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What advice professionals say...

“Before deciding on emigration to the UK there are a number of issues to consider. The most important is accommodation: a person on an average income can expect to spend 30-40% of their income on rent. It is advisable to source employment before arriving in the UK, but where this is not possible, it is advisable to have enough savings for a month’s deposit and month’s rent up front. People with limited means are advised to apply for Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) immediately upon arrival. We advise people to apply for benefits for several reasons: it will generate official proof of address which is necessary to obtain a National Insurance number (PRSI equivalent) and a bank account; it entitles the claimant to Housing Benefit (Rent Allowance) and Council Tax Benefit; and it entitles the claimant to free prescriptions. For those moving to the UK for reasons other than to work, it is important to bear in mind that except in certain exceptional cases, you will not be eligible for social housing and will be deemed intentionally homeless by local authorities if you have left a home in Ireland that was available to you. Therefore, having a deposit and rent up front is imperative to access accommodation in the private housing sector. Welfare benefits in the UK are significantly less generous than in Ireland. A typical JSA claimant over the age of 25 years can expect to receive £67.50 per week. Families with dependent children will be entitled to claim child benefit, tax credits and free school meals. Advice on other benefits such as Employment and Support Allowance (Incapacity), Disability Living Allowance, Pensions, Attendance Allowance, Carers Allowance, premiums, grants and loans is available at our drop-in Advice Service in Camden.” (Advice Manager)

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Moving to London; A Practical Companion for Irish People  
Moving to London; A Practical Companion for Irish People  

A helpful, practical and comprehensive guide to Moving to London for Irish people. Published by the London Irish Centre in May 2012.

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