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Guidebook 17 & 18 June 2017

www.opensquares.org @opensquares #OGSW17 @opensquaresweekend LondonOGSW

Organised by


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Welcome to the Weekend Welcome to this year’s Open Garden Squares Weekend – the London Parks & Gardens Trust’s most popular event. This year we are celebrating 20 years of opening London’s gardens for public enjoyment – offering you unrivalled access to some of the capital’s most unique and private Ed Ikin cultivated spaces. The Weekend is about enjoyment and discovery. From the historical and prestigious to the experimental and innovative, a single weekend ticket is your key to discovering some of the city’s most magnificent and diverse gardens. We have gardens on barges, in train stations and in skips, as popup orchards, beside churches and schools. Alongside London’s premier garden squares there are edible, medicinal, historical, ecological and reclaimed brownfield sites. Ultimately, the Weekend is a fantastic opportunity to see London’s ability to grow in extraordinary spaces. We began in 1998, when Caroline Aldiss organised the first open day with a vision of inspiring knowledge and appreciation for London’s green, urban network, and the contribution it makes to the capital and its inhabitants. Twenty years on, we are perhaps even more aware of the vital role of these cultivated spaces in terms of their environmental, social, aesthetic and economic impact. The Weekend celebrates this contribution with an extensive programme of walks, tours, talks and cycle rides, activities for families and children and a poets-in-residence programme. Last year approximately 18,000 visitors made 50,000 individual garden visits – making us London’s biggest garden-visiting weekend. This year a record number of gardens are joining us. There are over 230 gardens to explore, 31 new gardens to

discover, and 14 gardens that have been with us every year since we began. To give you ideas for planning your visit we have created a series of highlights on pages 5-9 on the following themes: Celebrating 20 Years, Family Favourites, Urban Food Growing, London’s Rooftops and Super Secret Spaces. As always, we are incredibly grateful to our sponsors and partners – Hamptons International Estate Agents, City of London Information Centre, Transport for London, The Poetry School, Arts Council England for supporting the Poets in Residence programme, Metropolitan Public Gardens Association and Green Man & Van. We would also like to thank the hundreds of individual volunteers and community groups that dedicate their time most generously to make the weekend such a brilliant success. Ed Ikin Chair of Trustees London Parks & Gardens Trust www.londongardenstrust.org @LDNGardensTrust Organised by

Supported by

Contents Planning your weekend

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What’s new for 2017

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Hidden Gems competition

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Highlights for 2017

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Activities 10 Garden listings and maps 11 Outer London map

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A North West London gardens

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B North East London gardens

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C South East London gardens

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D South West London gardens

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E Hammersmith and Fulham

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F Hampstead and Highgate

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G St Pancras and Islington

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H Hackney and Bethnal Green

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I Docklands

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J Lambeth and Clapham

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K Notting Hill and North Kensington 66 L Marylebone, Bayswater and Little Venice

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M Bloomsbury

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N City and South Bank

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O Kensington, Brompton and Chelsea 98 P Belgravia, Pimlico and Westminster

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Q North Lambeth and Southwark

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Index of gardens

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Organising the Weekend

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Cover photos © Diana Jarvis: (top left) Garden Barge Square; (middle) Ashworth Mansions; (top right) Fulham Palace Allotments; (bottom) Nomura International PLC

Planning your weekend To get the most out of the Weekend, it’s worth taking the time to plan in advance which gardens you want to see and how best to get there. This guidebook contains essential information for planning and getting around over the weekend, but we highly recommend that you use it in conjunction with a smartphone map or London street guide. Our website is a fantastic way to plan your weekend – visit www.opensquares.org/tickets/ planning.html for top tips and to use our Garden Selector tool. All information contained in this guidebook was believed to be accurate at the time of going to press. The London Parks & Gardens Trust cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of information provided by participating gardens. Please note that events may be postponed or cancelled owing to weather or to circumstances beyond our control. Visitors are reminded that these are private gardens and are kindly asked not to intrude or inconvenience residents.

www.opensquares.org Please check our website for any amendments or last-minute withdrawals on Friday 16 June. We will also try to let you know of any other public transport closures and anything else that might affect the Weekend. Please check the TFL and Network Rail works programme before your journey – tfl.gov.uk


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What’s new for 2017

New gardens for 2017 We are delighted to welcome several new gardens for 2017. They include: n Trumpeters’ House, a magnificent garden by the river in Richmond (D17) n A trio of sites belonging to Kingston University that deserve to be better known (D1-D3) n A cluster of community gardens in Wandsworth (D4-D6) n Five historic houses: the Deanery (N5), Forty Hall Estate (B4), Keats House (F7), Southside House (D15), Strawberry Hill House (D16) n Four educational gardens for schoolchildren: Charlton Manor Community Garden (C3), Linden Lodge School (D9), Meadlands Primary School (D10), Queenswell Junior School (A3) n Two roof gardens in the City of London: Baring Asset Management (N3), Hachette UK Limited (N10) n Eleven further gardens, all clearly flagged as new in the listings

Hidden Gems competition New for 2017 is our Hidden Gems competition! Join in a treasure hunt around our gardens across the city, to be in with a chance of winning a fabulous prize of afternoon tea at Duck Island Cottage in St James’ Park (left). While every garden has its own secret charms, our Hidden Gem gardens are those not easily found or frequently visited hidden treasures across the city, and we would hate for you to miss out on them.

How does the competition work? In each of the geographical areas covered in this guidebook is a designated Hidden Gem garden, which you can find by spotting the gem symbol displayed left. To enter the draw, you must visit at least four Hidden Gem gardens over the weekend and collect the secret word displayed. Once you have gathered the secret words, simply fill in all the details in one go at www.opensquares.org/hiddengems The draw will take place after the Weekend and the lucky two winners informed. Please see website for full competition details. Good luck and happy hunting!

Highlights for 2017

Celebrating 20 Years! This year Open Garden Squares Weekend celebrates 20 years of opening gardens for public enjoyment. Some of our gardens have been with us since the very beginning, and every year since! Belgrave Square (P2) 4.5-acre private Victorian garden designed by George Basevi in 1826. Cadogan Place South (O4) Originally known as the London Botanic Gardens, laid out by Henry Holland from 1777 onwards.

Royal Crescent Gardens

Cleveland Square (L3) A beautiful, quiet 1.5-acre garden square, dating from around 1855. Earls Court Square (O10) Charming Victorian garden originally laid out as part of the Edwardes Estate in the 1870s.

Thurloe Square

Ennismore Gardens (O12) Award-winning Victorian garden, named after William Hare, Viscount Ennismore and Earl of Listowel. Kensington Gardens Square (L8) Tranquil gardens, which are undergoing careful ecological regeneration. Ladbroke Square Garden (K2) Originally the site of the Hippodrome racecourse, built by John Whyte in 1837.

Earls Court Square

Cleveland Square

Merrick Square (Q8) A small garden square, originally laid out in 1853-6 as part of the development of land belonging to the Corporation of Trinity House. Queen’s Gate Gardens (O23) Created in the 1860s, and built on the site of former market gardens. Rosmead Garden (K8) Part of the Ladbroke Estate – Thomas Allom’s plan of 1823 for generous communal gardens, organised in a concentric layout of crescents. Royal Crescent Gardens (K9) Part of the Norland Estate, laid out by Robert Cantwell in 1846. St James’s Gardens (K11) Gardens centred on the church of St James, laid out in an informal woodland style. Thurloe Square (O26) Developed in the 1840s to designs by George Basevi – ushering in a new era of Italianate townhouse design in London. Triangle Garden (L15) Beautiful, tranquil midVictorian garden, in the form of a triangle.


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Highlights for 2017

Highlights for 2017

London Rooftops

Family Friendly

Some of the most exciting green spaces in London aren’t at ground level, but up in the skies!

Children under 12 go free over Open Garden Squares Weekend, and many of our gardens have a brilliant selection of fun and educational activities especially for children and families.

Roof East (B10) On the roof of a car park at Stratford shopping centre, with planters made from vintage sports cars and recycled decking from the Olympic Park. Home to the GrowUp Box, an urban farm based in a shipping container using Crossrail aquaponics and vertical growing. Seed-planting and talks all weekend. Crossrail (I3) Sitting atop the Canary Wharf Crossrail station is an exotic garden filled with ferns, grasses and flowering shrubs. The garden’s unique architecture and stunning landscape design are inspired by Canary Wharf’s rich maritime heritage. Packed programme of activities across the weekend including children’s activities, music, talks and workshops. NEW Hachette UK Limited (N10) A stunning roof garden inspired by the English country garden with lawns and multiple planted beds. Magnificent views overlooking the river Thames from Tower Bridge to the London Eye. NEW Baring Asset Management (N3) Two magnificent terraces with plants inspired by Barings’ long history as a firm of merchants and merchant bankers. Terraces inspired by Asia and Europe. 2015 City in Bloom winner.

The Roof Gardens, Kensington

NEW Sellincourt Primary School Edible Garden (D13) Edible garden set up in 2016 where pupils learn how to cultivate and harvest different produce. Sensory garden and sculptures. Seed planting, leaf sculptures, art activities, salad and fruit ‘make and taste’ sessions NEW Paradise Co-Op Urban Farm (D6) Once an overgrown and derelict site next to Sellincourt Primary School Wandsworth Prison, now a thriving and beautiful farm in the centre of the community. Guided walks, scavenger hunts and facepainting for children Eversheds Sutherland Vegetable Garden

The Roof Gardens, Kensington (O24) Originally laid out in 1933 above Derry & Toms department store, and themed as the Spanish Garden, Tudor Courtyard and English Woodland Garden. The gardens are home to a selection of exotic wildfowl, including four pink flamingos. Eversheds Sutherland Vegetable Garden (N7) Once a blank corner of the roof, this garden is now a thriving vegetable and herb garden. One of the most iconic views in London – from our beehives across to the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral. Teas, coffees, homemade cakes, activities for children.

NEW Railway Fields (B8) A former goods yard, transformed into a local nature reserve with over 200 species of wildflower, 70 species of bird and 21 species of butterfly. Nature trails and walks, natural play area, pond-dipping

Railway Fields

The Compound, Stave Hill Ecological Park (I6) An imaginative and creative space with a wildlife ‘city’, allotment, and woodland walk. Craft activities, beekeeper on site (Sunday only), nature trails. Create a wildflower meadow, build an insect house, or go out on the marsh with Stave Hill Saturday team

Canons Park – George V Memorial Garden (A1) A walled garden, once part of the first Duke of Chandos’s kitchen gardens, celebrating its 80th anniversary this year. Yoga sessions for all, herb discovery walks, face painting, art activities and storytelling Bee Urban (Q1) A bee-keeping and environmental education community project that has transformed unused spaces into gardens with new growing beds, fruit trees, soft fruit, nectar-rich plants, herbs and flowers. Beekeeping, crafts and candle-making, honey tasting Bee Urban


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Highlights for 2017

Highlights for 2017

Urban Food Growing Londoners love to grow! Visit some of the capital’s many unique and inspiring growing spaces over the Weekend and discover some of the innovative ways London is feeding itself.

World Peace Garden Camden

The Master’s Garden

Super Secret Spaces Open Garden Squares Weekend is your chance to discover and explore London’s secret green spaces. The Master’s Garden (N13) A private, hidden space within the Temple complex. The main part of the garden is an elevated plateau, built above 17th-century catacombs. St Mary’s Secret Garden (H11) A peaceful community garden hidden away in Hackney offering horticultural therapy and training for people with mental-health issues, physical and learning disabilities. Plant sale, ‘pop-up’ cafe with snacks and cakes produced by volunteers and staff. World Peace Garden Camden (F9) Award-winning secluded garden of contemplation transformed from wasteland by volunteers into a woodland glade. Tie a tag to the Tree of Hope: ‘What I want the world to be like when I grow up’. Music, poetry, story-telling, talks, art classes

Lillington and Longmoore (P9) One of London’s first low-rise, high density housing estates. Garden areas include classic mixed borders, Mediterranean planting, an exotic border with yuccas, palms, agaves and cannas, a sensory garden with bubble fountain, and a children’s garden. Guided walk, children’s playground (adapted for children with disabilities). Plant sale

Lillington and Longmoore

The Golden Baggers

The Golden Baggers (N8) Residents’ food growing space on the Golden Lane Estate. Forty individual boxes growing fruit, veg and flowers. Communal herb garden and small wildlife garden, all maintained by the community. Tea, coffee and cakes.

pumpkins and beans grow in skips. Tomatoes, ginger and chillies grow under polytunnels made of water pipes and polythene. Garden tours, cafe.

Winterton House Organic Garden (I7) Tucked away in the East End this community garden has a greenhouse, Share Community Garden allotment area, rare breed (D14) Home to a charity chickens, alpine garden offering training and and wildlife pond. Guided employment support for tours, plant sale, music disabled adults. The beautiful by London folk group The 2.5 acre walled garden is the Mudlarks. hub for their horticultural training project and includes a ‘bee lovely’ garden and polytunnels. Plants for sale. Refreshments by Share Catering. The Skip Garden (G17) Part of the Global Generation education charity, this is a mobile garden in the heart of Kings Cross. Apple trees,

Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses (J2) This small charity provides south London residents with a space to garden and a rich wildlife and horticultural resource for many educational activities. Stunning glasshouse exhibition of growing ginger plants. Plant sale, teas, cakes.

The Skip Garden

Share Community Garden


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Activities

Garden listings and maps

You can enjoy an amazing variety of activities in our gardens over the Weekend. Many of the gardens will be hosting afternoon teas, live music, art exhibitions, poetry, plant sales, puppet shows, children’s workshops and much more. To find out exactly what’s going on where, simply check the individual garden entry. Here are just some of the highlights!

Cycling tours

Walking tours

Led by experienced and friendly members of the London Cycling Campaign and Cyclists in Southwark, the rides go through quieter, characterful streets, including Quietways and Cycle Superhighways. You can join or leave or the tours at any point. No need to book – just turn up with your bike. Rides finish 5.30pm.

Our guided walks, listed on our website www. opensquares.org/activities, are a great way to visit some of the popular gardens, as well as discover the location of some of London’s secret gardens. Walks are led by experienced and friendly London tour guides from the City of London, Camden and Westminster Guiding Associations. Book to secure your place on this extremely popular programme. Walks cost just £3 and we advise you to book early to secure your place and avoid disappointment!

Saturday 17 June Meet at 10.15am at the main (west) entrance to St Paul’s Cathedral. Visit gardens in the City of London, on the South Bank and in Westminster, finishing near St James’s Park. Further info: philipbenstead1@gmail.com

Sunday 18 June Ride 1 Start Russell Square Gardens (near the café) at 10.15am. Visit gardens in Camden and Islington, returning to Russell Square. Email info@ westminstercyclists.org.uk Ride 2 Start 10am from the South Carriage Drive, Hyde Park, near Hyde Park Corner cycle hire station. Visit gardens in Westminster, the City of London, Bloomsbury and Marylebone, returning to Hyde Park. Email nigelbee@blueyonder.co.uk for further details.

Poets in Residence: Mixed Borders

We are delighted to welcome back The Poetry School to Open Garden Squares Weekend this year, with many thanks to the generous support of Arts Council England. Over the weekend we will be placing poets in residence in many of our gardens across the city. Look out for examples of their new work composed exclusively for the Weekend, enjoy their performances and maybe even help pen a garden-inspired line yourself! For full details on where you can find our poets, visit www.opensquares.org/ activities/poets.html

Gardens are presented in separate geographical areas. Maps at the start of each section show approximately where you can find each garden.

Garden listings key: Garden normally closed to the public Dogs allowed on leads

We recommend that you also use a detailed London map in conjunction with this guide. Each garden has a unique reference consisting of a letter and a number. The number refers to the map where the garden location is shown. You can find specific gardens using the index on pages 121-122. Gardens have different opening hours, so please check the individual listings for details. The majority of gardens taking part in the weekend are not normally open to the public. These are indicated with the key symbol (left). Some public gardens are included, many of which will have laid on entertainment or interpretation for the event. Others are of historical interest and are included to enliven your walk along the way.

Dogs Working assistance dogs are allowed in all gardens. Other dogs are allowed only where indicated and must be kept on a lead.

Info at londongardensonline.org.uk Toilet facilities for disabled visitors Toilet available for visitors National Trust property

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Capital Growth garden Picnics allowed Hidden Gems competition

London Gardens Online! Interested in finding out more about the historic elements of the gardens you have visited? The London Parks & Gardens Trust’s Inventory of Parks, Gardens, Squares, Churchyards, Cemeteries and other Green Spaces of Local Historic Interest is available online at londongardensonline.org.uk Gardens that feature on the inventory are indicated by this symbol.


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Outer London map B5

B

A41

Enfield

A41 A1

B11

A3

A1

A406

Outer London

A1

A1

Highgate

A

A1

B8

B2 B1

Map F Hampstead & Highgate

A41

A41

Map G St Pancras & Islington

A406

A40

Map K Notting Hill & North Kensington M4

Map E A4 Hammer smith & Fulham

M4

A2 A4

A4

Map L Marylebone, Bayswater, Little Venice Map O Kensington A4 Brompton Chelsea A304

South West London

Outer London

D20

D8

D2

D10

A3

D1

A304

D4

D12 D5 D6 D9 D14 Wandsworth

A406

A11

B6

A13

B9

A13

A2

A2

A102

C1

A202

A202

C10

A102

C2

C3 A2

Dulwich A205

C

C4

A2

C9

Lewisham

C5 A205

A20

A20

A214C7

A214

D13

D15

A11

Map I Docklands

C6

A3

B10

C8

Map J Lambeth & Clapham

D19

A406

B7

Map H Hackney & Bethnal Green

Map M Map N Bloomsbury City & South Bank Map P Belgravia, Pimlico, Map Q Westminster North A3212 A3212 Lambeth & Southwark

A10

Merton

A23

Opening times

A23

D3

Open Saturday and Sunday A24

A24 A217

A217

Open Saturday only

Croydon A232

Open Sunday only See individual listings for exact opening times

D7 D18 Sutton

A232

Outer London

D

D16

D11

D17 A316

A316

A205

A10 A503

South East London

A205

B3

A503

Camden A40

A406

Haringey

A4

A406

A406

A406

A1

Harrow

A10

Outer London

A1

A10

North East London

North West London

B4

Squares and gardens key

A B

A1. Canons Park – George V Memorial Garden A2. Osterley House Gardens A3. Queenswell Junior School Community Garden NEW A4. Roe Green Walled Garden B1. Abney Park B2. The Castle Garden B3. Clissold Community Garden B4. Forty Hall Estate NEW B5. Myddelton House Gardens B6. Pudding Mill Allotments NEW B7. Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park B8. Railway Fields NEW B9. Rainham Hall B10. Roof East B11. Woodcroft Wildspace

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C1. Ballast Quay Garden C2. Centre for Wildlife Gardening C3. Charlton Manor Community Garden (at Woodlands Farm) NEW C4. Charlton Manor Primary School C5. Culverley Green C6. De Frene Market Garden, Sydenham Garden C7. Dulwich Upper Wood C8. The Old Blue Cross Pet Cemetery NEW C9. Red House C10. Royal Garrison Church of St George, Woolwich

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D1. Kingston University – Kingston Hill NEW D2. Kingston University – Dorich House NEW D3. Kingston University – Knights Park/Stanley Picker NEW D4. Bramford Community Garden D5. Wendelsworth Community Garden NEW D6. Paradise Co-op Urban Farm D7. Carshalton House Landscape Garden D8. Grove House Estate and Downshire House (Roehampton University) D9. Linden Lodge School NEW D10. Meadlands Primary School NEW D11. Roehampton Club D12. Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability D13. Sellincourt Primary School Edible Garden NEW D14. Share Community Garden D15. Southside House NEW D16. Strawberry Hill House NEW D17. Trumpeters’ House NEW D18. Whitgift School D19. Wildcroft Manor NEW D20. Woodville Day Centre NEW


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AREA F: Hampstead and London Highgate Outer AREA

A

OGSW Guide 2017

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North West London goodies. Story-telling sessions for youngsters and their families. Free leaflets featuring recipes for dishes that would have been made using food from the kitchen garden Web www.canonsparkfriends.org Park keeper Derek Roy MBE

A2. Osterley House Gardens TW7 4RD

Canons Park

A1. Canons Park – George V Memorial Garden HA8 6RH Canons Park is a grade II-listed historic landscape and contains several listed buildings. The park was part of one of the grandest homes of 18th-century England, developed by James Brydges, the 1st Duke of Chandos. The George V Memorial Garden is a walled garden within the park, once part of the Duke’s kitchen gardens. It was completely redesigned in the 1930s after the park became public and this year (2017) celebrates its 80th anniversary. The garden reflects the 1930s period, with an evergreen structure accented by magnolia and other interesting tree species, flowering shrubs and seasonal groundcover planting. It features a central square pool with fountain, surrounded by a raised York-stone terrace with steps, informally planted flowerbeds, benches, and a sheltered pavilion. In 2006-7 the garden and the park were restored with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund. The park has won Green Flag awards every year from 2010 to 2016/7. Open Saturday 1–5pm Entrance Donnefield Avenue (closest to

station), Whitchurch Lane, Canons Drive, Howberry Road Access Bonded gravel surface on paths. Shallow steps to pond Nearest station Canons Park Buses 79, 186, 340 from Edgware Activities Yoga sessions for all during the afternoon. Herb discovery walk (3pm and 4pm). Face painting and art activity for children. Friends of Canons Park stall, featuring information and leaflets on the history and restoration of the park. Café on site selling lunchtime snacks, cream teas and other teatime

Osterley is the last remaining country estate in London with farm, parkland, gardens, 18th-century mansion and a Tudor stable block. The site, which covers 350 acres, is just eight miles from Hyde Park Corner. The mansion and gardens were created in the late 18th century by architect and designer Robert Adam for the Child family. The 18th-century Pleasure Grounds have been recently restored, and include a grade-I listed Adam garden house with lemon trees, American border, Long Walk (including a new Diamond Jubilee wood), flower beds in the Picturesque style and ornamental vegetable displays in the Tudor walled garden. Open Saturday 10am–4.30pm, Sunday 10am–4.30pm Entrance Jersey Road Access Level access but some gravel/ uneven surfaces and narrow paths Nearest stations Osterley (1.5 km), Isleworth (2.5 km) Bus H91 Activities Plants for sale. Café. Shop. Second-hand bookshop Web www.nationaltrust.org.uk/osterley Head gardener Andy Eddy

Queenswell Junior School Community Garden

A3. Queenswell Junior School Community Garden N20 0NQ NEW This is our third year working together on our small vegetable garden at the back of the main building of the school. In the first year, the children (with a little help) cleared the overgrown vegetable beds and planted lots of different crops together with huge success. They learnt what type of vegetables can grow in the same bed together and how to look after the plants to get the best crop possible. In the second year our big project was helping the local wildlife. The children had great fun, designing and building a large bug hotel, a small frog pond and a large wood pile. The whole school can use this area for the mini-beast section of the curriculum. We also used large pallets to grow vegetables in, to help suppress weeds in the main beds. This year we have built a bird-feeding centre, so that we can help more wildlife through the winter. The children enjoyed clearing, weeding and tidying the beds ready for next year’s growing season. We even provide food for our cooking club! Open Saturday 11am–3pm Entrance Sweets Way Nearest station Totteridge & Whetstone Buses 34, 125, 234, 251, 263, 326, 383 Activities Refreshments available Web www.queenswelljunior.co.uk Gardeners The children of Queenswell Junior School

A4. Roe Green Walled Garden NW9 9HA

Osterley House Gardens

This Victorian walled garden, built in 1899 for the Duchess of Sutherland, has formal lawns with rose beds, a rockery, flower borders, water lilies, a vegetable and fruit garden, a herb

garden, beehive, wormery, compost bins and a high-rise wildlife home. We have recently carried out the ancient craft of ‘hedge laying’ on a hawthorn hedge in the garden. A ‘Devon bank’ hosts a mixture of wildflowers and a dry-stone wall offers a habitat for frogs, newts and other creatures. Our recent creation is a stumpery. There is an original Victorian fishpond, a wildlife pond and a children’s area. Wildlife is encouraged, with bird boxes and feeders. Visitors are welcome to sit and enjoy the peace and tranquillity of this secluded

garden, which has won the Green Flag Community Award for the last 10 years. Open Saturday 11am–4.30pm Entrance Kingsbury Road, opposite Valley Drive. Follow roadway through Roe Green Park Nearest station Kingsbury Buses 183, 204, 324 Car parking Free parking outside garden Activities Children’s activities. Homemade refreshments. Sale of books and bric-à-brac Web www.bhcg.btck.co.uk


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AREA F: Hampstead and London Highgate Outer AREA

B

OGSW Guide 2017

North East London

B5. Myddelton House Gardens EN2 9HG Entrance Green Lanes, south of Manor House junction Access Not suitable for people in wheelchairs or who have trouble with slopes Nearest station Manor House Buses 106, 141, 341 Activities Café serving vegetarian food and herbal teas using produce from the garden. Garden tours. Art & craft activities for children Web www.castle-climbing.co.uk/garden Garden manager Ida Fabrizio Cg

B3. Clissold Community Garden N16 9EX

The Castle Garden

B1. Abney Park N16 0LH Abney Park is an extraordinarily atmospheric and overgrown cemetery, which is now a nature reserve. It contains numerous important tombs and memorials. Opened in 1840 as a Nonconformist garden cemetery, the site was laid out on the grounds of the Abney and Fleetwood estates. It is now a 32-acre historic park, cemetery and nature reserve in a built-up inner-city area. It represents an important green resource for the local community and a unique experience for visitors. The Abney Park Trust, a registered charity, took over the management of the site in 1991 and now runs events including environmental education, training, volunteer projects, guided walks, talks and workshops, as well as theatre productions, film locations, small music festivals and open days. Among the numerous important tombs and memorials are those to General Booth and Catherine Booth, founders of the Salvation Army, and to members of the Loddiges family. Open Saturday 8am–7pm, Sunday 8am–7pm Entrance Stoke Newington High Street Access Generally level access but uneven surfaces, and some narrow paths, steps and ramps Nearest station Stoke Newington

Buses 67, 73, 76, 149, 243, 393, 476 Activities Guided walk with John Baldock on Sunday 18 June at 2pm Conditions No alcohol on site Web www.abneypark.org

B2. The Castle Garden N4 2HA The Castle is a large Victorian water pumping station, listed grade II*. Largely redundant by 1971, the building opened to the public in October 1995 as the Castle Climbing Centre and has dominated the indoor climbing market in London ever since. The Castle Garden has been created over the past four years and is primarily a food, wildlife and education garden. We follow the kitchen garden model, supplying our kitchen with delicious organic produce that is made into vegetarian food for the café. We also grow and process herbs for tea blends for the café and make other herbal products, such as hand balms, sold in our shop. We try to be as self-sufficient and sustainable as possible, doing things like recycling and composting all our kitchen waste and teaching volunteers organic and sustainable food-growing methods. Come and see our food-growing areas, forest garden, beehives, round house, willow dome and much more! Open Saturday 11am–4pm

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The garden is the prime example of Peter Bedford Housing Association’s horticultural therapy programme and one of their burgeoning social enterprises. Hidden behind a row of Georgian terrace houses and bordering a very small wood, tenants and participants have used recycled materials and propagated plants over the years to create an established permaculture garden. Frequented by resident artists, food growers, bird watchers and sun-lovers this garden is open to the public for OGSW and events such as PBHA’s Harvest Festival. Access to the garden can be found between two Georgian houses on Clissold Road, which connects Albion Road with Church Street Stoke Newington. Open Saturday 10am–4pm, Sunday 12.30–4pm Entrance 23a Clissold Road Access Two sets of steps, each with a handrail. Unfortunately we currently have no provision for wheelchair users to access the garden Nearest stations Stoke Newington (1.5km), Manor House (1.8km) Buses 141 & 341 to Stoke Newington Church Street, 73 & 476 to Stoke Newington Town Hall, 393 along Stoke Newington Church St Activities Tours. Produce and products from the garden for sale. Tea and cakes made by participants from PBHA’s project and social enterprise coffee shop. Art and joinery products to view and buy, created by the Peter Bedford art group. Web www.peterbedford.org.uk Gardener Jo Beams Cg

Forty Hall Estate

B4. Forty Hall Estate EN2 9HA NEW The walled garden at Forty Hall was built by Sir Nicholas Rainton at the same time as the Hall (1629 and 1632). Over the centuries the garden has produced fruit and vegetables for the occupants of the Hall, with various greenhouses and an orangery adding to the range of food grown. The estate was sold to the London Borough of Enfield in 1951 and the garden was turned into an ornamental garden. Today visitors can enjoy a mixture of planting styles and purposes from the past four centuries. Rose beds date back to the Parker Bowles period (1920-1951), long borders are planted in the English cottage garden style with flowering perennials and herbs, while striking 16th-century thistles (Onopordum acanthium) punctuate the beds. Fruit and vegetables are grown in beds lining the north and south walls providing a link back to the original purpose of the garden. Ornamental trees of interest include an Indian bean tree (Catalpa bignonioides), handkerchief tree (Davidia involucrata) and tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera). A mature Wisteria sinensis in the north-eastern corner, a short avenue of ornamental cherries and several acers around the garden provide highlights throughout the seasons. The garden is managed by Enfield Council staff with the assistance of volunteers from the Friends of Forty Hall Park. We have won gold at Enfield in Bloom for the last four years, a testament to the hard work of all those who work to maintain this beautiful space. Open Saturday 11am–5pm, Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Forty Hill Access Fully accessible. Access to the

wider park possible along the greenway footpath leading north from the car park Nearest stations Turkey Street (2 km), Enfield Town (2.6 km, bus), Enfield Chase (3.25 km, bus) Buses 191 or W10 to roundabout on Myddleton Avenue, 10-minute walk to the Hall Activities Free guide to the Walled Garden from Reception at the Hall. Cedar Gift Shop open. Refreshments available from the Nice Green Café. Visitors can also explore the wider 31ha of parkland which includes a large meadow, double lime-tree avenue, the Turkey Brook river, woodland, fishing lakes and wildlife ponds Conditions Mobility scooters are available for loan if booked in advance (020 8363 8196) Web www.fortyhallestate.co.uk Senior gardener Sharon Maylin

Myddelton House Gardens

Explore stunning grounds, discover unusual plants and learn the captivating story of Edward Augustus Bowles, one of Britain’s most influential and innovative gardeners in his time. Bowles lived at Myddelton House in Enfield from 1865 to 1954 and dedicated his life to transforming the gardens into a haven for weird and wonderful flora and architectural curiosities. Following periods of neglect, the gardens have undergone extensive restoration and refurbishment. A two-year Heritage Lottery-funded project was completed in 2011. Now in its third decade, Bowles’ garden continues to be restored and maintained according to his unique style and ethos. Explore exotic plants in the restored range of glasshouses, visit the unusual botanical residents of Bowles’ famous ‘lunatic asylum’, and take a stroll through the heritage Kitchen Garden for a selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Look out for the wisteria, which is over 100 years old and bursts with brilliant blue flowers each spring. The gardens are also home to several National Collections, including colourful displays of iris and crocus. Various historical artefacts can be discovered around the eight acres of gardens, from the old Enfield Market Cross to two life-size lead ostriches that are nearly 300 years old. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Bulls Cross, opposite Turkey Street Access Steps and gravel paths, but most parts of the garden are accessible via ramps or pathways


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AREA B: North East London

OGSW Guide 2017 thousands of homes and tens of thousands of jobs. Entry to the park is free and it is open every day. Open Saturday 8am–10pm, Sunday 8am–10pm Entrance Westfield Avenue Access Fully accessible, For park mobility service, contact 0800 0722 110 or visit the website Nearest stations Stratford, Hackney Wick Buses 388, 339 and others at Stratford Activities Special OGSW walking tours by Community Guide Volunteers, giving an overview of the park and how it’s constantly evolving. Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 June, 11am, 12 and 1pm, departing from outside the Podium Bar and Kitchen. Tours must be booked in advance. Maximum 15 places per tour Web queenelizabetholympicpark.co.uk

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

Nearest station Turkey Street (1 km) Buses 217, 317, 617, 629 to Turkey Street (500m) Activities Information about Bowles and the history of the gardens in the museum. Tours of gardens. Refreshments at Bowles Tea Room Web www.visitleevalley.org.uk/ myddelton Head gardener James Hall

B6. Pudding Mill Allotments E15 2NJ NEW Manor Gardening Society (MGS) moved to their 50-plot site – Pudding Mill allotments – in February 2016. Situated at the southern edge of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, the site is owned by the London Development Corporation and is leased to MGS for 38 years. It replaces their previous site at Bully Fen in Hackney Wick, which was demolished to make way for the Olympic Park, along with a sister site at Marsh Lane in Leyton. Surrounded by tower blocks, railways and canals, Pudding Mill Allotments have been brought to life by a vibrant community of old and new MGS tenants. Their pleasure and pride in their allotments is apparent from the diversity of planting and willingness to experiment. We are dedicated to showing how urban allotments can provide food, leisure, companionship and a sustainable, wildlife-friendly environment in one of the busiest cities in Europe. Open Sunday 12–4pm Entrance Bridgewater Road Access Some woodchip paths. Disabled parking Nearest stations Stratford, Stratford International

Buses 25, 108, 276, 425, D8 Activities To be decided on the day, depending on the weather. Web www.mgs-puddingmill.org Society Secretary Mark Harton

B7. Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park E20 2AD Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park was created to host the highly successful London 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games. Since the Games, the park has been transformed to become one of London’s most exciting new tourist attractions. The park reopened to the public in 2014, and since then millions of visitors have enjoyed its gardens, landscaping and state-of-theart sporting venues every year. It is also at the heart of the redevelopment of east London, and is already providing

Railway Fields

B8. Railway Fields N4 1ES NEW A former goods yard that has been turned into a Local Nature Reserve. It was opened to the public 30 years ago by a group of local ecologists, and is now owned by Haringey Council and managed by The Conservation Volunteers, a national environmental charity. The Reserve is small (around a hectare in size) but it is a fantastic example of urban biodiversity, situated off bustling Green Lanes, bordered by the New River and adjacent to the London Overground railway line. Over 200 species of wildflower, 70 species of bird and 21 species of butterfly have been recorded on site. It is also the home of Haringey knotweed, discovered in 1987 by David Bevan, a rare and unlikely hybrid of Japanese knotweed and Russian vine,

which until then had not been discovered growing in the wild. For local people it is a peaceful green haven and a chance to experience local native wildlife. It offers a patchwork of habitats, including woodland, meadows and ponds. Local schools use it as an environmental education resource, and it is the base for TCV, who run conservation volunteering projects on site and in various green spaces in Haringey and North London. The Friends of Railway Fields, a devoted group of local volunteers, also work with TCV, carrying out conservation work days and hosting events that engage the local community, such dawn-chorus bird walks, natural arts and crafts workshops, bat walks and summer fairs. Open Saturday 11am–2pm Entrance Green Lanes close to Harringay Green Lanes station Access Accessible toilets. Ramp. Variable paths including wheelchair-accessible aggregate paths on part of the site Nearest stations Manor House, Harringay Green Lanes Buses 141, 29, 341, W5 Activities Nature trails and walks, natural play area, pond-dipping (possible) Web www.tcv.org.uk/railwayfields Site manager/senior project officer Clif Osborne

B9. Rainham Hall RM13 9YN Rainham Hall is nestled in the heart of Rainham village on the far eastern fringes of London. It is surrounded by a contrasting landscape of big skies, wild marshland and thriving industry. The gardens, located to the rear of the Hall, comprise nearly three acres and feature an orchard, herbaceous borders and woodland play area. Thanks to the efforts of volunteers and the community gardener over the last few years, an exciting transformation has been taking place. There are many new projects in progress such as the creation of small amphitheatre, hugel bed and a bosquette art walk. This green oasis in the heart of Rainham is constantly evolving. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Gate on Wennington Road Access Level access from the street. A winding path allows access between the top garden and lower lawn Nearest station Rainham Buses 103, 165, 287, 372 Car parking Nearest public car parking at Tesco Activities Special garden tours with

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Rainham Hall

community gardener, Jesse Lock, who will illuminate the vision for this urban green space. Tours each day at 11am, 12 noon, 2pm and 3pm (lasting for 30 minutes). OGSW ticket holders only – 15 spaces per tour on a first-come, firstserved basis Web www.nationaltrust.org.uk/rainhamhall/ Community gardener Jesse Lock

425, 473, 678 Activities 1-3pm Seed-planting workshops (all ages). Workshops last about 15 minutes. 3-4pm Talk on aquaponic urban farming, followed by Q&A Web www.roofeast.com

B11. Woodcroft Wildspace N21 3QP

B10. Roof East E15 1XE With support from the GLA Pocket Park Fund and the Stratford Renaissance Partnership, Urban Space Management teamed up with Groundwork London to design a unique rooftop urban park. The park includes planting, seating, a bar, an open-air cinema and a number of vintage sports cars used as planters, complementing spectacular views over the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Recycled pallets, scaffold boards, plants from the Chelsea Flower Show, and even recycled decking from the Olympic Park footbridge were used to make planters full of shrubs and saplings to bring colour and scents to the space. Roof East is home to the GrowUp Box, an urban farm based in a shipping container using aquaponics and vertical growing to demonstrate a sustainable model for local food production. Launched in June 2014, the park plays host to a wide variety of cultural events, from music and dance performances to family activities during the school holidays. Open Saturday 12–7pm, Sunday 12–7pm Entrance Stratford Shopping Centre, lift to level 8 Access Stair and lift access Nearest station Stratford Buses 25, 86, 104, 108, 158, 238, 257, 262,

Woodcroft Wildspace, located in Winchmore Hill, north London, is an educational wildspace for the benefit of the whole of Enfield borough. The 3.5-acre site features a wide variety of natural habitats, an orchard, wetland and separate boggy areas, an apiary, scrubland and open-air classroom facilities. The site has a very rich range of species in the plants, trees, insects, birds, pond life and mammals. It provides a tranquil environment used by schools and community groups. Fitness is also encouraged through our eco-gym and other activities such as tai-chi. Open Saturday 9am–5pm, Sunday 9am–5pm Entrance Woodcroft – off Broad Walk Access Grassy, uneven surfaces making it difficult but not impossible for wheelchairs Nearest station Winchmore Hill Bus W9 Activities Guided tours explaining the features of the wildspace and how the educational objectives are achieved. Orienteering sessions to explore the flora and fauna Web www.woodcroft.org.uk Chair Bob Ladell


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AREA F: Hampstead and London Highgate Outer AREA

C

OGSW Guide 2017

South East London

Senior site and projects officer Sylvia Myers

C3. Charlton Manor Community Garden (at Woodlands Farm) DA16 3RP NEW

Ballast Quay Garden

C1. Ballast Quay Garden SE10 9PD Ballast Quay garden is set on a wharf beside the River Thames in East Greenwich that was returned to nature in the late 1960s. This is a place for quiet meditation and relaxation in the presence of two powers of nature – the river and the plants. It is run by and for the neighbours of Ballast Quay. We have sculpture by Brian Greaves, blacksmith, and Kevin Herlihy, who designed and made the goat memorial. Dogs are very welcome, but owners beware it’s a dangerous site. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Ballast Quay Access Wheelchair access is difficult but not impossible with a carer Nearest station Maze Hill Bus 188 Activities Small exhibition on a subject of local interest, a display by Men In Sheds and a display linking the garden with Surrey Docks Farm. Teas may be available Conditions This is a riverside site, so great care is needed Web greenwooddm@hotmail.com Gardener Dr Diane Greenwood

C2. Centre for Wildlife Gardening SE15 4EE The Centre for Wildlife Gardening is an idyllic wildlife haven tucked away behind a quiet residential street in south London. It is a favourite spot for local families, school children, gardeners and wildlife watchers, having grown beyond recognition since the London Wildlife Trust created it in the late 1980s from an old council vehicle depot. The centre’s demonstration wildlife garden has a range of minihabitats, including four ponds, chalk bank, wildflower meadow, woodland copse, herb garden, stag beetle sanctuaries, insect hotels, and raised beds demonstrating permaculture. Do visit – you could see newts, toads, foxes, or even a kingfisher! Open Sunday 10.30am–4.30pm Entrance 28 Marsden Road Access Fully accessible Nearest stations East Dulwich, Peckham Rye Buses 185, 40, 37, 176, 484 Activities Wildlife garden tours with wildlife gardening tips, 11.30am and 2.30pm. Bug-hunting and pond-dipping for families. Wild garden self-led trail. Refreshments available for small donation Web www.wildlondon.org.uk/reserves/ centre-for-wildlife-gardening

This new garden was the brainchild of Charlton Manor Primary School head teacher Mr Baker and has been two years in development. Set in 89 acres of farm and woodland in southeast London, it provides an amazing area for children and adults to discover gardening and growing fresh produce. It has been developed with Olivier Blanc, creator of the Henri Le Worm App (a child-friendly app offering the discovery of growing and cooking) which, with its associated garden at Hampton Court Flower Show gave us the inspiration and design to bring this digital world to life. Children from Charlton Manor Primary School and other local schools are involved in sowing, growing, harvesting and cooking edible produce. They learn the importance of composting and experience the natural wild surroundings and wildlife, creating bug hotels and bird boxes while operating and understanding an organic approach to gardening. Children also grow produce to order and sell it to a London chain restaurant in Greenwich. Annual and perennial produce, fruit and vegetables, are grown in raised beds and polytunnels for cooking and eating. Natural native hedgerows grow around part of the garden, with Woodlands Farm creating the backdrop

Charlton Manor Community Garden

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focus for communal activities. Open Saturday 2–5pm Entrance Culverley Road Access Easy access – flat land with wide gate Nearest station Catford Bridge Buses 54, 75, 124, 136, 181, 185, 202, 208, 284 Activities Garden fête on Saturday afternoon. Teas and homemade cakes and jams, local honey (from surrounding roads), plant stall, local crafts for sale, raffle, face-painting, games for small children and live music Web www.culverleygreen.org

C6. De Frene Market Garden, Sydenham Garden

Charlton Manor Primary School

to the garden, providing hay meadows, wildflowers, 300-year-old oak wood, livestock and a wildlife pond. Open Saturday 10am–3pm, Sunday 10am–3pm Entrance 331 Shooters Hill Access Slopes with uneven grass and gravel surfaces. Unsuitable for wheelchair access. Limited parking Nearest stations Welling (then bus), Falconwood Buses 89, 486 Activities Sowing seeds and plants in pots or beds. Hot and cold drinks available with school-made cakes and fresh produce. Plant and produce sale Conditions Working farm – please close gates behind you Web www.charltonmanorprimary.co.uk Community gardener Hilary Piggot

C4. Charlton Manor Primary School SE7 7EF Hidden away behind Charlton Manor Primary School dining restaurant you will find our secret garden. A number of years ago it was derelict and overgrown. Today it’s a haven that includes raised beds, vegetables, fruit trees and vines, a large heated greenhouse, wildlife area with pond, bird hide, chickens and our very own bees and observation beehive. The garden has been awarded Green Flag status for the past three years. Used year-round by all our children (aged 4 to 11) there is a variety of gardening clubs at lunchtime and after school. In 2012 Charlton Manor led a group of other schools from Greenwich on a learning journey into plant care, which resulted in us growing the most beautiful cut flowers, being awarded a silver-gilt medal at the Chelsea Flower Show and

SE26 4AB meeting Her Majesty the Queen. Since then, every year, we have been awarded silver-gilt medals at Chelsea and gained further awards at Hampton Court Flower Show and Bexley in Bloom. We have been invited to enter all again in 2017. For a number of years we have been involved with Woodlands Farm on Shooters Hill and have now created our very own Charlton Manor Community Garden giving our children and other local schools the experience of food growing within a real working farm whilst helping to encourage a healthy lifestyle. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–3pm Entrance Indus Road Access Flat gravel paths may be difficult for wheelchairs, but we can assist Nearest station Charlton Buses 53, 54, 89, 422, 486 Activities Tea, coffee and schoolmade cakes. Pond-dipping. Talk and exploration of our observation beehive. Tours of the garden. Staff available to answer questions Web www.charltonmanorprimary.co.uk School gardener Nicholas Shelley Cg

C5. Culverley Green SE6 2JZ The gardens here form a triangle at the junction of three roads and were originally laid out as part of plans for an early Edwardian estate. The planting scheme comprises informal groupings of shrubbery set around a lawn. Each autumn more bulbs are planted to increase the spring impact and now autumn bulbs are planned. The local residents’ association continues to raise money for the green and additional trees for the surrounding tree-lined streets, and to promote use of the green as a

Growing Lives, a project of Sydenham Garden, is based at the De Frene Market Garden site. The project supports people suffering from mental distress and physical ill-health. It aims to improve well-being through social, therapeutic and vocational horticultural sessions, as well as offering an opportunity to achieve Open College Network qualifications. With new, transferable skills and increased self-confidence, participants’ employability also increases. The one-acre site is managed in sympathy with wildlife and includes raised beds, a polytunnel, orchard, an earth oven and solar fruit drier. Open Saturday 11am–2.30pm Entrance Entrance between houses 35 and 37 De Frene Road Access Most of the site fully accessible with purpose-built ramps where needed. Some non-accessible paths. Entrance track is steep but we have a drop-off point at the top for cars Nearest station Sydenham (no service 17/06/17), Lower Sydenham Buses 75, 202, 356 Activities Explore our site and, if you like, join in with our monthly local volunteer day Web www.sydenhamgarden.org.uk Garden manager David Cg

C7. Dulwich Upper Wood LNR SE19 1SS Dulwich Upper Wood is a small section of the Great North Wood, ancient woodland which once stretched from New Cross to Croydon. Paths through the high trees lead past fungi and fern gardens, insect hotels, and an interpretation centre, and offer an enjoyable amble through a secret


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AREA F: Hampstead and London Highgate Outer AREA

AREA C: South East London place on earth’. Open Saturday 11am–5pm, Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Red House Lane, Bexleyheath Access Difficult for wheelchairs with uneven brick paths and some steps Nearest station Bexleyheath Buses 89, 96, 422, 486, B11, B12, B14, B15, B16 Activities House can be visited for an additional entry fee (National Trust members free) after 1.30pm. Guided tours of the house from 11am to 1.30pm by prior booking only Web www.nationaltrust.org.uk/redhouse Gardener in charge Rob Smith

C10. Royal Garrison Church of St George, Woolwich SE18 Red House

woodland just below Crystal Palace. The site is managed by The Conservation Volunteers as a local nature reserve Open Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance East side of Farquhar Road Access Some slopes and steps, but there is a path that goes right through the nature reserve that is suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs. Two bark paths Nearest stations Gipsy Hill, Crystal Palace Buses 3, 122, 157, 202, 227, 322, 358, 363, 410, 417 to Crystal Palace Activities Guided walk at 11.30am. Portakabin with local history and wildlife information. Find out about the management and history of this lovely woodland local nature reserve Web www.tcv.org.uk Project officers Jim Murphy/ Anna Nichols Cg

C8. The Old Blue Cross Pet Cemetery SE18 4LX NEW The Old Blue Cross Pet Cemetery is the remaining part of what was the Blue Cross Kennels, where the pets of service personnel were kennelled, initially during the 2nd Boer War (1899-1902) and then WW1 and WW2. It is also the final resting place for much-loved pets of members of the community. Originally the memorial stones were upstanding, with attractive flowerbeds and shrubs. Today the stones are laid in the ground. Although animals can no longer be buried here, there is a Memorial Wall where plaques can be erected to commemorate a much-loved pet. There are over 200 stones. Some are so worn that the inscriptions are no

longer legible, while others have touching inscriptions which set the imagination to wonder about the families involved and what sort of animals their pets were. Open Saturday 11am–3pm, Sunday 11am–3pm Entrance Signposted path from Shooters Hill Road opposite the Fox Under the Hill pub Access Fully accessible but some of the paved surface is uneven. Benches and seating on site. Toilets at the pub opposite the cemetery and the Charlton Lido café Nearest stations Blackheath, then bus Bus 89 to Charlton Lido/Hornfair Park Activities Enjoy reading the many poignant inscriptions on the stones and talk to committee members who have worked on site over the last four years. Display of archive pictures and maps showing the extent of the kennels in the 1930-40s. Bring a swimsuit and have a swim in the open-air lido next to the park. Refreshments in the Lido café or the Fox Under the Hill pub. Have your picnic sitting under the trees Web www.oldbluecrosspetcemetery. org.uk Gardeners Committee working group

C9. Red House DA6 8JF Simple garden and orchard surrounding the only house commissioned, created and lived in by William Morris, founder of the Arts and Crafts movement. Red House is a building of extraordinary architectural and social significance. When it was completed in 1860, it was described by Edward Burne-Jones as ‘the beautifullest

St. George’s Garrison Church was built for the barracks directly opposite. It is a beautiful, tranquil place with splendid views of the Royal Artillery parade ground opposite. The grade-II listed ruins of the Victorian church (designed by Thomas Wyatt, the Earl of Pembroke’s architect for Wilton church in Wiltshire) were largely destroyed by a V1 flying bomb in July 1944. They contain the VC Memorial to the Royal Artillery, at the centre of which is the glorious Venetian mosaic of St George and the Dragon by Salvati. The mosaics of the phoenix and peacock have been restored and the remaining mosaics await restoration. Landscaping and planting of the garden is on-going throughout 2017. Lawn now covers what was once the paved floor of the church nave. Walled flowerbeds with plants and climbing roses provide a fine setting and a place for quiet and contemplation. There is a memorial in the garden to local men who died on active service or as a result of terrorist activities since the end of WW2. A dedicated team of volunteers, together with young people from the local Shooters Hill post-16 campus, help to maintain and improve the garden as a community resource. Open Saturday 11am–5pm, Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Grand Depot Road, opposite Royal Artillery parade ground Access Some uneven tarmac surfacing in front of building. Central gravel path inside Nearest station Woolwich Arsenal Buses 122, 161, 178, 244, 386, 469 Activities Tea, coffee and homemade cakes. Plant sale. Web stgeorgeswoolwich.org

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OGSW Guide 2017

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South West London

Kingston University – Kingston Hill

Kingston University Campuses D1. Kingston Hill D2. Dorich House D3. Knights Park/Stanley Picker

D1. Kingston University – Kingston Hill KT2 7LB NEW Campus with avenues of formal landscaping and areas of wild planting. Green walls with climbers line a slope leading to a listed wall with mature trees, passion flowers and magnolia. To the rear of the Business School are more wildflower slopes and banks. The Kingston Hill Memorial Garden is split into two parts: a woodland wildlife garden with a memorial installation which reflects the native woodland on site, and a newly planted rose garden that reflects the historic nature of some of the buildings. Coombehurst meadow, beside Coombehurst House, has a small area of acid grassland on the periphery. A giant sequoia stands sentinel over a pond, both survivors from the period when the house was a country mansion. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance Kingston Hill Access Lawn area not suitable for wheelchairs. Parts of the campus may be undergoing development work at the time of OGSW. Maps on the day will show any areas that are not accessible Nearest station Norbiton Buses 85, K3

home of the Russian sculptor Dora Gordine and her husband, the Hon. Richard Hare, a scholar of Russian art and literature. Now grade II-listed, the building was completed in 1936 to Gordine’s design, and is an exceptional example of a modern studio house created by and for a female artist. It was built on the remnants of an old orchard which is still present on the site. The orchard trees in the grounds are managed by Kingston University’s Biodiversity Action Group. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance 67 Kingston Vale Access Due to the historic nature of the house, wheelchair access is limited to one room on the ground floor Nearest station Norbiton Buses 85, K3 Activities Entry to the museum is normally charged, but will be free to OGSW ticket holders. Enjoy the grounds, house and collections and, weather permitting, spectacular views from the roof terrace overlooking Richmond Park.

D2. Kingston University – Dorich House SW15 3RN NEW One of London’s hidden gems, Dorich House Museum is located a ‘deer’s leap’ from Richmond Park, along Kingston Vale. Dorich House is the former studio

Kingston University – Dorich House

House open for tours, 11am-5pm Web www.dorichhousemuseum.org.uk

D3. Kingston University – Knights Park/Stanley Picker KT1 2QJ NEW Knights Park campus sits next to the Hogsmill River. In 2014 a partnership of Kingston University, the South East Rivers Trust and volunteers formed of students, staff and local community members and groups came together to create a new river bank in the Hogsmill adjacent to the campus. Visit the site and see what wildlife you can spot using the embankment and river next to it, followed by a visit to the Stanley Picker Gallery Garden. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance Grange Road Access The campus is accessible to those with limited mobility. Metered street parking on site may not be available due to summer improvement works Nearest station Kingston Buses 65, 71, 281, 406, 418, K2, K3 Web www.kingston.ac.uk/ aboutkingstonuniversity/location/ directions/knightspark


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AREA D: F: Hampstead South West and London Highgate

OGSW Guide 2017

Wandsworth Community Gardens Cluster D4. Bramford Community Garden D5. Wendelsworth Community Garden D6. Paradise Co-op Urban Farm A cluster of three gardens run by community groups which should be viewed as one entity and seen together. Suggested itinerary • Travel to Wandsworth Town station for Bramford Community Garden • For Wendelsworth Community Garden, turn left out of Bramford Gardens and follow Old York Road; left into Fairfield St; straight ahead over the traffic island (town hall on your right) into St Ann’s Hill, right into Borrodaile Road, then to the end of Vermont Road. (0.8 miles, approx 15 minutes’ walk) • For Paradise Co-op Urban Farm, from Vermont Road turn left into Allfarthing Lane. Follow it into Heathfield Road, cross Earlsfield Road and continue on Heathfield Road. Farm opposite the visitors’ entrance to Wandsworth Prison. (0.8 miles, approx 15 minutes’ walk) • Return via 219 bus to Clapham Junction railway station or, for the nearest community garden, continue along Heathfield Road, then Lyford Road, then the footpath to Sandgate Lane, right into Burntwood Lane, left into the Springfield Hospital site and follow signs to Central London Golf Centre for Share Community Garden (D14). (1.1 miles, approx 20 minutes’ walk)

D4. Bramford Community Garden SW18 1EW This community garden is designed and managed as a model of sustainability. Run by Transition Town Wandsworth volunteers, it aims to provide wildlife benefit, incorporate productive elements and be beautiful, contributing to its setting within a public park and educating the community on environmental issues in gardening. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance Old York Road, opposite Homebase entrance Access The garden is situated within a park and can be easily viewed from the public footpath. The raised bed area is accessible for push chairs Nearest station Wandsworth Town Buses 28, 44 (stop outside) + 28, 37, 39, 44, 87, 156, 170, 270, 337, 670 (500m) Activities Garden fête. Refreshments. Help-yourself herbs Web www.ttwandsworth.wordpress. com/community-garden/ Cg

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Access Entrance via a large double gate down a paved path. Main wood-chip path suitable for wheelchairs Nearest stations Wandsworth Common, Earlsfield, Clapham Junction Buses 77, 219 Activities Guided walks, scavenger hunts and face-painting for children. Volunteers available to explain how we work. Refreshments Web www.paradisewandsworth.org/ Cg

D7. Carshalton House Landscape Garden

D5. Wendelsworth Community Garden SW18 2LH NEW Gardening on a large council estate in the heart of the borough, we have been growing vegetables organically in our raised beds for the last five years. Our newly established community orchard has a wide range of fruit, which we plan to grow according to permaculture principles. We’re proud to be leading on a borough-wide composting project involving other community gardens during 2017. For more information, find us on Facebook. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance Corner of Allfarthing Lane and Vermont Road Access Some surfaces are uneven and/ or grassed Nearest station Wandsworth Town Buses 44, 77, 270

Activities Guided tours Coordinator Martin Cobley

D6. Paradise Co-op Urban Farm SW18 3HS NEW Once an overgrown and derelict site next to Wandsworth Prison, hard work and dedication from volunteers has turned this space into a thriving and beautiful farm in the centre of the community. We use this space for education, participation and celebration and believe that growing things on the land helps us to grow as a community. It’s a great place for kids and adults alike to adventure and explore. Paradise Co-op is special because of how it’s been created – by and for the community. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance Heathfield Road, opposite visitors’ entrance to prison

The grounds of 17th-century Carshalton House feature the remains of a formal landscape garden of 1716-20, laid out for Sir John Fellowes, sub-governor of the South Sea Company. The early gardens may have been designed by Charles Bridgeman, and include a water tower by architect Henry Joynes. A serpentine lake (now dry) with sham bridge was added in the later 18th century, replacing an earlier formal canal. The chalk-and-brick hermitage or grotto dates from around 1750. The remains of a wilderness survive as boundary plantings. The ornate brickand-stone water tower is a fine example of baroque architecture, and contains an orangery, pump chamber (with part restored water wheel), saloon and plunge bath with Delft tiles. Open Sunday 12–5pm Entrance Pedestrian entrance to water tower in West Street Access The water tower is wheelchairaccessible. Access to Hermitage via steps. Please phone 020 8647 0984 in advance regarding disabled access Nearest station Carshalton Buses 127, 157, 407 Car parking None on site. Parking in Festival Walk or Carshalton village Activities Water tower open all afternoon. Guided walks of the grounds and hermitage according to demand Web www.carshaltonwatertower.co.uk

D8. Grove House Estate and Downshire House (Roehampton University) SW15 5PJ

Wendelsworth Community Garden

Roehampton Great House originally stood on this site, built in 1625 for the Lord High Treasurer of England under Charles I. Some of the foundations are still visible in the cellar of Grove House. James Wyatt built the present house in 1792 for Sir Joshua Vanneck. Now part of Roehampton University, the beautiful

Linden Lodge School

listed grounds of Grove House were first laid out in the 18th century. The formal gardens, lily pond with fountain and limestone terrace were added in the 19th century, as well as the grotto (it is said, to deaden the noise from the adjacent convent!) There is also a lake, a sham bridge and a mausoleum. The icehouse was only discovered in 1998, when exploratory work on the grotto revealed a bricked-up door. Downshire House was built around 1770. The owner from 1912 to 1920 was Sir Stephen Herbert Gatty. In his time, extensive formal gardens were laid out, of which a small part survives to the north brick walls, stone balustrades with pineapples and a hipped-roof summerhouse with paired columns, by Oswald P. Milne. In 1949 Downshire House was the last of the Roehampton villas to be used as a private residence. In 1963, when it was Garnet College, the LCC installed a Lynn Chadwick sculpture The Watchers in the grounds. In 2006 part of the sculpture was stolen and the rest was removed to safe storage. In a collaborative project with Chadwick’s estate, the sculpture was returned to the grounds in early 2016. Open Sunday 11am–4pm Entrance Roehampton Lane Access Most of the garden circuit is accessible by wheelchair. Some steps but alternative routes are available. Uneven surface in places Nearest station Barnes (1km) Buses 72, 265 and 493 stop outside, 85 and 170 a few minutes’ walk away Car parking Parking available on site Activities Self-guided walks with information sheets

Web www.roehampton.ac.uk/Colleges/ Froebel-College/ Cg

D9. Linden Lodge School SW19 6JB NEW The gardens at Linden Lodge School are designed to support its work as a specialist regional centre for children aged two to 19 with a visual impairment, including those who are multi-disabled and visually impaired. The exterior of the main building remains much as it was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens in 1934. The Woodland Walk pays homage to the original Gertrude Jekyll design for the grounds. It allows children to feel the freedom of being immersed in the majestic calm of the wilderness, within a setting that has been carefully crafted to maximise safety and accessibility. The Linden Lodge Sensory Garden is a highly appealing environment which aids the children’s development through a variety of interactive features and sculptural elements. A sensory pathway offers a dynamic experience featuring sound stations, a bubble machine, and tactile memory posts. Sculptural displays

Linden Lodge School


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AREA D: South West London

OGSW Guide 2017

D10. Meadlands Primary School TW10 7TS NEW

Meadlands Primary School

range from soothing water features to stimulating shaped mirrors. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance 61 Princes Way Access Fully accessible to all physical and sensory needs Nearest station Southfields Bus 39 Activities Discover how to interact with the gardens as the children do. Mobility staff on hand guide visitors through the grounds blindfolded or in a wheelchair. Gain insight into new ways the outdoors reveals itself when approached from a different perspective. Refreshments and children’s handicrafts for sale Web www.lindenlodge.wandsworth. sch.uk

Meadlands’ outside space was simply grass lawn with five trees 23 years ago. Garden creator and coordinator Roger Howard had a vision of an environmental garden to improve the space for children, staff and the indigenous wildlife. Mimicking the countryside, the wildlife garden was created with hedgerows and paths into the woodlands. Different habitats have been planted to attract a wide range of birds, amphibians and insects, and include a loggery, a pond and nesting sites. Naturalist David Bellamy officially opened the garden in 1996. A treehouse and chickens are recent additions, as well as an orchard and raised beds. A highlight of the school calendar is Grounds Day, when Roger, pupils and parents tend the area and make improvements. With a qualified Forest Schools teacher among our staff, this is a programme that all our pupils benefit from and recently we won the Primary Science Quality Mark. We have also won awards from the Children’s Flower Society and Richmond in Bloom. Open Saturday 9am–3pm, Sunday 9am–3pm Entrance Main school gates through car park Access Some narrow paths and muddy paths in the woodland area Nearest stations Richmond or Kingston, then bus Buses 65, 371 Activities Tea/coffee, cake, botanicals. Fresh produce. Children’s activities, including Forest Schools Web www.meadlands.richmond.sch.uk Garden creator and coordinator Roger Howard

D11. Roehampton Club SW15 5LR The gardens were laid out at the time of the formation of the Club in 1901 and, although many changes have been made within the estate, they remain the heart of the facility, with many of the original features. The wooden clubhouse was replaced in 1969 with a glass and steel structure and both old and new features complement each other sympathetically. There is an attractive vista from the back of the clubhouse, which leads through a sunken garden with ornamental pond to a yew-hedge walk and finishes at a pavilion. Beyond a wrought-iron gateway is a rockery and herbaceous walk with seating bays

featuring fig, roses and wisteria climbers. A croquet lawn is flanked with attractive shrub planting and trees of interest. Returning to the clubhouse, there is the original tea lawn and rhododendron walk, which finishes the trail. Open Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Roehampton Lane Access Sections of limestone paving and gravel paths be uneven. Steps down to the sunken garden area. Nearest station Barnes Buses 33, 72, 265, 337, 493, 969 Activities Refreshments Web www.roehamptonclub.co.uk Head gardener Steve Hutchens

Sellincourt Primary School Edible Garden

Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability

D12. Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability SW15 3SW The Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability (RHN) first moved to West Hill in Putney in 1863 and for over 150 years has operated on this beautiful elevated site in south-west London. The property was originally owned by Mrs Penelope Pitt, who purchased the land in 1759 and commissioned Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown to design the estate. Later owners included Johann Anthony Rucker, who commissioned another prominent landscape gardener, Humphry Repton. Rucker also commissioned architect Jesse Gibson to design a new house, Melrose Hall. After brief ownership by the Duke of Sutherland, Melrose Hall was purchased by John Augustus Beaumont, who also bought large parts of the estate of Earl Spencer, including Wimbledon Park House. In 1863 Melrose Hall was purchased by the trustees of the newly established charity, The Royal Hospital for Incurables. The considerable role played by both Brown and Repton in the design of the grounds at the RHN makes the gardens of great interest. Brown designed an open landscape of grass and trees, a lake and a home farm. Evidence of his original designs remain visible in the grounds, with one tree that still stands from his time and vistas which are still evident. The hospital grounds

also include an award-winning cloister garden and several patient gardens. Due to its elevated position, the garden offers wonderful views over north west and south west London. Open Sunday 11am–4pm Entrance West Hill Access Fully accessible for wheelchairs Nearest stations Putney, East Putney Bus 170 Activities Tours at 11 am, 12 noon, 1pm, 2pm, and 3pm. Tea and cake stall Web www.rhn.org.uk

D13. Sellincourt Primary School Edible Garden SW17 9SA NEW Sellincourt Edible Gardens was set up in 2016 with funding from Awards for All and The Hedley Foundation, and support from Trees for Cities. Pupils have been learning how to cultivate and harvest different food produce over the year. This has been related to science topics and healthy eating in the curriculum. The gardens feature raised beds growing a variety of apple trees, fruits and vegetables. We also have a sensory garden at the front of the Early Years building, a shaded garden area and wildflower section. Among the beds are garden sculptures, which we are adding to each year. The gardens are an inspiring example of a school community working together to provide much-needed opportunities to garden in an inner-city environment. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance On Sellincourt Road Access Fully accessible Nearest stations Tooting Broadway, Tooting

Buses 44, 57, 77, 280, 355, G1 Activities Seed planting. Leaf sculptures. Children’s art activities. Salad and fruit ‘make and taste’ sessions. Refreshments Web www.sellincourt.wandsworth.sch.uk Gardeners Sellincourt pupils

27

and a wildlife pond. The site includes a ‘bee-lovely’ garden, sponsored by Neal’s Yard Remedies, which has been specially planted to encourage bees. The garden is also the headquarters of Share Gardening, one of Share’s social enterprises, which provides garden maintenance and planting services. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Vehicle access via Glenburnie Road; pedestrian and bicycle access also from Burntwood Lane. The garden is situated in a walled enclosure to the northwest of the Main Building, facing the golf course and next to Building 15 Nearest stations Tooting Bec (1.4km) underground, Wandsworth Common (1.7km) overground Bus G1 to Springfield University Hospital Car parking Available in the hospital. £2 for the whole day. Disabled visitors can park within the garden Activities Plants for sale. Refreshments by Share Catering, a social enterprise providing community catering services in Tea, coffee, cake and cold drinks Conditions No alcohol and no smoking Web www.sharecommunity.org.uk Horticulture training manager Jenny Shand Cg

D15. Southside House SW19 4RJ NEW Share Community Garden

D14. Share Community Garden SW17 7DJ This beautiful 2.5-acre walled garden, set within the grounds of Springfield University Hospital, maintains a strong link with its historic past in both planting and function. The project is based in the Gillian Webb Memorial Garden, which was once the male airing court in the days when Springfield was the Surrey County Pauper Lunatic Asylum. In 1841, the space was laid out with vegetable plots maintained by the patients. Today Share Community, a charity that provides training and employment support for disabled adults, uses the space as a hub for its thriving horticultural training project. The site includes a number of polytunnels and a glasshouse, which trainees use all year round to produce bedding plants, food crops and decorative plants to use in Share’s kitchen or for sale. Other features include colourful herbaceous and shrub borders, herbs, fruit bushes and trees,

Wilderness, order, woodland, secret pathways, classical follies and water all combine to create a garden of surprises at Southside House, with formal and informal elements entwined. We try to garden in an organic and environmentally responsible way and avoid the use of all chemical fertilisers, pesticides and herbicides. There is an orchard and small kitchen garden and a wild woodland grove. Wildlife is encouraged at Southside and regular residents/visitors include great, willow, blue and long-tailed tits, dunnocks, robins, fieldfares, green, gold and bull finches, nuthatches, blackbirds, thrushes (occasionally), greater-spotted woodpeckers, green woodpeckers, tawny owls and jays (less welcome).

Southside House


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OGSW Guide 2017

Strawberry Hill House

Open Saturday 2–5pm, Sunday 2–5pm Access Narrow and rough pathways, low arches, changes of level and water features Nearest station Wimbledon Buses 200, 93 Activities Guided tours of Southside House, 2pm and 3.30pm (admission charges apply) Web www.southsidehouse.com Head gardener Blanca Rey-Surman

D16. Strawberry Hill House TW1 4ST NEW Strawberry Hill’s 18th-century garden is one of the earliest in the English naturalistic style. With its winding paths, groves of trees and scented plants such as lilacs and honeysuckles ‘hanging down in festoons’, this beautiful landscape, designed by owner Horace Walpole from 1747, contrasted with the popular styles of the time. The restoration of the landscape garden continues in 2017 with the recreation of Walpole’s Serpentine Walk using many flowering trees and shrubs. Visitors can enjoy a peaceful and colourful landscape, explore beautiful surroundings and admire the unforgettable view of the picturesque castle. The popular café overlooks Walpole’s Acacia Grove and the community garden with its beds of herbs and vegetables. Open Saturday 10am–4pm, Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance 268 Waldegrave Road Access Woodland walk inaccessible to wheelchairs Nearest station Strawberry Hill Buses R68, 33 Activities Guided landscape tours – 11am, 12 noon, 2pm and 3pm with our knowledgeable garden guides. Learn about its key features, restoration and place in the historical context of the Thames landscape. Children’s garden

trail – look out for special trees, objects and furry friends Web www.strawberryhillhouse.org.uk Gardener in charge Kate Robinson

D17. Trumpeters’ House TW9 1PD NEW Situated on Crown land, once the site of Richmond Palace, built by Henry VII in the 16th century. Elizabeth I died there in 1603 and it remained in royal ownership till the death of Charles I, when it was sold and subsequently demolished. The only remains of the palace are two stone statues of trumpeters, which originally adorned the middle gate of the palace and were erected at the side entrance of the new house. The gardens were restored in the 1950s after the house suffered bomb damage during WW2. The current owner has spent 20 years developing and improving the garden, now considered one of the most important in the area. A huge lawn rolls from the front columned portico of the house down to the river. On the right, a series of garden ‘rooms’

emerge, many enclosed in clipped box hedging. Old apple, plum, pear and quince trees appear throughout the garden in orchards or singly. A newly planted ornamental pear tree avenue follows an octagon box hedge filled with lavender and a central candy-twist spiral. A number of formal knot gardens are planted with fairy roses in pink and white sprays. A striking feature is a pond filled with water lilies and carp and some charming bronze statues. Many paths lead to the pond highlighting different views and angles. Carved statues and urns create the appearance of an Italianate garden in some areas. Planting is mostly formal and provides seasonal interest. Running alongside the river, accessed through an ornate metal gate, is an arid garden featuring large eucalyptus trees, phormiums, cordylines and cardoons. Benches allow you time to sit and enjoy the wonderful outlook taking in the white pigeon aviary, armillary sphere and sundials, and a castellated working artist’s studio. This garden is seldom open to public and a visit is not to be missed. Open Saturday 2–5pm Access Wheelchair access on grass and gravel Nearest station Richmond Buses 33, 65, 190, 337, 371, 391, 419, 490, H22, H37, R68 Activities Teas and cakes. Check our website for more activities Gardener John Wheeler

D18. Whitgift School CR2 6YT The beautiful Haling Park is now the grounds of Whitgift School, an independent boys’ school. In 1588 the estate was home to Lord Howard of

Effingham, the Lord High Admiral of the Fleet sent against the Armada. The grounds were designed by Humphry Repton, with many superb specimen trees. A copse remains from the old medieval woodland. A series of fascinating, well-maintained gardens in a number of original styles provide a stimulating environment for students. The gardeners are continuously developing the gardens to make sure there isn’t another school garden as excellent as this to be found in the UK. Several gardens will be open for OGSW. The Boarding House Garden, constructed in 2013, is designed to give Whitgift boarders a space to relax and enjoy the outdoors. Planted in 2014, the Mediterranean border takes you on a journey into an exotic garden with non-native specimen plants. The formal Andrew Quadrangle features manicured lawns framed by tightly clipped topiary and is enhanced by a splendid Japanese Garden with an impressive bonsai collection. Exotic birds roam freely. The traditional Founder’s Garden sits within splendid high walls and boasts amazing herbaceous borders, a long and colourful rose pergola and a maze. The shelter of the walls creates a microclimate that enables quite tender plants to grow. The long front border is a well-balanced garden of perennials and shrubs and is a riot of colour from spring to mid-summer with huge rhododendrons and thousands of bulbs. Open Sunday 11am–4pm Entrance School entrance on Nottingham Road Access All areas wheelchair accessible Nearest station South Croydon Buses 60, 166, 407, 466 Web www.whitgift.co.uk

Wildcroft Manor

D19. Wildcroft Manor SW15 3TS NEW

Trumpeters’ House

Wildcroft Manor is a 1930s mansion block with 56 flats set in the grounds of where an 18th-century manor house once stood. The main gates are still in place. The gardens merge naturally into the woodlands of Putney Heath

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Woodville Day Centre

that surround it on all sides. There is direct footpath access to Wimbledon Common through the woods and under the A3. The gardens feature a wide variety of shrubs, perennial plants and bulbs – annual bedding plants are conspicuous by their absence. There is also a fine selection of mature trees such as cedar, acers, sweet chestnut, holly, rowan, cherry plum and yew. It is a well-stocked garden that tends towards the natural rather than the manicured so that it is very much in context with its environment. A particular feature is the rose garden and fountain. For those interested in history, there is an obelisk just outside the boundary fence of Wildcroft Manor erected 110 years after the Great Fire of London in 1776 by John Sawbridge, Lord Mayor of London, to commemorate the invention of Fire Plates ‘for securing buildings from fire’ by David Hartley. All four sides are carved with a detailed citation. Open Saturday 11am–5pm, Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Wildcroft Road Access Ample free parking in Wildcroft Road and at The Telegraph pub next door Nearest station Putney Buses 424 [to door] 14, 85, 93, 39, 493, 170 Activities The adjacent Telegraph Pub (‘A Country Pub in London’) makes the perfect watering hole on your gardens visiting day. Web www.wildcroftmanor.co.uk Gardeners Davidia Urban Gardens

D20. Woodville Day Centre TW10 7QW NEW The garden was originally designed as an accessible sensory garden for clients attending the Woodville Centre for day care. It has a circular central feature with brightly coloured spheres and shapes, surrounded by walks with raised beds and covered contemplation areas. The beds are planted with a variety of shrubs and perennials, providing permanent colour and shape which is enhanced with annual planting. There are mixed borders surrounding the building which frame the sensory area. A lawn area has been planted with flowering trees and has benches to allow clients to sit and enjoy the garden spectacle. The garden offers easy access for all, is fully secure and we hold activities and garden groups in the summer months. It enables clients to socialise in safe and relaxing openair surroundings. Open Saturday 10am–4pm, Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Woodville Road – just round the corner from Meadlands School Access Wheelchair accessible tarmac and resin Nearest stations Richmond, Kingston, then bus Bus 371 Activities Teas provided by our café, accompanied by music. Crafts on sale.


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OGSW Guide 2017

Hammersmith and Fulham

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Nearest station Putney Bridge Buses 14, 74, 22, 414, 430 Activities Guided tours. Teas and light refreshments. Plant and produce stall Web www.fpmaa.com Chairman of FPMAA Phil Edwards

E5. John Betts House W12 9NJ

Fulham Palace

All Saints Vicarage Garden, Fulham

E1. All Saints Vicarage Garden, Fulham SW6 3LG All Saints Vicarage garden was originally part of Fulham Palace and given to the church for a new vicarage in 1935. There are some wonderful mature trees. The largest – and probably the oldest – is the magnolia in the lawn. This, with the wisteria on the house, may be as old as the vicarage itself. A newly planted small orchard of five apple trees is part of the planting of the Fulham Palace walled garden next door. A wildflower meadow is sown annually around the apple trees. We are developing this into a wildlife area with a bug hotel and a new beehive. Next to the holm oak near the house is one of the most beautiful modern shrub roses, Rosa ‘Cerise Bouquet’. Melianthus major grows in and around her arching stems. The focal point of the centre bed is a Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’. An Indigofera pendula was added a few years ago and a Ceratonia siliqua last year, with two more planted in the garden. Rosa ‘The Fairy’, a modern shrub rose, grows in the front of the bed and flowers into the winter. A huge Cotinus on the west side lost some of its branches in a storm. The largest branch fell horizontally along the bed but stayed attached to the trunk, so virtually fills the whole of the top bed. The silver pear was planted for the silver wedding of the previous vicar. The small play hut behind it is in memory of a very young

parishioner who died suddenly and who often played in the garden. Behind it is a Hoheria. In the bottom bed a collection of ferns were planted in 2016 under the holly and space created around the Viburnum plicatum ‘Pink Beauty’. Behind this grows the relatively rare Mahonia russellii. The soil is sandy and stony and on the west side – the line of the old Fulham Palace moat – it is basically rubble. We are improving it slowly and also mulch thickly to conserve water and keep down annual weeds. We make as much compost and leaf mould as possible in the compost bays. We obtain chippings free from tree firms to make paths and for mulch in the woodland area at the front. Open Saturday 10am–1pm Entrance 70 Fulham High Street Access Mostly flat, one or two lips. Gravel drive at the front. Grass in the garden Nearest station Putney Bridge Buses 220, 414, 14, 74, 430 Activities Tea, coffee and cakes available. Help yourself – donations welcome in aid of the upkeep of the garden. All Saints Church and churchyard next door, accessible through back garden gate. Grade II*, beautiful glass, medieval tower and some of the finest monuments in London Web www.allsaints-fulham.org.uk Head gardener Steph McEvaddy

E2. Emery Walker’s House W6 9TS No. 7 Hammersmith Terrace is one of a terrace of 17 Georgian houses overlooking the Thames at the west end of Hammersmith’s Upper Mall. It was home (from 1903 until his death in 1933) to Emery Walker, the great printer and antiquary, who helped his friend William Morris, who lived nearby, to set up the Kelmscott Press. After Walker’s death, his daughter Dorothy preserved the house as it had been in her father’s lifetime. Full of original William Morris wallpapers, textiles and furniture, it is the best-preserved Arts-and-Crafts interior in Britain. The house was a private home until recently and opened to the public for the first time in 2005. Due to its fragile nature, the house can only take a few hundred visitors a year on guided tours from April to November. Features of the garden include a raised platform at the end overlooking the Thames, original terracotta tiles from the late 1890s, a grapevine grown from a cutting taken at Hogarth’s House around 1900, and a Cotswold-stone alpine trough. The planting still reflects some of Dorothy’s additions, such as the roses, and the Emery Walker Trust has plans to recreate more of her planting choices. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance 7 Hammersmith Terrace Access No wheelchair access. Steps up

to house and down to garden. Different levels at the end of the garden. Can be slippery when wet Nearest station Hammersmith (1.5km) Buses 27, 190, 267, 391, H91 Activities Shop open Conditions Limited entry in half-hour slots Web www.emerywalker.org.uk Gardeners Emery Walker Trust volunteers

E3. Fulham Palace SW6 6EA Fulham Palace was home to the Bishops of London from around 700 to 1973. The palace itself is an architectural treasure, including elements from the Tudor, Georgian and Victorian periods. It lies in 13 acres of lawn and gardens that still reflect the 18th-century landscape design. There are many interesting and unusual trees and plants. The gardens and nearby Bishop’s Park were restored between 2010 and 2012, thanks to funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Hammersmith and Fulham Council. Visitors can see the rebuilt vinery, the historic knot garden planted with perennials, a new orchard planted in 2014 and the ongoing work within the walled garden, as more of it is brought back into productive use. Open Saturday 11am–3pm Entrance At end of Bishop’s Avenue by gates to Bishop’s Park or by gate close to All Saints Church in Bishop’s Park Access Walled garden is accessible but some paths are narrow. The surface of the gravel paths varies, so manual wheelchair users may need assistance Nearest station Putney Bridge

Buses 14, 74, 220, 414, 430 Activities Four special guided tours by volunteers and garden apprentices for OGSW ticket holders at 11am, 12pm, 1pm, and 2pm. Head gardener and members of the gardening team present. Museum open 12-4pm. Walled garden open 10.15 to 4.15pm. Drawing Room Café serving light meals and refreshments, 9am-5pm. Plants for sale Web www.fulhampalace.org Head gardener Lucy Hart

John Betts House is part of the Hammersmith United Charities’ Almshouses. This is a private garden for older people. It is a past gold medal-winner in the London Gardens Society and Hammersmith & Fulham in Bloom competitions. The garden features many interesting plants, hanging baskets, a greenhouse, raised vegetable beds, a water feature and balconies with residents’ container gardens. The garden is a beautiful, safe haven of which the residents are rightly proud. Open Saturday 2–5pm Entrance Goldhawk Road/Rylett Road Nearest station Stamford Brook Buses 94, 237, 272 Activities Homemade cakes and plant sales Web www.hamunitedcharities.org.uk Gardener Jackie Thompson

E4. Fulham Palace Meadows Allotments SW6 6EA Fulham Palace Meadows Allotment Association runs this site by the Thames in the borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. A gift from the Bishop of London in 1916, the site is exceptional in that it covers an Anglo-Saxon site of historical importance. It is set within a designated Scheduled Ancient Monument area and under the jurisdiction of English Heritage. In the later Middle Ages, Fulham Palace is reputed to have been the largest moated residence in Europe. Run by dedicated volunteers, FPMAA plays a vital part in local life. With over 400 plots, an amazing cross-section of local residents from all walks of life gain a unique and exceptional experience within this inner-city haven. Open Saturday 11.30am–3.30pm Entrance Bishops Avenue, opposite the tennis courts. Also rear gate opening directly to Fulham Palace Access Narrow paths with uneven surfaces, not very suitable for wheelchairs

John Betts House


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AREA E: Hammersmith and Fulham

OGSW Guide 2017 United Charities. The garden was designed and planted in March 2012. This is a completely hidden oasis right in the middle of Shepherd’s Bush. It is a sister scheme to John Betts House. Features include plants to encourage bees and butterflies, a pond, a pergola and arches for climbing plants, and a large new community greenhouse. The garden won the Challenge Cup for large community garden from the London Garden Society in 2014 and 2015. Open Saturday 2–5pm Entrance Sycamore Gardens Access The garden is designed to give easy access for all abilities Nearest station Goldhawk Road Buses 94, 237 Activities Tea, coffee, homemade cakes. Plant and craft stalls Web hamunitedcharities.org.uk/housing/ sycamore-house Head gardener Jackie Thompson

E9. William Morris Society

The River Café

W6 9TA Cg

E6. Ravenscourt Park Glasshouses W6 0UL Situated in Ravenscourt Park next to the café, the glasshouses were formerly used by the local authority and fell into disrepair. Hammersmith Community Gardens Association took over the management of the two large glasshouses and walled garden and have brought the garden back to life. The display glasshouse showcases fruit, vegetable and flower growing, with an emphasis on unusual varieties. These are very popular with our school groups who regularly visit the site. Our Shelf Life project is extremely popular with children and adults, as it shows plants growing in food containers – for example, chickpea plants in a hummus tub, tomatoes in a ketchup bottle and potatoes in a crisp packet. The second greenhouse is a nursery, used by volunteers to raise seedlings and cuttings for the site and other local community gardens. The beautiful walled garden includes a medicinal herb border and vegetable plots, as well as grass and benches for picnics. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance To the right of the café in the park Nearest station Ravenscourt Park Buses 27, 94, 190, 237, 266, 267, 391, H91 Activities Herbal activities. Plants and refreshments for sale. Café next door for refreshments Web hcga.org.uk

E7. The River Cafe W6 9HA Fresh, seasonal produce has been a cornerstone of The River Cafe since it opened in 1987. Situated beside the Thames, its garden is a natural extension of this approach to food. A variety of Italian salad leaves, vegetables and herbs are grown, which make their way onto the daily changing menus. In fine weather, the restaurant extends throughout the garden among the long planters and fruit trees. For gardener Simon Hewitt, there are many challenges – from growing everything in containers to the exposed riverside conditions. These are balanced with all the rewards – a

freshly picked and podded broad bean, or some intensely flavoured quince paste served with a cheese plate. Entrance Thames Path at Rainville Road Nearest station Hammersmith (about 1 mile) Buses 190, 211, 220, 295 Activities Pre-booked tours on Saturday. Conditions The garden can be visited only on an escorted tour. Advance booking essential. Web www.rivercafe.co.uk Gardener Simon Hewitt

E8. Sycamore House W6 0AS Sycamore House is sheltered housing for the over-60s run by Hammersmith

William Morris lived at Kelmscott House for the last 18 years of his life. He wrote ‘The situation is certainly the prettiest in London... the garden is really most beautiful.’ Our small garden contains a

William Morris Society

number of plants which feature in Morris’s textile and wallpaper designs. The shady lower garden contains a variety of ferns, which thrive well in its microclimate. The lower floors of Kelmscott House are now the headquarters of the William Morris Society and contain a registered museum dedicated to his life and work. The museum is open on Thursdays and Saturdays 2–5pm. Open Saturday 2–5pm Entrance 26 Upper Mall, through the coach house in the cobbled courtyard, to

Moving house?

the left of the house Access Access to garden up three steps. Museum partly accessible to wheelchair users Nearest station Hammersmith Buses 27, 91, 267, 290 Activities Museum open. Book and gift stall. Handout containing Morris’s description and plan of the 1880s garden. Display of Morris’s designs. Children’s quiz and trail. Refreshments available Web www.williammorrissociety.org

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Sycamore House

35

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5 STAR RATING ON


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windy site. The park contains an unusual circular lawn known locally as ‘the bowl’ (it was once bowl-shaped but has since been filled in) and a ‘stage’, which is used for performances, picnics and other events. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance Abbey Road, between Boundary Road and Belsize Road Access Some level access, access via ramp to some parts. Some steps and uneven surfaces. No disabled access to hall and toilet at present Nearest stations South Hampstead, Swiss Cottage Buses 139, 189 Activities Tea, coffee and cake for sale in Tenants Hall at the South Hampstead end of the park Web friendsofalexandraroadpark.com Gardener Blue Burke, OCS

Opening days Open Saturday and Sunday Open Saturday only Open Sunday only Please check individual listings for exact opening times Key Underground station Overground station National rail station Bus station

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AREA F: Hampstead and Highgate

OGSW Guide 2017

F2. Branch Hill Allotments

F5. Hampstead Parish Church Burial Grounds

NW3 7LT On the corner of Oakhill Way, Branch Hill and Frognal, the allotment site was once the garden of Branch Hill House, a substantial Edwardian mansion occupied for some years by John Spedan Lewis, founder of the John Lewis Partnership. The house was converted to council accommodation for the elderly. In the 1970s enterprising locals and would-be gardeners nudged the planners in a green direction by growing vegetables and informally maintaining the site. The gardens had uncertain status during the 1980s, but action by The Heath Society led Camden council to earmark the land for community use as allotments. Today there are 32 plots, managed by Camden. Some are divided in half, so around 40 people have a contractual arrangement. Probably half as many again (friends of holders) garden there and visiting schoolchildren are pleased to assist. The glorious combe, in an area previously frequented by poets John Keats and Gerard Manley Hopkins, and artists John Constable and George Romney, is home to a variety of wildlife. The Branch Hill Allotments Association contributes to the maintenance of the site and represents gardeners’ interests in general. The aim is to allow wildness while developing cultivation. Open Saturday 2–5pm, Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Corner of Oak Hill Way and Frognal Rise Access Steeply sloping site with narrow grass paths and steps Nearest station Hampstead Buses 46, 210, 268 Conditions Visitors are advised to keep to the main paths

Branch Hill Allotments

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NW3 6UU

Fenton House Garden National Trust

F3. Fenton House Garden National Trust NW3 6SP Fenton House has extensive and innovative walled gardens, with formal walks and lawns, a rose garden, kitchen garden and a historic orchard. The garden, at the top of Hampstead’s Holly Hill, is divided into upper and lower levels. On the upper level, to the south of the house, a broad path runs from an intricate wrought-iron gate alongside mature heritage trees and newly created beds. To the north are perimeter terrace walks around a formal lawn and sunken rose garden. The planting is relaxed, within a structure of trimmed yew and box hedges, and gives successive colour and interest through the year. Steps beyond the rose garden lead down to the garden’s most charming feature – a sunken, walled area of orchard, glasshouse, culinary herb border, cut-flower beds and vegetables. In spring the lawn below the apple trees is transformed into a flowery meadow. Open Saturday 11am–4.30pm, Sunday 11am–4.30pm Entrance Hampstead Grove Access Upper walk, with views over whole garden, accessible to wheelchair users. Large number of steps to lower terraces of garden and orchard. Nearest station Hampstead Buses 46, 210, 268 Activities Throughout Sunday only short introductions to the gardens by the gardener and garden volunteers (no booking required). Display of historical photos of the grounds. A variety of plants from the gardens for sale. Tickets

available for entry to the house Web www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ fenton-house Gardener-in-charge Andrew Darragh

F4. Gainsborough Gardens NW3 1BJ In the 18th century Hampstead Wells were popular with fashionable Londoners, who visited the pump room to take the chalybeate waters and socialised in the assembly rooms, south of Well Walk. The area soon developed a reputation for rowdy behaviour and new spa buildings were erected in 1730 further along Well Walk. Eventually the buildings were converted to other uses, including an evangelical chapel, and finally demolished at the end of the 19th century. This area today is the site of Gainsborough Gardens, a circular enclosure with mature trees and luxuriant planting at the centre of a gated enclave of private houses. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Well Walk (north), Heathside (south) Nearest stations Hampstead, Hampstead Heath Buses 46, 268 + 24 Activities Lynne and Adrian, the gardeners who look after Gainsborough Gardens, will be present to answer any questions about the planting, Saturday 12-1pm and on Sunday 2-3pm (times to confirmed). Cake stall to raise funds for charity (to be selected). Gardener Adrian Crimmin

Two beautiful historic graveyards in the heart of Hampstead Village. The earlier graveyard adjacent to the 18th-century church dates from medieval times, and the more recent graveyard across the road from 1812. Many famous (and infamous) people are buried in the two graveyards including the artist John Constable, clockmaker John Harrison (who invented the marine chronometer for calculating longitude at sea), the actress Kay Kendall and the feminist Eva Gore Booth. Both graveyards were designated as Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (borough importance grade 1) in November 2003 and are managed as wildlife-friendly areas. The graveyards are maintained by volunteers and contain a wide variety of mature trees. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Church Row Access Limited access for wheelchairs. Both graveyards are on a slope and include uneven paths. Flat shoes are recommended Nearest station Hampstead Buses 46, 268 Activities Refreshments, tomb trails, quizzes and children’s activities. Guided tours at 11am, 1pm and 3pm on Saturday and 2.30 and 3.30 pm on Sunday Web tombwithaview.org.uk Volunteer organiser Judy East

Highgate Day Centre Garden

F6. Highgate Day Centre Garden NW5 1JY The Highgate Centre Garden is a private space run by service users with the support of two community gardeners. The centre has supported and empowered people living with mental-health difficulties in Camden for over 30 years. Developing and looking after the garden across the seasons is a key part of that support. The garden consists of a walled courtyard containing a herb garden, a small woodland garden and a series of

Hampstead Parish Church Burial Grounds

manger-style raised beds where we grow a range of vegetables, fruit and salads. The focal point is the sea of summerflowering annuals and perennials that form our centrepiece container-based planting scheme. We bring on as many of these plants as we can ourselves through propagation techniques taught by the community gardeners. The display tells us where we are in the seasons simply by what is in flower. You may spot a nesting bird or two in the jasmine, or in one of the boxes built and decorated by one of our resident artists. Last year we hosted families of blackbirds, wrens and thrushes. Away from the courtyard, we have renovated a small pond and bog garden. An old loquat tree nearby is underplanted with native ferns and woodland perennials. There is a small bench there where you can sit and enjoy the view. We have built a multi-storey wildlife stack where all manner of creatures beneficial to the garden can live, from stag beetles to lacewings. We try to run the garden as sustainably as we can. We propagate

from our own plants where possible, use kitchen waste and organic coffee grounds from our local coffee cart to produce compost, collect fallen leaves to make leaf mould and grow comfrey plants to make our own plant feed. Our garden is a beautiful little sanctuary away from the bustle of Kentish Town. We look forward to welcoming you. Open Saturday 11am–4pm Entrance 19-37 Highgate Road Access Narrow path to the pond but can still accessible by wheelchair Nearest station Kentish Town Buses 214, C2, 134 Activities Botanical art workshop at 12 midday on Saturday, run by botanical illustrator and landscape architect Jaco Nel. Beginners welcome, materials supplied. Sale of herbs and ornamentals that complement each other, and ready planted containers for instant impact, Refreshments – tea, coffee, homemade cakes and cookies Community gardener Ben Ledden


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OGSW Guide 2017

F8. Waterlow Park Kitchen Garden N6 5HG

Keats House

F7. Keats House NW3 2RR NEW The garden at Keats House provides a moment of calm in bustling Hampstead. Mere steps away from the Heath, our beautifully tended garden allows you the opportunity to walk in the steps of one of the best-loved of the Romantic poets – John Keats. The earliest references to the garden appear in the letters of Keats himself from his time living here in the years 1819-20. He recounts walking in the garden, seeking inspiration there and gazing at the outside world from his parlour when consumption had rendered him weak. Look out for two important trees. The large common mulberry may have been known to Keats. He is also said to have written ‘Ode to a Nightingale’ under a plum tree in the garden, and a newly planted plum tree celebrates this great work. Open Saturday 11am–5pm, Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance 10 Keats Grove Access Level access. Small amount of pathway not accessible after heavy rain Nearest stations Hampstead Heath, Belsize Park, Hampstead Buses 24, 46, 168, C11 Activities Find out about the hard work carried out by the volunteers who tend our garden and pick up tips from these skilled horticulturists. Garden tours Saturday 17 June, 2-3pm and Sunday 18 June, 11am-12 noon. Hear some of the fascinating and often amusing stories

about Keats and his ‘melodious plot’. Explore elements of Keats’s poetry and how it inspired the existing planting schemes. Free, booking recommended through keatsevent.eventbrite.co.uk. Family Day Minibeast Safari, Sunday 18 June, 1-4pm. Pick up a wildlife spotter sheet and see what birds and beasties you can spy. You can also make a miniature bug hotel to encourage minibeasts into your own gardens and outdoor spaces. Free, just drop in. Bring your own picnic. Visit the adjoining museum (admission applies)

Waterlow Park Kitchen Garden

In 1889, Sir Sydney Waterlow gave his gardens to the people of London as ‘gardens for the gardenless’. In 2011, the original site of the kitchen garden was restored and re-opened as a community resource for growing vegetables, fruit, herbs and flowers. Surrounded by yew hedges, the garden feels like a ‘secret’ part of Waterlow Park. A place for quiet retreat at times, at others a busy place for active gardeners. The design of the garden was planned by a team from Camden parks department, volunteers from TCV, and the Friends of Waterlow Park. There are 10 raised beds, each one managed and cultivated by a different local organisation. These include a primary school, a children’s centre and local groups, including the Friends. The park itself offers stunning views over London and many other natural delights. Open Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Dartmouth Park Hill near St Joseph’s church – second park gate from top Access Hard surface paths in the park but some grass paths and some uneven paths in the kitchen garden. Toilets at the Park Centre just above the kitchen garden. Ramp available Nearest station Archway Buses 210, W5, 271, 143 Activities See a range of plants and vegetables in the kitchen garden and meet some of the volunteer gardeners. Talks, walks and other activities – see our website for details Web www.waterlowpark.org.uk Cg

F9. World Peace Garden Camden NW3 2SB A wasteground area for more than 100 years next to Hampstead Heath station, the site was bought by local traders, residents and visitors, who financed it and volunteered to transform this site into a woodland garden glade. Tony Panayiotou redesigned the ponds and soft landscape, while Michael Wardle laid the hard landscaping. Consultants Simon Berry and Andy Darragh remain on board as advisers. Peace tiles from Friends of the Peace Garden greet visitors inside the entrance at the top of timber steps. Either side of the steps are informal seating arrangements for appreciating performances from a stage at the bottom. There are three small ponds and a wishingwell feature with a varied, fragrant blossom planting. The garden features climbers, magnolias and interesting pathways. This is a sanctuary, a place to contemplate peace, while children love the sheer adventure of this woodland glade – despite the contradiction of being next to Hampstead Heath station. The garden won the Time Out Love London Award 2016 for Local Culture in Hampstead. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance South Hill Park, next to Hampstead Heath station Access Not easily accessible steps, narrow paths. It can be viewed from the road through the railings Nearest station Hampstead Heath Buses 24, 46, 168, C11 Activities Children tie a tag to Tree of Hope ‘What I want the world to be like when I grow up’. Send your positive feelings to wish someone well with your coin to the charity 15 Second Peace. Record on video your own peaceful experience for our website. Music, song, poetry, storytelling, talks, art classes (subject to weather conditions). Please check website nearer the time. Web www.worldpeacegardencamden. org Consultant/Gardener/Landscape 2013 Andy Darragh/T.Panayiouto/ Michael Wardle /Simon Berry Michael Wardle

World Peace Garden Camden

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G5. Barnsbury Square N1 1JL

G1. Alara Permaculture Forest Garden N1C 4PF These garden spaces on Camley Street were formed from unused land around commercial buildings on an industrial estate close to King’s Cross in central London. The first job was to remove about 50 tons of rubbish, plus four months spent digging out Japanese knotweed. The largest area was enclosed and terraced using coppiced sweet-chestnut logs. Planting as a permaculture forest garden began in 2006 with silverberry, pomegranate, Japanese wineberry, apricot, apple, pear, plum, edible hawthorn and many other perennial food plants. To this has been added a vineyard next to a lorry park, an orchard by a cash & carry car park, community raised beds and a communal compost heap. In 2014 we built a greenhouse and extended the meeting area. In 2015 we re-sited the beehives, introduced chickens and built an anaerobic digester. There have been a huge number of people involved in this garden, who have turned up to help on the many planting and party days that are held here. Day to day, the gardens are maintained by the team at Alara and we harvest around 750kg of fresh foods from these gardens on a continuous year-round basis. We get visitors from around the world. Open Saturday 10am–4pm, Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Camley Street – between Booker Cash & Carry and Alara Access Vineyard, orchard and raised beds suitable for wheelchairs. Permaculture garden has steps and very narrow paths Nearest stations Camden Road, Camden Town, King’s Cross, St Pancras, Buses 46, 214 Activities Lots of different plants for sale. Food and teas from the garden Web alara.co.uk/29,l2.html Gardener Alex Smith Cg

G2. Arlington Square N1 7DR The Victorian terraces surrounding Arlington Square were completed around 1850, but it only became a garden square in the early 1950s when it was laid out by Islington council. Before that it was an unkempt open space, used during WW2 for trench shelters and barrage

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activities. Live music Web www.barnardpark.org

Barnard Park

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balloon moorings. The square today has large mature trees, lawns and interesting shrubs, roses and flowerbeds. An energetic residents’ association holds regular gardening sessions. Over the last six years volunteers have transformed the beds, digging in more than 50 tonnes of compost and manure and planting over 45,000 bulbs and perennials, as well as magnolias, acers, palms, rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias and 150 rose bushes. Unusual shrubs and plants include Disporum longistylum, Maianthemum salvinii, Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’ and Rhodoleia parvipetala. Locals have also turned a neglected corner into a popular small community garden with raised fruit and flowerbeds. In 2016 Arlington Square was awarded a record number of awards and accolades: ‘Outstanding’ in RHS’s It’s Your Neighbourhood, Gold in London in Bloom’s Best Small Parks, and joint first in their Clean and Green for the Queen awards. We came first in Islington in Bloom’s Best Residential Community Garden, and third in the London Gardens Society’s Large Public Garden Square category. In the Green Flag Awards the square was voted one of the best parks in the UK. HRH The Prince of Wales has visited the square and declared how impressed he was by the level of community participation, the variety of the planting and the positive impact the volunteers’ work is making on the neighbourhood. The ongoing restoration of the square by residents from the surrounding streets is a stirring

example of how communal gardening can bring neighbours together and forge friendships. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Access Level access. However, the gate opposite 10 Arlington Square has a step. Nearest stations Angel, Old Street Buses 21, 76, 141, 271 (New North Road), 38, 56, 73, 341, 476 (Essex Road) Activities Volunteer gardeners in action on Saturday, continuing their work enhancing this much-loved local space. Our horticultural experts will be on hand to answer questions and conduct guided tours of the planting. Refreshments available Web www.arlingtonassociation.org.uk Lead community gardener Paul Thompson-McArthur Cg

G3. Arvon Road Allotment Group N5 1PR Arvon Road Allotments Group was started in the late 1970s by residents from the nearby Ronalds Road Housing Action Area. Using funds from the Greater London Council (GLC) and Islington Council’s ‘Operation Clean Up’, they created allotments from the then GLC-owned, disused land at the Arvon Road site. The allotments adjoin the railway freight line which runs from Finsbury Park to Liverpool Street. The group has, over time, shored up and terraced the land so that it now provides 31 allotments for people living in the immediate surrounding area. The design

of the allotments is noteworthy as it is terraced down to the railway line – access from the top tier to the terraced area only possible in most areas by climbing down ladders. There is also a small mixed woodland, which is part of the Drayton Park and Olden Gardens Site of Importance for Nature Conservation, and a small pond. The site has strong community links to the streets around it (Horsell Road, Benwell Road, Drayton Park to Whistler Street, Framfield, Battledean and Arvon Road). It has historical significance as it was created by GLC funding in the 1970s and has always been independently managed and self-funded. Open Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Arvon Road Access Only the top tier of the allotments open to the public. This is a flat area with paving along the side. Access to the wood is via a woodland path not suitable for wheelchair users. Nearest stations Drayton Park, Holloway Road, Arsenal Buses 43, 271, 153, 263 Activities Members from Arvon Road Allotments on site to explain the history of the site and show visitors around. Refreshments available

both created in April 2010. Ongoing improvements have been made since 2012 to the long, dry, shady border along Barnsbury Road. This is a challenging site, but the Friends’ gardening group is slowly making progress. Open Saturday 11am–4pm Entrance Charlotte Terrace off Copenhagen Street, plus others Access Main paths are tarmac, some sloping. Much of the grass is sloping and can be muddy Nearest stations Angel, King’s Cross Buses 153, 274 (Copenhagen St), 17,91, 259 (Caledonian Rd) many more at Angel Activities One of the occasional community ‘pop-up’ days put on by the Friends of Barnard Park. Information on show about the history and development of the area with early photos and maps. Self-guided sheets and plant lists. Refreshments include tea, coffee, cold drinks and homemade cakes. Children’s

G4. Barnard Park N1 0JW A 10-acre public park with a rich history, from the beginnings of cricket with Thomas Lord in the 18th century to WW2 bomb damage. Wartime devastation was followed by prefab housing before the park was created in the 1960s. This is an area of dense housing with very little open space. Recently much has been transformed by the Friends of Barnard Park, including the creation of three new gardens with hundreds of plants and bulbs. There’s a herbaceous area in an old shrub bed and a herb garden in the children’s play area,

Barnsbury Wood

A peaceful square framed by trees in the heart of residential Islington. Features include a rose bed and flowerbeds. A woodland planting scheme is at the heart of the square. The hut in the square is opened regularly on Tuesday afternoons and Saturday mornings by volunteers so that visitors and residents can meet up and enjoy some tea and coffee. There are regular gardening sessions too, which help bring people of all ages together to create a greener square. Open Saturday 1.30–3.30pm Entrance Thornhill Road Access Three ground-level access gates Nearest stations Caledonian Road & Barnsbury, Highbury & Islington Buses 153, 17, 91, 4, 19, 30 Activities Park keeper’s hut open. Refreshments available Web www.friendsofbarnsburysqgardens. com

G6. Barnsbury Wood N1 1BW

Barnsbury Wood is London’s smallest Local Nature Reserve. This delightful hidden woodland was originally the garden of a house built in the 1840s. It eventually became abandoned to nature and is now home to a wealth of wildlife. The wood is owned and managed by Islington council. Due to its small and vulnerable nature, the wood is only open to the public on Tuesday afternoons (and


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OGSW Guide 2017 under development. History displays. Pre-booked trips up the clock tower. Refreshments Conditions Dogs allowed off leads Web www.islington.gov.uk/ caledonianpark Cg

G8. Culpeper Community Garden N1 0FJ

Caledonian Park and Community Orchard

on Saturday afternoons in summer). However, at other times the site is used by school groups for environmental education sessions. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Crescent Street, off Huntingdon Street Access Rough, unsurfaced and narrow paths around the wood. Can be muddy after heavy rain. However there are no slopes or steps Nearest stations Caledonian Road & Barnsbury, Caledonian Road Buses 17, 91, 153, 259, 274 Activities Stroll round the woodland and enjoy the hidden nature of this special site Web www.islington.gov.uk

G7. Caledonian Park and Community Orchard N7 9PL Caledonian Park and Community Orchard is located on the site of the 19th-century Metropolitan Cattle Market and retains at its heart the market’s imposing listed Victorian clock tower and railings by architect James Bunning. Once an area of open ground known as Copenhagen Fields, this was the scene of a huge demonstration in April 1834 to support the Tolpuddle Martyrs, a group of agricultural labourers deported to Australia for attempting to form a union. The market, opened by Prince Albert in 1855, operated until its slaughterhouses closed in 1963. Islington Council in 1970 created Caledonian Park on 18 acres. Extensive tree and shrub planting provide tranquillity and habitats for wildlife. The park is a borough grade 1 nature conservation area and offers woodland

walks. A new ‘natural play’ area was opened in 2010 and a section of the park with formal garden spaces and extensive tree, shrub and herbaceous planting was opened in August 2013. In 2010 the Caledonian Park Friends Group planted a small community orchard to add to the biodiversity and in 2013 developed a new nature garden, introducing plants and other features attractive to bees, butterflies and birds, a hibernaculum and loggery. Another community group is developing an ‘art garden’ with mosaic planters and a school group grows vegetables in raised beds. Open Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Market Road and via Drovers Way and Shearling Way off North Road Access Market Road, Drovers Way and Shearling Way entrances and others from North Road and most of park are wheelchair accessible. The Orchard/long grass areas and woodchip woodland walks are not Nearest station Caledonian Road Buses 274, 390, 393 + buses along Caledonian Road Activities Orchard tour, woodland walks. Children’s natural-play area, newly planted garden areas and wildlife garden

Culpeper Community Garden

Named after the herbalist Nicholas Culpeper, this green oasis is a unique project with small plots for local people and community groups to tend. We are a true community garden, open to the public 365 days a year. The garden has a communal lawn, ponds, a rose pergola, wildlife area and a dry garden, inspired by Beth Chatto as part of Islington’s climate-change adaptation strategy. The garden contains a vast array of shrubs and herbaceous perennials. This year we are reducing the heavy tree cover at the far end of the garden, to increase light to the plots and wildlife area. We will also be running some gardening and arts workshops for adults and children this summer. We work in partnership with disadvantaged groups in our community and provide a teaching resource to local primary schools. We organise a number of events and activities for our members and local people. In 2016 the garden was again rated ‘Outstanding’ by the RHS It’s Your Neighbourhood Scheme, and we were awarded the prestigious RHS National Certificate of Distinction. We also won first prize as the Best Community Garden in Islington. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance 2 Dignum Street, off Cloudesley Road Access Level access via Culpeper Open Space Nearest station Angel Buses 4, 19, 38, 43, 56, 73, 205, 214, 274, 394, 476 Activities Garden tours. Homemade refreshments Web www.culpeper.org.uk Garden worker Mandy Graham

G9. Freightliners Farm N7 8PF Freightliners City Farm was established on its present site in 1978 with the aim of bringing a little bit of the countryside to the inner city. The farm is set within Paradise Park, a small area of green space cleared of Victorian housing in the 1960s. The farm gardens can broadly be categorised as ornamental, wildlifefriendly and productive food-growing. Our paddocks, hedgerows and wild corners reflect sustainable management

Freightliners Farm

well as the gardens, you can meet our traditional and rare-breed farm animals, who help to maintain the grassed areas of the farm, teach visitors more about where their food comes from and always enjoy making new friends. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Chalfont Road (not shown on all maps), off Sheringham Road Access Bark paths around vegetable garden. Some steps and bark paths around hedgerow walk. Crazy-paved area in ornamental garden is slightly uneven Nearest stations Highbury & Islington, Caledonian Road, Holloway Road Buses 43, 153, 263, 271, 393 Activities Staff present to discuss planting schemes and give advice where they can. Children’s growing activities by our young farmers’ club on Saturday morning. Plant sale, including grow-yourown veg plants and pollinator-friendly planting scheme sets. Vegetarian café serving special garden-produce menu, including salads, sandwiches, mains and cakes – all homemade. Tea, coffee and soft drinks Web www.freightlinersfarm.org.uk Gardener Peter Hall

G10. Gasholder Park N1C 4AZ NEW Gasholder Park is defined by the iconic and Grade II listed Gas Holder No. 8 guide frame. Inside the guide frame, a versatile central lawn is encircled by a pathway, the outer edge of which is covered by a subtly perforated stainless steel canopy, with mirrored and satin finishes. The new park was designed by Bell Phillips Architects and Dan Pearson Studio. Gasholders have a rich history at King’s Cross. These iconic structures were built in the 1850s as part of Pancras Gasworks and remained in practices on rural farms, with hedgerow improvements such as planting for biodiversity and traditional laying, meadow flowers and field edges. We focus our produce gardens on growing to provide really local food for the farm café and local people. We aim to make a clear connection for visitors between growing, processing and eating food and to enable people to successfully grow their own. This year our ornamental gardens also have a food-growing theme, being planted as a potager garden with decorative herbs and vegetables used as bedding among the flowers. As

Gasholder Park

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use until the late 20th century, being finally decommissioned in 2000. The re-purposed gasholders have been given new life and will now be enjoyed by future generations to come. Open Saturday 12–4pm, Sunday 12–4pm Entrance Regent’s Canal, Canal Reach, Handyside Gardens. Near Granary Square Nearest stations King’s Cross, St Pancras Buses 10, 17, 30, 45, 46, 59, 63, 73, 91, 205, 214, 259, 390, 476 Web www.bellphillips.com, www. danpearsonstudio.com Architect/Designer Hari Phillips, Dan Pearson

G11. The Growing Kitchen N1 7HU The Growing Kitchen is a resident-led community garden project in a quiet corner of Hoxton. Through a lottery grant of £10,000 in 2010, a formerly disused site has been transformed into a beautiful shared garden. We have 35 micro allotments, a raised stone-built seated herb area, a communal foraging area with wildlife pond and a rose wall. A covered space with clay oven and barbecue is where we have our monthly meetings and stage fun events and workshops. In a built-up area, the Growing Kitchen has become a valued oasis of calm in which to garden, socialise and share food and ideas. With a truly diverse and multicultural membership everyone has an equal say and input, which has enabled the garden to evolve into a unique environment and source of pride for residents. Our collective aim is to reduce isolation, encourage healthy eating and invite new members and involvement. Most recently we partnered with the London Orchard Project and have also established an orchard and


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OGSW Guide 2017

The Growing Kitchen

wildlife area in the heart of Wenlock Barn. Through tenant engagement, more open access and diverse planting we are looking to shape our own environment and find an alternative to the council’s current gardening practices. In July 2013 we received the London Local Food Hero Award and in 2014 won the NFTMO award for resident engagement, reflecting our good work on governance. Noted by one resident as a ‘hidden piece of countryside in Hoxton’, all visitors will receive a very warm welcome. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Napier Grove Access Two steps leading from main entrance into garden. A secondary entrance on the other side has wheelchair access. Slight slope with narrow wooden decking leading to communal area Nearest station Old Street Buses 21, 76, 141, 271, 394 Activities Refreshments, peppermint tea and homemade cakes for sale. Informal guided tours available. A variety of seating plus picnic table

Entrance Avenell Road Nearest station Arsenal Buses 4, 19, 236 Activities Garden tours on Saturday at 11am, 12pm, 1pm 2pm and 3pm. Advance booking only Conditions You can only visit this garden on a pre-booked tour. Gardener Mark Walker

G13. King Henry’s Walk Garden N1 4NX This once-derelict site has been transformed by volunteers into a beautiful organic garden, where local residents can grow their own vegetables, fruit and flowers, join in the year-round programme of workshops and events, or simply relax in a peaceful environment. The garden has a large raised bed along the south-facing wall, planted with espalier and fan-trained fruit trees and split into small plots for allocation to local people. Visitors can enjoy the

G12. Highbury Stadium Square N5 1FE Highbury Stadium Square, known locally as Highbury Square, is a new garden at the centre of the former Arsenal football stadium, which was based in Avenell Road from 1913 until 2006. The stadium was designed by Archibald Leitch and built in the Art Deco style. The football pitch is now a modern minimalist garden, comprising hedges and grassy spaces, intersected by Perspex walls with integrated lighting and water features. This large garden now comprises the inner courtyard of the apartment blocks formed from the Arsenal stadium building. Open Saturday 11am–3pm

beautifully planted flower borders around the lawn (the garden is open to the public twice a week) or observe water wildlife at close hand from the low bridge across the pond. The garden was designed for accessibility and a number of large metal planters are particularly suitable for people in wheelchairs or who have difficulty bending down. The site also includes a small area of woodland, most unusual in this part of Islington, managed as an area of wildlife habitat. All planting has been planned to encourage biodiversity and attract beneficial insects. The garden is run on sustainable principles. All garden waste is composted and reused on site. The raised beds and brick paths were built using recycled materials. A custom-built system collects rainwater and distributes it to butts around the garden. In addition to receiving awards for community participation and wildlife friendliness, the garden has been commended by Britain in Bloom judges as ‘a centre of learning excellence’. Open Saturday 12–4pm, Sunday 12–4pm Entrance 11C King Henry’s Walk (to the left of the adventure playground) Nearest stations Canonbury, Dalston Junction, Dalston Kingsland Buses 21, 30, 38, 56, 141, 277 Activities Homemade refreshments. Plant sale. Traditional summer fête on the afternoon of Saturday 17 June Web www.khwgarden.org.uk

G14. The Olden Community Garden N5 1NH The Olden Community Garden is a registered charity, located less than five minutes’ walk from the Emirates

Pooles Park Primary School

Stadium. It is a haven for wildlife, an oasis of quiet amongst the hustle and bustle of Islington and a great source of pride to us in Highbury. It is a Site of Importance for Nature Conservation (Grade 1 – Borough). The garden, run by a group of hard-working volunteers, covers over two acres of open space off Whistler Street and Drayton Park, on a former railway embankment. There is a formal community garden which is fully accessible, a woodland, a greenhouse, an orchard of apple and plum trees, a wildflower meadow, allotments and growing spaces, and a small building called the Garden House. All the fundraising is done by volunteers, centred on regular garden work days and social events. Members have started a Kids’ Garden within the site, and students from City & Islington College’s Learning Difficulties Department have set up a food-growing project. Woodland Walk now open with log circle used for woodcraft classes. Open Sunday 1–5pm Entrance Whistler Street, opposite No 22 Access The garden is on a former railway embankment. The formal garden has disabled access, as do the toilets and garden house. The rest of garden is only accessible by steps with uneven surfaces Nearest stations Drayton Park, Arsenal Buses 17, 43, 153, 263, 271, 393, 4, 19 Activities Tea, coffee and cake stall Web www.oldengarden.org Cg

G15. Pooles Park Primary School N4 3NW

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haven of calm in a busy, densely populated area and much appreciated by the residents. Open Saturday 2–5pm, Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Bishop Street, behind St James’ Church Access Two steps up from street Nearest station Angel Buses 38, 56, 73,271, 341, 476 Activities Artist present (to be confirmed) Gardener Maggie Ford

The Pooles Park Community Garden is a beautiful, interactive green space just five minutes’ walk from Finsbury Park station. It is set within the school grounds and has, with much love, care and commitment by the staff, children, families and volunteers, evolved into a small oasis for the benefit of wildlife and us. In our productive Global Food Garden we grow a variety of organic fruits and

vegetables from all over the world. Our greenhouse keeps our chilli, aubergine and okra plants warm. A mini trainedfruit orchard enhances a south-facing wall. We have extensive composting facilities and rainwater collection tanks. Our hens are very friendly and happy. The wildlife pond and bog garden, miniwoodland, native hedgerows, wildflower meadows and circles support both visiting and resident wildlife, enabling the children attending Pooles Park to grow up seeing and understanding the importance of a variety of wildlife. We often fire up our earth oven to cook fresh, organic food from the garden. Our environmental education journey began over 12 years ago and the garden has been explored and enjoyed by visiting schools and organisations, as well as the children and staff at Pooles Park. A multitude of volunteers from the local and wider communities helps us to maintain and develop our fantastic garden. Open Saturday 1–5pm Entrance Hatley Road via the garden’s community access gate Access Ramp at entrance gate then level access Nearest station Finsbury Park Buses W7, W3, 210 and many more Activities Garden tours. Hanging basket workshops. Willow art workshops. Environmental themed workshops. Face painting. Music, drumming and food. Plant sale Web www.poolespark.com Environmental tutor Sophia Ioannou Cg

G16. St James Close N1 8PH Private communal garden surrounded on three sides by a church and Victorian almshouses. The property belongs to the Church of England and most of the residents have some connection with the church. The garden consists of a small lawned area and beds of herbaceous perennials and shrubs. It is a secluded

G17. The Skip Garden, Global Generation N1C 4AQ The Skip Garden is a mobile allotment on the King’s Cross development site, built by a combination of many local partners. The functions of an organic garden are divided between separate skips, including a growing house and green engine. The garden serves as an educational platform where local children, young people and business employees work together on tangible projects to improve local sustainability. This is a Capital Growth growing space and an exciting example of organic urban agriculture on one of the largest development sites in Europe. In the summer of 2015, the garden moved to its fourth home in King’s Cross. Working in partnership with the Bartlett School of Architecture, the plot has been transformed by a number of dynamic, custom-designed buildings. Our rammed-earth wall polytunnel, reed-bed dining area and sash-window glasshouse provide practical and sustainable structures that support our work in the garden and kitchen. Our work extends to local primary schools and businesses throughout King’s Cross, which includes the design and maintenance of planting outside Grain Store, Caravan, Yumchaa and Waitrose. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Tapper Walk, off York Way. Can also be reached on foot or bicycle from Kings Cross St Pancras and Goods Way. From Granary Square turn onto Stable St and continue on past Lewis Cubitt Park. Entrance beside the Viewing Platform Nearest station King’s Cross/St. Pancras Bus 390 Activities Regular tours of the garden, hosted by our young people. Skip Garden Café open, serving delicious homemade food and drinks Web www.globalgeneration.org.uk Gardens manager Paul Richens Cg


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AREA F: Hampstead andLondon Highgate Inner AREA

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Hackney and Bethnal Green

OGSW Guide 2017 risk’ and registered landscapes, making them more sustainable, accessible and attractive. The wider community is delighted with their renewed cultural and much-loved space, used for a diverse range of events. The Friends have a partnership agreement with the council to maintain the space, showing how communities can lobby for improvements in their local environment and influence design. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Access Access by steps only Nearest station Shoreditch High Street Buses 8, 26, 48, 55, 67, 149, 242, 243, 388 Activities Representatives of the Friends of Arnold Circus present throughout the day to give background information and answer questions Web foac.org.uk Gardener Andy Willoughby

Buses 8, 25, 108, 205, 276, 425, 488, D8 Activities Tours of churchyard and the historic church. Children’s craft activities. Homemade cakes and good coffee. Plants for sale Web www.bowchurch.webeden.co.uk

Cordwainers Garden

H4. Cordwainers Garden E8 3RE

H3. Bow Churchyard E3 3AH

Arnold Circus

H1. Approach Gardens E2 9LU NEW Approach Gardens is situated in the middle of a sprawling East End housing estate, surrounded by blocks of flats. A resident-led committee was formed five years ago to manage this onceunloved and unused space. Today it is a community food garden consisting of 40 raised beds that are individually attended by families from the estate, the local school and a day centre specialising in dementia care. There are two sheds, a communal composting area and a large polytunnel. We have communal fruit trees and bushes, and an award-winning wildlife area consisting of a small pond (with frogs and toads), native hedgerow, a ‘bug hotel’, a wildflower meadow and lots of ivy for the bees. The garden is softly planted with shrubs and beefriendly flowers. Often described as an oasis, the garden brings together many diverse groups from our local area. Open Sunday 12–4pm Entrance Russia Lane Nearest station Bethnal Green underground Cambridge Heath Station Buses 8, D6 309 D3 106 254 Activities Plants for sale. Refreshments Web www.approachgardens.co.uk

H2. Arnold Circus E2 7JF Arnold Circus is a unique garden and heritage asset at the heart of the 1890s Boundary Street Estate in east London. Designed as the centrepiece of Britain’s first publicly funded social housing scheme, it was intended to improve public health, promote exercise and be a ‘stage’ for the local community. Its tiered ‘wedding cake’ form inspired the layout of the surrounding estate. Following a period of decline, the garden was rescued thanks to concerted action by the local community, led by the Friends of Arnold Circus. In 2010 a major regeneration, led by LDA Design, sensitively balanced restoration, sustainability, improvements and design. This took place after months of careful research, followed by meticulous workmanship to restore the historic elements and add new ones. A vibrant new planting scheme brough colour and seasonal interest and improved biodiversity. The focal point of the gardens, the ‘at risk’ bandstand, was restored using handmade roofing tiles matching the original. Modifications were made to historic railings, incorporating new seating. A rainwaterharvesting system was installed, with underground storage reducing mains usage. Restored to their original beauty, the gardens highlight the principles of sympathetically revitalising buildings ‘at

The garden of this historic church was originally planned by the Metropolitan Parks and Gardens Association in 1895. St Mary le Bow has been situated ‘in the King’s Highway’ since the early 14th century, and now sits at the edge of the Bow flyover. At the rear of the church, you have the impression of a country churchyard, and then you find the unexpected ‘Edgelands’ beyond the railings. This area, planted with trees and roses, rises up and gently dovetails into the flyover itself. A small project growing fresh produce for the weekly food bank at the church began expansion in 2016. Open Saturday 12–4pm, Sunday 12–4pm Entrance 230 Bow Road Access Wheelchair access to most of the church and the west of the churchyard. The toilet is too small for wheelchairs Nearest stations Bow Church, Bow Road

Bow Churchyard

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Cordwainers (on the site of a former shoe-making college) is a small community garden in the middle of urban Hackney, tucked behind a wall in the lee of a large college building. It was created by a group of neighbours, who transformed a disused area into a thriving growing space for local people, visiting gardening groups and volunteers. We’ve built raised beds for fruit and vegetables and created mixed borders for wildlife-friendly plants. We’ve also planted fruit bushes, hedging and trees. We grow plants not just for eating or decoration, but to enjoy and promote their many other uses, such as dyeing, fibre or medicinal. We have a small medicinal plant bed and are in the sixth year of growing dye plants. We hold regular dye workshops using flowers, leaves, ‘weeds’ and barks gathered from the garden. We also grow flax to make thread and in 2014/15 led a project to grow, process and make a garment entirely in London from flax/ linen grown in plots around the city. Schools, community plots, city farms, park groups, housing estates, individuals and the London College of Fashion grew and processed flax to make the top – probably the first produced entirely in the city, at least for several decades. Some of the garden has been left wild, where we have made a pond, inhabited by many frogs. We also have beehives. All the beds are built from reclaimed materials – mostly scaffolding planks. We have turned polycarbonate sheeting into coldframes and there is a ‘slow’ shed made mainly from pallets and found materials and decorated by weaving willow through the slats. The garden is

Cranbrook Community Food Garden

run, maintained and funded wholly by volunteers. Open Saturday 11.30am–3.30pm Entrance 182 Mare St (London College of Fashion) Access Mostly flat grass and the space between beds is wide enough for wheelchairs. The pond area is not accessible. Small step from the hard surface of the entrance to the grass Nearest station London Fields or Hackney Central Buses 26, 30, 38, 48, 55, 106, 236, 254, 276, 277 Activities Herbal tea stall. Mix and make your own teabags. Plants and other garden products for sale. Teas and delicious cakes Web cordwainersgarden.wordpress.com Cg

H5. Cranbrook Community Food Garden E2 0QU Cranbrook Community Food Garden was designed and built in 2009 by residents of the estate and surrounding area. It consists of 21 raised beds, a shed, greenhouse, composting facilities and a large patio area with seating and a living roof. Gardeners get together to socialise, organise fundraising events and make plans for the coming year. It is free to join. We recently installed a narrow flower border around the food garden and the community centre next door, using perennials and self-seeding wildflowers. This ‘Edge Garden’ was developed further last year to provide a wildlife habitat and ‘food bar’, with a mix of native shrubs and flowering climbers, underplanted with bulbs. A


54

AREA H: Hackney and Bethnal Green

Dalston Eastern Curve Garden

garden club is held on Saturday mornings so that people can meet, socialise and work together. Members who show some commitment are given a key and can access the garden at any time for fun, work, relaxation or gathering food and herbs. Our policy is that everything in the garden belongs to everyone and we grow and share all crops together. The Cranbrook Estate, built in 1961-8, was designed by Skinner, Bailey & Lubetkin. The novel layout achieves its effect by playing with scale and perspective. The estate is also the site of Elisabeth Frink’s sculpture The Blind Beggar and his Dog. Open Saturday 10am–3pm, Sunday 10am–3pm Entrance The Avenue, Cranbrook Estate Roman Road – opposite Usk Street Access Wheelchair access to over threequarters of the garden, although the ground is uneven Nearest station Bethnal Green Buses 8, D6 Activities Plants, seeds and garden products for sale. Fresh produce and preserves. Refreshments Chair Lizzy Mace Cg

OGSW Guide 2017 produce and bee-friendly planting. Open Saturday 11am–10.30pm, Sunday 11am–10pm Entrance 13 Dalston Lane, next to the Hackney Peace Carnival Mural Access Some bark paths and grass – can be difficult for wheelchairs Nearest stations Dalston Junction, Dalston Kingsland Buses 30, 38, 56, 67, 76, 149, 242, 243, 277 Activities Members of the team who created the garden and volunteer gardeners available on Saturday, 2-5pm to answer questions. Café selling refreshments, including food using fresh produce grown in the garden. Pizzas from the clay oven on sale. Web www.dalstongarden.org Cg

large wooden pavilion is the focal point for community events and host music, dance, cooking and gardening activities, as well as being a relaxing meeting place. Most of the garden furniture has been constructed on site from reclaimed wood and recycled pallets from the nearby Ridley Road market. Planting includes silver birch and alder, small ‘copses’ of hazel and wild cherry, and a native hedgerow. Fruit, vegetables and herbs, chosen for their ornamental value as well as taste, are grown in large raised beds and used in the garden’s on-site café. The garden is tended by volunteers, including children and young people. No chemicals are used, all material is composted on site and rainwater is collected in recycled whiskey barrels. Additional projects include the Pineapple House, a large greenhouse for garden and environmental education, a communitybuilt clay oven for cooking with garden

H7. Fassett Square E8 1DQ Famed as the inspiration for the stage set for the BBC television series Eastenders, this garden has been lovingly restored to its former glory by local residents. The square has retained its original Victorian layout of paths winding round island beds and lawns, as well as many original lime trees around the perimeter. Bruno Court, on the north-west corner of Fassett Square, is a grade II-listed former hospital building influenced by the Bauhaus school of architecture. It was converted into flats in 1999 and has a roof terrace with a panoramic view of London. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance North end of square Access Shallow gravel path throughout the garden. Steps at entrance to Bruno Court Nearest stations Hackney Downs, Dalston Kingsland, Dalston Junction Buses 38, 242, 277+ 30, 56, 236

Activities Refreshments and bookstall Gardener Nancy Raeburn

H8. Geffrye Museum Gardens E2 8EA The Geffrye Museum is set in the former almshouses of the Ironmongers’ Company. When the almshouses were sold to the London County Council in 1911, the existing paths and beds were removed to create an open recreational garden, complete with bandstand. The gardens have now been restored to their 18th-century appearance to strengthen the historical context of the setting. In 1992 a derelict site adjacent to the museum was transformed into an award-winning herb garden with over 170 different herbs and plants traditionally associated with herb gardens, such as roses, honeysuckle and lilies. In 1998 the gardens behind the almshouses were laid out as a series of period garden ‘rooms’ to show the changing nature of English town gardens over the last 400 years. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Main gates on Kingsland Road Access Ramped access to museum and gardens. Accessible toilets. Audio guide to museum

H6. Dalston Eastern Curve Garden E8 3DF Created in spring 2010 to provide muchneeded public green space in an area just off busy Dalston Lane, this ‘secret’ garden is hidden behind hoarding next to the Hackney Peace Carnival mural. Visitors enter through a wooden doorway into a peaceful haven. The garden was built on the site of a disused railway line that had been derelict for over 50 years. It was developed as part of Making Space in Dalston, a Design for Londonfunded project, and has won awards. A

Fassett Square

Geffrye Museum Gardens

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Nearest station Hoxton Buses 67, 149, 242, 243, 394 Car parking Up to three hours accessible parking 10am-4pm outside museum on Kingsland Road for disabled badge holders Activities Self-guided garden activities for children on both days. Café overlooking the period gardens. Web www.geffrye-museum.org.uk Head gardener Heather Stevens

H9. Gloucester Square Residents’ Gardens E2 8RS This award-winning community garden is located within a peaceful tree-lined residential square situated between Haggerston Park and Regent’s Canal, on to which it opens. The canal was built by the architect John Nash between 1812 and 1820 to link the Grand Junction Canal’s Paddington Arm to the Thames at Limehouse. In the late 19th century, Gloucester Square was the site of workers’ cottages serving the nearby factories and gasworks. After bombing in WW2, the site became an electricity power station. In 1987 the square was redeveloped with affordable housing and today is all privately owned. It is unusual for the locality in its character

Gloucester Square Residents’ Gardens

and style, due to its low housing density. The developers allowed ample space for gardens, but over the years these spaces slowly became neglected until 2009, when residents decided to rejuvenate the flowerbeds and modernise the landscaping. This process is still in progress and there are now four established garden areas within the square, split into different themes and styles to reflect residents’ interests in plants and gardening aesthetics. There


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AREA H: Hackney and Bethnal Green

OGSW Guide 2017

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H12. St Peter’s Bethnal Green Church & Vicarage Gardens E2 7AE

St Mary’s Secret Garden

Nearest stations Bethnal Green tube (1.25 km), London Fields (0.5 km) Buses 26, 48, 55, 106, 254, D6 Activities Cream teas. Fundraising stall. Music on Saturday Web www.stjh.org.uk Head gardener Jocelyn Armitage

H11. St Mary’s Secret Garden E2 8EL St Joseph’s Hospice Garden

is a small woodland garden, a central planted landscaped area which is used as a recreational space and two flowerbeds themed as ‘English cottage garden meets French potager’, where plants, herbs and vegetables are seamlessly planted within borders. We garden economically, so the majority of the plants have either been propagated from seed, division or cuttings, or rescued off the streets. The garden achieved Gold in the Best Community Project (Non-Professional) category in Hackney in Bloom 2013 and was awarded Bronze for Best Community Garden 2014 by the East London Gardening Society. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 12–5pm Entrance Cester Street, off Whiston Road Access Level access but some uneven surfaces. Toilet available in Haggerston Park Nearest stations Haggerston, Hoxton, Cambridge Heath Buses 394, 236 Activities Food, refreshments, plant sale and garden-related crafts by artists and designers

Web gloucestersquare.weebly.com Voluntary head gardener HamzahAdam Desai

H10. St Joseph’s Hospice Garden E8 4SA One hundred years of garden tradition have provided St Joseph’s Hospice with an award-winning garden to suit the needs of visitors, patients and staff alike. Intended for both recreation and contemplation, seven distinct garden areas provide plenty of interest for visitors. Completion of major building works has resulted in a completely different shape for the south end of the gardens, providing contrasting areas of deep shade and full sun. Traditional perennials jostle with half-hardy tropicals in the borders, their colours supported by annual bedding schemes. Features include sculptures by Matt Caines and the ‘Oasis’ water feature in the front courtyard. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Mare Street, north of Victoria Park Road Access Some slopes

This community garden covers threequarters of an acre. It offers horticultural therapy and training for people with mental-health issues, learning disabilities, physical disabilities and other health problems, so as to enhance everyone’s physical and mental well-being. We provide gardening courses and training for the local community, specialising in food-growing initiatives. We also provide outreach services to other organisations and planting workshops at festivals and events. There are herbaceous borders, a herb and sensory area, vegetable areas, a woodland with working honey beehives, a small orchard, a small pond, a wildlife meadow and a greenhouse – all maintained by service users, learners and volunteers. Our Wish You Well garden, created for and by people with experience of mental distress, is now open for everyone to enjoy. There are many areas of the garden for sitting and relaxing. Or, if you are more active, follow the mini-beast trail and watch our honey bees at work. The garden has featured in the national press as one of the top 10 secret gardens in London. In 2012 we were cited as an example of good practice in food growing and urban agriculture projects research by City & Guilds. In 2012 and 2015 we achieved our Green Flag Community Award. We won Gold for best voluntary

garden (professional) in Hackney in Bloom in 2012 and 2013 and also feature in the book A-Z of London Gardens. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 11am–4pm Entrance Corner of Pearson and Appleby Streets Access Fully accessible Nearest station Hoxton Buses 26, 48, 55, 67, 149, 242, 243, 394 Activities Low-cost organically grown plants for sale, including herbs, annuals, herbaceous perennials and even trees, if you have the room. Seasonal vegetable produce. ‘Pop-up’ cafe with snacks and cakes produced by volunteers, staff and service users Web www.stmaryssecretgarden.org.uk Director Paula Yassine

St Peter’s Bethnal Green and its adjacent vicarage were built in 1841. Over time, the church garden has been a parade ground, schoolyard and cholera pit. Today it is a thriving community garden enjoyed by many. All the gardens are bounded by London plane trees almost 200 years old. Allotments and ornamental flowerbeds surround the church building. A biodiversity project is assessing conditions beneath the plane trees. The private garden belonging to the vicarage is opening its ‘secret garden door’ for the second time. This garden is a haven and place of meeting and has only recently been brought back into use. Open Saturday 2–5pm, Sunday 2–5pm Entrance South side garden entrance from St Peter’s Close Access Some narrow and uneven paths. Church is wheelchair-accessible from the front via a temporary ramp. The crypt is not accessible, nor is much of the vicarage garden Nearest stations Bethnal Green, Hoxton Buses 8, 26, 48, 55, 388 Activities Pop-up café during the afternoon. Tours of the church and the crypt below, which is normally closed. Opportunity to see the test beds of a biodiversity project run by the local gardening club Web www.stpetersbethnalgreen.org

St Peter’s Bethnal Green Church & Vicarage Gardens


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Docklands

Entrance Hardinge Street Access Some narrow paths but main entrance and roadway easily accessible Nearest station Shadwell Bus 100 Activities Guided garden walks. Light refreshments. Homemade produce. Craft stalls. Children’s activities. Live music Web www. cablestreetcommunitygardens.co.uk

have been created on the decks of many of the barges to form an ‘inside-out’ floating garden square. Open Saturday 2–5pm, Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Reed’s Wharf, 33 Mill Street Access We advise everyone to wear low heels and to hold on tight to ropes and railings access is on the rocky side. You visit the moorings at your own risk Nearest stations Bermondsey (less than 1km), also London Bridge and Tower Hill Buses 47, 188, 381, RV1 Activities Tea and cake (proceeds to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution) Web www.towerbridgemoorings.org Gardener Sophie Tatzkow

I5. Lavender Pond and Nature Park SE16 5DZ

Brunel Museum Gardens

I1. Brunel Museum Gardens SE16 4LF Brunel, one of the greatest engineers of the Industrial Revolution, and his family are celebrated in the Brunel Museum alongside the Thames, where the revolutionary tunnel opened in 1843. Explore the Grand Entrance Hall, home to a secret underground theatre with remarkable acoustics, and the abundant potager roof garden. Here the Midnight Apothecary rustles up gorgeous cocktails infused and garnished with fruit, vegetables, and herbs grown on site. Around the museum are shrubs and trees chosen by Brunel for his château in Watcombe, Devon, including a monkey puzzle tree seeded from trees he planted. Open Saturday 10am–10.30pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Railway Avenue Access Museum and garden fully accessible. Access to underground amphitheatre and roof garden by stairs only. Contact us for details Nearest station Rotherhithe Buses 381, C10 Activities Free museum entry. Sound and light show in the underground chamber. Saturday evening – enjoy cocktails and souvlaki as you watch the sun set over London. Discount 5-7pm on cocktails for OGSW. Last orders 10pm Web www.brunel-museum.org.uk Cocktail gardener / Midnight Apothecary Lottie Muir

I2. Cable Street Community Gardens E1 0EL Everyone is warmly welcomed in this peaceful haven – a well-established community garden in the heart of an historic inner-city area. Over 50 plots are tended individually by members and their families, and there are also wildlife areas, several small ponds, a traditional British hedgerow and raised planters for elderly gardeners and those with limited mobility. The gardens are 100% organic, encouraging the bees to make lots of honey. And our rhubarb crumble is second to none – just arrive early! Open Sunday 10.30am–4pm

Crossrail Place Roof Garden

I3. Crossrail Place Roof Garden E14 5AR An exotic roof garden, filled with ferns, tall grasses and flowering shrubs. This green oasis is hidden among the towering buildings of Canary Wharf, providing the perfect escape for those working nearby. Discover the garden’s unique architecture and stunning landscape design which have been inspired by Canary Wharf’s rich maritime heritage. Open Saturday 10am–6pm, Sunday 12–6pm Entrance Roof Garden level at Crossrail Place Nearest station Canary Wharf Buses D3, D7, D8, 135, 277, N550 Activities A packed programme of free events across the weekend including children’s activities, music, talks and workshops Web www.canarywharf.com/arts-events Landscape manager Alec Butcher

Lavender Pond was created in 1981 as part of the regeneration of the Surrey Commercial Docks and designated a local nature reserve in 2005, one of the oldest urban nature reserves in the country. The original dock walls and locks remain alongside the old pumphouse. Covering 2.5 acres in total, ponds are the park’s main feature. Boardwalks lead through extensive stands of reed, a colourful marsh area and on to woodlands. The park demonstrates creative ecology and conservation, showing how new habitats can be created for wildlife while allowing local people contact with nature through community involvement, education and training. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance Gate on Salter Road Access Reserve fully accessible, although paths and boardwalk require care. Nearest station Canada Water Buses C10, 381 Car parking On street parking on surrounding roads

I4. Garden Barge Square at Downings Roads Moorings SE1 2AX

Cable Street Community Gardens

Garden Barge Square is situated at Tower Bridge Moorings, Downings Roads, Southwark. These historic moorings date back 200 years or more. Gardens

Winterton House Organic Garden

Activities Pond-dipping for children (and adults!) from the new boardwalk. Guided tours Web www.tcv.org.uk/urbanecology Warden Michael Turner

I6. The Compound, Stave Hill Ecological Park SE16 6AX The Compound (managed by The Conservation Volunteers) and its SHED Visitor Centre is a miniature of the surrounding Ecology Park, with a wildlife ‘city’, allotment and woodland walk. In this imaginative and creative space visitors can find peace, inspiration, and ideas for conservation and recycling. The Compound is also a workspace and the base for practical work carried out in the park’s woodlands and meadows. Here is where gabions, bird boxes, and art works are created for the park. The park in the former Surrey Commercial Docks is unexpected, varied and beautiful in the summer. The outline of the docks still visible. Open Saturday 10am–4pm, Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance From the foot of the mound at the top of Dock Hill Avenue, Timber Pond Road SE16 6AX – behind Bacon’s College Access Hoggin paths, some slopes Nearest stations Canada Water, Rotherhithe Buses 1, 225, 381, 395 Activities Children’s craft activities. Beekeeper on site (Sunday only). Nature info trails. Quiz trails. Join the Stave Hill Saturday team in a practical activity – creating a wildflower meadow, digging out the marsh or building an insect house Web www.tcv.org.uk/urbanecology/ stave-hill-ecological-park Site manager Rebeka Clark

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I7. Winterton House Organic Garden E1 2QR RHS Gold Award Garden! Over several years local residents Melvyn and Ken have created a prize-winning horticultural oasis from a rubbish dump. Instead of putting their feet up, they fashioned a varied garden with a pergola, gravel planting, climbers and roses, mixed herbaceous border and a pond. The rare-breed chickens and ducks eat juicy snails from the garden, and a small allotment area enables residents to grow fruit and vegetables. Are you wondering what to do in retirement? Come and be inspired by these imaginative gentlemen creating a haven for the residents of Winterton House and the local community. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Deancross St, just off the Commercial Road Access The allotment area has a step entrance Nearest stations Shadwell, Whitechapel Buses 15, 100, 115, 135, 339, D9 Activities Guided tours with one of our volunteers. Mammoth plant sale at very low prices. Refreshments including homemade cakes and food. Appearances by top east London folk group The Mudlarks, who have been popular with visitors for the past two years Gardeners Melvyn Smith and Ken Davis Cg

I8. Woollen House Communal Garden E1 3ES Patricia looked out of her window one day and thought, ‘I would love to sit outside in a garden filled with flowering plants, old-fashioned roses, ferns and arum lilies, and I would love to be able to pick fresh fruit, herbs, and vegetables’. And so Patricia, an indomitable working grandmother who now has help from her daughter, made a garden that can be enjoyed by all the residents of Woollen House. Open Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Corner of Clark Street and Sidney Square Access Woollen House garden – no paths, just grass once inside garden. Sidney Square – paths all around Nearest stations Whitechapel, Shadwell Buses 339 + 15, 115, 135 Activities Tea, coffee and cake Voluntary gardener Patricia Quinn


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music. Activities for children including planting and crafts. An opportunity to view the church. Jumble sale on Saturday 17 June, 2-5pm in the crypt hall Web www.all-saints.org.uk Horticulturalist/gardeners Noel Kingsbury/Lesley Hopwood/ Gianluca Gardin

J2. Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses SE24 9BJ

All Saints West Dulwich

J1. All Saints West Dulwich SE21 8JY NEW The garden was designed and planted in 2013 as part of the ongoing redevelopment of All Saints Church, following an extensive fire in 2000. Award-winning horticulturalist Noel Kingsbury, who has worked with master plantsman Piet Oudolf, created a contemporary plan for the garden to provide year-round texture and colour. They are best known for what is broadly called an ‘ecological or naturalistic approach to garden design’. At All Saints Church, we wanted to create a garden with a simple beauty and harmony that reflects and complements its stunning internal space. The garden is a space for quiet contemplation and for community gathering. It also incorporates discreet spaces for the burial of ashes and so provides a place of peaceful remembering. We hope that being part of OGSW will enable many more people to discover and enjoy this recent and still little-known gem of an urban community garden. Open Saturday 12–5pm, Sunday 12–5pm Entrance Lovelace Road – near junction with Rosendale Road Access One external flight of stairs between certain sections of the garden. The lower level can also be accessed via a lift Nearest stations West Dulwich, Tulse Hill Buses 201, P13 + 2, 3, 68, 196, 468 Activities Plant sales and other stalls. Teas, coffees, soft drinks and cakes. Live

A small charity providing local people with a space to garden, a beautiful setting and a rich wildlife and horticultural resource for our many educational activities. This is a thriving community space with herb, medicinal, dye, vegetable, fruit and woodland gardens, a wildlife pond and indoor displays in the two greenhouses. Managed and maintained largely by volunteers with the support of part-time staff, enthusiasm and love have turned the gardens into what you see today – a far cry from the disused municipal plant nursery of 20 years ago. Covering just under one acre, the gardens consist of a series of ‘rooms’ with a wildlife corridor running the length of the boundary. We share an original grade II-listed wall with the neighbouring walled garden. The two Clearspan aluminium-framed greenhouses date from the 1980s and are the last of their kind in London. We offer visitors and the local community a relaxed and tranquil environment in which to learn about ornamental and

Eden at St. Paul’s Community Garden

crop plants from around the world, wildlife and the environment as a whole. Garden volunteering is open to everyone and also run activities for children during term-time and holidays. For more details, see our website. The project received a Green Flag Community Award again in 2016. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Dulwich Road, Brockwell Park Gardens, Brixton Water Lane or Tulse Hill Access Some uneven paths, but the greenhouses and most of the garden are accessible Nearest station Herne Hill Buses 2, 3, 37, 57, 68, 196, 322, 432, 468 Activities Ginger House – a stunning glasshouse exhibition of growing ginger plants. For 12,000 years humans have used gingers to cook, cure, dye, drink and perfume. Learn more about this fascinating family and admire the plants. Fresh herbal teas, homemade cake and biscuits available (featuring ginger and other flavours!) Ornamental and edible plants, fresh produce, garden art prints and postcards for sale Web www.brockwellgreenhouses.org.uk Community gardener Cat Stevens Cg

J3. Eden at St. Paul’s Community Garden SW4 0DX Eden Community Garden is a tranquil green space in the middle of inner-city Clapham. It was founded in 2000 on the site of an ancient burial ground, dating back 1,000 years to the original church

of Clapham, and is part of St. Paul’s churchyard. In the 17th century the land here was connected to the manor house owned by Richard Atkins, physician to King James I. It was a burial ground for parishioners who died from the plague, and then for Roundhead soldiers killed in the Civil War battle for Battersea Marshes. We try to create and maintain a sustainable habitat for wildlife and promote recycling and biodiversity through planting native British species and organic gardening. An apiary and a wildlife pond help us achieve this aim. We hold summer solstice and autumn celebrations and volunteering days throughout the year. The garden has won a Green Pennant for 11 years running and five Green Flags, and received a ‘thriving’ commendation in the London in Bloom competition, 2016. Open Saturday 9am–7pm, Sunday 9am–7pm Entrance Matrimony Place off Rectory Grove Nearest stations Wandsworth Road (500m), Clapham Common (1km) Buses 77, 87, 88, 322, 417, 452 Web www.edengardenclapham.org Community gardener Benny Hawksbee

J4. Royal Trinity Hospice SW4 0RN Trinity’s two-acre gardens were designed by John Medhurst, based on plans drawn up by American landscape architect Lanning Roper, who in 1982 had offered to design the gardens but sadly died before he could finish the job. Little of the garden pre-dates 1983 (when Medhurst finished his work) except hedges and trees, notably a purple beech planted in 1981 by the late Queen Mother. An old mulberry, a plane, horse chestnut and a swamp cypress lend maturity, while cherries add colour. The trees are protected by preservation orders and have to be carefully maintained. At the far end is a goldfish pond where a sculpture, Four Open Horizontal Squares, by George Rickey, moves with the slightest breeze. A new in-patient centre opened in 2009, requiring more landscaping to fit around the new buildings. The newer parts of the garden, designed by T.P. Bennett, are intended to be viewed from both the upper and lower levels of the centre, with steep slopes of shrubs and herbaceous planting falling towards the building. The centre and gardens were opened in July 2009 by HRH the Duchess of Cornwall. A weeping cherry, planted to mark the occasion, sits in the middle of one of the lawns, adding

lovely spring flowers to the gardens. The garden won the London Gardens Society Hospice Garden Plate in 2012, 2015 and 2016. Open Saturday 11am–4pm, Sunday 11am–4pm Entrance 30 Clapham Common North Side Access Steps can be avoided using the ramps Nearest station Clapham Common Buses 35, 37, 88, 137, 155, 345, G1 Activities Refreshments Web www.trinityhospice.org.uk Head gardener Terry Salter

J5. South London Botanical Institute SE24 9AQ The South London Botanical Institute (SLBI), which celebrated its centenary in 2010, continues to fulfil its original remit to inspire local people to find fascination in the plant world. The SLBI supports London’s smallest botanic garden, which is densely planted with over 500 labelled species, grown in a formal layout of themed borders. Traditional medicinal herbs grow beside plants used in current pharmaceutical research. Ferns, carnivorous plants, British natives, scented plants, monocots and drought-tolerant plants feature alongside rare trees and shrubs from

South London Botanical Institute

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the southern hemisphere. A new moss trail has been created, with each species linked to detailed information online. A new pond and wetland area are at the heart of the garden. There is access for pond-dipping and new planting will continue to provide a home for frogs and newts. We have re-created the ‘living museum of strange visitors’, as the original garden was described in a newspaper article of 1912. The writer marvelled at the profusion of wild flowers allowed to flourish in the garden, and this tradition continues. Other features include a specially commissioned mosaic, designed by Emma Biggs, to celebrate the centenary. Our lecture room had a major refurbishment in 2014, including a specially commissioned wallpaper designed around plants in our garden and pressed flowers from the herbarium. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance 323 Norwood Road Access Narrow paths Nearest station Tulse Hill Buses 68, 196 322, 468 + 2, 201, 415, 432 Activities Guided tours of the fascinating Institute building, including the lecture room, botanical library and herbarium. Unusual plants for sale. Garden café. Exhibition: Textiles & Botany Interwoven Web www.slbi.org.uk Head gardener Sarah Davey


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Squares & Gardens Key

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OGSW Guide 2017

Notting Hill and North Kensington

Hanover Gardens

K1. Hanover Gardens W11 3LN A peaceful woodland garden in the heart of the historic Ladbroke Estate, the quiet of which is disturbed only by birdsong and the bells of St John’s, Notting Hill. Rolling lawns with mature spreading planes and occasional specimen trees, including a tulip tree, are interspersed with copses of choice woodland planting, such as Callicarpa, Brunnera, Epimedium, Liriope, honeysuckle. hellebores and ferns. Dame Sylvia Crowe, the noted landscape architect and garden designer, lived here for many years. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Opposite 11 Lansdowne Walk Access Most of the garden is accessible by wheelchair, apart from one area with steps. Gravel paths Nearest station Holland Park Buses 31, 94, 148, 228 Gardeners Mark Steel and Chris Hearn. General maintenance: Joseph Jones

largest private garden squares in London, listed by English Heritage as grade II. Within the railings, shrubbery and stately trees enclose a long east-west walk along the north side, with winding paths around three spacious lawns, flanked by colourful herbaceous borders. There are two playgrounds, for small and older children. Open Sunday 2–6pm Entrance Gate opposite no. 60 Kensington Park Road only Access Level access, but gravel paths and uneven surfaces Nearest station Notting Hill Gate Buses 27, 28, 31, 52, 94, 328, 452 Activities Teas by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution Head gardener Colin Derome

K2. Ladbroke Square Garden W11 3BJ The garden was originally the site of a racecourse, the Hippodrome, built by John Whyte in 1837. The venture foundered as the course was too heavygoing. A plan of 1849 signed by the architect/surveyor Thomas Allason shows the garden laid out as it is today, the largest of the 16 communal gardens of the Ladbroke Estate. It is also one of the

Leinster Square Gardens

K3. Leinster Square Gardens W2 4PW Leinster Square Gardens was created when the surrounding imposing white

stucco houses were built between 1856 and 1864. The garden is dominated by three majestic plane trees planted at that time, the central plane tree planted on 26 February 1887 in Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee Year. The garden was rescued from decline by a group of residents in the late 1970s. They replaced the railings that had been removed during WW2 and planted azaleas, rhododendrons and a collection of camellias. Much of this planting survives today. By the early 2010s the garden was once again in need of attention. In 2015 it was extensively restored to include new paths, an irrigation system, a small pavilion and new seating as well as a new planting plan. The garden is maintained by a once-weekly gardener. Famous former residents of Leinster Square include the writer, ornithologist and founding member of the RSPB, William Henry Hudson at no. 11, and musician Sting at 28A. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Hereford Road Access Wheelchair-accessible Nearest stations Bayswater, Queensway, Notting Hill Buses 7, 23, 27, 28, 31, 36, 52, 70, 94, 148, 328, 390, 452 Web www.lsga.org.uk

K4. Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising W11 1QT This award-winning garden is situated behind the Museum of Brands, originally built in 1866 as the Bayswater Jewish School. The original planting in 1990 was a donation from the Chelsea Flower Show of the gold-medal-winning Crabtree & Evelyn scented garden to form part of the London Lighthouse HIV/AIDS centre. Since then the garden has developed to form a secluded enclave in the heart of busy Ladbroke Grove. The garden is a south-facing courtyard, enclosed by walls on three sides. The planting includes a mixture of herbaceous perennials, climbers and tender sub-tropical plants, such as Brugmansia, Abutilon and Musa, which flourish in this microclimate. Nest boxes encourage a number of small bird species to thrive in the garden. Open Sunday 11am–5pm

Entrance 111–117 Lancaster Road Nearest station Ladbroke Grove Buses 7, 23, 52, 70, 228, 295, 452 Activities The Museum of Brands provides a fascinating insight into how everyday lives have changed over the past 150 years through the evolution of consumer brands. Exhibits showcase historic and contemporary household packaging, toys, magazines, newspapers, technology, travel, fashion and design, a picture emerges, creating a visually stimulating and thoughtprovoking experience. For many it’s an emotional and nostalgic reunion with their past. A special Botanical Quiz exploring the collection is available to Open Garden Squares visitors. There is a small admission charge to enter the Museum. Web www.museumofbrands.com Garden co-ordinator Gary Eisenhauer

K5. Norland Square W11 4PX Originally part of the Norland Estate, the square and beautiful surrounding stucco-fronted houses were built by a property developer in the early 1840s. A shady gravel path meanders around the garden next to borders filled with mixed shrubs and ornamental trees. The garden railings were reinstated in 2007. The sunny central lawn has a children’s playground and tennis court at opposite ends. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance East side of the square Access Access to lawns via gravel path Nearest station Holland Park Buses 31, 94, 148 Activities Hot and cold drinks available with a large selection cakes and biscuits

K6. Pembridge Square W2 4ED Pembridge Square was built between 1856 and 1864, with the garden being completed in 1865. It recently received awards for the best garden in north Kensington and best large private garden square. The long rectangular garden has a beautiful woodland area, wildflowers at the east end, a rose garden at the west end and a long herbaceous border. Open Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Opposite 11 Pembridge Square Access Some narrow gravel paths, but others have been improved to allow wheelchair use Nearest station Notting Hill Gate Buses 27, 28, 31, 52, 70, 94, 148, 328, 390, 452 Activities Children’s play area with swings and a hornbeam maze

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Phoenix Farm and Learning Zone

Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player

K7. Phoenix Farm and Learning Zone W12 7DB Started in 2007, Phoenix Farm provides a learning resource for the school, local community groups and offers volunteering opportunities for local residents. Comprising two glasshouses and a series of beds, the farm produces fruit and vegetables of all descriptions, together with medicinal herbs, plants to attract wildlife, and edible flowers. Hammersmith Community Gardens Association helps to manage the project on behalf of Phoenix Academy School. This acre of space in the centre of the White City Estate provides opportunities for local residents to do some hands-on gardening and very successfully so the farm continues to win awards each year. In addition to over 40 varieties of vegetables and herbs, there is a

Pembridge Square

community orchard, soft fruits and wildlife areas, as well as bees, rabbits and chickens. The annual harvest festival attracted over 500 people, who were able to see a demonstration of apple pressing from Abundance London, try lots of farm-related activities and sample home-grown food. The farm is 15 minutes’ walk from our other site in Ravenscourt Park. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance Adjacent to Phoenix Fitness Centre, Bloemfontein Road Access Accessible toilet in adjacent fitness centre Nearest stations White City, Wood Lane Buses 220, 283 Activities Plant sale, refreshments Web hcga.org.uk/gardens/phoenixschool-farm Community food grower Cath Knight

K8. Rosmead Garden W11 2JG This garden is part of the Ladbroke Estate, which includes Arundel Gardens and St John’s Gardens. Thomas Allom’s plan of 1823 provided for generous communal gardens, organised in a concentric layout of crescents. The outer crescents date from the 1860s. Open Sunday 12–5pm Entrance Pedestrian gate on Rosmead Road Access Entry down a steep flight of steps followed by a short gravel slope. Uneven path Nearest stations Ladbroke Grove, Holland Park, Notting Hill Gate Buses 7, 23, 52, 452,228


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AREA K: Notting Hill and North Kensington

K9. Royal Crescent Gardens W11 4SN These gardens are part of the Norland Estate, developed from around 1840 by Robert Cantwell, who laid out Royal Crescent in 1846. They serve some 150 households in 44 houses. The Ordnance Survey map of 1860 shows a path following the periphery and trees and paths within the space. Two magnificent plane trees are at least as old as the Crescent buildings. The perimeter railings, sacrificed for the war effort in WW2, were restored in 1997. The garden committee has worked since 2003 with a garden designer on full restoration, to upgrade the design, enhance the planting and improve the use of space and visual amenity for all residents all year round. Achievements include the installation of a gazebo specially made for the garden as a new central feature in 2007, surrounded by roses and lavender, and replanting of the perimeter beds. Old and dying trees and shrubs have been replaced with new specimens, such as Prunus mackii, snakebark maple, Gleditzia, Liquidamber, Magnolia and Davidia involucrata. The garden came second in the communal gardens class from 2009 to 2013 and again in 2016. It

Royal Crescent Gardens

also won London Gardens Society awards from 2013 to 2016. Open Saturday 9.30am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Gate facing St Ann’s Road Nearest station Shepherd’s Bush and Holland Park underground Buses C1, 31, 49, 94, 148, 228, 295, 316, Oxford Tube, buses coming to Shepherds Bush/Westfield Contract gardener Joseph Jones

K10. St Charles’ Community Garden W10 6DZ NEW The garden is situated in the middle of an old Victorian hospital, which is now a NHS well-being centre. We grow a range of fruit and vegetables, together with medicinal and other herbs and also experiment with unusual fruit and veg. All the plots on site are held by community groups. We are supported by the Community Gardeners of the Royal borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Open Sunday 10.30am–4.30pm Entrance St Marks Road Nearest station Ladbroke Grove Buses 7, 70, 316 Activities Health and well-being

OGSW Guide 2017 workshops. Community stalls. Chair of Garden Club Marie Mulcahy

K11. St James’s Gardens W11 4RA The gardens were established in the late 1840s as part of the Norland Estate. A speculative developer, Charles Richardson, built the houses around St James’s Gardens and set up the gardens for the benefit of the residents who were, and still are, required to maintain them. Richardson gifted the site for St James’s Church to the Church Commissioners on the basis that the houses would be more saleable if they had access to their own adjacent church. The church, designed by architect Lewis Vulliamy, was built between 1844 and 1855. The gardens are laid out in an informal woodland style, dominated by the fine chestnut and lime trees which date back well into the 19th century. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance South side of gardens Nearest station Holland Park Buses 31, 94, 148, 228, 295, 316 Web www.josephjones.london Contract gardener Joseph Jones

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Holland Park Buses 7, 70, 52, 452, 23, 295, 316 Activities Delicious homemade savouries, cakes, tea, coffee, light drinks and wines. Guided tours by residents Web www.wesleysquare.co.uk Gardener Hilary Arnold

K15. West London Bowling Club W10 6PL

West London Bowling Club

K12. St Quintin’s Community Kitchen Garden W10 6NX A disused tennis court has been transformed into a community kitchen garden where local residents grow their own fresh produce. The site is used by nearly 100 local people and groups to grow a huge variety of fruit and vegetables. The garden consists of 48 raised wooden beds and provides a local food-growing centre. The design of the site maximises food-growing space and allows the garden to look attractive. Plotholders are encouraged to grow a mix of fruit, vegetables and flowers. The garden has an amazing ambience, which has helped foster a great community spirit between plotholders. It shows what can be created on an under-used and neglected open space. The garden achieved an Outstanding classification in the London Its Your Neighbourhood section of London In Bloom in 2016, which described us as ‘a green oasis’. In 2015 we received the London in Bloom Excellence in Gardening Award. We won second prize in the community food-growing category in London in Bloom in 2010, and several plotholders have won individual awards. The garden was runner-up in the allotment section of London in Bloom in 2014 and featured in The Great British Garden Revival series on BBC2 in 2013. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance St Quintin Avenue next to the Health Centre. Access Narrow paths, ramps

Nearest station Ladbroke Grove Buses 7, 23, 70, 228, 295, 316 Activities Plants and homemade cakes for sale. Tea and coffee Cg

K13. Stanley Crescent Garden W11 2NA One of the least altered communal gardens in the area, the garden is part of the Ladbroke Estate development which was largely designed and built in 1852-3 by Thomas Allom. It contains many old, rare and protected trees. The garden was recently voted the best garden square in Kensington and Chelsea in a competition organised by Garden Square News. Open Sunday 2–6pm Entrance South gate in Kensington Park Gardens Nearest stations Holland Park, Notting Hill Gate, Ladbroke Grove Buses 52, 228, 452 Web stanleycrescentgarden.wordpress. com

‘The hidden gem of W10...’ West London Bowling Club, founded in 1903, became known for its award-winning gardens, which were once patronised by royalty. Latterly the gardens went through a long period of neglect. Roses planted over 35 years by gardener Tony McGiver (now 87) were lost among the weeds and brambles. In 2014 a public appeal to revive the grounds brought a huge local response, not least from nearby St Quintin Community Garden. A volunteer gardening team has begun restoration and planted many new roses and fruit trees. The friendly ‘twinning’ with St Quintin’s makes the two gardens an unmissable venue. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Off St Quintin Avenue Access Limited wheelchair access. Some narrow paths and concrete ramp to grassy areas Nearest stations Ladbroke Grove, Latimer Road Buses 7, 23, 70, 228, 295, 316 Activities Indoor or outdoor tea, coffee and cake. Plant and homemade cake sales Web www.westlondonbowlingclub.com

K14. Wesley Square W11 1TP Wesley Square is one of west London’s best-kept secrets. The dwellings face an expansive lawn with large mature trees and abundant borders. To enter or leave you go through the award-winning garden, putting it at the heart of the community. Designed by Sir Terry Farrell, the square was completed in 1979. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Off Lancaster Road west of St Mark’s Road junction Access Wheelchair access via Kingsdown Close. Nearest stations Ladbroke Grove,

Stanley Crescent Garden


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Central London

OGSW Guide 2017

73

Marylebone, Bayswater and Little Venice Squares & Gardens Key L1

Ashworth Mansions Garden B1

Bryanston Square D3 73 Cleveland Square B3 L4 Cleveland Gardens B3 L5 Crescent Garden B2 L6 Dorset Square D2 L7 Formosa Garden B2 L8 Kensington Gardens Square B3 L9 Manchester Square Gardens E3 L10 Montagu Square D3 L11 Park Square & Park Crescent Gardens E2 L12 The Regent’s Park Allotment Garden E1 L13 Regent’s University London D2 L2

L3

L14

Royal College of Physicians’ Medicinal Garden

Triangle Garden Opening days

L15

Open Saturday and Sunday Open Saturday only Open Sunday only Please check individual listings for exact opening times Key Underground station Overground station National rail station Bus station

E2 B2


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AREA F: Hampstead and Highgate Central London AREA

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OGSW Guide 2017

Marylebone, Bayswater and Little Venice

W2 6HA

Nearest stations Baker Street, Marble Arch Buses 2, 13, 30, 74, 82, 139, 189, 274 Contract gardener Joseph Jones

L3. Cleveland Square W2 6DG

Ashworth Mansions Garden

L1. Ashworth Mansions Garden W9 1JL Maida Vale is renowned for the mansion blocks that line its broad avenues and give the area a very distinctive and quite European feel. The land was owned by the Church Commissioners who resisted development until the late 1890s. By this point, mansion blocks, rather than houses, were the most profitable option for developers. Ashworth Mansions is Maida Vale’s leading estate of mansion flats. Built 1899-1900, the Mansions comprise 105 flats in two imposing Queen Anne revival blocks, facing each other across extensive communal gardens. The garden of approximately 0.5 acre is laid out as woodland with mature trees, shrubs and perennials, herbaceous borders, nine defined beds, amenity grassed area and plenty of shade. Open Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Biddulph Road Access Some steps and uneven surfaces Nearest station Maida Vale Bus 98 Activities Have a chat with the residents. Web www.ashworthmansions.com

L4. Cleveland Gardens

with stuccoed fronts and columns and pediments at each corner and in the centre (the latter now lost). The square has magnificent old London plane trees set among other flowering trees. Planting includes rhododendron, azalea, camellia, weigela, dogwood, viburnum, mahonia, hydrangea and others. There is a memorial drinking fountain of 1863 at the south end and an early 19th-century cast-iron water pump in the form of a Doric column at the north end. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Middle of east side, opposite No. 11 Access Gravel paths

A beautiful, quiet 1.5-acre garden square with lawns, gravel paths and mature trees, surrounded by grade II-listed white stucco-fronted houses. The square dates from around 1855. Recent re-planting has created a garden more like a private garden than a park, with particular focus on horticulture. There is a diverse range of herbaceous perennials, including clouds of Hesperis, and Mathiola intermingled with dark purple/black poppies while early-to-late peonies intersperse with alliums, lupins and iris. A fragrant Styrax japonica edges woodland planting with foxgloves, Lunaria rediva, Epimedium and Smyrnium perfoliatum contrasting with Rodgersias and ferns. Open Saturday 12–6pm Entrance West gate, opposite no. 25 Nearest stations Paddington, Bayswater, Lancaster Gate Buses 7, 23, 27, 36, 46, 205, 332, 436 (Paddington) + 94, 148, 274, 390 (Lancaster Gate) + 70 (Queensway) Activities The Gin Garden, specialising in creating drinks inspired by garden, meadow and hedgerow Web www.clevelandsquare.org Garden manager Suzanne Etherton

Small sister garden to Cleveland Square, just 75m away. In 2006 the old perimeter fencing was replaced with beautiful traditional railings and the entire garden was refurbished – all achieved by the hard work of the residents’ association with the help of grants from English Heritage and Westminster City Council. Open Saturday 12–6pm Entrance East gate, opposite no. 7 Nearest stations Paddington, Bayswater, Lancaster Gate Buses 7, 23, 27, 36, 46, 205, 332, 436 (Paddington) + 94, 148, 274, 390 (Lancaster Gate) + 70 (Queensway) Web www.clevelandsquare.org Garden manager Suzanne Etherton

L5. Crescent Garden W9 1ED Recently given an award as London’s best large private garden square, Crescent Garden is a three-acre communal garden, just off Warrington Crescent. It is surrounded by stuccofronted houses dating from around 1865, including a grade II-listed balconied terrace. In the 1970s local residents defeated plans by the Church Commissioners to turn the garden into communal car parking. Today it has lawns, a fine set of interesting trees, island beds and many unusual plants and shrubs. There is also a children’s play area. The area was bombed in WW1, when enemy planes mistook the canals of Little Venice for the river Thames. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Entrance next to 1 Warrington Crescent, down ramp and through gate Access Gravel paths Nearest station Warwick Avenue Buses 6, 46, 98, 187, 414

L2. Bryanston Square W1H 2DH Bryanston Square was built between 1811 and 1821. The houses on the east and west sides were built to a grand design

Cleveland Square

Crescent Garden

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Activities Children’s play area with swings and slide Web www.crescentgarden.co.uk Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player

L6. Dorset Square NW1 6QJ Dorset Square is the central feature of an urban layout planned by the Portman Estate (1815-20). The square, architecturally still intact, was laid out on the site of Thomas Lord’s first cricket ground, established in 1787. Sir Laurence Gomme (1853-1916), an early pioneer of the Blue Plaques scheme, lived at no. 24 from 1895 to 1909. His home is marked by the 800th blue plaque. George Grossmith, co-author of The Diary of a Nobody, was also a resident of the square. He too is marked by a blue plaque, as is Dodie Smith, author of 101 Dalmatians. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance South Gate – opposite no. 34 Nearest stations Baker Street, Marylebone Buses 2, 13, 18, 27, 30, 82, 74, 113, 205, 274, 453 Gardener Mario Crasta

L7. Formosa Garden W9 1EZ

This beautiful and tranquil communal garden, created around 1860, is triangular in shape and lined with 48 aged pollarded London plane trees. A dynamic and imaginative new 50-year tree planting programme was initiated in November 2016 and over 40 new and interesting trees have now been planted as a first phase. There are several large island beds surrounding an impressive oak, which when lit for Christmas provides the perfect meeting point for

Formosa Garden

resident carol singing! The splendid beds are crammed with interesting, unusual and colourful shrubs and herbaceous perennials, giving a long period of pleasure to the residents. At the eastern end of the garden a mediterraneanstyle bed showcases a wide range of specimens which usually flourish only in more sunny and arid conditions. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Adjacent to 32 Castellain Road W9 1EZ Access Gravel paths along the triangular space Nearest station Warwick Avenue Buses 6, 46, 187, 414, 98 Web www.formosaamenity.co.uk Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player

L8. Kensington Gardens Square W2 4DJ These gardens, which are undergoing careful ecological regeneration, are surrounded by five-storey stuccofronted houses built in 1858 by Henry de Bruno Austin. Originally family houses for members of the then-emerging professional classes, the grade II-listed properties are now flats and hotels. The gardens enclose a tranquil green space in this busy enclave of Bayswater. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance Gate opposite no. 75 Kensington Gardens Square Access Gravel paths Nearest stations Bayswater, Queensway, Royal Oak Buses 7, 23, 27, 70, 94, 148, 390 Web www.kgsgarden.org.uk Gardener David Ashton, One Two Tree Garden Services


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OGSW Guide 2017

L9. Manchester Square Gardens W1U 3AB A beautiful Georgian square with a fine collection of trees, shrubs and plants, first laid out between 1776 and 1788. A major replanting programme took place in 2006-8. The square is named after the Duke of Manchester, who – attracted by the good duck-shooting in the area – built a house (then called Manchester House) on the north side in 1777. The 2nd Marquess of Hertford acquired the lease in 1797 and it became known as Hertford House. In the 19th century Hertford House was home to Sir Richard Wallace (1818–90), illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess, who displayed much of the Hertford family’s fabulous collection of fine and decorative arts here. In 1897 Lady Wallace left it to the nation as the Wallace Collection. Hertford House today is a rare example of a London town house occupying the whole side of a garden square. A church originally planned for the centre of the square was never built. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Opposite Hinde Street, leading from Marylebone High Street Access One very shallow step at entrance. Gravel paths Nearest stations Bond Street, Baker Street Bus Any bus along Oxford Street or Baker Street Activities Come and relax on the lawn in our beautiful garden. Bring your own picnic, deckchairs and rugs Contract gardener Joseph Jones

L10. Montagu Square W1H 2LA Montagu Square lies within the Portman Estate and is a fine example of late Georgian architecture. It is the only purely residential square left in Westminster and has a beautiful, tranquil, shady garden. In 1554 Sir William Portman, Lord Chief Justice to Henry VIII, bought the freehold to the manor of Lileston (Lisson). Most of the land was used for farming until the 1750s, when building on the estate expanded rapidly, centred on Portman Square. The square was laid out by the estate’s architect, James Thompson Parkinson around 1800. It was named after Elizabeth Montagu of nearby Montagu House, now demolished. She is remembered for her literary Blue Stocking Society and the annual May Day party for chimneyclimbing boys. Roast beef and plum pudding were served and a shilling given to every boy. Among those who attended this festivity was a young David Porter,

Manchester Square Gardens

who started life as a chimney sweep but grew up to be the builder of Montagu Square. More recently, the residents restored the railings, which had been removed during WW2. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Gate in George Street Nearest stations Baker Street, Marble Arch Buses 2, 13, 30, 74, 82, 139, 159, 274 Activities Tea, coffee and biscuits Gardener Joseph Jones

L11. Park Square & Park Crescent Gardens NW1 4LH Park Square is one of the largest of London’s private squares, designed and laid out by John Nash. It is dominated by plane trees said to have been planted in 1817 to commemorate the allied victory at Waterloo two years earlier. Other trees of note include a tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) and weeping silver lime (Tilia tomentosa ‘Petiolaris’). An original and unique feature of the garden is the Nursemaids’ Tunnel, an early pedestrian underpass connecting Park Square to Park Crescent. The tunnel passes under the busy Marylebone Road, allowing families to promenade safely through both gardens without worrying about the noisy public throng passing overhead. The combination of Park Square and Crescent was designed to form a transitional entrance feature to Regent’s Park, leading the visitor from the formal Nash streetscape of Portland Place in the south, to the green and picturesque landscape in the north. It was described as a ‘sort of vestibule’ to the new royal park. New gates and railings have been installed to original designs. Park Crescent was originally planned as a full circus by Nash, however only a graceful and elegant semicircle was realised. The elegant pavilions

conceal ventilation shafts for the London Underground. The gardens retain most of their original Nash layout and have been managed continuously from their inception by an organisation specifically set up in 1824 to carry out this task, the Crown Estate Paving Commission. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance 12 Park Square East – Main CEPC Office Gate Access Steep tarmac ramps through tunnel between Park Square and Park Crescent. Gravel paths. Cyclists should not secure their bikes to surrounding railings or lamp posts, but can leave them in an allocated area at their own risk Nearest stations Regent’s Park, Great Portland Street Buses 18, 27, 30 + C2, 88 Activities Children’s play area in central area includes swings and sandpit Conditions Small family picnics are permitted Web www.cepc.org.uk Head gardener Kevin Powell

much more. Training is open to anyone interested in growing food. Many sessions are also run with local schools, and we have regular open days throughout the year. Open Saturday 10am–3.30pm Entrance Corner of Chester Road and Inner Circle Access The entrance to the garden is located next to the Park Office gate. The garden has wide, even paths that are accessible to wheelchairs Nearest stations Great Portland Street, Baker Street, Regent’s Park Buses 18, 27, 30, 205, 453 Activities Tours. Plants and produce available. Garden hunt. Activities for children Web www.capitalgrowth.org/training/ the_regents_park Co-ordinator Julie Riehl Cg

L13. Regent’s University London NW1 4NS The university sits in 11 acres of Crown Estate land within Regent’s Park. The site was originally home to the pioneering Bedford College for Women. The grounds are laid out in an informal woodland style, with wide expanses of lawn surrounding ivy-covered buildings. A variety of trees and shrubs includes a number of mature plane trees, one of which is a ‘Great Tree of London’. A ‘secret garden’ tucked away behind mature hedges features roses, seating, a pond and tree ferns. This was originally the Bedford College botany garden, established in 1909. The university campus occupies the original site of South Villa, designed by Decimus Burton, one of the original Regent’s Park villas in the

L14. Royal College of Physicians’ Medicinal Garden NW1 4LE The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) was founded in 1518 and is a registered charity that aims to ensure high-quality care for patients by promoting the highest standards of medical practice. Its present grade I-listed building was designed by Sir Denys Lasdun in 1964 and is an award-winning museum and venue. The RCP’s garden of medicinal plants (all of which are labelled with their botanical

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name) has flourished and matured over the last 10 years. Themed areas of plants associated with medicine from different regions of the world surround the building, making a verdant home for plant knowledge and beauty. Additionally, the eight small gardens along our Regency terrace of St Andrews Place contain plants that were used to make medicines in the College’s first Pharmacopoeia, published in 1618, all of which are described in Culpeper’s Herbal. The garden is both beautiful and educational. The plants – from which we obtain local anaesthetics, treatments for swine flu, leukaemia, diabetes, cancers, cardiac problems, asthma, scurvy and intestinal worms, as well as narcotics, hallucinogens, ecstasy and more – are endlessly fascinating. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance St Andrews Place. Access from Outer Circle, NOT Albany St or Peto Place Access Part of the garden has no path, just sloping lawn. Mostly brick paths. Wheelchair ramps where there are steps outside. Lifts inside the building Nearest stations Great Portland Street, Regent’s Park Buses 18, 27, 30, 88, 205, 453, C2 Car parking No parking on site Activities Conducted tours throughout the day – learn how plants were used as medicines over the past five millennia to the present day. Tea and light refreshments. Toilets. Free Wi-Fi. Leaflets and books for sale. Information about the plants on the website. Explore the RCP’s iconic modernist building, the museum’s collections of art, silver and medical artefacts and current exhibitions Web garden.rcplondon.ac.uk Head gardener Jane Knowles

L15. Triangle Garden W9 1BQ

L12. The Regent’s Park Allotment Garden NW1 4NR The Regent’s Park Allotment Garden has been developed in partnership between Capital Growth (London’s food-growing network), The Royal Parks and Capel Manor College to inspire, educate and demonstrate the growing of fruit and vegetables in an urban environment. We focus on chemical-free techniques. The allotment is a wonderful example of a thriving food-growing space in the heart of the capital. Capital Growth conducts its urban food-growing training programme here. It covers the essential elements of any successful urban foodgrowing project, including planning, soil management, composting and

plans made by architect John Nash in the early 1800s. Bedford College took a Crown lease on the estate in 1908 and new buildings, designed by architect Basil Champneys, were opened by Queen Mary in 1913. The Gate Lodge, on the south-east corner of the estate, is the only part of the original Nash/Burton design that remains. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance Rear of University. Enter Regent’s Park through Clarence gate, turn right and cross the footbridge over the lake. Turn right and the garden entrance is on your left Access A few steps, uneven surfaces and narrow paths, but most parts of the garden are accessible Nearest station Baker Street Buses 2, 74, 82, 274 Activities Free booklet about the garden’s history and planting Conditions Opening is subject to bookings for private events. Please check the OGSW website to confirm opening over the weekend Web www.regents.ac.uk Garden manager Don Wiley

Royal College of Physicians’ Medicinal Garden

A beautiful, tranquil garden, perfectly proportioned in the form of a triangle, with formal and informal beds. The original white stucco houses, dating from the 1860s, surround this peaceful space. There is a central island of London plane trees that are over 100 years old. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Corner of Randolph Avenue and Randolph Crescent; between 26 and 28 Randolph Crescent Access Wheelchair access on rather steep slope. Gravel paths Nearest station Warwick Avenue Buses 6, 46, 187 Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player


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Step inside for a literary night out… M3. Brunswick Square WC1N 1AZ

British Medical Association Council Garden

M1. Bedford Square WC1B 3HH Built between 1775 and 1786, Bedford Square is the best and most complete Georgian square in London. The elegant surrounding buildings, now mainly offices, were once fashionable town houses and have distinctive Coadestone entrances. The large oval garden at the centre is surrounded by pre-war iron railings and screened by encircling shrubberies and mature plane trees. Recent improvements to the garden include a newly turfed main lawn, numerous perennial additions to the borders and major pruning works to both the shrubbery and trees. Areas of interest include a restored summerhouse, a Victorian stumpery and pocket planting of a large variety of herbaceous plants. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance North side of square Access Hard surface only at entrance to garden Nearest stations Tottenham Court Road, Goodge Street Buses 10, 24, 29, 73, 134 + 1, 7, 8, 19, 25, 38, 55, 98, 242 Web www.bedfordestates.com Head gardener Tom Abbott

M2. British Medical Association Council Garden WC1H 9JP The garden of the British Medical Association is a hidden secret on the site of Charles Dickens’ house on the corner of Tavistock Square. It was designed by architect Sir Edwin Lutyens and is today planted extensively with medicinal herbs. Planting is refreshingly green around a central oval pool and the use of physic plants among the planting bears witness to the continuing role of plants in contemporary pharmacology. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance BMA House in Upper Woburn Place, opposite NE corner of Tavistock Square Access Only accessible to wheelchairs by prior arrangement Nearest stations Russell Square, Euston Buses 59, 68, 91, 168 Activities Our 2017 theme is BMA Gardens for Health. Focus on social wellbeing, food and gardening with a range of displays, discussions and demonstrations throughout the day. See OGSW website for full programme. Café. Gardener Daniela Sikora

Brunswick Square was one of the gardens flanking the Foundling Hospital (now demolished), a charity set up in 1739 to cater for abandoned children. Work on the square began in 1795 and the gardens were originally laid out and railed in 1799. The square’s large London plane tree, more than 200 years old, is recognised as one of the Great Trees of London. The grade II-listed square is named after Caroline of Brunswick, the Prince Regent’s wife. In Jane Austen’s Emma, Mr and Mrs John Knightley make their home in Brunswick Square, then on the edge of London, commending its healthiness ‘Our part of London is so very superior to most others. The neighbourhood of Brunswick Square is very different from almost all the rest. We are so remarkably airy!’ J.M. Barrie, author of Peter Pan, as well as Virginia Woolf and other Bloomsbury Group members are among the famous former residents of the area. New research places the Darlings’ home, into which Peter Pan flew to visit Wendy, on the south-west corner of the square. The original houses surrounding the square have been replaced by the UCL School of Pharmacy and the Foundling Museum to the north, the Brunswick shopping centre to the west and International Hall (a university hall of residence) to the south. The children’s charities, Coram and Coram’s Fields, are off the square. Mecklenburgh Square is a similar, but

Every month the Bloomsbury Institute hosts events for book lovers, academics and thinkers inside our historic Bedford Square premises. Previous guests have included Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Gilbert, Khaled Hosseini, Carlos Acosta and William Boyd. See our website for upcoming authors and events. Tickets are just £15 and include complimentary refreshments.

Never miss an invite by joining our newsletter at: www.bloomsburyinstitute.com Follow our updates

@BloomsburyInst

Events take place at Bloomsbury Publishing, 50 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3DP.

B LO O M S BU RY Brunswick Square

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private, square to the east, linked by a path on the north-east side. Open Saturday 11am–4pm Entrance Turn right on exiting the station Nearest station Russell Square Buses 17, 45, 46, 59, 68, 91, 98, 168, 188 Activities Saturday 17 June, 11am, Garden Squares of Bloomsbury walk. Meet on the front steps of The Goodenough Club, 23 Mecklenburgh Square, WC1N 2AD. Walk ends at Bedford Square (about 1 hour). No need to book, just come along. Medicinal plants theme with UCL School of Pharmacy. Free entry and 20% discount in the café for OGSW ticket holders to the Foundling Museum, which tells the story of Britain’s first home for abandoned children and London’s firstever public art gallery. Self-guided walks around the Bloomsbury squares on the Association of Bloomsbury Squares and Gardens website. Web www.bloomsburysquares.org.uk/ brunswick-square

M4. Calthorpe Project Community Garden WC1X 8LH A 1.2-acre community garden, which opened in 1984 after local residents campaigned against the sale of the land for development. Today it includes a Walter Segal self-build community building, an under-fives’ area, a wild garden, community composting area, Bangladeshi women’s’ plots, family plots and an AstroTurf futsal pitch. We have also developed a food-growing area with

OGSW Guide 2017 raised beds and a large polytunnel for use by local people, schools and other community groups. Small allotments are available for local families. Last year we installed an anaerobic digester, which turns raw and cooked food waste into liquid fertiliser and bio-gas. Open Saturday 12–6pm, Sunday 12–6pm Entrance From Gray’s Inn Road, opposite Westminster Kingsway College Access Fully accessible Nearest station King’s Cross Buses 17, 45, 46 Activities Plant sales. Tea and coffee for sale Conditions No alcohol permitted on site. Guide dogs only Web www.calthorpeproject.org.uk Gardeners Staff and volunteers Cg

M5. Collingham Gardens Nursery WC1N 1PH This is a completely hidden, semi-wild garden in the middle of Bloomsbury, with many large trees dating back at least a century. It was originally part of the first graveyard set outside church land in London and belonged to St George the Martyr, Queen Square – the other half is now St George’s Gardens. The gravestones (and the bodies!) remain. It later became the site of a medical school specialising in anatomy and dissection, run by an American, Dr Cooke, used by the University of London and the nearby Garrett Anderson Hospital for Women. The land is owned by the church of St George the Martyr and the nursery is a vital part of the community, offering pre-school learning experiences for local

Access There are a number of single steps along the entrance route from the chapel. The hard landscaping is uneven Nearest station Tottenham Court Road Buses 1, 8, 10, 14, 19, 24, 25, 29, 38, 55, 73, 98, 134, 176, 242, 390 Activities Staff on hand to tell you about the house and garden, the charity and its history Conditions The House will not be open Web www.hosb.org.uk

M8. International Lutheran Student Centre Sunken Courtyard WC1H 9QH Fitzroy Square

children. The nursery’s ethos is ‘play and learning through exploration of the natural world’. The children connect with animals and learn to treat them with respect. They grow food, which they harvest and cook, and plant new trees to replace those that die. They experience a little oasis of greenery and wildness in central London. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance From Henrietta Mews at junction with Wakefield Street and Handel Street Access Access via ramp. Paths can be narrow, uneven, slippery and muddy Nearest stations King’s Cross & St Pancras, Russell Square, Holborn Buses 59, 68, 91, 168, 188 Activities Exhibition on history of site. Also information on the pre-school nursery rated ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted. Refreshments available. Toilets Web collinghamgardensnursery.com Head Katharine Browne

M6. Fitzroy Square W1T 6EF

Collingham Gardens Nursery

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Fitzroy Square is one of London’s finest squares and the only one designed by Robert Adam. It is named after Charles Fitzroy, 4th Duke of Grafton, who commissioned Adam to design the houses for a new London square in the late 18th century. Many famous artists, writers and statesmen have lived here. Houses marked by blue plaques include those once occupied by Victorian Prime Minister Lord Salisbury and writers George Bernard Shaw and Virginia Woolf, who both lived at no. 29 at different times. During the last 40 years the square and garden have been restored, including the circular stone plinth and railings to the original design. The

Lloyd Square

The House of St Barnabas

garden’s latest special feature is a newly installed organic children’s play area. Open Sunday 10am–6.30pm Entrance North side of Fitzroy Square, off Warren Street Nearest stations Warren Street, Great Portland Street Buses Northbound 10, 24, 29, 73, 134; southbound 88, C2; westbound 18, 27, 30 Activities Booklet for sale with further information on the square and its history. Homemade cream teas and light refreshments served in the tea tent Garden director Edward Turner

M7. The House of St Barnabas W1D 4NQ This secluded courtyard garden is the largest in Soho. Bordering the garden on one side is a grand Georgian townhouse, dating from 1746. On the other is the Chapel of St Barnabas, built in 1862 in French Gothic style. The garden enjoys minor fame as the setting for Dr Manette and Lucie’s entertaining in Charles Dicken’s novel, A Tale of Two Cities. The

two tall plane trees described still stand today. It is said that Dickens himself used to sit in the garden to write, as a friend of the then proprietor of the house, Sir Joseph Bazalgette. There are three important trees in the garden an ancient mulberry and the two planes mentioned by Dickens. The House of St Barnabas is a charity that helps people who have been affected by homelessness back into work. In 2013 they opened their social business, a members’ club, which offers a space for people to gain real work experience in a vibrant business, while drawing together a membership of people who are motivated by social change. The current landscape design was done by Hannah Gardner (New British Landscapes) in association with Sara Ingrams. The garden is cared for by Streetscape, a London-based social enterprise offering apprenticeships in landscape gardening to 18-25 year olds who are long-term unemployed. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance The Chapel of St Barnabas – Manette Street

The private courtyard of St Mary with St George German Lutheran Church and the International Lutheran Student Centre (ILSC), is a sunken haven in the busy streets of Bloomsbury. It was created on a site damaged during WW2, to provide a safe, calm place for student residents and members of the Church congregation and community to work and relax. The first glimpse of the small paved garden is through a lunette in the reception area. There is a variegated Weigela and Japanese rowan tree in the centre, with ground-level beds around the courtyard containing a variety of perennial shrubs as well as seasonal and annual plants. The area is overlooked by a garden balcony (no access). The garden is planted, maintained and watered by ILSC staff, although it is also offered to student residents and members of the congregation of St Mary’s to plant or help with maintenance if they feel inspired! In St Mary’s Church, which opens onto the garden, there is

International Lutheran Student Centre


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OGSW Guide 2017 and wildflowers. The garden is totally maintained by volunteers, none of whom are professional gardeners. An average of 6-10 attend regular ‘work’ days, weeding, pruning, dead-heading, moving plants and watering every evening in the summer. Each autumn there are two or three big bulb-planting days when we put in 2,000 spring and summer bulbs and the garden is becoming known for its spectacular spring bulb displays. The garden is popular with old and young alike, used continually throughout the day and evening, when it is locked. Families bring their toddlers to smell the lavender and marjoram plants. Red Admiral, Peacock, Painted Lady, and fritillary butterflies have all been seen through the years. A robin made it his territory for three seasons and in 2016 two blackbirds and a pair of great tits took up residence. Open Saturday 8am–10pm, Sunday 8am–10pm Entrance Marchmont St and Handel St Nearest stations Russell Square, King’s Cross, Euston Buses 10, 59, 68, 91, 168 + 18, 30, 63, 73, 205, 253, 390, 476 Web www.marchmontassociation.org.uk Head gardener Ricci de Freitas

Lloyd Square

a sculpture of Christ on the Cross by Elisabeth Frink, who also created the wonderful Walking Madonna at Salisbury Cathedral. On another side of the garden is a social clubroom, used regularly by student residents and by St Mary’s for social and community events such as their annual Christmas fair, and monthly ministry with children and youth. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance 30 Thanet Street Access One small step on pavement just outside the front door. Eleven steps or lift to sunken courtyard garden on lower ground floor. Completely level access (via a lift) from Sandwich Street we will happily direct you from 30 Thanet St Nearest stations King’s Cross, St Pancras, Russell Square Buses 10, 30, 59, 73, 91, 205, 390, 476 (Euston Road) + 59, 68, 91, 168 (Tavistock Square) Activities Visitors are welcome to take time to sit and reflect. Musical and cultural programme (details to be confirmed). Fairtrade tea, coffee, chocolate and cold snacks in the clubroom. Barbecue and soft drinks in the middle of the day Web www.ilscentre.org.uk

M9. Lloyd Square WC1X 9BA

The tranquil and secluded garden of Lloyd Square has a traditional layout, with trees around the perimeter and a central flowerbed surrounded by smaller beds, planted with shrub roses and perennials in an informal design. A gravelled path leads to a pergola. The lawned children’s play area was originally a tennis court. The distinctive pedimented façades of the surrounding houses were designed by the father-andson team of John and William Booth between 1820 and 1830 for the Lloyd Baker family, who owned the whole estate until the mid-20th century. A garden committee run by residents has managed the garden since 1917. In the last few years, renewal work has been undertaken to repair and renovate the railings, reinstate paths, extend planting across the garden and refurbish the arbour. Leaving the square at the southwest end, a walkway leads through St Helena’s Garden, recently replanted by the local community group with shadeloving plants. Open Sunday 1–5.30pm Entrance South side of the square

Access Chippings on paths may cause difficulties for pushchairs and wheelchairs Nearest stations Angel, King’s Cross Buses 63, + 19, 38, 341, + 30, 73, 205, 214, 394, 476 Activities Display boards on the history of the square and the story of Bethany House Gardener Liz Thornton

M11. Mecklenburgh Square WC1N 2AD Named after Queen Charlotte, formerly Princess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the square was designed by Samuel

M10. Marchmont Community Garden WC1N 1NJ NEW Rescued with Lottery Fund money, this derelict site was raised, levelled, planted and opened in September 2011. The garden features six distinct areas, each different in aspect (sunny/ shady) and soil (dry/damp) and planted accordingly. We try to give the different borders varied plant structures and colour palettes. Despite the small space, there are over 120 varieties of plant, ranging from trees and shrubs with different flowering and berrying times, chosen for their adaptability and attraction for wildlife, to herbaceous perennials and country-cottage annuals

Mecklenburgh Square

Pepys Cockerell and Joseph Kay for the Foundling Estate in the early 19th century. The grade II-listed two-acre garden was laid out in 1810-12. It remains close to the original design, with fine mature planes and other ornamental trees, formal lawns and gravel paths. A section devoted to plants from New Zealand includes a number of rarities. A herb garden has been planted with assistance from the Wellcome Trust. A children’s play area, barbecue area and tennis court cater for the large number of postgraduate students and their families living around the square. Open Sunday 12–5pm Entrance Gate on east side of square Access Wheelchair accessible Nearest stations Russell Square, King’s Cross Buses 17, 45, 46 + 19, 38, 55, 243 Activities Leaflet describing the garden and celebrating its 200th anniversary. We hope to offer a charity cake stall run by children of the residents Web mecklenburghsquaregarden.org.uk Gardener Myriam Sarens

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that reflects the ethos of the gallery and its artists. The garden is an unexpected refuge in the heart of urban London and another of Bloomsbury’s best-kept secrets. The gallery, founded in 1979, is a self-supporting charitable trust, named after the month in which the gallery was founded, a season associated with ripeness and fruition. It exhibits and promotes the transvangarde – or transcultural avant-garde Open Saturday 11.30am–5.30pm Entrance 24 Old Gloucester Street, through gallery Access Two steps up from street but wheelchair ramp is available Nearest stations Holborn, Russell Square Buses 55, 68, 91,168, 25, 8 Activities Café serving lunches, cakes, tea, coffee, juices and lovely wine. Tours of the garden and the building Web www.octobergallery.co.uk Courtyard gardener Chili Hawes

M13. The Phoenix Garden WC2H 8DE

M12. October Gallery WC1N 3AL Located in a former Victorian school built in 1863, October Gallery is dedicated to the appreciation of contemporary art from all cultures around the world. A central courtyard is filled with acers, camellias, bamboo, Pieris, shrubs and flowers, providing a delightful setting

A peaceful green retreat for local residents, workers and tourists all year round and a haven for a wide range of urban wildlife. Created by local volunteers in 1984 on the site of a former car park, this is the last of the Covent Garden community gardens. The garden shows what can be achieved with ingenuity upon a bedrock of West End rubble. Plants


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M14. Ridgmount Gardens WC1E 7AU

The Phoenix Garden

are chosen to suit the difficult growing conditions and support a wide range of wildlife. This creates an attractive year-round display with echiums towering over vibrant red salvias, clematis scrambling through bramble and golden nettles thrusting through purple elders. A stone’s throw from the West End’s theatres, a surprising range of wildlife makes its home here: five species of bee, various butterflies, many birds (blue and great tit, wren, robin, blackbird, greenfinch, house sparrow, woodpecker, kestrel, and sparrowhawk) and the West End’s only frogs. We continue to introduce innovative methods to create new habitats and improve the garden. Retaining walls have been built from recycled newspapers, while reclaimed bomb rubble from deep below the garden has been used to build gabion dry-stone walls. Our recently completed a new garden building replaced the 30 year old breeze block shed. This beautiful architect-designed building enables us to carry out our work and host community events, as well generate revenue through hires to keep the garden running. There has been extensive re-landscaping around the building over the past 15 months. The garden is a registered charity managed by an enthusiastic team of volunteers and funded through subscriptions, donations and grants. The garden has received many awards, including the European Award for Ecological Gardening in 2015 and Natur Im Garten ecological garden accreditation 2016. Open Saturday 10am–6pm, Sunday

10am–6pm Entrance St Giles Passage off New Compton Street (sign posted from Shaftesbury Avenue / Charing Cross Road). Garden remains open till dusk. Access Refurbished paths now accessible. Because of landscaping works, a portion of the garden may not be accessible this year Nearest stations Tottenham Court Road, Leicester Square, Covent Garden Buses 14, 19, 24, 29, 38, 176 Activities Questions and comments for the gardener will be collected and answered later Web www.thephoenixgarden.org Community gardener Christopher Raeburn

Russell Square Gardens

Residential garden occupying a narrow strip of land opposite the imposing Ridgmount Mansions, a Victorian-era apartment building. Stretching from Chenies Street to Torrington Place, the path of this long, narrow garden leads alongside a series of miniature lawns interspersed by shrubby borders. Planting includes mixed herbaceous borders and a woodland glade area. A new sunny border by Chenies Street is now established and flowering well. At either end of the garden sit ornamental birdbaths frequented by the local avian population. This garden is a rare treasure. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Near Chenies Street end Access Very narrow path, not suitable for wheelchairs Nearest station Goodge Street Buses 10, 24, 29, 73, 134, 390 Web www.bedfordestates.com Head gardener Thomas Abbott

M15. Russell Square Gardens WC1B 4JA One of only three London squares designed by Humphry Repton and considered by many to be one of the finest in London. It was originally designed as the centrepiece of the 5th Duke of Bedford’s 1800 development plan for northern Bloomsbury. James Burton created a link between Russell and Bloomsbury Squares in the form of a central axis along Bedford Place. Repton completed this vision by terminating the view in each direction

with statues of the Duke of Bedford and Charles James Fox. Although the square has undergone various changes since its original conception, many historic features remain. The fine mature trees do not date from the original 1804 planting, but they echo the original pattern of Repton’s lime avenues and have been retained. The square is listed grade II and protected by the London Squares Preservation Act of 1931. It lies within the important Bloomsbury Conservation Area. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance All four sides Nearest station Russell Square Buses 59, 68, 91, 168, 188 Activities Friends of Russell Square present for information and history. Punch and Judy show and children’s activities on both days. Archives and picture exhibitions. Guided tours, depending on the weather. Cafeteria with open-air seating Web www.camden.gov.uk/whatson

M16. St George’s Gardens WC1N 2NU Originally meadowland, the site was acquired in 1713 to serve as the burial grounds for the new churches of St George, Bloomsbury Way and St George the Martyr, Queen Square. These were the first church burial grounds in London not to be sited next to their churches. The first burial was in 1715, and the first recorded case of ‘body-snatching’ (the theft of corpses for medical research and teaching) took place here in 1777. Today the gardens are a peaceful retreat. The many large plane trees create shade, while imposing ivy-clad tombs and gravestones may be found throughout the gardens. The site, restored in 2001 by the London Borough of Camden with a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund, now includes a sensory garden created by the Friends of St George’s Gardens near the Chapel of Rest. Open Saturday 8am–9pm, Sunday 8am–9pm Entrance Handel Street (off Hunter Street), Sidmouth Street or Heathcote Street (both off Gray’s Inn Road) Access Level access from Sidmouth and Heathcote Streets Nearest station Russell Square/King’s Cross Buses 17, 45, 46 Activities Information leaflets. Friends of St George’s present, 10am-5pm, both days

Web www.friendsofstgeorgesgardens. org.uk

M17. SOAS JapaneseInspired Roof Garden WC1H 0XG The School of Oriental and African Studies has a small, modern Japanesestyle roof garden, designed by Peter Swift and opened in November 2001 by the donor, Mr Handa. The main features are a karesansui (dry landscape) with rocks, a chequerboard planting of lemon thyme alternating with grey pebbles, an engraved water basin and a raised platform for performances. The garden’s theme is ‘forgiveness’ and it is a space for quiet contemplation and meditation. Open Saturday 10.30am–5pm, Sunday 12–5pm Entrance Via Brunei Gallery in the northwest corner of Russell Square Access Wheelchair access via ramp and lift Nearest stations Russell Square, Euston Square, Goodge Street. Buses 7, 59, 68, 91, 168, 188 Web www.soas.ac.uk/visitors/roofgarden

SOAS Japanese-Inspired Roof Garden

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M18. White Hall Hotel WC1B 5BU The peaceful gem that is the garden of the grade II-listed Grange White Hall Hotel provides an oasis of calm and tranquillity to guests and all those who visit. This sunny green-lawned enclave between the British Museum and Montague Street has a private terrace and conservatory, perfect for taking afternoon tea. Visitors to the garden will find a quintessential English garden, right next to the British Museum, which has changed little over time. So come and enjoy this quiet haven in the heart of London. You can also visit another of our boutique 18th century townhouses, Grange Blooms Hotel, and its charming garden patio, situated just next door. Open Saturday 11am–6pm, Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance 2-5 Montague Street Access Stepped access from the conservatory Nearest station Russell Square Buses 7, 188 Activities Afternoon tea available at the hotel Web www.grangehotels.com


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N17 RD ST RD ST Whitechapel Whitechapel CT CT H OXFO OXFO THR O TR OU Gallery Gallery U Heron Tower Heron Tower NEW NEW Holborn Holborn N21 St Joseph’s Garden N Guildhall and Guildhall and E TN D ET D1 D Centre Centre SD SD N28 N28 Supreme Court Supreme Court Aldgate Aldgate N6 N6 ST ST Point Point N22 St Luke’s Terrace Garden Tower 42 Tower 42 I T C H St. Botolph I T C H St. Botolph East N Freemasons’ E N Freemasons’ D1 East without without EE E St.City Paul’s St. Paul’s ST ST Hall Hall City Aldgate Aldgate N23 Salters’ Garden IE IE N7 N7 D2 30 St. Mary Aldgate 30 St. Mary Aldgate A A T Bank of Bank N N Sof ST AL AL E E L L Thameslink Thameslink E E D D C H E AEngland Axe Axe St. Paul’s St.C HPaul’s NEE NEE Royal Courts Royal Courts EAP PSID E A D England EAD SIDE N24 Southwark Cathedral Churchyard RGEAT ET TREET S S E T T LT L U D G AT HR HR U E E D E E T T Cathedral Cathedral L L of Justice of Justice F F E HILL E HILL P O U LT P ORoyal NHALL S U LT R Exchange Royal L E A D EExchange LEADENHALL S T DR DLSE T RY LSE RU UR and Herb Garden D4 C O RYN H I L L CORNHILL RY Y L LA of Lloyd’s of AN Seven Seven Leadenhall Lloyd’s Leadenhall NE Mansion Mansion N13 N13 E H H N25 Community Garden at Tate Modern D3 T Bank Bank London Dials Dials Y C Bush Royal RoyalY C Bush Market Market E E London ET E House House W R R House D W House Opera House Opera House D ST ST N26 Vestry House NEW E3 Covent Covent H H 100 Victoria U100 CAN ND ND VICTORIA E E NVictoria FE NCHURC FE NCHURC TO R I A S T R E ET CANNO NO Q Embankment Q USETERNE EVTI C N29 Embankment RA RA N S N S N29 N11 N11 Garden Garden T T T T N27 Beech Gardens, The Barbican Estate D2 S S Fenchurch Fenchurch Tower Gateway Tower Gateway N14 N14 Monument Monument UP P E R T H A M E S S T UP P E R T H A M E S S T N10 N10 Street Street R EE T R EE T N28 Christchurch Greyfriars Rose Garden C2 Covent Garden Covent Somerset Garden Temple Temple Blackfriars Blackfriars N31 N31 Somerset Cannon Cannon Market N26 N26 The Monument The Monument House D Market HouseN D Royal Mint Royal Mint N29 Cleary Garden 3 3 T T N D3 N N Street Street Leicester Leicester N30 N30 ME RA RA KME Court Court Blackfriars Blackfriars N16 N16 NK S TB A N LOW LOW Tower Hill Tower Hill Square SquareS T N30 St Dunstan’s in the East garden BA ER T ER T E3 Blackfriars Blackfriars T T H H M M A A E E M M E E E E S S STR STR E E Bankside Bankside EA EDA D MRE ST H A M E S A A ST THA N31 St Olave Hart Street Churchyard FIEL ST FIEL RI RI E3 Custom Custom E SMITH National National O O IVER Tower of TowerS M ofI T H V I Oxo Oxo Charing Charing R R House House Gallery Gallery Shakespeare’s Shakespeare’s London London Tower Tower Opening days Cross Cross Globe Globe ALK ALK London London Wharf Wharf St. Katharine St. Katharine ’S W ’S W Tate N25 Tate N25 EEN EEN Trafalgar Trafalgar Open Saturday and Sunday Docks Docks Bridge Bridge QU QU Modern N5Modern N5 Square Square EmbankmentEmbankment HE HE T T H MCity S HMS NO NO S T. S T. Southwark Southwark City REET National National R D S T R E E T Open Saturday only RTH RTH Tower Tower KA KA D ST UMB UMB R Belfast Belfast T T HA HA Cathedral Cathedral ERLA ERLA FO FO London London RINE’ RINE’ Theatre Theatre GO GO ND ND S W S W LD LD AM AM AV AV N24 Bridge N24 Bridge Festival Festival A A Bankside Bankside E E Open Sunday only ST ST SO SO Hay’s Hay’s BR N JU BR N JU U U ID ID T H W Mix T H W Mix Southbank Southbank Borough Borough GE BILE GE BILE Galleria Galleria S S E E ARK ARK St. Katharine’s St. Katharine’s Special condition apply Centre Centre Market Market STR STR City City EET EET BFI Imax BFI Imax ST ST Waterloo Waterloo Hall Hall . T . T Menier Menier Please check individual listings for exact The Shard The Shard HO HO TO Horse Horse East East M TOO Gallery Gallery HSBC HSBC M A S opening times OL Southwark Southwark AS L Guards Guards EY ST ST EY N4 N4 Guy’s Guy’s London London Design Design ST ST RE RE Palestra Palestra Parade Parade ET ET N S N Hospital RE RE E T Hospital ET Key ST UNION STRE UNION STRE T Museum Museum ET ET Eye Eye Young Vic Jerwood Space Jerwood N19Space E N19 T Young Vic T E 4 4 C U Theatre CU Theatre Underground station Waterloo Waterloo DG DG HE HE CIT

RC Church

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Docklands Light Railway Overground station Pier National rail station Bus station


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N1. Barbican Station Pop-up Garden EC1A 4JA The first community garden on the Underground, created by a partnership between Friends of City Gardens and Transport for London. The garden was designed by international landscape architect practice Gensler with a strong, linear scheme of planters that fill the 100-metre-long disused platform. Planters feature a scheme of red vertical posts rising in the form of a wave. The design mimics the acceleration and braking of trains arriving and leaving the station. The planting complements the wave pattern with multi-stemmed trees, climbers and substantial shrubs providing height. Colourful plants and vegetables contribute a pollen- and nectar-rich mix to boost biodiversity in this challenging environment. The garden is sponsored by local businesses Hamptons International, Kingston Smith and Redrow London. The planting was designed, installed and is maintained by Friends of City Gardens volunteers and will remain until the adjacent track becomes a siding for trains. Open Saturday 11am–3pm Entrance Aldersgate Street Access Platform accessed via three sets of stairs. Not accessible for wheelchair users or those with limited mobility Nearest station Barbican Buses 4, 56, 153

Barbican Wildlife Garden, Fann Street

Activities Pre-booked tours between 11am and 3pm on Saturday only Conditions Although the garden can be seen from other platforms, it can be visited only on a pre-booked tour Web www.friendsofcitygardens.org.uk Chair, Friends of City Gardens Sarah Hudson

N2. Barbican Wildlife Garden, Fann Street EC2Y 8BR One of three gardens on the Barbican Estate provided for the enjoyment of its residents. It is an important open space, providing a green corridor for wildlife movement in, around and through the City. The garden is tended by Barbican Wildlife Group (BWG) – residents and other volunteers – under the management of City Gardens. The aim is to enhance wildlife and provide a peaceful but interesting environment for residents. The garden includes a wildflower meadow, a sunny, dry pollinator bed garden, a shaded shrubbery with under-planting, two ponds, two native hedges, a variety of trees and a compost area. There are also a number of insect habitats, including bee boxes, as well as bird feeders and bird boxes. The garden is now in the second year of a five-year management plan, prepared with the assistance of the London Wildlife Trust. As a result, 2016

OGSW Guide 2017 saw the construction of a second pond, the hard work being carried by volunteers from Trust of Conservation Volunteers. London in Bloom has twice awarded the garden a Certificate of Excellence, and Friends of City Gardens one of its first Gold awards and two Certificates of Excellence. In 2016 the garden received Gold awards from both London in Bloom and City in Bloom. Open Saturday 10am–4pm, Sunday 12–4pm Entrance Fann Street Access One step into garden. Path made from mulch/woodchip – difficult for wheelchair users Nearest station Barbican Buses 4, 56, 153 Activities Sale of wildlife-friendly plants and refreshments Web www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/ citygardens Team leader/Barbican Wildlife Group volunteer Geoff Rogers/Joanna Rodgers

N3. Baring Asset Management EC2M 3XY NEW The development of the two roof gardens was initiated in 2010, with three principal aims to improve the immediate views from the meeting rooms, increase the flexibility of Barings’ hospitality facilities and make a positive environmental impact. The two gardens have their own characteristics, the northern terrace being inspired by Asia and the southern terrace by Europe. Feature plants include a 70-year-old cork oak (Quercus suber) and arches made from Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi). On the Asian terrace there is a Quercus dentata (commonly known as the Daimyo Oak) which has been grown as a miniature form yet retains the leaf size of a fully grown tree. Charles Funke, who designed the gardens, remains involved in the development of the terraces. Other species found on the terraces include yew, Gingko, a Judas tree (Cercis siliquastrum), camellia and acer. The gardens are now part of life at Barings, enhancing both staff events and client hospitality, and include herbs and fruit trees which are used in the food produced by our kitchens. Entrance 155 Bishopsgate Nearest station Liverpool Street Buses 8, 26, 35, 42, 47, 48, 78, 135, 149, 205, 242, 344, 388 Conditions These gardens can only be visited on a pre-booked tour

N4. Crossbones Memorial Garden SE1 1TA According to local lore, Crossbones was once the burial ground for the ‘single women’, also known as ‘Winchester Geese’ who worked in Bankside’s stews (brothels) licensed by the Bishop of Winchester. The story of The Geese and their connection with Crossbones was revived in The Southwark Mysteries by John Constable, which in turn inspired performances, vigils, the world-famous shrine to ‘the outcast dead’ on Redcross Way and the creation of an ‘invisible garden’ on the old burial ground. The present garden retains many original features of the ‘invisible garden’. New features include the stunning ‘goosewing’ entranceway, designed and built by artist Arthur de Mowbray and the honeycoloured Cotswold limestone walls built by volunteers under the guiding hand of John Holt from the London School of Drystone Walling. Pastel shades to evoke the ‘feminine’ decorate the edge of the garden. Plants with red, white and deep-purple flowers and distinctive foliage burst through the existing broken ‘strip’ (the original archaeological trench dug here in the 1990s, which exposed the soil) representing the lives and energies of the people buried here and those we wish to remember. The foundations of Winchester Palace, off nearby Clink Street, have been planted up as a garden (also managed by Bankside Open Spaces Trust). Open Saturday 11am–3pm Entrance Union Street, near junction with Red Cross Way Access Wheelchair-accessible from Union Street. Some trip hazards – visitors be aware Nearest stations Borough, London Bridge Buses 21, 35, 40, 133, 343 + 344, 381, RV1 Activities Garden tours by volunteer warden. Inspiring tours of the garden led by John Constable (author of The Southwark Mysteries and long-standing campaigner for Crossbones) with Katy Nicholls. Saturday 17th June: 11.30am and 1.30pm Web www.crossbones.org.uk

N5. The Deanery SE1 9JE NEW

Dating back to 1712, this delightful historic garden belongs to the private residence of the Dean of Southwark Cathedral, located just beside the Globe Theatre. Secluded and hidden from the bustle of tourists, it is a peaceful haven

Crossbones Memorial Garden

for wildlife. Planted with mature shrubs, trees and herbaceous plants, the garden is looked after by the gardener from the Cathedral. Open Saturday 10.30am–2.30pm Entrance Via the very narrow Cardinal Cap Alley, next to 51 Bankside, near Tate Modern Access Some steps and narrow paths Nearest stations St Paul’s, Southwark, Borough Buses 344, 381, RV1 Activities The Dean and Friends of Southwark Cathedral present Conditions Access to this small garden is via the historic Cardinal Cap Alley and visitor numbers may be restricted at certain times

N6. Drapers’ Hall Garden EC2N 2DQ The garden behind the hall is a small part of the original garden, purchased by the Drapers’ Company from King Henry VIII in 1543. The Great Garden, as it was called, is now occupied by the modern building known as Drapers’ Gardens. In 1543 rose bushes, gooseberry trees, gourds, strawberries and herbs grew here. A bowling alley, maze and summerhouses added to its attractions. Open to the public, the garden remained a welcome retreat in the smoky City until Throgmorton Avenue was constructed in 1874. The avenue sliced through the east side of the garden, prompting the remainder to be leased to eager property developers. The Great Garden was thus sacrificed to the demands of the commercial City, but the upper garden close to Drapers’ Hall was

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retained and periodically renovated. The present layout with raised beds and paving was created as part of the Company’s celebrations to mark the 650th anniversary of the granting of its first charter by King Edward III in 1364. The planting scheme includes plants that have significance for the Company through the colouring (azure and gold from the Company’s coat of arms) or relevance to the textile trade. The tradition of fruit-bearing trees continues with the garden’s five mulberry trees, one of which was planted by HM the Queen in 1955 and another by the Prince of Wales in 1971. The gates, walls and railings, designed by Stephen Dykes Bower, date from the 1970s. Open Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Throgmorton Avenue Access Wheelchair accessible Nearest stations Bank, Liverpool Street, Moorgate Buses 100, 153, 214 (westbound) + 11, 76, 133, 141 Web www.thedrapers.co.uk

N7. Eversheds Sutherland Vegetable Garden EC2V 7WS The Eversheds Roof Garden sits atop an award-winning environmental building. With Dusty Gedge as the consultant, the green roof of this London law firm was originally planted with sedum and wild plants. These are left alone to spread and do what comes naturally and they attract a variety of wildlife. The Eversheds vegetable garden was once just a blank corner located amongst the plant and machinery. The garden started life as a few pots of herbs, but has been transformed by Marta and Julie, our volunteer gardeners, into a hidden gem. They work hard to expand the garden and like to experiment with the crops and varieties they grow. The garden is also home to the firm’s beehives. Bee-friendly plants are grown to provide food for them and the staff restaurant is provided with herbs and flowers for table displays. Marta and Julie have gained well-deserved recognition, winning the Most Innovative in Design Award, City in Bloom 2014 and the Outstanding Food Growing, Commercial, City in Bloom 2015. In 2016, the firm won Gold Awards for the vegetable garden and the green roof. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance 1 Wood Street Access No access for wheelchair users. Only access to the roof is by stairs Nearest stations Bank, St Paul’s


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OGSW Guide 2017

Inner Temple Garden

Buses 8, 25, 242 Activities Amazing and iconic views across London. Gardeners and beekeepers present. To encourage gardeners of the future, we will have several ‘Just for Kids’ activities. Linger for a chat, and sample food made by our very talented chefs. Tea, coffee, sandwiches and cakes for sale, plus seating Volunteer Gardeners Marta and Julie (individual Golden Pollinator Awards winners)

some gardeners grow their own green manure. Open Saturday 10.30am–4.30pm, Sunday 11am–4pm Entrance In the middle of the Golden Lane Estate, adjoining the Ralph Perring Centre, between Basterfield House and Hatfield House Nearest station Barbican Buses 4, 55, 56, 153, 243 Activities Tea, coffee and cakes Chair of Golden Baggers Sue Pearson

N8. The Golden Baggers

N9. Gray’s Inn WC1R 5ET

EC1Y 0ST

The gardens of Gray’s Inn are known as the Walks. They were laid out in 1606 by Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626) when he was Treasurer at Gray’s Inn. The main feature of the gardens is a broad gravelled path between an avenue of young red oak trees and mature London planes. The Indian bean trees (Catalpa bignonioides) at the end of the Walks, now bowed with age and supported by crutches, grew from slips which were brought back from Virginia in America by Sir Walter Raleigh and planted by Bacon. The Walks have always been a popular promenade and were fashionable throughout the 17th century. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance High Holborn, next to the Cittie of York pub Nearest station Chancery Lane Buses 8, 242, 25, 521 Web www.graysinn.org.uk Head gardener Jason Reid

A community food-growing space set up by residents for the benefit of the residents of the Golden Lane Estate. Started in 2010 with 20 one-tonne bags on the unused site of the former nursery playground, its popularity quickly grew and a further 20 bags were added in 2011. There is currently a waiting list. In early 2016 the bags were replaced by boxes to provide a more permanent, accessible solution and comprises 40 individual boxes, for the growing of fruit, vegetables, salad crops and flowers. A communal herb garden, soft fruit, apple trees in pots and a grapevine add to the range of produce grown. There is also small wildlife garden with an emphasis on bee, butterfly and insect-friendly plants. Managed by the Golden Lane Baggers, each member is responsible for their own bag, the maintenance of the site and the social activities of the growing community. A recent addition, the potting shed, gives storage space, a potting bench and a meeting place. There is also a children’s bag for young gardeners to dig. A compost-maker uses our green and brown waste, and

N10. Hachette UK Limited EC4Y 0DZ NEW Award winning Roof garden with beautiful views overlooking the river

Thames. Landmarks to be seen sweep from East to West and include the Tower of London and the London Eye. There are two lawns and multiple planted beds with an English country garden feel. The emphasis of the planting is to create flower filled herbaceous borders with a strong colourful palette. The desire is to encourage wildlife into the landscape and help to promote a more biodiverse and sustainable City of London. Some vegetables and herbs are also grown on the terrace in the Kitchen garden area. Open Saturday 10am–3pm Entrance 50 Victoria Embankment Nearest station Blackfriars Buses 45, 63 Conditions Escorted visits to the garden (for a group of 40 maximum). Visits every 30 minutes starting from 10am. Last entrance 2.30pm Landscape maintenance John Rodgers, Q&S

N11. Inner Temple Garden EC4Y 7HL A surprising oasis of peace in the centre of the City, occupying a three-acre site within the historic precincts of the Temple. There has been a garden here since the 12th century and legend has it that the Wars of the Roses began after an encounter here. A deep herbaceous border flanks the 18th-century gates at the main entrance, renowned for the use of succession planting and innovative colour combinations. In early summer this border is luminous with a variety of alliums, inter-planted with delicate forms of aquilegia amidst the developing foliage of salvias, asters, heleniums, geraniums, grasses and dahlias, supplying a tapestry of colour until winter. Other features include a peony garden, a brass Queen Anne sundial, a statue by van Ost, a pond, a broad walk lined with mature plane trees along the Embankment boundary, tranquil woodland plantings and a constantly refreshed pot display. The 12th-century Temple Church lies within the boundaries of the Inn, the prizewinning garden of the Master’s House on its eastern boundary. As well as notable lawyers and politicians, many men of letters have lived here, including Charles Lamb, Oliver Goldsmith, Charles Dickens and Samuel Johnson. The courtyards of the Temple are adjacent, where barristers have their chambers and smaller pockets of greenery and plantings can be found. Open Sunday 10am–2pm Entrance Crown Office Row, via Tudor Street security gate Access Access via a level path although

there are a couple of slight inclines Nearest stations Blackfriars, Temple Buses 4, 11, 15, 23, 26, 63, 76, 100, 172, 388 Conditions Professional photography by prior arrangement Web www.innertemple.org.uk/index/ the-inner-temple-garden Head gardener Andrea Brunsendorf

N12. Lever Street Community Garden EC1V 3SW Lever Street Community Garden is a ‘win-win’ story. It was launched in 2013 as a project between the local community and Islington council to enable local residents to grow vegetables of their choice. Before this, over-use of the small garden by dog owners who did not ‘pick up’ had led the council to plant the site and keep it locked. At the same time local residents who had cultivated land behind a local community centre were distressed at losing their plots when the land was required for building. The locked garden offered an ideal opportunity for the evicted gardeners. Money was found to construct 17 onemetre-square raised wooden beds and lay on a water supply, while retaining much of the council’s original planting around the perimeter railings. The gardeners organised a constitution, insurance and rules. They agreed with the council to open to the public once a month and to maintain the existing planting of fruit trees and bushes, over 60 types of flowering garden plant and a communal herb bed. In a part of London more known for technology start-ups and high-rise buildings, the garden has brought together locals of all ages and backgrounds, creating new social bonds through the cultivation of tomatoes, beans, peas, onions, pumpkins, spinach and potatoes, not to mention links with a local primary school. It won Islington’s Lisa Pontecorvo prize in 2014. Open Saturday 1–4.30pm, Sunday 1–4.30pm Entrance Lever Street – opposite Mora Street Access Woodchip-covered paths Nearest station Old Street Buses 21, 43, 76, 135, 141, 205, 214, 271 Chair Rose Heatley

this L-shaped garden runs between the two. The main part of the garden is an elevated plateau, built above 17th-century catacombs to create more burial space when the crypts within Temple Church were full. The catacombs, which lie next to the church, are sealed and not open to the public. The entire area was extensively bombed during the war and most of the surrounding buildings were damaged or destroyed. The original layout of the garden was not significantly altered and the catacombs remained undamaged. Several mature trees and the original plants were lost during bombing. The existing layout of the garden dates back to a post-WW2 garden renovation. The planting reflects the fact that, being a raised plateau, the soil is very free-draining. Only plants tough enough to withstand the dry conditions are used. Open Sunday 12.30–5pm Entrance Tudor Street. East side of the Temple Church Access Access is via steps only Nearest stations Blackfriars, Temple Buses 4, 11, 15, 23, 26, 76, 172 Gardener Bob McMeekin

N14. Middle Temple EC4Y 9AT Wander through hidden courtyards and discover a sunny square, where tender species like Plumbago survive all year round, and a vegetable and cutting garden. In the main garden, a fine medieval hall, where the first-recorded performance of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night took place, forms a spectacular backdrop for a terrace of mixed shrubs and roses and a seasonal planting scheme with lawns sweeping down to the River Thames. Open Sunday 10am–2pm

N13. The Master’s Garden EC4Y 7DE This quiet, hidden garden is situated on the north side of the Temple complex, just a stone’s throw from Fleet Street. The Master’s House is the vicarage associated with Temple Church and

Middle Temple

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Entrance Access to Temple via gate located on Temple Place (near to Temple Tube). Also through Tudor Street. No entry via Fleet Street or the Embankment Access Most of the garden accessible to wheelchairs. The raised section at the north end of the garden can only be reached by steps Nearest stations Temple, Blackfriars Buses 4, 11, 15, 23, 26, 76, 172, 341, 388 Activities Head gardener present and will be giving tours through the day. Refreshments available Conditions Last entry to Main Garden 1.45pm Web www.middletemplehall.org.uk Head gardener Kate Jenrick

N15. Museum of Methodism, John Wesley’s House and Wesley’s Chapel EC1Y 1AU Wesley’s Chapel was built in 1778 by John Wesley, the founder of Methodism. It was designed by the architect George Dance the Younger, surveyor to the City of London. Wesley described his Chapel as ‘perfectly neat but not fine’. It is one of London’s undiscovered architectural jewels, a fine example of Georgian architecture and a grade I-listed building. The grounds, now public gardens, were originally part of the cemetery where early Methodists were laid to rest. There is a memorial to John Wesley’s mother Susanna and a commemorative elm tree to Wesley. Visit the Physic Garden at the front of John Wesley’s House, learn how common herbs were used for medicinal purposes in the 1700s and see our beautiful fuchsia trees. Walk through the corridor of London plane trees, with irises, tulips and lilies through the seasons on either side, to the Chapel entrance and through to the cemetery gardens. There you can sit on one of our benches and survey the roses, lavenders and ivies. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance 49 City Road Access Gardens and museum fully accessible, but Wesley’s House is not due to a Georgian staircase. The main courtyard is cobbled Nearest station Old Street Buses 21, 43, 76, 141, 214, 271 Activities Free entrance to the museum. Experience what life was like inside Wesley’s House Conditions Dogs not permitted anywhere on site with the exception of guide dogs Web www.wesleysheritage.org.uk Caretakers Adrian and Dino


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OGSW Guide 2017 garden was awarded RHS Small Park of the Year 2016 and holds a community Green Flag Award 2016. Open Saturday 8am–8pm, Sunday 8am–8pm Entrance From Redcross Way Nearest stations London Bridge, Borough Buses 21, 35, 40, 133, 343, 344, C10 Activities Meet the gardener and learn about the history, Saturday 2pm-4.30pm Web www.bost.org.uk Garden manager Mary O’Connell

N16. Nomura International PLC EC4R 3AB No.1 Angel Lane is an architecturally distinguished development occupying the largest area of open riverside space in the City of London. It forms the focal point of the new business district connecting the river and the heart of the City. The sixth-floor terrace – the size of eight tennis courts – has unobstructed panoramic views of the river Thames. It is open to staff and clients, to eat al fresco during the summer months, enjoying the tranquillity of the gardens, its water features and London’s breathtaking scenery. The formal gardens are planned and maintained by ISS Facilities Landscaping. Hedges, shrubs, herbaceous plants, ferns, herbs and grasses – as well as the lawns – are kept in pristine condition The kitchen garden is divided into 12 beds, providing ample space to grow over 25 different varieties of vegetables and edible flowers. Planned and maintained voluntarily by Eileen, Linda and Tessa (the switchboard team), seeds are started off in their homes and brought in by Tube, finally reaching the garden to flourish and enable the chefs to take their pick of fresh vegetables in season for client dining. Any surplus is sold to staff, the profits donated to charity. Now in its 5th year, the garden has won many prestigious awards, including Best Large Garden at the Flowers in the City awards 2014, Outstanding Food Grower (Commercial) at the City in Bloom Awards 2015, and the Gold Award at Flowers in the City 2016. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance 1 Angel Lane Nearest stations Monument, Bank Buses 15, 21, 35, 40, 43, 47, 48, 133, 141, 149, and 344 Web www.nomura.com Gardeners Tony and Matt (ISS Landscapes) Eileen, Linda and Tessa (volunteers)

N17. Postman’s Park EC1A 4EU This small park in the City of London was formed from the churchyards of St Leonard, Foster Lane and St Botolph, Aldersgate, and the graveyard of Christ Church, Newgate Street. The park derived its name from its popularity as a lunchtime garden with workers from the nearby Old Post Office. The park was laid out as a public garden in 1880. The Watts Memorial, a touching wall of tablets by the artist G.F. Watts, records the

N20. Museum of the Order of St John EC1V 4JJ

Providence Row Rooftop Garden

heroic deeds of ordinary men, women and children who lost their lives to save others. It was erected to mark Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887. The hand-lettered tiles are by Doulton, the ceramic makers. Open Saturday 8am–7pm, Sunday 8am–7pm Entrance St Martin’s le Grand, Aldersgate Street, King Edward Street Access Level access via King Edward Street only Nearest stations St Paul’s, Barbican Buses 4, 8, 25, 56, 100, 172, 242 Web www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/ postmanspark

N18. Providence Row Rooftop Garden E1 7SA Providence Row is a homelessness charity in east London. Over the past three years, we have transformed our outside spaces into flourishing gardens where people can receive accredited gardening training, learning about soil and composting, organic gardening and raising plants. Our courtyard garden was transformed in 2013 by the charity’s clients, volunteers and staff from a concrete urban yard into a green oasis. A large Robinia tree spans an area of native woodland planting. Raised beds with a vibrant mix of herbaceous perennials provide colour all year round. Mobile planters provide further greenery and offer a flexible, therapeutic and beautiful environment for the services and activities at this busy centre. Also tucked away on the rooftop is our secret allotment, an organically run garden where we grow a wide range of edible produce and have pockets of wildlife, ponds and wildflower planting to increase biodiversity. The garden is incredibly productive and

grows everything from bottle gourds to courgettes. A ‘forest garden’ corner supports large fruit and nut shrubs with edible under-planting. Higher up is our apiary, where a colony of bees are busy pollinating our produce and making honey. Much of the fruit, vegetables and herbs from this garden are used in our kitchen, which produces breakfasts and lunches for 30-50 rough sleepers who use the centre every day. Open Saturday 12–4pm Entrance 82 Wentworth Street Access The courtyard garden is fully accessible. Access to the roof garden includes steps Nearest stations Aldgate East, Aldgate Bus 67 Activities Garden tours. Refreshments Web www.providencerow.org.uk

N19. Red Cross Garden SE1 1HA This delightful garden was originally laid out in 1887 on the site of a derelict paper factory by Octavia Hill, the Victorian philanthropist and co-founder of the National Trust as ‘an open-air sittingroom’ for the people of Southwark. In its heyday it was the scene of the annual Southwark flower show and many concerts and fêtes. Bankside Open Spaces Trust (BOST) worked with many supporters to restore the original layout of this beautiful Victorian garden. The project included the re-creation of the pond with bridge and fountain, bandstand, new flowerbeds, lawns and benches. The garden is laid out in front of Octavia Hill’s model dwellings and community hall (private), both integral to her vision for the local community. It is now run as a community garden, managed by BOST, with volunteers helping to maintain the space. The

As a part of the 2010 redevelopment of the Museum of the Order of St John, the Cloister Garden was re-landscaped and planted with medicinal plants and herbs to reflect the work of the Knights Hospitaller and to call to mind the former gardens of the medieval Clerkenwell Priory. A contemplative green space offering an oasis of calm in central London, this garden is full of interest – both horticultural and historical. Highlights of the garden include towering cardoons, beautiful scents, architecture ancient and modern, and fascinating connections to the past. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance St John’s Gate, St John’s Lane Access Narrow paths among low flower beds. Step-only access (7 steps without handrails) Nearest station Farringdon Buses 63, 55, 243 Activities Museum open. The London Tea Party Company pop-up café, serving tea and cake. Make a medieval soap ball with herbs that would have been used by the Knights Hospitaller to treat their patients. Children’s trail. Beekeepers present Web www.museumstjohn.org.uk

N21. St Joseph’s Garden E9 6PX The purpose of this small garden is manifold. It is an extension into the neighbourhood of the almost invisible basement Church of St Joseph. It is a patch of vegetation in an otherwise built-up environment, a haven for birds and a space where people may pause and be refreshed. The garden is a modest tribute to a very great Christian, the late Cardinal Basil Hume (1923–99), Archbishop of Westminster, monk and shepherd, whose life of prayer and service to the Gospel was an inspiration to so many. The garden was designed by

young landscape gardener Simon-Peter Stobart, whose influences included Japanese design and one of the themes from the ‘Song of Songs’ in the Bible – an enclosed garden in which the Beloved might be encountered and experienced. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Lamb’s Buildings, Lamb’s Passage, off Bunhill Row, EC1 (next to the Cass Business School of City University, Bunhill Row) Access Fully accessible Nearest stations Old Street, Moorgate, Barbican Buses 55, 243, 43, 205 Web www.stjosephsbunhillrow.co.uk

N22. St Luke’s Community Centre EC1V 8AJ Rooftop garden terrace tucked into what was a Victorian primary school and is now a vibrant community centre in Old Street offering a wide variety of services and activities to local people. Looked after by St Luke’s Gardening Group, the planting in this two-year-old garden is entirely in pots and troughs of various sizes and styles. The group, which meets every week and is open to everyone, aims to create a relaxing and colourful space in this south-facing sun trap. The colourful planting shows what you can do in a small urban space. It includes a range of climbers, ericaceous shrubs, a mini herb garden and an ivy hedge providing a lush break between the terrace and café roof. The permanent planting is supplemented by bee-friendly annuals. The garden’s colour scheme (green, pink and purple) has been chosen to reflect the dazzling colours and energy of St Luke’s. Our brand new community food growing area, built on a concrete car park, aims to show how plants can be grown in difficult urban conditions. Ten raised beds have been shaped and placed in order to make the best use of the light and to create functional spaces for people to work or just enjoy the garden. The planters are allocated to different groups based at the community centre, including the Men’s Shed, Multi-cultural Group, Over-55s and Children’s Group. There is a greenhouse for propagating plants and growing seeds, and a variety of different composting methods on site to save and recycle as much organic matter as possible. The space is used to grow herbs, vegetables and flowers for the community cookery school as well as herbal workshops and arts & crafts activities. Open Saturday 12–4pm, Sunday 12–4pm Entrance Via St Luke’s Community Centre at 90 Central Street. The terrace

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will be clearly signposted Access Lift to the first floor and a door and a small step to access the terrace Nearest stations Old Street, Barbican Buses 243, 55 (Old Street) 4, 56 (Goswell Road) 43, 205, 214, 394 (City Road) Activities Members of the volunteer gardening group present to answer questions and chat to visitors. Café. Plants and homemade products on sale. Conditions The first floor terrace is very small so we can only accommodate a limited number of visitors at any one time. There is an adjoining terrace which is part of our café where visitors can wait, as well as the café itself, and the rest of the community centre Web www.slpt.org.uk

N23. Salters’ Garden EC2Y 5DE Salters’ Garden is framed by Roman House, the Salters’ Hall and part of the Roman Wall. This year, following major building redevelopment, the garden joins the neighbouring sites of St Alphage Garden and the Brookfield/Schroder space to form the largest public space created in the City since WW1. The garden is set out to a design by David Hicks in 1995 to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the Salters’ Company. It is sunk below street level in a formal style of box hedging, lawn, pergolas, gravel pathways and paving, with colour provided by climbing roses. Recently the garden has been further developed with accessible routes, better lighting of the Roman Wall, additional hornbeam hedging and a new decorative water feature at the east end. Stonemason Lida Lopes Cardozo Kindersley carved the inscription on the water feature. There is also a new east entrance into the neighbouring gardens.


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OGSW Guide 2017 Web www.tate.org.uk/modern/building/ garden Parks operations officer Joe Mayhook

N26. Vestry House EC4R 0EH NEW

Southwark Cathedral Churchyard and Herb Garden

Open Saturday 9am–5pm Entrance From St Alphage Garden, off Wood Street Nearest stations Moorgate, St Paul’s Buses 100 + 76, 133, 141 Conditions Children must be accompanied at all times Web www.salters.co.uk Gardener Mr F. Wright

N24. Southwark Cathedral Churchyard and Herb Garden SE1 9DA Southwark Cathedral is London’s oldest gothic church, dating from 1106, when it was the Priory of St Mary Overie. The present garden is designed using plants with Shakespearean and biblical connections. Shakespeare worshipped here when the Cathedral was known as the Parish Church of St Saviour’s from 1540 and his brother Edmund is buried within the grounds. The South Churchyard was restored in 2001 and opened by Nelson Mandela, with Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who was a curate in the Southwark diocese. The churchyard was further restored in 2015. The East Churchyard herb garden, which was replanted in 2016, was constructed around the ruins of the medieval Lady Chapel, using herbs which were grown in the Apothecaries’ Garden of St Thomas’ Hospital, originally near the site. Visitors can also see a memorial to Mahomet Weyonomon, the 18th-century leader of the American Mohegan tribe, who is buried here. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance Via the west entrance to the Cathedral from Cathedral Street (Saturday) via the main West Gates (Sunday)

Access Accessible entrance to the churchyard through the courtyard on the north side of the cathedral Nearest station London Bridge Buses 17, 21, 35, 40, 43, 45, 47, 48, 133, 141, 149, 381, 521, RV1 Activities Shakespearean botanical trail. Herb stall. Giant chess. Refreshments. Exhibition of botanical illustrations by Vicky Mappin in the Cathedral Refectory. Special Choral Evensong at 4pm on Saturday – all welcome Web www.southwarkcathedral.org.uk Gardener Mark Gibbons

N25. Community Garden at Tate Modern SE1 9TG A stunning gated community garden with fruit trees, a wildlife pond, flowerbeds, herb garden, grapevines and a winding path leading to a small fernery. The garden was opened in 2006 and is run in partnership by Tate Modern and the green community charity Bankside Open Spaces Trust (BOST).The garden is enjoyed by local residents, including schoolchildren, who take part in events including planting days, pond-dipping, wildlife-spotting, gardening clubs and the very popular Halloween event. Local people can meet, dig, have fun and take pleasure in flowers, plants and animals, in what is otherwise a busy tourist thoroughfare. The result of years of volunteers’ hard work, supported by TATE Modern and BOST, is a beautiful and much loved haven for wildlife and local people. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance Front lawn area of Tate Modern on the east side Nearest stations London Bridge, Southwark Buses RV1, 381 Activities Plant sale

This award-winning garden (one of a pair) was created on the historic site of the churchyard of St Laurence Pountney and the College of Corpus Christi, dating from the 12th century. Both were destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 and not rebuilt. Privately owned, this unique space combines a traditional style of parterre planting with a more contemporary design. A small, secluded area is planted with nectar-rich flowers and naturalistic in style. The wisteria walkway and espalier apple and pear trees echo the formality, while the textural hard landscaping contrasts well with the perfect grass lawn. Tombs and headstones are woven into the garden design, hidden among various ferns. Vegetables and flowers are grown in planters with a special emphasis on plants to improve air quality and increase biodiversity into the City. Open Sunday 11am–3pm Entrance Laurence Pountney Hill Access No wheelchair access. Mainly laid with stone there are is also a small gravel and decking area Nearest stations Bank, Monument, Mansion House Buses 15, 17, 21, 35, 40, 43, 47, 133, 141, 149, 344, 521 Activities Display of insect and bug hotels designed and made by local schoolchildren on show Gardener Marion Blair

City gardens visited on pre-booked guided walks

to suit the varying light conditions created by surrounding residential flats. The planting scheme includes 22,000 herbaceous plants, which provide colour and interest throughout the flowering season. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Access from street level via White Lyon Court, located at the junction of Fann Street and Aldersgate Street, opposite The Shakespeare pub. Nearest stations Barbican, St Paul’s Buses 4, 56, 100, 153, 172 Web www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/ beechgardens

N28. Christchurch Greyfriars Church Garden EC1A 7BA In the Middle Ages this was the site of a Franciscan monastery and today’s garden is on the site of the Franciscan Church of Greyfriars (1225). Following the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII, it was converted for use as a parish church. In 1429 Richard Whittington, Lord Mayor, founded a library here. Numerous wellknown people, including four queens, were buried in the old church, which was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666. A new church, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, was built between 1687 and 1704. The body of the Wren church was gutted by fire in 1940 during WW2 and only the west tower remains. A major overhaul of the gardens took place in 2011. Heavily planted herbaceous borders include a variety of modern repeat-flowering shrub roses and climbers in a colour scheme of mainly blue, purple and white, with shots of deep crimson, silver and lime to bring it to life. The wooden obelisks replicate the original church towers and host a variety of climbing plants.

N27. Beech Gardens, the Barbican Estate EC2Y 8DE Beech Gardens is one of the newest gardens in the City of London bringing a modern horticultural approach to the planting of the grade II-listed Barbican Estate. The garden is located on a raised podium area in the north-west of the Barbican Estate and was the result of waterproofing works to the roof on which the original garden sat. Professor Nigel Dunnett was commissioned to develop the concept and a planting scheme. Challenging site conditions included exposure and varying aspects. Four plant mixes were developed

Vestry House

Open Saturday 8am–7pm, Sunday 8am–7pm Entrance King Edward Street Nearest station St Paul’s Buses 4, 8, 25, 56, 100, 172, 242 Web www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/greyfriars

N29. Cleary Garden EC4V 2AR Nestled in the heart of the City, the area originally housed Roman baths before vintners used the site for trading and growing vines in the Middle Ages. Today the garden has two terraces leading down to an intimate lawn – a haven for office workers and visitors escaping the City’s bustling crowds. The garden is named after Fred Cleary (1905-1984), a great campaigner for increasing the City’s open spaces. In 2007 it underwent a major redevelopment as the Loire Valley Wines Legacy Garden, with vines and aromatic plants to evoke the flavours and bouquet of wines from the Loire region. Open Saturday 8am–7pm, Sunday 8am–7pm Entrance Queen Victoria Street Access The lower levels can be reached only by steps or from Huggin Hill (steep slope) Nearest stations Mansion House, St Paul’s Buses 4, 11, 15, 17, 23, 26, 76, 100, 172, 388 Web www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/ clearygardens

N30. St Dunstan’s in the East Church Garden EC3R 5DD Opened by the City of London in 1971, St Dunstan’s in the East is claimed to be the most beautiful public garden in the City. An imaginative planting scheme of unusual trees, wall shrubs and flowers

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grows amongst the ruined arches. Climbers cover the tracery, creating a scene of romance and peace. Set within a grade II-listed ruined Victorian wall, the site now forms part of the parish of nearby All Hallows by the Tower. Most of the church was destroyed in WW2, although the Wren tower and steeple survived. Open Saturday 8am–7pm, Sunday 8am–7pm Entrance St Dunstan’s Hill, off Lower Thames Street Access Steps, uneven surfaces, narrow paths Nearest stations Bank, Tower Hill Buses 15, 42, 78, 100, RV1, N15 Web www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/ dunstaneast

N31. St Olave Hart Street Churchyard EC3R 7NB A medieval church dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, St Olaf, best known as the resting place of 17th-century diarist Samuel Pepys, who was buried in the church nave in 1703 next to his wife Elizabeth. The church is documented from the late 12th century and was completely rebuilt in the 15th century. It was one of several spared by the Great Fire of London, but was heavily damaged during the Blitz in 1941 and restored in the mid-1950s. The church is grade I-listed, with the mid-17th-century entrance on Seething Lane and 18th-century wall and railings listed grade II*. Charles Dickens referred to the church as ‘St Ghastly Grim’ because of the macabre ornamentation above the gateway. The churchyard is located on the south side of the church off Seething Lane. The numerous tombs have been replaced by a garden which has recently undergone a refurbishment. The churchyard is the final resting place of 16th-century botanist, William Turner known as ‘the father of English botany’. The 400th anniversary of his death was in 2014. Plants associated with William Turner include Artemisia abrotanum, Vinca minor, Anemone nemorosa, Cornus sanguinea, Camellia sinensis, Polygonum bistorta and Lavandula latifolia. The garden features a labyrinth formed from contrasting dark and light granite setts which has a Jerusalem cross as its centrepiece. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Seething Lane Access Single step to access the garden Nearest stations Tower Hill, Tower Gateway, Fenchurch Street, Aldgate Buses 15, 40, RV1


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10am–5pm Entrance Opposite 55 Sloane Street Access Good access from Sloane Street Nearest station Knightsbridge Buses C1, 19, 22, 137, 452 Activities Sculpture by David Wynn. Music and refreshments in adjacent Cadogan Place South Garden Head gardener Ric Glenn

O4. Cadogan Place South Garden SW1X 9RX

Cadogan Place South Garden

O1. Bina Gardens East SW7 4NH

Nicknamed ‘the Secret Garden’, this award-winning small, rectangular garden is tucked away between Rosary Gardens and Bina Gardens. It was originally laid out in the 1880s as a formal garden by the Gunter Estate and has many unusual mature trees and shrubs, enhanced by summer planting and complementary sculptures. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Through Dove Mews off the Old Brompton Road. Nearest station Gloucester Road Buses C1, 430 Activities Small plant stall. Refreshments Gardener Lisa Simmonds

O2. Bramham Gardens SW5 0HF Bramham Gardens is a large, tranquil one-acre lawned garden established in the late 1800s. It boasts some of the tallest plane trees in any London square. It is flanked by pink red-brick Victorian houses and terracotta houses in DutchGothic style by architect Harold Peto. Like many of the surrounding streets, Bramham Gardens derives its name from the Yorkshire connections of the local landowners, the Gunter family. In recent years there has been much new planting. Open Sunday 10am–5pm

Entrance West side Access One step up into garden Nearest station Earl’s Court Buses C1, 430 + C3, 74, 328 southbound Gardener Contract gardener

O3. Cadogan Place North Garden SW1X 9SR The buildings and gardens of Cadogan Place were laid out and developed by Henry Holland from 1777 onwards. This ‘north’ garden was created by Humphry Repton in 1806. Repton excavated soil to create hollows and hillocks and laid out gently winding paths to guide the visitor around the landscape. During WW2 the railings were removed to donate to the war effort. In 1939 part of the garden was requisitioned by the Air Ministry for a barrage balloon. In May 1942 it was wholly taken over by the War Office. The ground was used to dig in tanks, station anti-aircraft guns and as a camp for troops. In the 1970s the garden was re-landscaped when an underground car park was built beneath it. The central area of the garden, to all intents and purposes, is now therefore a roof garden. The shallow soil presents interesting horticultural challenges and opportunities. Some more unusual trees are grown here, including a Brazilian pepper tree (Schinus molle) and a chinaberry tree (Melia azedarach). Look out for lots of different bees buzzing in the lavender. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday

The buildings and gardens of Cadogan Place were laid out and developed by Henry Holland from 1777 onwards. At the end of the 18th century this ‘south’ garden was known as the London Botanic Garden. The mulberry trees on the lawn are said to be around 300 years old and thought perhaps to have been grown for the silk trade. They are however black mulberry, which is less preferred by the silk worm. Nevertheless the fruit is delicious and the trees beautiful. The severe storm of October 1987 resulted in the loss of many large trees, which have now been replaced with a variety of ornamental trees. An interesting mixed border is planted opposite the mulberries. On the east side, a walk running the length of the garden is being developed for spring interest, along with a fern garden and mini-stumpery. Look out throughout the garden for large old Cyclamen hederifolium corms, some as big as dinner plates. Near the tennis courts, a water garden is partially hidden by black bamboo and willows, while to the centre of the garden is the awardwinning Hans Sloane Garden, adapted from a design for the 2003 Chelsea Flower Show to celebrate the life of the physician and collector Sir Hans Sloane, who died in 1753. His daughter Elizabeth married the 1st Earl Cadogan. Many important people have enjoyed this garden, including William Wilberforce (1759-1833), campaigner for the abolition of the slave trade, who lived at 44 Cadogan Place. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Opposite 91 Sloane Street Access Ramps Nearest stations Sloane Square, Knightsbridge Buses C1, 19, 22, 137, 452

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blossom displays. The gardens feature Peto’s hallmark naturalistic placement of large trees, as if in a woodland predating the existence of all buildings. The distinctive rear elevations of each house create a community which appears to have organically developed over time. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Collingham Gardens gate Nearest stations Gloucester Road, Earl’s Court Buses C1, 430 + 74, 328, C3 (southbound) Gardener Hamish Crawford, Joseph Jones in collaboration with the CGGC Gardening Officer

O7. Cornwall Gardens SW7 4AW

Carlyle’s House

Activities Live music and refreshments. Sculpture by David Wynn Head gardener Ric Glenn

O5. Carlyle’s House SW3 5HL A peaceful walled garden in the heart of Old Chelsea. The Victorian writer Thomas Carlyle and his wife Jane rented this house for nearly 50 years. Carlyle’s House opened as a museum in 1895 and is now owned by the National Trust. Laid out when Chelsea was still a riverside village, the garden at Cheyne Row was a typical town garden, with an oblong patch surrounded by high brick walls to the east of the house. From the back door, three steps led to a yard paved with flagstones, from which one step led up to a gravel path, bordered with box. The path branched to the left between the flowerbeds, and led to the earth closet, a square brick building almost hidden in summer by lilac bushes and fruit trees. In 1843 Jane complained that Carlyle never dreamed of lying in the shade of his own walnut tree ‘It is a tree! Leaves as green as any leaves can be!’ Carlyle walked and sat in the garden. ‘It was,’ he said, ‘of admirable comfort in the smoking way.’ Come and see the garden that was theirs for nearly 50 years. Open Saturday 11am–4pm Entrance 24 Cheyne Row, through house Access Too narrow for wheelchairs Nearest stations Sloane Square, South Kensington Buses 11, 19, 22, 49, 170 Web www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ carlyleshouse Gardeners Linda Chinnery & Linda Skippings

O6. Collingham Gardens SW5 0HW These award-winning gardens were named after the village of Collingham in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the family home of local landowner Captain Robert Gunter in the 19th century. The grade II*-listed houses were designed by architects Ernest George and Harold Peto in the 1880s, and represent the high point of late Victorian individualism. They surround communal gardens created by Peto, also a leading Edwardian landscape designer. Exceptionally, the gardens’ overall layout survives and has not been altered since it was first conceived by Peto. The gardens are laid out in a simple, symmetrical style with wide lawns and curving gravel paths. The central circular lawn is framed by shrub beds, each with its own Japanese cherry tree, producing magnificent springtime

Collingham Gardens

Cornwall Gardens was developed from 1866 to 1879 on a block of land belonging to the Broadwood family, the famous piano makers. The garden is in three sections. The magnificent plane trees, planted in 1870, are among the tallest in London and, with several other species, contribute to the tranquil atmosphere of a woodland garden. An irrigation system has allowed the lawns and flowering shrubs to flourish and made further planting possible. Most of the railings were lost in WW2, but privet hedges now add to the cosy, secluded feel. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance Central section (west of Grenville Place) Access One step down at the gate to the garden level Nearest station Gloucester Road Buses 49, 74 Gardener David Ashton, One Two Tree


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OGSW Guide 2017

Courtfield Gardens (East)

O8. Courtfield Gardens (East) SW5 0NQ In the mid-19th century most of the area between Earls Court Road and Gloucester Road was part of the Gunter estate. When plans were being made to develop the area around Earls Court Manor House (next to the site of the present Earls Court Station) the Gunter family gave a portion of the fields as a site for a new church. St Jude’s opened on Christmas Eve 1870 and closed as a parish church in 2004. Today the building houses St Mellitus Theological College. The surrounding deeply sunken garden has ornamental flowerbeds and a bank of azaleas and rhododendrons with an abundance of self-seeded violets. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Opposite No. 62 Access Sloping gravel path leading down to main garden Nearest stations Gloucester Road, Earl’s Court Buses 49, 74 + 430, C1 Activities Children’s playground

O9. Courtfield Gardens (West) SW5 0PD A tranquil mid-Victorian square with a wide variety of shrubs and ornamental trees. This includes a wedding cake tree,

a handkerchief tree, two giant sequoia and a tobacco tree. The one-acre square dates from 1873 and is dominated by a large central plane tree. The square takes its name from the Court Fields around Earls Court Manor House, which stood nearby. The perimeter railings, which were sacrificed for the war effort in WW2, were replaced in 2008 and will be repainted this year. An irrigation system was installed in 2010 and a new planting scheme introduced in 2011, which included the creation of three tropical/mediterranean beds in the northeast corner of the garden. We added a Victorian gazebo and arbour in 2012, followed by a pond, wildlife garden and orchard in 2013. The wildlife garden is enclosed by mixed country hedging and in spring is carpeted by fritillaries, cowslips and wild violets. The orchard features heritage native fruit trees, to which we will add hazelnut trees this year. In 2015 in the northwest corner we created a hedged children’s play area with a sunken sandpit, a natural willow playhouse and matching wigwam. The garden has won many prizes, including first prizes in the Brighter Kensington & Chelsea competition in 2013 and 2015, and a silver-gilt in the 2016 London Gardens Society competition. Open Sunday 10am–5pm

Entrance West side, opposite 19 Courtfield Gardens Access Mostly flat gravel paths, lawn and some woodchip paths Nearest stations Gloucester Road, Earl’s Court Buses C1, 430 + C3, 74, 328 southbound Web www.courtfieldgardens.net Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player

London plane trees have now grown to dominate the square. One on the south side was blown down in the 1987 gale. The garden has been maintained and improved over the past 30 years, and in the past has won first prize in the Brighter Kensington & Chelsea Scheme competition. Recently the north-east corner of the garden has been cut back and replanted with the help and guidance of Charles Wood and Eyre Sykes. New roses and fruit trees have been planted to remember former residents of the square and we enjoy the flowering of the Diamond Jubilee Rose, planted to celebrate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012. The garden hosts many neighbourhood social events, including a very popular annual summer barbecue, a Christmas-treelighting party and soirées musicales in spring and summer. The rather grand stucco-fronted terraces in the late Italianate style on three sides of the square are complemented by the grade II*-listed Flemish-style red-brick houses on the south side. In the early 1970s part of the square was in danger of being torn down and replaced with high-density housing, but was instead designated a conservation area. The last 20 years have seen the conversion of the remaining hotels into high-quality flats. Dame Ninette de Valois, founder of the Royal Ballet, spent her early years at no. 23 and ran dancing classes in the first-floor ballroom. Choreographer Sir Frederick Ashton also lived in the square as a

O10. Earls Court Square SW5 9DG This award-winning Victorian garden was laid out as part of the Edwardes Estate in the 1870s, and was well managed with an almost full-time gardener until 1939. In WW2 the handsome cast-iron railings were taken away and five huge emergency water tanks filled the southern half of the garden. By the early 1970s the garden had become overgrown, used as a dump and surrounded by green wire netting. In the mid-1970s the newly formed residents’ association brought the garden under the provisions of the 1851 Kensington Improvement Act. Landscape gardener and resident Christopher Fair designed the present layout. The children’s play area was added in 1980. The established

Edwardes Square

young man at around the same time. Mr Frank Gielgud lived at no. 36, where his son, actor Sir John Gielgud, was very possibly conceived before the family moved in 1904. In 1963 no. 21 became the home of the National Poetry Society and most of the famous poets of the day read their works in the salon. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance South side of square; wheelchairs via north gate Nearest station Earl’s Court Buses C1, C3, 74, 328, 430 Activities Live music on both days. Homemade tea and cakes Web www.ecsgarden.org.uk Gardener Anna

O11. Edwardes Square W8 6HL One of London’s loveliest garden squares. A beautiful three-acre garden with meandering paths through shrubberies, lawns, flowerbeds, rose pergola, croquet lawn, grass tennis court and a children’s play area. The square was built between 1811 and 1819. By 1820 the garden was laid out much as we see it today. With guidance from the Royal Horticultural Society, it was designed by Signor Agostino Aglio, an Italian artist, who planned the plantings and winding walks in a manner different from most other squares. A Grecian-style lodge with Doric columns was built for the gardener. Known as ‘The Temple’, it is still the

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residence of the square’s head gardener. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance South side, next to The Temple Access Good wheelchair access and pathways Nearest stations High Street Kensington, Earl’s Court, Kensington (Olympia) Buses C1, 9, 10, 27, 28, 49, 328 Activities Refreshments cakes, sandwiches and Pimms Conditions No picnics Head gardener David Magson

O12. Ennismore Gardens SW7 1AA This beautiful, award-winning Victorian garden, named after William Hare, Viscount Ennismore and Earl of Listowel, formed part of the gardens and paddocks of Kingston House, which stretched the length of Prince’s Gate. In the mid19th century the house was built in the centre of the 21-acre estate for Elizabeth Chudleigh (the bigamist Duchess of Kingston, who was still married to the Earl of Bristol), from which she could enjoy uninterrupted views towards Surrey. Following her death the development of the estate began in the 1840s. The garden, named after William Hare, Viscount Ennismore and Earl of Listowel, covers half an acre. It was laid out and enclosed with cast-iron railings by Peter and Alexander Thorne in the late 1870s, after they had built the large houses of the northern, southern and western Portland stone ranges. These, added to the lesser brick-and-stucco houses of 1846-54 built by John Elger, completed the garden square. The core of the garden, from the beginning, has been fine London plane trees. The present layout of grass, beds and borders, with a few minor changes, has survived for 50 or more years. The garden has been extensively developed and restored over the past 25 years. An urn (a reduced-size replica of one designed by William Kent for Alexander Pope’s garden in Twickenham) was erected in memory of actress Ava Gardner, who lived in the first-floor flat at No. 34 for many years. The most recent (2014) addition is a boulder garden of Cornish field stones, laid out below young silver birches. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance West side, opposite No. 18 Nearest station Knightsbridge and South Kensington Buses C1, 9, 10, 14, 52, 74, 414, 452 Car parking Respark in operation. Visitors’ parking on pay-by-phone spaces and single yellow lines


104 AREA O: Kensington, Brompton and Chelsea

OGSW Guide 2017 and flowering shrubs, with very pleasant walks. Sir James Barrie, author of Peter Pan lived at 133 Gloucester Road on the east side of the square. Rumour has it that Peter flew in through the first-floor window to take the children to NeverNever Land. While the houses on the north side are intact, those on the west have been restored. The south side was destroyed by bombs in WW2, during which the garden was used as a baseball ground by American soldiers. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance West side Nearest stations Gloucester Road, South Kensington Buses C1, 49, 430 Activities Historical introduction to the square and garden notes Web www.12tree.co.uk Gardener David Ashton

O15. The Ismaili Centre Roof Garden SW7 2SL

Gledhow Gardens

Conditions Dogs, other than working assistance dogs, must be left at the gate. Water provided Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player

O13. Gledhow Gardens SW5 0AY The gardens here are named after the family home of Miss Jane Benyon of Gledhow Hall in Yorkshire, who married landowner Captain Robert Gunter in the 19th century. The area was originally filled with market gardens and there was once a thriving village located between Gledhow and Bina Gardens. The site was developed by James Gunter, who founded a property empire on the proceeds of his celebrated bakery business. Gunter’s first purchase was Earls Court Lodge, known as Currant-Jelly Hall. Eventually he purchased most of the land as far as Redcliffe Gardens and developed it as rented houses for the London season. The communal garden here was formed by the Gunter Estate management, which joined the originally separate back gardens

of the surrounding Victorian villas together. The clean microclimate has nourished some of the oldest and healthiest trees in London. There is a range of interesting wildlife, including a variety of rare bird species. We keep the gardens as organic and pesticide-free as possible. Thanks to the generosity of Dr Robert Ker, the gardens now belong to the residents. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Gledhow Gardens side (redbrick houses), off the Old Brompton Rd Nearest stations Gloucester Road, Earl’s Court Buses C1, 430 Web www.gledhowgardens.org.uk Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player

O14. Hereford Square SW7 4TS Hereford Square was built by the architect Thomas Holmes between 1845 and 1850. The garden with its iron railings was completed in 1848 at a cost of £1,300. The square has retained its charm and the garden is full of trees

The Ismaili Centre Roof Garden is one of London’s best-kept secrets. The serene setting of this beautiful garden reflects motifs from Islamic architectural heritage, drawing on the traditions of Muslim civilisations that have inspired outstanding buildings for many centuries throughout the world. The chahar-bagh (four-part garden), delineated by a central fountain, draws inspiration from the Qur’anic imagery of the Garden of Paradise. Sheltered yet open, it combines granite and greenery with geometry, symbolism and the sound and flow of water. Visitors are treated to a sanctuary of calm amidst the bustle of the city below. Open Saturday 10am–1pm Entrance Thurloe Place Access Lifts to all floors Nearest station South Kensington Buses C1, 14, 49, 74, 345, 360, 414, 430 Activities Garden tours 10am-1pm (last tour at 1pm) Conditions No photography

John Stuart Mill (1806-73) at no.18, musician Sir Charles Hubert Parry (1848-1918) at no.17 and pioneer of public health Sir John Simon (1816-1904) at no.40. Open Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance South side Nearest station High Street Kensington Buses 9, 10, 28, 49, 52, 328, 452 Activities The Treblemakers, an all-female a cappella group will be entertaining visitors from 12 to 12.45pm (also at Thurloe Square O26, 2pm) Gardener Stephen Airey

O17. Lexham Gardens W8 5JA This small one-acre square was refurbished in 1990. It has won the All London Garden Square Best Garden award three times (it was second in 2009) and the Brighter Kensington & Chelsea Prize nine times. Among the facilities are a children’s play area and ponds with fountains. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance East and west ends Access Kerb and small step at gate Nearest stations Earl’s Court, Gloucester Road Bus 74 Activities Garden party 3-5pm on Saturday, including children’s entertainment. The Mayor of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea is the guest of honour Conditions No ball games Gardener Oliver Dickinson

SW3 4UY The building of the original square was begun in 1836 on the site of the old orchard of Box Farm, owned by the Markham family, which had had common rights since the ‘29th year of Elizabeth’. In 1935 the garden was laid out as a cherry orchard, in celebration of the Silver Jubilee of George V. After WW2, the square was redesigned in the style of a private country garden by the head gardener at the Royal Hospital Chelsea. The garden is notable for its light, open aspect and rare shrubs and trees, none of which have been allowed to obscure the colourful borders. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance North side Nearest station Sloane Square Buses 11, 19, 22, 211, 319 Gardener François Pont

O19. The Mosaic Rooms SW5 0SW Originally conceived in 2015 as a pop-up garden by SmallWorld Urbanism, a collective of award-winning designers, architects and permaculturists, this garden has been left to establish itself, replenished and replanted as an urban green space, behind The Mosaic Rooms gallery. It features a layered modular garden, including flowers, vegetables and herbs and integrated upcycled seating arrangements made using commonly discarded materials. The Mosaic Rooms is London’s free space for contemporary culture from the Arab World.

O20. The Wildlife Garden at the Natural History Museum SW7 5BD Opened in 1995 as the Natural History Museum’s first living and working exhibition, the Wildlife Garden reveals a range of British lowland habitats, including deciduous woodland, chalk meadow, heathland, reed bed and ponds. An educational resource for visitors of all ages, the garden demonstrates the potential for wildlife conservation in the inner city. To date, around 3,000 species of plant and animal have been recorded by scientists and volunteers at the museum. Escape the city and wander through the tranquil habitats of the garden for free! Winner of the London in Bloom Meadows Award 2016 and a Green Flag holder. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Via main entrance to Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road Access Disabled access from Exhibition Road Nearest station South Kensington Buses 14, 70, 74, 345, 360, 414, 430, C1 Web www.nhm.ac.uk/wildlife-garden

O21. Nevern Square SW5 9NW

O16. Kensington Square W8 5HD One of the earliest garden squares in London, dating from the 17th century and built as part of the Thomas Young Estate. Originally called King’s Square, it was surrounded by fields until 1840. Today the square provides a quiet, leafy haven just yards from Kensington High Street. The first buildings date from 1682 and the west side was completed in the 1730s. Artist Sir Edward Burne-Jones (1833-98) lived at no. 41, philosopher

O18. Markham Square

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Open Saturday 11am–6pm, Sunday 11am–6pm Entrance 226 Cromwell Road Nearest station Earl’s Court (Earl’s Court Road exit) Buses 74, 328, C1, C3 Activities Current free exhibition. Bookshop. Café. Web www.mosaicrooms.org

Lexham Gardens

Nevern Square, built from 1880-86, was named after the village of Nevern in Pembrokeshire, country seat of local landowners the Edwardes family. William Graves designed the square, with the garden an integral part of the layout. Residents paid an annual rent of two guineas for garden maintenance. The east, north and south sides (of uniform design) were built by Robert Whitaker, and the west side completed by George Whitaker in the red-and-yellow brick Domestic Revival style that contrasts with the white stucco-fronted houses of the surrounding streets. Note the continuous first-floor balconies with delicately patterned iron railings. In 1974 local residents formed a non-profitmaking company to buy the square, and in 1978 the Kensington Improvement Act of 1851 was applied, ensuring a regular income for the maintenance of


106 AREA O: Kensington, Brompton and Chelsea the garden. During WW2 the railings were taken down and the north gate destroyed by a flying bomb. The railings were replaced in 1979 and a replica Victorian gate constructed in 2005. The garden’s seven magnificent plane trees probably formed part of the original planting, and there are 28 other varieties of tree. The simple layout consists of a large lawn with a circular central bed, surrounded by gravel paths and borders planted with a mixture of shrubs and herbaceous plants. Most of the beds get little direct sunlight, and show the range of plants that can be grown in these conditions. There is also a small play area for children. Open Saturday 12–5pm, Sunday 12–5pm Entrance East side of square Access Gravel paths Nearest station Earl’s Court Buses C1, C3, 74, 328 Web www.nevernsquaregarden.co.uk Contract gardeners Joseph Jones – Hamish and Eileen

O22. Paultons Square SW3 5DP Pleasant Georgian square built in the 1830s on the site of an old market garden, land previously owned by Sir Thomas More and Sir John Danvers. It

is the furthest west of the squares that lead off the King’s Road. Interesting lawned garden with unusual plants, shaded by mature plane trees, and a central play area, enclosed by railings. The garden was redesigned to celebrate the millennium with a number of new features. The square was named after Paultons in Hampshire, the country seat of George Stanley, the son-in-law of Sir Hans Sloane. Sir Hans was Lord of the Manor of Chelsea in the 18th century and gave his name to Sloane Square, Sloane Street, Sloane Avenue and various places starting with ‘Hans’. Open Saturday 12–5pm Entrance East side Nearest stations South Kensington, Gloucester Road and Earl’s Court Buses 11, 19, 22, 49, 211 Head gardener Chris Bell

O23. Queen’s Gate Gardens SW7 5LY Queen’s Gate Gardens was created in the 1860s when a residential square was built on the site of former market gardens. The landscaping largely retains its original Victorian layout and the old mulberry and Catalpa trees must be at least 150 years old. The circles visible in the lawn mark underground bomb

OGSW Guide 2017 shelters from WW2. Our garden is always beautiful, but particularly in spring, when it is spectacular – carpeted with bluebells and brilliant with blossom and spring flowers. In this big city, the gardens are a source of joy and bring a sense of community to the members. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Opposite 45 Queen’s Gate Gardens Access Uneven surface and small step at south gate. Gravel paths Nearest station Gloucester Road Buses 49, 74, 70 Web www.qgg.org.uk Gardener Manuel Mendes

O24. The Roof Gardens W8 5SA Originally laid out above Derry & Toms department store, which opened in 1933, The Roof Gardens were conceived by the vice-president of Barkers, Trevor Bowen, who employed landscape architect Ralph Hancock to realise his vision. The gardens opened in May 1938. The three themed gardens have been extensively restored and replanted. The Spanish Garden is now planted in the style of the 1950s, while the Tudor Garden planting is based on the Biba ethos and planting from the 1970s. The English Woodland Garden,

which contains trees from the original planting, is managed as a 21st-century environmental and wildlife garden. The gardens feature a selection of exotic wildfowl, including four flamingos. Owned by Sir Richard Branson for 33 years, the gardens are part of Virgin Limited Edition. They host a members’ club, a private function venue and, since 2001, on the 7th floor overlooking the woodland garden, the award-winning Babylon Restaurant. Open Sunday 8–11am Entrance 99 Kensington High Street (actually in Derry Street) Access Wheelchair access possible, although one or two very small areas of the garden are not accessible Nearest station High Street Kensington Buses 9, 10, 27, 28, 49, 52, 70, 328, 452 Activities Head gardener present Conditions No picnics or alcohol. Please note closing time of 11am, when the garden must be vacated Web www.roofgardens.virgin.com Head gardener Pilar Medrano-Dell

through the skills and commitment of the charity’s beneficiaries – disabled people from across London. From our newly refurbished main garden on East Carriage Drive you can purchase plants and herbs potted up by our gardeners, and there is opportunity to visit the herb garden and Old English garden, where volunteers will be able to answer any questions you may have. Open Saturday 12–4pm, Sunday 12–4pm Entrance Chelsea Gate. We are just in front of the tennis courts Access Full disabled access and toilet facilities Nearest stations Battersea Park, Queenstown Road Buses 137, 452 Activities Plant and herb sales. Volunteers present Conditions No alcohol Web www.thrive.org.uk

Thrive Battersea

O25. Thrive Battersea SW11 4NJ

Queen’s Gate Gardens

Thrive is a national charity that uses gardening to bring about positive changes in the lives of people living with disabilities or ill-health, or who are isolated, disadvantaged or vulnerable. Gardening is now a proven therapy as a safe, secure way to develop someone’s ability to mix socially and make friends, and to learn practical skills to become more independent. Thrive’s garden project in Battersea Park features three glorious gardens created entirely

Thurloe Square

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O26. Thurloe Square SW7 2SX A typical Victorian garden, with mature trees, winding paths, lawns, borders, flowerbeds and children’s play area. The square was developed in the 1840s to designs by George Basevi and ushered in a new era of Italianate townhouse design in London. The square takes its name from John Thurloe, Oliver Cromwell’s Secretary of State. In the 18th century the land passed from Anne Browne to her second husband, Thurloe’s grandson. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance South side Nearest station South Kensington Buses C1, 14, 49, 74, 345, 360, 414, 430 Activities A cappella singing group, the Treblemakers, performing at 2pm (also at Kensington Square O16, 12am) Web www.thurloesquaregardens.com Contract gardener Garden Associates – Robert Player


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AREA F: Hampstead and Highgate Central London AREA

P

OGSW Guide 2017

Belgravia, Pimlico and Westminster

10 Downing Street

P1. 10 Downing Street SW1A 2AA The garden at No.10 Downing Street has been enjoyed by Prime Ministers and their families, as well as visitors to the building, for over 280 years. The terrace and garden were constructed in 1736, shortly after Sir Robert Walpole moved into No.10. The garden is dominated by an open lawn of half an acre that wraps around the building in an L-shape. There is a central flowerbed with flower urns, a bench and an arch. Tubs of flowers line the terrace and roses line the main pathway through the garden. The garden also features an attractive bronze sculpture by Barbara Hepworth, a pond and some lovely trees. A small vegetable garden produces radishes, spring onions, beetroot, cress, carrots and leeks. There are bird-feeding tables where birds as exotic as a parakeet have been seen feeding. The garden has provided an informal setting for a number of significant gatherings, including the press launch for the announcement of the coalition government in May 2010, and in 2011 a barbecue for military personnel hosted by the Camerons and Obamas. The London 2012 School Games competitors also used the space for activities. In April 2014 a group of schoolchildren aged 10-11 years planted poppy seeds for the Royal British Legion’s Centenary Poppy Campaign, and in July of that year a reception with Joey the War Horse was held to commemorate WW1. The garden also hosted the 100th anniversary birthday party for the Brownies, attended by 112 girls from across the country and in 2016

commemorated 400 years since the death of Shakespeare with leading actors spending the day coaching children for a performance in the garden. Entrance 10 Downing Street Access Steps Nearest station Westminster Buses 3, 11, 12, 24, 53, 87, 88, 159, 453 Activities Guided tour for winners of the ballot Conditions You can only visit this garden on a tour. Places allocated by public ballot

P2. Belgrave Square SW1X 8QB Belgrave Square Garden is Belgravia’s green and leafy centrepiece. This 4.5-acre private garden was designed by George Basevi and first planted by Thomas Cubitt in 1826 to act as a landscape to the grand new houses of the square. Influenced by a design of John Claudius Loudon, the layout of the square remains faithful to its original network of paths and retains

Belgrave Square

some of the original planting in the form of mature planes. A central path curves through pergolas overhung with wisteria and roses. The garden is large enough to lose yourself in and grand enough to balance the imposing mansions that surround it. Four summer houses with covered seating known as ‘the temples’ have been added around the inner path. More obvious recent additions are the tennis court, children’s playground, and outdoor gym. The statuary around the garden reflects the international nature of the square and offers a rare chance to see a collection of modern figurative work. A 1998 statue of Sir Robert Grosvenor by Jonathan Wylder at the corner of Wilton Crescent features a quote from John Ruskin ‘When we build, let us think we build for ever’. The Belgrave Square garden committee seeks to balance the maintenance of the garden’s historic character with the needs and expectations of modern users. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance West side, opposite no. 6 Nearest stations Hyde Park Corner, Victoria Buses C2, 2, 9, 10, 14, 16, 38, 52, 73, 74, 82, 414, 436 Activities Live music with Sam Hardy on acoustic guitar. Master baker Victoria Gilmore selling homemade cakes, tea and coffee. Giant jenga and other outdoor games. Garden guide Web www.grosvenorlondon.com/ourcustomers/gardens Senior gardener Stuart Camm

and a column surmounted by a statue of Frederick Augustus, the ‘Grand Old Duke of York’. The gardens have retained much of their 19th-century character, with serpentine paths, trees and shrubs. Handsome railings and a number of good statues define the perimeters of the gardens, the latest commemorating Sir Keith Park who helped win the Battle of Britain in WW2. The gardens have been managed continuously from their inception by an organisation specifically set up in 1824 to carry out this task, the Crown Estate Paving Commission. In 2008 the gardens were restored. The original path network was reinstated with a firm surface of self-binding gravel. Replanting has added a greater variety of shrubs and groundcover more suited to the shaded environment. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance South-west side of Waterloo Place Access Raised stone threshold at gate. Firm paths Nearest station Piccadilly Circus Buses 3, 6, 9, 12, 13, 15, 23, 88, 94, 139, 159, 453 Web www.cepc.org.uk Head gardener Kevin Powell

P4. Chester Square SW1W 9HS Chester Square was laid out between 1828 and 1840 by the 1st Duke of Westminster and his surveyor and architect Thomas Cundy II as part of the Grosvenor Estate. St Michael’s Church on the west side was also designed by Thomas Cundy and still provides a backdrop to the garden today. The garden is planted with shrub and herbaceous borders and contains a delightful central rose garden. Just under 1.5 acres in size, it was restored in 1997 to

P3. Carlton House Terrace Gardens SW1Y 5AP Carlton House, the London residence of the Prince Regent, was built (at great expense) on part of the site of the former royal garden of St James’s Palace and remodelled in 1813 by the Regency architect John Nash. After becoming George IV, the Prince Regent lost interest in the house and it was demolished in 1827. Nash replaced it with Carlton House Terrace (1827–32) and Carlton Gardens (1830–33), houses for ‘persons of the highest social rank’. Waterloo Place was Nash’s southern terminus for Regent Street. The central space between the two blocks of nine houses was intended to have a domed fountain, but is now occupied by steps down to the Mall

Dolphin Square

the layout that appears in the Ordnance Survey map of 1867. Rope-edged tiles and some original trees have survived. The garden’s essence today is one of peace and tranquillity. Past residents include the poet Matthew Arnold (1822-88) at no. 2, and Mary Shelley (1797-1851), author of Frankenstein at no. 24. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Opposite no. 20 Nearest stations Sloane Square, Victoria Buses C1, C2, 2, 16, 38, 52, 73, 82, 436 Activities Garden information guide Web www.grosvenorlondon.com/ our-customers/gardens/chester-squaregarden Senior gardener Dean Evans

P5. Dolphin Square SW1V 3LX The garden of this luxury residential complex remains much as it was planned in 1935, but the maturity of the trees and plants have made it more beautiful. It has a bloom of colour in the spring and summer, especially from the rose beds. There are two spacious lawns, an avenue of pollarded chestnut trees and several rockeries and raised borders. There is also an award-winning mimosa tree. Recent additions are a herb garden for the tenants and a circular seated area nestled between Howard and Nelson House. The dolphin fountain, commissioned from James Butler RA in 1987, can be found in the centre of the garden. Just up some steps from the fountain is the Moroccan Garden, which was landscaped in the 1980s following a competition. The Moroccan Garden has its own small fountain, raised lavender beds and terracotta-tile floor. Around the corner from the Moroccan Garden is a

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Japanese-style grotto made with original tufa limestone. It may interest the ecologically aware visitor that Dolphin Square gardens are among the last gardens in Westminster to be watered from their own artesian wells. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Chichester Street Nearest station Pimlico Buses 24, 360, C10 Activities On-site restaurant. Advance bookings only Conditions No photography or filming Web www.dolphinsquare.co.uk Head gardener Michael Deville

P6. Eaton Square SW1W 9BD Eaton Square is one of London’s premier addresses. The layout, along with Belgrave Square, was begun in 1826 by Thomas Cubitt for the Grosvenor Estate. The square was named after Eaton Hall in Cheshire, home of the landowner, the Duke of Westminster. The gardens flanked either side of what was the main approach to Buckingham Palace. Today the garden remains a tranquil retreat of formal lawns, shady pathways and quiet seating areas divided between six main enclosures. The central garden on the south side is open for OGSW. In 2015 these perfectly manicured gardens received London in Bloom’s ‘Small Park of the Year’ award. Mixed borders around two formal lawns are divided by a path and seating through a shaded enclave. In addition, there is a tennis court with a planted walking area around the outside and formal raised beds, which always offer a vibrant display in time for open days. Sundials, water features and garden sculptures by David Harber are currently on display around the garden. Famous past residents include Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain (no. 37) and actress Vivien Leigh (no. 54). Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Opposite no. 42 Nearest stations Sloane Square, Victoria Buses C1, C2, 2, 16, 38, 52, 73, 82, 436 Activities Live brass band performances from The Master Butchers Band. Award-winning entertainer John Styles performing Punch & Judy at 12 noon, 1.30pm, 2.45pm and 4pm. Everbean stall selling cakes, snacks and drinks. David Harber sculptures. Garden guide Web www.grosvenorlondon.com/ our-customers/gardens/eaton-squaregarden Senior gardener Brett Domnall


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AREA P: Belgravia, Pimlico and Westminster

P7. Eccleston Square SW1V 1NP The square takes its name from the Cheshire village of Eccleston, part of the estates of the landowners, the Dukes of Westminster. Originally a low-lying swamp which was drained in the early 17th century, it was planned as a threeacre square in 1828 by Thomas Cubitt (1788–1855). Over the past 30 years, the whole garden has been replanted to give year-round interest. There are many specialist collections, including camellias, climbing and shrub roses, and a National Collection of ceanothus. In 2006, a Wollemi pine was donated to the square. The species was thought to have been extinct until found recently in Australia. Over the past eight years a large variety of unusual tender plants have been put in and are flourishing in the garden. Among our especially tender plants we have a few specimens of the giant Mexican dahlia, Dahlia imperialis, which grows to about four metres and flowers in mid-November, if there is no frost. We also have the white sunflower tree, Rojasianthe superba from Guatemala, which flowers in March, but needs a very mild winter to hold its flower buds. It did well in 2013. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance North-west side, opposite no. 15 Nearest station Victoria Buses 11, 24, 44, 211, C10 Car parking No parking restrictions over the weekend Web www.ecclestonsquaregardens.com Gardener Pavel Votapek

P8. Ham Yard Hotel Roof Garden W1D 7DT This leafy rooftop garden is set on the fourth floor of Ham Yard Hotel, with sweeping views over the London skyline. Designed to satisfy the senses, the garden is watched over by two ancient olive trees and surrounded by apple and pear espaliers. Now over two years old, the garden blooms all year round with seasonal flowers, from poppies and lemon verbena to jasmine, creating a wild meadow. Raised beds made of railway sleepers and picket-fencing form salad, herb and vegetable gardens. There is a lounge area scattered with Whitman benches and a settle with upholstered seats. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Ham Yard, off Great Windmill Street Access Small ramp for wheelchair access Nearest station Piccadilly Circus Buses 14, 19, 38 Web www.firmdalehotels.com/hotels/ london/ham-yard-hotel Gardeners Clive and Kate Goodman

P9. Lillington and Longmoore Gardens SW1V 2LD The Lillington Gardens Estate, designed by Darbourne & Darke for the City of Westminster, was one of the first low-rise, high-density housing estates in London. Construction started in the mid-1960s and continued until Longmoore Gardens was completed in the late 1970s. The estates were designated a conservation area in 1990

OGSW Guide 2017 and parts are listed grade II*. Originally the estate was landscaped as a series of green spaces with trees. Since 1996 these have been developed into a number of unique gardens planted with a wide range of shrubs, herbaceous plants and bulbs suited to the dry urban environment. Individual areas include classic mixed borders, mediterranean planting, an exotic border with yuccas, palms, agaves and cannas, a sensory garden with bubble fountain, pergolas, a Jubilee Garden, a children’s garden and residents’ allotments. Perennial meadows and wildlife areas and a pond have also been made to increase biodiversity. Some borders have been replanted recently. Bedding and hanging basket plants are raised by the gardeners. The estate has won the Best Garden for Wildlife section of the Westminster in Bloom competition and has achieved a Green Flag award for excellent management and maintenance for 10 years running. It was the first social housing estate in the country to win this award. There is a playground for children under 10 accompanied by an adult. This is adapted for children with disabilities. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance 3 Charlwood Street Access Difficult in a few places Nearest stations Pimlico, Victoria Buses 2, 24, 36, 185, 436 Car parking Please park off the estate in the street Activities Map of the gardens. Gardeners present. Guided walk, 3pm. Children’s playground. Plants for sale. Tea, coffee and homemade cakes Head gardener Jim Myers

P10. Marlborough House SW1Y 5HX

Eccleston Square

Built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1709-11, this magnificent house is now the working headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat and the Commonwealth Foundation. The garden has been largely maintained in its original formal 18th-century layout, with a number of large, plain expanses of lawn, intersected by gravel pathways. At its southern and western boundaries, bordering The Mall and Marlborough Road respectively, the lawns bank upwards, enabling residents to see over the fairly high boundary wall from the gravel path. Against these walls are formal beds with some hedging and other planting. At the eastern boundary is a less formal, extensive shrubbery, with a woodland path and a pet cemetery, where the tombstones commemorate

woodpecker visit the garden. Open Saturday 11am–5pm, Sunday 12–5pm Entrance 5 Motcomb St Access One step into the shop and a flight of stairs down into the garden Nearest station Knightsbridge Buses C1, 19, 22, 137, 452 Activities Cakes and pastries freshly baked. Coffees, teas and hot chocolate Conditions A maximum of 12 people at a time as it is a small space Web www.rococochocolates.com

P12. Warwick Square SW1V 2AL

MaRoCoCo Garden at Rococo Chocolates

household pets, including some of Queen Alexandra’s dogs. There is a revolving timber summerhouse with a thatched roof commissioned by Queen Mary, the last royal resident of the house, in front of the east wing of the building. In the south-east corner of the garden is a brick-built gazebo. Open Saturday 10am–5pm Entrance Marlborough Road Nearest station Green Park Bus 9 Web thecommonwealth.org/ marlborough-house

P11. MaRoCoCo Garden at Rococo Chocolates SW1X 8JU A small courtyard garden behind Rococo Chocolates. The layout by Dræyk van der Hørn of Bonnington Square Pleasure Garden was executed by Chantal Coady, the shop’s founder, who has also been closely involved with the Bonnington Square gardens. Once a neglected city space, with a lone acacia tree, the garden now features a Moroccan tile mosaic and is filled with fragrant plants – all used in the Rococo repertoire rose, lavender, geranium, mint, jasmine and a kaffir lime. The result is a stunning asymmetric mirrored courtyard in the middle of Belgravia. Many elements in the garden are recycled old mirrors came from the late Lady Rusheen Wynn-Jones’ house in Sprimont Place and tiles from Dar Interiors. The garden is now a favourite hangout for local birds, with a couple of resident robins. Tits, a family of blackbirds, and even a great-spotted

Warwick Square was laid out in the early 1840s as part of Thomas Cubitt’s development plan for Pimlico. The westward vista from the garden towards St Gabriel’s Church was a component of Cubitt’s original design. The garden features a rose garden, formal bedding and a relaxing lawn area. Mixed planting of shrubs, herbaceous and annuals gives yearround colour and fragrance. Six of the original iron lamp standards remain in use. New railings to match those donated to the war effort during WW2 have been installed and the original hoggin paths and rope-edge tiles reinstated. The two original Victorian mounds have been re-landscaped with timber forts, concealed paths and hiding places to encourage children’s play. The square has been extensively replanted in recent years, designed to be an all-seasons garden, with particular emphasis on winter interest and scent. It is home to a large variety

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of birds, insects and butterflies. ‘Rus in Urbe’ is written above the gates and, indeed, this is a piece of romantic countryside in SW1. The square won Gold in the London in Bloom Competition 2016 and 2015, and Silver Gilt in The London Squares Garden Competition 2016. Open Sunday 11am–5pm Entrance Opposite no. 12 Nearest stations Pimlico, Victoria Buses 24 + C10, 2, 36, 185, 360, 436 Web www.warwicksquarepimlico.co.uk Head gardener Sarah Syborn

P13. Wilton Crescent Garden SW1X 8RX Wilton Crescent was an addition by Thomas Cundy, the Grosvenor Estate surveyor, to the original 1821 Wyatt plan for Belgravia. Today this crescentshaped garden is planted with a white theme and is a tranquil enclave only a stone’s throw from Belgrave Square. Modern sculpture mixes with imposing London plane trees. The garden was highly commended in the 2011 London Gardens Society Competition. Open Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Opposite 38 Wilton Crescent Nearest stations Hyde Park Corner, Knightsbridge Buses C2, 2, 9, 10, 14, 16, 38, 52, 73, 74, 82, 414, 436 Activities Garden information leaflet Web www.grosvenorlondon.com/ourcustomers/gardens/wilton-crescentgarden Senior gardener Dean Evans


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Q1. Bee Urban SE11 4BE Bee Urban is a beekeeping and environmental education community project based in Kennington Park. We have been at ‘the Hive’, our new site in the park, since March 2015. The garden has raised growing beds, fruit trees, soft fruit, nectar-rich plants, herbs and flowers. We have been developing the garden’s biodiversity through planting and creating a habitat for nature. All planting has been designed to be nectarrich according to Royal Horticultural Society and British Beekeepers’ Association guidance. Points of interest include a natural observation hive, cob oven, apiary, indoor observation hive, planted beds and borders and raised beds. Regular volunteers from the local community maintain the site every Thursday and Friday. Volunteering opportunities at Bee Urban include gardening, beekeeping, construction/ carpentry, cob-oven construction, bread and pizza making, candle-making, paper-making and more. We provide outreach work across south London and hold weekend open days on the second Sunday of each month. The building is available as a space for groups to use for meetings and social gatherings. We work in partnership with Hiver Beers to host the ‘Hiver experience’ which involves a beekeeping session and honey and honey beer tastings. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Behind the café in Kennington Park Access Some steps, uneven surfaces and gravel paths Nearest stations Kennington, Oval Buses 3, 36, 133, 159, 185, 344 Activities Beekeeping, crafts and candle-making. Honey and honey beer tasting with Hiver Beers Web www.beeurban.org.uk

a 9-metre-high Industrial Revolution iron waterwheel, a huge Helping Hand sculpture and evocative, lush sub-tropical planting. Further planting under the umbrella of the Paradise Project includes trees, groundcover planting, vines and endless street gardens. The pleasure garden is today regarded as one of the finest community gardens in London. If you go through 27 Bonnington Square you get to Q5. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance North side Nearest station Vauxhall Buses 2, 36, 88, 185, 436 also 44, 77, 77A, 156, 322, 344 Activities As part of the celebrations for Open Garden Squares Weekend, Junction Jazz will be performing on Saturday 17th June, 3-5pm. Junction Jazz are a group of South London-based musicians that play a diverse range of musical styles from jazz classics to Dixieland, Bebop and Bossa Nova. Refreshments of drinks and food will be available during the performance from Italo Deli. Web bonningtonsquaregarden.org.uk

Q3. Durand Gardens SW9 0PS Durand Gardens are an unusual D-shaped space in the Stockwell Park Conservation Area. The shape of the garden is said to be derived from it once

Q2. Bonnington Square SW8 1GA The pleasure garden here was once a bombsite, then a derelict playground, before it was imaginatively re-designed by the Bonnington Square Garden Association, a group of local residents with backgrounds in film, art, design and horticulture. Funded by grants and local sponsorship, the garden includes

being the site of a plague pit. The area was developed from around 1840 to 1870, with houses built around the garden on a pattern-book system in a wide variety of styles. The gardens themselves were neglected for many years until the residents bought them in the 1980s. Since then they have been kept as woodland gardens and are at their best in the spring, with large displays of bluebells and daffodils. The main group of trees are limes and oaks, with a scattering of specimen trees amongst them. The central grass area is a delightful spot for a picnic. There is now a residents’ scheme to develop a wider season of plant and tree display so that the gardens are also attractive in the summer and autumn. Open Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am–5pm Entrance Opposite no. 19 Access Uneven ground. Wheelchairs can get in but may find it uncomfortable Nearest station Stockwell Buses 155, 333 (Clapham Road), 3, 59, 133, 159, 415 (Brixton Road) Activities Information on the garden’s history and planting

Q4. Glengall Wharf Garden SE15 6NF The garden is a new project that is reclaiming an unkempt part of Burgess Park. Since 2012 we have been developing a large community garden that shows

the use of a wide variety of different sustainable gardening methods, all managed by local people. We grow a wide range of fruit and vegetables, using permaculture techniques to develop an edible forest garden. A pond, pergola, hot composting, natural bee-keeping, hügelkultur, a polytunnel and more can be seen either completed or in development. The site is on an old wharf of the Surrey Canal and the old cobbles are still in evidence. A lively, diverse and busy project, we are an ‘ideas hub’ for alternative gardening and sustainability. The garden is a Permaculture Association Land Centre, so a great place to find out more about this type of ecological design. Open Sunday 11am–4pm Entrance Surrey Canal Walk Access Very irregular surfaces Nearest stations Peckham Rye (1.5km, bus) Buses 63, 363 to Waite Street Activities Self-guided tours, homemade cakes, teas and seasonal produce. Plants to buy or swap Web burgessparkfoodproject.org.uk Gardeners Local volunteers Cg

Q5. Harleyford Road Community Garden SW8 1TF In 1984 local residents started to grow vegetables on a 1.5-acre plot of wasteland, beginning the present community garden. Apart from a few existing trees, the whole garden has been created and is maintained by residents. The garden is divided into several areas including a wildlife area, pond and a playground. Recent enhancements include a mosaic wall, extended mosaic paths and new benches. If you go through 27 Bonnington Square you get to Q2. Open Sunday 2–5pm Entrance 37 Bonnington Square or Harleyford Road Access Most parts wheelchairaccessible, including the WC Nearest stations Vauxhall, Oval Buses 36, 185, 436 + 2, 88 Activities Tea and cakes. Music. Jumble and other stalls, Sunday 2-5pm

Jamyang Buddhist Centre

grade II since 1993. Jamyang Buddhist Centre bought the Old Court House in 1995, when it was in poor repair. A large team of volunteers restored the beautiful old building over time, including the exercise yard, which retains the original Victorian cobblestones. The gated courtyard garden covers approximately 120 square metres. It features a magnificent golden Buddha statue and a small meditative garden space. The garden, designed and maintained by volunteers, is planted entirely in raised beds and pots. A mixture of shrubs, climbers, perennials, herbs, fruit, vegetables, annuals and wildflowers also provides flowers for inside the building. There is a mini-meadow and a mass of bulbs in spring. An old Victorian castiron safe found on site nestles among boulders beneath the Buddha statue, forming the base for a pretty fountain. We aim for the garden to be a haven in the city for creatures great and small. His Holiness the Dalai Lama visited in 1999. The idea of sharing the building is part

Q6. Jamyang Buddhist Centre SE11 4NA

Durand Gardens

Our garden is located in the original exercise yard for prisoners of the Old Kennington Courthouse, which was a Lambeth magistrates’ court for 100 years, built in 1869. It is the last surviving Victorian courthouse in London, listed

117

Harleyford Road Community Garden

of the commitment we made during the purchase campaign to bring the Old Court House back into community use. The centre is involved in a variety of partnerships and networks with local health, non-profit and community groups. Open Saturday 10am–4pm Entrance 43 Renfrew Road Access Building and garden fully accessible. Courtyard cobblestones may be a bit uneven for a wheelchair Nearest stations Kennington, Elephant & Castle Buses 196 (Kennington Lane), 133, 155, 333 (Kennington Park Road), 3, 59, 109, 159 (Kennington Road) Activities Café with food produced on site. Small shop Web www.jamyang.co.uk Volunteer head gardeners Anne Swindell & Ros Williams

Q7. Kath Gillmore Community Garden SE1 8HT This Peabody housing estate, built in 1871, is listed grade II. The community garden was imaginatively designed in 2013 to make use of a disused tarmac courtyard. It comprises 14 raised beds, which residents use for growing food and nectar-rich plants. The garden is entered by an enchanting planted courtyard, with fruiting hedge and herb plants. It has played host to gardening clubs, theatre performances and bike workshops and is run by a local beekeeping resident (yes, there will be kids’ bee suits to try on!), with the support of residents on the Peabody Blackfriars and surrounding estates. Open Saturday 12–5pm Entrance Between Blocks S & T, Peabody Blackfriars Estate, Blackfriars Road


118

AREA Q: North Lambeth and Southwark

OGSW Guide 2017

119

Access Level access Nearest stations Southwark, Waterloo, Elephant & Castle Buses 45, 63, 100 Activities Observation beehive, pollinator planting guides and bee suits for children. Candle-making, crafts, face and henna hand painting. Plant sale. Self-guided estate tours. Screening of estate film ‘Changing Lives’. Refreshments Web www.peabody.org.uk/about-us/ our-mission/our-history/history-of-ourestates#blackfriars Garden co-ordinator Carole Wright

Q8. Merrick Square SE1 4JB Small, quiet, well-maintained garden square, originally laid out in 1853-6 as part of the development of land belonging to the Corporation of Trinity House. It is still composed of 32 single houses, owned by Trinity House. Holy Trinity Rectory, between nos.16 and 17, was built in 1872. Open Sunday 11am–6pm Entrance West side Access Kerb at entrance. Outer parts of the garden reached across lawns Nearest stations Borough, Elephant & Castle, London Bridge Buses 21, 35, 40, 133, 343, C10 Activities Music and refreshments by Trinity Newington Residents’ Association Web www.tnra.net

Merrick Square

Trinity Church Square

Q9. Trinity Church Square SE1 4HT A formal garden square built between 1824 and 1832 on land belonging to the Corporation of Trinity House. Most of the houses, still owned by Trinity House, have been converted into flats. The church is now the Henry Wood Hall, used for orchestral rehearsals. The garden, maintained by Trinity House and Trinity Newington Residents Association, contains one of the oldest outside statues in London, probably of Alfred the Great and possibly originally

sited in Westminster Hall. The garden has been open to residents only since 1997 and has been well used since the closure of Trinity Street to through traffic in 2002. Open Sunday 11am–6pm Access Level entrance. Garden is mostly lawn Nearest stations Borough, Elephant & Castle, London Bridge Buses 21, 35, 40, 133, 343, C10 Activities Music and refreshments by Trinity Newington Residents’ Association Web www.tnra.net

Walworth Allotment Association

Q10. Walworth Allotment Association SE17 3EQ Walworth Allotment Association was founded in the 1970s by a passionate local Southwark community who wanted to grow their own fruit and vegetables as close to home as possible. This site, which includes a wildlife area, pond and thriving beehives, has developed over the years through various planting and community initiatives. The current twice-yearly working party has reclaimed industrial/garage space to create a pleasant, intimate communal urban green space. We have 16 plots, some of which are shared, with a very diverse group of keen gardeners. We grow a variety of fruit, herbs and vegetables organically, with the occasional floral flourish! This is possibly one of the most urban vegetable growing sites in the world – the London Eye is almost in sight, while the roar of the cricket crowds at the Oval can be heard while gardening on a summer’s day. You’re welcome to come and enjoy our creative horticultural inner-city delights. Open Saturday 10am–6pm, Sunday 10am–6pm Entrance Fielding Street, off Walworth Road, just west of railway bridge Access Ground uneven in parts, but still wheelchair accessible

Nearest stations Kennington, Elephant & Castle Buses 12, 68, 171, 176, 468 from E+C Activities Tea and delicious homemade cakes

Q11. Walworth Garden SE17 3BN Walworth Garden was first established in 1987 when local residents set about reclaiming a derelict plot of land in a

Walworth Garden

heavily built-up inner-city corner of Walworth in Southwark. Thirty years on, the garden is a hub of the community, boasting a learning centre, wildlife pond, food-growing, orchard, horticultural training centre and the Garden Services Division, which employs locals to create and maintain gardens. A registered charity and social enterprise, in 2015 the garden gained its fifth consecutive Community Green Flag Award and won an ‘Outstanding’ certificate in the RHS/London in Bloom ‘It’s Your Neighbourhood’ award scheme. The garden, described as a ‘mini Kew Garden’ by our London in Bloom judge, is now open seven days a week, and also sells a whole host of plants, compost and goodquality terracotta pots. Open Saturday 10am–2pm, Sunday 10am–4pm Entrance 206 Manor Place Access Accessible toilet. Hoggin paths Nearest station Kennington Buses 133, 155, 333 + 12, 35, 40, 45, 68, 148, 171, 176, 468 Activities Site produce for sale including honey, beeswax candles, chutney, plants, compost, planted containers and bouquets Web www.walworthgarden.org.uk Gardener Oliver Haden Cg


120

121

Index of gardens Garden name and postcode

page

10

Bow Churchyard E3

52

Calthorpe Project Community Garden WC1 82 Canons Park – George V Memorial Garden HA8 14 Carlton House Terrace Gardens SW1 110 Carlyle’s House SW3 101 Carshalton House Landscape Garden SM5 25 The Castle Garden N4 16 Centre for Wildlife Gardening SE15 20 Charlton Manor Community Garden (at Woodlands Farm) DA16 NEW 20 Charlton Manor Primary School SE7 21 Chester Square SW1 111 Christchurch Greyfriars Church Garden EC1 97 Cleary Garden EC4 97 Cleveland Square W2 74 Cleveland Gardens W2 75 Clissold Community Garden N16 16 Collingham Gardens SW5 101 Collingham Gardens Nursery WC1 82 Cordwainers Garden E8 53 Cornwall Gardens SW7 101 Courtfield Gardens (East) SW5 102 Courtfield Gardens (West) SW5 102 Cranbrook Community Food Garden E2 53 Crescent Garden W9 75 Crossbones Memorial Garden SE1 91 Crossrail Place Roof Garden E14 60 Culpeper Community Garden N1 46 Culverley Green SE6 21

Bramford Community Garden SW18

24

D

10 Downing Street SW1

110

A Abney Park N16

16

Alara Permaculture Forest Garden N1 44

Tell us what you think! Visit www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/6YR5H8N to give us your feedback about Open Garden Squares Weekend 2017.

Alexandra Road Park NW8

37

All Saints Vicarage Garden, Fulham SW6

32

All Saints West Dulwich SE21 NEW 64 Approach Gardens E2 NEW 52 Arlington Square N1

44

Arnold Circus E2

52

Arvon Road Allotment Group N5

44

Ashworth Mansions Garden W9

74

B Ballast Quay Garden SE10

20

Barbican Station Pop-up Garden EC1 90 Barbican Wildlife Garden, Fann Street EC2

90

Baring Asset Management EC2M NEW 90

Save the date for next year’s Open Garden Squares Weekend 9 and 10 June 2018

Barnard Park N1

45

Barnsbury Square N1

45

Barnsbury Wood N1

45

Bedford Square WC1

80

Beech Gardens, the Barbican Estate EC2

96

Bee Urban SE11

116

Belgrave Square SW1

110

Bina Gardens East SW7

100

Bonnington Square SW8

116

Bramham Gardens SW5

100

Branch Hill Allotments NW3

38

British Medical Association Council Garden WC1

80

Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses SE24 64 Brunel Museum Gardens SE16

60

Brunswick Square WC1

80

Bryanston Square W1

74

C

E

Cable Street Community Gardens E1 60 Cadogan Place North Garden SW1

100

Cadogan Place South Garden SW1

100

Caledonian Park and Community Orchard N7

Dalston Eastern Curve Garden E8 54 The Deanery SE1 NEW 91 De Frene Market Garden, Sydenham Garden SE23 21 Dolphin Square SW1 111 Dorset Square NW1 75 Drapers’ Hall Garden EC2 91 Dulwich Upper Wood LNR SE19 21 Durand Gardens SW9 116

46

Earls Court Square SW5 102 Eaton Square SW1 111 Eccleston Square SW1 112 Eden at St. Paul’s Community Garden SW4 64

Edwardes Square W8 Emery Walker’s House W6 Ennismore Gardens SW7 Eversheds Sutherland Vegetable Garden EC2

103 32 103 91

F Fassett Square E8 54 Fenton House Garden National Trust NW3 38 Fitzroy Square W1 82 Formosa Garden W9 75 Forty Hall Estate EN2 NEW 17 Freightliners Farm N7 46 Fulham Palace SW6 33 Fulham Palace Meadows Allotments SW6 33

G Gainsborough Gardens NW3 38 Garden Barge Square at Downings Roads Moorings SE1 60 Gasholder Park N1C NEW 47 Geffrye Museum Gardens E2 55 Gledhow Gardens SW5 104 Glengall Wharf Garden SE15 116 Gloucester Square Residents’ Gardens E2 55 The Golden Baggers EC1 92 Gray’s Inn WC1 92 Grove House Estate and Downshire House (Roehampton University) SW15 25 The Growing Kitchen N1 47

H Hachette UK Limited EC4 NEW 92 Hampstead Parish Church Burial Grounds NW3 39 Ham Yard Hotel Roof Garden W1 112 Hanover Gardens W11 68 Harleyford Road Community Garden SW8 117 Hereford Square SW7 104 Highbury Stadium Square N5 48 Highgate Day Centre Garden NW5 39 The House of St Barnabas W1 83

I Inner Temple Garden EC4 92 International Lutheran Student Centre Sunken Courtyard WC1 83 The Ismaili Centre Roof Garden SW7 104


122 Index of gardens Garden name and postcode

OGSW Guide 2017 page

J Jamyang Buddhist Centre SE11

117

John Betts House W12

33

K Kath Gillmore Community Garden SE1

The Old Blue Cross Pet Cemetery SE18 NEW 22 The Olden Community Garden N5 48 Osterley House Gardens TW7 14

P

Kingston University – Knights Park/ Stanley Picker KT1 NEW 23

Paradise Co-op Urban Farm SW18 NEW 24 Park Square & Park Crescent Gardens NW1 76 Paultons Square SW3 106 Pembridge Square W2 69 Phoenix Farm and Learning Zone W12 69 The Phoenix Garden WC2 85 Pooles Park Primary School N4 49 Postman’s Park EC1 94 Providence Row Rooftop Garden E1 94 Pudding Mill Allotments E15 NEW 18

L

Q

117

Keats House NW3 NEW 40 Kensington Gardens Square W2 Kensington Square W8 King Henry’s Walk Garden N1

75 104 48

Kingston University – Kingston Hill KT2 NEW 23 Kingston University – Dorich House SW15 NEW 23

Ladbroke Square Garden W11

68

Lavender Pond and Nature Park SE16 61 Leinster Square Gardens W2

68

Lever Street Community Garden EC1 93 Lexham Gardens W8

105

Lillington & Longmoore Gardens SW1 112 Linden Lodge School SW19 NEW 25 Lloyd Square WC1

84

M Manchester Square Gardens W1

76

Marchmont Community Garden WC1 NEW 84 Markham Square SW3

105

Marlborough House SW1

112

MaRoCoCo Garden at Rococo Chocolates SW1

113

The Master’s Garden EC4

93

Meadlands Primary School TW10 NEW 26 Mecklenburgh Square WC1

85

Merrick Square SE1

118

Middle Temple EC4

93

Montagu Square W1

76

The Mosaic Rooms SW5

105

Museum of Brands W11

68

Museum of Methodism, John Wesley’s House and Wesley’s Chapel EC1Y 93 Myddelton House Gardens EN2

17

N

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park E20 18 Queen’s Gate Gardens SW7 106 Queenswell Junior School Community Garden N20 NEW 15

R Railway Fields N4 NEW 18 Rainham Hall RM13 19 Ravenscourt Park Glasshouses W6 34 Red Cross Garden SE1 94 Red House DA6 22 The Regent’s Park Allotment Garden NW1 76 Regent’s University London NW1 77 Ridgmount Gardens WC1 86 The River Cafe W6 34 Roe Green Walled Garden NW9 15 Roehampton Club SW15 26 The Roof Gardens W8 106 Roof East E15 19 Rosmead Garden W11 69 Royal College of Physicians’ Medicinal Garden NW1 77 Royal Crescent Gardens W11 70 Royal Garrison Church of St George, Woolwich SE18 22 Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability SW15 26 Royal Trinity Hospice SW4 65 Russell Square Gardens WC1 86

S

The Wildlife Garden at the Natural History Museum SW7

105

Nevern Square SW5

105

Nomura International PLC EC4

94

Norland Square W11

69

O October Gallery WC1

123

85

St Charles’ Community Garden W10 NEW 70 St Dunstan’s in the East Church Garden EC3 97 St George’s Gardens WC1 87 St James Close N1 49 St James’s Gardens W11 70

Museum of the Order of St John EC1 95 St Joseph’s Garden EC1 95 St Joseph’s Hospice Garden E8 56 St Luke’s Community Centre EC1 95 St Mary’s Secret Garden E2 57 St Olave Hart Street Churchyard EC3 97 St Peter’s Bethnal Green Church & Vicarage Gardens E2 57 St Quintin’s Community Kitchen Garden W10 71 Salters’ Garden EC2 95 Sellincourt Primary School Edible Garden SW17 NEW 27 Share Community Garden SW17 27 The Skip Garden, Global Generation N1 49 SOAS Japanese-Inspired Roof Garden WC1 87 South London Botanical Institute SE24 65 Southside House SW19 NEW 27 Southwark Cathedral Churchyard and Herb Garden SE1 96 Stanley Crescent Garden W11 71 The Compound, Stave Hill Ecological Park SE16 61 Strawberry Hill House TW1 NEW 28 Sycamore House W6 34

T Community Garden at Tate Modern SE1 96 Thrive Battersea SW11 107 Thurloe Square SW7 107 Triangle Garden W9 77 Trinity Church Square SE1 118 Trumpeters’ House TW9 NEW 28

V Vestry House EC4R

96

W Walworth Allotment Association SE17 119 Walworth Garden SE17 119 Wendelsworth Community Garden SW18 NEW 24 Warwick Square SW1 113 Waterlow Park Kitchen Garden N6 40 Wesley Square W11 71 West London Bowling Club W10 71 White Hall Hotel WC1 87 Whitgift School CR2 28 Wildcroft Manor SW15 NEW 29 William Morris Society W6 35 Wilton Crescent Garden SW1 113 Winterton House Organic Garden E1 61 Woodcroft Wildspace N21 19 Woodville Day Centre TW10 NEW 29 Woollen House Communal Garden E1 61 World Peace Garden Camden NW3 41

Organising the Weekend Open Garden Squares Weekend is organised by the London Parks & Gardens Trust. Our small, paid part-time office team is supported by a volunteer organising team. The Organising Team

Area Coordinators

Organising team Volunteers: Marion Blair – Guided Walks and Logistics Jock Blakey – Weekend Volunteers Coordinator David Lowe – Photography Archivist Janne Watson – Secretary of the Organising Team Colin Wing – IT Manager and Cycle Rides Contractors: Sarah Harrison – PR Manager Guy Jackson – Designer Sarah Jackson – Guidebook Editor London Parks & Gardens Trust Staff: Sarah Duffin – Events and Marketing Manager Polly Freeman – Operations Manager Helen Monger – Director Helen Sadler – Social Media and Content Manager Hannah Shimko – Events, Activities and Ticketing Coordinator

Our dedicated team of Area Coordinators work year round to find exciting new gardens across 27 of London’s boroughs. We’d like to say a huge thank you to our Area Coordinator team for everything they do. Marion Blair Candy Blackham Jock Blakey Andrea Charman Daniel Cutter Lynne Eva Anne Greig Dorothy Jones Sue Lovell-Greene Marsha Nicholson Adeline Schlumberger

Garden Representatives and Weekend Volunteers It takes over 1,200 dedicated volunteers to make OGSW happen! We’d like to say a huge thank you to all the garden representatives and committees who prepare and open the gardens, all those who help to organise and run activities in the gardens over the Weekend, and to the huge army of volunteers who so enthusiastically welcome visitors to the gardens, sell tickets and much more. The London Parks & Gardens Trust is grateful to everyone who contributes to making the Weekend a success, year on year. We look forward to seeing you again in 2018! President: Todd Longstaffe-Gowan Chair of Trustees: Ed Ikin Vice Chair of Trustees: Verena McCaig Treasurer: Lisa Watson Secretary: Maureen Nolan


Protecting and promoting London’s green open spaces We hope you enjoy your weekend, where we’ve showcased some of the green spaces we know about. The Trust is an independent charity reliant on members. The Trust works all year round to: • carry out academic research documenting and recording the importance of London’s green space • provide impartial expert advice to gardens and parks faced with dilemmas over horticultural preservation • campaign for their protection and comment on planning applications. All of this requires the support of active volunteers, charitable donations and members.

Join us today! Please see our website www.londongardenstrust.org for full details. Our membership package includes a ticket for Open Garden Squares Weekend 2018. We welcome volunteers and can offer a wide range of roles depending on your interests. Duck Island Cottage, St James’s Park, London SW1A 2BJ 0207 839 3969

London Historic Parks & Gardens Trust is a registered charity no 1042337 and a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales no 2935176

OGSW 2017 Guidebook  
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