The hoodoos – tall thin towers of rock – dot this collection of natural amphitheaters, slot canyons, arches and mesas. Check out the exceptional sunrises at the aptly named Sunrise Point and Inspiration Point. nps.gov/brca

min.

Highlights 1 SEE COURTHOUSE TOWERS & BALANCED ROCK 2 HIKE THE WINDOWS TRAIL 3 WATCH THE SUNSET AT DELICATE ARCH (ABOVE) 4 PADDLE, KAYAK OR CANOE THE COLORADO RIVER 5 HIKE THE FIERY FURNACE 6 SEE LANDSCAPE ARCH 7 VIEW NATIVE AMERICAN PETROGLYPHS 8 CYCLE THE FAMILY-FRIENDLY BAR M LOOP

RED ROCK FORMATIONS RISE FROM THE DESERT IN STRANGE AND HYPNOTIC CLUSTERS, holding your gaze as their colors

and shapes transform on your approach. But it’s the up-close views of the sandstone monoliths that will surprise you most, as you realize just how fragile it all is. Hoodoos crumble before your eyes. Balanced Rock seems to teeter on its stem. And Landscape Arch? This golden span looks hardly more solid than a whisper. An 18-mile scenic drive rolls through this wonderland of rocks, with spur trails providing a closer look. Today, there are more than 2,000 natural stone arches in this high-desert park, where wind, water and geological forces have combined to create the fantastical shapes travelers see today. Author Edward Abbey, a park ranger at Arches in the 1950s, urged visitors to ditch their cars and explore the sandstone wilderness with intensity – an intensity that should cause you, he said, to bleed. Practically speaking, a few blisters here should suffice. nps.gov/arch

FIND DETAILED INFORMATION ON ALL 59 NATIONAL PARKS IN LONELY PLANET’S NEW NATIONAL PARKS OF AMERICA ($29.99).

311

miles from Arches

4

hours +

50

ZION NATIONAL PARK The soaring red rock cliffs of these canyons began as sand dunes more than 200 million years ago. Today, the landscape is home to all sorts of wildlife, ranging from the California condor to the Arizona toad. nps.gov/zion

min.

ÿ

STAY HERE Devils Garden Campground / recreation.gov Summer 2016

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CONCIERGE SECRETS:

EUROPE Hotel concierges know all the local hot spots and hidden destinations. Here, six of Europe’s best share their favorite places to eat, drink, explore and relax. By Sophie McGrath / Portraits by Jake Walters

// Cotton House Hotel in Barcelona, Spain


ROME

GABRIELE SALINI, G-ROUGH

SALINI IS A SEVENTH-GENERATION ROMAN AND THE FOUNDER OF G-ROUGH, A COLLECTION OF STYLISH SUITES ADORNED WITH MODERN ART AND MIDCENTURY FURNITURE IN ARTFULLY DISTRESSED SETTINGS (G-ROUGH.COM). THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY G-ROUGH; JAKE WALTERS; ALBERTO PIZZOLI/GETTY IMAGES; MARTINA MONOPOLI; JAKE WALTERS; ALESSANDRO ROSSETTI; OPPOSITE: COURTESY COTTON HOUSE

HE CONCEIVES OF G-ROUGH AS A HOME AWAY FROM HOME, AND OFFERS GUESTS HIS OWN RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EXPLORING THE ETERNAL CITY.

WHY I LOVE ROME Roma backwards spells “amor,” or love, which sums up the feeling anyone born in Rome has for the city. Personally, I love its architectural mix and beauty, its blue sky, its cultural richness and its easy escapes out to mountains, lakes and the sea. And, of course, it’s the capital city of the most beautiful country in the world. FAVORITE PLACE TO SOAK UP SOME CULTURE Tor Marancia is a suburb of Rome where urban artists have covered dozens of buildings in amazing murals. It’s an attempt to transform an ugly place into a beautiful one, and make the suburbs a more enjoyable place to be. I find it really interesting. FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP SBU is a clothes shop owned by two brothers, Patrizio and Cristiano. I love their jeans; they fit very well and are made in the north of Italy, so the craft and fabric quality are excellent. SBU has a friendly atmosphere and a stylish interior, with a little courtyard where the brothers sometimes serve drinks (sbu.it). FAVORITE FREE EXPERIENCE I love to walk around the city center, enjoying the tangibility of its history and art. It makes the whole city into an open-air museum – while, at the same time, it’s full of the lively choreography of locals, speaking, moving, gesticulating and shouting. FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOOD TO LAZE AWAY AN AFTERNOON Rione Monti is the oldest neighborhood in Rome, just off the Forum on a little hill. It’s also one of the youngest, in spirit: it’s a very creative place with lots of local shops and a real cultural mix, from

Japanese restaurants to piadina (flatbreads) from northern Italy. I often stop for a gourmet sandwich in Tricolore (tricolorepanini.com) and at the Sacripante gallery and bar (sacripante artgallery.com); for dinner, I like Urbana 47, which has a local sourcing policy (urbana47.it). FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT Al Moro is an old-time, traditional restaurant, from the silverware and wood-paneled walls to the way the waiters are dressed and the tables laid. The owner will serve you, host you and tell you about the dishes; there’s a big picture on the wall of his grandfather, who the restaurant is named after. The white truffle with freshly made tagliolini is amazing, and I love to end with some sweet homemade zabaglione with chocolate (ristorante almororoma.eu). FAVORITE EXPERIENCE TO SPLURGE ON IF Experiences offers experiences led by experts: a nighttime visit to a secret museum or archaeological site, entry to a private palace, or, my favorite, a glass of champagne in the bell tower of Sant’Agnese in Agone, a 17th-century church. It’s almost impossible to get the key; I don’t know how they do it. Being in a place so old feels like climbing up into the past (iflm.it). FAVORITE BAR Jerry Thomas is great for a late night. It’s a small speakeasy open until 4 in the morning, where you have to book a table and get the password (which changes often) to be allowed in. Inside is one of the world’s top mixology bars, manned by excellent bar staff; at the moment, I’m partial to their whiskey sour. There’s . . . sometimes live music too (thejerrythomasproject.it).

Clockwise from top: the Sito Room at G-Rough // Sant’Agnese in Agone // Tor Marancia // Jerry Thomas bar // the city center // SBU clothing shop

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BERLIN

TESS WARREN, DAS STUE Hospitality graduate Warren worked in Thailand before joining Das Stue five years ago. She is guest relations manager at the hotel, once the Danish embassy and now grandly redesigned, with striking artwork and a Michelinstarred restaurant (das-stue.com).

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA BREAKFAST KITCHEN; COURTESY OF DAS STU; JAKE WALTERS; JAKE WALTERS; JULIAN NELKEN; JON ARNOLD / AWL IMAGES

WHY I LOVE BERLIN It’s a really creative and fun city. I love its diversity; it’s multicultural and people are very open-minded.

FAVORITE POP-UP Streetfood Thursday is a unique event on Thursday evenings, with street food, drinks and music inside an old market hall in Kreuzberg. The stalls are always changing, but there’s food from all around the world: Vietnamese buns, oysters from Holland, pizza and pasta, and great barbecue dishes, for FAVORITE PLACE TO SOAK UP SOME CULTURE example. I like to try everything. It’s a popular evening and a really Sammlung Boros is a bunker converted into a contemporary art fun place to people-watch (facebook.com/StreetFoodThursday). gallery. The family that bought it had so much art that they STRANGEST decided to store it there, and now they offer private tours, REQUEST showing people around and explaining the works. There are FAVORITE JOURNEY We had to arrange more than 700 pieces – including artworks by Ai Weiwei Taking a boat along the River Spree is nice because you get for a violinist to wake up to see Berlin from a different side. In the summer, I might rent and Alicja Kwade that I really love – and the location is so a guest on his birthday a boat in Treptower Park, where there there’s a lake with a interesting (sammlung-boros.de). with a Lionel Richie song. little island, and you can also head out on the river. It’s a fun place to hang out (sternundkreis.de, rent-a-boat-berlin.com). FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP The streets and courtyards of Hackescher Markt have lots of cool shops featuring Berlin designers and small brands. I go there to buy EVENT I’M MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS YEAR clothes, including good-quality designer vintage pieces. I also love Paper & Lollapalooza [music festival] . . . first came to Berlin last year, when it was Tea, which is a shop that sells stationery, posters and great tea. I always tell held in an old airport – hopefully the location will be as unusual this year. guests to walk around Hackescher Markt and get a bit lost because it’s such The coolest artists play there and I can’t wait to go (lollapaloozade.com). a nice area (hackescher-markt.de). FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT Curry 36 is an imbiss (fast-food counter) that does a very good currywurst, a sausage with curry sauce served with fries or bread. It’s a typical dish here that a lot of people eat – nothing fancy, but it tastes so good (curry36.de). FAVORITE BAR Klunkerkranich is a bar on top of a parking lot that has views over the whole of Berlin – a great place to sit on a summer afternoon, or to watch the sun go down. It’s very informal, with people lounging around on couches, and has great music and a really nice atmosphere. They have all kinds of drinks, but I usually go for gin and tonic or a glass of wine (klunkerkranich.de). FAVORITE PLACE TO GET OVER A HANGOVER I’d head to The California Breakfast Slam for a bloody mary (or two, or three). It’s a casual, American-style breakfast place that does great hangover food. I can never decide what to get, so I’ll have something like eggs Benedict to share and then the pancakes, which are really good (cabslam.com). FAVORITE FREE EXPERIENCE The Sunday karaoke in the Mauerpark is hilarious. Someone started it with a laptop and portable speakers, probably as a joke, and now it’s so popular that people queue up to participate. It’s like a free [American] Idol in the park’s open-air theater, with hundreds of people showing up to watch. Some acts are really good and some are really bad, but funny; it’s completely different every time. I’ve never seen anything else like it (bearpitkaraoke.com).

Clockwise from top left: at California Breakfast Slam // One of the elegantly appointed rooms at Das Stue // Curry 36 // Hackescher Markt // Klunkerkranich // boat along the River Spree

EVERY DAY, I GROW A BIT MORE IN LOVE WITH BERLIN.

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AMSTERDAM WILKO VAN DE VLAG, CANAL HOUSE Born and raised in Amsterdam, Van de Vlag has worked for several of the city’s top hotels during his 30-year career. He is guest relations manager at Canal House, a luxurious property set in 17th-century townhouses on one of Amsterdam’s most beautiful canals (canalhouse.nl).

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WHY I LOVE AMSTERDAM Amsterdam is unlike any other city on Earth. I love the variety of cultures, the beautiful architecture and the exciting events held throughout the year. It’s a 24/7 celebration. And walking along the canals is a unique experience.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF THE BUTCHER; COURTESY OF CANAL HOUSE; JAKE WALTERS; PETER BAAS; MERTEN SNIJDERS/GETTY IMAGES; BOB BRONSHOFF

FAVORITE BREAKFAST SkyLounge is located on a rooftop in the heart of Amsterdam, and has amazing 360-degree views of the city, and comfortable furniture that makes me feel right at home. I love the “12 uurtje” (12 o’clock) spread, with fresh cornbread, Gouda cheese and ham – plus hagelslag (chocolate sprinkles) on the side (skyloungeamsterdam.com).

joints. You need the password to get in; not many people know it, though we have it at the Canal House. It’s a great speakeasy with an easygoing crowd and good, inventive cocktails (the-butcher.com).

FAVORITE MUSIC VENUE I love seeing musicals at the Royal Theatre Carré, one of the DON’T MISS oldest theaters in Amsterdam. It’s an intimate space where There’s a hidden museum the staff really make you feel at ease and take care of in Amsterdam: Our Lord you. It always feels a bit special to step inside (carre.nl). in the Attic, a Catholic church founded during FAVORITE EVENT the Reformation, when The Grachtenfestival features performances of classical worship was in secret. music. For 10 days every year, the city becomes a stage for

FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP The Negen Straatjes (nine little streets) in the Western Canal Ring is full of boutiques, as well as galleries, restaurants and bars. It’s a very pleasant place for a stroll. I go there for clothes and shoes mainly, but also music and little things for my home. The clothes are made differently here than anywhere else in the city, in terms of both fabric and the way they’re cut (de9straatjes.nl).

talented young Dutch musicians (grachtenfestival.nl). FAVORITE WAY TO GET OVER A HANGOVER When I need a pick-me-up, I always visit the Vondelpark or Westerpark. They’re such peaceful places, and the sound of leaves dancing in the wind, birds singing and trickling fountains always lifts my spirits.

FAVORITE PLACE TO SOAK UP SOME CULTURE I love to walk around Tertius, a gallery in downtown Amsterdam that combines contemporary art with a collection of unique objects like vases, chandeliers, tables and chairs handmade by artists. They’re all special. If you buy anything, you know that people will compliment you and ask where it’s from. FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOOD TO LAZE AWAY AN AFTERNOON I was born and raised in Rapenburg, a district of former warehouses on a small canal in the city center, and I always feel at home there. It’s one of the oldest parts of Amsterdam. In the early days, boaters traded goods here. It’s a beautiful, cozy neighborhood where people still hang out of windows to talk to each other, or sit together having tea on the [sidewalk].

Clockwise from top left: at The Butcher // the Great Room at Canal House // the Negen Straatjes // Tertius gallery // Grachtenfestival // Royal Theatre CarrŽ

FAVORITE PLACE TO RELAX The Flevopark is a park in east Amsterdam on the edge of a huge lake. I like to sit by the shore, watching boats drift past and listening to the waves. In the city center I’m always busy, but there I can be in my own world, thinking and watching the world go by (flevopark.nl). FAVORITE RESTAURANT FOR A SPECIAL OCCASION La Rive is a Michelin-starred restaurant on the Amstel River with incredible views, especially in the moonlight. It’s classy and stylish, with attentive staff and great French- and Mediterranean-inspired food. I always go for the tournedos steak, which melts in your mouth (restaurantlarive.nl). FAVORITE BAR The Butcher is a cocktail bar hidden behind one of the city’s hottest burger

IT’S A LIVELY CITY WHERE ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING CAN HAPPEN.

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BARCELONA

ALFREDO MARTÍNEZ, COTTON HOUSE HOTEL

MARTÍNEZ IS CHIEF CONCIERGE AT THE COTTON HOUSE HOTEL, WHICH OCCUPIES A 19TH-CENTURY MERCHANT BUILDING THAT’S A STUDY IN COLONIAL-STYLE GRANDEUR (HOTELCOTTONHOUSE.COM). MARTÍNEZ WAS RECENTLY NAMED ONE OF SPAIN’S TOP CHIEF CONCIERGES BY THE PRESTIGIOUS LES

WHY I LOVE BARCELONA There are so many reasons. The food is fantastic, the weather is great, and it’s a cosmopolitan city where you can meet people from all corners of the world. There are beautiful beaches, a rich history and superb modern architecture, plus some of the best restaurants and wine on the entire planet. I also love how walkable it is – you can get anywhere in 20 minutes. FAVORITE BREAKFAST Café Jaime Beriestain is a restaurant and bar inside the designer’s concept store. It’s a fantastic space, decorated with the shop’s chic furniture and homeware, and there’s a terrace which is great for breakfast on a sunny day. I don’t think there’s anywhere else like it. The food is healthy and delicious: fish, salads, bocadillos (baguette sandwiches) and egg dishes, made with quality produce. I’m a fan of the eggs Benedict (berie stain.com).

Clockwise from top left: the lobby lounge at the Cotton House Hotel // Disfrutar // Bó de B // El Born // at Café Jaime Beriestain // the Fabra Observatory at Tibidabo mountain

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FAVORITE RESTAURANT FOR A SPECIAL OCCASION Disfrutar is a beautiful, minimalist restaurant that uses the latest techniques in its molecular gastronomy-inspired dishes. It was recently awarded a Michelin star. When I last went, the menu had 28 courses; as soon as I finished one, the brilliant wait staff would bring another. All [the courses] looked stylish and tasted delicious – especially the pesto ravioli and crispy egg with mushroom. Disfrutar means “enjoy,” and you will (disfrutar barcelona.com). FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOOD TO LAZE AWAY AN AFTERNOON I love Gràcia, where I live. It’s a neighborhood, just outside the city center, that was once an independent town, and it’s full of beautiful old buildings. There are quiet plazas and terraces where you can have a coffee or read a book, and little local shops sell everything you might need. Though it’s only a 20-minute walk from the city center, it’s beyond the tourists and traffic.

FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP El Born is a fashionable neighborhood where lots of shops have recently become ateliers for new designers. Instead of the usual brands, you’ll find unique pieces from Catalonia, like beautiful shoes or bags made from recycled leaflets. It’s a good place to find something one-of-a-kind; I buy a lot of gifts there.

FAVORITE MUSIC VENUE Entering the Bluesman Cocktail Bar feels like going back in time. Decorated like a ’20s cabaret bar, it’s an intimate place with only about 10 tables, inside a historic hotel. Every night there’s a different genre, from rock to jazz or blues (hotel palacebarcelona.com).

FAVORITE PLACE TO RELAX Tibidabo mountain has beautiful views over the city. I like to go and watch the sun set there, or from the abandoned Spanish Civil War bunkers at its foot. I also love the Parc del Laberint d’Horta, a historic park that’s a beautiful place to get away from everything. It has an impressive maze, too – I’ve never found the center!

FAVORITE PLACE TO GET OVER A HANGOVER I’ll meet my friends at the tiny hole-in-the-wall Bóde B, grab a bocadillo de jamón [a ham sandwich] and sit by the dock in Barceloneta. It’s a great place to people-watch, play sports or simply enjoy the view. We’ll walk along the beach, where street artists perform, and grab a few drinks at a beach bar (facebook.com/bodeBCN).

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF COTTON HOUSE; FRANCESC GUILLAMET; JAKE WALTERS; JAKE WALTERS; MATHIAS MARTIN; JORG GREUEL/GETTY IMAGES

CLEFS D’OR CONCIERGES ASSOCIATION.


LONDON

AMY CUNNINGHAM, MONDRIAN LONDON AT SEA CONTAINERS

CUNNINGHAM HAS WORKED AT FIVE-STAR MONDRIAN LONDON AT SEA CONTAINERS SINCE IT OPENED IN 2014. LOCATED ON THE SOUTH BANK, THE ’20SINSPIRED HOTEL HAS ONE-OF-A-KIND PIECES OF FURNITURE, SCULPTURE AND PHOTOGRAPHY, AND GLORIOUS VIEWS OVER THE RIVER THAMES, PARTICU-

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF MONDRIAN LONDON AT SEA CONTAINERS; COURTESY OF 214 BERMONDSEY; MARC BRENNER; JAKE WALTERS; ©IWM; JAKE WALTERS

LARLY FROM ITS TOP-FLOOR BAR (MONDRIANLONDON.COM).

WHY I LOVE LONDON It’s always changing, from the buildings to the people. You never quite know what you’re going to see. And it’s so diverse. It’s a unique city. FAVORITE BREAKFAST On weekend mornings you’ll see people queuing outside Milk, a tiny café in Balham, near where I live in south London. It feels a bit like a farmhouse, with wooden tables and wallpaper you might see in your grandma’s house, and they make everything from scratch. I really like the homey atmosphere (milk.london). FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP I love the vintage market stalls and shops of Camden Passage in north London. There’s a real range of things, from jewelry and bric-a-brac to cute tea sets, and there’s a book market on Thursdays and Fridays. It’s great for gifts; I find quirky things I couldn’t get at other markets (camdenpassageislington.co.uk). FAVORITE PLACE TO SOAK UP SOME CULTURE The Imperial War Museum goes through the years from WWI onward with artifacts, video, photographs and art – and it’s free (iwm.org.uk). I also like the Menier Chocolate Factory, a small venue where a lot of independent plays start off before moving to the West End, if they do well (menierchocolatefactory.com). FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOOD TO LAZE AWAY AN AFTERNOON Marylebone feels more like a country town than a place in London. It has lots of independent shops and is very quiet. The houses are gorgeous too; I’d live there if I could. Though it’s right by busy Oxford Street, it’s not at all touristy. I could happily

spend a day exploring. It’s also right next to Regent’s Park, with its beautiful rose garden. FAVORITE PLACE TO RELAX On a sunny day, I love to go to Richmond Park. It’s one of the biggest parks in London, and, with its deer, it feels like you’re in the countryside. It’s elevated, so you can look out over the city skyline to St. Paul’s [and skyscrapers] the Shard and the Gherkin (royalparks.org.uk). FAVORITE BAR 214 Bermondsey is a small underground bar with a focus on gin. I like how hidden it is. There are hardly any signs, and you wouldn’t know it was there. Inside, it’s dimly lit, with flickering candles, brick walls and a tiny bar. I often get A History of Violets, with gin, violet and prosecco; it’s really good (214-bermondsey.co.uk). FAVORITE FREE EXPERIENCE Brockwell Lido is a pool in the middle of a beautiful park, with a great café that has been around since the 1920s. London gets so hot and sticky in the summer, and it’s really nice to have a place where you can chill out and almost feel like you’re abroad. You’ll see all types of people, from old couples sitting watching, to families with their children. It suits everyone (fusion-lifestyle .com/centres/Brockwell_Lido). FAVORITE JOURNEY ACROSS THE CITY I like to take the MBNA Thames Clipper boat from Westminster Pier to Greenwich. It’s a regular service, like a river taxi, but going under Tower Bridge is so stunning that I almost feel like I’m a rock star on my own little private boat. I like that . . . everyone can share some of London’s most iconic views (thamesclippers.com).

Clockwise from top left: a standard room at Mondrian London // at 214 Bermondsey // Menier Chocolate Factory // Camden Passage // Imperial War Museum // at Milk

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PARIS

JEAN-CLAUDE ELGAIRE, MAMA SHELTER

Elgaire is a former president of Les Clefs d’Or who has worked as a concierge in Paris for more than 50 years. He has headed the team at Mama Shelter since the hotel opened in 2008. Designed by Philippe Starck, the hotel, in an arty quarter of east Paris, is full of playful touches (mamashelter.com).

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: FRANCIS AMIAND, COURTESY OF MAMA SHELTER; COURTESY OF EXPERIMENTAL COCKTAIL CLUB; COURTESY OF LES DEUX MAGOTS ; LOIC VENANCE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; STUDIO SEBERT; LAURENCE MOUTON

WHY I LOVE PARIS It’s the most beautiful city in the world. Everybody who comes to Paris falls in love with it. And there’s its romance, its ambience, its rich history – including the world’s biggest museum, the Louvre.

Guy Savoy has been nominated as one of the world’s best chefs, and the restaurant is a dream. Everything is beautiful and luxurious . . . and the food and wine are wonderful. I’d go every day if I could (guysavoy.com).

FAVORITE BAR FAVORITE BREAKFAST I like to go to the Experimental Cocktail Club, a small bar with brick I love Paris’s traditional, old-fashioned cafés – other places just walls and timber beams, where the people are nice and the DON’T MISS don’t have the same character. Les Deux Magots on the Left cocktails are beautiful. You can find classic cocktails in any In the summer, there Bank is a beautiful café with an interior just as it was at bar, but here they’re always making new ones for guests to are free film screenings in the beginning of the last century. They haven’t changed try. They’ll have 15 or 20 to choose from on any given day. I city parks. Two of the best anything, and they don’t want to, because that’s the love to discover new drinks. For me, that’s the charm of the are the Cinéma au Clair soul of the place. I like to have a tartine au beurre (butcocktail (experimentalevents.com). de Lune festival and tered baguette) and a white or black coffee – I’ll dip the Cinéma en Plein Air in FAVORITE MUSIC VENUE tartine in the coffee, the French way! It’s delicious. When La Villette. La Flèche d’Or is a small, charming venue in an old railway stathe weather is good, I’ll eat at one of the tables outside, in front of the church of Saint-Germain-des-Prés (lesdeuxmagots.fr). tion in east Paris. A lot of new bands who are starting out play there. Because they’re not professional yet, they work hard to make you happy, and are often very good. I love discovering new sounds and listening to FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP performers who bring so much energy (flechedor.fr). The Marché d’Aligre near the Bastille is one of the biggest and best outdoor markets in Paris. It has lots of beautiful produce that’s not too expensive. I love buying fruit there, especially apples; there are so many types from all around France, sold in little apple carts like you’d find 100 years ago. But I can find anything I want here (marchedaligre.free.fr). For clothes, I go to Saint-Germain-des-Prés, where there are hundreds of boutiques and traditional service – staff love to help and have time to talk. There are also shops selling beautiful antiques – expensive, but the best in Paris. I’m happy just to look at them. FAVORITE PLACE TO SOAK UP SOME CULTURE The Musée Jacquemart-André is a small museum in a 19th-century mansion that’s full of art and antique pieces, from Renaissance sculpture to French paintings. It’s not as well known as the Louvre or Musée d’Orsay, but it’s very beautiful, holds lots of excellent exhibitions, and has a lovely salon de thé (tea room). You can spend a few very relaxed hours there (musee -jacquemart-andre.com). FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOOD TO LAZE AWAY AN AFTERNOON The Île de la Cité is the island in the Seine where Notre-Dame is located, and one of the most charming places in Paris. It’s best discovered simply by wandering among its old buildings, restaurants and cafés. I like to linger by the riverside, where there are bouquinistes – little shops selling books and old magazines – and locals resting in chairs, and stop and chat for a while; people are always pleased to talk. I’ve been exploring the area for a very long time, and every time it’s different. FAVORITE RESTAURANT FOR A SPECIAL OCCASION If I want to have a really pleasurable evening, I’ll go to Guy Savoy, a threeMichelin-starred restaurant in the new Hôtel des Monnaies on the Left Bank.

EVERYBODY WHO COMES TO PARIS FALLS IN LOVE WITH IT.

Clockwise from top left: the bar at Mama Shelter // at Experimental Cocktail Club // Les Deux Magots // Marché d’Aligre // Musée JacquemartAndré // at Guy Savoy

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ESCAPE TO YOUR OWN VERSION OF PARADISE AT SOME OF OUR FAVORITE ISLANDS WORLDWIDE, FROM THE COAST OF NEW ENGLAND TO THE BALTIC SEA.

find your PERFECT

ISLAND

for culture / CHILOƒ, CHILE Chiloé, it’s often said, is an island whose character was inherited from surrounding seas rather than from the Chilean mainland Ð be it through the fishermen who set out on foggy mornings to bring home a catch to make curanto (seafood and meat steam-cooked over hot rocks) or the Magellanic and Humboldt penguins that squint out to sea from the western coast. The architecture in this blustery, green land looks like nothing else in South America. In Chiloé you’ll see palafitos (stilt houses) in Castro (pictured) and other villages, as well as World Heritage-listed churches built entirely from timber, which creaks sonorously in the Pacific wind. Among the latter are the church of San Francisco de Castro, painted mustard yellow and purple, and the more sober 18th-century Santa Maria de Loreto, held together by wooden pegs.

TIP The 106,000-acre Chiloé National Park teems with wildlife, from 110 different types of birds, to foxes and the reclusive pudú (the world’s smallest deer), which inhabits the shadowy forests of the contorted tepú tree.


MICHAEL RUNKEL/GETTY IMAGES


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ISLAND

for doing absolutely nothing / CAYE CAULKER, BELIZE “No Shirt, No Shoes . . . No Problem.” You’ll see this sign everywhere in Belize, but in no place is it more apt than on Caye Caulker. Indeed,

TIP Caye Caulker is a great home base for some of the best snorkeling in the world. The excellent spots in the area include Hol Chan and Shark Ray Alley, accessible by one of the many tour operators that line Front Street.

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nothing seems to be a problem on this tiny island, where the only traffic sign instructs golf carts and bicycles to “go slow,” a directive that’s taken seriously. The island has long been a budget traveler’s favorite, but in recent years tourists of all ages and incomes have begun to appreciate its unique atmosphere. There are no hassles; instead, just white sandy beaches, balmy breezes, fresh seafood, azure waters and a fantastic barrier reef right at its doorstep. All visitors should be sure to schedule in plenty of time for swinging in a hammock and enjoying the breeze (which is a legitimate activity here).

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for a taste of New England / BLOCK ISLAND, RHODE ISLAND This New England island’s attractions are simple. Stretching for several miles to the north of Old Harbor is a lovely beach. Bike or hike around the rural, rolling farmland, pausing to admire lighthouses (including Southeast Lighthouse, pictured) or the many species of birds that inhabit the island. With a population of just 1,050, Block

Island is a great alternative to more popular spots Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard; local places such as Oar, where you can have the delightful combo of sushi and sailboat watching on the lawn, will liven you up when you feel like you’re about to fall into total coastal Zen.

TIP The most popular way to reach Block Island is via one of the ferries that run from locations in Connecticut, Rhode Island and New York. blockislandferry.com and goblockisland.com


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ISLAND

for legends / MLJET, CROATIA For anyone following coast roads south through Croatia, Mljet represents the grand finale – one last big island before the Dalmatian Archipelago fades out into the Adriatic Sea. It’s a case of saving the

TIP Head to the north end of the island to enter the verdant Mljet National Park, which is only accessible via foot or bicycle. You can buy admission tickets in the villages of Pomena and Polače for about $15 a person. mljet.hr

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best until last, with Mljet – home to just 1,100 people – being one of the most untouched islands in the Mediterranean: all tumbledown terra-cotta-roofed villages (such as Prožurska Luka), quiet stone wharves and low-slung hills forested with Aleppo pine. It’s equally perfect whether you board one of the sailboats that bob beside limestone rocks or cycle along the solitary road that wriggles its way across the interior. Explorers from both sea and land can visit Odysseus's Cave (shown here) – a sea tunnel rumored to be the spot where the Greek hero was imprisoned by the nymph Calypso, and into which brave swimmers set out on their own mini-odysseys.

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for a party / BORACAY, PHILIPPINES Despite being one of the smaller islands in the archipelago, Boracay is the Philippine island that makes the most noise, stays up latest and has the groggiest voice in the morning. The epicenter of the party is White Beach (pictured), a 2.5-mile strip of soft white sand that has – over a few decades – morphed from a laid-back hippie hangout to an energetic nightlife capital of Southeast Asia, with countless bars beneath the seafront palms. There’s plenty to keep hungover souls busy too: try the easy climb to the viewing deck atop Mount Luho (more of a hill, really) for views out to the neighboring islands of Carabao and Tablas, or charter a ride on a paraw – a type of outrigger sailboat that sweeps gracefully along the island’s shore.

TIP There is no commercial airport on Boracay; travelers fly into nearby Caticlan or Kalibo and connect via boat. There are multiple flights per day from Manila on Cebu Pacific and Philippine Airlines.


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ISLAND

for atmosphere / SANTORINI, GREECE Few volcanic eruptions have adjusted geography for the better like the blast that shook Santorini more than three millennia ago, an

TIP Lodgings in Fira, Santorini’s main town, can be pricey. Expect to pay for a view. If you don’t mind walking into Fira, try accommodations in Firostefani and Imergovigli instead.

THIS PAGE: ARTIE PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES

explosion that turned a single island into a curious chunk of land shaped like a broken Life Saver. What stands today is a place unlike any other: windmills, churches and whitewashed houses cascading down cliffs that were once the rim of a mighty volcano, blue sea having long since replaced bubbling magma below. Vacations in Santorini follow an established routine: idling on beaches of red volcanic sand, rambling the alleyways of hilltop villages (such as Oia, seen here), and visiting the crumbling ruins of Akrotiri – an outpost of the Minoan civilization until it was destroyed by said eruption around 1620 BC. All, however, are but a prelude to the daily drama of watching the setting sun shimmering in the waters of the Southern Aegean, from a balcony high on the cliffs.


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for sailing / UNION ISLAND, ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES As proven by the swaying masts offshore, Union Island is among the best-loved anchorages in the Caribbean, the harbor backed by colorful corrugated-iron huts under green hills. Scan the vessels for the distinctive silhouette of Scaramouche, a schooner that found fame appearing in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies. Channel Jack Sparrow by hopping aboard for a day trip to the lovely Tobago Cays (pictured), five uninhabited isles where snorkelers can walk the plank (or just jump off the boat) to spot parrotfish and sea turtles among the coral.

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TIP The best beach is at Richmond Bay, a little more than half a mile north of the small port town of Clifton.

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ISLAND


for explorers / BAFFIN ISLAND, CANADA Baffin Island represents Canada’s Arctic frontier at its wildest – vertiginous peaks, creeping glaciers, frozen plains where winter temperatures routinely sink lower than 20 below zero, and a coastline where tiny Inuit villages huddle against cliffs facing out over the ice floes. The most spectacular corner of this 195,928-square-mile island is remote Auyuittuq National Park, where you'll find yourself in the company of caribou, wolves and bears. Be sure to travel with a seasoned guide, lest you experience the park from within the confines of a polar bear’s stomach.

TIP Based at Camp Dorset Suites, Huit Huit Tours on Baffin Island offers day trips, multiday dog-sled adventures and summertime excursions focusing on wildlife and culture. capedorsetours.com


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ISLAND

GO FARTHER / The Dry Tortugas National Park is a boat ride away. Try the Yankee Freedom III, where the $175 round-trip gets you breakfast, lunch, snorkeling gear and a 45-minute tour of the fort. drytortugas.com

for nature / MADAGASCAR There is no African destination with weirder, more consistently wondrous wildlife than Madagascar. The island detached from the mainland 160 million years ago and ever since has been perfecting some of the planet’s most distinct and sublime natural spectacles, from strangely bulbous baobab trees to fingernail-size chameleons. The lemurs are the headline attraction, however. For an easy introduction to this family of primates (one species seen here), visit Andasibe-Mantadia National Park, and keep your eyes peeled to spot sifakas – lemurs that skip sideways along the forest floor – while keeping your ears tuned to catch the call of the indri, a lemur close to extinction, whose song sounds like a police siren.

TIP The Andasibe Hotel has the best double rooms around, with knockout views of a verdant rice paddy. Located on a jungle lake, the hotel offers many activities as well. Doubles from $65; andasibehotel-resto.com


for food / BORNHOLM, DENMARK Although located closer to Poland, Sweden and Germany than to Denmark, Bornholm is emphatically Danish, with woods out of

THIS PAGE: MARIE LOUISE MUNKEGAARD; OPPOSITE PAGE: FREDERIC CIROU/GETTY IMAGES

TIP Bornholm is a 35-minute flight from Copenhagen on Danish Transport Air; Delta and Norwegian Airlines both have direct flight options to Copenhagen from the States.

a Hans Christian Andersen story, a castle worthy of Hamlet and a growing reputation for “new Nordic” food. The pioneer is Kadeau (pictured), a restaurant where foraged ingredients become high-concept dishes, such as oysters with hemp wrapped in a kale leaf. If you’ve space left, book a seaside table at elegant Le Port or try heartier food, such as cured herring, at Nordbornholms Røgeri, a traditional smokehouse.

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JOURNEY TO SOUTHERN AFRICA FOR UNIQUE ENCOUNTERS WITH WILDLIFE ALONG THE SHORES OF

Zimb THE ZAMBEZI.

// VICTORIA FALLS, IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ZAMBEZI RIVER at the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe, is considered the world’s largest waterfall. The water level peaks in April, at the end of rainy season, when more than 130 million gallons flow over the edge per minute, causing an explosion of spray that can be seen from 30 miles away. Here, bathers on the Zambian side sit at the lip of the falls, in a basin known as the Devil’s Pool.

By Amanda Canning / Photographs by Jonathan Gregson

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In 1958, anyone peering through a pair of binoculars from the crest of Bumi Hills might have been distracted by the sight of a bare-chested man in a floppy hat attempting to strap an elephant to a wooden raft. Rupert Fothergill was chief game ranger of what was then Rhodesia, now northern Zimbabwe, and charged with relocating wildlife stranded by the rising waters of the newly created Lake Kariba. Grainy footage of the time shows him contending with a number of irregular predicaments: shoulder-deep in water and clutching a wriggling, rabbit-like hyrax in his arms; casually attempting to shoo away a rhino with a wave of his hat; and hoisting a bedraggled baboon by its shoulders into a boat. By the time “Operation Noah” wound down in 1964, Fothergill and his team had saved more than 6,000 animals. Today, from the vantage point of Bumi, Kariba looks more like a sea than a lake. On the shore, small herds of elephant, buffalo and hippo graze on the jewel-bright grass. Straight ahead, the crumpled, gray hills of Zambia are just visible, but there’s nothing but water to the horizon, left and right; the weekly car ferry that traces a steady line through the waves east to west will take a full 24 hours to complete its journey. More than 50 years since it was created, Kariba remains the world’s largest manmade lake. And yet it is seen by some as a temporary blip, one likely to disappear before too long. 76

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CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT // From

his canoe on a channel of the Zambezi River in Mana Pools National Park, Cloud Magondo scans the landscape for hippos. // At Mana Pools, you’re guaranteed to see plenty of wildlife, including hippos, crocodiles, zebras and elephants. // Hwange National Park – Zimbabwe's largest protected area – is home to one of the world's largest elephant populations; an estimated 30,000 are found at the park.

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u

In the mythology of the region’s Tonga people, the Zambezi, one of Africa’s largest rivers, is home to the river god Nyami Nyami. A giant dragon, with the body of a serpent and the head of a fish, Nyami Nyami provides for the Tonga when times are hard. In 1957 and 1958, Zimbabwe suffered the worst floods it had seen in recorded history, twice sweeping away the wall being built to create Lake Kariba. Nyami Nyami is angry, said the Tonga; he does not want the dam. Sightings of a 650-foot-long beast weaving through the lake are still reported in the local papers, and the region’s earthquakes are attributed to the monster crashing against the dam, attempting to reach his wife stranded on the other side. Local guide Student Muroyiwa grew up with these stories. Wearing a crisply ironed shirt and safari shorts – clothes with which Fothergill would be well familiar – he steers his boat among the treetops. Their blackened branches poking out of the water like macabre fingers, the trees are all that remain of a mopane forest that once carpeted the Kariba Gorge, lost when the Zambezi was dammed. Cormorants settle on their branches, taking to the air only to dip suddenly beneath the surface, while swallows fresh from their summer breaks in Europe snatch up insects above it. Muroyiwa points to an island named after the last human to leave the valley as the waters rose around him. “Mola believed in Nyami Nyami and he knew he didn’t want the dam. ‘There’s no way the water will get to my doorstep,’ said Mola. But the water started coming and coming and it came right into his house,” explains Muroyiwa. “In the end, he just got into his canoe and paddled away.” Muroyiwa’s mother, Unarie, was another who left when the lake was formed, walking 12 miles inland to the resettlement village that was to be the Tongas’ new home. She sits in the shade of her mud-brick house, its roof thatched with bluegrass. Tin pots dry in the sun outside. Tomatoes, sweet potatoes, okra and maize grow in the small plots tended by her family. At the edge of their cluster of huts, a lookout tower stands empty; as soon as night falls, one of her grandchildren will climb up and keep watch for marauding lions, hyenas and elephants. “I am too old to go to the lake now,” Unarie says, “but my life in the old village was perfect. I never saw Nyami Nyami but I would be more than happy if he wanted to break the wall.” Until that day comes, all must adapt to the damming of the Zambezi. A hundred miles downstream from Kariba, the river continues its journey to the Indian Ocean in a thick, languid swirl. From the floodplain spring groves of broad, oaklike Faidherbia albida trees, giving the region a strangely familiar look. Were it not for the zebra snuffling beneath the branches, one might imagine oneself to be in any nature park on a golden summer’s day. Cloud Magondo started his training as a wildlife guide in Bumi Hills before moving here, to Mana Pools National Park, one of Zimbabwe’s four UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Fixing his “I ♥ Jesus” baseball cap to his head, he climbs into a canoe and slides off from the bank. A blacksmith lapwing rises from its nest in the water hyacinth and makes its hostility known in a frenzy of furious twittering. The eyes and ears of a hippopotamus surface. Magondo whacks the side of the canoe with his paddle. “You don’t want to give a 3-ton animal a surprise,” he says. “If he runs at you, you won’t outrun him. All that is left is fragments.” The hippo rises and starts to power through the narrow channel toward us, a crest of water surging in front of him. A few nervous seconds pass, waiting for him to plunge beneath the boat and launch us skyward to join the lapwing – but the hippo runs straight past. “Now we just need to worry

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AT HWANGE NATIONAL PARK, lions can be found at any time of day resting by watering holes. At night their deep roars reverberate throughout the park’s camps. // LEFT: Hwange National Park is one of the best spots for giraffe watching. The largest male giraffes can exceed 18 feet in height and weigh up to 4,250 pounds; females top out at just under 15 feet and around 2,600 pounds.

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// ELEPHANTS GATHER AT

the water’s edge to drink. An elephant has more than 40,000 muscles in its trunk; it takes a baby elephant about a year to master its use.


b about the crocodiles,” Magondo says, with the smile of a man who greatly enjoys winding up those less accustomed to African wildlife than he is. The boat is abandoned in the hunt for Mana Pools’ most famous resident. Magondo creeps through the undergrowth, stepping over bright red flowers fallen from sausage trees, and stopping to admire a green-spotted bush snake curled around a branch. Impala look up from their grazing, and then buck away in alarm. A muscular eland bull stands his ground for longer, before stalking haughtily into the bushes. “We have found him,” Magondo says, crouching down. “Look, there is Boswell.” Ahead, an elephant as old as Lake Kariba, his tusks stretching far beyond his giant skull, stands beneath a Faidherbia, gently swaying. His trunk reaches for the seedpods hanging in the canopy above him, his back arches, and he hoists himself into the air. For six seconds he balances on his back two legs, like a dog begging, and pulls down the branches. Boswell and a few others like him in the area are thought to be the only elephants in the world to stand like this; it’s only in the last 30 years that they have been observed doing so. One theory is that Faidherbia trees have been in decline since the damming of the Zambezi upset the park’s ecosystem, and competition for their pods is fierce. “Boswell is smart,” Magondo whispers as the animal scoops the coiled red pods into his mouth with his trunk. “He realized to survive you have to be the elephant that can reach higher than anyone else.”

Boswell is not the only elephant to have changed its behavior in recent years. In the western stretches of Zimbabwe, far from the banks of the Zambezi, lies Hwange National Park. In the thick of dry season, little vegetation sprouts from the scraggly thorn bushes anchored in soil blown in from the Kalahari Desert. There is no river god to come to the rescue in times of need, but Hwange has not been abandoned. The spirit of Fothergill lives on. “Do you hear that?” asks Adam Jones, an apprentice guide, bringing his Jeep to a stop. The steady put-put-put of a water pump beats through the still air. “You’re listening to the heartbeat of the park.” Hwange’s first boreholes were drilled back in the 1930s, keeping the region’s pools artificially topped up when the rains fail. The park’s animals now associate the sound of the pumps with the promise of water. A short drive along a bumpy track reveals a plain dotted with gray lumps. They are on the move. From all over the plains, elephants come, bustling over the dusty ground in a giddy trot, trunks flailing wildly. At the water hole, they drink, splash in the shallows, roll in the mud and chase crocodiles, baboons and each other, tooting happily. The routes that lead to the water holes are ones that have been used by elephants for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. They form distinctive paths through the bush. Humans follow them now too, many behind the reassuring figure of Julian Brookstein, rifle slung over his shoulder, mirror shades pushed back on his head. “If you’re ever lost out here,” he says, “follow the elephant trails. They’ll always lead to water.” We are not the only ones to pass this way: fresh cheetah, hyena and porcupine tracks keep us company on the path, and tiny klipspringer antelope dart from the granite hills poking out of the dusty soil. We pass the full skeleton of an old bull elephant, its long tusks lying in the muddle of bones – a rare sight today, when elephants continue to be illegally slaughtered for their ivory tusks. “Where an elephant dies, so lies his ivory,” Brookstein says, pausing to examine the remains. “It’s a romantic idea now, sadly.” Brookstein has had plenty of encounters with live elephants, and most

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CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT // Large herds of animals, including zebra, migrate to Mana Pools National Park in the dry season. // At Mana Pools, several pools formed by the winding Zambezi are scattered along the river’s course. // Elephants and other animals at Hwange National Park rely on dozens of man-made watering holes.

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a other wildlife, in the six years he’s been a professional walking guide. He has yet to fire a shot from his rifle in defense. “Ninety percent of an encounter is how you act,” he explains. “These animals are used to things running away from them; they’re programmed to chase. They back away if you walk toward them.” It may be the least instinctive thing to do when confronted with a 7-ton mass of muscle and bone, but Julian’s point is soon proved.

A 50-year-bull-old elephant, unfathomably large from ground level, takes exception to our presence and charges at us, huge ears flapping as he gathers speed. Brookstein keeps walking toward him, shouting, waving his arms and kicking up dust. The elephant gets within a few yards, stops, looks a little unsure, and finally turns tail, departing with an indignant snort. “A lion is a little different [from] an elephant,” Brookstein says as we clamber back into the Jeep. “He’ll growl to let you know you’ve come close enough, as if to say, ‘Stay where you are and we’ll stay friends.’” It’s good to know, for Hwange is home to many lions. Their deep, bass calls reverberate through the canvas walls of our tents at night, and they are an ever-present decoration around the camp. At any time of the day, they can be found resting by a nearby water hole, watching with indifference as giraffes cautiously make their way down to drink; keeping an eye on young cubs that tumble over one another and leap on their parents; and flopped in the little shade offered by a termite mound. There is a new addition too: a recently arrived young male who’s wise enough to keep well out of the way of the local pride. He has found himself a spot to hide and keep out of trouble, his yellow eyes constantly scanning his surroundings for danger. “He’s well aware he’s in another lion’s territory," says Jones. “He would have heard the others roaring all night. He must be scared.” Perhaps the young lion will pluck up the courage to stay and fight the dominant male for his patch. Given his nervous disposition, it seems more likely he’ll move on, padding slowly across the bush, past the water holes with their constant stuttering soundtrack, and beyond, looking for a territory where he can start a pride of his own. One lion from Hwange was recently tracked by researchers all the way to Victoria Falls, some 120 miles away. It is difficult to imagine a landscape less like that of Hwange. The waterfall, the world’s largest curtain of falling water and one of the planet’s greatest natural wonders, makes its presence known from far across the bush. First comes a faint rumbling, like rush-hour traffic on a distant highway, audible from miles away; then, a low gray cloud comes into view, squatting on the horizon. The full force of Mosi-oa-Tunya (“the smoke that thunders”), to give the falls their rather more apt indigenous name, becomes apparent when the plains suddenly fall away. From the rim, the Zambezi plunges 355 feet, hitting the ground so hard it creates a mist that rises a quarter of a mile through the air, like rain that has decided to fall upward. Visitors who wind their way along the paths that skirt the falls are soon drenched by spray. Others sit in pools right at the waterfall’s edge or fling themselves off the Victoria Falls Bridge with a length of bungee rope tied to their feet, in foolhardy defiance of all accepted rules of self-preservation. Peering into the gorge ripped through the earth, there is no sign of the bottom, just a boiling whirl of clouds, speared by a series of rainbows. If Nyami Nyami were to choose a lair from which to plot a final attack on Kariba Dam, it would be here, coiled in the chasm. One day he will rise and reclaim his river. It is only a matter of time before he breaks through.

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Make it happen Zimbabwe

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The Victoria Falls River Lodge is in Victoria Falls National Park, a 20-minute drive from Victoria Falls International Airport, the closest airport for this itinerary (from $420 per person, including meals and activities; victoriafallsriverlodge.com). The lodge sits on the banks of the Zambezi, with giraffes, hippos and elephants passing through camp. Accommodation is in huge, luxurious, thatched tents, with large beds, wooden flooring, private decks, baths with a view, and outdoor showers. An alternative to flying to Victoria Falls is to fly to Harare, Zimbabwe's capital, a 1-hour flight, or about a 9-hour drive, from the lodge. Hop on the shuttle bus to UNESCO-listed Victoria Falls ($29; victo riafallstourism.org). Allow at least two hours to walk the length of the falls; to swim in Devil’s Pool, right on the edge of the falls, you’ll need to cross to Livingstone Island on the Zambian side. For a unique perspective, take to the skies with the Zambezi Helicopter Company (zambezihelicopters.com). A 15-minute flight costs $150 per person; a 30-minute flight that takes in the falls and the national park costs $284 per person. It’s off to Hwange National Park. The flight from Victoria Falls takes about 45 minutes ($310; safari-logistics.com). The staff at Camp Hwange can arrange pick-up from here (from $410 per person including all fees, meals and activities; camp-hwange.com). The drive to the camp, deep in the park, is an adventure in itself, taking you past water holes where herds of elephants gather. Its beautifully appointed tents face a water hole, so you can view wildlife from your veranda and fall asleep listening to lions roaring in the darkness. Guides have unrivaled knowledge of the region’s flora and fauna, and the focus is on getting you out among it as often as possible, including on walking safaris. Next is Mana Pools National Park, on a short flight with Safari Logistics (from $512). This is the place to see Zimbabwe’s famously unique balancing elephants, which stand on their back legs to grab seed pods in the acacia trees. Zambezi Life Styles is a friendly camp on the banks of the river. Wildlife often passes right by the tents (two-night minimum stay; from $477 per person, per night, including fees, meals and activities; africanbushcamps.com). Don’t miss the chance to go out on a canoe on the Zambezi, drifting past hippos as you go. Your final stop brings you to an entirely different landscape: Lake Kariba. The huge man-made lake is home to a petrified forest and islands with wildlife, stranded when the area was flooded. Bumi Hills is perched on a hill overlooking the lake, and the hippos, antelopes and elephants that crowd its shores (from $380 per person, including all meals and activities; bumihills.com). The views from the pool, bar and restaurant are terrific. Highlights here are sunset cruises on the lake, and shoreside drinks by the fire at sunset. From Kariba, it’s a one-hour flight to Victoria Falls, and your flight home.


Map Key 1 Harare 2 Hwange National Park 3 Lake Kariba 4 Livingstone 5 Mana Pools National Park 6 Victoria Falls

Hotels 1 Bumi Hills Safari Lodge 2 Camp Hwange 3 Victoria Falls River Lodge 4 Zambezi Life Styles

THINGS TO KNOW

FLIGHT TIMES From NYC

From ATLANTA

19

24

HOURS

HOURS

WHEN TO GO // Wildlife viewing is at its best during the dry season of May to October, when animals congregate around watering holes, but Zimbabwe is otherwise a year-round destination. The rainy season lasts from December to February.

LODGING // Bumi Hills Safari Lodge

Camp Hwange

Victoria Falls River Lodge

Zambezi Life Styles

FOR MORE INFORMATION Zimbabwe is featured in Lonely Planet’s Southern Africa guidebook ($34.99); the country chapter can be downloaded ($4.95) at lonelyplanet.com. TRAVEL ADVICE // The economic and political situation in Zimbabwe can be unstable; keep

up to date via the U.S. Department of State’s website, travel.state.gov. Summer 2016

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This is something you set out to do once in a lifetime. Until youre compelled to do it again. Discovering your Maine Thing begins begins here. VisitMaine.com


great escape QUEBEC

Indulge in distinctive cuisine and explore wild landscapes in Canada’s French-speaking province.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP/ ESTOCK LEFT: © HUBER/SIME PHOTO

BY JOHN A. VLAHIDES

// A bakery in Montreal, Quebec. From irresistible patisseries and magnificent food markets reminiscent of Paris to English pubs and hipster bars, Montreal has one of the most exciting food scenes in North America. Summer 2016 / LONELY PLANET

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1

Domestic and international airlines land at Montreal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport, about 12 miles west of downtown.

Montreal CULINARY CAPITAL

Experience the city’s culinary renaissance, from full-tobursting local-produce markets to acclaimed Quebecois and fusion fare. Shafts of sunlight stream through the domed roof, illuminating row upon row of stalls splashed with color. Fruit sellers fuss around tables of neatly stacked produce while florists peek through gaps between hanging baskets and potted plants. Around these, vendors sell anything from local delicacy tourtière (a traditional meat pie) to steaming, chocolate-coated crêpes and freshly shucked oysters. Aromas of fresh herbs, pungent cheeses and maple sugar merge. This is Marché Jean-Talon (Jean-Talon Market), Montreal’s largest market, trading since the 1930s. Its open-wall concrete arcades house some 300 vendors, mostly local farmers. It is open year-round, but comes into its own in spring and summer when the variety of produce is bewildering: 15 types of peppers at the fresh peppers vendor, and a dozen types of mushroom at another specialist stall. Everywhere are tiny signs indicating the distance from city to farm: most are fewer than 50 miles. It’s no wonder that many Montreal chefs brag about shopping here. “Farm-to-fork” is a familiar refrain, but the concept is a radical shift for Montreal, where until recently nearly all food was mass-produced. The change came in the ’80s with the arrival of a wave of immigrants from the likes of Greece, Spain and North Africa who brought new styles of cooking. Now Montreal is Canada’s most multicultural city and its emergent culinary style is gathering momentum. 88

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ESSENTIALS For More Information marchespublics-mtl.com, hotelherman.com Where to Eat Adjacent to downtown’s Marché Atwater, EVOO combines Irish tradition and French-Quebecois technique in dishes such as beef cheek with braised cabbage and fingerling potatoes (main courses from $19; restaurantevoo.com). Where to Stay Located by Chinatown, near old Montreal, Zero1 is a contemporary hotel with 163 rooms and suites featuring picture windows and small kitchen areas (from $93; zero1-mtl.com).

“It’s a young scene,” says local food writer Mayssam Samaha, who emigrated from Lebanon as a child. “Montreal has two schools of cuisine. The old style is heavy, meaty, rustic; and then there’s this new, more dainty style, focused on the local ingredients you find at the markets.” Hotel Herman is a restaurant that typifies the new approach. Set in the heart of the Mile End neighborhood, it has an industrial-chic feel with exposed brick walls and unpolished wood floors. Owner Dominic Goyet is hands-on in the extreme, crafting the repurposed wood-topped tables himself and establishing close links with local farmers. His kitchen staff not only kneads the bread but also churns the butter. “We bring the leftover bread to Mr. Petit, the goat farmer, and he feeds it to his goats,” says Goyet. “Then he brings us the milk, so we can make our cheese. It’s a cycle.” His menu is remarkable for its simplicity and adventurousness. “We concentrate on the ingredients, trying to use maybe just three on each plate, so you can taste their flavors,” he says. Venison tartare comes with an emulsion flavored by hay and burnt onion dust, no less. A simple tomato salad features locally foraged lobster mushrooms and cheese from the milk of Mr. Petit’s goats. The laid-back atmosphere is as striking as the menu. As we dine, a local celebrity chef arrives for dinner on his night off. He is greeted warmly, but with little fanfare. “Even the fussiest restaurants aren’t fussy,” says Samaha, “which is probably why Montreal doesn’t have any Michelin stars. But who cares? We have really good food now, and it’s going in a great direction.”


Clockwise from far left: Chicken liver mousse with apricot, cranberry and walnut soda bread at EVOO // Hotel Herman’s bar // mushrooms for sale at Marché Jean-Talon // fruit and vegetables

CLOCKWISE FROM TOPTOM LEFT:ROBINSON PHOTOGRAPHS:

at the market

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Clockwise from top: La Mauricie National Park’s landscape has been shaped by the passing of glaciers, creating a multitude of lakes. // A canoe is the preferred way to explore the park. // André Dominique paddles Lac du Fou.

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2

It’s about 116 miles from Montreal to La Mauricie National Park. Drive northeast on Autoroute 40 to Trois-Rivières, then head north on Autoroute 55/Route 155, exiting to the park’s main entrance at Saint-Jean-des-Piles, near Grand-Mère.

La Mauricie uricie

National Park P THE GREAT OUTDOORS

PHOTOGRAPHS: TOM ROBINSON

Hop into a canoe and keep your eyes peeled for native wildlife, from dam-building beavers and scavenging black bears to the elusive moose. “Can you believe I’ve never left Quebec?” asks André Dominique, silver hair spilling from beneath his billed cap. “That’s because I haven’t finished exploring my own territory. It’s so big, I don’t think a lifetime is long enough.” Clasping the prow of our canoe and moving with a nimbleness that belies his mature years, he leads the way through the still-dark forest, frost-coated leaves crunching underfoot. By the shore of Lac du Fou, the sky is brightening. Mist hovers over the lake, its glassy surface mirroring pines silhouetted by the emerging sun. The landscape does feel immense, and ancient – the Precambrian rock here in La Mauricie National Park is among the oldest on Earth. Once the height of the Himalayas, the Laurentian Mountains eroded down to nubs, low rounded hills densely wooded with sugar maple, birch and pine. This expanse teems with wildlife, including bear, beaver, otter and moose. Between the hills lies a network of lakes, some so long that Native Americans used them as highways, plying the water in birch-bark canoes. Today, canoes remain the preferred means of exploring the park, and the fastest way to penetrate nature. It’s hard to believe that this remote wilderness, measuring some 200 square miles, is just two hours from Montreal. Just off shore, the woods seem to grow louder. The rattat-tat-tat of a distant woodpecker echoes across the lake. Mists swirl like evanescing ghosts in the morning light.

ESSENTIALS For More Information Visit refugedutrappeur .com for accommodation and activity options in La Mauricie National Park. Where to Stay & Eat Presiding over 17 square miles of forest, a short drive from the perimeter of the national park, Hotel Sacacomie, a striking, log cabin-style hotel, has simply decorated rooms, some with lake views and open fireplaces. In lieu of televisions, a wide range of activities are available, including bear spotting, seaplane tours and kayaking excursions (from about $150; sacacomie.com).

A beaver swims past, branch in mouth, en route to a lodge near shore. Then, a single loon – the park’s mascot – alights beside us in a hissing of rippling water. “Try to remain silent and keep ears and eyes open,” Dominique says. Pointing to a spot on the bank from which the sound of snapping branches and rustling leaves echoes, the guide brings his finger to his lips. “A moose,” he says, with a hint of apology. “I’m sure of it.” There’s little disappointment – canoeing this wilderness on a frosty morning is its own reward. Black bears are common here, but equally elusive. The nutrient-rich nuts of the beech trees that grow in abundance keep the bears fat, healthy and numerous; around the hiking and cycling trails that dissect this protected area, it’s not uncommon to see the tree trunks lacerated by claw marks. Most of these animals will avoid confrontation – a small mercy since the males grow every year that they’re alive and can live 20 years; 500 pounds is not an unusual weight. The sun ascends higher and now the lake sparkles with a flickering white light. We’ve still yet to see a soul, or anything man-made. The handful of lodges where visitors to La Mauricie stay are restricted to the periphery of the park. Within its confines there’s just a small number of isolated camping sites. Nearing the shore, Dominique pauses. “You know, everything we see on Earth we call our mother,” he says. “It’s our way of being thankful for every minute that we get to spend in such magnificent beauty.” After hauling the canoes back on to the shore, he returns alone to the lake’s edge to undertake a ritual. He stoops to splash his face with water, then stands tall and shouts across the water: “Merci le lac. Merci la mère.” His voice echoes back at him from the forested fringes. “We do this to thank the lake,” he says. “To thank Mother Earth.” Summer 2016 / LONELY PLANET

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3

Return to Grand-Mère and head north on Route 155, joining Route 170 at Lac Saint-Jean toward Alma. From Grand-Mère, it’s roughly 160 miles to Lac Saint-Jean.

Lac Saint-J Saint-Jean SCENIC CYCLING

Motorists crossing the nondescript flats between Chicoutimi and Lac Saint-Jean may wonder if the area is popular among Quebecois for quasi-political reasons alone. The region touts itself as the heartland of Quebec nationalism. However, upon reaching the lake, there is a subtle beauty to this open area where the meeting of sky and water is interrupted only by pale wooden houses and shining church spires. The 160-miles of cycling trails around Lac Saint-Jean combine to form the Blueberry Bike Trail. The name alone brings to mind a gentle, two-wheeled meander, handlebar-mounted basket filling steadily with ripe fruit. The reality is a cycle path circumnavigating a lake so large that its opposite shore is visible only on the very clearest of days. Today isn’t one of them. The wind howls, clouds coalesce and great sheets of rain begin to fall. Bernard Parent is used to this. As president of the cycling club of Roberval, one of the dozen or so small settlements that line the lake, he’s all too familiar with the changeable weather in these parts. It’s simply a case of seeking shelter in a café or lodge within pedaling distance and sitting it out. The owners certainly won’t complain. “It’s part of our culture to host people,” Parent says, tucking into a slice of blueberry pie. “We’re like that ’round here. And there’s definitely no need to lock your bike.” 92

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ESSENTIALS For More Information veloroute-bleuets.qc.ca Where to Stay & Eat Built in the early 1900s as a company town for an adjacent pulp mill, ValJalbert historic village, at the foot of the Ouiatchouan Falls and 5 miles north of the town of Chambord, has been reinvented as a heritage village with costumed guides and incongruously refined guestrooms (from $298; valjalbert.com).

The Véloroute des Bleuets is certainly aptly named: blueberries are a principle product of this part of the Laurentian Highlands and they appear everywhere, popping up in liquors and chocolate bars, flavoring syrups and adorning buildings and T-shirts. The fruit is as much a point of civic pride in this French-speaking corner of Quebec as is the separatist movement. True to form, the clouds begin to break before coffees and pies have been finished. Through the window, the nearly 400-square-mile expanse of Lac Saint-Jean is bathed in sunshine. Back in the saddle, Parent takes the lead, the pace as leisurely as the gradient. In the perfect antidote to dicey, ill-defined urban bike lanes, the route is paved throughout, with lanes for passing and markers warning of hazards or changes in terrain. Meadows slope to the water’s edge, which is framed in places by slivers of driftwood-scattered sand backed by pines. Cheese factories, microbreweries and century-old properties from the region’s fur-trading heyday pass by. In a woodland stretch, a family rests in a picnic spot, map and pastries from a village boulangerie laid out on their makeshift table. “You don’t have to worry about getting lost. You don’t have to worry about cars,” says Parent, emerging from the woods and freewheeling a gentle descent. “What you sense here is total peace of mind.”

PHOTOGRAPHS: TOM ROBINSON

Pedal your way along a picturesque, peaceful shoreline, stopping off to relax and indulge in local beers, cheeses and blueberry pie.


Above: Circumnavigating Lac Saint-Jean, the Blueberry Bike Trail passes 15 lakeside towns. Below: the former pulp mill at Ouiatchouan Falls in

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

Val-Jalbert


The whale watching in Tadoussac is especially good between August and October. The salt water of the Atlantic mixing with the fresh water of the Saguenay Fjord makes the St. Lawrence River the perfect feeding ground for numerous cetacean species.

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From Chambord, it’s 131 miles to Tadoussac. Join Autoroute 70 eastward to Saguenay, continuing on Route 172 to Tadoussac.

Tadoussac adoussac WHALE WATCHING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: © SIME / ESTOCK PHOTO, TOM ROBINSON, BRUCE YUANYUE BI/GETTY IMAGES

Head out to the waters of the mighty St. Lawrence River to spot an abundance of migrating minke, fin, sperm, beluga and blue whales. “Là-bas! Là-bas!” No translation is required – the captain’s urgent pointing leaves no doubt about the meaning. He cuts the Zodiac’s motor and the inflatable boat comes to a standstill, all eyes trained on the murky gray water to the east. A hiss and a pillar of spray, like the smoke from a small campfire, rises from the surface. Then another. The noise is rasping and rhythmic – the telltale blow of a humpback. The dorsal fin appears as the creature arches its back and slides below the surface. There’s a pause, and then the tail fin breaches the water, its size hinting at the gargantuan bulk slipping beneath. “That’s Tic-Tac-Toe,” says the captain, raising his voice above the cheers. “You can tell by the white underside of her tail and the markings.” It’s a rousing reception, but such a sight is not uncommon in this stretch of the St. Lawrence. The river moves an astonishing one quarter of the world’s freshwater supply, from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic. Off Tadoussac, the now-brackish water intersects with the Saguenay Fjord, a 60-mile-long freshwater river, draining algae-rich snowmelt. Algae feed the zooplankton, which feed the krill, which in turn draw the whales. In addition to the highly migratory humpbacks, which travel thousands of miles each year, minke, fin, sperm, beluga and blue whales all converge here for one of nature’s more voluminous all-you-can-eat buffets.

ESSENTIALS For More Information parcmarin.qc.ca Where to Eat Set in a small cottage aglow with candlelight, chef-owned Chez Mathilde features a changing menu showcasing seasonal ingredients, (Main courses from $18, 227 Rue des Pionniers, 418-235-4443).

Where to Stay Built 150 years ago, rambling Hotel Tadoussac is gorgeously placed on the St. Lawrence River, with two dining rooms and a bar overlooking sprawling lawns by the water. Open early May to late October (from $115; hoteltadoussac .com).

The 20-passenger Zodiac throbs back into life and cuts a line through the water. It’s balmy on land, but just a few degrees out very cold on the water. Fog obscures the far bank of the 15-mile-wide mouth of the Saguenay. “There are only two techniques for spotting whales,” the captain says. “Eyes and ears. It’s often so foggy that we can’t see another boat. So we go to a spot, cut the engine and wait.” Getting lucky on the return to shore, a fin whale appears. Such is its length – this one is estimated to be 66 feet long – it appears slender as it moves through the water. Its trick is to swim in tight circles, corralling the krill together. “They’re so fast, we call them the greyhounds of the seas,” says the captain as he sets a course for home. Through the mist, the fjord appears, thousand-foot-high rock walls rising on both sides of the gaping river mouth. Whale watching is not just a seaborne activity. Departing from the visitors center at nearby Cap de BonDésir, ranger Valerie Busque leads the way along a wooded path down to the sea’s edge. “Because of the steep drop, you can watch whales swim right to your feet – if you’re patient,” she says. Busque advises bringing a sandwich. As we scan the horizon, she says, “People always ask me what time the whales arrive, and I tell them, ‘You just have to wait and watch.’” Summer 2016 / LONELY PLANET

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Make it Happen / Quebec

Flight Times From Chicago From Los Angeles

2 HOURS

about

5

HOURS

Quebec’s main airport is Montreal– Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport, in Montreal. Quebec City Jean Lesage International Airport is another option. Trains // From the U.S., Amtrack trains run once daily between Montreal and New York City (amtrak.com). VIA Rail has fast and frequent service along the Quebec City– Windsor corridor, via Montreal, and services the South Shore and Gaspesie (viarail.ca). Car // Continental U.S. highways link directly with their Canadian counterparts at numerous border crossings. These roads connect to the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 40 within Quebec), which runs directly through Montreal and Quebec City. It’s a good idea to rent a car for exploring the wider province.

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FRENCH IN QUEBEC THE KNOW-HOW

English and French are the two official languages of Canada, but in Quebec the preservation of French is a primary concern. Outside Montreal and Quebec City, English can be hard to find, and road signs and visitor information will often be in French only. Quebec settlers were relatively cut off from France once they arrived in the new world, so the French you hear today in the province, known colloquially as Quebecois, developed more or less independently. The result is a rich local vocabulary, with its own idioms and sayings. Quebecers learn standard French in school, hear standard French on the news and grow up on movies and music from France, so if you speak French from France, locals will have no difficulty understanding you.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Lonely Planet’s Montreal & Quebec City ($21.99) focuses on the two cities, while Canada ($27.99) has a chapter on Quebec province; individual chapters can be downloaded at lonelyplanet.com ($4.95).


postcards

WHERE YOU’VE BEEN AND WHAT YOU’VE SEEN

NORMANDY, FRANCE Heavenward At the end of 2015, I spent one month traveling in France. One morning, I woke up before sunrise and hopped on a bus from Paris to Normandy to see Mont Saint-Michel, an abbey and monastery that sits atop an island commune. There is a magical point just before you reach the final destination, when Mont Saint-Michel comes into view, and it takes your breath away.

Andrew Webb is a web developer based in Boston, Massachusetts.

Send your best new travel photos (at 300 dpi), – along with the stories behind them (in 100 words or less), a photo of yourself, and a onesentence bio – to postcards @lonelyplanet.com.


postcards HAVANA, CUBA Wind & Light

Much of Havana seems frozen in time, but, especially with the influx of American tourists, new development is happening. Dick Kinler, of Arlington, Texas, spent a week photographing Havana.

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COLCA CANYON, PERU Color Pop We were traveling for a long time on this particular day. The landscape was incredible; every twist and turn on the mountain road revealed something new. Traditionally dressed locals sold their produce on the roadside, and the colors of their clothing stood in stark contrast to the grays and greens of the mountains. I thought the children holding lollipops were adorable in their bright clothes, and they had pet llamas on leashes.

Olivia Thomas is a high school English teacher.

JAIPUR, INDIA Doors of Perception As soon as I was led into the courtyard of Pritam Niwas Chowk at the City Palace by my guide, my eyes popped with wonder. I tried not to blink in order to take in the beauty that surrounded me. The vibrancy of the place was breathtaking. I loved this particular gate, the Southwest Lotus Gate, with its flamboyant colors. Even now when I think about that courtyard, I can almost smell the rose petals that were scattered all around.

Srishti Lal visited Jaipur during the Hindu festival of Dussehra.

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postcards BHAKTAPUR, NEPAL Purple Pose

Brian Cox hopes to turn his passion for photography into a career.

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Bhaktapur (Place of Devotees) is 8 miles east of Kathmandu; its population is mostly made up of Newars, who have their own distinct language.


mini guides 6 TEAR-OUT


Welcome to a World of Good

The time of your life, now 10% closer Travel changes people, and people change the world. Travel with G Adventures and discover your planet, make new friends, and earn memories you’ll remember for the rest of your life. Book before July 31, 2016 and save 10% off* any G Adventures small-group adventure tour. Quote promo code 16TB010DES01 when you book.

1 888 800 4100 gadventures.com Receive 10% off per person on guaranteed departures of select small-group tours as follows: Tour must be booked by July 31st, 2016 at 00:00 EST for the G Adventures’ tour portion of select trip codes departing before December 31st 2016. Valid for new bookings only and must quote promo code 16TB010DES01 at time of booking. Bookings must be made by calling G Adventures, visiting gadventures.com, or by booking through Lonely Planet. This promotion is only open to residents of the United States. Cannot be combined with any other offers, promotions or discounts and is subject to availability. Does not apply to MS Expedition, National Geographic Journeys with G Adventures, Cruising the Galapagos, SPIT tour, FIT, Independent trips, pre- or post-tour accommodation, insurance, airfare not included in the itinerary, upgrades, add-ons, “My Own Room” or “My Own Tent,” transfers, theme packs, or other in-country or on-board services. G Adventures reserves the right to withdraw this offer from sale at any time without prior notice. Any refunds made with respect to products booked under this promotion shall be issued at the discounted rate. G Adventures reserves the right to cancel any booking due to unauthorized, altered, ineligible, or fraudulent use of discount. G Adventures is not responsible for technical or system errors that may interfere with or otherwise prohibit the use of the promotion. All G Adventures’ tours are subject to G Adventures’ full booking conditions, found here: gadventures.com/terms-conditions-policies/


Sailboats on the Charles River

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Art MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

First opened in 1876, this is one of the world’s top art museums. Its superb permanent collection of some 500,000 works includes musical instruments from across the globe, jewelry, fashion, textiles, photography and ancient artifacts. A focal point of the museum is the four-story Americas wing, with 53 galleries (mfa.org; 465 Huntington Ave; 10am–4:45pm Sat–Tue, 10am–9:45pm Wed–Fri; $25).

MINI GUIDE

Culture in Boston Boston was once dubbed the Athens of America, and its arts scene continues to thrive, with top-notch galleries, opera, a symphony orchestra and experimental theater.

Tear out page here then fold along dotted lines

SYMPHONY HALL

INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART

The Gardner is filled with more than 2,500 priceless objects, primarily European, including outstanding tapestries and Italian Renaissance and 17th-century Dutch paintings. The four-story greenhouse courtyard is a masterpiece and a tranquil oasis that alone is worth the price of admission (gardnermuseum.org; 280 The Fenway; 11am–5pm Wed– Mon, until 9pm Thu; $15).

A work of art itself, the ICA is housed in a glass structure cantilevered over a waterside plaza. Within the vast interior are cuttingedge exhibits and a permanent collection showcasing the likes of graffiti artist Shepard Fairey, sculptor Tara Donovan and photographer Boris Mikhailov (icaboston.org; 100 Northern Ave; 10am–5pm, until 9pm Thu–Fri, closed Mon except certain holidays; $15).

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COMEDY

LIZARD LOUNGE

Near-perfect acoustics match the ambitious programs of the worldrenowned Boston Symphony Orchestra, which performs in 116year-old Symphony Hall, one of the world’s top concert halls and the first designed with acoustical principles in mind. In the summer, the Boston Pops Orchestra takes over, sometimes fronted by pop stars (bso.org; 301 Massachusetts Ave.; tickets from $30, and many events are free).

ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM

Stage

Music Boston’s best small music venue is popular for its jazz and rock bands, Sunday night poetry slam and Monday open-mic challenge. The bar stocks excellent New England draft beers, which are complemented by the sweet-potato fries. It’s located below the Cambridge Common restaurant (lizardlounge club.com; 1667 Massachusetts Ave.; see website for changing opening hours; tickets from $5).

Mickalene Thomas’s Monet’s Salon at the ICA

The Boston Symphony Orchestra performs at the Symphony Hall. WALLY’S CAFÉ

When Wally’s Café opened in 1947, Barbadian immigrant Joseph Walcott became the first African American to own a nightclub in New England. It still attracts a diverse crowd to hear jazz music. It’s the kind of place where someone will recognize a well-known out-of-town musician in the crowd and convince them to get up on stage and play (wallyscafe.com; 427 Massachusetts Ave.; 9pm–1:30am Mon–Sun; free).

The third floor of Hong Kong, a noodle house, is where you’ll find the low-budget Comedy Studio. It has a reputation for hosting cutting-edge acts and is where new talents refine their racy material. Each night has a different theme; on Tuesdays you can usually see a magic show (thecomedystudio .com; 1238 Massachusetts Ave.; show 8pm Tue–Sun; tickets from $10). PERFORMING ARTS

The Citi Performing Arts Center comprises two facing theaters. The opulent and enormous Wang Theatre, built in 1925, has one of the largest stages in the country. It hosts extravagant music and modern dance productions and presents giant-screen movies. Across the street, the more intimate Shubert Theatre hosts musical theater (citicenter.org; 270 Tremont St.; tickets from $25).

Boston comedian Ryan Douglass performs at the Comedy Studio. THEATER

The Boston Center for the Arts serves as a nexus for excellent small theater productions. Each year 20-odd companies present more than 45 separate shows, from comedies and drama to modern dance and musicals. The BCA occupies a complex made up of several buildings, including a cyclorama from 1884 built to display panoramic paintings (bcaonline.org; 539 Tremont St.; tickets from $10).

TURN OVER FOR MAP AND NUMBER LOCATIONS

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MINI GUIDE Culture in Boston

Essentials

WHERE TO STAY

Housed in a granite building in the historic Charlestown Navy Yard, The Constitution Inn is an excellent, affordable hotel. Rooms are modern and decorated with plain cherry furniture; some have kitchenettes (constitutioninn.org; 150 3rd Ave.; from $100).

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Sleeping

The Know-How

GETTING THERE & AROUND

Downtown Boston is about 4 miles from Logan International Airport; reach it on the Silver Line bus (free to downtown, $2.65 to return; mbta .com), or take a shuttle bus (Route Nos. 22, 33 or 55; free) to the Blue Line T station called Airport, then get the T (subway; $2.65) or the water taxi to the waterfront district ($12; bostonharborcruises.com). The T is useful for the sights; a day pass with unlimited travel on subway, bus or water shuttle costs $12. Alternative airports are Manchester Airport in New Hampshire and T.F. Green Airport in Rhode Island.

Sights

Dating from 1851, the Liberty Hotel building was once a prison.

The Newbury Guest House offers a prime location in the heart of Newbury Street in Back Bay. The 32 modern rooms are spread among three historic brownstones and include charming features, such as in-room fireplaces (newburyguest house.com; 261 Newbury St.; from $159 including breakfast). The luxurious Liberty Hotel’s lobby soars under a 90-foot ceiling, and guest rooms have floor-toceiling windows with amazing views of the Charles River and Beacon Hill (starwoodhotels.com; 215 Charles St.; from $227).

READ ALL ABOUT IT

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Harvard Square has long been famous for its independent bookstores. The best include:

Discover more of Boston with Lonely Planet’s Guides app (lonely planet.com/guides), featuring offline maps, essential information and must-see sites curated by on-theground experts. Lonely Planet’s Boston ($19.99) is a comprehensive guide to the city. For lots of useful, up-to-date info for Boston visitors, go to cityofboston.gov/visitors.

• Grolier Poetry Bookshop. Founded in 1927, Grolier is America’s oldest – and perhaps most famous – poetry bookshop (grolierpoetrybookshop.org). • Harvard Book Store. The university community’s favorite place to browse since 1932, the store today boasts its own book-making robot (harvard.com). • Raven Used Books. This store’s 15,000 books focus on scholarly and literary titles, selling at discounts of up to 80 percent (ravencambridge.com). • Schoenhof’s Foreign Books. Since 1856, Schoenhof’s has been providing Boston’s foreign-language-speaking literati with reading material in a remarkable 700 languages (schoenhofs.com).

COMPILED BY NATALIE MILLMAN, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM MARA VORHEES. PHOTOGRAPHS: MASSIMO BORCHI/SIME/4CORNERS, THE COMEDY STUDIO, GLOW IMAGES/ALAMY, STU ROSNER, LISA VOLL PHOTOGRAPHY

Entertainment


Start exploring the Old Town from Castle Square.

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Central Warsaw PALACE OF CULTURE & SCIENCE

This “gift of friendship” from the Soviet Union, built between 1952 and 1955, remains Poland’s tallest building. It’s home to a huge congress hall, three theaters and a multiplex cinema, but the best feature is the viewing terrace: on a clear day the Mazovian plains are laid out before you (pkin.pl; Plac Defilad 1; 9am–8pm; viewing terrace $5). UL PRÓZNA

MINI GUIDE

Historic Warsaw Poland’s capital was gloriously restored after being flattened in World War II. From the World Heritage-listed Old Town to the former Jewish ghetto, the city’s past is integral to its modern-day identity.

Old Town & Around

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OLD TOWN SQUARE

The partially walled Old Town is centered on Old Town Square, which, for those with an eye for historic buildings, is the loveliest in Warsaw. It’s lined with tall houses exhibiting a blend of Renaissance and baroque, with Gothic and neoclassical elements; most were reconstructed after WWII. An 1855 statue of the Warsaw Mermaid (Syrena), the symbol of Warsaw, occupies the center of the square.

TOMB OF THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER

Inside the Saxon Garden, the remnants of the Saxon Palace shelter the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The big event is the changing of the guard that takes place every Sunday at noon. Wander around the gardens, which date from the early 18th century and feature baroque statues and an ornamental lake (Ogród Saski; gardens open 24 hours; free).

Greater Warsaw

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MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF POLISH JEWS

ROYAL CASTLE

The castle’s history dates to the 14th century, when the Great Tower was built. This massive brick edifice had its heyday in the mid-1600s, when its grand baroque apartments were created. Highlights include the Great Assembly Hall, restored to its 18th-century decor of dazzling gilded stucco and golden columns (zamek-krolewski.pl; Castle Square 4; see website for changing seasonal opening hours; tour $6, free on Sun).

This short street leading off Plac Grzybowski, opposite the Jewish Theatre, is an eerie survivor of WWII. Its crumbling red-brick facades, the ornamental stucco long since ripped away by bomb blasts, are still pockmarked with shrapnel scars. A few blocks to the south, in the courtyard of an apartment block at ul Sienna 55, is one of the few surviving fragments of the wall that surrounded the Jewish ghetto.

Remnants of Saxon Palace shelter the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

The 16th-century-style Marble Room within the Royal Castle ST. JOHN’S ARCHCATHEDRAL

This is one of Warsaw’s oldest churches, built in the early 14th century, and remodeled several times. Razed during WWII, it regained its Gothic shape through postwar reconstruction. Look for the red-marble Renaissance tomb of the last dukes of Mazovia in the right-hand aisle (ul Świętojańska 8; 10am–1pm & 3pm–6pm Mon–Sat, 3pm–6pm Sun; free).

This 43,000-square-foot multimedia education center, opened in 2013, is home to cultural activities including temporary exhibitions, workshops, concerts and theatrical productions. The permanent exhibition charts the 1,000-year history of the Polish Jews (jewishmuseum.org.pl; ul Anielewicza 6; 10am–6pm Wed–Mon; events priced individually). WARSAW RISING MUSEUM

This modern museum is housed in a beautifully restored red-brick power station. It traces the history of the 1944 Uprising against Nazi occupation through three levels of interactive displays, photographs, film archives and the personal accounts of those who survived (warsawtour.pl; 1944.pl; ul Grzybowska 79; 10am–6pm Fri– Mon & Wed, until 8pm Thu; $4.50, free on Sun).

Synagogue ceiling in the Museum of the History of Polish Jews ŁAZIENKI PARK

This park is a beautiful place of manicured greens and wild areas. Once a hunting ground attached to Ujazdów Castle, Łazienki was transformed into a splendid park, complete with a palace. Today its popularity extends to families, proud peacocks, red squirrels and fans of classical music, who come for the alfresco Chopin concerts (lazienki -krolewskie.pl; ul Agrykola 1; dawnsunset, concerts mid-May–Sep; free).

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MINI GUIDE Historic Warsaw

Essentials

The Know-How

GETTING THERE & AROUND

Warsaw Chopin Airport, Warsaw’s main airport, is 6 miles south of the city; it handles most domestic and international flights. WarsawModlin Mazovia Airport, 25 miles to the north, handles budget carriers. Regular trains and buses, as well as taxis, run from both airports to the center of town. You’ll want to make use of the city’s extensive tram, bus and metro lines, which all use the same ticketing system ($6.50 for a weekend ticket valid from 7pm Fri to 8am Mon). Taxis are readily available and not overly expensive. WHERE TO STAY

Campanile Varsovie is a modern place in central Warsaw. The rooms are light and comfortable, with a pale-yellow stucco effect on the walls and a desk area placed to take in views across the city (campanile.com; ul Towarowa 2; from $100).

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Sleeping

WARSAW RISING

EXPERT TIP

By the end of WWII, just 15 percent of Warsaw’s buildings were left standing. A huge regeneration operation followed:

Warsaw’s restaurant and entertainment scene is the best in Poland. You can dine well and affordably here on cuisines from around the world, and take your choice of lively bars and clubs. Some of our favorites: Warszawa Wschodnia (gessler.sohofactory .pl) in the Soho Factory complex, serving a modern interpretation of Polish cuisine and French classics; Restauracja Polka (restauracja polka.pl), serving traditional Polish food in Old Town; and Charlotte (bistrocharlotte.pl), a dazzling French bakery and bistro facing Plac Zbawiciela.

• Between 1949 and 1963, work The “Tree” room at the Castle Inn features artwork on the walls .

Castle Inn is in a 17th-century tenement building in the Old Town. Rooms overlook either St. John’s Archcathedral or Castle Square, and come in a range of styles, including “Alice in Wonderland” and “Orient Express” (castleinn.pl; Swietojanska 2; from $110). Hotel Bristol, in Old Town, is touted as Poland’s most luxurious hotel. Its neoclassical facade conceals original art nouveau features and huge rooms that are both traditional and homey (hotelbristolwarsaw.pl; Krakowskie Przedmiescie 42/44; from $188).

was concentrated on the Old Town, aiming to return it to its 17th- and 18th-century appearance. So complete was the restoration that in 1980 UNESCO granted the Old Town World Heritage status. • Reconstruction of the Royal Castle (below) started in 1971, and by 1984 the splendid baroque castle stood again as if nothing had happened. • The Soviet legacy is less impressive, the city center becoming a blend of bunker-like Stalinist structures and dull edifices. • Since 1989, steel-and-glass towers have begun to break up the cityscape’s monotony and the outskirts are steadily filling up with pretty houses.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Lonely Planet’s Poland ($24.99) has a chapter on Warsaw, which is also available to download at lonelyplanet.com ($4.95).

COMPILED BY NATALIE MILLMAN, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM MARK BAKER. PHOTOGRAPHS: SHUTTERSTOCK, STOCK CONNECTION/SUPERSTOCK, M BRONARSKI, MAGDA STAROWIEYSKA/MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF POLISH JEWS, TRAVELPHOTO, DAN HERRICK/GETTY IMAGES

Sights


Madrid’s Gran Vía, also known as the street that never sleeps

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Plaza Mayor & Royal Madrid PLAZA MAYOR

The monumental heart of the city, the Plaza Mayor was completed in 1619 by Juan Gómez de Mora. It’s built in typical Herrerian style, with slate spires, geometric precision, simplicity and sparse decoration. Ochre-hued apartments with wrought-iron balconies and 17th-century frescoes overlook the plaza, the site of bullfights and executions during the Spanish Inquisition. PALACIO REAL

MINI GUIDE

Architecture in Madrid From the heart of the old city to the showpiece architecture, Madrid rivals Paris, Rome and Barcelona for the breadth of its monuments. Start your tour in Paseo del Prado, a beautiful boulevard lined with museums and gardens.

PARQUE DEL BUEN RETIRO

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CAIXAFORUM

This extraordinary structure near the southern end of the Paseo del Prado is one of Madrid’s most eye-catching and unusual architectural innovations. This brick edifice is topped by a summit of rusted iron. On an adjacent wall is the hanging garden, a lush vertical wall of greenery. Inside are four floors of exhibition and performance space with soaring ceilings (fundacio.lacaixa.es; Paseodel Prado, 36; free).

PLAZA DE LA VILLA

The Plaza de la Villa is enclosed on three sides by fine examples of 17th-century barroco Madrileño (Madrid’s baroque architecture: an amalgam of brick, exposed stone and wrought iron). On the western side is the 17th-century former town hall, in Habsburg-style baroque. Opposite is the Gothic Lujanes house and tower. The baroque Casa de Cisneros, built in 1537, with later Renaissance alterations, also catches the eye.

Worth a Trip

El Retiro This is one of Madrid’s largest parks. Laid out in the 17th century by Felipe IV, the gardens of El Retiro were opened to the public in 1868 and are now a favorite haunt of Madrileños. Just south of the lake is the Palacio de Cristal, a beautiful steel and glass pavilion, and in the northeast of the park is Ermita de San Isidro, one of the few examples of Romanesque architecture in Madrid (Puerta de Alcalá; free).

The Royal Palace, finished in 1764, is an Italianate baroque landmark. Around 50 of its 2,800 rooms are open to the public. It’s popular, so try to visit at 10am before the tour buses arrive. From the northern end of the Plaza de la Armería, the main stairway leads to the royal apartments and the Salón del Trono (throne room) – a lavish space with a ceiling painted by the Venetian baroque master Tiepolo (patrimonionacional .es; Calle Bailén; $10.75).

Tiepolo’s elaborate fresco in the throne room at the Palacio Real

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SAN LORENZO DE EL ESCORIAL

The striking facade of museum and gallery CaixaForum PLAZA DE CIBELES

Of all the grand roundabouts on the Paseo del Prado, Plaza de Cibeles most evokes the splendor of imperial Madrid. The jewel in the crown of this stirring celebration of belle epoque is the Palacio de Cibeles (1917), which serves as Madrid’s city hall. The fountain of Cibeles, named after Cybele, the Greek goddess of fertility, lies at the center of the plaza and is one of Madrid’s most beautiful statues.

Several villages were razed to make way for this formidable palacemonastery complex, conceived by King Felipe II in the 16th century as a royal palace and mausoleum for his parents. It’s a one-hour train trip from Madrid to San Lorenzo de El Escorial, now a prim town complete with quaint shops and restaurants (patrimonionacional.es; closed Mon; $10.75). PLAZA DE TOROS MONUMENTAL DE LAS VENTAS

Las Ventas was opened in 1931 and is the heart and soul of Spain’s bullfighting tradition. One of the largest rings in the world, it has a neo-Mudéjar (a Moorish architectural style) exterior and a huge arena able to seat 23,000 spectators. Tours take you out onto the sand and into the royal box (lasventastour.com/en; Calle de Alcalá, 237; tours $12).

The four-story Plaza de Toros Monumental de Las Ventas CHAMBERÍ

With its signature plaza, old-style shops and unmistakable barrio feel, Chamberí is one of Madrid’s most authentic neighborhoods. Wander the tree-lined avenues, admire the mix of architecture – from neo-Gothic to modern – and visit the Estación de Chamberí: abandoned in 1966, this Metro station has reopened as a museum that recreates the era of the station’s inauguration in 1919 (esmadrid.com/en; free).

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MINI GUIDE Architecture in Madrid

Sights

Essentials

The Know-How

WHERE TO STAY

A boutique hotel in Madrid’s La Latina district, Posada Del Dragón is a restored 19th-century inn. Rooms look out over the street or over the pretty internal patio. There’s a terrific bar/restaurant downstairs (posadadeldragon.com; Cava Baja, 14; from $99).

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Contemporary minimalism at the innovative Hotel Silken

The ’70s facade of Room Mate Óscar is a striking local landmark. Rooms are awash in bright colors and some have floor-to-ceiling murals. There’s also a good tapas bar and a rooftop terrace (oscar .room-matehotels.com; Plaza Vázquez de Mella, 12; from $120). Each floor of the luxury Hotel Silken was designed by an architect – including Jean Nouvel, Ron Arad, David Chipperfield, Sir Norman Foster and Zaha Hadid – resulting in an intriguing mix of styles (hoteles-silken.com; Avenida de América, 41; $185).

Centro de Arte Reina Sofía The building that is home to Picasso’s Guernica is adapted from the shell of an 18th-century hospital, with eye-catching exterior glass lifts (museoreinasofia.es). Museo Thyssen-Bornesmisza The renovated 19th-century Villahermosa Palace and the adjoining modern extension house one of the top private collections of European art in the world (museothyssen.org). Museo Nacional del Prado You might visit the Prado for Goya and Velázquez, but the building itself is a masterpiece designed by Juan de Villanueva, an 18th-century architect who left his mark across the capital (museodelprado.es).

FOR MORE INFORMATION Lonely Planet’s Pocket Madrid ($13.99) is a valuable guide to the city, while Madrid City Guide ($22.99) is a more extensive book with chapters available for download at lonelyplanet.com ($4.95). There’s also our Guides app (lonely planet.com/guides), featuring offline information for travelers on the go. For what’s going on in the city, visit esmadrid.com.

COMPILED BY NATALIE MILLMAN, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM ANTHONY HAM. PHOTOGRAPHS: MARK READ, SHUTTERSTOCK, HEMIS/ALAMY, IMAGEBROKER/ALAMY, ALBERTO PAREDED/ALAMY, RAFAEL VARGAS

ART & ARCHITECTURE The city’s collection of art is housed in some fine buildings:

GETTING THERE & AROUND

Adolfo Suárez Madrid-Barajas Airport is 8 miles northeast of the city. It’s Europe’s sixth-busiest hub, served by nearly 100 airlines and with almost 50 million passengers passing through every year. From the airport you can travel by Metro (about $5; 25 minutes), Airport Express bus ($5.50; 40 minutes; emtmadrid.es) or taxi ($22–$32; around 30 minutes). Moving around the city is simple and the Metro system is all you are likely to need; there are 12 color-coded lines and single tickets cost from $1.60 (metromadrid.es).

Sleeping


Kayaking down Vancouver Harbour toward the Burrard Street bridges

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Relaxing QUEEN ELIZABETH PARK

The city’s highest point offers views of mountain-framed downtown Vancouver and is home to specimens of every tree native to Canada. It also contains sports fields, formal gardens and fountains at the park summit (home to the Bloedel Conservatory), where you’ll find a hulking bronze sculpture by British artist Henry Moore (vancouverparks.ca; corner W. 33rd Avenue & Cambie Street; free).

MINI GUIDE

KITSILANO BEACH

Summer in Vancouver Studded with sandy beaches, forest trails, kayak routes and the mighty Stanley Park, plus food trucks and alfresco dining, western Canada’s major metropolis is an ideal summer destination.

WALKING

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HIKING

North Vancouver’s Grouse Grind, a steep slog up the side of Grouse Mountain, is nicknamed Mother Nature’s StairMaster. Around 2 miles in total, this forest trek takes about one hour to conquer. At the top, hikers are rewarded with free access to the resort’s facilities but must buy a $10 ticket for the required Skyride gondola ride back down (grouse mountain.com; 8:45am–10pm daily, from 7:30am in the summer).

GRANVILLE ISLAND PUBLIC MARKET

From pyramids of glistening fresh fruit to deli counters that inspire picnicking, this is one of North America’s finest markets. It’s the perfect spot to while away an afternoon. Snack on smoked sausages and hot, honey-dipped doughnuts with a cup of coffee in the sun while enjoying the street performers at the shoreline plaza (granvilleisland.com; Johnston Street; 9am–7pm daily).

Eating & Drinking

Activities Built between 1917 and 1980, the 5.5-mile Stanley Park seawall trail is a popular outdoor hangout. Encircling the park, it offers mountain-fringed vistas on one side and dense forest canopy on the other. You can walk the whole thing in two to three hours, cycle it in an hour, or explore the 15 miles of trails that crisscross the park, including Siwash Rock Trail and Beaver Lake Trail (vancouver.ca).

Facing English Bay, “Kits” Beach is one of Vancouver’s favorite summertime hangouts. The wide, sandy expanse attracts Frisbee and volleyball players, as well as those who just like to hang out and catch the rays. The ocean is fine for a dip, though serious swimmers should consider heated Kitsilano Pool, one of the world’s largest outdoor saltwater pools. Perch on a log and catch the breathtaking view (vancouver.ca; pool entry $4.25).

Macaws at Queen Elizabeth Park’s Bloedel Conservatory

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STEAMWORKS BREWING COMPANY

Walking the Stanley Park seawall toward the West End KAYAKING

A sunset kayak around the coastline is a signature outdoor activity that many locals enjoy. Headquartered on Granville Island, Ecomarine Paddlesport Centres offer guided kayak tours as well as kayak and stand-up paddleboard rentals. The 2½-hour sunset tour departs from Jericho Beach or English Bay Beach (ecomarine.com; 1668 Duranleau St.; sunset tour, Wed, Fri & Sat, Jun– Sep, $50).

The historic, brick-paved Gastown is home to Vancouver’s best watering holes, including the landmark Steamworks Brewing Company, whose signature beer is the refreshing Lions Gate Lager. There are outdoor tables for summer drinkers and great views across the water from inside (steamworks.com; 375 Water St; 11:30am–late; pints from $4.25). GALLEY PATIO & GRILL

A terrific spot at sunset to plop down in one of the patio chairs and eyeball the sailboats steering toward shore as the pyrotechnic sky unfolds. There are usually a couple of local wine offerings, along with beers from R&B Brewing (the Sun God Wheat Ale is recommended in summer). Beachside dishes include fish and chips, seafood chowder and burgers (thegalley.ca; 1300 Discovery St.; main courses from $7).

The Juice Truck, one of the city’s many independent food trucks FOOD TRUCKS

Vancouver has a great street-food scene, offering anything from Korean sliders and salmon tacos to Thai green curry and barbecued brisket sandwiches. Food Cart Fest takes place every summer Sunday: 20-odd carts converge alongside community markets to a backdrop of live music and DJs (foodcartfest .com; 12pm–5pm Sun, late Jun–Sep; 215 West 1st Ave., $2 admission or free with food donation).

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MINI GUIDE Summer in Vancouver

Essentials

WHERE TO STAY

The popular Victorian Hotel has an excellent location close to downtown action. Rooms have high ceilings, glossy hardwood floors, a sprinkling of antiques and plenty of charm (victorianhotel.ca; 514 Homer St.; from $105 with shared bath and $160 with private bath).

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Eating

Sleeping

The Know-How

GETTING THERE & AROUND

Most visitors will arrive by air at Vancouver International Airport, south of the city on Sea Island in Richmond. Alternatively, U.S. trains trundle in from Seattle to Pacific Central Station. Cross-border bus services also arrive at this terminal. Canada Line trains to downtown take around 25 minutes and cost from $7.75; taxis cost around $30. Downtown Vancouver is easy to get around on foot, while buses and SkyTrain light rail are useful for hopping to other neighborhoods, and miniferries ply the waters around False Creek.

Sights

STANLEY PARK TOUR

FOR MORE INFORMATION

• From the Georgia Street entrance,

Download Lonely Planet’s Guides app (lonelyplanet.com/guides) for access to essential information in the palm of your hand, or check out Lonely Planet’s Vancouver ($21.99); individual chapters can be downloaded at lonelyplanet .com ($4.95). Miss 604, a beloved Vancouver blog, lists events in the city (miss604.com).

trace the seawall around to Brockton Point’s bright totem poles (below).

The Victorian Hotel was built in 1898.

Times Square Suites Hotel in West End is the ideal apartmentstyle accommodation; its spacious one-bedroom suites include full kitchens. There is also a rooftop grilling area (timessquaresuites.com; 1821 Robson St.; from $80). Rosewood Hotel Georgia has had a spectacular renovation to bring the 1927 landmark back to its heyday. Modern art adorns the public areas, while the rooms have a classic style with earthy tones (rosewoodhotels.com; 801 West Georgia St.; from $315).

• Continue along the seawall, past a lighthouse, before reaching Lumberman’s Arch.

• Follow the path to the miniature

railway, then follow Pipeline Road to the Tudoresque pavilion. In front is the Malkin Bowl outdoor theater.

• Continue south to the freshwater

Lost Lagoon, then follow the shoreline to Lost Lagoon Nature House , where you can learn about the local flora and fauna.

• Continue to the lagoon’s western tip, then head to the oceanfront. Follow the seawall to Third Beach and settle down for a sunset panorama.

COMPILED BY NATALIE MILLMAN, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM JOHN LEE AND RYAN VER BERKMOES. PHOTOGRAPHS: CHRIS CHEADLE/ALL CANADA PHOTOS/SUPERSTOCK, JOSE MOYA/AGEFOTOSTOCK/SUPERSTOCK, DANITA DELIMONT/ALAMY, GUNTER MARX/ALAMY, LINDSAY ELLIOT

Drinking


Eilean Donan is named after a Celtic saint martyred in 617.

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Northern Highlands CASTLE OF MEY

About 6 miles from the village of John O’Groats, this castle served as the Queen Mother’s holiday home. The exterior may seem grand, but it feels domestic inside, from a casual lounge with a TV showing her favorite show (Dad’s Army) to a photo of King George in 1943 lovingly inscribed with “Bertie” (castleofmey.org.uk; Thurso; May– Sep; castle, grounds & gardens entry $15.75). EILEAN DONAN

MINI GUIDE

Highland Castles Scotland’s tumultuous history has left a legacy of military strongholds scattered across the Highlands, from looming stone fortresses to majestic castles towering over historic towns, each with a story to tell.

URQUHART CASTLE

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CAWDOR CASTLE

This castle, 5 miles from Nairn, was the 14th-century home of the Thane of Cawdor, one of the titles prophesied for the eponymous character of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. But Macbeth, king of Scotland in the 11th century, couldn’t have lived here: the central tower wasn’t built until the 14th century. It’s still the Cawdor family home, with three gardens and the Big Wood (cawdorcastle.com; Nairn; May–Oct; $15.25).

DUNROBIN CASTLE

Although Dunrobin dates back to 1275, most of what is seen today was built in a French style from 1845 to 1850 and is adorned with towers and turrets. Only 22 of the 187 rooms are open to visitors, with hunting trophies prominently displayed. Formal gardens, where falconry displays take place two or three times a day, extend down to the North Sea coast (dunrobin castle.co.uk; Golspie; late March– mid Oct; $15.75).

Southern Highlands

Central Highlands Commanding a brilliant location 1.5 miles east of Drumnadrochit, with outstanding views, Urquhart Castle has a huge visitors center that includes a video theater and displays of medieval items discovered on the site. The five-story tower house at the northern point is the most impressive remaining fragment of the much-sacked castle (historic-scotland.gov.uk; Drumnadrochit; $12).

Located at the entrance to Loch Duich, Eilean Donan is one of Scotland’s most beautifully situated castles, and surely must be represented in millions of photo albums. It’s on an islet, linked to the mainland by an arched stone bridge. Inside there’s an excellent exhibition: keep an eye out for photos of castle scenes from the movie Highlander, as well as a sword used at the Battle of Culloden in 1746 (eileandonancastle .com; Dornie; Feb–Dec; $10).

Dunrobin Castle has housed the Sutherland family for 700 years.

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DUNSTAFFNAGE CASTLE

The last clan chief inhabited Brodie Castle as late as 2003. BRODIE CASTLE

Set on 173 acres of parkland, Brodie Castle is 8 miles east of Nairn. Highlights include a library with more than 6,000 dusty volumes, wonderful clocks, a huge Victorian kitchen and a 17th-century dining room. The Brodies have been living here since 1160, but the present structure dates mostly from 1567, with many additions over the years (nts.org.uk; Forres; grounds open all year, castle open Mar–Oct; $15).

Dunstaffnage, 2 miles west of Connel, looks like a child’s drawing of what a castle should be . It’s one of Scotland’s oldest stone castles. It was built around 1220 and captured by Robert the Bruce during the Wars of Independence in 1309. The haunted ruins of the nearby 13th-century chapel contain Clan Campbell tombs decorated with skull-andcrossbones carvings (historic -scotland.gov.uk; Dunbeg; $6.50). SKIPNESS CASTLE

On the east coast of Kintyre rise the substantial remains of 13th-century Skipness Castle. It’s a striking building, composed of dark-green local stone trimmed with contrasting red-brown sandstone. The tower house was added in the 16th century. From the top you can see the roofless, 13th-century Saint Brendan’s Chapel down by the shore (historic-scotland .gov.uk; Skipness; castle open yearround, tower in summer only; free).

Weapons adorn the armory hall fireplace at Inveraray Castle. INVERARAY CASTLE

This 18th-century building, with its fairy-tale turrets and fake battlements, houses an impressive armory hall, its walls patterned with a collection of more than 1,000 polearms, dirks, muskets and Lochaber axes. It’s surrounded by a 16-acre garden, including 2 acres of formal lawns and flowerbeds, and a 50,000-acre estate. The tearoom showcases local produce (inveraray-castle.com; Inveraray; Mar–Oct; $14.25).

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MINI GUIDE Highland Castles

Essentials

The Know-How

GETTING THERE & AROUND

There are no direct flights from the U.S. to Inverness, but you can catch a connecting flight there from a European hub. Alternatively, fly direct to Edinburgh or Glasgow from NYC or Atlanta, then take a train up to Inverness (about four hours). The two Highland railway lines from Inverness – north along the east coast to Wick and Thurso, and west to Kyle of Lochalsh – are justly famous. ScotRail’s Highland Rover ticket offers four days of unlimited travel to be used within eight days ($116; scotrail.co.uk). Rent a car to explore the more remote areas. WHERE TO STAY

Inveraray’s George Hotel has a choice of 17 opulent rooms complete with four-poster beds. The bar, with its rough stone walls, flagstone floor and peat fires, is a delightful place to cozy up. You can request breakfast in your room (thegeorge hotel.co.uk; Main Street East; from $120).

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HIGHLAND CLEARANCES

EXPERT TIP

one of the most shameful episodes in Scottish history saw the often forced and violent eviction of peasants from their homes and farms by Highland lairds wanting to clear land for more profitable sheep farming.

Located at the entrance to Loch Duich, near Dornie, just by the main road to Skye, Eilean Donan Castle is the Highlands’ most photographed fortress. Citylink buses to or from Skye will stop opposite the castle.

• In the late 18th and 19th centuries

Glenelg Inn by the Sound of Sleat, with the isle of Skye behind

Half an hour from Eilean Donan Castle, the Glenelg Inn has great views of Skye. There are seven stylish rooms, a cozy bar and an elegant dining room serving up the local catch (glenelg-inn.com; Glenelg, Kyle; closed Nov–Dec; from $170, including breakfast). Inverness’s Rocpool Reserve is an elegant Georgian hotel with designer rooms in shades of chocolate, cream and gold. Luxuries include balcony hot tubs with TVs, plus a restaurant by acclaimed chef Albert Roux (rocpool.com; Culduthel Road; from $278).

• Most peasants either were relocated to crofts, or small farms, on poor coastal land or fled to the cities in search of work – fueling in part the Industrial Revolution. Many thousands emigrated to North America, Australia and New Zealand.

• The Clearances marked the beginning of the depopulation of the Highlands, a process that is still going on. The Land Reform Act (2003) has allowed crofting communities to buy out the land that they live on with the aid of taxpayers’ money.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Lonely Planet’s Scotland ($24.99) and Scotland’s Highlands & Islands ($21.99) have chapters on the Northern, Central and Southern Highlands, each of which can be downloaded at lonelyplanet.com ($4.95). The website visithighlands .com has up-to-date information on local activities and events.

COMPILED BY NATALIE MILLMAN, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM NEIL WILSON. PHOTOGRAPHS: JOHN HUBBLE/ALAMY, ALEX HAVRET/GETTY IMAGES, NICK HUGH MCCANN © INVERARAY CASTLE, SCOTIMAGE/ALAMY, RIEGER BERTRAND/HEMIS.FR/SUPERSTOCK

Sights


The cable car and Morro da Urca, seen from Sugarloaf Mountain

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Best Beaches IPANEMA

Ipanema has been Rio’s most famous beach since bossa nova stars Tom Jobim and Vinícius de Moraes introduced the world to it with their 1960s hit song “The Girl from Ipanema.” The long stretch of sand is dotted with posts, which mark off subcultures as diverse as the city itself. Posto 9 is where Rio’s most lithe and tanned bodies tend to migrate; a handful of hippies and artists hang out here too. COPACABANA

MINI GUIDE

Beach Life in Rio de Janeiro For Cariocas (residents of Rio), the beach is the backyard. Join them as they prepare to host the Olympics, for volleyball, surfing, snacking or relaxing amid the people parade.

SURFING

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VOLLEYBALL

Whether you’re interested in improving your game or just meeting some cariocas, pay a visit to Escolinha de Vôlei. Pelé, who speaks English, is an ex-professional volleyball player who has been teaching and hosting volleyball classes since 2001. Look for his large Brazilian flag on Ipanema Beach near Rua Garcia D’Ávila. Pelé’s students are a mix of locals and expats, who then meet for games.

PRAIA VERMELHA

Hidden near the cable-car station to Pão de Açúcar (Sugarloaf Mountain), beneath smaller hill Morro da Urca, this tiny, wellconcealed beach has a magnificent panorama of the rocky coastline from the shore. It’s one of Rio de Janeiro’s prettiest and most idyllic beaches. The coarse sand gives it the name vermelha (red). Because Praia Vermelha is protected by the headland, the water is usually calm.

Beach Eats

Best Activities Superb waves are all around in Rio. For a quick fix, join the locals off Arpoador, an area between Ipanema and Copacabana. Otherwise, head to the beaches west of Rio; the nearly half-milelong, rainforest-backed Prainha is considered the best surf spot in the area, with waves reaching 10 feet. The Surf Bus takes passengers and boards to Prainha from Largo do Machado (single tickets $2.45).

The beach of Copacabana extends for 2.5 miles. The “stock market” area, denoted by a rainbow flag, is the gay and transvestite section; soccer players hold court near Rua Santa Clara; posts 5 and 6 draw a mix of retirees and kids from nearby favelas (hillside shantytowns); and you’ll find the fishermen’s community beach by the Forte de Copacabana. Apart from people-watching, the main attraction is running or cycling the beach path.

The long, scalloped beach of Copacabana at sunset

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CARIOCA COM VOCÊ

Rio, known for its big breaks, has a huge surfing community. WALKING

Everyone loves the paved Pista Cláudio Coutinho, a 1.2-mile trail winding along the southern contour of Morro do Urca. It’s a lush, treelined area, with the waves crashing on the rocks below. Look out for families of marmosets, with their gray fur, striped tails and tiny faces. To get there, walk about 110 yards north along the edge of Praia Vermelha and you’ll see the path straight ahead, just past the beach.

At the northeast end of Leme, elevated over the beach, this peacefully set kiosk serves plates of sardines and other seafood, as well as strong alcoholic drinks. Nearby, you can watch fearless Carioca kids diving off the seawall, or take a walk through a protected rainforest, home to numerous species of birds (near Praça Almirante Júlio de Noronha; open 24 hours a day; snacks from $2.85). TRÈS

Copacabana has seen a new crop of flashy kiosks replacing the wooden ones, such as this top choice for Francophiles. Très whips up crêpes, both savory (blue cheese and walnuts), and sweet (Nutella with banana). It also does cheese and charcuterie plates, milkshakes and appetizers such as shrimp with garlic (tres-restaurant.com; Copacabana, at the end of Rua Siqueira Campos; snacks from $1.50).

A new-style kiosk at Posto 6 on Copacabana beach URUGUAI

Of the many barracas (food stalls) on the beach in Ipanema, Uruguai is a longtime favorite, in business for more than 30 years. Come here for scrumptious chicken, beef or sausage sandwiches, served with tangy chimichurri sauce. Look for the blue-and-white striped Uruguayan flag flying high over the beach (Posto 9, Ipanema beach, 7:30am–8:30pm; sandwiches from $2).

TURN OVER FOR MAP AND NUMBER LOCATIONS

Summer 2016

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MINI GUIDE

Beach Life in Rio de Janeiro

Essentials

WHERE TO STAY

Overlooking Arpoador beach, the Arpoador Inn is the only hotel in Ipanema or Copacabana that doesn’t have a busy street between it and the beach. Rooms are small, but the “deluxe” rooms have ocean views (arpoadorinn.com.br; Rua Francisco Otaviano, 177; from $130).

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Eating

Sleeping

The Know-How WHO IS THE GIRL FROM IPANEMA?

GETTING THERE & AROUND

Direct flights take about 10 hours from NYC, 8½ hours from Miami, and 15 or more hours, including a layover, from the West Coast. Rio’s Galeão International Airport (aka Tom Jobim International Airport) is 9 miles north of downtown. Premium Auto Bus runs every 20 minutes to Flamengo, Copacabana, Ipanema, Leblon and other areas (1¼ to 2 hours; $3; premiumautoonibus.com .br). Taxis charge about $28.50 to Copacabana and Ipanema (45–90 minutes). The most convenient way to get around is metro; single fares cost about 85 cents.

Activities

• Her name is Helô Pinheiro, and in

Sleep close to the beach at Marina All Suites.

1962, tall, tanned and young (17), she frequently went to the beach of Ipanema. Her route from her home a few blocks away took her past the Bar Veloso, where several men made overtures to her.

• In August 1962, inside a cramped The Casa Mosquito is a beautifully designed guesthouse with luxurious rooms. The 1940s mansion sits in a tranquil garden with views of Sugarloaf Mountain and the Pavão-Pavãozinho favela (casamosquito.com; Rua Saint Roman, 222; from $164). At the Marina All Suites you’ll find suites made up of pretty bedrooms, beautifully decorated living rooms, and views of the Leblon shoreline. There’s also a top-floor pool, a spa and a bar (marinaall suites.com.br; Avenida Delfim Moreira, 696; from $250).

club, Tom Jobim and João Gilberto took to the stage to play a nostalgic, sorrowful tune with a jazzy beat composed by Jobim and poet Vinícius de Moraes – “Garota de Ipanema” (“The Girl from Ipanema”). It became a smash hit and launched the bossa nova music genre.

• Helô only became aware that she was the inspiration for the song in 1965. She got to know de Moraes and Jobim, and both men proposed to her, but she married her highschool sweetheart instead.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Check out more of Rio with Lonely Planet’s Guides app (lonelyplanet .com/guides), featuring offline maps, essential information and must-see sites curated by on-the-ground experts. There’s also Lonely Planet’s Rio de Janeiro ($21.99), with chapters available for download at lonely planet.com ($4.95). For information about all the best surf spots and wave conditions, see wannasurf.com.

COMPILED BY NATALIE MILLMAN, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM REGIS ST LOUIS. PHOTOGRAPHS: ANTONIO BARTUCCIO/SIME/4 CORNERS, PAULO FRIDMAN/CORBIS, MICHAEL ROBERTSON/ALAMY, FLAVIO VELOSO/BRAZIL PHOTOS/LIGHTPOCKET VIA GETTY IMAGES

Beaches


Get outdoors with Lonely Planet Celebrate the centennial of America’s National Parks Service in 2016 with Lonely Planet. Our new releases include guides with inspirational images, maps, driving tours and essential information, as well as a beautiful hardcover gift guide covering all 59 parks, to inspire you to explore them for yourself.

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Offer applies to any combination of our print editions, PDF eBooks, individual chapters and print+digital bundles, and is available with Lonely Planet Shop website orders only. Excludes print guidebook bundles. Offer available on in-stock titles only and excludes all pre-order titles (print or ebook edition). No backordering available. Offer may not be combined with other special offers, discounts or promotions (including promotional codes). Offer excludes delivery charges. Offer is available until September 30th, 2016 and subject to change without notice.


A Moment with . . . @DailyOverview

BENJAMIN GRANT has been changing our perspective of planet Earth through his compelling Instagram account, @DailyOverview, featuring satellite images and aerial photographs. Here, he shares his mission, process and his favorite otherworldly snaps.

Tulips / All I have to work with is whatever was captured on the particular day the satellite was overhead. Tulips in the Netherlands start to bloom in April and are only this color for a couple of months. I can’t help but feel lucky that this spectacular view was captured on this day.

Valparaiso, Chile / I always find it fascinating how our species adapts to the landscape where we live. In this particularly stunning example of Valparaiso, Chile, it is amazing to see how the houses and roads seamlessly morph into the cliffs above the Pacific Ocean.

Jacksonville / While a highway interchange in Florida may not seem like the most interesting subject for a photograph, I love how the Overview perspective can show us what sprawling infrastructure looks like and how this human ingenuity makes travel possible.

Ipanema Beach / This is one of my favorite images for its sheer beauty. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is definitely at the top of my list of places I’d like to visit and this image – specifically the unbelievable surface of the water – makes the thought of a trip here even more exciting.

Bourtange / Bourtange, in Groningen, the Netherlands, was built with this star structure so an attack on the city could be defended and attackers would face fire from behind in two directions. Overviews like this allow you to get a better understanding of a different time, and it doesn’t hurt that it happens to be beautiful!

Crescent Dunes / While it’s not a typical travel destination, I love how this image of the Tonopah, Nevada, solar power facility reinforces the new perspective we can gain from above.

Lonely Planet (ISSN 2379-9390). Summer 2016, Volume 2, Number 2. Published four times a year (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall) by Lonely Planet Global, Inc., 230 Franklin Road, Building 2B, Franklin, TN 37064. Application to mail at Periodicals postage prices is pending at Franklin, TN, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lonely Planet, PO Box 37520, Boone, IA 50037-0520. Subscriber Services, U.S., Canada and other International: Direct all inquiries, address changes, subscription orders, etc. to Lonely Planet, PO Box 37520, Boone, IA 50037-0520. You may also access customer service via the web at lonelyplanet.com/usmagazine /customerservice, via email at lnpcustserv@cdsfulfillment.com or by phone at 800-829-9121. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. Please allow up to eight weeks for delivery of your first issue. Subscription rates: 1 year $12.00 domestic only; in Canada, $20; other International, $35 (Publisher’s suggested price). Single copies $5.99.

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WHAT’S NEXT With a new double-wishbone rear suspension and a lower center of gravity, the 2016 Prius is making getaways even more thrilling. toyota.com/prius Prototype shown with options. Production model may vary. Š2015 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.

Lonely Planet magazine (US) Summer 2016  

This is the full version of the Summer edition. Your Best Summer Ever - 42 of America’s Greatest National Parks, Cities, Beaches and Road Tr...

Lonely Planet magazine (US) Summer 2016  

This is the full version of the Summer edition. Your Best Summer Ever - 42 of America’s Greatest National Parks, Cities, Beaches and Road Tr...