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Cass Session

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The Cass Session 4 londonmet.ac.uk/thecass ISBN 9781916408302

9 781916 408302

RRP £15

Cass Session

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Cover image Belmonte Calabro, Film Screening Photo by Florian Siegel


Cass Session

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The Cass Session 2017–18 Edited by Michael Upton and Andrew Stone. Production team: Dawn Fernandez, Miguel Ferrer Gil and Kate Stanbury. Design by Turnbull Grey. Typeset in Helvetica Neue, Din and Brenta. Photograph on cover by Florian Siegel. Photographs on interior front and back cover, and pages 2–18, 32-34, 36-48, 60, 75, 82–85,113–136, 152–153, 156, 165, 170, 172, 174, 176, 180, 184-185, by Stephen Blunt. Printed and bound in the UK. First published in 2018 by The Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design London Metropolitan University Old Castle Street London E1 7NT A catalogue record of this book is available from the British Library. ISBN 978-1-9164083-0-2 This publication is also available online londonmet.ac.uk/casssession1718 © The Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design 2018 © The authors 2018 All rights reserved. Except for the purposes of review or criticism, no part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form by electronic or mechanical means, including photocopying, recording and information storage or retrieval, without prior permission from the publisher. With thanks to our many students, staff, partners and collaborators – without whom this publication would not be possible.


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Art 017 Fine Art 019 Theatre Arts 037 English and Creative Writing 045 Architecture Undergraduate Postgraduate Moscow School of Architecture (MARCH) Applied Technology in Architecture (ATA)

057 059 087 110 112

Design 3D Interiors Visual Communication

115 117 139 155

Foundation

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Culture/Life 181 Critical and Contextual Studies 183 Projects 184 Research 186 Essays 187 MA by Project 194 News and events 196 Public lectures 200 Across school 202 Short courses 204 Staff and students 206 Contact us

contents

Introduction 007

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Introduction


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It is my pleasure to introduce the extraordinary quality and breadth of work produced by our students in the last year. The Cass Yearbook presents this achievement within the context of the diverse range of Art, Architecture and Design activities, both within the School and beyond, in the last 12 months. This has been a significant year for The Cass. Over the last two years we have moved from two separate sites into a single building at Calcutta House in Aldgate, with library and workshops integrated into the life of the School. So now we are here, at the heart of the city. And as you stand on the bridge connecting Calcutta House and the Annexe, our context is clear; look south and Aldgate Tower and the Whitechapel building, home to insurers, engineers, design and media companies and the government’s digital services, frame an assertive modern city; look north and you see the street traders of Petticoat Lane, social housing and textiles shops, a diverse, robust, historic and pressured piece of London.

introduction

Welcome to The Cass Yearbook 2017–18

This is an area undergoing significant change and the balance between regeneration and continuity, global and local interests can be fraught. Nominally this is about the City and the East End and these are our communities. We engage with and work alongside both these and the value of The Cass’s established place as a supporter, a mediator and a creative presence in the life of our piece of city is key to so much that you will see in this book. The work you will see offers different perspectives, actions and scales, and our students’ metropolitan experience and ambition is one we support and pursue with energy. Of course, to do this requires many players. Evolving live projects include working with the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in and around Brick Lane, and the success of the collaboration with Sandys Row Synagogue, where students from Interiors and English and Creative Writing worked with author Rachel Lichtenstein. continued…

Introduction


introduction continued…

Work with the Corporation of London focused on its completion of Aldgate Square, where Mark Collington and Animation students developed projection mapping on to the new café and where Jewellery and Silversmithing student, Dominik Wiecek, won the competition to encase a ventilation shaft at the square. This should be installed later this year. The Cass Projects Office has been key to managing these collaborations. Other connections were both local and global. Local school children took part in Awash with Ideas, a workshop in Old Castle Street where, with the road closed, lengths of fabric hung across the street above tables upon which different textiles were dyed. Engagement with London schools ran throughout the year with our participation in the National Saturday Art and Design club, and for the first time this year the Writing and Talking club, bringing 14 to16year-olds into The Cass’s world of projects and ideas. In October and November, over 200 people including school children, designers, a group of civil servants, academics, students and Women’s Institute groups helped Textile Design’s Gina Pierce create the Big Blanket for Christmas, for Crisis. There have been events and activity that have a far wider geographical engagement. The ongoing collaboration between Architecture and the Commune di Belmonte Calabro in southern Italy has continued to develop and

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An immediate benefit of being in the same building has been to reveal and connect The Cass’s different cultures and practices.

Interiors had Skype-based workshops with a community project in South Africa. In April our Head of Design, Chris Emmett, arranged for The Cass to host an off-site event as part of the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting. Called “It’s going to be good” this was not just about art, or architecture or design, but about young people from across the world who recognised their capacity to create positive change and to make things happen. The conversations and presentations were inspirational but they were also real, grounded in a belief that they could be achieved. At The Cass we aim for our students to have that same ambition and to enable that early in their studies. An immediate benefit that being in one building brought, by integrating nearly all subject areas into the same building, has been to reveal and connect The Cass’s different practices and cultures and our students and their disciplines. Our established cross-school activities, Making a Living Week and Celebration Week, again provided reciprocal presentations between students and practitioners in all subjects. The cross-disciplinary opportunity the School offers was enhanced further this year through the launch of Cass Culture, cassculture.org, by Joseph Kohlmaier. This allows us to share and promote the richness of student and staff activities inside and outside of The Cass, and is representative of the enriching, diverse, holistic environment for which we are striving.


Introduction


introduction continued…

The exhibitions and lectures reinforced the dialogues between London and international collaborations. The year opened with the second Belgian exhibition from WalloniaBruxelles in the Atrium, which also hosted Everything out of the Door from Rome, curated by RIBA 2 student Rita Adamo. This was followed by the celebration of east London life in Sue Andrews’ Brady Club’s archive and photography exhibition, and by our own Fashion students’ Project Red show. The season culminated with the School’s first Summer Show at Calcutta House. The range of guest lectures and events was bountiful throughout the year. Jane Clossick and Matthew Barac co-ordinated a year-long series of research seminars, the Hothouse workshops provided another rich set of talks in Visual Communication and in Architecture, two series, Form-givers, organised by James Payne and the second, Who Cares?, run by students Andra Corina Tuna and Rengin Dogan, brought strong ideas and speakers. There were practitioners working and speaking to students throughout the School. In Fine Art the Open Field residencies completed a second innovative and provoking year, Interiors ran its first cinema club in the first term and Cass Cities has partnered with The London Society to run a series of Architecture Saturday Schools. Project Red catwalk show

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Introduction


introduction continued… We have waited too long to explicitly recognise the presence and contribution of history to our range of practices and so it was a delight to host the first Cass Histories lecture by Maeve Brennan. Textile Design student Frances McBain won the Tissage rug competition which saw her travelling to India to see her rug being produced. Fine Art’s Charlotte Aitken, a 2017 graduate, won the ARTIQ graduate prize and Ella Merriman (Furniture and Product Design) and Tarn Phillip (Architecture) were both selected for Venice Biennale fellowships. Several groups of students took their practice directly to public events, with first-year Fine Art students curating a series of pop-up exhibitions in galleries around London and in Southend-on-Sea, and Theatre Arts students holding their New Beginnings festival at the Chelsea Theatre. And for a second year, Graphic Design and Illustration and Animation students worked with English and Creative Writing students to produce Anthology II. The ongoing success and effectiveness of the School’s relationship with the Students’ Union has been prominent again this year. The most evident result of our sabbatical officer, Georgia Robinson’s, campaigning was the collaboration between the School, Jen Ng in The Cass Projects Office, and Rachel Ward and Paul Ayles of the estates department to build the Calcutta House roof garden. This has been popular all year and now incorporates structures built by Architecture and Interiors Foundation students too. Georgia’s term has now finished and we would like to thank her for all she has done and we look forward to working with our new officer, Jessica Hoarau. Working with the Students’ Union has also established two new cross-school student societies, the Live Drawing society, and MASS (Metropolitan Architecture Student Society) who are working with us in the planning of a small materials shop for next year. The year has seen many successes and awards for students and staff. Many colleagues have worked extraordinarily hard to ensure students’ performance, engagement and progression into employment is as successful as possible. Over the last year the School has consolidated its good performance The ceramics studio at Calcutta House

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in both the National Student Survey and Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, and this culminated in Art being ranked fourth in the country in The Guardian’s university league table. Amongst many staff successes, Foundation tutor Suzanne Cohen was named Educator of the Year at the Into Film awards and Associate Professor Patrick Brill (Bob and Roberta Smith) presented Bob and Roberta’s Most Excellent Adventure on BBC4. We appointed Dr Matthew Barac as Reader in Architecture, Dr Jos Boys as Visiting Professor in Foundation, Peter Marigold as Visiting Professor in Design and Entrepreneurialism and, coinciding with the opening of his practice’s British Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, Peter St John as Professor of Architecture. To achieve all these things I must thank every student and every member of staff in The Cass and those areas that support us. We engage colleagues from our diverse fields in many ways, as full-time academics, associate or hourly-paid lecturers, consultants and visiting speakers. Every one of them makes a contribution to our students’ development and achievement and I would like to thank each of you for your care, rigour and generosity toward our students and toward The Cass. These introductory pages are a summary of the year. They are reflective and celebratory and many things will not be noted (for which I apologise) and they are not usually used to say “goodbye”. But this year there are two colleagues leaving this summer who have dedicated so much of their working lives to the enabling of The Cass students’ learning and practice and their development as artists, designers and architects, that it is really important that they are recorded. David Hobson, who leaves after 44 years working in the School and its predecessors and the last 27 in Foundation, and Mick Williamson, leaving after 46 years, whose camera has followed us all and whose passion established the basis for Photography at The Cass. Thank you both for everything you have done. Within The Cass there are key teams of colleagues who are too often unsung in the work they do and the benefits they bring to the School are not always seen or appreciated.

Introduction


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001 An architecture studio. 002 and 003 Celebration Week 004 The Cass Summer Show. 005 A fashion studio.

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I would especially like to thank all our wonderful technical team at Cass Works, led by Marcus Bowerman, without whose patience and support for students so much of the work you see could not have been produced. Our highly effective administrative team, from which colleagues have moved on and new faces arrived, Adam, Mursheda, Levent, Stuart, Francesca and Anna, and allied to that Maeva and Julie who drive forward the richness of our short course programme; the wonderfully dedicated academic tutor team, Elaine, Jon, Emma and John, led by Cecile Tschirhart, who support so many students through their studies and manage the student success coaches; The Cass Projects Office, managed by Anne Markey, supporting student employability, collaborations and partnerships and our longstanding live projects provision that engages so many students and for which Jen Ng is an indefatigable lynchpin. Also based there is our graduate intern, Maria Klimko, who has produced posters, invitations and brochures to support and publicise The Cass events all year. And finally to the work of Michael Upton, our public face of student recruitment but who also maintains such support to the School via Twitter and in the production of the yearbook. In this, critically, Dawn, Kate, Miguel and Demetria, in taking on the mantle of attempting to gently manoeuvre the 100+ authors and contributors to the yearbook so that Turnbull Grey, our yearbook designers, had a chance of getting this published on time.

Andy Stone Head of School The Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design July 2018

Introduction


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art Fine Art


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One: The Subjective Eye Two: Beyond the Surface Three: The Hole in the Screen Four: Open Field Five: I Love Painting Things Six: Making the Stone Stony

Courses Fashion Photography Fine Art Painting Photography Master of Fine Arts

fine art

Studios

Previous page: Gretel Warner Studio 5 xxx This page: Adele Lazzeri Studio 6

Fine Art


fine art overview Rosemarie McGoldrick Head of Fine Art

The cluster of courses that include Fine Art, Painting and Photography was rated fourth in the UK out of 66 art schools by The Guardian’s 2019 university subject league table for Art. This was after climbing from 66th position three years ago, 32nd place two years ago and 19th last year. The first-year students were prolific, passing through a ‘carousel’ of six art media project workshops. We had five strong senior studios. In art, these emphasised socially engaged painting, screen and environmental 3D work. Photography had a good year, with a very strong showing in the annual Owen Rowley Prizes. For the first time, a photography studio took an approach that accommodated commercial strengths. There’s been a major resurgence of work in clay, with discoveries and explorations that rate with any art school in the country – something to watch. We had residential fieldtrips to Berlin, Paris, Zagreb and the Portland Sculpture and Quarry Trust. The Open Field programme of artist residencies with its talks and workshops provided powerful workrelated learning opportunities for all. At the same time, Professor Patrick Brill (aka the artist Bob and Roberta Smith) collaborated at length with the world-famous curator Nicolas Bourriaud at MoCo’s La Panacee gallery in Montpellier, France. Finally, the Photography BA course leader Mick Williamson retires this year after 46 years at The Cass. We wish Mick all the best. To lead that course to new successes, James Cant now joins us from Norwich University of the Arts.

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001 Ava Yusuf, 2018, Studio 1. 002 Fletcher Downie, Studio 6.

Fine Art


studio one the subjective eye

001 Charlotte Rolfe, 2018. 002 Basma Musaad, 2018. 003 Matthew R Terry, Languor, 2018. 004 Beatrice Moltani. 005 Unwanted, Evelina Sarupiciute, 2018. 006 Christiano Takatsch.

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Studio leaders: Mick Williamson and Ania Dabrowska Focusing on fine art photography in a professional context, this studio offered students a programme of talks, critiques, individual tutorials, exhibition visits, critical seminars and practical production workshops. The studio’s theme pointed to a critical questioning of the production of meaning: how the construction of images by artists is driven by cultural, political and social forces, how their artworks can affect these frameworks, and to a triangular relationship that exists between the subject of photographs, the author and the audience, which is the key to understanding the meaning of photographic works.

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Fine Art


studio two beyond the surface

001 Alvaro Gimenez. 002 Zsuzsanna Palmai. 003 Asia Walecka. 004 Emilia Joye. 005 Jary Villanueva.

Studio leaders: Paola Leonardi and Heather McDonough A field trip to Paris Photo in autumn promoted research into exhibition practices and photobooks, whilst a trip to The Photography Show (Birmingham) in spring helped students to research professional developments in photographic equipment as well as professional standards of presentation, printing and displaying. Students also took part in the organisation of the exhibition The Hidden Heroine, presented as part of Women’s History Month.

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The studio was carefully planned to support artistic practice whilst promoting employability, and through seminars and practical exercises, covered topics such as website production, self-employment, invoicing and business plans. Students gained valuable work experiences, such as internships with companies such as Creative Locations and Espero Studio, or participation in The Brady Club. Others assisted professional photographers in the fields of fashion, editorial and product photography or developed entrepreneurial skills by starting their own companies or working self-employed on commissions, shooting fashion lookbooks, video production and event photography. 002

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Fine Art


studio three the hole in the screen

001 Raisa Watkiss 2, 2018. 002 Toby Tobias. 003 Adam Oczkowicz, Untitled, 2018, multimedia installation. 004 Rowan Gatherer, Landscapes, 2018, tetraptych, oil on canvas. 001

Studio leaders: Patrick Ward and Jonathan Whitehall We kicked off the year with a field trip to Berlin as the studio descended on the Martin-Gropius-Bau for the epic video installations of Ed Atkins, and over to the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein for the Harun Farocki retrospective. During this year’s Celebration Week, Level 6 students had the opportunity to present their works-in-progress to renowned gallerists Amanda Wilkinson and Robin Klassnik. 002

In April, students Lea Barre, Ryan Rasco, Emeline Dias and Lydia Abbot joined the Zagreb/London Exchange, collaborating with students from the Zagreb Academy of Art, Croatia, on a number of projects across both cities. In May, Raisa Watkiss instigated the Weird Garden one-night The Cass take-over for an evening of experimental music, sound art and performance. Many students exhibited independently and professionally throughout the year including Merlin Massara at Dzialdov, Berlin; Adam Oczkowicz, Toby Kidd and Hamed Faramarziha at Gallery 46, London; Lewis Baxter at Paper, Manchester and C4D, London and Rhys Laird at The Spanish City, Whitley Bay.

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studio four open field 001 Research and Experiments, Chooc Ly Tan. 002 Chooc Ly Tan, Open Field residency. 003 Will Peck and Smári Róbertsson, workshop for Open Field, October 2017. 004 Jamie Jenkinson, Video Walk workshop for Open Field, November 2017. 005 Bethan Hughes, Open Field residency. 001

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Studio leaders: Ben Cain and Janette Parris Unique among UK art courses, Open Field is a work-related learning initiative run by Ben Cain for insight into how artists ‘practice’. Students observed and shared in resident artists’ working processes, the theoretical and practical development of their work and its contextual hinterland. Students had the unique opportunity to learn about professional art practice via first-hand experience. A small group of students were assigned to each residency period. They worked as artist’s assistants, took part in the programme alongside their regular studio work and helped to organise Open Field events. Artist residents during 2017/18 were: Smári Róbertsson and Will Peck; Jamie Jenkinson; Bethan Hughes; the Women of Colour Index Reading Group; Matthew Smith and Chooc Ly Tan.

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Fine Art


studio five I love painting things

001 Tedi Lena, The Homeless Man and the Toddler, oil on canvas. 002 Aimee Nicholls, 2018. 003 Tedi Lena, Untitled 2, 2018.

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Studio leaders: Bob and Roberta Smith, Andrea Medjesi-Jones An amazing year. Interesting people make interesting art, people with stories to show us the times we live in. Methods and materials workshops developed a sense of shared ownership of processes. We had days of finding colour, painting portraits and getting lost in dark corners. The concept was that paintings are ‘things’, as well as depicting ‘things’. What actually happened was that students sewed canvasses about politicians clamping down on migration. Celebrated musicians of colour. Made prints about African crafts and western prejudices. Created networks of colour and field surface. Built strong images of women inspired by 100 years of suffrage and #MeToo. Ripped up what painting was and replaced it with powerful works reflecting socially engaged vanguardist attitudes.

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studio six making the stone stony

001 Simone Maier. 002 Jadine Lambert. 003 Simone Maier. 004 Fletcher Downie. 005 Peter Trnkus.

Studio leaders: Rosemarie McGoldrick and Peter Fillingham This Fine Art studio set out to explore what Iris Murdoch once called “the thingy world”, in which objects must be allowed to have “all a life and being of their own, and friendliness, and rights”. It’s in such a spirit of companionship that the Making the Stone Stony studio acknowledged how our relationship with objects alters, once we think of them as things. And that’s when the stuff of an art studio (wood, paint, stone, metal and clay) gets a life again, dons its glad rags to sashay back in through an art school’s doors.

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We studied particularly in three dimensions and looked for art research material in Bill Brown’s introduction to Thing Theory, backed up by readings of Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter and Aldo Leopold’s Thinking Like a Mountain. We worked out how objects might become things when they matter to us more subjectively, especially when they don’t do what they are supposed to, but go wrong, and in particular how the objects we make may have eco-political agency in this anthropocene era. 002

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Fine Art


master of fine arts 001 Jenny Nash, Parted, Vanished, The Beautiful Paradox, 2017.

The new professional practice master's course, Fine Arts MFA got off to a strong start in 2017 – 18, with three postgraduate students (Alison Anderson, Steven Bennett and Jenny Nash) taught by the artist Galia Kollectiv. There were first outings for new modules aimed at artist audience-building – Sustainable Practice and Networking – deliberately designed to foster and establish professional digital footprints and core relationships that then last in a long and sustainable way well beyond the course itself. Sharing the wonderful rooftop space on the top floor of Small Annexe with its sister course, the Art and Design research master's MA by Project, Fine Arts MFA moves on now to a year of Project Development and the final summer Project as Professional Practice with the tutors Galia Kollectiv, Jonathan Whitehall, Rosemarie McGoldrick and Nicolas de Oliveira.

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Theatre and Film Theatre and Performance Practice

theatre arts

Courses

Theatre Arts


Theatre Arts, consisting of Theatre and Performance Practice and Theatre and Film (and a collaborative award in Theatre and Film Production Design with Subject Area Design), provides innovative training in acting and performance, production, directing, dramaturgy, and writing. Our award-winning graduates work across theatre, television and film. In the 2016 Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey, 100% of Theatre and Performance Practice graduates reported that they were in work or further study six months after completing the programme.

Overview

This year students have continued to benefit from our ‘learning through doing’ approach to developing new artists, and have enjoyed a huge range of workshops and talks with visiting professionals, work placements, and opportunities for public sharing of their work.

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Students in the first year have shown immense growth in all areas of their learning. Some have developed their acting skills through intensive work on monologues, scene study, training in voice and movement, and performed in many film and theatre projects led by fellow students. Others have also created their own original film, theatre and dance pieces and showcased exciting new design skills they’ve developed through a number of exhibitions at the University. Second-year students have enjoyed even more specialisation, with the chance to take modules in directing, dramaturgy, choreography and producing, in addition to subjects such as acting, and film and television production. This has brought them


into contact with some of the country’s most important companies and theatres, including Complicité, the National Theatre, Royal Court, Cirque du Soleil, and many others. Some students created original films that were shown in a mysterious, disused boiler house, whilst others were involved in producing and acting in adaptations of Macbeth and Juliet of the Spirits. Many second-year students also performed original choreography at Conway Hall and in an innovative new dance film.

Theatre, Skewbald Company, Michael Knight Theatre, The Strongbox, Move the World, and MAD Trust. An additional feature this year was the integration of peer-led events, curated directly by the students and including training activities and readings. Outside of the academic year, our international collaborations last summer included intensives and performances at Istituto Teatrale Europeo in Rome, Crisis Art Festival in Arezzo and the International Shakespeare Festival in Gdansk.

In the third year, students created a series of original pieces and shared these with the public, including their graduation festival, New Beginnings: A Festival of Remix and Revolutions at the Chelsea Theatre. They also exhibited installation projects, led workshops and performed at schools across London, generated portfolios of their own scripts, and practised the skills required to be producers.

Dr Jane Turner led second-year students of the Choreographing Performance module in the creation of a short film with London Met videographer James Allen. SWARM makes connection between bees, their self-organising patterning ‘waggle’ dances and students’ own similarly organised dance practice. The Holloway Road Tower Building hosts bees in hives on its roof and finding interconnections in creative patterning behaviour inspired whilst also contributing to environmental health, and the film highlights the synergy with sensing bodies dancing together.

Students across all years continued to benefit from Making a Living and Welcome Weeks and our weekly Industry Programme that has been busier than ever this year. This featured a range of guest talks and masterclasses, every Thursday afternoon. Highlights this year included a talk by Complicité associate artist and award-winning writer Richard Katz and artist Takaya Fujii visiting from Japan, guest workshops and sharings by professional companies including Odd Eyes

Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso Course leader, Theatre and Film Rishi Trikha Course leader, Theatre and Performance Practice

Theatre Arts


Productions

The second year in Theatre and Performance Practice culminated in a production performed on campus to the public. This project was an opportunity for students to develop a range of skills and was designed to model a professional process. Students acted as a company, with their tutor functioning as director, and were assigned a range of roles, both onstage and backstage. Together with the stage characters they were cast in roles for costume, set props, marketing, rehearsal management, stage management and dramaturgy. This year, the productions were led by directors and senior lecturers Christopher Holt and Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso, in collaboration with production manager Jelmer Tuinstra. Christopher Holt directed his company in Power is Cold, an adaptation of Heiner Muller’s Macbeth; a potent exploration of power and its abuse, the piece also made a poignant comment on gender identity with an all-female cast. The theme of adaptation continued in Jacek Ludwig Scarso’s staging of Federico Fellini’s Juliet of the Spirits. The film, which encapsulates Fellini’s theatrical aesthetics, was conveyed as a live performance through a multidisciplinary and highly visual staging, inventively re-imagining our Holloway campus theatre studio. Alongside the Theatre and Performance Practice productions, Jelmer Tuinstra directed an itinerant staging of Strindberg’s A Dream Play, in the atmospheric spaces of our disused Boiler House in our Holloway campus. Opening with a secret message for the audience found in a temporary weblink, the staging featured Skype conversations, live camera feeds, video projections and voice-overs integrated with live performance, in an enticing reimagining of the play’s oneiric imagery.

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Students acted as a company, with their tutor functioning as director, and were assigned a range of roles, both onstage and backstage.

Images from Juliet of the Spirits, a second-year production directed by J L Scarso, Theatre Studio TMG-65, Holloway campus.

Theatre Arts


Below Images from In the Dust of Things Unsettled, exhibition of installations at the Atrium, Aldgate campus. Opposite Images from New Beginnings: A Festival of Remix and Revolutions, original student performances presented at London’s Chelsea Theatre.

Installation and Site

Installation and Site is a studio exploring the blurred borderlines between theatre, film and fine art. The students investigated a range of methods to conceive original work across live, digital and object-based installation art. This year, our programme included off-site research trips at Tate Modern, Somerset House, the V&A, Gallery 180 The Strand, as well as a special collaboration with Whitechapel Gallery, where the students had access to the Gallery’s archives on the occasion of the Performa retrospective exhibition. Through these experiences, students developed a range of responses to site across media. The outcome of their discoveries was presented in the form of an exhibition titled In the Dust of Things Unsettled, a collection of works exploring displaced identities, fleeting memories and impermanent existence. From a gingerbread installation inspired by the need for social housing in the city to a durational performance inspired by a Finnish epic story, the pieces gave the students an opportunity to develop their individual artistic visions and communicate these to the public attending the show. The exhibition was designed to be presented in two consecutive events, set in contrasting environments: the Atrium Gallery in Aldgate and the Boiler House on Holloway Road. This experience was intended to challenge the students in re-imagining the same work in response to different site aesthetics: an experiment that we look forward to continuing in the future.

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Festival

The third-year Festival studio is the confluence point of all different areas of the programme. Students work in companies to perform, write, direct, choreograph, design and produce their own original pieces around a theme set by their tutor. Performances are presented at a London venue to a paying audience that can include agents, theatre programmers and producers. The 2018 festival was called New Beginnings: A Festival of Remix and Revolutions, and was presented at the Chelsea Theatre. It consisted of pieces as diverse as the course itself; there were textdriven narrative plays in a variety of theatrical styles, as well as site-responsive work, an installation and a dance piece. The festival gives students a chance to consolidate and apply their learning in a professional setting, and to give full voice to their unique artistic interests and identities. It also brings together The Cass Theatre Arts community in its entirety, as students from the first and second years are deeply involved in helping their third-year colleagues to bring their ideas to fruition. There were some truly dazzling pieces in this year’s festival, which our young artists may continue performing after graduation in the companies that they have established on the course.

Theatre Arts


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Creative Writing and English Literature English Literature Creative, Digital and Professional Writing

Anthology II, a collaboration between English Literature and Creative Writing students and Visual Communication students.

english and creative writing

Courses

English and Creative Writing


Below: White Noise (Torn face revealing skulls) illustration by Caleb James, text by Ciaran Bankwalla Opposite: Frank O’Hara Illustration by Hubert Windal, text by Ciaran Bankwalla

Our degrees cover contemporary and historical literature from Romantic poetry and Victorian novels to children’s literature, performance poetry, science fiction and page-to-screen adaptations. Our students learn about literature and other art forms, national and international culture and politics, and the relationship between literature, publishing and technology, philosophy and religion, and environment and place.

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Overview

In a dedicated year-long module on the publishing industry we invite celebrated writers and guest speakers from major publishing institutions to help students understand the process of taking a manuscript from author to printed book and beyond, into prize structures, rights fairs and literary festivals. Our aim is for students to graduate with a confident sense of how the publishing industry works and a clear idea of where in the industry they might want to work. Our modules focus not only on individual creative practice and critical skills but on a lively intellectual engagement with literary history, theory and contemporary production. Students learn to place their creative output in context and actively engage with wider debates about publishing and the place of literature in today’s world. We also help students develop the technical aspects of writing – editing, grammar, punctuation – in a shame-free environment, enabling them to write fluently and confidently in a variety of genres, including creative nonfiction, and to deepen their understanding of different cultural and literary forms.

Central to everything we do is a love of literature and a thorough and wide-ranging discussion of what it means to be a reader and writer today. Creative writing workshops are tutor-led opportunities where students learn to present their creative work, to offer and receive feedback, and develop creative, intellectual and technical skills. Workshops form an essential part of developing creative practice. English literature classes typically consist of lectures and discussion seminars, mixed with student presentations and opportunities to work on critical or creative assignments and projects. This year undergraduate students met former student Emily Critchley, who read from her first novel Notes on My Family, The Times Children’s Book of the Week as we go to press, and which the paper calls an “exceptional young adult/crossover debut” and a “compelling, sharply observed story of a family in crisis told, in an understated narrative voice reminiscent of Mark Haddon or Harper Lee.” Students visited the London Book Fair, one of the world’s largest literary rights acquisition fairs, and through collaboration with Sarah Wasley from Granta Books also

English and Creative Writing


… they’ve learned that in the feature every word counts – clunky expression and baggy ideas must be ruthlessly edited out. visited CPI Printers in Kent to understand the book production process. Students met Jon Gray, celebrated book cover designer, Matthew Plampin (pictured), historical novelist and art historian, Nikesh Shukla, novelist, journalist, editor, agent and literary innovator, and Liz Vater, founder of the Stoke Newington Literary Festival, where many students volunteered. Students also worked with author Rachel Lichtenstein on an archive project that will make the history of Sandys Row Synagogue and its past congregations available to the public in online form, and visited the Guildhall Library and Archive to understand digital archival research and see original publications from the time of the Great Plague and Great Fire. We also visited London’s many thriving cultural venues, such as Tate Britain and Tate Modern, The Globe Theatre, the V&A Museum of Childhood, and Poetry Unplugged at the Poetry Cafe. At postgraduate level, we’ve had a very diverse cohort of students over the past year – they’ve come to us from the UK, of course, but also the US, Kuwait, Georgia and Balochistan; from families originating in Albania and Jamaica – and how well they’ve gelled. They’ve wrestled with how to write the ‘other’ and how to depict the self, how to re-configure narrative so that it makes full use of the distinctive features of digital platforms like Twine – and how to tell a story through dialogue in scripts that meet professional standards. They’ve imagined the lives of foundlings based on the poignant objects in the Foundling Museum, have pondered the challenges of writing about painful personal experiences with guest lecturer and memoirist Cathy Rentzenbrink, author of The Last Act of Love, and explored the potential of digital fiction with the writer and digital strategist Chris Meade.

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They’ve also had to think seriously about how to pitch their ideas and get published on websites, in newspapers and magazines as they’ve learned that in the feature every word counts – clunky expression and baggy ideas must be ruthlessly edited out. For what distinguishes the Creative, Digital and Professional Writing MA – and is attracting students from all over the world – is this twin focus on developing students’ creative abilities and at the same time enhancing those professional writing and editing skills that will get them employed. And employed they become. Among alumni are Steve Casey, now a storyliner for the BBC TV soap EastEnders; Marian Broderick, author of the hugely popular Wild Irish Women, who is following it up this summer with Bold, Brilliant and Bad; and our brilliant student rep, Erin Ebert, who’s landed a global strategy post at eBay to begin after she’s completed her MA later this year. In her piece for the Creative Non-Fiction module, Imogen Stead didn’t just describe Vivienne Westwood’s red shoes, she became them. Trevor Norris Course leader, Creative Writing and English Literature Anne Karpf Course leader, Creative, Digital and Professional Writing


HIS To be sure he will show you at some point and leave it trailing amid the confusion like a lost child dropping breadcrumbs. Like a certain kind of naive, bad piece of art that makes you want to stare harder. It will spark a blaze that will entice you to reside, gridlock, patterns of urgency. Insignificant fog strangles his breath. He smirks, observing you examining him. He interprets your yesterday for you and makes remarks about the ways people consume one another. Some things continue for years without discussion. He shepherds your hold under sheets of pressure, shows you the damage. Waving it in front of you, he’ll pretend it’s yours alone.

Amy Melley Creative Writing BA, ‘Poems for Her’, Moderns to Contemporaries

SAY YOU’LL BE THERE Baby, you blasted into my life like a rocket and planted something at the root. A new monarchy, female, convicted with being everything and nothing for the time; obvious fools to men, belonging to us. See, Kathy likes these girls. Now, their tornado has dwindled like water down a drain making room for new storms. Awakening a rhythm from ocean to ocean, plots develop into fields of pouts and bare midriffs; sprouting before dawn full of doubt. They aroused a rage that I wasn’t aware of then. Perfect for an adventure on a midnight train, hire as ‘mistress-secretary’, shred by shred, groping catching, manufactured originals, whispers like seashells held to my eardrum. Still relish in the remains, peeled back to our younger selves, we had such pure intense desire to transform.

English and Creative Writing


‘The protagonist argues with herself and the conceptualized subject of her project, which is Dick, over what she wishes she was, what she is expected to be and what she actually is. She documents thereby her internal turmoil as a woman during the end of her marriage and a one-sided affair, imagining scenarios of confrontation and attempting to justify herself. This is the central drama of the book: Chris is infatuated with the idea of Dick, obsessing over him at first with Sylvère. Together they devise the concept of an art project, conducting letter writing and attempting to get Dick involved in order to publish consensually. When Dick becomes unresponsive, however, Chris’s fixation with her notion of him does not diminish and she questions more intently her relationship with him and through that the existential place of a woman in the art world. She attempts to formulate her relationship to both men in her life in one of her letters: ‘I got together with Sylvère because I saw how I could help him get his life together. I’m drawn to you, ‘cause I see how you can help me take my life apart…’ (Kraus 116) In this she admits that her relationship with Sylvère was not initially about her needs, but similarly to her fascination with Dick, it was about her understanding of his mind. Through Dick, she attempts to understand herself in a manner that she was unable to with Sylvère. In both relationships she doubts her own femininity, or rather her performance thereof. The book is essentially a postmodern study and enactment of female despondency.’ Anna Kremer English Literature BA, ‘Performing the Self in I Love Dick’, Moderns to Contemporaries

Janet Barnett Creative Writing BA, ‘We’re done’, Moderns to Contemporaries

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‘sedately we assemble ourselves into a circle, we measure each other up and down, from left to right, young, old, men, women, children, the gradient shades of brown and black: burnt, cocoa, singed mottled blue, red and gangrene, our differences, making us all the same, PAIN, the pain and sorrow has no pleasant division, kicked, punched, whipped, chained, bound, beaten to near last breath, ripped away, pulled away, ripped apart, pulled apart, we all feel it all the same, the hard labour we all must endure, soiled rags, rotten rags, barely covering skin, her skin, his skin, our skin, barely covering his dignity, her dignity, our dignity, “Does anybody hear me” I bawl cradling myself, jerking, jerking, “Yes, me child” an elder woman weeps swaying holding up her frail arms to the skies, in the still of the night, the dim light illuminates, casting shadows around the room, the body what was a body is intertwined together with… – it’s easy to see where the body began and the other ended, ‘if I can’t have you no one can’, blood boiling screams of pain, cries of agony, sighs of relief, of justice, of peace, screams of anger, of joy, of more pain, cannot be heard as Rob and his body do not suffer a horrific ordeal, his mind is full of his future it is not going into shock, his membranes are reforming regenerating, the tissues and cells are fusing together to make him whole, his flesh is not bubbling, it’s not popping like fresh popping

The Cass Session

corn, his skin isn’t crackling like rind in the oven, there’s no putrid smell in the room, his epidermis is unharmed untouched unsinged undissolved, Rob’s not feeling burning sensations over his face over his hands, he’s not trying to protect his body as the liquid cascades from the spillage, not over him, his face his body and the bed, dashing back into the empty glass making it full again, the hand recoils away from the bedside table she’s not standing over him, there’s no look in her eyes, she’s not thinking so intently not making her jaw jut outwards, he’s not laying down soundly resting after an attack, there’s no deep uninvited unwelcome gaze on her face, she isn’t there, there’s no trace, the insipid puce wine hasn’t been spilt it’s floating back into the glass back into the bottle the silver rewinds the cork intact, Rob’s not pondering touching her, he doesn’t have to put his arms around her to give comfort, she’s not starting to cry and cry the tracks aren’t forming on her face, Rob’s not standing at the bottom of the unfamiliar stairs that once were very familiar, he doesn’t go up the stairs, he has no thoughts for the things left behind, he’s not there to collect anything, his phone isn’t showing her number he doesn’t answer it, his phone isn’t showing private number, he doesn’t answer it, he didn’t change his number, he doesn’t answer her calls, he didn’t answer her call ‘We’re done’.


The poet’s task is to use language to “ceaselessly gather the honey of the visible” and “store it up into the great golden beehive of the Invisible”; language has the power to carry visible things into “its realm of invisibility” (Phelan, 2010, p.184). The angels in Rilke’s Elegies are described as “pollen of blossoming godhead” (Rilke, 1923, II: 12), “spaces of being” and “shields of felicity” (Rilke, 1923, II: 14) – through the poet’s ability for “linguistic alchemy” (Komar, 2010, p.91), the physical and the abstract are joined together thus creating gaps and paradoxes that point to a description of transcendence, “to a bliss beyond the fiddle” (Rilke, 1923, IX: 63). The poet has the ability to work on the gap between reader and writer and between things and words, creating precious absences that help us transcend into a realm of infinite possibility. Yet Rilke does not only acknowledge language’s power of ambiguity and indeterminacy and the way it can allow mortals to get a glimpse of the angelic realm. What is at the beginning of the first elegy a desperate and unanswered call to the angels becomes the establishment of an individual voice that speaks from the earth and for the earth. As we progress through the poems, we notice a shift “toward a geocentric and anthropocentric poetics based on immanence rather than transcendence” (Komar, 2010, p.90). From the Seventh Elegy onwards, Rilke’s elegies change course and reverse from a struggle towards angelic transcendence to a return to the earth, and an acceptance of human limits which becomes a praise of human shortcomings. “Earth, you darling, I will!” (Rilke, 1923, IX: 72) is the remarkable exclamation at the end of the Ninth Elegy; the poet discovers that he can celebrate the physical world just as much as he can praise the angel. When we get to the Ninth Elegy it is not the human that looks up to the angel but the angel that has to learn from the human, who can tell him things of the earth through language; the poet unveils our human ability to “tell [the angel the] things” of the world (Rilke, 1923, IX: 58.

Maddalena Eccher English Literature BA, ‘R M Rilke and the beehive of the invisible’, Why Literature Matters

‘The omnipresence of television in White Noise is echoed in the disembodied random electronic voices and list of brand names the children repeat in their sleep. Engulfed in video screen and mediascape, they experience an unstoppable flux of signifiers, an ‘ecstasy of communication’ (Baudrillard, Selected Writings, 577) that destroys the structure of meaning and their ability to imagine an alternative world. This continuous transmission displaces their alienation and anxiety allowing new forms of self-experience: a euphoria and dispersal of the self not only into communicational promiscuity but also a consumerist ideology. The supermarket seems to function as pivot in Blacksmith – as it could be anywhere else in America. It is the central meeting place, a new self-contained, timeless agora. The city shows signs of neglect but the only supermarket improves. It is no surprise that the novel ends there, in the plenitude of shelved products and customers moving between the radiation of the scanners and the waves of the screens. The supermarket becomes the place where people satisfy their needs and the safe harbour where individuals reaffirm their identity with the acquisition of goods. Jack shops at the supermarket and contemplates his Kierkegaardian ‘fear and trembling’ towards death while Murray enthusiastically celebrates shopping as a contemporary religious rite.’ Federica Morgillo Creative Writing and English Literature BA, ‘Don DeLillo’s White Noise’, Why Literature Matters

English and Creative Writing


‘The moon is gone and I can hear something drop through my letterbox. There are more cigarettes, and now the letters of condolences are beginning to arrive. I open them and walk out into my garden. I want to see the sky change, from dark to orange light, and with my head tilted to the silhouette of the moon, I remember him telling me about Venus. Venus breaks all the rules we believe in, all the laws we abide by here. It rotates in the opposite direction, the Sun rising in the west, setting in the east, and those rotations are slow and thoughtful. This means that, if you were to find yourself on Venus, you would be able to walk faster than those rotations, keeping both the slow sunrise and the slow sunset in front of you and behind you. You would be able to know what was coming at all times. You could always dwell in the light, and run away from the darkness. And then he would say that Venus is the planet with the most clouds. You would have to be lucky to see the sun. There is a rustling coming from the alleyway. I open the side door and there is a bin-man, going through the black bags that should have been taken away. He tells me he can’t take all of this. He tells me the records are not recyclable. They have no afterlife to look forward to. He says goodbye and I bring the records inside.’ Joshua Derraji Creative Writing and English Literature BA, ‘The Water’s Slow’, Why Literature Matters

‘‘He is a good man’, she repeated. A young man wearing a sandwich board with angry looking words on it stood on the other side of the street. He was selling newspapers to passers-by. Suddenly Braine felt a wave of grief wash over her, nearly drowning her. There in the middle of the Whitechapel Road, amongst the vendors and carriages and motor-cars and omnibuses and bicycles and pedestrians which were appearing at an alarming rate, she stopped. Yes, it was like waves. She remembered Solomon’s warm voice as he read her the news by the fire in their tiny kitchen; he had always waited to be home to read it to her after his long day at work; after the children were in bed and dinner was finished. He would stop to show her the pictures or photographs; sometimes he would teach her a word, patiently sounding out the letters. Now she had forgotten those words, but not the warmth of his presence, the smell of his skin or the curl of his hair. When her little Zussya was learning to read, he had taken up the role; reading to her, slowly sounding out the letters for himself, faltering sometimes. She had felt then a sad pride; her children would be educated, like their father; but it was also a thing that built a wall between her and them, elevated them above her and slowly took them away from her. She knew this gesture of Zussya’s to be one of kindness, an unspoken recognition of her desolation. Her older boys were thrown head-first into roles of manhood, work and blustering strength. Her little one had understood her pain and had attempted to rebuild her broken heart through little gestures; a dish cleared from the table, a flower picked from the roadside, a reassuring squeeze from the small, warm hand he slipped into hers as they walked down the street.’ Rowan Benson English Literature BA, ‘Paths’, Literary London

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Niamh Fitzgerald Creative Writing and English Literature BA, ‘Rosita’, Literary London

‘She hadn’t thought of it before. What if they said no? Her dream hadn’t allowed her to think this far. The thick yellow snakes always came hurling out of her before the librarian could decipher what she was trying to say. A wave of nausea hit her as she pulled open the heavy door. A girl wearing pink spectacles with pink hair tips to match sat reading at the information desk. She didn’t look up, nor did she even seem aware of who entered the room. Liraz walked quietly over to the section that read ‘Fiction’. She knew the word well from Stamford Hill Library. Made-up stories and made-up people, often in made-up worlds. She stayed in the Torah section in that library, though. Her father made sure of that. Liraz felt made-up now, too, like she was back in her dream. Her nerves settled slightly when she saw that nobody she knew was around. Just herself and the sound of the librarian’s clicking pen. As she sifted through the books, fingering their spines with care, she felt the yellow snakes slowly shrivel inside her. She let titles like ‘Flossy Teacakes Fur Coat’ and ‘Lola Rose’ swill around her mouth. Pinks, greens and purples blurred in front of her. As the London morning breathed through the window, she reached for the powder-blue book on the end. She felt herself grow tall. Rosita, Rosita, Rosita – her almost, all white, rabbity cat.’

‘It is the divergence of Benjamin’s materialism from the psychic idealism of the Surrealists that makes it difficult to pin-down psychogeography to a set form. The Surrealists sought to subvert their surroundings through a ludic refusal of the rationalistic principles that dominate the modern world, and to tap into the spontaneous freedom of unconscious life, whereas Benjamin, though interested in theories of the mind, was more concerned to theorise the unconscious and privilege historical-material conditions. We must bear in mind that the work of Benjamin and the Surrealists did not aim at being ‘psychogeographical’, and that it is an umbrella term we are able to apply to their ideas. It is through the work of the Situationists that we find the term psychogeography for the first time, the definition of which becomes: ‘The study of the specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals’ (Internationale Situationniste #1). With the Situationists we find again a focus aimed towards revolutionary ends, a movement that rejected what it proclaimed as failed ideas that preceded the Second World War. The Situationists’ work sought to achieve revolutionary ends through an understanding, much like Benjamin’s, of the specific psychic effects of place. We may, however, look to a writer who enables us to relocate the stomping grounds of psychogeography from the Paris of Benjamin, the Surrealists and the Situationists to London, and who embodies both the psycho-metaphysical work of the Surrealists as well as a more materialist and demystified version of psychogeography in his later work. Perhaps the most well-known early work of Iain Sinclair is Lud Heat (1975). Merlin Coverley notes that Sinclair’s work ‘is heavily indebted both to the Surrealist drift of Breton and Aragon and to the visionary tradition of London writers’ (Coverley, 2010). In this prose poem, Sinclair writes about ley lines that converge on London’s Hawksmoor churches, and he finds through them a transcendental psychic cartography of the city, the churches becoming constellations of a reality that transcends time and place.’ Robert Jeffery English Literature BA, ‘Psychogeography then and now’, Literary London English and Creative Writing


Chadha’s film depicts the daily life of the Bakshis (Bennets), who are a traditional middle-class Indian family. In the opening scene Lalita is helping her father take care of the farming process on their land. At the same time there are interwoven cuts that show Mr Balraj (Mr Bingley), his sister Kiran Balraj (Caroline Bingley) and Darcy landing in Amritsar, in the Punjab region. Immediately, we are given a very clear representation of the characters. Mr Balraj is ecstatic to be back in his motherland. Darcy is almost repulsed by the simplicity and chaotic elements of the place. Kiran/Caroline, more accustomed to western values, mocks both; her character’s attitude appears both in the novel and throughout the film: “I was never more annoyed! The insipidity and yet the noise; the nothingness and yet the self-importance of all these people!” We then return to the Bakshi household where the mother wants her daughters to get ready for a party. Through the dialogue we learn that Mrs Bakshi is only interested in finding suitable rich husbands for her daughters, mimicking in this way the renowned opening line of the novel: “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in a want of a wife.” In its treatment of arranged marriage and other social issues, Bollywood, just as Hollywood, mostly constructs escapist narratives, and draws them in a relatively lighter way. It is not until quite recently that Bollywood has started to break down social barriers and address properly taboo issues such as mental health, addressed for example in Dear Zindagi by Gauri Shinde. Although some dislike Bride and Prejudice for being too flamboyant and part of a different tradition, others appreciate it for the way it mixes cultures and ideals to recreate original concerns. For the latter category of critics the most important characteristic is that, as Oliete-Aldea argues, Bride and Prejudice is a hybrid film that ‘deal[s] with transnational issues in terms of production, setting and thematic content.’ Chadha essentially recreates the conflict of classes and prejudices by joining Western and Eastern traditions together in the film. Ashini Fernando Creative Writing and English Literature BA, ‘Gurinder Chadha’s Bride and Prejudice’, From Page to Performance

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‘Shoes must have very high heels and platforms to put women’s beauty on a pedestal.’ (Vivienne Westwood)

A sculpture, a little piece of art to be admired. Show stopping, sexy, an object of desire. Standing tall at 9 inches, I am temptation. Can I tempt you? Put me on, put me on. I have the ability to transform you. I can elongate your legs, slim your calves and lift your bottom. Your hips will rock when you walk, you will appear vulnerable yet feminine, titillating those that watch but empowering you. Like the magical shoes in fairy tales I can offer you the chance to escape, transporting you to the life you wish you were living. Just as Cinderella left the life of drudgery and exchanged her wooden clogs for glass slippers you too shall go to the ball. Discard your worn out flats put on the ruby slippers and like Dorothy follow the yellow brick road. Don’t feel guilty, I won’t chastise you for your vanity, like Karen’s red shoes did, forcing her to dance to her death; or Snow White’s stepmother ‘made to dance in the red-hot iron shoes until she dropped to the ground dead.’ Elevating and entrapping I am a paradox constricting you whilst protecting you. I may cause you pain but will that be part of the pleasure? A reward for being punished. I am provocative and can easily arouse a man. Freud’s theory is that I am the vagina and the foot is the penis. Just be careful of those foot fetishists, they may try to steal me from you. I can turn a mousy librarian into a powerful Dominatrix – those men will surrender, you can whip, spank and punish them as much as you please! Revenge for every time they’ve looked past you and stared at the leggy blonde. I offer you luxury and status. I am the Georgian town house in Mayfair and the Porsche you cannot afford. I am the fantasy to distract you from tedium. I can trigger memories more vividly than a photo. The memento of a special occasion a preservation of the past. I am the promise of romance, excitement and adventure. I am charismatic, witty and drop dead gorgeous. I will give you more pleasure than any man can and unlike your little black dress I will always fit you and be yours forever. At £5,000 I am worth every penny. Go on I dare you! Imogen Stead Creative, Digital and Professional Writing MA, ‘Object’

English and Creative Writing


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I am also very pleased to announce that Peter St John has been promoted to Professor of Architecture and Dr Matthew Barac has been promoted to Reader in Architecture. I look forward to conversations with both of them on how we can expand and refine the relationship between research, teaching and practice which is so powerfully part of the ethos at The Cass. Our teaching staff continue to win awards, and 2017’s Unit 14 graduate Matthew Gregorowski has just been announced as one of four winners of the prestigious European 2018 Young Talent in Architecture Award (YTAA). In June 2017, we had a very successful RIBA Visiting Board and achieved the maximum five years of revalidation for our Part 1, 2 and 3 courses, without conditions or recommendations. The RIBA Visiting Board Outcome Report also gave us several commendations, which included noting of our strong ethos and spirit that cultivates constructible architecture combined with substantial social enquiry. The work showcased in this yearbook is a testament to this. I would like to thank all staff and students for developing new ways of making architecture, exploring the complexities of our towns, cities, environments and cultures, with the majority of units and studios situating their programmes in London, with other locations ranging from Nottingham and Stewartby (UK) to Kiruna (Sweden), Tarusa (Russia), Uckermark (Germany), Belmonte (Italy), Athens (Greece), Castasegna and Pontresina (Switzerland), and Cevennes and Paris (France). We are delighted that so many awardwinning practitioners, both established and emerging, continue to teach Architecture at The Cass, across all our courses. Signy Svalastoga Head of Architecture

architecture

We celebrate the first year in our new Aldgate home, and I commend all the staff and students for making a successful transition, evidenced by the very high quality and richness of work produced.

Rohullah Kazemi Foyer in Paris, White Foamboard Model, Unit 09, Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture

The CASS Sessions

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architecture

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Course Architecture (RIBA Part 1)

Rebecca Kalbfell Campus workshops, section in context, Studio 3, Architecture.

Architecture Undergraduate


first year

architecture 001 Model show and tell. 002 10 layer drawing pin-up. 003 Street installation, Furniture project. 004 Hybrid drawing. 005 Canal Section, Julia Wladysiak. 006 Street View, Luca Puzzoni. 007 Layer drawing, Michela DeSantes. 008 Clay workshop ‘drawings’. 009 Street installation, Furniture project.

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Tutors: Colin O’Sullivan and Charlotte Harris We continue to focus our attentions on making, and continued to collaborate with the wonderful designers, artists and makers at The Cass – wood and metal workers, silversmiths, jewellery designers, upholsterers, fabric designers, weavers, guitar makers and ceramicists. The processes of observing and making once again culminated in a winter exhibition in the School’s Atrium and led on to the students’ final project where they designed workshops and homes for their choice of maker. Sites located in London Fields, Vyner Street and along the Regent’s Canal provided a rich context for the year’s major project. 003

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Architecture Undergraduate


studio one the gesture of a building 001

001 Maquette after the painting The Virgin and Child Embracing,1660-85, Sassoferrato by Daniela Bello Vargas. 002 Women in a Theatre Box, about 1885-90, Hilaire-GermainEdgar Degas, Aleksandra Kuchta. 003 Precendent facade models, Tyler Summers and Simon Melizan, Konstanze Martin and Andrea Vinamagua. 004 Blackfriars Baroque, Lori Lee Fong. 005 Maquette after the painting –The Blind Beggar, 1853, Josephus Laurentius Dyckmans by Rana Al-Kolaibi. 006 View of final project from Blackfriars Bridge, Simon Melizan. 007 No.1 Poultry, James Stirling, Natasha Coenraad and Celine Delassoud. 008 Maquette with painting of Saint Clement and a Donor, late 1480’s, follower of Simon Marmion, by Simon Melizan. 009 Maquette after the painting – A woman playing the lute for two men, about 1667– 8, Gerard ter Borch and Lori Lee Fong. 010 Roof top gallery, Karla Cerovac.

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Studio leaders: Alex Bank and Sam Casswell This year the studio placed emphasis on the role of model-making as a tool to investigate the theme of building gestures. The starting point was not architecture but works of art. Gestures between figures were explored through paintings that hang in the National Gallery. Students selected a work containing between two to five figures and produced many small maquettes that attempted to capture and distil the gestures of the painted figures in a physical form. The challenge was to abstract the gestures, so they became ambiguous yet still recognisable and related to the original artwork. The resulting maquettes were open to interpretation as ensembles of buildings evoking urban relationships.

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This process of translation was free and enjoyable. It was effective in introducing the students to the studio theme and proved surprisingly useful later in the year. For many, the maquettes were a constant point of reference offering clues as to how to forge meaningful relationships between building figures – existing and proposed. Some of the final designs bear a remarkable resemblance to the maquettes in terms of the gestures they embodied, sharing similar forms, colours and poise. In the end, everything is about the relationship between things. 004

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Architecture Undergraduate


studio two after city:

assemblage, incrementalism and infrastructures

001

001 Kevin Adorni. 002 Kevin Adorni. 003 Margherita Zompa. 004 Kevin Adorni. 005 Kevin Adorni. 006 Kevin Adorni. 007 Teng Yang Yu. 008 Margherita Zompa. 009 Amadeo Martini. 010 Amadeo Martini.

Studio leaders: Colin O’Sullivan and Charlotte Harris Over half the world’s population lives in urban areas occupying just three percent of the earth’s surface. Rapid global urbanisation leaves rural regions facing an uncertain future. In our increasingly interconnected world, can re-imagined rural settlements offer a viable alternative to the inequalities of the neo-liberal city? Through a framework of participatory mapping and an incremental approach to design, students grappled with these questions through projects based in Uckermark, a rural region north of Berlin, Germany. Timeframes, economics, land pressures, and social and spatial organisation are different in rural locations, but it is these factors that offer a frame of reference in considering new forms of settlement, one that finds a balance between an existing context and twenty-first century infrastructure.

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With special thanks to: Jamie Scott Baxter, Prof Dr Gabriela B Christmann and Ralph Richter at LeibnizInstitut für Raumbezogene Sozialforschung (IRS); Daniel and Theresa at Libken, Denk und Produktionsort; the children (and adults) at Zuckermark, Wallmow, Germany; Roland Schulz, Grumsin Unesco; Keita Tajima and Sophie Roycroft, Unit H, UEL; Rob Rainbow, UEL; Mo Woowin Wong and Chris Thorn, Studio 4, CSM; Ulrike Steven and Gareth Morris, Studio 8, The Cass; Dr Paulo Moreira, Dr Jane Clossick, Adam Cheltsov, Karina Papianaite and Carlotta Conte, The Cass.

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Architecture Undergraduate


studio three crossing cultures: re-thinking campus

001 Nina Sevova. 002 Henriette Desmoures. 003 Shivani Tipari. 004 Rebecca Kabfell. 005 Filming Process, Animation/ Architecture Collaboration. 007 Belmonte Calabro, Film Screening. 008 Atchara Thongrong. 009 Zoltan Tozser. 001

Studio leaders: Sandra Denicke-Polcher and Jane McAllister We are concerned with architecture as a form of civic agency. We explored how architecture can be formed through local knowledge, social and festive practices, back-dropped by the pressures of capitalism. In the last two years, we have placed ourselves at one of these pressure points in southern Italy, the small mountain village Belmonte Calabro, which is experiencing gradual abandonment as young locals migrate north for employment, and an estranged population arrives on Italy’s coast in search for new beginnings.

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As a method of working, this live project involves undergraduate and postgraduate students, graduates, migrants, villagers and cross-school collaborations. Our students questioned whether the introduction of industry and education to the village could settle both indigenous and new populations together and ‘re-think the local’. Students explored the two architectural typologies from the local area, ‘medieval village’ and ‘suburban sprawl’, through animations and in-situ projections. Projects developed by our students sustain old expertise and initiate new skills, revive local agriculture and create new industry and employment opportunities for locals and migrants to contribute to the ‘crossing of cultures’.The students returned to Belmonte in July to share their projects, show up new opportunities for the village and actively shape local discussions.

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009

Architecture Undergraduate


studio four place for play 001 Albion Square, Zahra Salim. 002 Rotherhithe Drypoint, Rachel Buckley. 003 Bath House Entrance, Rachel Buckley. 004 Playing Field, Daniel Stilwell. 005 Threshold, Carlos Bargao. 006 Instrument, Daniel Stilwell. 007 Tolentini Gateway, Carlos Bargao. 008 Thames Stairs, Daria Fisenko.

001

Studio leaders: Anna Ludwig and Rufus Willis To play is to act free of convention and constraint and we have been speculating how the pluralism and ambiguity inherent in the phenomenon of play can help us to define territories for this magical and ingenuous spirit to inhabit and find its place in the City. The manifold connotations of play encompass the innocence and intuition of children exploring the world to the social and cultural significance of games, performance and spectacle. 003

On London’s South Bank, where the terraced landscape of the 1951 Festival of Britain has become a playground contested by skateboarders, second-hand book sellers, brutalist cultural icons and ubiquitous leisure tourism, we began with the idea of an ‘instrument’ as a construct which contains as many possibilities of usage as uses to which it is put – an instrument must be played.

002

Further downstream on the peninsula of Rotherhithe we went on to explore how play can galvanise communities by creating places that are both shared and contested through multiple and diverse inhabitations. We considered how play can shape the city at scales from the intimate to the infrastructural and our proposals responded to the interplay of three elements – Boundary, Hall and Field.

004

68

The Cass Session


005

006

008

007

Architecture Undergraduate


studio six collaborations 001 001 Existing Elevation. 002 Facade Drawing. 003 Drawing. 004 Model. 005 Drawing. 006 Untitled Extract Pages. 007 Upper Floor Plans. 008 Interior. 009 Villa Garbald. 010 Model Shot. 011 Lost in Translation.

Villa Garbald by Gottfried Semper including the restoration and extension by Miller and Maranta Existing southern elevation 1:200

002

Laret Square Facade 1:100

Facade drawings

Initial concept designs for the main building facade facing the square.

Laret Square Facade 1:100

Studio leaders: Andrew Jackson, David Leech and Martin Nässén Architecture is a product of collaboration. A conventional understanding of collaboration in architecture is that which occurs between the different actors that give life to a new building: clients, engineers and city authorities all contribute to the task of design, with the architect supplying a unique artistic vision to shape and co-ordinate these disparate voices.

003

004

70

The Cass Session

This year the students had the chance to propose projects to extend seminal existing pieces of architecture which had already in some ways been previously extended or added to. Our sites for the final projects were at Villa Garbald, Switzerland, where Miller and Maranta have extended Gottfried Semper’s villa and garden, and at Pontresina where Peter Maerkli and colleagues have worked together to create an ensemble of new apartment buildings as an intuitive extension of the town. All these buildings were themselves the products of the work of important architects separated by time and circumstance. The students’ responses to these places sought to create a new whole in which the relationships between the works, between old and new, is more important than the individual parts.


Survey Pontresina village- scale 1:200

005 006

Plan

Bedroom floor plan, main building. 1:100

007

Constellation of volumes spilling down into the valley. These additional spaces create a new entrance to the site, a restaurant with a piazza and rugged, banked garden

009

008

010

011

Facade Model

Facade concept model showing pre-cast relief and ornamental balustrades signifying the more public areas of the building. 1:20

Architecture Undergraduate


studio seven FIT: theme

and variations 001 001 Claudiu Bischescu, The Addict’s Journey, Athens. 002 Federica Ranalli, Life inside the taverna, Athens. 003 Vanessa Barsan, Proposed Elevation, Voulis Street, Athens. 004 Alyzza Valid, Proposed Elevation, Athens. 005 Claudiu Bischescu, Street Elevation, Athens. 006 Maria Shinshinova, Metaxourgio, Athens. 007 Maria Shinshinova, Casting within a structural frame. 008 Alyzza Valid, View from Keramikou Street to proposed public courtyard, Athens. 009 Alyzza Valid, View of proposed public courtyard, Athens.

Studio leaders: Robert Barnes and Bo Tang 002

As both a continuation and new departure for the Architecture of Rapid Change and Scarce Resources (ARCSR), Studio 7 based this year’s work in Athens, Greece. Building on established ARCSR teaching methods, students used hands-on techniques of measurement and construction analysis to survey some of the vast empty properties in the city centre. Along with improvised conversations with local residents, migrants and refugees, we sought to locate an economic and culturally viable design solution for one of the many problems besetting both asylum seekers and the Greek government. Drawing, sketching, photographs and models were used in the preliminary testbed project to gain understanding of the problems of urban renewal in London, and this was transferred to Athens for the main project. A collaborative fieldwork publication Civic Way Station was produced following the studio trip to Athens in November 2017.

003

Students were provided the opportunity to learn about classical architecture and Greek culture, as well as those of the refugees they met. Building on associations with nongovernment organisations and charities, as well as ‘anarchists’ currently occupying the city, Studio 7 moved closer towards a potential future live ARCSR project in Athens, supported by the Water Trust.

004

72

The Cass Session


005

006

007

008

009

Architecture Undergraduate


studio eight good growth

001 Bottle factory, concept model by Jonathan Whittaker. 002 Courtyard developments with Space Studios by Joana Santos. 003 Courtyard developments with workshops by Joana Santos. 004 Student group. 005 Livesey Library with mixeduse courtyard development by Karol Owsiany. 006 Exrotaprint in Berlin by Shakibur Ahad. 007 Bottle factory extension, new workshops by Jonathan Whittaker. 008 Bottle factory extension, new courtyard by Jonathan Whittaker. 009 Livesey Library with mixed-use courtyard development by Karol Owsiany. 001

Studio leaders: Gareth Morris and Ulrike Steven Studio 8 responded to the Mayor of London’s call to create a ‘City for All Londoners’ based on the principles of ‘good growth’ – development that is socially, environmentally and economically inclusive. Focusing on the Old Kent Road ‘opportunity area’ where 20,000 new homes are planned, the studio engaged with the challenge of bringing together high-density housing, light industrial use and communal spaces. The Old Kent Road is one of London’s oldest roads, and for well over a century it has been an area alive with industry, making and supplying the things and services that London needs. Looking behind usually closed doors, we experienced the exciting mix of industries vital to the local economy and to the wider city. By talking to local organisations and through mapping existing uses, the studio identified potential for shared spaces and explored programmes that brought together the culturally diverse communities.

002

Inspired by our study trip to Berlin, Germany, where we visited industrial courtyard developments, the studio created options for mixed-use, Old Kent Road specific courtyards that connect existing buildings and programmes with new developments.

003

74

The Cass Session


005

004

006

007

008

009

Architecture Undergraduate


studio nine public rooms, convergent spaces 001

ENTRANCE HALL

SPACES

001 Regine Po Vern Chan. 002 Yalin Hu. 003 Katarzyna Nowak, Tate Modern Study Model, photo David Grandorge. 004 Seoyoung Bae, Somerset House Study Model, photo David Grandorge. 005 Regine Po Vern Chan, Rubens House. 006 Seoyoung Bae, Somerset House Study Model, photo David Grandorge. 007 Katarzyna Nowak, Sadler’s Wells Choreographic School. 008 Yujin Kim, Sadler’s Wells Choreographic School. 009 Regine Po Vern Chan, Rubens House. 010 Regine Po Vern Chan, Detailed Perspective.

Studio leaders: Jillian Jones, Ewan Stone and David Howarth The studio’s aim was to develop equitable public rooms, educational buildings and art spaces that enable and support existing and emerging communities. We explored the typological idea of public buildings and the ways they can positively affect the context around them.

002

We began by studying the existing public rooms and cultural spaces of London through large-scale modeling, photography and drawing, collating this work into an Atlas of Institutions. At the Rubens House Museum in Antwerp, Belgium, and the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, we focused our attention on new pieces of building within historic settings, re-ordering the existing sites and developing proposals for new entrance and exhibition spaces. For the main project of the year, we based ourselves in Queens Yard, Hackney Wick, an area currently colonised by the local art community but under threat from largescale residential development. We imagined new outposts for the V&A, Sadler’s Wells and London College of Fashion, to provide cultural space for the local community as an alternative means to regenerate the city whilst promoting convergence – the process of closing the gap in performance and prospects between the wealthiest and the poorest communities in London.

003

76

The Cass Session


010

SECTION THROUGH WORKSHOPS AND GALLERY

PUBLIC ROOMS, CONVERGENT SPACES V&A HACKNEY WICK

004

005

006

007

008 PUBLIC ROOMS, CONVERGENT SPACES THE RUBENS NEW VISITOR CENTER

009

AXONOMETRIC DRAWING OF RUBENS HOUSE

Architecture Undergraduate


studio ten old, new, hot and cool

001 Despoina Papadopoulou, View from the Teacher’s Office. 002 Giorgio Amirante, Architectural Fragment. 003 Delaram Nabidoost, View from Battersea Park. 004 Genesis Adewole, Interior Perspective. 005 Giorgio Amirante, Principal Elevation. 006 Jignesh Pithadia, Elevational Study of Sir John Soane’s Stables. 007 Giorgio Amirante, A Temporary Lecture Theatre. 008 Chawki Karam, Fenestration Abstraction. 009 Hannah Kidd, Elevational Study of Embankment Gardens. 010 Kally Raouf, Courtyard Study.

001

Studio leaders: Kieran Thomas Wardle and Owain Williams This year, Studio 10 have proposed buildings which are Old, New, Hot and Cool.

002

003

Students were challenged to develop proposals for a new School of Modern History set within the historic grounds of Sir Christopher Wren’s Royal Hospital, Chelsea. Through developing a series of spatial encounters between Chelsea Pensioners, students and members of the public, a design process emerged where students looked to existing buildings as well as fragments of their own spatial inventions to develop a surprising yet contextual university building. The result was a series of architectures that look to the past to say something unexpected about the future.

004

78

Architects in the eighteenth century would travel to sites of antiquity to study ruined structures and scant remains of classical ornament, which would in turn inform their own propositional work. We began this year by building our own vocabulary of forms and spaces to establish a personal canonical practice; an iterative process of thinking, doing and reflecting on the forms our students created and the process through which we create them.

The Cass Session


005

007 006

008

010

009

Architecture Undergraduate


studio eleven well built 001 Tai Pham, Exploring Lincoln’s Inn Fields. 002 Giorgio Amirante, Architectural Fragment. 003 Jen Bailan, Laura Roberts, Raffaela Snoboda, Model of the Cripps Building. 004 Tai Pham, Structural Model. 005 Jamie Strang, Elevation study. 006 Jamie Strang, Axonometric. 007 Laura Roberts, An extension for Somerset House. 008 Syed Ahmed, Lincoln’s Inn Fields. 009 Ali Saheli, Masterplan. 010 Amrit Gurung, Wren Library Study.

001

002

Studio leaders: Edmund Fowles and Ingrid Petit This year we turned our gaze to some of the oldest institutions in the world, places that become your home for several formative years in the pursuit of ‘higher education’ – universities. We posed the simple question – how do we build well?

003

004

The most enduring universities emerged from the building form of Cistercian monasteries, such as Le Thoronet Abbey. Clusters of interconnecting quadrangles at once define a spatial and organisational logic for rooms within a college whilst contributing significantly to cities’ urban streetscape and civic qualities. Longevity does not necessarily rely upon static and unwavering edifices. Sir Alex Gorden’s popular mantra “long life, loose fit” provokes reflection on how buildings might be as generic, flexible and “loose-fitting” as possible, inviting the resourcefulness and improvisation of successive generations to impress their own ideals. The studio explored universal forms of architecture built to stand the test of time and challenged students to conceive a new University building near the Strand to house academic communities and unknown pursuits for centuries to come, embodying values of academic freedom, critical enquiry, and institutional autonomy; a building of long life and low specificity, timeless and changeful.

005

80

The Cass Session


006

007

008

010

009

Architecture Undergraduate


undergraduate architecture

technology

002

Technology modules in the undergraduate and postgraduate architecture courses equip students with a rigorous knowledge of construction, materials, sustainability and services, leading to an integrated approach to technology in final degree and diploma studio projects.

001 Making Workshop, Shingle Clad Timber Frame, Tech 2, Architecture. 002 Making Workshop Crit, Bamboo Space-Frame, Tech 2, Architecture. 003 Amadeo Martini, Structural Model, IDA, Architecture.


First year technology The Cass’s new building formed a case study to understand principles of technical drawing, structure, materials, construction, environment and services. This set of tools was summarised in a Tech Book and was used in the final project to investigate a technological question about the building. Tutors: Bo Tang, Robert Barnes, Maurice Mitchell, George Fereday, Siân Moxon, Jen Ng and Ah-Ra Kim

Second year technology The year began with the analysis of an exemplar sustainable building and its approach to environmental design, services integration and materials sourcing. This was followed by a week-long, 1:1 scale-making workshop at Mudchute City Farm. Through guided group construction exercises, students experienced first-hand the structural properties of building materials, interrogating new methods of jointing and assembly. Students produced an illustrated diary documenting their experience and related research into structures, materials and construction. In the final project, students produced technical drawings and models of recent case study buildings related to their design studio themes. Expert consultants, comprising structural engineers, landscape architects, contractors, graphic designers and architectural model makers, contributed a wide range of industry expertise.

001

Tutors: George Fereday, Siân Moxon, James Payne, Robert Barnes, Chris Hosegood, Jane McAllister, Marcus Bowerman, Maurice Mitchell and Sandra Denicke-Polcher Consultants: Neil Davidson, J & L Gibbons; Aurelien Thomas, Jestico + Whiles; Cíaran Malik, HRW Engineers; Artemis Antonopoulou, Stephen Hadley, Stephen Setford, Tom Fotheringham, Stanton Williams; David Leviatin, London Timber Frame; Aidan Hall; Ben Stuart-Smith; Odel Jeffries

003

Architecture Undergraduate


001

003

004

002

005

84

The Cass Session


Third year integrated design audit In the final year, Technology was integrated with the studio design project, beginning with a diary of research and design development covering cultural, professional, technological and sustainability considerations. A technical report was produced to explain the final design project’s approach to these issues. Students met real consultants, including structural and services engineers, and landscape architects to fully resolve their projects. Tutors: Siân Moxon, George Fereday, Robert Barnes, Angie Pascoe and David Grandorge Consultants: Aurelien Thomas, Michael Evans, Jestico + Whiles; Craig HarrisonSmith, Stanton Williams; Bronwen Gombert, Connected Architecture; Steve Caulfield, King Shaw; Neil Davidson, J & L Gibbons; Ed Tricklebank, ARUP; Sanja Buncic, Tall Engineers; Saud Muhsinovic, Fulcrum Mott MacDonald; Aran Chadwick, Atelier One

006

001 Laura Roberts, Detail Model, IDA, Architecture. 002 Francesco Salvatori, Structural Isometric Study, IDA, Architecture. 003 Making Workshop, Sweet Chestnut Shed, Tech 2, Architecture. 004 Making Workshop, Sweet Chestnut Shed, Tech 2, Architecture. 005 Regine Chan, Sustainability Diagram, IDA, Architecture. 006 Making Workshop, Sweet Chestnut Lattice, Tech 2, Architecture. 007 Rebecca Kalbfell, Section Showing Materiality, IDA, Architecture.

007

Architecture Undergraduate


86

The Cass Session


architecture

Architecture Professional Diploma in Architecture (RIBA Part 2) Examination in Professional Practice (RIBA Part 3) Architecture and Urbanism

postgraduate

Courses

Kasia Alaszewska Kiruna Winter Sports Centre Unit 03

Architecture Postgraduate


001

88

The Cass Session


unit two classicism,

modernism and architecture in the present time 001 Vyara Kuneva General arrangement. 002 Manmeet Auluck Section through auditorium. 003 Manmeet Auluck Office facade. 003

Studio leader: Tony Fretton

002

This year the studio designed three buildings in the curtilage of Somerset House, a classical pavilion in accordance with Palladio’s Four Books, an auditorium in the style of modernism and an office building in the manner of the present time. Students conducted research in pairs from a list of subjects covering classicism and modernism.

Architecture Postgraduate


001

002

005

003

004

90

The Cass Session


unit four building

laboratory / frozen timber 001 Kasia Alaszewska, Porosity and layering of urban tissue. 002 Anastasia Stan, Arctic Shelter. 003 Merethe Granhus, Scanscape. 004 Rana Rehman, Reinterpreting Campo Marzio. 005 Ashley Kirk, Sami Parliament. 006 Ben Salter, Kiruna Crematorium. 007 Ashley Kirk, Kiruna 2018. 008 Silviya Stoyanova, Composite Drawing Kiruna Masterplan.

“Cities don’t often decide to pack their bags, get up and move down the road. But that’s exactly what Kiruna, an Arctic town in northern Sweden, is having to do – to avoid being swallowed up into the earth.” (Oliver Wainwright – The Guardian).

006

The renowned plan of the arctic town Kiruna from the early twentieth century and its location is usurped by the mining operations in the world’s largest iron-ore mine. The new town plan housing the 14,000 displaced inhabitants of the town is moved 3km to the east of its current location. The unit strives for an arctic architecture adapted to both the natural landscape, the extreme climate, as well as the limited local resources. The unit deployed virtual reality as a design apparatus, permitting design experimentation using 3D painting, and modelling and compositing in first-person view free of scalar considerations.

007

Many thanks to: Francis Aish, Foster & Partners; Mark Conroy, Ben Adams Architects; Jeremy Foster, J Foster Architects; David Grunberg, D*Haus Company; Nate Kolbe, Superfusionlab; Ardi Rexhepi, KTB Architects; Henry Unterrainer, Arup. 008

Architecture Postgraduate


001

003

004

002

92

The Cass Session


unit five the

infrastructure of the street 005

001 Clara Rasines Mazo, Collective Proposals, Model Photograph. 002 Delia Scarpellino, Urban Move, Model Photograph. 003 Rengin Dogan, The Staggered Line of Sight, Model Photograph. 004 Matthieu Tate, Modularity, Model Photograph. 005 Clara Rasines Mazo, Entrance View, Model Photograph. 006 Timothy Lewis, Apartment Interior, Model Photograph. 007 Delia Scarpellino, Dwelling Interior, Model Photograph.

Studio leaders: Alex Ely, Michael Dillon and Lydia Johnson Our aim this year was to challenge the uncomfortable issue of high-density development within a rural locality outside of London. At the site of Stewartby brickworks near Bedford, we re-thought the infrastructure of the street to propose new collective urbanisms. We drew inspiration from the simple infrastructural approach to workers’ housing in Saltaire and Copenhagen, to challenge archaic forms of outer-urban development and explore ideas of communality, density and intensity. 006

Through the year, we interrogated three aspects of communal living: the porch, the dwelling and the street. From initial studies of thresholds, layering and tectonics, we challenged the perception of what a dwelling needs to be. We tested ideas of utility, privacy and spatial priority in order to define an infrastructural driver for the organisation of the home. Continuing this route of inquiry, our focus scaled from one dwelling to 100. As a collective approach, the 12 plots posed solutions to high-density in rurality, and faced up to the very real context of the UK housing crisis. By harnessing the shared benefits of high-density, we found sophisticated, playful and plausible responses to a post-industrial context for a post-London community.

007

Architecture Postgraduate


002

001

004

94

003

The Cass Session


unit six civic fit 001 Lan Milne, Anarchist Collage Athens. 002 William Whitelaw, Forest of Columns, Athens. 003 Maya Shankla, Belmonte Festival, Calabrai. 004 Geraldine Dabu,Theatre and Dance Studio, Athens. 005 Manvir Hansra, Homeliness Collage, Calabria. 006 Nastassia Ruecher, Internal Model Photo, Athens. 007 William Whitelaw, Internal Bottle Sketch, Athens. 008 Geraldine Dabu, Puppet Theatre, Karagiozis Corner, Athens.

005

Studio leaders: Professor Maurice Mitchell, Francesca Pont, Dr Bo Tang, Jane McAllister and Sandra Denicke-Polcher Students chose sites in Athens, Greece or Belmonte, Calabria, Italy: both migrant gateways where the drama of urban change is happening now, Athens the classical city is transformed into a shrinking metropolis, and Belmonte into an abandoned hill village.

006

Students used a Loose Fit approach to design interventions which gel with both things that have been made beforehand and those that might come afterwards. Avoiding demolition, removal and replacement, they have rather sought to add, transform and re-use. Named forms carry forward form from one interpretation to another, their familiarity giving confidence and homeliness, transcending time, location and scale. Schemes are performative rather than formally determined.

007

008

It seems appropriate, therefore, that Athens, where concepts of citizenship were first explored in Greek theatre, and Belmonte street festivals, should be settings where experiments with an architecture of temporary performance should strive to fit order and meaning into place at a time when familiar notions of EU citizenship are under existential threat. Students have found places of civic solidarity and sharing, trade and exchange. Moving from refugee camp to Urban Campus and People’s Palace, students have crafted jewel-like commodities, embedding them within the metabolism of the city.

Architecture Postgraduate


001

002

003

005

96

004

The Cass Session


unit seven a lean

architecture 006 007

001 Timber Translations 1:20 Models, Water Tower: Jordan Gibbs, Natasha Hayden, Joshua King, Miles Reay-Palmer. Cooling Tower: George Fenton, Kai Majithia, Tarn Philipp, Tony Powell. Gravel Mill: Tom Brownill, Anna Mason, George Mathers, Rudi Perestrelo. Grain Elevator: Urim Islami, Anna Tebble, Roshun Dehokenana. Cooling Tower: Reflected Ceiling Plan George Fenton. 002 Primary School and Social Rent Housing Sectional Isometric, Anna Tebble 003 Primary School and Social Rent Housing at Night View, Tom Brownill. 004 Housing Above School Hall Elevation, Tom Brownill. 005 Housing Winter Garden above School Hall Views, Tom Brownill. 006 Primary School Yard View, George Mathers. 007 School Facade Study Partial Elevation and Fragment, George Mathers. 008 Classrooms and Communal Hall Plan and Model Studies, George Fenton. 009 Social Rent Housing viewed from Playground Elevation, Anna Mason. 010 Social Rent Housing View, Joshua King

Studio leaders: David Grandorge and Paloma Gormley 008

This year, the unit pursued a Lean Architecture, a thesis characterised by 10 architectural and environmental tenets. This thesis was tested in the project Timber Translations. Industrial structures depicted in the ‘objective’ photographs of Bernd and Hilla Becher were re-imagined in timber and engineered timber elements, allowing students to explore languages of jointing, supporting and bridging in a single material at a large scale. This was followed by research into materials, elements and construction that has been collated in an open resource Atlas II. 009

010

The major design project for the year addressed the design of housing for social rent and a primary school on a site that forms a new edge to the Golden Lane Estate. Students determined the adjacency of school and domestic programmes, with each other and with surrounding buildings and spaces. Material, spatial and compositional strategies were enacted simultaneously, whilst design outputs were subjected to spontaneous inventions. Most importantly, the students’ projects sought to promote delight through an architecture that celebrates the infra-ordinary and everyday exchanges.

Architecture Postgraduate


001

005

003 002

98

The Cass Session


unit eight 004

midland cities II – nottingham translations 001 Ross Kirker, Night time procession. 002 Callum Bolger, Whitehall elevation and plan abstraction. 003 Louis Mayes and Ross Kirker, Nottingham canal survey drawing. 004 Nicola Blake, Civic Suburbia. 005 Existing and proposed cast models. 006 Gustag Hedburg, Hill View.

Studio leaders: Takero Shimazaki (t-sa) and Summer Islam This year Unit 8 continued to explore the design of public space, and proposed theatrical architecture as opportunities for civic renewal. Beginning with studies of Inigo Jones’ work along the Strand in London, the unit researched moments of theatre in cities, and the role of buildings as a backdrop to public activity and procession. Jones trained as a painter, was an acclaimed stage-set and costume designer, and gained renown following his appointment as Surveyor-General of the King’s works for his architecture and urbanism. His work was developed through a series of considered translations of the buildings he visited in Rome, Venice and Vicenza. We studied his built and unbuilt works, including the Covent Garden piazza, The Queen’s House, Banqueting House, and his designs for Whitehall and the Strand, and travelled in his footsteps. Our sites are within the centre of Nottingham, approached through carefully drawn survey, model-making and research. As set designers, we have designed and proposed new temporary ‘scenes’, urban public stages within the city. Public buildings, theatrical in nature, explore the dynamic relationship between the proposed architectural intervention and the collective of the city. 006

Architecture Postgraduate


001

002

003

004

100

The Cass Session

005


unit nine making urban 001 Jonathan Ramdeen, Foyer, Paris, Pencil on Paper Elevational Sketch. 002 Gabriel George, Foyer in Paris,1– 50 Second Floor Plan Study. 003 Han Wang, Foyer in Paris, 1– 50 model. 004 Joshua Kaile, Foyer in Paris, Massing models. 005 Rohullah Kazemi, Foyer in Paris, White Foamboard Model. 006 Rohullah Kazemi, Foyer in Paris, White Foamboard Model. 007 Joshua Kaile, Foyer in Paris, Textured facade model. 008 Jonathan Ramdeen, Foyer, Paris, Foam and Cherry 1– 200 Massing Study.

006

Studio leaders: Stephen Taylor and Theodoros Thysiades This year Unit 9 continued its two semester/ project structure. The first semester took us to the remote French mountains of the Cevennes National Park where the students designed a small hotel as part of an existing seventeenthcentury stone hamlet. The second semester took us to Paris where the students designed Foyer – a hostel for young people – within the heart of the city. As with the first semester, the unit focused on questions of form and composition, plan and spatial richness, and looked at how these things interact with the distinctive architectural culture of Haussmann’s urban Paris. 007

In developing building proposals for each project, the students were concerned with questions of form and composition, scale and character, material, colour and construction, all of which were at play with the distinctive historical and cultural conditions of their respective sites.

008

In preparation for the main design projects, we started the year with a short two-week photographic study entitled Building Cultures, during which students looked at specific towns and buildings across the UK, and observed and documented the way a single material has been used so resourcefully as to become the essence of a particular place.

Architecture Postgraduate


001

005

002

003

008

004

102

The Cass Session


unit ten an 006

007

architecture of relationships V 001 Muneeb, Ali Khan, Cultural Exchange. 002 Muneeb Ali Khan, Cultural Exhange. 003 Cindy Rerity, Soft Borders. 004 Junaid Ghafoor, Crafts College, model. 005 Hannah Jarvis, Science College, Site Plan. 006 Junaid Ghafoor, detail. 007 Hannah Parr, Community Workshops. 008 Lionel Giordano, Platform view.

Studio leaders: Signy Svalastoga, Jonathan Cook and Edward Simpson The location for this year’s projects was Tarusa, Kaluga Oblast, Russia, a small town south of Moscow. We collaborated with colleagues from the Moscow School of Architecture, MARCH. “Tarusa is a relatively small town in Kaluga region, little touched by industrialisation, allowing it to preserve its natural landscape and cultural heritage. The town is located on the picturesque bank of the Oka river. The beauty of the surrounding landscape turned out to be Tarusa’s main asset, which gave the town a boost in the late 1800s, attracting major painters and writers to the area. In the mid-twentieth century, many Soviet dissident authors – writers, poets, composers – found a haven there. Tarusa has preserved this cultural spirit to this day.” “The total population of Tarusa in 2016 was 9,267 people. In the summer, due to seasonal residents and tourists, the population increases about ten times.” “History, nature and the people of Tarusa made the town a rare place which escaped the rough urban intervention. Currently, there are problems of further city development. Tarusa needs a planning strategy which would allow it to preserve its values and to make the town competitive.” Narine Tyutcheva and Polina Lyslova, MARCH

Architecture Postgraduate


001

002

003

004

005

104

The Cass Session


unit twelve hotel sphinx 001 Matt Pettenden, Rostislav Pazaitov, Monika Marinova,City of the Captive Globe. 002 Anna Pizova, Omer Brener, Robert Haynes, Collage City, Digital. 003 Group, Public Rooms, Models in Balsa Paper. 004 Mirko Solinas, Carlo Grignani, Nadia Everard, Monuments Permanence. 005 Nicolo Spreafico, Luke Vouckelatou, Kontorhausviertel London, Digital. 006 Group, Clay Massing Studies, Clay. 007 Carlo Grignani, Coloured office interior, Digital. 008 Anna Pizova, Hotel suite, Digital.

006

Studio leaders: Peter St John, James Hand and Ben Speltz The unit examined London’s different conditions and the city’s potential for current reinvention. Parts of London today are undergoing a crisis of densification, entering new territory for which it has few models appropriate to its streets. Large and important areas of the city are being wasted in commercial interest, with buildings that have lost all typological basis and relationship to public space. What is the future of this? Louis Kahn’s plan for Downtown Philadelphia of 1951 speculated on such a step change in the scale and movement of the city centre, reinventing how object buildings would make a distinctive part of the city. His proposal for clusters of monumental buildings, with large public spaces between and generous interior public halls, emulated the freely disposed civic building forms of ancient Rome.

007

This year, the unit worked at Old Street Roundabout, one of the worst and most energetic examples of out-of-control commercial development in the city. We designed free-standing buildings with a civic element – hotels, university buildings and company offices for the so-called Silicon Roundabout quarter at Old Street. Our research was concentrated on the form of the city and the detailed design of the public ground floors. 008

Architecture Postgraduate


001

0

002

003

1

2m

004

View showing the communal corridor on the residential floors

Perspective Overlooking the old Western Basin of the former London Dock, now a colossal public square, the commerical office towers rising from where warehouses would once have stood.

Elevation Detail Showing the existing condition of the London Dock perimeter wall Pennington Street, Wapping Drawing s - 1:25

005

View looking over the “corridor zone� of Wapping between the Eastern cluster and Canary Wharf

106

The Cass Session


unit fourteen dis-place 001 Ensembles: Plaster Models. 002 Perspective overlooking the old Western Basin of the former London Dock. 003 London Dock perimeter wall, Pennington Street, Wapping. 004 View showing the communal corridor on the residential floors. 005 Linking eastern cluster with Canary Wharf. 006 Elevation study.

Studio leaders: Pierre d’Avoine and Pereen d’Avoine Unit 14 worked in Tower Hamlets, east London this year. We have been concerned with diaspora, displacement and the indigenous. Tower Hamlets has been subject to accelerating redevelopment this century, when the only constant has been change and flux.

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We studied the communities that live in the borough and traced their journeys into and from the East End over generations. We have been concerned with the impact of gentrification, the potential to assimilate or enjoy difference – how the social impacts on the architectural and vice-versa. We studied different building typologies within the borough – terraces, low-rise high density housing, towers – and questioned the matrix of public space in which they are situated. We visited Rome to study and compare the work of Vignola, Borromini, Libera, Moretti and others, focussing on how façade relates to section and plan, and architecture as gesamtkunstwerk. The task for the unit has been to invent scenarios that question the way in which land is procured in the city and to propose new ways of forming communities and livelihoods through intelligent design and building strategies.

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unit fifteen building society 001 Andrada Luca, Harrow Photograph. 002 Florence Fathers, Sectional Model, Photograph, Building Society. 003 Rachel Mills Powell, Facade Detail, Model Photograph. 004 Rachel Mills Powell, Precedent Study Composite Drawing. 005 Neil Cockburn, Spreefeld Housing Site Photograph. 006 Oliver Carter, Model Photograph, Building Society. 007 Alex Scally, Alexandra Road Housing Site Photography. 008 Tyler Gordon, Interior View, Collage, Building Society. 006

Studio leaders: James Binning, Ellie Howard and James Pockson In the UK, self-build has become a synonym for low-rise, small-scale domestic construction, a pleasant enough conception but one that implicitly limits self-build to a world of piecemeal anomalies. Constrained by a complex web of financial, cultural, political, and technological barriers, self-build accounts for less than a tenth of the UK’s annual housebuilding compared to Europe, where it is as much as 80 percent.

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Unit 15 sought to redefine the terms of the self-build movement in Britain, exploring self-build as a powerful economic and urban alternative to developer-driven housing. We worked across the London Borough of Harrow, with projects addressing the brief from scales intimate and domestic, up to the strategic reuse of the former Kodak Factory site. Projects began with a critical and speculative scenario, interrogating the potential for alternative models of development. From there we zoomed into site-specific proposals with the potential to become prototypical models of the future. Through combining rigorous architectural research with a multidisciplinary programme of writing, critical thinking, drawing and visual communication, we developed our ability to seduce and persuade a broad audience, taking our ideas beyond the confines of the crit space.

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Moscow Architecture School MARCH

001 Alena Katkasova, Rethinking Plastic, Studio MA2. 002 Peter Kornishin, Ontology of Home, Studio MA2. 003 Alena Katkasova, Rethinking Plastic, Studio MA2. 004 Artemy Kondon, Arkadia, Studio BA2. 005 Peter Kornishin, Ontology of Home, Studio MA2. 006 Arkadi Ioselevich, Fermata (detail), Studio BA3.

Moscow Architecture School (MARCH) is a sister organisation of The Cass, which offers London Met validated courses in architecture and urbanism at undergraduate and postgraduate levels at its campus in Moscow. MARCH attracts attention across Russia and internationally. Its students’ projects show a maturity in approach, a playful experimentalism and refined execution across the studios. Second-year BA students used the theme of Arkadia, to find and fix ‘ruptures’ in the urban fabric by projecting an idyllic, heavenly landscape, and discovered a set of new programmes through animation, inhabitation and proposition, led by Nadezhda KorbutSmirnova, Anton Petukhov, Maria Kurkova, Daria Gerasimova and Anton Timofeev. The third-year BA studio looked at the idea of periphery, through the eyes of an idealistic architect, led by Ruben Arakelyan. The second studio designed their final projects beginning from an architectural detail found in Novgorod, which then yielded highly sophisticated, developed buildings transplanted to Moscow, inspired by a chimney, a crack, or an arch, led by Kirill Asse, Anton Gorlenko and photographer Yuri Palmin. The Architecture and Urbanism MA studios developed a contrasting approach to designing a building. Whether starting as a critique of the inevitable Moscow renovation project, which is likely to erase the language of early Soviet residential architecture from the centre of the city, or proposing alternative visions for residential quarters of future Russian cities, which would be both urban and low rise or rural and high density at the same time, this studio was led by James O’Brian and Joseph Van Der Steen. The second studio followed its theme of ‘rethinking’ and challenged its students this year to rethink materiality through their projects. Students explored everything from weathered steel to bread to cellophane, designed new modes of labour, public piers, or event spaces made out of beached plastic, led by Eugene Asse and Igor Chirkin. The Cass students were invited to spend a semester studying in Moscow at MARCH as part of the second year of their degrees. This summer we offered students a unique opportunity to take part in the first The Cass-MARCH Summer School, held in Moscow. We developed an active city-making toolkit using a real urban and political scenario in an historic area of Moscow. The Summer School is led by Professor Mark Brearley, Head of Cass Cities, and Xenia Adjoubei, lead tutor at MARCH.

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design charette, the self-build scout hut

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Fourth-year postgraduate Architecture students were tasked to design a self-build Scout hut in a week in November 2017. Working in small groups, students developed building systems for an on-going live project for a Scout campsite in rural Kent and presented 12 detailed proposals to the 15th Fulham Scout group. The design charette aimed to promote a direct engagement with material properties and afford an understanding of how thinking and drawing, allied with making, can inform design. The super-structure and external envelope was designed to be prefabricated in London in a space measuring 15m Ă— 6.5m and transported to the proposed site on a 40ft flatbed trailer, where it was assembled upon a pre-made foundation with connection to services.

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Following this intense workshop the projects were further refined for a design report and fully costed and scheduled to give total weight, fabrication, construction and transport costs. In the weeks preceding the design charette, a lecture series presented by a range of researchers and practitioners explored the technical issues of self-build construction. In a very short period of time, students were introduced to a rigorous process of designing and making, supported by the staff and equipment of the The Cass Works workshops. Economy of means in terms of materials, detailing, ease of construction and cost were tested to the limit in each project. 005

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design Introduction


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3D

Studios First Year 3D First Year Fashion Accessories and Jewellery One: Amalgam Two: Scandalous Three: Elixir Four: All the Ingredients Five: Something to Say Six: Tribe

Courses Design Studio Practice Fashion Fashion Accessories and Jewellery Furniture Furniture and Product Design Textile Design

Previous page: Lisa Wallius Light, knitted wool, Studio 4 This page: Barbara Thwaites Memories, Knit, Studio 5

3D


3D

For the first time ever, the whole of The Cass is under one roof with all courses situated in Aldgate’s newly converted Calcutta House complex. The eclectic mix of art, architecture and design courses has succeeded in developing a stronger sense of community and shared mission.

overview Marianne Forrest Head of 3D

001 Harriet Hall, Lines and Circles, Hand Screenprint, Studio 5. 002 Fashion Studios. 003 Level One work.

Our building contains excellent workshops, studios and study spaces but is also a real community and unique cultural environment. It is that sense of community alongside creative energy that gives The Cass its strength. The different courses rubbing up against each other and cross-discipline communication has begun a kind of metamorphosis, with disciplines sampling the practices of others and studios in which mixed subject cohorts learn from each other.

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It is within this fertile environment that students of jewellery have found themselves working to briefs that challenge the scale and context of ‘jewellery’, textile design students working in ceramics producing new ceramic surfaces and textile composites, and fashion students working in metals to make accessories and jewellery. As a central London venue, The Cass has hosted a multitude of externally-facing events. The Making Matters exhibition in September was our contribution to the London Design Festival. On display were pieces by 20 graduates and alumni from The Cass design studios, each with an emphasis on social engagement. The exhibition celebrated the diversity and inventiveness of making, from the fine detailing and miniaturisations of jewellery to the riotous intensity of colour exposed in expanding foam stools and the highly inventive use of sandblasted wood to create new jointing systems for furniture.


The Cass presents... events calendar also encompassed two very successful evenings hosted by Visiting Professor Peter Marigold. First was the Kickstarter for Creatives night, with speakers from crowdfunding platform Kickstarter and newly graduated students of Furniture and Product Design BA discussing the amazing results of their Kickstarter campaign that set them on their paths to success. This was followed by the Contemporary Design Studios in London event that presented the work of world-renowned design studios Gareth Neal, Glithero and Raw Edges. Each of these three design practices has a highly idiosyncratic approach to the point and nature of the design and making process, which in turn reflects the positive effect of cosmopolitan London as a breeding ground for imagination and innovation. As always, our students entered competitions and the Aldgate Vent project produced a winning design from Jewellery and Silversmithing BA student Dominik Wiecek – an extraordinarily proposed construction, a kind of jewellery for the landscape, at the same time a beautiful and practical solution to an awkward problem – how to vent the underground system both practically and attractively.

More successes were found in the Samuel Chan competition with two designs chosen to go into commercial production for the company later this year. Furniture and Product BA students also devised a Kite Party – a reference to the Bauhaus Kite parties of the 1920s and 1930s. The project culminated in an exhibition at BDP for Clerkenwell Design Week. Alongside was the excellent show at Platform in the same week, with students creating new designs for a competition run by commercial partners Collaborate and Verco. The finales to the year’s calendar are the summer show events which have included the Fashion Salon. This was a spectacular sound and light-show in which moving mannequins animated the graduating fashion students’ garments among the live audience. It is our community-centred approach to the study of design and the commitment to meaning in our work that makes The Cass a special place. As our graduates move on to new challenges, it is with a solid understanding of their place within their own disciplines and communities as designers, alongside a willingness to engage with some of society’s most compelling issues, and an ability to think creatively to provide practicable solutions.

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3D


Previous page A fashion studio at Calcutta House. 001 Project Red and 002 – 005 Images taken from Fashion Accessories and Jewellery first year studio, depicting students at work.

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Design has the power to change the way we see and respond to the world around us and it is one of the most effective forms of non-verbal communication. As a designer, understanding the challenges of being a maker helps to unlock greater potential in final products, be they textiles, garments, jewellery or furniture. The first year has been an exciting journey for all of our students, whether making furniture, fashion, textiles, products or jewellery.

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first year 3D

3D’s first year at The Cass has a particular focus on making and experimental design. Thinking and problem finding through research, problem solving, craft and expression play their part in all 3D projects. With this at the heart of their first year of study at The Cass, the students experienced an incredible variety of projects from materials and process-based technique exploration such as the use of horn and plastics, wood, metal and ceramics, as well as textiles. Projects were broadly based on identity with Fashion BA students creating their own Project Red collection in preparation for the catwalk show that has established itself at the heart of their year. Furniture and Product Design BA students, along with those from Design Studio Practice BA, made beautifully crafted pieces that questioned functionality and the possibilities of their own making process. Textile Design BA students practised process with design development featuring their personal approaches to drawing and creative expression. Fashion Accessories and Jewellery BA students made hats, bags, sunglasses and jewellery that reflected their own selfies! They played with identity and discussed what makes us who we are to other people, families and friends. Creative people are generally happiest making tangible things they can see and touch. Students of design are attuned to the necessity of making as a developmental activity. This, however, is not at the expense of thinking; fundamental research methods and an understanding of how ideas come about are core attributes of successful application and articulation. Learning about how we see, how we can adapt, how we describe and articulate aesthetic language gives confidence and enables students to tackle the real issues that face us as designers today. Exploration and experimentation is rooted in originality, aesthetics and innovation.

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first year

fashion accessories and jewellery 001 Tom Mannion, Ring planter, Brass, Copper. 002 Farzana Catarina, Identity workshop. 003 Project Red. 004 Fashion Accessories and Jewellery First Year. 005 Farzana Begum, Sunglasses. 006 Catarina Leandro, Buttons. 007 Melting pot.

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With many voices competing for attention in the industry, Fashion Accessories and Jewellery BA students must understand their own place amidst the cacophony of competition. The course enables students to comprehend the practical and commercial articulation of their own distinctive practice within the sector. Far from enabling students to make instant ‘jewels’, the intent is to enable them to rationalise their dreams and make them sustainable for themselves and valuable to their future clients. Working in metals, textiles, plastics and even horn, the students have created a huge range of accessories including sunglasses, bags, hats, rings, brooches and hair combs. Starting with their own identities and those of the people around them, they have explored the themes of their cultural heritage and social environments through the medium of accessories, researching to identify and evaluate what it means to be themselves in their family environment and culture. The results have been an adventure in people, clothing, costume, environment and values.

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The year ahead promises to be full of travel, competition, exploration and creative experimentation. 007

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studio one amalgam 001 Anton Mikonnen, Onion Pods, ceramic. 002 Barnaby Lewis, Samuel Chan Desk, Walnut. 003 Adam Watts, Vaulting Horse Bench, Cork and timber. 004 Anton Mikonnen, Candle Shade 6. 005 Catia Cabral, Ceramic and Leather.

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Studio leaders: Cathy Stack, Peter Marigold and Will Smith Finding and exploring a question is more interesting and productive than fixating on solutions. A hands-on approach, combining unconstrained experimentation with a well-developed understanding of craft and manufacture skills, has developed an exciting range of works in this year’s live projects.

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Collaborate teamed the courses with Verco and Perkins & Will to reinvent co-working spaces. Through critical thinking and research, the winner, Adam Watts, was inspired to create Perch, an interpretation of the vaulting horse as seating in cork and ash. Ella Merriman came second with Dog-Eared Shelf, a brilliantly elegant and witty system for bags and coats in the washroom. Third prize went to Martha Haines for her moveable screen planter, Jacob’s Space. Camira Fabrics sponsored the Kite Party held at BDP during the Clerkenwell Design Festival, reminiscent of the Bauhaus Kite Parties of the 1920s and 30s installed in the BDP showroom. Moe Redish won the Samuel Chan Joined and Jointed award with a rail desk for commercial volume production. This year has been a journey on which talent, thinking, experimentation and research in practice has led to unexpected destinations.

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studio two scandalous 001 Amelia Morton, Recycled Textiles. 002 Fashion studios. 003 Raghad Saleh, The Cass SALON. 004 Suzette Codnerprou. 005 Georgia Harvey, The Cass SALON. 003

Studio leaders: Steph Aman, Marta Jakubowski, Koki Kang, Fumi Kimura and Karen Coughlan

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Studio Scandalous takes creative risks and makes collections intended to provoke reactions or even scandalise the viewer. The Graduate Salon show questions how fashion is presented and consumed with static and active models. The students are bursting with ideas, bold and experimental – questioning what is right and wrong, challenging conventions of beauty and power. Suzette Codnerprou creates a twisted aesthetic with black knotted silhouettes – the collection Jab Jab takes its inspiration from carnival. Suzette designs directly on the stand, creating sculptured silhouettes in vast piles of knots and tangled forms, the most powerful pieces evoking the macabre through the carefully sculptured forms. Amelia Morton extracts the damage out of fashion design with considered use of recycled materials that characterises all her work. She explores colour through natural dyes over fabrics dug from the recesses of other people’s wardrobes in her personal fight for the planet. Concepts and final designs are nothing until made real by the people who wear them. From catwalk and mannequin to wardrobe and back again, these creations live to be worn.

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studio three elixir 001 Georgia Harvey, Serial Killer 1, Gaberdine and textile. 002 Fashion studio. 003 Fashion studio. 004 Bweendo Hachieuka.

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Studio leaders: Adam Entwistle, Lee Lapthorne, Steph Aman, Marta Jakubowski, Fumi Kimura and Karen Coughlan Powerful evocations expressed through structure and form have evolved with students learning their craft through the close study of technique. Their designs have taken on the silhouettes of corsetry combined with the fluidity of draping with attention to detail and finish. The distinctive work of Georgia Harvey shows the questioning approach of a conceptual designer. Through her work Georgia has explored the narratives of serial killers to create a collection that evokes both the murderers and the investigation teams behind their capture, wading through the psychological and the macabre, provoking questions about the relationship between hunters and the hunted. A collection that evokes the trench-coated investigator and the blood-soaked killer, each reliant on the other in a twisted culture of crime. Mariam Adeniran’s designs reference the romance of aliens and space travel while Emily Jamieson’s beautifully relaxed knits are magical transformations of contour and concept. These were seen among the student collections at the innovative Graduate Salon show that refused to be bound by conventions and showed the work in a format that challenged ideas about the perception and purpose of fashion.

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studio four all the ingredients

001 Ajike Doherty, Cast objects worn, Silver. 002 Louise Mason, Mirrors of the Alchemist, Brass, Copper, Bronze. 003 Margaret Conroy, Shadow Lines, Gilded Gilding metal, steel and textile. 004 Maria Gower, Perfume, Silver, Copper.

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Studio leaders: Heidi Yeo, Simone ten Hompel and Adi Toch Interrogating both the natural and the manmade world, the students focused not only on the designing and making of jewellery and silversmithing artefacts, but also on producing human experiences. By embracing how people read and interact with what is made, the students investigated how things function within social, economic and environmental contexts. The students consolidated their own design philosophy and explored established and emerging platforms of dissemination.

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Individual spirit and the essential workplace attributes of successful cooperation and collaboration have harnessed gut instincts and creative impulses towards well thoughtout results. The live projects have supported imagination and experimentation across a spectrum, from the bespoke to multiple production and at different physical scales. Highlights from the year have included the Contemporary Applied Arts Exhibition and the winning of the Aldgate Vent project by Dominik Weicek. Most of the graduating students will go on to set up their own companies as designers and makers, and some intend to pursue a path of further study. Whichever way they choose, all the ingredients are there for a successful career ahead.

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studio five something to say 004

001 Frances McBain, Tractus (rug detail), Wool Weave. 002 Harriet Hall, Lines and Circles, Hand Screenprint. 003 Farah Nasir, Roses, Weave. 004 Ligah Thrower, Woven form, Silver. 005 Sarai Bibby, Comfort, Collage.

Studio leaders: James Hunting, Gina Pierce and Sam Wingate Something to Say has worked on a series of projects, experiences and shared occasions that have considered the juxtaposition of the personal voice of the maker and the regard of the viewer or consumer. Each student has arrived at a personal definition of textiles through their own self-expression. Less about finished outcomes, Something to Say has uncovered a series of questions regarding identity and ideas to be answered by its participants. Students engaged with issues that develop an understanding of the power and potential of textiles in the broadest sense. Surface, pattern, colour and texture all contribute to the language of textiles and each student has spoken for themselves through their personal approach to the manipulation of these elements. The studio’s success with projects such as the Tissage competition in which students pitched to design rugs for ethical manufacture in India (won by Frances McBain) and competition entries to Texselect, Bradford Textile Society, the Goldsmiths Awards (won by Liga Thrower) and Fine Cell have all added to students’ awareness of the commercial sector and the opportunities that await them. 005

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studio six tribe 001 Hayley Jones, Graffiti Print. 002 Hayley Jones, Graffiti Print. 003 Briony Piper, Floral Prints. 004 Shannon Lee, Howay the Lads. 005 Shannon Lee, Howay the Lads, Knitwear.

Studio leaders: Karen Coughlan, Sam Wingate, Claire Whelan, Lisa Bloomer and Gina Pierce Our tribe has evolved into a close-knit team of distinct and individual voices that share an understanding of what it means to be a ‘tribe’. An understanding of the working practices and thought processes of designers, makers, clients and the wider world is essential to the engaged and aware professional textile designer. The students have risen to the challenge of the studio ethos of intelligent and intellectually enquiring engagement in projects where themes have included those that reward thoughtful and sensitive research, such as identity and belonging.

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This enquiry has led to an understanding of their individuality as a part of and in opposition to the tribalism of cultural approaches to design. The high level of personal creative input, thoughtful debate, fresh ideas and a highly professional approach to practice has been evidenced in projects that have included the Print Archivist Project from which five students were chosen to exhibit their work, and the Bradford Textile Design Competition. Each of the participants in the studio now has a thorough understanding of what it means to be a designer working in an industry that relies on collaboration in its broadest sense.

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Courses Interior Architecture and Design Interior Design Interior Design and Decoration Theatre and Film Production Design

interiors

Studios First Year Interiors First Year Theatre and Film Production Design Two: Action Stations Three: Factories+ Four: 24hr Transform-Atrium Five: Aberrant Architecture

Interiors


interiors overview Kaye Newman Head of Interiors

Previous page: Ratcha Daengbunma, Pedley Street Depot, Studio 2

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We are constantly in the midst of change; political and economic factors move and sway people and the way they make their living, or have to seek or cultivate new ways of living. As interior designers we are intrigued by how people adapt to new spaces and how different behaviours consequently emerge, shaping new contemporary customs and practices. As interior educators we therefore seek to create briefs and projects that strengthen current knowledge and also enable forward thinking. Our students are actively involved in primary research and, to support this, leading practitioners are invited to deliver a series of lectures throughout the year, encouraging debate and discussion about how to design but more importantly, why we design.

The Cass Session


The Theatre and Film Production Design course has just completed its very first year. Whilst we did promise an exciting inaugural year, it surpassed all expectations by working on the Strongbox production at the Vaults, winning the Vaults’ show of the year. The course worked with Wilton’s Music Hall, looking at theatre in a historical context and completed the live experiences at the Hippodrome Casino Theatre on the award-winning musical Miss Nightingale. It is exciting to have both these areas of Theatre and Film Production Design working alongside the Interiors courses; there is great synergy between performance and experience of the designed environment. The areas are very strongly linked through the studios but also through connection to our Critical and Contextual Studies (CCS). This year in CCS our students enjoyed a cinema club exploring cultural expression through the medium of set design in the films of Wes Anderson.

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The four Interiors studios have been following briefs that investigate new ways of living, occupation, dwelling and industry – looking at climate change, the displacement of people, community engagement and collaborations, spatial performance, interpretations of the past that give meaning and understanding of our heritage and links with the world. The studios have endeavoured to transform and reinvigorate sites and create a sense of future possibilities. Through The Cass Projects Office first-year students have been asked to work with author Rachel Lichtenstein on a live project funded by the Heritage Lottery to create a mixed-use cultural heritage museum and an educational event space in the basement of the oldest surviving Ashkenazi synagogue in the UK, Sandys Row Synagogue in Spitalfields. The space will offer the chance to exhibit the rich oral and filmed histories of the communities that have lived in the East End. Rachel has said that the finished work was incredibly impressive and has sent a note of congratulations to the first-year students, saying that she looks forward to working with us in the future.

001 Miriam Aggett, Amplified Narratives collage. 002 Charly Clark, interior visual Rope, Spices Hays Galleria.

Perhaps what is not visible in this yearbook is the hard work undertaken by the second-year students during their work placement. They have the wonderful opportunity to work with London’s leading interior and architectural practices, being involved in projects across the UK and the world. The employers have yet again sent glowing reports of their commitment and teamwork, which is a promising herald of future professional success.

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001 Alexsandra Jabodzinska, Sandys Row, perspective visual. 002 Miriam Aggett, Sandys Row, final building section. 003 Melanie Denton Model, Sandys Row. 004 Eleanor Hopwood, Sandys Row, visual. 005 Alex Jabodzinska, Sandys Row, site sketch. 006 Lucy Johnson Squire, Amplified Narratives.

Studio leaders: Janette Harris, Suzanne Smeeth-Poaros, Karl Harris and Kaye Newman This year’s first-year Interiors students have been investigating narratives of London’s East End. The first project, Amplified Narratives, asked the students to design an interior that imbued within it a personal story perceptibly stored in an object that the students themselves owned. The second project, City and East End Narratives, was set in Raven Row, designing a space based on a legend or myth from the City or East End hypothetically for the Folklore Society.

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Finally for the major project, students had the exciting opportunity to work in collaboration with renowned artist and author Rachel Lichtenstein on a live project for Sandys Row Synagogue in Spitalfields. Sandys Row is the oldest surviving Ashkenazi synagogue in the UK. The board have secured Heritage Lottery funding for a mixed-use cultural heritage programme in the currently unused basement space. The development of the basement will provide a unique flexible space through which rich oral histories can be told to impart cultural significance to the wider community. The students have developed projects that Sandys Row are reviewing at present with a view to the synagogue adopting and installing some of the proposals.

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studio two

action stations 001 Section Entrance. 002 Will Turner, Nexus Pod Model, South Elevation. 003 Will Turner, Nexus Highline Visual. 004 Charlotte Ponting, Nexus Highline Visual. 005 Lina Danileviciute, Utopia of Pedley Street. 006 Lina Danileviciute, Nexus Dog House pod. 007 Charlotte Ponting, Nexus rendered sections Pod.

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Studio leaders: Kaye Newman and Janette Harris This studio explored the question “What makes a Home?” in respect of those who have been temporarily displaced from their own homes and communities. What do they require from a temporary home? Indeed, what is home? Could these temporary homes have a second purpose, or share other spaces and manifest this hybridity, and through this become less of a simple and utilitarian quick fix for the victims? Could these homes help to recover the health and well-being of those that have been displaced?

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Often those who have been displaced through war, human catastrophe and climate change have to leave behind not just belongings but memories, pets, routines, friendships, jobs – all of which build the notion of home and settlement. The requirements for temporary and transient living are often understood as basic and meeting essential needs only. But are we making the situation worse by compounding the level of adversity suffered by those displaced? Because of factors including climate change and other catastrophic events, disasters hit communities, including Londoners, every year. Surely it’s time to seek a better and more sympathetic response to these inevitable circumstances. 007

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studio three factories+ 001 Sophie Schaefer, HERBAL. 002 Sophie Schaefer, internal Visuals. 003 Sabah Mizban, Environmental Diagram. 004 Sabah Mizban, ETFE Polytunnel Visual. 005 Sabah Mizban, Long Section.

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Studio leaders: Andy Merritt, Simon Petty, Anne Thomas and Paul Smyth How can factories become a positive for the planet rather than a negative? Our studio looks into how new forms and notions of industry can bring factories back into the centre of London for the benefit of both people and the natural world.

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What if we brought heavy industry back into the city and with it the sensory overload of noise, toxic smells and visual impact? How can factories be turned on their heads and become positive elements of city living? Can we once again live side by side with heavy industry but in the twenty-first century? How can we and the natural world feel the benefits rather than reel from its effects? Across three different sites and typologies, Somerset House, 20 Dalston Lane and Brixton Rec, we investigated how future factories could fit into our existing cityscape and be objects of awe that bring new functions, new experiences, new aesthetics and new hope. 005

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studio four 24hr transformatrium

001 Kat Loizou, final visual, Tea Clipper, Hays Galleria. 002 Kat Loizou, final rendered plan, Hays Galleria. 003 Kat Loizou, Tea Clipper ghostship visual, Hays Galleria. 004 Steph Payne, final visual, Hays Galleria. 005 Steph Payne, installation, Kit of Parts, visual, Hays Galleria. 006 Kat Loizou, the Counting House, daytime, visual. 007 Charly Clark, Resin Rope, Spices material experimentation, Hays Galleria.

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Studio leader: Andrew (Sid) Siddall Studio support: Suzanne Smeeth-Poaros This year we focused on proposals for the transformation of atrium spaces within a 24hour installation timespan. Installations often require months of planning and prefabrication, but have very short installation windows to avoid disturbance to commercial activity. As such, these projects present specific and challenging problems for designers. 006

The site of Hays Galleria became our main focus, a converted wharf space on the river Thames near London Bridge housing a glorious sweeping steel and glass atrium. Steeped in mid-1980s folly and in dire need of transformation, it’s a building with shoulder pads and trouser braces; red ties and shiny suits. Ideas were drawn from the building’s changing history, the river, historical links to the Wharf, and the people and produce that have passed through time to conceive a fitting tribute to its past and propose a seasonal transformation. Projects addressed materiality, the experiential and the adaptable. Key considerations were given to short-term installation and the after-life of materials, their reconfiguration and reuse. Component parts for the installation of Hays were evaluated and adapted to create a satellite event for a 24-hour period within the Counting House, a site historically and geographically connected to Hays Galleria; new aesthetics and new hope. 007

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studio five aberrant architecture

001 Rosalina Gadyuchkova, Poo Power, Digital Perspective Section. 002 Andeigh Mcdougall, Make Do, Mend to the Max, Digital Interior Perspective. 003 Grace Cross, Shelta, Vernacular Hack, Object Photograph. 004 Alexandra Kondor-Krupanszki, Moor For Less, Hand Drawn Sectional Perspective. 005 Oraine Monteux, Between the Lines – A Whistle Blowers Safe Haven, Digital Plan. 006 Andeigh Mcdougall, Make Do, Mend to the Max, Digital Interior Perspective. 007 Agata Kaczorowska, Rainwashed, Vernacular Hack, Object Photograph. 008 Oraine Monteux, Between the Lines – A Whistle Blowers Safe Haven, Digital Plan.

Studio leaders: Kevin Haley, Sam Brown and Claudio Esposito

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Taste, class, culture, age, politics, economics, solvency and amenities are all factors that dictate and affect how we dwell. Our living environments either become highly personalised spaces or de-personalised accommodation. We can base our own identities on where we choose to settle, creating inbuilt personal narratives that become both part and parcel of the exteriors and interiors of our homes. As our population grows ever larger, we fail to satisfy the demand for housing. According to recent census statistics, London needs at least 40,000 new homes every year just to keep pace with demand, yet less than half that number are being built. As housing prices soar, it now becomes increasingly difficult to become a homeowner. This year, Studio 5 explored alternative, near-future modes of the domestic and the environments, communities and tensions that shape, influence, change and drive them. As a studio we researched, documented and reacted to the extraordinary, the ordinary and the idiosyncrasies of how we live and sometimes break from the traditions of how a home could function. We used Canvey Island in the Thames estuary, with its rich and diverse history, as a test bed for future-living prototypes.

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theatre and film production design 001 Collaboration, Riders to the Sea. J M Synge, Installation. 002 Collaboration, Riders to the Sea, J M Synge, Installation. 003 Alice Larner, Our Country’s Good, Timberlake Wertenbaker, Model Box. 004 Collaboration, Riders to the Sea, J M Synge, Installation.

Studio leader: Sid (Andrew) Siddall Theatre and Film Production Design at The Cass is a new degree course exploring design for both live and recorded performance, feeding on historic skillsets and inspirations to inform our thinking as we grapple with new media interventions and contemporary expectations of what design can and should be. This year has seen collaborations with students in Theatre and Performance Practice BA to create a series of installations based on Riders to the Sea by J M Synge, and strong placement links forged with professional award-winning shows Strongbox at Vault Festival and the musical Miss Nightingale at the Hippodrome Casino Theatre.

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From model box making to costume design, technical drawing to storyboarding, the course has pushed students to investigate artists and makers as diverse as Hitchcock, Jarman and Steinbeck, and used original television works such as Peaky Blinders as a springboard for new narratives and stage experiments.

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Courses Design for Publishing Graphic Design Illustration and Animation

Hannah Reid Type World, digital, Studio 3

visual communication

Studios First Year Visual Communication One: Future Past Two: Ellipsis Three: Design Futures Four: Give and Take Five: Space Speaks, Time Talks


The Cass Visual Communication has a respect for craft, for making and for the heritage of the tools we use to create, but it also has a future-facing attitude that uses digital technologies to create work of integrity, value, and vitally, of agency.

visual communication overview

Susanna Edwards Head of Visual Communication

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001 The Cass Summer Show. 002 Finn Kidd, Josef K, illustration.

Our facilities are unique: students work in traditional technologies such as letterpress in order to understand the principles of typography and digital design, and also in printmaking, publishing, motion graphics, animation, interactive design, experiential design and illustration. We continue to teach drawing as a core skill and seek to collaborate with other disciplinary areas. Our Cass Works facilities mean that students can access 2D and 3D making workshops, ranging from screen printing, laser cutting, 3D printing, to rug making and ceramics – offering a range of making possibilities unlike any other Visual Communication department in the UK. We carefully consider the commercial world that our graduates will enter and ensure that they become independent and adaptable professionals with core skills that enable a life-long career in the creative industries. Design for Publishing BA, Graphic Design BA and Illustration and Animation BA engage leading experts in the field to provide students with the right understanding, skills and attributes to enter the industry with confidence. Students learn the very foundations of their specialist subject areas through specialist core skills workshops and so develop a culture and process of thinking through making, in order to understand how best to apply their skills in industry contexts. Interdisciplinary collaboration and thinking is also part of the learning experience, providing opportunity for students to experience and mirror the latest developments in industry practice across the creative sectors. We provide opportunities for students to apply

for paid commissioned work on in-house design and illustration projects and for external clients, and students may also undertake an internship as part of their workrelated learning. The Visual Communication cluster has designers and illustrators in residence who, together with our alumni and industry professionals, create a culture in which students, staff and industry share a dynamic community of practice and studio working culture. We focus on understanding, reaching and connecting with audiences through visual communication, working to briefs through work-related learning. Through our Hothouse initiative, we connect with leaders in the field to offer the latest insights and mentoring in relation to our three courses. Students learn to think creatively and strategically, and leave with the ability to create work and fully understand the process of planning, creating, costing, producing and presenting work to clients and audiences across a broad range of outputs. Our graduates may become freelance illustrators, graphic designers and typographers working in publishing, print or editorial; or they may find opportunities working as digital designers and illustrators exploring immersive experience design and experiential design. We have developed collaborative working and teaching with our enterprise unit Accelerator, and our students are crowdfunding and testing fantastic designrelated projects that are put into production. We present opportunities for students to extend the potential of their skillset, so they are prepared for the fluid expectations of an ever-changing industry.

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first year

visual communication 001 Bich Dang, News from Elsewhere, screen printed book. 002 Ross Leonard, Sound, Set, Action, moving image. 003 Clara Delgado Caballero, News from Elsewhere, publication. 004 Jeremy Burton, News from Elsewhere, riso printed book. 005 Jana Ballieul, Sound, Set, Action, Animation. 006 Jana Ballieul, Sound, Set, Action, Animation. 007 Michael Brown, News from Elsewhere, riso printed publication. 008 Khalid Nahary, News from Elsewhere, riso printed book.

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Tutors: Sara Carneholm, Ricardo Eversley, Alistair Hall, Michelle Salamon, Emily Evans, Kieron Baroutchi, David Price, Kim Vousden and Heather McDonough 002

The first-year students from Design for Publishing BA, Graphic Design BA and Illustration and Animation BA explored key design and production practices through a portfolio of core workshops designed to introduce students to subject-specific skills and ways of thinking. These included critical design thinking, visual research methodologies and animation. Students were encouraged to test, experiment and create iterations of their work throughout the process of making, culminating in extensive explorative and innovative outcomes. News from Elsewhere led to many beautifully printed publications in a wide range of formats and processes, and Sound, Set and Action showcased the students’ reactions to creating moving images for sound. Students will continue to experiment widely but with more professional focus as they progress to their second and third years of study.

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studio one future past 001 Cameron Little, Final Project. 002 Will Howells, Sketch book reportage. 003 Agnieszka Fraczak, Archives and Future Places, Animation. 004 Alessandra Cuccu, Archives and Future Places, Projection Mapping. 005 Elisa Buscemi, Archives and Future Places. 006 Elisa Buscemi, Activism.

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Studio leaders: Susanna Edwards and Michelle Salamon Future Past is a studio run in collaboration with The Roman Road Trust. Projects encouraged students to collect data based on archive material to build informative and visually appealing storytelling of significance to contemporary audiences. The studio investigated the past through archive materials in order to explore themes and issues that remain relevant today and influence the future of a location. Themes explored have included activism, archives and future place. The studio catered for students of graphic design, illustration, animation and publishing, looking into relevant and appropriate approaches, tools and techniques to communicate themes for presentation to an identified contemporary audience. Students built portfolios of professionally-curated outcomes that evidenced an understanding of both motion 3D and print processes.

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studio two ellipsis 001 Viktoria Hristova Anthology, Sara Carneholm Mytkowski. 002 Carlos Valencia, printing composition, Materials Process Print book. 003 Caleb James, Pubster magazine. 004 Katie Hardcastle, Making A Living Book. 005 Jennifer Garwood, Anthology. 006 Karl Fitzgerald, Animal Farm. 007 Karl Fitzgerald, The Falcon, Materials Process Print book. 008 Puro Laevuo, inside folded booklet, Anthology project.

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Studio leaders: Angharad Lewis and Alistair Hall Studio Ellipsis is about exploring the act of publishing in all its forms; in doing so we investigated the physical tools of publishing by experimenting with materials, processes and print. To ensure that all aspects of publishing, right up to the final stages, are experienced by students, we published a book, in collaboration with Creative Writing and English Literature BA students from The Cass, interpreting their words through visual storytelling.

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We also deeply immersed ourselves in the world of independent magazine publishing, and then planned and launched our own titles to communicate with new audiences. We are graphic designers, illustrators and publishers.

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studio three design futures 001 Kyrle Simpson, Artefact 3018. 002 Ida Lindblom, Artefact 3018. 003 Ida Lindblom, London Architecture. 004 Jothan Morris, Artefact 3018. 005 Jothan Morris, Artefact 3018. 006 Kannika Iamphongdee, Type World.

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Studio leaders: Ricardo Eversley and Emily Evans 002

Design Futures: a studio that authored via the lens of traditional and digital products as tools for design making, thinking, seeing and storytelling. Projects have encouraged students to interrogate and refine their illustrative and design skills through factual, experimental and industry-led methods and processes. Students explored the future possibilities of visual communication through dynamic research, testing and producing in order to challenge the boundaries and archetypes that currently exist within their respective fields. Themes explored included architecture as a tool for branding, sci-fi then and now, typography and symbolism.

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studio four give and take 001 Finn Kidd, Walk the Line, screen print. 002 Oliver VillalongaRoman, Match and Mismatch, screen print. 003 Salem Khazali, Broad, riso print. 004 Sasha Mitchell, The Colour of Pain, book. 005 Ella Deadman, Pure Filth, photography.

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Studio leaders: Sara Carneholm and Russell Weekes It’s not broken, let’s fix it. Take notice. Find new perspectives, new functions, reposition. Play. We add, we take away, we move things. We make things move, we find new ways to make something moving. We create culture. We play and we make decisions. We create culture. 002

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studio five animation:

space speaks, time talks 001 Gustav Freudenthal, Sรถlvaposten poster, 3D render. 002 Richard Haynes, Caravan of Curiosities, Projection Mapping Installation. 003 Jessica de Leeuwe, Reflections, Film still. 004 Richard Haynes, Caravan of Curiosities, Stop Motion Puppet Development. 005 Jessica de Leeuwe, Character design Neon, water colours and ink (edited in photoshop), Animation. 006 Jessica de Leeuwe, Projection mapping stars onto Church model, Animation. 007 Gustav Freudenthal, Sรถlvaposten concept art, Sketch.

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Studio leader: Mark Collington The Animation studio explored how a text manifests itself in the spatial and temporal medium of animation production. It consolidated a range of contexts, cultural theories and industry practices acquired across the three years of the course. The major project began by venturing into more abstract responses to a text by revisiting the language of the edit and montage theory (using moodboard-beatboards), as well as experimenting with different forms of sound, including diegetic sound, narration and music. The major project then continued with more literal interpretations of a text through applying conventional narrative genre and structure to storyboarding.

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Calcutta House roof garden Photograph by Luke Jones


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—Walter Gropius, 1922

The DNA of the Bauhaus persists especially in foundation courses where experience is laid down to which future creative practice is added. What happens later can often obscure what is an essential layer of an individual’s creative work that follows. The remarkable feature of The Cass foundation course this year has been the sheer ambition of the students. They have set their sights high, achieved so much – individually and in groups  –  and worked beyond the workshop and studio boundary to exceed expectations of their reach into the world. Some students arrived eager to nourish and refine an existing ambition; others have taken the year to review their initial direction, and with opportunities for new connections, methods and materials found a new path; others started the course unsure and/or unclear about their creativity and it is within the open territory of creative practices at The Cass that they have found their place; still others are undecided at the end of the course and progress to degrees at The Cass to refine, explore and experience aspects of their creativity further.

foundation

“… educating people to recognize the basic nature of the world in which they live, and in combining their knowledge with their imagination so to be able to create typical forms that symbolize that world. What is important then, is to combine the creative activity of the individual with the broad practical work of the world!”

The essence of the foundation course is the dynamic relationship between the work, the students and their tutors; at different points throughout the year each is in turn informed, encouraged, provoked or critiqued by the other and this results in a unique creative energy. There are three parts to the foundation programme: Critical and Contextual Studies, Workbook and Studio Practice.

Roof garden project construction Architecture and Interior Design Group

Introduction


Foundation overview

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In Critical and Contextual Studies, students explore the territory where their creative practice may be placed. Visits to galleries, museums and exhibitions encourage the objective use of intellectual tools as well as the articulation of subjective responses, and this is further developed in seminars and in the personal choices for essay topics at the end of the year. This year Critical and Contextual Studies situated creative practice both culturally and geographically in the city of London, with visits to galleries, museums and exhibitions including Soul of a Nation – the work of black artists in the US civil rights era at the Tate Modern, through to the work of photographers and filmmakers such as Wolfgang Tillmans, Coco Fusco, Andrei Tarkovsky, Nan Goldin, and Santiago Sierra. The students exercised their objective use of intellectual tools and the articulation of their subjective responses in a range of critical and analytical perspectives with titles such as The Impact of Brexit on the

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Arts in the UK; Women in War Journalism; The Morality of Images of Suffering; Female Performance Artists’ Use of the Body; Music and Cultural Resistance; Manet and the Male Gaze; and The Semiotics of the Light Bulb. The Workbook module sits between Critical and Contextual Studies and the studio, and is where students work with the practical and intellectual aspects of a range of creative practices. They research and experiment with the different ways artists, designers and architects find or have ideas, how they work with different processes and in different contexts, and explore the relations between a creative piece and its location, medium or ‘audience’. Initially in the studio there is an emphasis on substantial production and strict deadlines of presenting work in different ways to different audiences, eg over 2,500 Plasticine objects collectively-made in just two days were presented as a flash mob event disseminated via social media, followed by participating in Window Wanderland, a public exhibition as part of the Aldgate Community Events. At the close of the year students participated in a studio competition and selected projects to make and install full-sized ensemble pieces for The Cass roof garden. For Studio Practice, we have two groups – Architecture and Interior Design and Art, Media and Design. The Architecture and Interior Design programme develops individual design projects of increasing complexity and scope. With the Fragment, Agent and Scene projects, students respond to the physical, environmental and social conditions of sites in east London, and then engage with each others’ interventions in an ensemble architectural performance. Drawing, representation and making are explored in parallel using the wide range of facilities across different subject areas at The Cass. Orthodox technical drawing skills are applied to both specific and evanescent conditions – site, place, time, movement – and combined with experimental techniques – collage, mark making, assemblage and recording with sound artist Joseph Young – to capture aspects of atmosphere, memory and narrative.

projects in the second term, based on The Cass subject areas, eg Talking Points in Interiors, Unravelled in Fashion, Formats in Visual Communication; or run by Foundation tutors with practising artists, designers, makers contributing, eg Identity with sculptor Tony Heaton.

001 Roof garden project, second stage, design competition, AID group. 002 Teun Staal, Explorer Project, AID Group. Photo: Madalina Podgoreanu. 003 Amrit Sanger, still from animation.

This experience directly supports the students’ final project in the third term by developing a strong individual motivation, taking responsibility for their own productivity, research and creative development, and making informed choices – all core skills for entry and progress to the 22 undergraduate courses at The Cass. Film has been a ‘go-to’ medium this year with access to the new studio facilities in the Holloway campus contributing to over 45 short films made across art, architecture and design projects in addition to the expected film and animation projects. The films contributed to Foundation’s strong showing in The Cass Celebration Week and extended out to the Dis/ordinary Spaces Conference at the Bartlett and the London Festival of Architecture – students made films for presentation at both these external events. The Dis/ordinary project brought disabled artists and students together on projects exploring aspects of identity; this innovation is a platform for staff and students to experience and/or participate in pedagogical research at this level in future guided by our newly appointed Visiting Professor of Diversity and Creativity, Dr Jos Boys.

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The Art, Media and Design programme has a wide remit introducing a broad range of visual representation and making techniques to the whole group in the first term and then developing and adding to these within longer

Foundation


001 Yasmine Rajab, Aikaterini Pitsi, Lucia Mugena, Body Mapping Project, AID group. 002 2,700 objects in two days, AMD group. 003 Adelina Garifyanova, Assemblage for Workbook. 004 Matthias Thomas, Blue Girl, AMD group. 005 Jorge Alonso Baldo, Installation, AMD group.

Tutors Manuela Barczewski, John Cash, Aleks Catina, John Coleman, Jeremy Collins, Alpa Depani, Deej Fabyc, Cristina Gerada, David Hobson, David Howells, Luke Jones, Tania Lopez Winkler, Christina Paine, Janette Parris, Shamoon Patwari, Chi Roberts and James Steventon 001

Very many thanks to: Guest tutors Tony Heaton, Zoe Partington and Joseph Young Guest critics Paul Ayles, Robert Brown, Jos Boys, Owain Caruna Davies, Pierre d’Avoine, Pereen d’Avoine, Stephanie Farmer, George Gingell, Matthew Haycocks, Anders Luhr, Erika Suzuki, Ashmi Thapar, Corina Tuna, Jen Ng and Rachel Ward Success coaches Rana Alkolaei, Kinga Augustyn, Ronan Cahill, Lori Lee Fong, Simone Maier, Dimitrina Mitreva, Delaram Nabidoost, Tai Pham, Federica Ranalli, Ali Salehi, Adam Watts and Anita Zarzycka The Cass colleagues Emma Davenport, Elaine Pierson, Harvey Reehal, Francesca Vilalta, Karen Thomas, Charlie Snelgrove and hub staff, Federica Arisco and library staff, subject-area tutors for second term projects, tutors from London Met’s School of Computing and Digital Media Sponsors Jesmonite for materials for Architecture and Interior Design Group Foundation roof garden project

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Christal Gentles, Execution Re-enactment, Foundation Art, Media and Design Group.

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L I F E

C A S S C U LT U R E

Awash with Ideas workshop and street party for the London Design Festival 2017.


Critical and Contextual Studies Critical and Contextual Studies (CCS) is a schoolwide teaching curriculum that aims to orient and engage students in the histories and theories of their discipline, and the broader social and material contexts of their practice in contemporary culture. Taught by an interdisciplinary team of practitioners, the programme helps students to develop important academic skills, but encourages them to apply these skills creatively and critically. We see writing as a form of practice. We encourage open-ended and unusual approaches to teaching, learning and working methodologies that produce unexpected results – challenging students to contest the boundaries of their discipline, and help break down the divide between practice and theory. The CCS team teaches in both undergraduate and postgraduate courses at the School, and co-curates Cass Culture, connecting its teaching activities to the School’s wider programme of public lectures and helping students to test their ideas in the context of events, research seminars, visits and field-trips, and public debate. 2017–18 Dissertation studios: Studio 1: Another India Studio 2: Contemporary Ecology Studio 3: Music is the Weapon: Performance, Culture and the Music Industry Studio 4: Not allowed Studio 5: Imperfect Theories Studio 6: C  urating as a Spatial Practice: From the Wunderkammer to Installation Art Studio 7: Souvenir Studio 8: Post – card Studio 9: ‘The Form of the Text’ Studio 10: Constellating Studio 11: Science Fiction Futurity Studio 12: Alternative Fashioned Modernities Studio 13: Desire, Trauma, History Studio 14: Design and Nature: Forms of an Entanglement Studio 15: Music, Technology and Ideas Studio 16: Narrative and Storytelling Studio 17: Knowing Audiences Studio 18: Time and the Image Studio 19: Material in Motion Studio 20: The Liminal Studio 21: Reading the library (and nothing but the library) Studio 22: Meaningful work Studio 23: A Common Thread

Musarc performing Joseph Kohlmaier and Claudia Molitor’s Die Gedanken sind Frei, at the choir’s tentacular three-day festival Odrathek, 11–13 May 2018. Photo: Yiannis Katsaris

Teaching and learning in CCS culminates in the development of an independent thesis in the final year of study. In this context, The Cass has created one of the UK’s most innovative teaching frameworks in thirdyear undergraduate study. The Cass Dissertation brings together students from all areas – art, architecture and design – in cross-disciplinary, elective dissertation studios led by tutors and practitioners from a broad range of backgrounds, whose differing interests, approaches to teaching, research and writing practices produce a uniquely open and vibrant learning environment. After an introductory series of school-wide lectures, seminars and workshops, students join a dissertation studio to develop an independent topic which can be aligned or productively juxtaposed to the studio’s programme of research and activities. The outstanding work produced in the dissertation studios represents the cumulative effect of three years of sustained learning and the quality of the dissertations is a testimony to the the creativity of our students and The Cass’s unique and expansive approach to teaching history and theory. Each year, The Cass celebrates the best final dissertations with a range of prizes. In 2017–18, the award winners were CCS School Best Dissertation Award Henriette Desmoures, Architecture BA CCS Histories Award Rachel Buckley, Architecture BA CCS Writing Award Raisa Watkiss, Fine Art BA CCS Research Award Lisa Wallius, Graphic Design BA CCS Travel Award Rebecca Kalbfell, Architecture BA CCS Progress Prize Katie Hardcastle, Illustration and Animation BA Commendations Best Dissertation, Film and Television Studies Kaylee Gaines-McGee Best Dissertation, 3D Design Barnaby Lewis Best Dissertation, Interior Architecture Rosalina Gadyuchkova Best Dissertation, Music Jonathan Clarke

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P R O J E C T S

The Cass Projects Office provides professional support for work-related learning for students of The Cass at London Met. We enable live projects carried out by students as part of their coursework, as well as external consultancy commissions and contract research projects.

We support socially engaged creative commissions where students, academics and practitioners from The Cass come together to deliver collaborative projects. Our flexible forms of delivery benefit both clients and students alike. Brief development and proposals happen through client group consultations, regular presentations and client feedback, with detailed documentation throughout the process providing for richly engaging projects. We support work-related learning to help meet London Met’s commitment to add value through developing our students’ employability skills and their graduate outcomes. Live projects provide students with the opportunity to gain real-life work experience whilst obtaining academic credit.

The images show a selection of projects completed this year. They highlight the broad range of scales that students work in: jewellery-makers designing street vent covers for the Corporation of London in 100 years in the new Aldgate Square, Architecture students designing buildings for a Scout campsite in Kent, Textile Design students designing and curating a series of exhibitions in local workspace The Loom, and Interiors students designing a cultural centre for the historic Sandys Row Synagogue.

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001 Aldgate Sculptural Vent Designs Dominik Wiecek (third-year Jewellery and Silversmithing BA student) won the City of London Corporation competition to design a sculptural ventilation shaft for the new Aldgate Square. His piece will be installed in autumn 2018.

002 The Loom, Whitechapel Fashion BA and Textile Design BA students were invited by The Loom workspace in Whitechapel to create a series of ever-evolving exhibitions. Senior lecturer James Hunting and his students curated work referring to the building’s textile and manufacturing history.

003 Calcutta House roof garden The Cass Projects worked with London Met’s estates department to design planting and seating pieces for the new Calcutta House roof garden. The pieces were intentionally ‘infrastructural’ to enable plans for future projects on the roof. The first installation was by Architecture and Interior Design foundation students for the Summer Show.


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Postgraduate students studying the Applied Technology module in Architecture ran a ‘demountable structures’ competition for a new facilities block for the 15th Fulham Scouts in their Biggin Hill campsite. The new lightweight timber bathroom block will be built in autumn 2018.

The Cass annual enterprise, practice and employability festival Making a Living Week ran in November 2017. Events saw over 2,000 students attend high-profile practice and enterprise lectures, workshops and panel discussions to develop their employment skills in the creative industries.

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R E S E A R C H

The Cass Research

The relationship between teaching and research is central to The Cass.

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The studio/atelier model brings together students and staff, including practitioners, industry leaders, researchers and research practices under thematic studio programmes, supported through projects, exhibitions, screenings and public lectures with a shared research focus. This pedagogic strategy has allowed us to reposition our research expertise at the heart of curriculum design and delivery. Each research cluster or group provides the intellectual and practice-based expertise and discourse to support The Cass’s thematic studio model and the supervision of MA by Project and PhD students. The system encourages a natural synergy between research and teaching, and fosters innovative practice. Alongside the articulation of pedagogy and research, there continues to be significant research strengths in Art Practice, Writing, and Design as Research and Performance, with exhibitions, collaborations and performances in the UK and globally. Individually, Peter St John was appointed Professor of Architecture and we appointed two further Visiting Professors, Dr Jos Boys in Foundation and Peter Marigold in Design. This year we also introduced fortnightly research seminars, organised by Dr Matthew Barac and Dr Jane Clossick, who run The Cass Architecture PhD by Project. Our PhD students and alumni came together with researchers and practitionerresearchers from the wider world to present their work for review amongst peers in a thoughtprovoking series of exchanges. The series presentations included: The Death and Life of Public Streets, Dr Agustina Martire; StreetSpace Workshop; Networks of Making and Inhabitation, Mike Baldwin and Lewis Jones; An Architecture of Relationships, Signy Svalastoga; Regeneration: London’s Lost Industry, Juliet Davis (Cardiff) and Jane Clossick; The Architecture of Autonomy: Threats and opportunities for self-authorship in urban space, Jane Clossick and Ben Colburn (Glasgow); On Beauty in Art and Architecture, Rut Blees Luxemburg and Patrick Lynch; City Making from the Bottom Up, Maurice Mitchell; Projects from the Architecture Research Unit, Florian Beigel, Philip Christou, Lucy Pritchard and Pau Bajet. Also a part of this series were PhD students’ progress submission presentations by Torange Khonsari, Marie Brenneis, Asif Din, Annisa Jabbour, Bobby Supatira, Jane McAllister and Mary-Jane Opie. Structurally we map research themes that are most closely aligned to the Government’s Industrial Strategy and seek out and encourage crossuniversity collaboration to develop clusters of investigation and discourse. This creates a rich research environment, using cross-school events to offer opportunities for the sharing and dissemination of research activity in order to focus the new and established research community, support learning and engage external partners and audiences.


Creativity from difference Dr Jos Boys Visiting Professor, Diversity and Creative Practice (The Cass Foundation) and co-director of The DisOrdinary Architecture Project For me, this year has centrally been about investigating what happens when you start from human difference as a creative generator. This is based on the belief that our many and various ways of being in the world – the extraordinary richness that neuro- and bio-diversity can offer – is a vital but often under-used creative force in artistic and design practices. Getting involved with The Cass at London Met, on the invitation of the Head of Foundation Chi Roberts, has enabled us to begin to investigate some ways of both valuing students’ own experiences and of developing an open-minded and thoughtful attentiveness to the world beyond ourselves, as key initiating elements of becoming an artist or designer. This is part of a broader developing interest around what inclusive learning might look like, based on understanding creativity as growing out of diversity, rather than courses being created, with ‘diversity’ just being bolted-on afterwards. Such an approach and attitude aligns very much with the ongoing work of the DisOrdinary Architecture Project, of which I am co-director with artist Zoe Partington, which aims to develop new and innovative models of practice for thinking about disability within the art and design disciplines. To explore some of the opportunities that starting from difference offers as a creative force, Tony Heaton, Zoe Partington and Joseph Young – three disabled artists from the DisOrdinary Architecture Project – co-designed activities with tutors in the Art, Media and Design group, and the Architecture and Interior Design group at Foundation level. In each case, the aim was to start from disability (and other identities) as often invisible, marginalised or ignored aspects of human difference, as a way of opening up the creative potential that valuing our multiple and diverse kinds of embodiment can bring.

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It is incredibly important to think about different ways of being in the world – this is vital to people’s work. (…) Identity, difference, such a big thing to do and discuss about, such a big issue, so important in the current day. —Student feedback comment, May 2018 This work developed from a prototype project in The Cass Foundation last year with Joseph Young, entitled Soundmarks. In this academic year each artist collaborated with The Cass tutors to co-create activities within existing modules that focused on starting from difference. Young made binomial sound recordings with students as part of the Mapping the City project set by Luke Jones and Aleks Catina, with his sound walks forming one of a series of student exploratory investigations of urban space. Young brings his own experience of hearing loss to his art practices, by engaging with the complexity and poetry of everyday street noise. That is, deafness actually enables him (and the students) to listen harder and with more concentration: It made us focus on things that we would not really notice usually, and to analyse them in a different way. Going on the recording walk was very good; being in silence really amplifies your senses. It was so powerful to look at the same space in as many different ways as you can; to keep discovering new things all the time, it was transformative. —Students’ feedback comments, May 2018 By slowing down and focusing on the aural sense, they experienced a focused concentration and a new way of listening that was quite profound. I hope that this will influence their creative practice as architects and designers for years to come, so that they will consider sound as an integral part of the design process, by designing aural environments that are accessible and a pleasure to inhabit. —Artist comment, April 2018 Zoe Partington worked with Art, Media and Design (AMD) Foundation students to explore how creating spoken language descriptions of built space both enhances powers of detailed visual observation, and opens up other ways of experiencing the world beyond sight, such as touch and smell. As a partially sighted artist, Partington’s practice centrally concerns how ‘being different’ can enhance your creativity in engaging with spaces and objects, and how important it is for artists and designers to engage with disability and difference within their work.

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If both of these interventions focused on starting from difference as a way of developing students’ awareness beyond conventional ways of ‘seeing’ the world, the dis/un/en/able brief for AMD students started more explicitly from the personal. As the brief said: ‘Thinking differently’ is part of creativity and is generally regarded positively, ie imagination; thinking outside the box; lateral thinking, brainstorming; originality. Indeed, in many creative practices it is regarded as essential. ‘Being different’ from what is considered ‘the norm’ on the other hand can often lead to physical and attitudinal barriers in society, or worse. What is the relationship between what is simply common and what is considered normal? Are there contradictory value judgments in what is unique/rare/precious and what is different/unusual/ strange? Students were asked to make a piece that spoke to the space between their body-identity and the wider world. Here Tony Heaton, a disabled sculptor, collaborated with Foundation tutors. Tony brought out something in all of us about identity, something different – I moved well beyond my expectations. He brought out something in my project that I was not expecting. He helped us so much. I liked that Tony included discussions of power, who controls what gets said and how it gets said. —Students’ feedback comments, May 2018 Having Tony working with us literally modeled the pros and cons around choosing to claim his identity as a disabled artist (…) Rather than having lectures on diversity, or sitting in meetings talking about BME stats, here he was showing how diversity is a creative opportunity. —Tutor feedback comment, May 2018 It doesn’t matter what I think my identity might be, whatever it is I cannot hide the fact that I am a wheelchair user, and in my interaction with non-disabled people the wheelchair is the first thing they see. I know they will make all sorts of assumptions, many of them negative, about that. My approach then has to be to totally own that identity, be explicit and unashamed about it, it’s situation normal for me, they are the ones that will have to get over it… fortunately, I can help them with that… —Artist comment, April 2018


What next (1): doing it better next time

What next (2): towards inclusive learning

The most immediate feedback from students in the focus groups we undertook after the project, was a shared belief that thinking about identity and difference was central to their developing practices; that there should be more activities that foreground these issues; and that these should be embedded throughout their studies.

As part of our evaluation we are also reviewing the implications for the Foundation programme as a whole. It is clear in talking to tutors that they recognise and value the diversity of students coming onto the course, and already explicitly aim to build from each student’s personal interests and concerns:

These issues are so critical to contemporary art – it is a forum that should be opened up early in the course, and be embedded by the end of the first term.

It’s important to value what they (the students) are already.

This ‘opened my door’, why doesn’t this happen elsewhere? This would have been good for all Foundation students. Issues of diversity increasingly have a voice and are spoken about more widely. We need more conversations about those broader things – and beyond disability, to cover the range and fluidity of identities. Would also be good to explore through the work of relevant non-normative artists. —Students’ feedback comments, May 2018 Students had plenty of valuable suggestions about how starting from diversity and difference might be incorporated into their courses, as well as ideas about how to improve the DisOrdinary Architecture Project interventions for next time– ideas that we will share and discuss through a more detailed evaluation report, and hope to build on in coming years.

With any of the things we do as staff, we try to respond and guide the student. They are the catalyst, and we try to find a way through into one final project that is very much ‘theirs’. The cohort is very diverse (…) The way the studio works, the community of learners is already going in that direction (of creativity in diversity). This is a strength. Identity is a central theme. This goes back to the start of the course, where I say that 150 individuals join us, that this is not a matter of everyone being the same, but having a sense of themselves and bringing that to their work. Learning is not about becoming someone else, but finding who you are and using that productively in your work/ creative practice. —Tutor feedback comment, May 2018 Students also noted and enjoyed this emphasis: To me that is very important (the idea of inclusive learning), these things only happen by doing new things… This university is a great place for the freedom that you get. It opens you to anything you want to learn and gives you the possibility to actually do it. This suggests at least four core components to continuing to develop inclusive learning across The Cass Foundation: •A  diverse intake, bringing and sharing a rich range of perceptions and experiences •T  he valuing of, and building on, different kinds of knowledges, histories and identities •S  paces that enable the development of creativity that starts from difference •E  xplicit embedding of resources in support of diversity throughout courses

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What next (3): disabled artists making DisOrdinary spaces I want to end by briefly giving a background to the DisOrdinary Architecture Project, and how the lessons we are learning in collaboration with The Cass Foundation programme at London Met are influencing what we plan to do next. DisOrdinary grew out of a group of disabled and Deaf artists based in south-east England, who got Arts Council England (ACE) funding over 10 years ago, to make creative work about their experiences of the built environment. Whilst this was an important development for the artists, it showed that a more direct engagement with architects, other built environment, design and art students, educators, researchers and professionals was vital for such creativity to directly inform their practices, and for diverse groups to learn from each other. We started from the belief that disability is most often still treated as outside of history, theory or identity – that is, it is seen as an unproblematic functional ‘category’ and as an individual and ‘tragic’ problem. Art made by disabled people is assumed to be mainly therapy, with art and design practices that centre on access and inclusion predominantly framed as boring and ‘politically correct’ rather than exciting, creative and generative. The DisOrdinary Architecture Project (originally called Architecture Inside-Out) wanted to find ways to challenge these assumptions, through dialogue, creative collaboration and co-design between disabled artists and people across the art and design disciplines. Through ACE funding we developed a series of creative events, initially focused on bringing architects and artists together to generate work and debate. These activities centred on two one-day charrettes (collaborative intensive design workshops), one in the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in May 2018, and the other at the Lightbox, Woking in June 2018, as well as a series of supporting workshops of various kinds. At Tate Modern, for example, 16 architects and 17 disabled and Deaf artists worked in eight collaborative groups. We asked teams to make work in response to the motto “enter this place that is a joy to us.” This was deliberately open-ended – aimed at producing work not just for disabled people, but out of the creative intersections between the day’s diverse participants. By treating each

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other as equals, and by having an equal number of disabled to non-disabled people, disability ceased to be the ‘problem’ (whilst simultaneously being centrally important). By the end of the day, we had filled the Turbine Hall with installations and performances, many of which also involved the public. In a variety of different ways, the work explored how to represent difference constructively and enjoyably, rather than starting from a conventional division between disabled and non-disabled ‘needs’. Since then we have developed and tested a wide variety of interventions building on the creativity and experiences of disabled and Deaf artists – what Zoe Partington calls “disabled people’s particular prowess for ‘reading space’.” We continue to develop partnerships between disabled artists and architectural practices, museum and gallery spaces, and higher education. This might be on specific projects, or it might be through funding artists-in-residence placements or other ways we haven’t thought of yet. The most recent ACE funded programme is enabling us to undertake exploratory projects in 10 different architecture, interiors and arts courses across the UK, at different levels from Foundation through to postgraduate and professional practice courses. As at The Cass, we always try to capture this work as it happens, critically reflecting on it and making it the centre of continuing debate, knowledge sharing and improvement. We need to develop a clearer understanding – and better ways of explaining – what is distinctively innovative and important about this kind of approach to disability, difference, architecture and the arts. We need more projects, publications and events that share the good practice that has already happened, as well as examining how to embed these ideas further. Crucially, we want to go on developing more innovative ways of creatively working together with art and design practitioners, educators, students, theorists and activists to continue the debate through a shared language and understanding of space through difference, and to inspire each other with success stories of what does and doesn’t work. Ultimately it will be this sharing and dissemination of good practices that works to promote the valuing of diversity and difference in art and design education and practice, that can help shifting problematic attitudes to disability and other identities in the wider world, which then can demonstrate how creativity grows out of the vibrant qualities of diversity in all its many forms.


Art is your Bob and Roberta Smith AKA Patrick Brill OBE RA Associate Professor in Fine Art

Human right

Art around the world is under threat. In a post-democratic age, artists have the most to fear. A young poet Naima Abwaan was recently jailed in Somalia for three years. The Kurdish artist Zehra Dogan has been imprisoned by the Turkish Government for depicting an explosion. Ashraf Fayadh, a Palestinian poet and curator, was threatened with a death penalty until the Saudi government commuted his sentence to 800 lashes; there are many more such cases. Artists, poets, musicians and theatre-makers suffer repression by authoritarian regimes for two reasons. Firstly they have a certain access to the media. If they are ‘closed down’ the regime says to the populace “Don’t speak out” and secondly, dictatorships don’t want their citizens to have competing views of the world. In this country we are in danger of clamping down our children’s imaginations. Recently I was pleased to sign a letter published in The Guardian which 100 of my fellow artists were also signatories, expressing the view that the Government’s Ebacc initiative was stifling the arts in schools. At The Cass we are the most diverse art school in the UK. Our job as lecturers is of course to teach, but it’s also to hear and develop new voices. Interesting people make interesting art. The art world is generally is too white, too male and too rich. Everyone has the capacity to make art and I am proud to work at an institution that takes this society-transforming, imaginative and creative part of our humanity and says to all “Art needs you”.

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On being theatrical Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso Theatre and Film course leader, and director of Elastic Theatre

I have been thinking about theatricality a lot over this last academic year. Not only about theatre in itself, but about the property of resembling theatre, of seeing theatre’s own aesthetic conventions and internal logic in other things. Theatre that spills into other art forms: visual arts, architecture, cinema, to name but a few. Teaching and researching theatre within an art school like The Cass, such spillage has become for me ever more significant and an integral part of what I notice in both mine and my students’ work. On our degree programmes in Theatre Arts, we have always championed the idea that theatre and performance may take many forms and should not be confined solely to the traditional stage. Yet, while the integration of performance and its broader frame of ‘perfomativity’ has been an essential part of the art world for decades (indeed, the recent acquisitions by major museums like the Tate testify to this), the relationship between theatre and other arts has often been more problematic. In a recent conference on the subject at Lancaster University, I was reminded of Michael Fried’s essay Art and Objecthood, in which he associated the term theatricality with the negative property of a work to make the viewer conscious of it being art, hence preventing his/her full absorption into the viewing experience. This pejorative connotation of the theatrical, to mean something that presents itself demonstratively and artificially, is not an isolated case in art theory. The word theatre and the word performance, while often blurred for those of us who work in this field, may still denote very different meanings in the art world. Not long ago, performance artist Marina Abramovic made such a distinction clear (at least for her) in a TED talk. “Performance is a mental and physical construction that a performer makes in a specific

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time in space in front of an audience (…) and the difference between performance and theatre is huge. In the theatre, the knife is not a knife and the blood is just ketchup. In the performance, the blood is the material and the razor blade or knife is the tool. It’s all about being there in the real time and you can’t rehearse performance.” I cannot help but see the roots of this perception of theatre as somewhat ‘fake’ in a centurieslong legacy of associating the act of taking on another persona, of pretending a situation, with the seed for immorality and potential danger. And if in the Middle Ages such connotations were deemed downright sinful, now we may approach these as ‘artificial’, with an inherent hint to the idea that to make something theatrical is to make it untrue to itself. Theatre is inextricably porous, hybrid and, let’s say, messy. It refuses to be pinned down to a specific discipline as it always combines a few (acting, choreography, music, design and so on), in ever-changing mixes. Yet, as the fine arts world increasingly embraces those same qualities, the notion of theatricality may indeed represent a useful frame to understand a range of creative expressions. Notice how in so many art gallery programmes the focus has increasingly shifted from the display of permanent objects to the creation of ‘experiences’ for the public, with opportunities for visitors to interact, take part, watch live interventions and play. The Turbine Hall and the Barbican Curve commissions have both championed this notion in recent years. The public yearns for such experiences. Is it to do with entertainment? Possibly. Could this risk becoming gimmicky and ‘dumbing down’ the academic relevance of the museum space? There is always that risk, but I like to think that there is far more to this than mere PR and audience pleasing. In an age of social media, of compulsive selfbroadcasting and of an increased sense of what Baudrillard anticipated more than 30 years ago as the ‘loss of the real’,


theatre’s own constructed realities, consciously staged and made spectacular, may create deep connections with us precisely by refusing to present themselves as real. At once, they recapture our atavistic need to tell stories and amplify these through performance, while at the same time they may reflect our era’s non-linear logic and craving for sensorial immersion. In a recent module I had the pleasure to teach, Installation and Site, students were mentored through a creative process leading them to their own theatrical installations. Among the many exciting offerings that the students made, Spanish student Belen Gonzalez responded to this task with a powerful durational tableau. Recreating the setting of a kitchen in the Atrium workshop, she continuously peeled and chopped onions, her gaze directed at a television screen, itself positioned on a kitchen surface littered with onions. Her eyes increasingly tearful, she sustained this action for hours, while the screen showed a medley of news footage from the recent unrest in Catalonia, paradoxically mixed with melodramatic telenovelas. In the deliberate ambiguity of this statement, we the audience were immersed in a setting, in which we simultaneously witnessed the reality of the performer’s physical presence in the space, her real tears, her progressive exhaustion, as well as the choreographed construction of the mise en scene. And while the knife actually was a knife in this case, to go back to Abramovic’s quote, it’s the constructedness of the setting and its playfulness that gives it its power; the tears were real tears but they were also fictional. We were ingeniously triggered to reflect on our own response to the media and whether we too may inadvertently choreograph this. Theatricality may tease us with ostentation, selfreferentiality and disguise. Cinema, beyond its conventional association with detailed realism when compared to the language of the stage, has also, in many cases, borrowed these same characteristics. Another highlight from this year’s work reminds me of this. I have always been intrigued by Federico Fellini’s cinematography, particularly in his later, increasingly non-linear works. Giulietta degli Spiriti, signalling the start of this phase in his career, struck me as a perfect opportunity to explore how cinematic theatricality may be adapted to live performance. Depicting a bored housewife in a bourgeois house in 1960s Italy, confronting her demons as she comes to terms with her husband’s adultery, the film encapsulates many of the theatrical conventions for which Fellini’s cinema became known. Mostly filmed in studio, exposing its own artificiality through stylised sets and lighting, the film captures Fellini’s quintessential aesthetics; a fascination for the sacred and the profane and for the poetic and the grotesque; the careful choreographic composition of every single shot, often at the expense of the credibility of the scenario or the characterisation; the self-referentiality of characters sporadically looking straight into the camera, breaking the implicit fourth wall. Despite the inbuilt theatricality of the film, the task of adapting this to the stage proved arduous to say the least. Film and theatre typically denote different

timing needs, different dialogue styles, not to mention the scale of what cinema (particularly in Fellini’s gigantic productions) may achieve if compared to live performance. Yet, precisely because of the challenge, the students and I gained even more motivation. The sheer beauty of Fellini’s imagery highlighted to us the responsibility in adapting his work. I think we succeeded in this and it has been without any doubt one of the most enjoyable experiences I have had, staging work in our campus facilities. The theme of intermedial adaption informed other highlights this academic year. Directed by Jelmer Tuinstra, our Theatre and Film students revisited Strindberg’s A Dream Play, in a site-specific staging inside the atmospheric environment of our currently disused Boiler House; a venue that we hope to continue using for more exciting projects of this kind, beautifully lending itself to immersive theatrical experiences. Part of a module entitled Combining Theatre and Film, the project sought to reinterpret the text through both live and digital media. Opening with a secret message for the audience to be found in a temporary weblink, the staging featured Skype conversations, live camera feeds, video projections and voiceovers integrated with live performance, in an enticing reimagining of the play’s oneiric imagery. Ironically, if theatricality was previously mentioned as an antidote to an increasingly mediatised world, digital technology may on the other hand help us expand our theatrical imagination, discovering new possibilities in the language of performance. As I write these words, I am preparing for a new research project, this time in collaboration with artist Takaya Fujii, who recently gave a talk at our University, and Weissraum Gallery in Kyoto. Here, I aim to explore Ikebana, the Japanese tradition of floral arrangement, through the frame of theatricality. This art form, which is increasingly established in the west, often surprises the viewer in its contemporary aesthetic, despite a history of many centuries. Far from being simply decorative, the complex philosophy behind its compositional rules makes Ikebana practice an act of careful contemplation as well as one of aesthetic action. What started for me as a recreational pastime now is taking on an increasingly layered connotation. Is floral arranging comparable to the act of staging? Do plants ‘perform’, in their live process of blossoming and decaying? Is the act of arranging these a theatrical experience in itself? As I investigate these questions, I am happy to keep my understanding of theatricality open. Whether digital or live, our idea of what constitutes being theatrical will continue to be an evolving concept. This is only logical: if theatre is a constantly self-redefining art form, no understanding of theatricality, by consequence, will ever be exhaustive or definitive. And, as the property of resembling, hinting at theatre, of playing with theatre, theatricality will continue to posit questions, playfully refusing a resolution or a denouement.

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M A

Project outputs are as diverse as the many perspectives brought to the course, from artworks for public exhibition to architectural live-projects. 001 Lieta Marziali, Are We There Yet – On Recurrence, Recollection and the Resilience of Material Existence, 2018. 002 Stacked Up animation work in progress, 2017. 003 Claridge 1,000 ideas.

001

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P R O J E C T

B Y

The MA by Project is a one-year full-time or two-year parttime interdisciplinary research degree. The MA supports students in undertaking and completing a self-directed research project through creative and professional practice. Students come to the MA by Project from a range of disciplinary backgrounds and experiences to join a research community which spans all of The Cass subject areas. The course takes advantage of the broad range of experience and expertise represented by the School’s teaching staff and each student is appointed a project supervisor whom they work with throughout. Students are further supported by taught modules in research methods, theoretical studies and sustainable practice which offer a lively interdisciplinary forum.


002

003

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196

The Cass Session Furniture and Product Design students collaborate with Italian restaurant Carluccio’s to design new pasta shapes, with their work judged by late Antonio Carluccio. Architecture alumnus Frances Williams named as second winner in RIBA Journal Eye Line drawing competition. The book, Reinterpretation, about our our urban spaces celebrates ongoing collaboration between The Cass Interiors and Dongyang Mirae University in South Korea. Fine Art alumnus Samuel Eyles exhibits solo show Behind Closed Doors at the Ply Gallery. Textile Design graduate Ellie Williams named new artist-in-residence for Daylesford Estate in From Land To Craft competition. Session 3: The Cass Yearbook 2017 is launched. The Cass is one of 10 venues for Art Night London, hosting the exhibition by Güneş Terkol.

JULY

The Estate of Today and Tomorrow, run by The Cass unit leaders Mae Architects. The practice Feilden Fowles opens their studios to the public and The Cass Summer Show 2017 attracts 2,500 to the private view.

S U M M E R

The Cass lecturer Sian Moxon’s National Park City project included in Mayor of London’s environmental strategy. Theatre and Performance Practice students collaborate with Istituto Teatrale Europeo for intensive workshop series. Technology staff receive commendation for excellence from Institute of Structural Engineers for their Mudchute Making Workshop. Lecturer Alpa Depani awarded a Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship to explore approaches to the design of public realm in global cities. Calabria Live Project sees Architecture students return to Italy to continue collaborative work with villagers and refugees. Lines of Thought design exhibition celebrates the work which takes place before final designs are realised. Creative Writing and English Literature students team up with Visual Communication students to publish inaugural collaborative Anthology. The Cass events for #LFA2017 include panel discussion Graffiti, Memory and the City examining alumnus Marc Vallée’s photographic project, the exploration of Old Kent Road at Livesey Exchange by The Cass Cities and architectural practice what if: projects, the River Walks Series curated by student Louis Mayes, and the guided tour

JUNE

NEWS/EVENTS Strange Lands solo exhibition by Fine Art alumna Dolores De Sade explores memory, nostalgia, myth and narrative. The Cass Professor(s) Bob and Roberta Smith, aka Patrick Brill, transform the Hull School of Art and Design into a Freedom of Expression Centre.

AUGUST

Long-term collaboration between Head of Visual Communication Susanna Edwards and author and filmmaker Iain Sinclair is celebrated as part of The House of the Last London exhibition. Other Worlds showcases the work of Photography, Fine Art, MA by Project and PhD research students at the School. Making Matters for London Design Festival 2017 explores the process of designing and making through pieces by 20 design graduates and alumni. Awash with Ideas, a day of textile design workshops and a street party, attracts local community and schools. Entrer: Five architectures in Belgium is a multisensory exhibition by WallonieBruxelles Architectures exploring the diversity of architectural processes in Belgium, curated by Audrey Contesse. Photography alumnus David George presents his solo exhibition The Broken Pastoral at the Sid Motion Gallery. The Cass Starters, a group of design alumni, exhibit with manufacturer and retailer company SCP as part of London Design Festival. Graphic design studio, Regular Practice, announce collaboration with The Cass Visual Communication as research partners. Textile Design alumna Vicky Cowin wins Elle Decoration British Design Award for exquisite woven wall hangings. Rosemarie McGoldrick, Head of Fine Art, presents the talk Unscoping Animals at The Political Animal event.

SEPTEMBER

AU T U MN

20


Crossing Cultures collaboration is launched between Architecture Studio 3 and Unit 6 and Comune di Belmonte, Calabro, Italy. Postgraduate Architecture students work with the 15th Fulham Scout Group to create a live construction project as part of Applied Technology studies. Design graduate Laura Bradshaw-Heap fundraises for her Mother Makers network of artistic mothers to exhibit at Munich Jewellery Week. Fine Art alumna Charlotte Aitken wins national ARTIQ Graduate Art Prize. Three of the six shortlisted designs in the London Festival of Architecture Modern Maypole competition are by practices led by alumni from The Cass. Humans Being

NOVEMBER

Architecture alumna Julia King completes PhD by Practice project involving a live sanitation initiative in a slum resettlement in Savda Ghewra, home to over 8,000 families in Delhi, India. Interiors graduate Petra Heftberger announced winner at the National Association of Shopfitters Design Partnership Awards. The Cass connected female artists and metalsmiths Juliette Bigley, Ane Christensen, Rebecca de Quin, Simone ten Hompel and Adi Toch for inaugural TRESOR contemporary craft exhibition in Switzerland. PhD student William Longden founds The Joy of Sound charity, providing bespoke instruments and workshops where disabled people make a new kind of community music. Furniture and Product Design graduate, Mandie Beuzeval, enjoys success at the London Design Festival with her innovative Great Dryer. Fine Art alumnus Leonardo Ulian presents a solo exhibition, Real Reality, at Beers London. Takero Shimazaki, postgraduate architecture studio leader, appears on the popular TV series, Grand Designs. Theatre Arts senior lecturer, Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso, exhibits Precarious Balance/Equilibrio Precario at ArteSpazioTempo in Venice.

OCTOBER Digital is Fine Art alumna Nye Thompson’s exhibition at The Lowry, Salford, exploring the role of digital technologies in art. Novelist and creative writing lecturer Dr Sunny Singh publishes first in-depth study of Indian superstar Amitabh Bachan’s film career and star persona. Theatre and Performance Practice alumna Lizzie Willis explores madness in Shakespeare’s plays with Luke Dixon in Bedlam. Furniture and Product Design students enjoy cultural trip to Eindhoven, the Netherlands, visiting museums and innovative creative spaces. Head of Visual Communication Susanna Edwards facilitates at Southampton’s 2117 Speculative Futures project. Notes On My Family, the debut novel by Creative Writing graduate Emily Critchley is published. Kickstarter for Creatives: Leading Designers and Makers, including Max Frommeld, Oscar Lhermitte and Sidekick Creatives, discuss the power of crowdfunding to a full house at The Cass. Fergus Feilden and Edmund Fowles, leaders of undergraduate Architecture Studio 11, win University of Oxford Green Templeton College design competition. Art exhibition Between the Sword and the Wall at Islington Arts Factory features work of Fine Art alumni Samuel Eyles, Miguel Angel Ferrer and James Johnston. Bob and Roberta’s Excellent Protest Adventure, a BBC documentary presented by The Cass Fine Art Professor(s) Bob and Roberta Smith aka Patrick Brill, explores the age of activism by following a year of protests across the world. 2,000 students attend over 50 employability events at the School’s Making a Living Week. Interior Design alumna turned illustrator Lina Navickaite captures visual takeaway of talk to students by Jo Casselle, a furniture alumna.

Big Blanket for Crisis project from Textile Design creates a huge blanket to raise awareness of homelessness in London. Theatre and Performance Practice students present In the Dust of Things Unsettled, a multimedia and live performance event in Calcutta House’s Atrium, inspired by explorations of London’s major collections. Musarc, the architectural choir/research project, hold their Christmas concert at Christ Church Spitalfields. Architecture Unit 8 students studying the urban development of cities in the Midlands present their work to the Mayor of Leicester. Acclaimed actor and writer, Richard Katz, visits Theatre Arts students to discuss his experience of working in the performing arts. Twelfth annual open studios event The Cass Christmas Cracker features exhibition by Fine Art and Photography students. The Cass Foundation students participate in Window Wanderland at London Met’s Aldgate Library, an international festive initiative developed by alumna, Lucy Reeves Khan. The winter graduation ceremony sees hundreds of graduands celebrate their academic achievements at London’s Barbican Centre. Lorelei Press announces Sarah Jane Wilson, Creative Writing alumna, will have her debut novel, Out There, published in 2018. Denise Lewis, recent Textile Design graduate, wins competition to design curtains for Toynbee Hall. An evening of poetry and prose celebrates launch of Just Met 2017, an anthology of student creative writing.

DECEMBER

017 W IN T E R 2017

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NEWS/EVENTS

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Alumnus Gareth Jones is first artist-inresidence at Grow Pod, Hackney. Senior lecturer Dr Jane Turner leads Open Dance Creative Performance project in London and Cambridge. The Seeker, a new work by Fine Art alumna Nye Thompson, is presented at the V&A’s Drop-in Digital Design session. Photography lecturer Paola Leonardi presents her exhibition Borderlands: The Edges of Europe at Shutter Hub. Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso exhibits sculptural work, Hole, with Anise Gallery at the London Art Fair.

JANUARY

Theatre Arts students perform extracts of their projects to Adrian Berry, artistic director of London’s Jacksons Lane Theatre. The Observer’s Rowan Moore, architecture critic, praises work of alumni Casswell Bank Architects. Work by contemporary art jeweller and MA by Project student Lieta Marziali features in book Narrative Jewelry: Tales from the Tool Box. Contemporary Design Studios in London event sees world-renowned design studios Gareth Neal, Glithero and Raw Edges present at the School. Fashion designers of the future showcase their designs in the third annual Project Red catwalk show. Jewellery and Silversmithing students present exhibition Material Romance at Contemporary Applied Arts. THE WHOLE WORLD IS AN ART SCHOOL! exhibition by The Cass Professor(s) Bob and Roberta Smith opens at Von Bartha Gallery in Basel. Interiors students plan re-purposing a shipping container for community project via Skype with Kate Carlyle of Monkeybiz, South Africa. The Forgotten Suffragettes talk explores historic and contemporary women’s rights and class struggle. MA by Project alumna Juliette Bigley wins the Collect Open Artist prize at the Craft Council’s International Fair for Contemporary Objects.

FEBRUARY

W I N TE R

Architecture exhibition, Everything Out the Door, reveals results of CAMPO research project curated by Matteo Costanzo and Maria S Giudici. Furniture graduate Ray Brown selected to exhibit alongside his tutor Peter Marigold at show to celebrate 15 years of The Aram Gallery. Furniture students take part in the inaugural Up In The Cloud furniture design competition sponsored by Collaborate, Perkins+Will and Verco. Student-led curatorial group presents A Connection is Made exhibition at Gallery 46, exploring collaboration at The Cass. Architectural practices and studio leaders Mae Architects and what if: projects make shortlist of annual Architect of the Year Awards organised by Building Design. The annual Easter Bunny Fine Art and Photography exhibition takes the form of a pop-up salon. Design for Cultural Commons lecture series curated by Torange Khonsari coincides with launch of the new postgraduate programme. Art alumnus Gabriel Andreu presents first solo exhibition, Emaskulate, at the Cavespace in Pimlico. Maeve Brennan delivers inaugural The Cass Histories Lecture, On History and Repair. Hidden Heroine sees Photography students, staff and invited artists celebrate personal role models as part of Women’s History Month. Fine Art lecturers Michael Stubbs and Andrea Medjesi-Jones feature in Destroyed by Shadows at Cornerstone Gallery, Liverpool Hope University. Fred Gatley, who teaches ceramics, exhibits new work at The Rabley Gallery in Wiltshire.

MARCH

20 S P R I N G 2018


The Cass hosts It’s Going to be Good, an international event for young changemakers from 60 nations, coinciding with the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting. First-year Interiors students investigating new typologies within architecture visit the Old Oak Collective, a large co-living space. Performance and art special guest lecturer Takaya Fujii gives students an insight into contemporary work inspired by the ancient Japanese tradition, Ikebana. Architecture alumnus Thomas Randall-Page wins annual Architecture Foundation Antepavilion Competition with design for inflatable performance venue. Studio leaders Gareth Morris and Ulrike Steven of what if: projects named Infrastructure Architects of the Year at the BD Architect of the Year Awards. The Cass Interiors students work with artist and author Rachel Lichtenstein on a project at Sandys Row Synagogue, one of UK’s oldest surviving Ashkenazi synagogues. Projects by teaching practices Cottrell and Vermeulen, Mae Architects and Feilden Fowles shortlisted for RIBA London Awards. Reader in Silversmithing Simone ten Hompel features in Impulse/ Impulses book celebrating 30 years of innovative artist-in-residence programmes in Schwäbisch Gmünd. MA by Project student Lieta Marziala’s work features in online exhibition by Australia’s Garland Magazine. Student society MASS at The Cass welcomes Hello Wood, an awardwinning Hungarian practice who are hosting the summer school Cabin Fever. First-year Fine Art students curate series of pop-up exhibitions at venues in east London and Southend-on-Sea. Tractus, a rug by Textile Design student Frances McBain, is manufactured in India and exhibited in Germany following Tissage competition success. The Cass Cities host screening of Concrete Soldiers documentary exploring social cleansing in council housing.

APRIL Weird Garden was an evening of experimental sound and vision curated by Fine Art student Raisa Watkiss. At Hammering Out a Poem, artist Peter Clossick speaks about the philosophy and ideas behind his figurative paintings. New Beginnings is a graduation showcase by Theatre and Performance Practice students at Chelsea Theatre. A selection of photographs and memorabilia from the Brady Club’s archive exhibited at Loom in Aldgate. Architecture lecturer Alpa Depani selected for Public Practice scheme placing new generation of planners in local government. Furniture students exhibit at both Up in The Clouds at House of Detention and BDP’s Bauhaus Kite Party during Clerkenwell Design Week. Work by photography alumni David George and Marc Vallée features in London Nights, a new exhibition at the Museum of London. Rosie Hervey, architecture alumna and tutor is awarded Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship for project to investigate different models of living together.

MAY

Culture

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SALON, The Cass Graduate Fashion Show 2018, saw the traditional runway replaced with an interactive showcase. Students Ella Merriman and Tarn Phillipp granted Venice Fellowships by British Council and spend a month researching in Venice during the international biennale. Theatre Arts lecturer Rishi Trikha takes part in the Circus 50:50 programme which includes a director’s residency at the Roundhouse and at the New Vic Theatre. 23rd Irish Writers in London Summer School takes place. Designs by The Cass alumni Casswell Banks and Yinka Ilori make final of Dulwich Pavilion competition, organised by the London Festival of Architecture. The exhibition Identity and diversity: different ways of being-in-the-world is presented at Calcutta House’s roof garden in collaboration with The DisOrdinary Architecture Project. Structure prototypes by Architecture students exhibited in Place for Play: the Search for Identity in Aldgate Square. The Cass Cities present Planning Action Old Kent Road, a two-day workshop initiating creative responses to the area’s key contested development sites. Made from 45,000 coins, the bench Money Box, created by alumnus Nicholas Kirk Architects, is one of winners of the LFA City Benches Design competition. Art courses at The Cass are ranked fourth in The Guardian’s university league tables for 2019. The Cass Projects Office and Tower Hamlets Council launch 28 Brick Lane Street art competition. Brick Lane Girl by photography alumna Héloïse Bergman is among top picks at Royal Academy Summer Show. Aardman animator Richard Haynes exhibits postgraduate project exploring nostalgia. The Cass Summer Show 2018 opens with a packed private view on 21 June.

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The Cass Hothouse Talks October–April Guest lecture series from the Visual Communication area Amélie Barnathan, illustrator and print-maker; Kellenberger-White, designer; Rachel Littlewood, designer and riso-printer; Mason London aka Joe Prytherch, illustrator and animator; Mother London; National Theatre’s Graphic Design Studio; Patrick Savile, illustrator and printmaker; Mark Stansfield, The Paper Library; Serena Wise, art director; Fiona Woodcock, illustrator and animator Organised by Emily Evans Interiors Cinema Club October–November Season exploring our sense of self and the material world Midnight in Paris (dir. Woody Allen, 2011); Orlando (dir. Sally Potter, 1992); Goodbye Lenin (dir. Wolfgang Becker, 2003); The Grand Budapest Hotel (dir. Wes Anderson, 2014) Introductions by Dr Harriet McKay and Kaye Newman Open Field Residencies October–May Fine Art residency programme and related events providing students with insight into how artists practice Bethan Hughes; Jamie Jenkinson; Smári Róbertsson and Will Peck; Matthew Smith; Chooc Ly Tan; WOCI Reading Group (Rehana Zaman, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Samia Malik) Curated by Ben Cain 3D Design November and February Kickstarter for Creatives (Heather Corcoran; Max Frommeld; Oscar Lhermitte; Sidekick Creatives) Contemporary Design Studios in London (Glithero; Gareth Neal; Raw Edges) Curated by Peter Marigold


The Cass Research Seminar Programme November–April Researchers and practitioner-researchers from the School and the wider world come together to present their work for review amongst peers. Including: The Death and Life of Public Streets, Dr Agustina Martire; StreetSpace Workshop; Networks of Making and Inhabitation, Mike Baldwin and Lewis Jones; An Architecture of Relationships, Signy Svalastoga; Regeneration: London’s Lost Industry, Juliet Davis (Cardiff) and Jane Clossick; The Architecture of Business, Large and Small, Frances Holliss and Mark Brearley; PhD students’ progress submission presentations, Torange Khonsari and Marie Brenneis; An Exploration of Pedagogy and Research, James Benedict Brown (Norwich), Matthew Barac, Sandra Denicke-Polcher and Digby Warren; The Architecture of Autonomy: Threats and opportunities for self-authorship in urban space, Jane Clossick and Ben Colburn (Glasgow); PhD students’ progress submission presentations, Asif Din and Annisa Jabbour; On Beauty in Art and Architecture, Rut Blees Luxemburg and Patrick Lynch; PhD students’ progress submission presentations, Bobby Supatira, Jane McAllister and Mary-Jane Opie; City Making from the Bottom Up, Maurice Mitchell; Projects from the Architecture Research Unit, Florian Beigel, Philip Christou, Lucy Pritchard and Pau Bajet. Form-Givers January–March Young practices throughout Europe who are delivering their first projects discuss architectural language and form. APPARATA; Arrhov Frick; Estar; Harqueitectes; David Leech Curated by James Payne Who Cares? February–March The Cass explores humanitarianism through self-initiated architectural projects in marginalised communities in both developed and developing countries.

Publishing and the Industry February–May Guest series from English and Creative Writing exploring all aspects of the publication journey Jon Gray, book designer; Sarah Hodgson, HarperCollins; Kate Manning, Waterstones, Random House and Simon and Schuster; Matthew Plampin, author; Alice Saunders, LAW; Bartley Shaw, HarperCollins Children’s Books; Nikesh Shukla, novelist, screenwriter, editor and broadcaster; Liz Vater, Stoke Newington Literary Festival; Sarah Wasley, Granta and Portobello Books. Presented by Dr Louise Tucker On Histories and Repair 18 March The Cass Histories Lecture 2018 – inaugural lecture in new annual series delivered by Maeve Brennan. Design for Cultural Commons April–May Series accompanying launch of the new MA programme exploring aspects of the cultural commons debate. Tom Dobson, public works; Nicolas Fonty, Justmap; John Bingham-Hall, Theatrum Mundi; Dr Adam Kassa, RCA; Torange Khonsari, London Met; Andreas Lang, R-URBAN; Mothiur Rahman; Dr Diana Stirbu, London Met; Sion Whellens, Solid Fund. Curated by Torange Khonsari The London Society Saturday Schools June–July Exploring the architecture of London from the years before the First World War, through the period of long reinvention, to the present day. Neil Bennett; Jane Clossick; Tom Coward; Benedict O’Looney and Mark Prizeman. Curated in collaboration with Cass Cities

Assemble and RARA; Design Affects, Azuko Orizzontale, La Seppie Lab Remi Conolly and Vicky Cave; Sam Mitchell and Here There Architecture; Tak Tak Tak and Khora; Tumpa Yasmin and Studio Nuumi. Organised by Nastassia Ruescher, Manvir Hansra, Agnieszka Pyrdol, Unit 6

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A C R O S S S C H O O L


Speakers, Making a Living Week 2017

Critics, Celebration Week 2018

Making a Living Week is The Cass’s annual festival of employability and entrepreneurship, offering guest speakers, talks, events, workshops and careers advice for our students.

Celebration Week is an opportunity for students from across the School to present their studio work to panels of external critics. The week provides a daily programme of ‘crits’, screenings, events and pop-up shows.

3D Deborah Salvador Kitty Joseph Kit Miles Kim Thome Yinko Ilori

3D Yinka Ilori – Furniture designer Sara Gunn – Jewellery maker Emma Hardstaff – Fashion designer Kim Thome – Furniture, interiors and product designer

Accelerator Natasha Triay – Accelerator, London Architecture Lucy Mori – KLMORI Alex Gordon – Jestico + Whiles Nabil Hamdi Tak, Tak, Tak East Quinton Pop – HOK Levent Kerimol – GLA Melisa Meyer – We Made That Sandra Coppin – Coppin Dockray

Architecture: Undergraduate Dr Frances Holliss – Director of the WorkHome Project Aran Chadwick – Director of ‘Atelier One’ Gianni Botsford – Architectural tutor and practitioner Architecture: Postgraduate Eugene Asse – Architect, scholar and critic Shumi Bose – Architectural writer, historian, editor and teacher Lisa Shell – Founder of Lisa Shell Architects Stephanie Macdonald – Architect Fine Art and Photography Gillian Fox – Curator, commissioner and arts project manager Robin Klassnik – Gallery director

Careers Fiona Tracey – Employment Outcomes, London Met

Foundation Dr Jos Boys – Independent scholar

English and Creative Writing Michael Hughes Louise Tucker Emily Critchley

Interiors Professor Graeme Brooker – Head of Interior Design, Royal College of Art Julia Rowntree – Co-director of arts organisation, Clayground Collective Tamsin Green – Project leader and architect, Heatherwick Studio

Fine Art and Photography Paola Leonardi – Photography senior lecturer, London Met Ben Cain – Fine Art senior lecturer, London Met Charlotte Cullinan – 4 COSE Jane Richards – 4 COSE Pete Fillingham – Fine Art senior lecturer, London Met Ray Massey Patrick Ward – Fine Art senior lecturer, London Met Patrick Brill – Fine Art senior lecturer, London Met Steve Macleod – Director, Metro Imaging Sarah-Jane Rawlings – Fun Palaces Galia Kollectiv – Fine Art senior lecturer, London Met

Theatre Arts Adrian Berry – Artistic director, Jacksons Lane Theatre Visual Communication Tom Sharp – Founder and creative director of The Beautiful Meme Rose Blake – Illustrator and artist Emily Gosling – Senior editor at AIGA Eye on Design and editor of Type Notes magazine

Interiors Owen Williams – sixredsquares Joanne Caselle Del Hossain Adrem Kickstarter for Creatives The Cass Starters Group Sidekick Creatives Heather Corcoran – Kickstarter Peter Marigold – Furniture senior lecturer, London Met Max Frommeld – Kickstarter Oscar Lhermitte – Kickstarter Theatre Arts Stef Smith Richard Katz Visual Communication Kate Moross – Studio Moross Kati Russell – The Girlhood Fig Taylor – Regular Practice Tom Finn – Regular Practice Kristofer Soelling Justin Hobson – Fenner Paper Nik Hill Jonathan Clarke

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S H O R T C O U R S E S


Our skills-based courses provide learning opportunities to a wide range of students with a variety of personal or professional reasons for attending. Students benefit from tuition from our practitioner-academics and enjoy stateof-the-art workshop facilities. The Cass has a history of teaching creative skills to makers and artists from the local area and beyond, stretching back to the 1800s. We uphold this heritage through short courses in traditional disciplines such as upholstery, furniture-making, restoration and conservation alongside a broad portfolio of contemporary creative art, architecture and design subject areas reflecting the School’s expertise. We also offer skills-based Continuing Professional Development (CPD) courses, as well as bespoke tuition on request. We consistently update our portfolio to reflect the shifting educational and employment landscape and in response to the feedback we receive from our students. We have recently introduced one- and two-day workshops to allow first-time students to explore a new skill before committing further, and masterclasses for those building on previous experience. We are developing our portfolio preparation courses beyond the 16 to 18-year-old demographic to reflect the rising numbers of students seeking to enter higher education at different stages in their lives. 2018-19 promises to be another year of providing inspiring and life-enhancing courses. Courses currently on offer: Furniture and upholstery AMUSF Modern and Traditional Upholstery Introduction to Traditional Upholstery Upholstery Skills One-Day Workshop – Drop-In Seat Upholster a Traditional Kidney Shape Stool – Masterclass Chair Caning Introduction to Furniture Making Intermediate Furniture Making Modern and Traditional Finishing Restoration and conservation Furniture Restoration Gilding for Beginners Historic Varnishes and Finishes: Japanning and Oil Finishing Architecture and Interiors Portfolio Preparation – Interiors Design Portfolio Preparation for 16-to-18 year-olds (Architecture, Spatial Design and Interior Architecture) RIBA: Practice in the UK Designing Through 3D Sketching Sketching Interior Spaces Design for Retail Interiors Algorithmic Design Techniques with Grasshopper AutoCad Fundamentals AutoCad Intermediate Introduction to ARCHICAD BIM

Graphics and illustration Children’s Book Illustration – One-Day Workshop Create an Editorial Illustration in a Day Experimental Drawing Illustrated Packaging – One-Day Workshop Introduction to Children’s Book Illustration Introduction to Hand-Drawn Type Introduction to Illustration Introduction to Screen Printing Working in Collage Jewellery and silversmithing Chain Making and Wirework From Metal Sheet to Hollow Form  – Making Vessels and Containers Jewellery Making with Metal and Resin Recycle Your Old Jewellery Photography Alternative Photographic Printmaking Black and White Photographic Print Processes  – The Essentials Botanical Cyanotypes Discover Photography InDesign for Photographers Introduction to Colour Printing from Film Introduction to Photography One-Day Introduction to Colour Printing Software and digital design 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping Fashion and textiles Introduction to Weaving Rug Gun Tufting – Two-Day Workshop Introduction to Leatherwork Leather Belt Making Musical instrument making Introduction to Guitar Making Intermediate/Advanced Guitar Making Theatre production Devising Character Commedia dell’Arte for the 21st Century Irish Writers in London Summer School

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S T A F F

staff list A Nabil Ahmed Funmilayo Akinlabi Stephanie Aman Susan Andrews Attua Apparicio Hector Arkomanis Julie Asis Julia Atkins Edwina Attlee

F Deej Fabyc Arrash Fakouri George Fereday Peter Fillingham Thomas Finn Marianne Forrest Edmund Fowles Oriana Fox Tony Fretton

B Jon Baldwin Alexander Bank Matthew Barac Manuela Barczewski Robert Barnes Kieron Baroutchi Abigail Batchelor Mick Battley Francesca Baxter Oliver Bayliss Keith Beckles Zoe Berman James Binning Kelvin Birk Lisa Bloomer Mark Bloomfield Sid Bose Marcus Bowerman Levent Bozdere Adam Bradley Mark Brearley Patrick Brill Pascal Bronner Richard Brown Sam Brown Paul Brown Luisa Brotas Andrea Bugli Toby Burgess Vanessa Butt

G Matthew Gates Fred Gatley Richard Gatti David George Lezley George Cristina Gerada Indra Gersone Nandita Ghose Lucie Gledhill Lisa Goldman Paloma Gormley David Grandorge Andrew Grant James Grant Damian Grist Naomi Groves

C Ben Cain Stuart Cameron Sara Carneholm John Cash Sam Casswell Alexander Catina Jolanta Cerniauskiene Zelda Cheatle Robin Clifton Jane Clossick Jason Coe Gonzalo Coello De Portugal John Coleman Mark Collington Jeremy Collins Angela Constantinou Jonathan Cook Karen Coughlan Joe Cruz Andrew Cutting D Pereen D’Avoine Pierre D’Avoine Nick Da Costa Ania Dabrowska Mathew Dart Emma Davenport Karen David Ron Davis Nico De Oliveira Sandra Denicke-Polcher Alpa Depani Michael Dillon Eva Diu Richard Ducker E Sebastian Edge Susanna Edwards Alex Ely Chris Emmett Laura Encinas Ortega Adam Entwisle Emily Evans Sinead Evans Ricardo Eversley

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H Christoph Hadrys Kevin Haley Alistair Hall James Hand Dr Paul Harper Charlotte Harris Janette Harris Karl Harris Kevin Hayley Mathias Herbst Rosie Hervey Andrew Hewish Danielle Hewitt Thomas Hillier Andy Hills David Hobson Frances Holliss Christopher Holt Christopher Hosegood Ellie Howard David Howarth David Howells Peter Hufton James Hunting I Summer Islam J Andrew Jackson Lydia Johnson Jenny Johnson Jillian Jones Luke Jones AnatolJust K Anna Kamyk Hannah Kane Koki Kang Anne Karpf Yiannis Katsaris John Keefe Sinead Keegan Maeva Khachfe Mursheda Khanom Torange Khonsari Ah-Ra Kim Fumi Kimura Maria Klimko Joseph Kohlmaier Galia Kollectiv L Lee Lapthorne Alex Law David Leech Paola Leonardi Emma Lesley Angharad Lewis (Briggs) Tania Lopez Winkler Maggi Loughran

Anna Ludwig Jonas Lundberg M Jonas Mace Gordon Maclaren Simone Maier Peter Marigold Franco Marinelli Anne Markey Andy Marritt Jane Mcallister Heather McDonough Rosemarie McGoldrick Harriet Mckay Andrea Medjesi-Jones Joanna Meehan Anna Mill Maurice Mitchell Gareth Morris Rod Morris Siân Moxon Tony Murray N Rose Nag Tanya Nash Martin Nässén Robert Naylor Kaye Newman Jen Ng Fergus Nicol Rose Nordin Trevor Norris O Colin O’Sullivan Niall O’Sullivan Elena Onyshchenko Ben Oram Gabriele Oropallo P Christina Paine Janette Parris Angela Pascoe Shamoon Patwari James Payne Kate Payne Emily Penny Ingrid Petit Simon Petty Miles Phillips Gina Pierce Elaine Pierson Sophie Pitt James Pockson Francesca Pont David M Price R Harvey Reehal Miguel Reyna Lisa Rigolli Chianna Roberts Jane Roberts Gian Carlo Rossi Tom Routh S Michelle Salamon Damaso Sanchez Randulfe Victoria Sandars Jacek Scarso Alex Schouvaloff Conor Scully Allan Seago Punya Sehmi Takero Shimizaki Andrew Siddall Edward Simpson Sunny Singh Marina Skia Suzanne Smeeth-Poaros William Smith Paul Smythe Carlos Soler Kristoffer Solling Rachael South Ben Speltz Peter St John Cathy Stack

Ulrike Steven Alice Stevenson James Stevenson Lesley Stevenson Andrew Stone Ewan Stone Michael Stubbs Signy Svalastoga Richard Szusman Beata Szwast T Bo Tang Stephen Taylor Ali Taylor Ian Teague Jamie Teasdale Simone ten Hompel Maria Theodorou Anne Thomas Theodoros Thysiades Adi Toch Rishi Trikha Georgios Tsakiridis Cecile Tschirhart Louise Tucker Jelmer Tuinstra Jane Turner Shaun Turner U Michael Upton V Cristina Vanegas Francesca Vilalta Kim Vousden W Chiying (Jean) Wang Patrick Ward Kieran Wardel Russell Weekes Geraldine Wharry Claire Whelan Richard Whitby Jonathan Whitehall Matthew Whiteley Owain Williams Mick Williamson Rufus Willis Sam Wingate Y Fiona Yaron-Field Heidi Yeo


A Sehlah Aaqab Mira Abad Lydia Abbott Fatima Abdul Hamid Hussein Abdullah Daniel Abellan Felices Diana Abid Zehra Abidi Ossama Aboallaban Zahra Aboobaker Elora Aboua Debora Abrantes Lima Jose Maria Abreu Pereira Licia Abreu Santos Sara Abubaker Shirley Accini Alexandra Achi Dmitriy Adaev Ishaaq Adam Amber Adams Leah Adams Oluwafunmbi Adeagbo Jonathan Adebanjo Caroline Adegeye Oluwaseyi Adelowo Genesis Adewole Kevin Adorni Sylvia Aehle Yasmin Afif Zana Agafonova Karen Agyekum-Hene Ian Ahabwe Shakibur Ahad Anika Ahamed Khan Mariame Ahmad Atta-Ul-Karim Ahmed Syed Ahmed Muse Ahmed Nishat Ahmed Miriam Ahmed Syed Ahmed Zaeem Ahmed Moayad Ahmed Afrah Ahmed Mohamed Matteo Aiello Charlotte Aiken Fiona Ainomgisha Charys-Love Akamessan Seyithan Akbas Paul Akinniran Olamidotun Akinrosotu Janet Akinyemi Akabla Akro Jubedha Akther Haidar Al Har Shams Al Saffar Rana Al-Kolaibi Seyi Alabi Mohamed Alasow Goncalo Albuquerque Revellino Alcendor Beatriz Alcobia Parag Ale Ritu Ale Alexandra Alexandrou Qasim Ali Sabreen Ali Chopy Ali Jalal Neringa Aliksandraviciute Sima Aljabri Roua Aljammal Worood Alkhafaf Shirley Allen Ryan Allen Rory Allen Sade Allen Rebecca Allison Shiraz Almokdad Nada Alobaidi Giovanni Alonzo Elizabete Alpe Meis Alsaegh Jamie Alston Ilia Altaio Carne Cristiano Alves Sara Alyushaa Breje’Adje Amar Thom Amar Joao Amaral Dos Santos Nina Amato

Faye Ambrose Hayam Amin Nida Amir Iman Amir Heidar Giorgio Amirante Daniel Amoako Harith Amour Verity Anderson Fidel Andetsion Ilia Andreopoulou Sofia Andrews Liam Andrews Tsanta Andriamiangy Olympia Anesti Raphael Edmond Angelina Sol Angelucci Amelie Anne Zsuzsa Antaloczi Marcos Anton Banon Zain Anwar Tina Anzinger Tomasz Apolinarski Georgios Apostolopoulos Laura Applegate Victoria Arad Patricia Armstrong William Armstrong Sara Aroca Rosas Miranda Arriola Acevedo Robert Arthur Siobhan Artigan Catharine Arul Dass Lovisa Arvidsson-Kvissberg Jasmine Asamoah Robespierre Asare-Koranteng Shamikha Asif Luke Askwith Michel Aslangul Alexander Assael Rasharde Atavwigho Holly Au Manmeet Auluck Katrina Austen Caterina Avataneo Aisha Awale Temitayo Awofolu Gracie Ayino Rebecca Aymar Arian Azemi Malika Azhigaliyeva Sara Aziz Alessandra Aziza B Cassandra Babalola Lima Babul Cecelia Back Jack Badger Seoyoung Bae Ali Bahreini Nathaniel Baidoo Ismena Baig Jennifer Bailan-Ebaco Norman Bailey Aletha Baird Pau Bajet Mena James Baker Joanne Baker Robert Baker Maryam Bakhtiari Zadeh Robert Balan Kerstin Balduf Samantha Ball Faiz Baluch Karolina Banasik Alexander Bank Jarrett Banks Ciaran Bankwala Athanasios Banos Katja Banovic Alison Baptiste Paula Barba Calzado Carlos Bargao Holly-Eva Barker Leoni Barker Franki Barker-Johnson Laszlo Barna Jonathan Barnard Janet Barnett Lea Barre Laura Barrington

Andrew Barrington James Barrington Siclania Barroso Vanessa-Gabriela Barsan Sonny Barthley Martina Barzanova Domenico Basile Daniel Baskett Hannah Bass Omer Bastas Shohham Basu Seyed Alborz Bathaei Bozchelouei Abby Batucan Alexia Bavage Lewis Baxter Kate Beale Antonia Beamish Stuart Beattie Eleanor Beaumont Natasha Beckles Marina Begman Rajna Begum Afsana Begum Zebu Begum Mahmuda Begum Dael Behagg Assem Beisenova Joshua Bellman Yenifer Bello Vargas Majda Benfaida Hannah Bennett Jack Bennett Mihir Benodekar Alisha Benskin Rowan Benson Michael Benwell Tim Bergin James Berk Isabelle Berre Jonas Bertlind Mondi Betaj Jasdeep Bhalla Abhiroop Bhattacharya Anisah Bhayat Francesca Bianchi Sarai Bibby Claudiu Bichescu Paulina Bienkowska Bilge Bilici Logan Bishop Vineeta Bishwakarma Conor Black Alexander Blackmore Nicola Blake Maria Blanco Alba Michael Bland Angela Blazanovic Anna Blom Greg Blom Nancy Bodson Nikolay Bogdev Ellie Boggans Reanne Bolah Callum Bolger Jean-Baptist Bolou Courtney Booth Naomi Boots Valentina Bordin Carolina Borgatti Monika Borkowska Lisa Born Nicolaas Bornman Artur Bornyakov Marco Bortone Michela Boscardin Jelena Bottani Fanny Boucharin Callum Boult Jessica Boulton A’Isha Bounouar Darrell Boye Jack Boyns Evelina Bozyte Rachel Bradley Aisha Braimoh Anya Brakha Harriet Bramley Martha-Leah Braund-Bond Christopher Breach Carly Breame

S T U D E N T S

student list Harry Paul Terence Breeden Marie Brenneis Cecilia Bressan Nile Bridgeman Edgar Brito Laura Bromley Harriet Brooks Andrew Brown Molly Brown Anastasia Browne Thomas Brownill Wesley Brownlee Awuraama Bruce Mariangela Bruna Chelsea Bryant Che Bryers Jessica Buckle Rachel Buckley Emma Bueno De Mesquita Viktorija Buklajeva Patrik Bukovszky Mateusz Bulawa Alexandra Bullen Daniel Bunbury Laxmi Bura Kamala Bura Laya Burgan Adam Burgess Sophie Burrows Louis Burrows Nathaniel Burton Shaun Burton Craig Burton Elisa Buscemi Peta Bush Brigita Butkute Abigail Butler Joanna Butryn Jack Buttling John Byrne Jennifer Byrne C Catia Cabral Deborah Cacciapuoti David Caetano Ambrosio Ronan Cahill Edem Caliph Esther Calle Pena Inedia Camamate Timothy Cambridge Neave Cammock Jonathan Campbell Kyle Campbell-Pope Hugo Campos Margherita Canali Paul Candengue Annachiara Candiani Sophie Cantor Raymond Cape Sam Carby Joao Cardoso Sofia Carlsson Patrick Carter Raquel Carvalho Ashley Case Jack Case Veronica Casey Fierro Niralee Casson Rachelle Castillo Harriet Catchpole Danielle Cave Karla Cerovac Lisa Cerutti Didem Cetinkaya Lara Chamandi Charlotte Chambers Regine Chan Yoanne Chan Yu Chan Christopher Chan Megan Chandler Sivashangar Chandrakumar Georgia Chapman Nicole Chapman Evangelia Charalampous Matthew Charlton Joseph Charman Darine Chekkouri Adam Cheltsov Shuo Chen

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Kang Chen David Cheverton Arthur Chia Samantha Chilton Stephen Chislett Ruxandra-Stefania Chiujdea Sina Chiyana Katya Chong Mo Huen Chong Ryan Choong Saminah Choudhury Tasnia Chowdhury Oliver Choyce Sibylle Christ Chris Christodoulou Ileana Chua Dominik Chung Kin Chong Amour Cibwabwa Michael Cielewicz Marianna Cieslewicz Eleonora Cipollina Daniel Clark Charly Clark Ben Clark Alexander Clark Jade Clarke Richard Clarke Sripriya Clement India Clements Hannah Clifford Joycelyn Cobbold Suzette Codnerprou Natasha Coenraad Michelle Coggon Kathryn Coghlan Paul Colfer Alessio Colizza Elena Colli Richard Collings Jonathan Collingwood Sally Collinson Terry Comer Massimo Conca Amy Condron-Dorey Jade Conlin Darryl Connor Margaret Conroy Charlie Constantinou Luigi Antonio Conte Carlotta Conte Simone Conti Lottie Conway-Plumb Sarah Cook Anna Cooke Georgia Cooke Ben Cooper Samantha Copperwaite Kaylah Corbett Declan Corbett Silvia Corcuera Amy Cornish Finlo Corrin Jacovos Costi Matthew Cotsell Jordan Cottage Edward Couper Claudia Covatariu Caileigh Cowan Adam Cowell Hayley Cox Mary Crabtree Enotria Crescenzi-Clarke Charles Critchell Harold Crosland Charlotte Cross Grace Cross Niall Crowley Alessandra Cuccu Sara Cuce Francesca Cucurachi Maria Cueva Paucar Siobhan Culhane John Cullinan Tilson Cunha Yazmin Cura Morna Currie Amy Cutler Agnieszka Cybul

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D Chiara D’Anna Segunda Da Gama Joaquim Lia Da Silva Pires Katarzyna Dabrowka Geraldine Dabu Chiara Dadini Ratchaneewan Daengbunma Mariachiara Dal Pozzo Bich Dang Lina Danileviciute Ama Dapaah Muugi Dash Mona Dash Sepideh Dastani Sade Davies Elin Davies Andrea Dawson Gaelle De Bournet Duane De Gale Elisabetta De Guio Jessica De Leeuwe Michela De Santes Chloe De Silva Tommaso Debenedetti Camilla Degli Esposti Roshun Dehokenanan Joseph Dejardin Eureka Dela Cruz Celine Delassoud Katharine Deleay Clara Delgado Caballero Alexander Dent Ramesh Depala Fides Desacada Marie Desmoures Sarah Despreaux Hollie Deverell Thomas Devine Peter Dew Fatemah Dhanji Emeline Diais Babacar Diallo Thiao Thurston Dias Geovick Diassona Andrew Dickerson Lora Dimova Asif Din Joseph Disney Enes Dizdarevic Clarisse Djedje Tony Do Cristian Dobjanschi Rengin Dogan Ajike Doherty Joanna Doherty Adrian Doherty Leon Donald Damien Doonan Robert Douge Charlie Dowd Fletcher Downie Aleksandra Dudziak Hannah Duffy Ross Duggleby Numedia Dugha Lewis Duncan Nicholas Dunlop Ria Dunn Elliot Dunn Philip Durham Isabella Dyson E Emma Eady Keanu Ebanks Maddalena Eccher Tamsin Edwards Rebecca Edwards Paul Egan Matthew Eglen Henriett Egressy Malika El Asry Farzana El-Syed Gabriele Elertaite Samantha Ellis-Hunter Ahmed Elmasri Agnes Elvin Song Eng Samson Eniola Ariane Erlicher

The Cass Session

Krists Ernstsons Anthony Erokwu Tolulope Esho Rana Eskandari Yasmina Esteri Ennadir Sebastian Eugenio Holly Evans Lee Evans Alun Evans Noah Evans Thomas Evans Frederique Evans-Jeanrenaud Eujainie Eversley Chidozie Ezeh F Ida Faal Carlos Faber Hanabergh Lubna Fakhri Castillo Nancy Clare Falloon Adenike Falodun Daria Famularo Eunice Fapohunda Hamed Faramarziha Saleha Farhan Filipa Faria Andi Fatkoja Kevin Faure Martina Favero Ayesha Fazil Loraine Feldman Terrence Feliciano George Fenton Bridget Fenty Viktoria Fenyes Kevin Ferguson Muttutantrige Fernando Zarajane Ferrier Patryk Fic Esther Fidlin Sandra Figler Dimitrios Filippas Maria Fiore Fatma Firat Niamh Fitzgerald Karl Fitzgerald James Fitzgerald Daryl Fitzgerald Kurtis Fleming Mark Fletcher Ryan Flint Florina Florescu Agata Florio Lara Fluixa Samuel Flynn Emma Fogarty Emmanuel Fonkwen Damion Forbes Keivan Forootan Andrea Forrai Jordana Fournillier Cameron Fox Agnieszka Fraczak Chloe Francis-Rowe Lida Franco Rojas Julie Frankish Olivier Frayssineau Gustav Freudenthal Samantha Friend Sheila Frimpong Christian Frost Bianca Fugaru Geoffrey Fung G Manon Gabet Rosalina Gadyuchkova Sean Gair Alessia Galatini Conor Gallagher Sean Gallagher Camellia Gamal-Eldin Iraide Garai Arta Garanca Nigel Garcia Maria Garcia Villajos Marina Gardiner Miriam Garofalo Daniella Garside Jennifer Garwood Rowan Gatherer

Filip Gavurnik Emily Gayer Toyin Gbomedo Philip Gee Yash Gehi Cecile Genevier Deva Gent Ivo Georgakiev Georgi Georgiev Anna Georgieva Serena Geromel Darja Gerova Haseeb Ghauri Maha Ghazal Monica Gheorghe Kiaran Ghetia Maria Ghislanzoni Clelia Giannuoli Alexander Giarlis Jordan Gibbs Tiniesha Gibson Hannah Gilbank Jessamy Gilbert Harjit Gill Jeremy Gill-Praba Robert Gillan George Gingell Gabrielli Giulio Tatiane Giusti Rodrigues Georgia Glover Kaiyil Gnanakumaran Elle Godfree Susanna Gogarty Dilan Gokcan Yasemen Gokce Irina Golda James Goldberg Oliver Goldie Jessica Golfarini Oscar Gomes Nikolai Gomes De Almeida Andrea Gomez Silva Daxiao Gong Belen Gonzalez Matthew Goodfellow Roisin Gooding Angus Goodwin Maria Gower Peter Johann Grabowski Emma Graham Noa Grandchamp Corina Grande Eguiluz Micah Grant Janet Gray Cathal Grealish Jordanna Greaves Alexander Greco William Green Lauren Green Matthew Gregorowski Jolanta Greiviene Laura Grieco Eleanor Grierson Reda Grigaraviciute Carlo Grignani Enrico Grimani Nicholas Grimmett Edward Grocott Alexandra Groszek Emma Guard Emanuele Guelfi Rita Guerreiro Anjeum Gul Mariam Gulamhussein Lisa Guldenaar Niroshan Gunasingam Amanda Gunasinghe Sophie Gunn Noah Gurden Amrit Gurung Vimbai Gwata H Daniel Haaga Sarah Habershon Ahlam Hadaid Noura Haddad Joann Haddadin Jeremy Hadfield Eleni Hadjittofi Laura Haenni

Kamil Hafeez Alexander Haggart Louise Haggart Megan Haggis Martha Haines Halil Halil Laila Halilova Christopher Hall Harriet Hall Rachel Hallam Kawthar Hamad Tegan Hamid Southam Georgina Hammond Sanghoon Han Chenchen Han Naama Haneman Manvir Hansra Olivia Hansson Kate Hardcastle Thalissa Harding Luke Harding Aneta Harezlak Marzieh Hariri Siobhan Harkin Steven Harley Valencia Harris Edmund Harrison-Gray Dora Hartridge Georgia Harvey Paul Harvey Maram Hashem Fatha Hassan Janan Hassan Lucianna Haughton Jodi Hawkins Joseph Hawkins Adam Hayes Richard Haynes Robert Haynes William Hayward David Haziz Petra Heftberger Mazen Helal Amy Hemsley Simon Hendley Anne Hennelly Joana Henriques Correia Rex Henry Joseph Henry Bryony Henson Frederick Herbst Oliver Hester Peyman Heydarian Sharlyn Heywood Kim Heywood Shannon Hicks Orlando Hill Michael Hill Joshua Hill-Walsh Laurence Hiller James Hills Andrew Hills Alex Hite Estelle Hobeika Aidan Andrew Hodgkinson Peter Hogan James Hogarth Anthony Hogger Sean Holden Lucy Holl Lucy Holland George Holland Laurence Holmes Inga Holth Vincent Hon Shane Hood Catherine Hooper Syeda Hoque Ikramul Hoque Rahul Horeesorun Paris Horstmann Midia Hossein Awan Hossein Fahim Hotak Edward Houghton Rokhsane Hovaida Helena Howard Janet Howd William Howells Sophie Howorth Valentin Hripko


Viktoria Hristova Yalin Hu Jade Huang Chia-Liang Huang Vanessa Hubbard Louis Hull Kinza Humayun Miu Hung Tayma Hunte Emma Hunter Zanele Hurworth Belawal Hussain Saba Hussain Julie Hutchinson Jessica Hy Peter Hyland I Chara Iacovidou Kannika Iamphongdee Riam Ibrahem Ahmed Ibrahim Jose Iglesias G-Arenal Precious Ikekhua Stephen Illingworth Amanda Impey Hatti Ingall Mathew Ingham Amjad Iqbal Lucy Irvine Adam Isaaks Monique Ishmael Emilia Iskra Dipti Islam Urim Islami Iman Issa-Ismail Enrica Federica Italiano Olga Ivanova Roxana Ivascu J Annisa Jabbour Becky Jackson Darren Jackson Vanessa Jackson-Cofie Joao Jaguite Hoshil Jaikishor Oluwatoyosi Jaji Katarina Jakcsiova Jowita Jakubowska Suaad Jama Sally James Celine James Caleb James Emily Jamieson Nadeem Jan Adnan Janjua Jerzy Jaraczewski Ayesha Jarratt Tommy Jay Roshan Jayatissa John Jeffers Robert Jeffery Oriana Jemide Matthew Jeniec Rosie Jenkins Robert Jenkins Seong Wook Jeong Mari Joemagi Rebecca Johansson Aaron Johns-Gordon Cheriece Johnson Robert Johnson Shannon Johnston Howes Rhiannon Jones Miri Jones Fraser Jones Chantelle Jones Emily Jones Gareth Jones Lyndon Jones Hayley Jones Indre Jonikaite Emma Jonsson Andrew Joyce Robert Joyce Emilia Joye Artur Jozefowski Indre Jursenaite

K Agata Kaczorowska Helawar Kader Seif Kadhim Ashraf Kadhim Husayn Chris Kaewhin Vilma Kairyte Devya Kakkar Rebecca Kalbfell Natalia Kallas Mudiama Kammoh Lackey Kanhukamwe Musu Kapu Dogukan Karabulut Eve Karanikki Georgios Kardakos Adebayo Kareem Ayisat Kareem Jeremy Karikari Vilte Kasetaite Ugnius Katinas Peterson Richmond Katsande Demetris Kattashis Ellie Kavanagh Katharina Kawaters Adriana Keast Kate Keeble George Keeble-Wright Frederick Keen Scott Kelly Kemal Kemal Sean Kennedy Leanne Kennerson Toyibat Keshinro Diamonika Keto Ra-Ees Khaidoo Ayda Khalek Sarah Khamees Zara Khan Dolat Khan Muneeb Khan Arooj Khan Maham Khan Ahmed Khankhara Karim Kharasan Reem Khatoun Parnian Khazaei Torange Khonsari Davood Kiani Khalkhali Hannah Kidd Finnian Kidd Andrew Kiely Yujin Kim Hongjae Kim Eleanor King Joshua King Ashleigh King Julia King Jennifer Kingston Lara Kinneir Ksenia Kinzhalova John Kipling Samantha Kirk Ashley Kirk Elizabeth Kirk Emma Kirk Ross Kirker Agnieszka Kiryluk Orsolya Kiss Susan Kistner Alex Kite Olivier Kitenge Nikolaus Klahre Maria Klimko Billy Klofta Hannah Knoos Nathanael Knowles Natalia Kochanska-Zelska Jon-Scott Kohli Emiljano Kola Jakub Kolodziejak Alexandra Kondor-Krupanszki Benedicte Konga Klara Konickova Karolina Korzynska Paulina Kosciak Turan Kose Glebs Kostenko Charalampos Kotanidis Frank Kouadio Sean Koudela Panagiotis Kourkoumelis Nicholas Kousoulou

Jessica Koyenyi Dimitrios Kozakis Malgorzata Kozdron Arian Krasniqi Frauke Kremer Klaudia Krzyzaniak Aleksandra Kuchta Thugitha Kugathasan Vyara Kuneva Kenta Kuratomi Safiya Kurzweg Eimante Kutkaite Katarzyna Kuzniarz Ricky Kwok L John Lacey-Smith Prudenza Lacriola Puro Laevuo Rhys Laird Chantelle Lake Kit Lam Yuk Lam Wilson Lam Chemilla Lambert Jadine Lambert Thomas Laming Bethany Lampard Kimberly Lamport Marios Lampouras Kezia Lander Alice Larner Julianna Larte Rebecca Lascelles Jason Laurence Andrew Laurie Jadzia Lawal Emmet Lawlor Claire Lawton Marisa Sandra Laycock Dora Lazar Adele Lazzeri Linda Le Pard Lauren Leacher Sean Leahy-Fitzgerald Sujong Lee Changyeob Lee Shannon Lee Sojeong Lee Mincheol Lee Sowon Lee Maria Lee Fong Robert Lee-Peace Elena Legakis Ange Lemee Tedi Lena Niamh Lenihan Nadir Letang-Cushnie Samuel Levine Dorette Lewin Barnabas Lewis Ellie Lewis Timothy Lewis Morgan Lewis Callum Lewis Denise Lewis Loukia Lhomme Cheuk Li Reynold Li Yucong Li Keith Li-Cho Georgia Lia Silvia Liano Ines Liborio Guna Liepa Jamie Lilley Ludovica Lillo Smrita Limbu Jeremy Lincoln Ida Lindblom Thomas Lindner Patricia Lindo Louisa Ling Tansy Linklater-Johnson Gaspar Lipszyc Juan Lis Cameron Little Jasmine Lloyd George Loaring Abigail Lockey Natasha Lofthouse Madelaine Loftus Nora Loh

Katarina Loizou Alvaro Lopez Gimenez Emer Loraine Soniamaria Losapio Daniel Louden Ana Loureiro Farinha Petrela Mariyam Lovimi Charles Lowe Katherine Lozada Echeverria Yiting Lu Rachel Lucido Anders Luhr Ka Hang Luk Jessica Luke Paul Luwaga Jordana Lyden-Swift Megan Lyons M Farah M’Rabet Mandy Ma Fawn Ma Nathan Maalo Roger Maaraoui Jenny Macdonald Julie Maclean Hamish Alexander Macpherson Catherine Mactaggart Maliheh Madadi Mary Madanamootoo Dessislava Madanska Conrad Maddy Miguel Madeira Ventura Wandrille Madelain Divya Madhani Gaetano Maggi Zainab Mahdi Khadijah Mahdi Soraya Mahmoud Vivienne Mahon Anna Mahoney Simone Maier Francesco Mainetti Nadia Majarally Kartikai Majithia Pal Major Sin Ching Mak Cleopas Makaza Anna Makin Christina Makri Jurgita Maksimova Gareth Malanaphy Vidhi Malhotra Sufyan Malik Shabir Malik Georgios Malliaropoulos Abbie Malthouse Valentin Manaila Victor Mandi Jessica Manique Vanisha Manji Alexander Mann Luisa Mannilaan Aminata Mansaray Georgia Mansfield Natalie Mansour Armani Manzambi Nicola Margai Nicoleta Marin Anna Markauskaite Lukasz Markowski Benjamin Markscheffel Adam Marley Blazhka Marnikova Nicholas Marschner Amber Marsh Giuditta Martello Konstanze Martin Amadeo Martini Latasha Martinis Roque Oliver Martire Coulthard De La Mare Laurie Martorelli Lieta Marziali Sofia Masgana Beverley Mason Louise Mason Anna Mason Merlin Massara Stephen Massiah Rajan Masters Angela Mastracco George Mathers

Culture

Prateek Mathur Joana Matos Marius Matulevicius Silvia Mavakala Frederick Mawhood Susan May Charles Mayes Marta Mazurek Mudada-Simba Mbandaka Kamryn McIntosh Matthew Mcaleese Zack Mcauley Frances Mcbain Chloe Mccolgan Christopher Mcdonnell Andeigh Mcdougall Alexander Mcdow Sophie Mcdowell Damani Mcfarlane Matthew Mcferran Clare Mcgee Charlotte Mcglinchey Barry Mcgowan Jordan Mcilroy Ciara Mcinerney Julian Mcintosh Caroline Mcintosh Jessica Mckeand Justin Mckenna Dominique Mcleod Kenneth Ross Mcmahon Rachael Mcmeekin Marlowe Mcmillan Sharitha Mcneil Katie Mctaggart Irmantas Melko Amy Melley Joshua Melvin-Gibbons Adrian Mendez Borda Giulia Menenti Ella Merriman Timothy Metcalfe Adam Mezughi Fadwa Mezughi Leo Michael Anton Mikkonen Marzieh Milani Stephen Millard Rosemary Miller Dionne Miller Shannagay Miller Edward Millo Joseph Mills Rachel Mills-Powell Lan Milne Tasni Minns Mehrdad Mishra Laurence Misick Rikesh Mistry Sasha Mitchell Grant Douglas Mitchell Vlad Mititelu Dimitrina Mitreva Sabah Mizban Rosanna Mizon Montell Mloyi Gary Mlynek Kelvin Mnyanza Souad Mohamed Suaad Mohamed Rima Mohammad Tarar Somayyeh Mohammadi Melksari Kumars Mohebpour Cristian Moica Nadia Mokadem Beatrice Moltani Antonello Monno Jessica Montero Estrella Oriane Monteux Diana Moon Bradley Moore Stephanie Moorhouse Ali Moradi Camilla Morelli Federica Morgillo Louise Moriarty Luka Morkyte Amber Morris Amelia Morton Azadeh Mosavi Laura Mottola Arila Moulas Emmanuel Muhangi

Life


Alicia Mukaya Mwana Harriet Mulcahy Giovanni Mule Grace Mullen Jordan Mullineaux Davis Abdulkadir Munie Shonali Murarka Matthew Mure Sarah Murphy Brian Murphy Rusty Murphy Eoin Murphy Nascillia Murray Carla Murton Basma Musaad David Musgrave Vanessa Musoke Anwaar Mustafa Swed Giovanni Musumeci Mary Musungay Tamkvaitis Alsy Mutshipayi Myriam Mutshipule Janay Mwanza Vincent Mwesigwa-Kisa N Rhabia Nabi Delaram Nabidoost Sara Nabulsi Ozan Nacar Alexandru Nacu Luke Nagle Khalid Nahary Previn Naidoo Firouz Najmi-Tabrizi Shalini Nandakumar Yana Nanovska Latiya Nanton Reyhan Nas Jennifer Nash Farah Nasir Elena Nedelcu Irina Alexandra Nedelcu Yasen Nedyalkov William Negus Zuleika Nelson Michael Nemorin Hana Neto Deana Neubauer Rachael Neville Margaret Nevin Peter Newby James Newsham Ciaran Nicholl Dean Nicholl-Collins Aimee Nicholls Carl Nicholls Christopher Nicholson Ilja Nikiforovs Mark Nikulin Merethe Nilsen Phoebe Niner Karina Nipane Ramona Niroomand Yuan Niu Patricia Nkunga Chloe Noble David Nobre Katherine Nolan Kevin Nolan Philip Noone Lucy Norfield Kofi Norman Timothy Norman Emily Norman Elizabeth Norris Neda Nosratabadi James Notarianni Samar Noun Marta Nowacka Krystyna Nowaczenko Katarzyna Nowak Marsha Nsiah-Opoku Alison Ntim Osita Nwachukwu Philip Nzimi O Cormac O Droma Sean O’Brien Jesse O’Connor

210

Maryann O’Driscoll Richard O’Hanlon Emma O’Hara Sophie O’Neill David O’Sullivan James O’Sullivan Azkar Obied Mumtaz Obsiye Rhiannon Occhini Anna Oczkowicz Silas Ogbole Harry Ogden James Ogier-Russell Jihoon Oh Shukurat Okoya Jennifer Olakitan Rasheedat Olaniyan Oluwafunmilo Olarerin Mercy-Sharon Olasogba Tomas Olesen Maria Oliveira Spinola Francesca Olivucci Robert Olley Davide Olmeo Maria Olmos Zunica Oyindamola Oloko Sade Olotin Aleksandra Olszewska Gbolade Oludare Lynsey Oluwo Hana Omar Olumayowa Onabanjo Elena Onyshchenko Mary Opie Emmanuel Oppong Adebowale Oriku Paul Ornsby Maria Oros Petro Tomos Osmond David Ostle Petra Otenslegrova Takuya Oura Patrick Owens Karol Owsiany Augustina Owusu Eray Ozcan Cigdem Ozkan Kamelya Ozkeser Gaye Ozturk P Karina Paberza Marta Paczula Amrita Padan Anna Page Lewis Paine Kasparas Pakalnis Zsuzsanna Palmai Yvonne Palmer-Thomas Konstantina Panagiotidou Barbara Panecka Claire Panni Emily Pantling Godi Panzout Despoina Papadopoulou Karina Papianaite Frederique Paraskevas Jusin Park Stephen Parkes Amy Parkin-Brown Daniel Parris Callum Partridge Wiktoria Pasieka Szymon Pasierb Tuesdae Pask Aakash Patel Riaz Patel Drasti Patel Clare Paton Matt Pattenden Rachael Patterson Louise Patterson Callum Paul Asha Paul Bellow Juste Paulauskaite Stephanie Payne Rostislav Pazaitov Edwhite Pe Owen Pearce Nikol Pechova Giacomo Pelizzari

The Cass Session

Alicia Pell Viola Pelu John Pena Jack Joseph Penford Baker Laura Penman Richard Penman Thomas Penny David Pepper David Pereira Rudi Perestrelo Maria Perez Chauvie Blanca Perez Gonzalez Aquilino Perez Hernandez Adam Perkins Christopher Permain Archie Pethick-Lewis Simon Petty Samuel Pew Latter Esther Peyrovi Tai Pham Quyen Phan Elvis Philip Hannah Phillips Michael Phipps Junxue Piao Rachel Pickford Alicja Pierianowicz Alexis Pierre Berenice Pierson Mateusz Piesniak Migle Pikelyte Daniel Pilaquinga Teran Carolina Pileggi Khaleefah Pilgrim Ile Marianne Pink Briony Piper Angela Pippo Faisal Piracha Thamini Pitchaimani Jignesh Pithadia Angeliki Pitsanopoulou Daniela Pitta Groz Damahn Pitters-Knight Anna Pizova Alzbeta Pochyla Viktorija Podkolzina Georgia Politi Marco Polonioli Gemma Pont Marin Charlotte Ponting Danilo Ponzetta Marketa Popelkova Maria-Elena Popovici Joseane Porfirio De Souza Nicholas Porter Ben Porter Emily Porter Iza-Florina Porumbu Henry Posner Cem Postalci Rebecca Potter Kyriaki Pouangare Chris Powell Tony Powell Thomas Powell Daniel Power Justyna Poyser Radhika Praveen Laura Predeinaite Serena Previti Rebecca Prince Lucy Pritchard Becky Probert Aleksandra Prominska Maria Proscia Angela Prudom Gabriele Pulci Dean Punter James Purkiss Louisa Purkiss Luca Puzzoni Peggy Quinn Caroline Quinn Nikta Qumarcy R Grace Radford Ana Raducu James Ragonesi Simranjit Rahi Farah Rahman

Alanur Rahman Hafsah Rahman Biraj Rai Rojani Rai Gurleen Raj Mickeala Ramsey Eleanor Ramsey-Blyth Rachana Rana Federica Ranalli Maxwell Randall Thomas Randall-Page Kally Raouf Ryan Rasco Haniyyah Rashid Angelina Raymond Ali Raza Aqilah Razick Miles Reay-Palmer Reece Recardo Rebecca Reddin Moe Redish Marek Redo Laura Reeve James Reeves Dean Regalario Rana Rehman Hannah Reid Clare Reid Paschal Reilly Beata Religa Adam Renouf Luke Renouf Cindy Reriti Tom Resch James Retief Reginald Reynolds Andres Ricci Sarah Richards Rory Richardson Robert Richardson Alice Riley Irene Rios Elvira Rizova Noor Rizvi Benjamin Robb Laura Roberts Dane Roberts Matthew Robertson Nigel Robinson Sherine Robinson Paul Robinson Ben Robinson Martin Robinson Dowland Samuel Robinson Thorley Harriet Robison Celine Roblin-Robson Amara Roca Iglesias Guy Rochez Robyn Rockmann Pablo Rodriguez Diaz Elena Rodriguez Montelongo James Rogers Hannah Rose Nicholas Rose Sophie Rose Jack Rosewall Dominik Rozkosz James Rubio Nastassia Amanda Ruescher Kamelia Ruseva Diggory Rush Michael Rush Amy Rush Da Silva Thomas Russell Andrea Russell Catalin-Adrian Rusu R Ghina Sabra Farhaan Saeed Fatemeh Safaii Rad Uroosa Safdar Samirah Safdar Terjinder Sagoo Shashwat Sahay Pouya Sahranavard Amina Said Dalitso Sakala Aahan Sakhuja Raghad Saleh Ali Salehi

Zahra Salim Wafaa Salim Katie Salisbury Ben Salter Francesco Salvatori Naseba Samadi Mario Sampaio Kong Keyura Samson Wilson Sanches Lucretia Sandu Julianne Sandvik Christian Sansostri Helio Santos Joana Santos Anuj Saradna Teresa Sarpong Evelina Sarupiciute Morvarid Sarvghadi Shanette Savage Charlotte Savage Sylwia Sawicka Tomas Schular Sandra Schupp Cameron Seabright Shaih-Marie Sedeno Miriam Seisay Moe Sekiya Gillian Self Danushan Selvarajah Sercan Semiz Shona Semper Jinwoo Seo Duarte Sequeira Eleni Serefoglou Oleg Sevelkov Nina Sevova Amanda Sexton Noble Sey Bahar Seyedtabatabaei Magdalena Seyfried Madeline Seymour Ayyub Sharif Rohini Sharma Guy Shenton Alice Shepherd Viral Sheth Nathaniel Shields Charlotte Louise Shields Andrew Shiels Kohsaku Shinohara Maria Shinshinova Temitope Shoaga Kashif Shonuyi John Short Shantel Sibanda Micah Sides Arnar Sigurjonsson Martins Silins Julian Sillem Emma Silva Diane Silva Aminah Silvera Ana Silverio Cabo Nunes Barroso Tenda Simbo Leigh-Anne Simms Xhulja Simoni Giulia Simonotti Kyrle Simpson Katarina Sims Dominique Sinagra Arron Sinclair George Sinclair John Sinha Kristina Sipylaite James Sirett Fong Ting Derek Siu Natalie Siwicki Shirley Skerritt Jevgenijs Skicko Christos Skourogiannis Aleksandra Skula April Slocombe Peter Smahajcsik Catriona Smart Daria Smiechowska Hannah Smith Ross Smith Marcela Smith Jodie Smith Nicholas Smith Clark Smith


Pamela Snow Rosie Snowden Sandra Socharczuk Krishma Sokhal Weronika Sokol Aron Solberg Mirko Solinas Watchara Sonsri Jessica Soriano Elena Sorokina Grant Sorrell Andrew Sosnowski Roberto Sotgiu Sofia Sousa Botinas Duarte Madeira Casey Spall Zoe Spittle James Spittle Siobhan Spooner Nicolo Spreafico John Sprunt Neil St John William Stacy Anastasia Stan Iva Stanisheva Jamie Stannard Amelia Stanton Milda Stasaityte Jacob Steele Archibald Steele Rumen Stefanov Adriyana Stefanova Kerry Steptoe Andrew Stevenson Tyne Stewart Daniel Stilwell Irena Stoeva Ruth Stone Nicholas Stone James Stopps Peter Stovin Silviya Stoyanova Hannah Stringer Jamie Strong Daniel Struthers Emilia Strzala Elisabeta Suciu Agnieszka Sudolska Kayanat Suleman Samie Sultan Tyler Summers Selin Sun Harveen Sunner Erika Suzuki Tansie Swithenbank Raffaela Swoboda Ekaterina Sycheva Martyna Szmigielska Iga Szuman-Krzych Kamila Szymkiewicz T Hiroto Tabata Max Tacchi Beatrice Tagoe Jose Taguiang Aydan Tahmazova Preeti Tak Christiano Takatsch Castellano Dilys Tambini-Mcgee Evelina Tamulionyte Stephanie Tandoh Jessica Tang Wing Shun Tang Lilla Tantos Sofia Targova Ramez Tarighi Laiqah Tariq Ege Tarlakazan Matthieu Tate Richard Taylor Elliot Taylor James Taylor Hannah Taylor Maria Tayyab Hollie Teague Ee Teh Ahmed Tejan-Jalloh Jacob Tejlmand Magdalena Tello Angel Tenorio Castillo Liyou Terefe

Yodit Terefe Lene Terland Katharine Terry Priya Thandi Chelsey Theobald Styliani-Nefeli Theodorou Craig Thomas Lisa Thomas Gareth Thomas Frederique Thomas-Baratte Rebecca Thompson Madinah Thompson Molly Thompson Atchara Thongrong Liga Thrower Barbara Thwaites Eduard Tipaldo Shivani Tipari Abbie Tipler Dorottya Tisza Toby Tobias Adrian Tobin Stephanie Todd Denitsa Todorova Silvia Tognoli Miranda Tongeman Matilda Tonveronachi Maarja-Kristiin Toomsalu Jonathan Toon Brandon Toor Dilan Toraman Caroline Torisheju Gallagher Carolina Torres Megan Townsend Zoltan Tozser Niamh Treacy Edward Trebilcock Mattia Treccani Ben Tregoning Nicola Trowers Federica Truscello Calvin Tsai Kyveli Tsakiri Hiu Tung Tse Ilias Tsiris Hallam Tucker Deanna Tuitt Andra Tuna Jonathan Tunney Slawomir Turek William Turner Karabo Turner Myles Turner Despoina Tzanou U Billie-Mae Ukairo Ersin Ustusoy Petar Uzelac Chukwuemeka Uzoh Rebecca Uzong Haluk Uzumyiyen V Veera Vaisanen Eivinas Valaitis Iara Valdivia Carlos Valencia Alyzza Valid Ane Van Der Westhuizen Zsofia Varga Aliki Varlamidi Rafaela Vasa Nikolaos Vasileiou Egle Vaskyte Mircea Vasvari Parimah Vatini Gerlinde Velarde Paula Veleda Barea Varshalakshmi Venkatachalam Elizabeth Venning Alice Verge Bobby-Lee Verkuijl Georgina Vernon Eline Verstegen Francesco Vertucci Janina Vesala Dominic Viall Abigail Vickers Zachariah Vieira Katrina Vilcane

Chiara Villa Oliver Villalonga-Roman Armando Villani Jary Villanueva Janakan Vimalananthan Andrea Vinamagua Obando Kirils Vinokurovs Amy Vinten Amrita Virdee Opinder Virdi Chelsea Vivash Argyro Vlachaki Anastasiya Vodolagina Dina Wahby Katrin Wahdat Zahraan Wahid Tamara Wakefield Joanna Walecka Georgina Walker Charlotte Walker Jordan Walker Sunissa Walker Sophie Walker Natalie Walker-Fifield Milen Wall Courtney Wallace Joe Wallace Lisa Wallius Wan Anis Wan Kamaruddin Yen-Ting Wang Edan Ward David Ward Chelsea Ward Hitra Wardag Roseanna Ware Barry Wark Gretel Warner Jessica Warner Garmai Washington Ashleigh Watkins Constance Watkiss Alexander Watson Richard Watson Eden Watson-Saunders Emily Watt Kerry Watton Adam Watts Louis Webber Oliver Webber Caroline Wellesley Tahirah Wellington Jake Wells Paul Welsh Isabelle Wheatley Giles Wheeldon Faye Wheeler Jordan Whitaker Joanne White William Whiteaway Gary Whitechurch Emma Whitehead Jemma Whitehouse Jonathan Whittaker Harriet Whittaker James Whittam Joanna Wickham Dominik Wiecek Harry Wilkins Eleanor Wilkinson Millie Wilkinson Anna Wilkowska Ellen Williams Frances Williams Joseph Williams Tom Williams Merayah Williams-Schuarz Nathalie Wilson Hubert Windal Dominika Wittbrodt Demi Witter Evans Wodzrah-Gomez Urszula Wojcieszczuk Helen Wolstencroft Catherine Wolter Chris Wong Lucy Wood Lindsay K Woodall Sophie Woodbridge Joseph Woollard Adam Worsley Sandra Wozny

Christa Wright Daniel Wright James Wright Liam Wright Paul Wright Peter Wright Nyomi Wright Silvia Wu Shih Chin Wu Yat Wu Pei-Hsuan Wu Y Kiera Yates Ashley Yepsen Simal Yesiltepe Zhiyong Yin Teng-Yang Yu Qiyu Yuan Sahar Yusefi Ava Yusuf Aisha Yusuf Can Yuzudik Z Jolanta Zacharova Naila Zahoor Sherwin Zakipour-Saber Dominika Zakowana Catherine Zaluski Leticia Zampangi Thalita Zanin Vaz De Lascio Giulia Zanotti Anita Zarzycka Zhongjing Zhang Ruoyu Zhao Loai Zidan Agnieszka Zielke Micael Zilani Chad Zimmerman Margherita Zompa Merve Zorpineci Vestina Zuikaite

Culture

Life


Contact us

Thank you for your interest in the work of The Cass. To find out more, read our latest news and find details of our next events and exhibitions, visit londonmet.ac.uk/thecass If you are interested in studying with us, browse our courses at londonmet.ac.uk/courses Contact our enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 or online at londonmet.ac.uk/contact @TheCassArt


Cover image Belmonte Calabro, Film Screening Photo by Florian Siegel


Cass Session

4

The Cass Session 4 londonmet.ac.uk/thecass ISBN 9781916408302

9 781916 408302

RRP £15

Cass Session

4

Profile for London Metropolitan University

Cass Session 4  

The fourth yearbook from the University's creative hub, Cass Session 4 marks another hugely successful year for The Sir John Cass School of...

Cass Session 4  

The fourth yearbook from the University's creative hub, Cass Session 4 marks another hugely successful year for The Sir John Cass School of...