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Abbey days AUTUMN IN THE WYE VALLEY

West Country Life

magazine Western Daily Press, Saturday November 16


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Inside 2

COLUMNISTS

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PICTURE ESSAY

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PEOPLE

Martin Hesp is all ears in the West; while Alice Bell ponders the office party

Fran Stothard discovers the cinema of yesteryear in a backroom in Clevedon

Our changing taste in cheese; plus the interesting life of chef Michael Caines

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PLACES

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PEOPLE

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FOOD

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ABSOLUTE CORKERS

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Inspired by the Scottish coast, artist Rachel Morley has some crafty gift ideas

Bread with Chris Rundle; and a taste of the Med with Yotam Ottolenghi

Ned Halley has plenty to say about the so-called world wine shortage

SHOPPING Be ‘on trend’ by giving your home a metallic makeover; plus, florals for winter

BOOKS

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TRAVEL

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WALKS

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GARDENING

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ANTIQUES

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Rural rambles

Our endless fascination with Stonehenge is recognised by James O Davies

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The science behind The Simpsons; plus King Arthur and Richard Hammond

Exploring Thailand and Laos by train; plus, the festive season in Brittany

Martin Hesp enjoys autumn on the Levels; while Sue Gearing picks the Wye Valley

Alan Down guides you around the best trees to plant – whatever your reason

The extraordinary stewardess Elizabeth Plumb; plus global interest for Gine

TELEVISION We talk to Sarah Lancashire in the run-up to her new series; plus, TV highlights

TV guide Poem & Puzzles Horoscope Where in the West Cover by Tim Ireland

‘The Starlings are back,’ says Western Daily Press photographer Fran Stothard. ‘Currently roosting on Shapwick Heath, they fly in at dusk often swooping around in giant murmurations before diving into the reeds, At daybreak they all rise in a mass covering the skies above the Somerset Levels’

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Online westerndailypress.co.uk/wcl

Roger Evans My granddaughter has always wanted a puppy. It is of interest at this point to consider what she probably had in mind. It would probably be small, cuddly, obedient, probably didn’t mind being dressed up as a Barbie, and probably didn’t mind being pushed around in a pram – you get the picture. And what did she get? A 12-week-old sheep dog. Whisper it quietly, but this is part of our succession policy. Well, Mert is getting on a bit now and rather than wait, you get another in the pipeline. And if you need to do that anyway why not tell the little girl it’s her puppy. It’s a win-win for everyone, except her. She managed to fuss it for a couple of weeks, but it soon got too big and strong for that sort of nonsense. I felt a bit guilty, but not for that long. So now it spends its days on the farm, it’s called Maddy, at least we let her name it. It’s a bit headstrong, which is another word for willful. Mert completely ignores it unless it gets within five yards, after which he attacks it. The turkeys are now in more danger from Maddy than they are from the fox, so for them it’s danger night and day. There was nothing in her CV to suggest that she was interested in shooting, but the lads who shoot here came for what they call an outside day, so, unknown to us, she went off with them for a day’s shooting and they bought her back when they had finished. Apparently she was quite good at finding pheasants. Which is a bit of a plus, because all she seems to find on the yard is trouble. My two eldest grandsons now attend a sixth form college 15 miles from here and probably 25 miles from where they live. Several local children (or are they called students?) make similar journeys and as some of them, including my eldest grandson, now have cars getting there in the mornings is not a problem. But they all seem to finish at different times and getting home is not so easy. Number two grandson appears to finish later than the others. Public transport will get him half way home but we often have to fetch him. After having to fetch him one night, because he hadn’t any money on him, I gave him £20 and told him that it was to spend on bus or train and not on cider. I’m not sure it should be necessary to tell a 16-year-old not to buy cider but there you go. Last night he phoned up at 6.30 to say he was stuck the seven miles away so I fetched him. I WCL-E01-S2

get him in the car and say he is late, how long has he been hanging about there? Turns out he’s been there two hours. “Why didn’t you phone earlier?” Didn’t have any more money, so he wandered about various people’s houses he knew to see if they would phone us, but they were all out. In the end he went to a filling station and they let him use their phone. “Where’s the money I gave you?” “I left it at home.” “Where’s your mobile phone?” “I left it at home as well.” “You could do with a spinner every morning.” “What’s a spinner?” And so, finally, we get to my story. I once worked for a month on a farm in North Wales. I was there to help with the milking. The boss and I used to milk together in the morning and I milked on my own in the afternoon. There was a local lad from the village who worked there as well doing general duties. We milked, in those days, in a large cowshed and every morning there was a ritual to be followed. We’d usually been milking an hour when the lad from the village came to work and every morning he came and stood by us as we milked. Sometimes the boss would leave him standing there for 10 minutes, just waiting. Eventually he would say: “take your cap off Arthur.” “Oh, do I have to?” “Just take your cap off.” That was the ritual. Every morning Arthur had to have a “spinner”, to make sure he was fully awake. And what a spinner it was! The boss was in his early 30s, strong and as fit as anyone I knew. Although Arthur knew it was coming soon, he would always catch him out with a stinging swing of his knuckle to the back of the head. And Arthur would say, “ouch” rub his head where the hurt was, put his cap back on and go off to do his work. He was certainly fully awake! He wasn’t that sharp, that Arthur, or he wouldn’t have stood there like that every morning waiting for his spinner. It isn’t a sad story because apart from making sure he was awake, the family there showed him lots of kindness. I explained to my grandson about a spinner as we drove home. “If you go to college again without any money and without your phone, you’ll get a spinner.” “Ok,” he says. But we both know he won’t.

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Columnists

Martin Hesp Dogs bark, pheasants cry and a chainsaw cuts into a tree.

Alice Bell Student discounts, drunken trips to Asda and last-minute studies.

Meanwhile, bullocks low, sheep bleat, buzzards mew, the 3.13 from Malaga to Bristol soars past the far side of the hill, a wren chirrups doing whatever wrens do in the hedge outside the office, a car door slams down in the lane, the swollen river rushes… All this I can hear, right now, just after the big military helicopter flew up the coombe banking so low it bent branches. Indeed, it is because the Sea King chopper filled the valley with deafening but momentary noise that I’ve taken temporary notice of all the other audible things that are reaching my ears. I guess this is what blind people do – hear everything – are keenly aware of things going on around them as long as those things make a noise… I also guess my valley’s list of sounds would be similar to those in many rural West Country areas. As a lifelong traveller I have observed that different places around the world have very different sounds – and the blend of things I’m hearing right now provides what is a uniquely West Country soundtrack. If you were to write a book with the haunting title Where Distant Dogs Bark, it could be set anywhere in the world – but throw in pheasants, bullocks, sheep, wrens, swollen streams and especially buzzards and the geographically astute reader might imagine they were somewhere in Somerset, Dorset or Devon. Not Cornwall, I’d argue, which for the most part has a different blend of sound. More gull and chough than buzzard, more sea-scented spume than riverrush – and in many places without the audible matrix of animals grazing in a landscape of steep hills. For steep valley sides offer their own texture as an audible backdrop. Go out to the Somerset Levels, which provide the opposite of a ravine, and you will hear sky. I mean it. Shut your eyes and you will hear the indeterminate moan of the great arc above your head, interspersed by the cries of wild duck or, at this time of the year, with the occasional hushed-vroom which is the closest you can get to writing down the noise that a murmuration of 10,000 starlings makes. I first thought about the subject years ago when I lived on a rocky coast in Greece. The sounds there were shockingly different from the ones I was used to in my native hills. Distant barking dogs – yes, you will always hear them in the wilder parts of Greece – but what surprised me in that remote place was the constant sound of people. It took me a while to realise the simple reason… in hot countries, farmers and villagers do a great deal of living outside. We Brits are a closed-door community compared to the mountain dwellers of places like Greece, where folk think nothing of lazing under a tree from where they can enter into long and profound conversation with a man picking olives a mile away across a deep gorge. At least, you think it’s profound until you learn to speak the language. Then you might realise that, far from being spiritual in some kind of Tibetan way, these trans-mountain conversations go something like this… “Thanassis, you are an idiot – you should leave the olives until the wind blows more down.” “I would, Manolis, if I was a lazy donkey like you.” After half an hour of this, a distant mountain monastery bell might toll and the men will fall silent. And there will be the sound of goats and, later, eagle owls. Anyone who has ever heard the haunting cry of those night

And then all you get at the end of a university degree is a Batman-esque cape and an ugly hat that looks like it’s been sat on by a sumo wrestler. Well, you get a graduation outfit and a degree with about as much practical use as Action Man’s genitals. After all that studying and all that expense, even our lecturers don’t expect us to have landed a job five months after finishing because they scheduled our graduation for 10am on a Friday. So of course I couldn’t go. Because I was at work. Missing your graduation does seem a bit like a corpse not turning up for its own funeral. Then again, I have no desire to ponce around in a mortar board either. There’s a

creatures, screeching among mountains, will never forget it... But now, in these past seconds, the hair-onback-of-neck jogging memory of the eagle owls and everything else has gone. My telephone is ringing. The little tweet noise my Twitter-feed makes on the computer is sounding like an irritating version of the garden wren outside. The bell which announces an incoming email clangs so unlike any sound an ancient Greek monastery might toll. I have returned to the modern world – a place where it’s best to forget about the audible landscape that surrounds you. The silence that was a symphony has turned into the cacophony of progress.

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COLUMNISTS COLUMNISTS ONLINE ONLINE You can can enjoy enjoy the the best best You of Alice Alice Bell’s Bell’s and and Martin Martin of Hesp’s Saturday Saturday essays essays –– and and Hesp’s our other other writers writers –– on on the the our Western Daily Daily Press Press we webbssiittee Western westerndailypress.co.uk/wcl ndailypress.co.uk/wcl wester

reason why you don’t see many page three photographs of girls at their graduation. Talking of clothes, my office Christmas party is looming, which means it’s that time of year again when women across the country start desperately seeking The One. The one dress that doesn’t make them look too fat, too thin, too flat-chested, too busty, too slutty or too schoolmarmish. As a freelance journalist, I’ll work for anyone provided they pay nicely and have an unlimited supply of tea on the premises. I spend my time flitting from office to office in exchange for cash, like a confused lady of the night. How long do you think it will be before ITV starts a new TV show called Secret Diary of a Freelance Girl? Having said that, at least half my work comes from the one company and even their boss gets me confused with a full-timer sometimes. So when everyone in the office, even the cleaning lady, received an invite to the Christmas party while my inbox stayed as quiet and desolate as the response to Geri Halliwell’s new comeback single, I was a bit miffed. I was even more miffed when the menu did the rounds and everyone was choosing their starters, while I was just debating what flavour of Ben & Jerry’s I’d use to smother my sorrows with that night. Then the boss asked what I was going to have. I said coldly: “Nobody’s bothered to invite me. Sir.” He looked taken-aback and said: “I’m pretty sure they have.” I replied: “No they haven’t” and, in true pantomime style, he answered: “Yes they have”. And of course, as most employees will find out to their cost, the boss is always right. Turns out I had been invited but the email informing me of this had gone straight into my spam folder. Awkward. I was left to dismount from my high horse in as dignified a manner as possible when I knew I had just flashed the world my knickers. Christmas parties in the office now have even tighter security than Buckingham Palace, and it’s about as effective. We have a health and safety list already pinned to the noticeboard in preparation for the big day, forbidding employees to put up decorations using anything less than an EU-approved stepladder complete with safety harness. You definitely shouldn’t use your swivel chair because we have all seen those kind of accidents. Mainly on You’ve Been Framed or in the A&E department. Employees have also been warned to “resist the temptation to photocopy parts of their body, because of the risk of glass in painful places if the machine breaks”. Nobody would want to do that, right? Nobody other than the office dork after five pints of Budweiser, anyway. Also, we’re not allowed a Christmas tree because apparently each year more than 1,000 people are injured while putting them up. Depends where you put them I should imagine. Or are we expecting offices across the land to go a bit “day of the triffids” this festive season?

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SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 3


Picture essay Fran Stothard

Projectors and cinema memorabilia at the historic Curzon For anyone interested in old projectors and cinema memorabilia the Curzon Collection at the historic Curzon Cinema in Clevedon is magical, writes Western Daily Press photographer Fran Stothard. The cinema, which celebrated its centenary on the site last year, was saved from closure in 1996 when locals rallied to help form the Curzon Community Cinema. The heritage projector collection is curated by Maurice Thornton, aged 84, pictured here, who was the projectionist at the Curzon from 1996 until 2007, and in all has been a projectionist for 40 years. He now runs the cinema with help from a colleague Colin Cowles and a small team of volunteers. The main collection of heritage projectors is housed in a warehouse behind the cinema. More, smaller, 16mm 9.5mm and eight mm projectors are housed on the cinema’s top floor. One 35mm projector which holds special memories for Maurice is a 1939 Gaumont British (N) Portable Sound Projector, developed particularly for the Royal Navy. It was designed so that it could be taken apart and taken down steep stairs and through hatches. Maurice, who is ex-Navy, operated one such machine on carriers, including during the Korean War. Another part of the museum created by Maurice is in the cinema. The Stanley Newton Projection Room is named after the man who was projectionist here for 55 years from 1912, and has been set up to show how things would have looked in the old days. Personally my introduction into photography, began as a ten-year-old when I won a Kellogg’s Cornflakes competition… the prize, an 8mm Kodak cine camera and projector…

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minutes to know Dermot Murnaghan As BBC’s popular teatime quiz show Eggheads turns ten years old, presenter Dermot Murnaghan discusses the show’s best bits, why he couldn’t compete with an Egghead and his memorable run-in with a very famous fan Can you tell us how Eggheads came about? It’s a very simple format really, which we put together all those years ago. It’s based on the British love of quizzing, and we thought what happens if you got the best quizzers in the land and anyone who fancied a go took them on? So we’ve got the television equivalent of the pub quiz. What have been some of the memorable moments? The first one that stands out is the mighty amount of money we got up to early on, which was £75,000, and won by a team of students. If you add that up, a thousand pounds a time, the Eggheads went 15 weeks of transmission without losing. It was unprecedented – there was something in the water I think. After ten years, you must have picked up a fair bit of general knowledge. Are you a dab hand at a pub quiz? We always get asked that. But sometimes I sit at home, watching something we’ve recorded – there’s quite a long lead time, so it will have been recorded several months before – and my children can’t be bothered waiting for the answer and ask me, and I’ll have forgotten. So you wouldn’t hold your own as an Egghead? Definitely not! I know a little bit more perhaps about some of their weaknesses, but they’re not of us. They’re from the Planet Quiz. My analogy is that it’s like playing pub football with David Beckham. You’ve had some celebrity specials over the years. is there anyone you’ve always wanted to get on the show? It’s amazing the people you find who love Eggheads. My favourite is Sir Alex Ferguson. I once was at a do at Old Trafford, and he called me over to his table. His first question was ‘That Daphne – is she a nice lady?’. We talked for half an hour about Eggheads, he’d hardly missed an episode. He hasn’t appeared yet but he’d be on my dream team. Both you and Jeremy Vine are serious journalists. is the gravitas you impart important to the show? Yes, a little bit. There’s a tendency on British quizzes to get people from the gravitas side – Paxman and Humphries are all at it – but from our point of view there’s a chance to show you’ve got a hinterland, a different side too. So it’s a nice break from the serious world of news? Yeah you’ve put your finger on it, it is nice. You also presented Treasure Hunt some time ago. would you consider branching out into more entertainment programmes? Such as? Dermot’s Comedy Hour?!. Lastly, who’s your favourite Egghead? Favourite Egghead? It depends on the subject. There’s Chris and his engineering knowledge, Kevin – there doesn’t seem to be a city he hasn’t visited and can tell you something about, Daphne told us an amazing story about working in a bank, there’s Barry on a kibbutz – we once embarrassed him by bringing out the old photos, he wouldn’t have looked out of place in David Bowie’s band! CJ, of course, with his acting, and Judith , I do love having a bit of fun with Judith...

Scenes from the filming of Star Wars in the Curzon Collection of Cinema Heritage Technology in Clevedon; Stanley Newton, who spent 55 years as projectionist, far left top WCL-E01-S2

Eggheads is on at 6pm, weekdays on BBC Two

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People Su Carroll

Born in the West Country, Michael Caines’ life leading up to his success as a chef reads like a Hollywood film. Known for his work at the Bath Priory, you can join him there for lunch at the end of the month

Michael Caines’ background is rather like the stuff of a Hollywood movie. A young boy adopted into a large and loving family grew up with a love of food and cooking, fuelled by the vegetables and fruit his father grew in the garden and the wholesome, homely meals his mother prepared in the kitchen. Not terribly academic at school, and dangerously close to trouble, he found his passion for food and went on to work with Raymond Blanc at Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons before moving to France to work with legendary chefs Bernard Loiseau and Joël Robuchon. He was appointed head chef at Devon’s Gidleigh Park in 1994 and not long after lost his right arm in an accident. Not only was he back at work within a month, but he took Gidleigh Park on to further Michelin glory, earning a second star in 1999. In his 20-year tenure at Gidleigh he has also developed a partnership with hotelier Andrew

Brownsword with ABode Hotels and Michael Caines restaurants in Exeter, Canterbury, Manchester, Chester and Bath. He’s appeared on TV and cooked for the great and the good. His career may be stellar, but there’s something very down to earth about the boy from Exeter. Michael Caines is not your average celebrity chef. For a start, his new cookbook is not only new, it’s also the first time he has published a collection of recipes. And it’s not full of foams, jus, and carefully constructed towers of delicate food. This is Michael Caines at Home. It reflects his ordinary upbringing and shows us how he became the chef he is today. “That’s part of the story,” says Michael. “Ultimately where you’re from gives a context. It seemed like a good place to start.” So why has it taken so long for Michael to

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write his first cookbook? He must be the only top chef who hasn’t ventured into publishing. I’ve been very, very busy,” is his honest answer. “I’ve been opening hotels and helping Andrew Brownsword and you can’t do everything. There’s only so much time in the day. But I felt my first cookbook was well overdue.” It has certainly been worth waiting for with nearly 100 delicious recipes reflecting Michael’s own foodie passions. He talks about ingredients, flavours, the role of alcohol and shares favourite recipes – the things he cooks at home, like simple braised red cabbage, or carrot soup, or a pumpkin risotto. Game, meat and poultry win recipe space, but his favourite fish dishes abound here. It’s a real triumph for a first-timer, and a very personal book. “Food is personal,” says Michael. “I’m not writing recipes inspired by other people; they are inspired by my experience and knowledge. You’re getting a story about my feelings about food. The secret’s in the title – Michael Caines at Home. I want to give people aspirations to try something. It’s about building confidence and ability. You can start with something easy and then build up to something more difficult. It’s the things I cook and bake at home with the family,” says father-of-three Michael. “Things like tagliatelle with wild mushrooms. Simple things.” Having found the time to write his book, Michael got heavily involved in the whole process. “I styled the food myself – cooked it all. And David took all the shots. The shoot took ten days with a day of planning all through March. I really enjoyed doing the photography and

choosing all the different dishes and plates to use. I was very specific. I spent one day just going through every single shot, how it would be presented, what plate I wanted to use. I had an agenda of how we were going to shoot it. It was keeping it focused.” Does he like to keep control? “It’s not about keeping control, so much, it’s about the budget more than anything else,” laughs Michael. “And I don’t need anyone to style my food any more than I needed a ghost writer. I want people to recognise it as a project I’ve created. I didn’t want to write a cookbook for meals in under 20 minutes or food for under a fiver. What I wanted to write about was the ingredients I like. I wanted it to be different in that way. “Like the use of alcohol, or herbs, veg, pulses, pasta, seafood, shellfish, poultry and game. I think there’s a nice balance to the book and I’ve included side dishes. “I have plenty of recipes I could have included, so hopefully there’ll be another book. I feel that I have a very strong future ahead of me. You only get to do the second book if the first book is any good.” He shouldn’t worry. The book is lovely – clear recipes, interesting bits of information and lots of ideas of delicious things to cook, and he is pleased with the result, he says: “It has given me a bit of confidence to believe in my ability to write. But I can wait a while, I’m not in a rush. I want to enjoy this book for what it is.”

Michael Caines will be signing copies of his book at a lunch at the Bath Priory, in Bath, on Wednesday, November 27, where he is also executive chef. Tickets for the event cost £55, to include a copy of the book

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Food Tina Rowe

The old farmer said: ‘They don’t cry but they are more trouble than babies.’ “They” were his precious cheeses, but the good news is that, like babies, cheeses also have the ability to mature into exceptional individuals. The farmer, a maker of Stilton in the Midlands, was making the point that cheeses need turning regularly, to distribute their moisture evenly. They need loving care. I heard the story while spending a memorable lunchtime sampling a wide variety of West Country cheeses at the invitation of the British Cheese Board. Whatever our age it’s good to have friends old and young. So it is with many things. Some cheeses are at their best when fresh and young, others develop a new depth of flavour as they mature. If you have got into the habit of always buying the same brand and variety you cannot do better than experiment over the weeks and months ahead. You are in for a wonderfully enriching experience. Of course it is not just the age of any cheese that matters, the methods of production, whether the milk is pasteurised or raw, where the cows grazed and what they ate, all play a part. My fellow journalists came up with some intriguing descriptions as we tucked into the Cheddars, Bries, goats’ cheeses, Camembert, Red Leicester, Double Gloucester, Cornish Yarg and Cornish Blue on offer at a British Cheese Board tasting at Lubborn Creamery at Cricket St Thomas, near Chard. “I could almost taste whisky in there,” said one. “Mmmm, I’m tasting green peppers” said another. “A lovely, crunchy, texture,” said a third. They were not all talking about the same cheese, but I hope you get the picture. No whisky, or pepper, was involved, just wonderful flavours and textures developing naturally. Once a Cheddar gets to two years old calcium lactate crystals are likely to have developed. They are the little white crunchy spots that add piquancy to the flavour. By this age most cheeses will have developed a more mature flavour with a “longer finish”. The three-year reserve made by Dairycrest’s Davidstow creamery and sold by Waitrose was a good example. To be labelled West Country Farmhouse – a European Union Protected Designation of Origin – a cheese has to be made in one of the four counties of Devon, Somerset, or Dorset from West Country milk. “Cheddaring,” the process of breaking up and stacking the curd to help it to dry has to be carried out by hand,

rather than machine, which gives a firmer texture to the finished product, and the cheese must be allowed to mature for at least nine months. There are just eight farms using the PDO specification – Batch Farm, Barbers, Ashley Chase, Cricketer Farms, Keens, Westcombe, Parkham, and Alvis. Two others, Brue Valley and Denhay, have recently stopped and are running down their stocks. Montgomerey and Quickes make to PDO specification but do not use the designation. British taste buds have changed radically over the last 25 years. In 1990 about 60 per cent of the Cheddar sold was mild, with 20 per cent medium, and the rest mature and farmhouse. Today about two thirds of the Cheddar sold is extra mature and farmhouse, with 20 per cent mild and 15-20 per cent medium. People are still looking for more flavour and the big dairies are responding. Lubborn, based at Cricket St Thomas, near Chard, was the first commercial maker of French-style white mould cheeses, such as Camembert, in Britain. Gentler and milder than their French counterparts they soon became a British staple. They also produce goats milk cheese and a richer Channel Island Brie. The cheeses we sampled included Cornish Brie, and Gevrik goats’ cheese from Cornish Country Larder; reduced fat mature hard cheese, Double Gloucester and Red Leicester, produced by Arla at Taw Valley; Cornish Blue from the Cornish Cheese Company; Cornish Yarg, the distinctive nettle-wrapped crumbly cheese with a fine coating of white mould; Cricketer Farm’s hard mild goats’ cheese; Davidstow’s Cathedral City range; Norseland’s blended Mexicana; the farmhouse makers already listed and Wyke Farm, the largest independent cheesemaker in the UK (and a growing exporter). It was difficult to choose a favourite, but among a strong field the most memorable Cheddar for me was Westcombe’s, Cheddar, with a deliciously fruity finish. Nigel White, secretary of the British Cheese Board was our guide, and passes on these tips: If you have left-over cheese grate it and pop in the freezer. It will last for ages and defrost quickly. Cut Stilton into 250gramme pieces, wrapped in foil and put in the freezer it will keep for a couple of months. Defrost it in the fridge and it will keep its shape. We produce 700 varieties of cheeses in Britain. There is a wealth of discovery ahead.

Nigel White, from the British Cheese Board, leads us into the tasty world of cheese

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PICTURES: CLARE GREEN

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Places James O Davies

When I stand in the centre of this numinous monument, with my camera, I get a special feeling.

James O Davies says: ‘Stonehenge offers more, no matter how many times you return. I am constantly surprised that you can stand in a position and see a particular angle or a nuance of light on a stone for the first time, and this happens again and again’. Clockwise, from left, an ‘elk’ at Stonehenge; the ancient monument at late twilight in the snow; sounding a horn at the winter solstice in 2012

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It’s one of awe, excitement and privilege. I doubt that feeling will ever wear off. I have been photographing Stonehenge on and off for the last 15 years, sometimes just in passing, at other times arriving with preconceived, purpose-built images in mind. It sometimes seems futile – Stonehenge receives a million visitors a year, nearly all armed with cameras of various sizes, all shooting every second of the day. The results must be staggering. What I can offer is a unique view with access from inside the stone circle and a desire to record the stones in a new and sometimes challenging way. There is a rich lineage of photographers who have photographed the stones, many of them my photographic heroes. Bill Brandt, Don McCullin, Richard Misrach and Martin Parr have each shot in their distinctive styles: Brandt in his trademark black and white, heavy on the blacks and finding sculptural elements reminiscent of his more famous nudes; McCullin shooting wide, with great skies to accentuate the space; Misrach using strobes on individual stones just as he shot cacti in the Arizona desert; and Parr, using both colour and fill-in flash, more interested in the interaction of the public and their experience. Why a photographic book on Stonehenge? It must be one of the most photographed structures in the country, a monument laden with history and all the visual imagery that that brings with it. Stonehenge has always drawn artists and photographers. Its completeness, its location, its ability to both absorb and reflect light, its trickery – Stonehenge appears small in the

landscape, yet up close the sarsen stones are bewilderingly huge – all contribute to a desire to record what is no more than sky, grass and stone. The answer is that Stonehenge offers more, no matter how many times you return. I am constantly surprised that you can stand in a position and see a particular angle or a nuance of light on a stone for the first time, and this happens again and again. I have stood in all conditions – snow, mist, fog, frost, bright sun, soft low sun, dusk, darkness – sometimes with temperatures so low my fingers were too cold to change the film in the camera. And the sarsens react to those atmospheric conditions, having the ability to turn from a warm honeyed glow to a pale grey in a matter of minutes. My preferred time of day is the early morning, before sunrise. There is life in the grass, either with a frost or perhaps dew, or maybe a low mist. It’s also quiet and the landscape feels still. The images in this book are mostly from digital files with a handful of images scanned from film. Either way I refuse to use filters and I try to keep any post-production down to levels that could be performed in a darkroom with conventional printing methods. I have been interested in creating a series of shots using strobe lighting on the stones, dictating where the light should fall and how it both changes and strips away any context. This book represents a snapshot of a work in progress. I hope it offers a glimpse of why these stones are revered around the world.

A Year at Stonehenge by James O Davies, published by Frances Lincoln, priced £16.99 in hardback

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West Country Voices heard this week Ebb and Flow Writers Lisa Ford and Emma Green have just published their first children’s adventure book, The Pink Flamingo. The busy mums write under the names Ebb (Emma) and Flow (Lisa) and are continuing a tradition that began when they were growing up together in Brixham, in Devon, as Lisa revealed. Emma used to live opposite me in Brixham when we met. Our mums were friends and I was probably about four when we met for the first time. We’ve been friends ever since. When Emma left school she went travelling a lot and went to Australia. When she came back she met her husband, David, and they ended up back in the West Country. They have two boys – Toby, who’s ten, and William, six, and my partner, Garry, and I have a son, Coyde, who’s also ten. So he and Toby are now friends, continuing the tradition.

We started writing together when we were young.

A portrait of a woman, above, taken by James O Davies at the winter solstice at Stonehenge in 2012; crowds gather at sunrise for the 2010 summer solstice, far left

We were always giggling together and we were always getting told off and told to be quiet. We would spend all our time together in the summer holidays and we would write little stories. We were about ten then. Writing was something we enjoyed doing. We wrote a couple of books and then we sent them off to a publisher with a covering letter. I remember writing “from Lisa, 13¾”. We didn’t hear back from them. Then, when we had children, we talked about the stories we read them and what got them giggling. Reading to Coyde reminded me of the characters when we were young. Then Emma told me she’d found the stories we’d written as children all those years ago, along with the letter we’d sent off.

I read the stories to Coyde and he thought they were really good. They were about two friends – Handy Andy and Fred Dread – so that thought was there. Coyde said we should write another book.

His reaction made us want to return to the writing? When the kids played together in the summer holidays, we would brainstorm ideas. I always carried a little jotter in my bag and would jot down ideas, maybe something Coyde says, and then we’d storyboard it. We just balance each other out.

The Adventures of Drifter and Scully is aimed at youngsters of two to seven years. They tell of the adventures of two mischievous seagulls that get up to all sorts of adventures, around the bay with their friend Dab the crab. The first book is The Pink Flamingo, which tells of the importance of wearing sun cream. We wanted something a child could learn from and we’ve written nine stories now. Another one is The Pirates of Men’s Pants and book three is The Gull Next Door about a gull called Gloria, so there might be romance in the air! We wanted the books to be educational, rhyme, be humorous and have great pictures. Emma’s husband, David, has done all the beautiful watercolour illustrations for them.

The book’s going really well. It’s in local bookshops. Help from Will Ford at Another Chapter, in Brixham, has been invaluable. We’re having a book launch there today (November 16). It will be easy to find, there’ll be a giant crab outside!

One of the striking shots of Stonehenge, in Wiltshire, from James O Davies’ new book WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 9


People Sally Bailey

Inside each one of Rachel Morley’s fantastical doorstops is something special. It’s a large flat stone washed smooth from years of being caressed by the North Atlantic and Irish sea, before being thrown up onto the beach and scooped into her bag. Rachel’s beautiful felt work draws inspiration from the Scottish shoreline that she scours for pebbles to weigh her doorstops down. In Dumfries and Galloway, where she shares a family holiday home, the landscape sparks her imagination. “I don’t notice getting inspiration from there but it just soaks into me,” Rachel says. “The colours of the heathers and the landscape have obviously had an impact, and the pebbles with their different shades and layers and lines, you could see it by just sitting them in the landscape to photograph them. “Our family has a log cabin right on the coast overlooking an estuary. There’s a beautiful sandy beach and the skies you get are incredible. It’s such a magical place.” From beachcombing for pebbles with her black Labrador Milly at her side, to her husband James photographing her work beside the shore, Scotland and the sea weave their spell. Rachel was drawn to felting at art college, learning how to make her fabric from scratch by weaving strands of mohair wool together and experimenting with different shapes and forms. Today she makes jewellery, bowls and sculptural pieces. At Winds of Change gallery, in Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, she’ll be showing and selling her doorstops, cubby holes and cubby bowls. The Presents of Delight exhibition, which runs until just before Christmas, has been curated by gallery owner Jane Smoczynski who has hand-picked affordable pieces to go under the Christmas tree, pretty glass choker necklaces, ceramic jugs shaped like animals, vases, plant markers, and wonderfully wintry paintings, perhaps even a few of the £10 egg cosies that inspired Rachel’s curly-topped doorstops. The process of felt making is long and intricate, an ancient art, Rachel explains, developed when people lined their shoes with wool in Biblical times and the warmth and movement of their feet knitted the strands together and turned it into fabric. “I used to think felt came in squares,” Rachel says, “but it’s a very intricate process”. For each piece she makes, Rachel will travel to find the right yarn. The wool for the coloured stripes in the doorstops came from a mill she visited in Yorkshire.

Rachel Morley’s ‘cubby holes’ which are being displayed at the Winds of Change gallery in Winchcombe, Gloucestershire PICTURE: JAMES MORLEY

Every morning she spends hours layering the wispy strips of wool over each other, horizontally then vertically. Dampening them with soapy water, putting them in a net bag, rolling it in a wicker blind until the pieces mat together and drying it in her airing cupboard. For each doorstop, she makes a plastic mould and gradually builds up the strands around it, wetting and rubbing to mesh it together and fluff it up, then creating a separate tail for the top which has to be joined on, again wetting and repeatedly rubbing the fibres until they start to shrink and meld together seamlessly. She cuts a hole, removes the template, shapes it by hand, and temporarily stuffs it to create its shape. After a day or so in the airing cupboard, the flat pebble she’s chosen from the beach in Scotland is put in the bottom, with smaller ones wrapped up in muslin on top and the gaps stuffed with wool before it’s sewn up. The process takes about eight hours for each item making them good value at £55. It’s hard work but thrilling as each piece comes out different to the last. “It is fascinating,” Rachel says. “It’s very physical. When I’m making the felt I have to do it in the morning because it’s exhausting but I must love it because I keep doing it. I love to try new things, I don’t want to churn out the same things all the time otherwise it’s not art.” Rachel’s work constantly evolves. She’s made brooches and rings, tea cosies and egg cosies, brightly coloured wall hangings and her popular spotty bowls. Her husband James shows them in their best light by photographing them in wild settings. “James loves the sea so he’s happy to be taking photographs on a windy day. If we want to go somewhere a bit off the beaten track, he takes the dog, packs the tripod and sets off. My cubby holes have loops on the top so we hung them in a windswept tree to take pictures. We get some strange looks.” The result could have been the most exotic bird houses you’ve ever seen but it wouldn’t be the first time her work has been used for a different purpose than intended. At a recent exhibition a woman wanted a doorstop but simply didn’t need one. “She bought it to put in her bedroom,” Rachel says. “She said it was so tactile and lovely to hold she was going to cuddle it!” Sitting in her studio, once a single garage on the side of her house, Rachel couldn’t be happier. “It’s not huge but everything in it is mine,” she says. “I take Milly out for a walk and aim to be in there felting by 10am so I can listen to Women’s Hour. I love working to the radio, I listen to the afternoon plays, or sometimes fiddle with the stations, maybe a bit of Classic FM. “I have a few little bits of mine around my studio, like a starfish hanging. And my dog has her big bed next to me, I could do with the space really but it’s lovely to have her there. When she’s dreaming and the radio’s on and I’m felting I’m happy.”

Presents of Delight is at Winds of Change gallery, 8 High Street, Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, until December 20. The gallery is open from Tuesday to Saturday, from 10am to 5pm. For details, call 01242 603836 or visit www.windsofchangegallery.co.uk

10 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

Artist Rachel Morley with her felt doorstops on the Scottish coast at Dumfries and Galloway which inspires her work, ‘I don’t notice getting inspiration from there but it just soaks into me’ she says PICTURE: JAMES MORLEY WCL-E01-S2


Retirement dreaming?

Wake up to the benefits of renting at The Hawthorns FINDING a practical solution which matches the quality of your retirement living dream may be easier said than done – and renting may not automatically spring to the top of your list of possible solutions. However, increasing numbers of UK retirees are discovering what their counterparts in America and Australia found out a few years back – that renting your retirement home offers many advantages over continued property ownership. Even more are discovering how you can continue to benefit from both! The Hawthorns Retirement has brought its highly successful American formula for retirement living to the UK at Eastbourne, Clevedon and Braintree. These developments, in a nutshell, offer you continued independent living, none of the worries of home ownership and total flexibility to change your lifestyle at a month’s notice should circumstances dictate. And all this is achieved by renting your retirement home at The Hawthorns. Your monthly rental includes all your many monthly expenses including all your meals and snacks, utility bills, housekeeping, maintenance – even a free mini-bus to take you to the shops and back. If you sit down and calculate what you are spending on all those items living in your own home, the rental fees appears very reasonable indeed. As well as the financial argument, life at The Hawthorns offers the added benefits of security, companionship and the flexibility of handing in just one month’s notice of your decision to leave. Whilst many residents fund this idyllic retirement lifestyle from the proceeds of the sale of their home, many others opt to rent out their own property and fund their new-found lifestyle from the rental income, maintaining their property as part of their estate. Either way, they enjoy to the full the many benefits of renting, namely: •The freedom to live in new areas or change accommodation as desired •The ability to easily move closer to friends or family members •A lifestyle free from property and ground maintenance and the stress of everyday bills •Enjoying the benefits of quality accommodation more suited to their needs with live-in managers. So whilst home ownership may be central to our traditional aspirations, it’s not necessarily central to the great retirement dream. Maybe you should wake up to the benefits of renting!

To f i n d o u t m o r e p l e a s e c a l l : 0 1 2 7 5 7 9 0 0 6 0

or pop in and visit us at: 18-19 Elton Road, Clevedon, North Somerset, BS21 7EH.

Alternatively find us at: www.hawthornsretirement.co.uk WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 11


Eating out Pip Larkham

What was going on with our early November weather? Short, sharp showers? Surely these were meant to come in April, not on Bonfire Night? Our hope for a cold, clear evening were dashed by a massive downpour just 20 minutes before the display was due to start, but it didn’t deter the thousands of people migrating towards Bath’s recreation ground (or a near-enough vantage point) for its annual fireworks display. Wet, and slightly cold as the wind whipped up, we waiting patiently for the “boomers” which didn’t disappoint, but 10 minutes later it seemed like monsoon season had arrived once more. “What time’s the table booked?” asks husband Ian. “Eight,” I replied. Would they mind if we were early? It required around five seconds thought to come to our decision, as the rain lashed down. Now, if you don’t know Bath that well, you might be hard pushed to find new steak house The Herd. It’s, basically, in a tunnel, just a

The Herd, in Bath, served top quality steaks when Pip Larkham and partner paid a visit stone’s throw from Pulteney Weir, hidden under Pulteney Bridge. We run to our destination, and complete with dripping umbrellas and soaked coats, walk into the welcome warmth of The Herd. We’re 15 minutes early, but our table is ready and we’re shown swiftly to our seats. Having opened at the end of the summer, The Herd is still buzzing with being the new kid on the block. It’s light and bright with white stone walls, chunky wooden tables and stylishly tiled floors. The polite and helpful waiting staff all wear black, there is an air of conviviality and best of all, thank God, we’re starting to dry off. A smiley waitress takes our drinks order – some tap water and a large glass each of Merlot torresella at £5.95 a pop. However, we didn’t need a huge amount of time to decide what to eat. It was either steak, steak, or steak – ribeye, sirloin or T-bone etc; char-grilled chicken, lamb or fish were also on the menu (as was a veggie choice of home-made gnoc-

chi), but we were here to sample the main attraction so ordered two 8oz fillets which each came with twice-cooked chips. Did we want a starter? Before steak and chips? Not likely and, to be honest, choices like carpaccio, calamari and a chicken liver terrine board, to name just a few, didn’t sound too appealing before a big meal. We sipped our wine as we watched soggy people march past the restaurant window, as the firework display finally ended, and felt pleased we’d ducked out early. The clean, white walls of the venue have a few pictures on them, namely of cows. One large black and white photograph hangs on the wall at the other side of the room, while just above our heads was a cow “map” showing which part of the animal attributed to which side of beef. But there was no fillet on the graphic... hmmm, tenderloin maybe? Still, there was no more time for pondering as our meals arrived on square white plates and, my goodness, they looked and smelt good. The chips were in their own dish which was promptly tipped on to our plates. We’d also ordered a side salad of rocket and parmesan to share, and accompanying sauces (at a pricey £1.95) of blue cheese and béarnaise that arrived in little ramekins. Wow, these steak were good – Ian’s was medium rare, mine medium, and maybe both could’ve done with a minute extra in cooking but they were fine, with a lovely char-grilled effect top and bottom. There was also a little bundle of micro beetroot on the side which complemented the beef. The chips were piping hot with a delicious crispy outside, and the fresh pile of rocket leaves with wide parmesan shavings went perfectly with meat. We both resisted the urge to ask for ketchup as a condiment, but said “yes” to little jug of vinegar. I was fairly happy with my béarnaise (it was a bit runny) but I gradually spooned it over the steak. Ian’s blue cheese sauce was, well, thick and cheesy – great for dipping the chips in. We cleared our plates and sat back. Dare we go for dessert? Well, we could at least have a look at the menu. To be honest, the choices looked rather heavy after a large meal – sticky toffee pudding, rice pudding, cheese, but in the end we settled on a chocolate mousse (myself) and crème brulee plus a cappuccino (Ian). Both looked nice as they arrived with a dusting of icing sugar. Ian’s had its lovely, snappy caramelised top and creamy insides. It was rather sweet, so the cappuccino made an ideal accompaniment. Meanwhile, my super sweet mousse came with a side helping of raw redcurrants – perfect to offset the sweetness, plus you get to eat it with a white chocolate spoon! Ooh, my six-year-old nephew would love this. Luckily, a “grown-up” dessert spoon is also provided but I tried my best with the chocolate spoon until it started melting. After clearing our plates once more, we were definitely full this time. We asked for the bill which came to around £85. Expensive perhaps, but you get what you pay for, and those steaks were very good. If the standard stays this high, I’m sure people will keep coming back.

Venue The Herd, 12 Argyle Street (main road entrance), Bath, BA2 4BQ Contact 01225 316583 Price range Steaks from £19.95 to £25.95; lunch special: two courses for £14.95 (with main of burger or gnocchi)

12 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

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Food Chris Rundle THE PIES HAVE IT Trish Rayner, from the Unusual Pork Pie and Meat Company based in Shepton Mallet, proudly displays her produce at the Wells Food Festival last month PICTURE: CLARE GREEN PICTURE: FRAN STOTHARD

You may be interested to know I’ve just given away the family heirloom – or at least what passes for such a thing in families such as ours. I always say burglars are welcome to drop in any time and have a root around. If they find anything of value I’ll go halves with them. Anyway, this was a cup. A genuine art deco Clarice Cliff cup from around 1930 in her ‘Gayday’ design: conical bowl with a solid, triangular handle and a pretty floral pattern. It came from an assortment of crockery I found as I was clearing out my mother’s sideboard when she sold her house some 20odd years ago. And I discovered it with something of a shock. I realised what it was and the fact that it might have some value. Then, in a vivid flashback, I recalled the day many years previously (I would have been in my mid-teens) when my mother was looking out stuff for the church jumble sale and said she’d never much cared for this odd-looking tea service and had never actually used it so it might as well go. And off – since Clarice Cliff had not been rediscovered then and neither of us dreamed she ever would – the whole lot went: the rounded teapot with its recessed handle, the milk jug, the sugar bowl, the saucers, the plates and the cups – all, evidently, bar the one that got left behind. Someone at that jumble sale got a bargain – but probably didn’t realise until years later that they had. Well, good luck to them. It was never, ever a complete set without the one forgotten cup and now that, after sitting on a shelf looking somewhat neglected and forlorn for the last couple of decades, has gone to my friend who’s a Clarice Cliff collector and may, should the Lord spare him long enough, be able to acquire via the good offices of eBay the rest of the pieces (he’s already tracked down a couple of plates) of a complete tea service. Where the set came from I have no idea, though given its date it was probably a wedding present. Or maybe it was a collection my mother and father built up gradually, because Clarice Cliff pieces used to be sold in Woolworths for sixpence each. But tucked inside the lonesome cup I also found one of my mother’s recipes for tea bread. Now there’s a blast from the past. Tea breads. Just the sort of thing to slice up and serve on a Clarice Cliff plate as we wait for the valves to warm up so we can listen to Children’s Hour. Tea breads. Reminders of the days when there was actually a meal called ‘tea’ with bread and butter and cakes and doughnuts and perhaps some sardines on toast to begin with, and pots and pots of steaming tea. Before we got all continental, scrapped ‘tea’ and waited for supper instead. Tea breads, in any event, are simplicity themselves to make and the kind of thing you could send the children off to do on a rainy afternoon because there’s no footling around with yeast and they can include some fun ingredients such as bananas or pineapple. Yes, indeed, in that sense they are not true

‘breads’ but can be dated back to the mid-19th century when chemical raising agents first became available, enabling cooks to knock up something for the tea table during the course of the afternoon, rather than having to start at dawn. Or even the previous night. What you don’t use the first day should be wrapped in film, then in a slightly damp cloth and finally in foil, to prevent them drying out.

Cherry and banana loaf Ingredients 225g self-raising flour, 175g light soft brown sugar, 100g softened butter, two beaten eggs, pinch of salt, 100g glacé cherries, rinsed under hot water and chopped, two ripe bananas, mashed. Method Heat the oven to 160C gas mark 3. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl, stir in the sugar and the remainder of the ingredients and beat or whisk for a couple of minutes until well mixed. Pour into a greased and lined 900g loaf tin and bake for an hour and a half. Allow to cool on a wire rack.

Honey bread Ingredients 175g plain flour, 75g Demerara sugar, teaspoon each bicarbonate of soda and mixed spice, pinch of salt, 25g butter, one egg,75g clear honey, 150ml water, 50g sultanas. Method Heat the oven to 180C gas mar 4. Sieve the flour into a bowl, stir in the sugar, soda, spice and salt then rub in the margarine. Beat the honey together with the water and the egg then add to the dry ingredients, beat well, add the sultanas and stir in then turn into a greased and lined 450g loaf tin and bake for an hour.

Pineapple bread Ingredients One 225g tin of pineapple in natural juice, 50g walnut pieces,100g butter, 50g caster sugar, three tablespoons black treacle, one beaten egg, 350g self-raising flour, 175g icing sugar. Method Heat the oven to 180C gas mark 4. Drain the pineapple, reserving the juice, and chop coarsely. Chop the walnuts into small pieces or pulse in a food processor for six seconds. Cream the butter, sugar and treacle together and add the egg a little at a time with some of the flour. Beat well, add the remaining flour and fold in the pineapple, walnuts and four tablespoons of the juice. Turn into a greased and lined 900g loaf tin and bake for an hour. When slightly cooled turn out onto a wire rack and glaze with the icing sugar mixed with two tablespoons of the pineapple juice.

Tea breads are simplicity themselves to make and the kind of thing you could send the children off to do on a rainy afternoon because there’s no footling around with yeast and they can include some fun ingredients such as bananas or pineapple. Even better with a cuppa in a Clarice Cliff teacup WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 13


Food Andy Welch

‘I’m sorry to keep you waiting,’ says Yotam Ottolenghi. ‘I was in the middle of tasting a new soup recipe and got carried away.’ Once he describes the recipe – his take on a classic minestrone – it’s perhaps understandable why he lost track of time. “We’re very nearly there with this one,” he says. “The recipe will be on my website soon, which is just so satisfying. So much work goes into perfecting these recipes.” It’s a process the Israel-born chef has been through countless times in recent months. He spent most of June and July filming Ottolenghi’s Mediterranean Island Feast, his second series for More4, the sequel-of-sorts to Ottolenghi’s Mediterranean Feast broadcast almost exactly a year ago. “I went to Sardinia, Corsica, Majorca and finally Crete,” he says of the new series. “Each island was a journey in its own right, and we spent ten days in each place. I’d come back to London for a few days before going back out again. My friends saw me with a tan and thought I’d just been holidaying, but honestly, I was working very hard.” On each island, the 44-year-old, tried to unravel the local food culture and understand the essence of the place, focusing not only on the cuisine, but why it had evolved as it had. On Corsica, he discovered a rich shepherd’s culture he didn’t expect to find, but due to regular invaders, locals moved inland to work the hills rather than live off the sea. “The terrain there is so mountainous, lush and fertile, so the diet is lots of pork, lamb and chestnuts,” he says. “Crete feels much more Middle Eastern, with spices, herbs and pulses, as you might find in Lebanon or Israel.” Sardinia, meanwhile, confounded Ottolenghi’s expectations. “I always feel really sorry for people who don’t leave the resort when they’re in a place like that,” he says. “It’s easy not to make an effort because you’re on holiday and you want to relax, but you can miss so much.” While on the island, the Mediterranean’s second-largest, he drove up into the hills to spend the day with a goat shepherd. They milked goats and, after returning to the shepherd’s rudimentary home, made ricotta, which is formed from whey left over from cheese production. “It could have been 2,000 years ago,” he says, “and fresh ricotta is really out of this world. I was very lucky. I used it to make little fritters mixed with orange and Sardinian honey. It was incredible.” Despite establishing a string of delis in London in the past 12 years, this is only Ottolenghi’s second TV series. He explains that while offers came in thick and fast after he moved to the UK (in 1997, after completing his Israel military service), he had been reluctant to get involved. “I didn’t think it was about the food,” he says, “so I was always a little put off by the idea. I’m glad I gave in, because I’ve really enjoyed these two series and we’ve managed to make the shows more about the food than just stylish production. I’ve realised it’s completely worthwhile on that front. Not just that, when I come back from travelling with new ideas for myself, I think I’ve done something worthwhile. These are ideas that I can use again and again in my work. On a personal

level, some of the experiences I’ll never get to do again.” One such experience happened on Sardinia. He joined some local fisherman going out to catch lobster, which they later cooked on the beach over a fire made with gathered driftwood. Ottolenghi grilled some wild fennel and grapes he’d brought with him as a salad. “Can you imagine how good that meal was?” he says, beaming. “The smoky lobster went so well with the sweetness of the grilled grapes. “Whether I was learning a new dish or about the island’s history, or recreating a local dish with my own twist, it was all about discovery. I think my favourite recipe was a grilled fish, brushed with herb-infused oil as it cooked. It was a revelation.”

Ricotta fritters with orange and honey – Sardinia Ingredients for six 470g fresh ricotta; 60g caprino goat’s cheese, or another soft goat’s cheese; three eggs; 60ml milk; 1½tbspn fresh mint, finely chopped; zest of one orange; 160g plain flour, possibly more; 1½tspns baking powder; 50g caster sugar; about 700ml sunflower oil, for frying; 4tblspns honey, melted for drizzling; icing sugar for dusting; salt. For the topping: one orange; 100g sugar; 100ml water

Method

Start by making the topping. Peel the zest of the orange, being careful not to get the white pith as this is bitter. Slice into thin julienne strips. Put the sugar and water into a small saucepan and place on a medium heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Gently simmer for three to four minutes, until it forms a syrupy consistency. Add the orange strips, continue cooking for a minute and then turn off the heat and allow to cool. Beat 350g of the ricotta with the goat’s cheese and eggs until smooth. Whisk in the milk, mint and orange zest and set aside. In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, sugar, and quarter of a teaspoon of salt. Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients to form a batter, adding more flour if necessary, until you reach a dropping consistency – that’s when the mix doesn’t immediately fall off the spoon when you lift it out of the bowl, but does slide off after a few seconds. Set aside for ten minutes to rest. Heat a small, heavy-based saucepan with the sunflower oil, so it comes approximately 4cm up the side of the pan (it’s important the oil doesn’t come more than half way up the side). When the oil’s medium hot (180C), gently drop heaped teaspoons of the batter into the oil and cook for three to four minutes, turning occasionally, until lightly golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. Continue with the remaining batter until they are all cooked. Pile the fritters on to individual plates and drizzle over the warmed honey. Top with a dollop of ricotta and dust with icing sugar. To finish, sprinkle the orange strips on top of the ricotta and serve immediately.

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Paella with soller prawns and grilled vegetables – Mallorca Ingredients for six 4tbsp olive oil, an onion, finely diced (around 290g), 2tsp sweet paprika, ½tsp smoked paprika, four cloves garlic, sliced, 250ml dry sherry, 500g paella rice, 1.5l chicken stock, warmed, 1tsp saffron threads, three long strips of orange skin, 400g French beans, blanched, two small courgettes, sliced on an angle 1cm thick, two green peppers topped and tailed and cut into strips 1cm thick, 200g cherry tomatoes, two lemons, quartered, five spring onions, ends removed, cut into 6cm lengths and quartered lengthways, 1kg whole prawns, shells on, salt

For the parsley oil:

40g parsley, roughly chopped, two green chillies, roughly chopped, 90ml olive oil, salt

Method

Start by making the parsley oil; blitz the parsley, chilli, olive oil and quarter of a teaspoon of salt in a food processor, or a mortar and pestle, until almost smooth but maintaining some of the parsley’s texture. Heat one tablespoon of olive oil in a paella or large saute pan on medium high heat. Saute the onion for ten minutes, stirring occasionally until it’s soft and glossy without too much, if any, colour. Stir in the spices and garlic and cook for another minute. Pour over the sherry and bubble away for three minutes until it’s reduced by half. Add the rice and cook, stirring for two minutes, until warm and glossy. Add the chicken stock, saffron, orange

strips and three-quarters of a teaspoon of salt, and gently stir so the rice is even in the pan. Leave to simmer for 20 minutes until the rice is cooked through but still retains a slight bite and the stock is absorbed. Remove the pan from the heat and leave somewhere warm. Meanwhile, place a griddle pan on high heat and ventilate the kitchen. In a large bowl toss the beans with half a tablespoon of olive oil and a pinch of salt. Add the beans and grill for one minute. Remove and place in a bowl. Mix the courgettes in the same bowl with half a tablespoon of oil and quarter of a teaspoon of salt and cook for three to four minutes on the grill, until lightly charred. Put in the bowl with the beans. Repeat the process with the peppers, oil and salt. Add half a tablespoon of oil and a pinch of salt to the tomatoes and grill for two minutes until they are just starting to char and split. Repeat with the spring onions, cooking for only 30 seconds. Place the lemons directly on the grill plate and lightly caramelise each side for 30 seconds. Lastly, mix the whole prawns with quarter of a teaspoon of salt and half a tablespoon of olive oil and grill for one minute on each side. Remove immediately once cooked. Spoon two thirds of the rice on to a platter. Sprinkle over a selection of vegetables, followed by more rice, gradually building the layers outwards as well as upwards, but not too high. Scatter the prawns on top of the vegetables, lightly pushing some of them into the rice. Finally add the lemon wedges and drizzle over the parsley oil. Serve immediately.

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Foodie treat Mark Taylor Students who want to ditch the ready meals and takeaways in favour of real Italian food can now learn the art of home cooking with a Bristol-based Italian ‘Mamma’. From her home in Westbury-on-Trym, Cristina Orlando runs cookery courses for students, teaching them the basics of nutritious cooking. The courses have been set up in conjunction with Italian sauce brand Sacla’, which recently carried out research into students’ eating habits. The study found that they are eating an unhealthy and expensive diet of takeaways and snacks because they don’t know how to cook quick, cheap but tasty meals. In an attempt to change the way our students eat, Sacla’ has teamed up with Italian mothers in five university cities. Over the course of the coming weeks, these experienced home cooks will open up their kitchens to students and host a series of homebased cookery classes based on the Italian principle of simple, healthy ingredients cooked well. The Sacla’ Student Cookery School is an initiative aimed at helping students get the most out of cheap, seasonal, fresh ingredients and store cupboard staples – all treated with love, passion and Italian flair. Cristina Orlando was born and brought up in Florence and splits her time between there and Bristol. Cristina is passionate about cooking and often does so with her 17-year-old daughter. She says she is thrilled to be a Sacla’ Mamma. and is keen to pass on her wisdom, along with Italian mammas in London, Manchester, Swansea, and Glasgow.

Celebrity TV chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s Ricotta Fritters With Orange And Honey from Sardinia, top, and, below, Paella With Soller Prawns And Grilled Vegetables from Mallorca. He has just returned from a recipe-finding trip around Europe

Comfort food Rosa Mashiter With Christmas drawing closer now is the time to make good use of your freezer, and cook off some standby meals for the festive season that can just be taken out as and when required, defrosted and heated through. This year most of us are watching our household budgets, although I have also found, when talking to people generally, , that the majority are stoically determined that “this will be the best Christmas ever”. Now is the time to get started on your Christmas freeze-away dishes as it will enable you to make good use of all the offers like BOGOF and specials available in the shops and supermarkets.

Spicy cottage pie Ingredients for four to six Two tbsp olive oil, a medium onion, two cloves garlic, 450g lean minced beef, 300ml red wine, 400g tin chopped tomatoes, 400 tin kidney beans in chilli sauce (available in most supermarkets), 600g sweet potatoes, 450g potatoes, 25g butter, 3tbsp milk

Method

Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Peel and roughly chop the sweet potatoes and potatoes. Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil and add the sweet potatoes and potatoes and cook for approximately 20 minutes or until

tender. Drain well, add the butter and milk together with a good seasoning of freshly ground black pepper and mash well until smooth and creamy in texture. Meanwhile peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Heat the oil in a large frying pan and sauté off the onion and garlic until the onions are soft and transparent. Add the minced beef, stirring to break and cook over a high heat until the mince is browned all over. Add the wine, lower the heat and allow to simmer for a couple of minutes Add the tomatoes and cook for a further 20 minutes, then add the beans and continue to cook for a further 20 minutes and transfer to an ovenproof dish. Top with the mash using a fork to make texture. If you want to eat now rather than freeze, bake in a preheated oven at 190C (375F, gas mark 5) for 30 minutes. If you want to freeze then allow the pie to completely cool, cover the dish with foil and then clingfilm all around the dish and freeze. To use defrost in the refrigerator overnight, and cook in a preheated oven at 190C (375F, gas mark 5) for 35 to 40 minutes.

Sausage and Lentil Stew Ingredients for four to six One tbsp olive oil, 125g pack diced pancetta (or bacon lardons), 12 good quality pork sausages, two medium onions, four cloves garlic, two medium carrots, a level tsp dried rosemary, 300g Puy lentils, 900ml hot chicken stock, 1tbsp white wine vinegar, 400g passata, two tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley

Corona di Napoleone – just like mamma makes it

Method Peel and roughly chop the onions and garlic. Peel and dice the carrots. Heat the oil in a large fireproof casserole and add the pancetta and sausages and cook for ten minutes, turning them until nicely browned. Once browned remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. Add the onions, carrot and garlic to the casserole and cook, stirring, for about four minutes or until the onions are soft and transparent. Return the sausages to the casserole and add the rosemary, lentils, stock, vinegar and passata, seasoning well with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, bring to the boil and then lower the heat, cover the dish and allow to simmer away for 45 to 50 minutes, stirring from time-to-time until the lentils are tender. To eat now, spoon straight from the pan and accompany with some warm crusty bread and a mixed green leaf salad. To freeze, remove from the heat, and allow to cool completely before transferring to a suitable freezer container. To use, allow to defrost overnight in the refrigerator, then allow the casserole to come up to room temperature before putting into a preheated oven at 190C (375F, gas mark five) for 45 minutes or until hot through.

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Corona di Napoleone (Napoleon’s Crown) Ingredients 500g tortellini al formaggio; 500g frozen peas; 300g thinly sliced ham; 500ml milk; 50g flour; 60g butter; 250ml double cream; 100g Parmesan cheese; three cloves garlic; 3tblspns olive oil; 2tspns sugar; Sacla classic basil pesto

Method

In a pan, pour the olive oil and garlic and gently let it turn golden on a very gentle heat. Add the frozen peas, add salt and pepper according to taste, and then the sugar. Cover it and stir the peas every now and then until softened. In another pan, prepare the besciamelle sauce. Put 50g of butter in a pan and let it melt on low heat. Take the pan out of the heat and put the flour, stir until smooth then add the milk gradually by stirring continuously. Put the pan back to the hob and stir until the sauce becomes thicker. Boil enough water in a large pan with two tablespoons of salt. As soon as it boils add the tortellini and let them boil for few minutes. Drain the tortellini and put them in a bowl. Mix them with the besciamelle sauce, the cream, the Parmesan cheese, one third of the peas, 100g of ham and pepper. Get a round mould with a hole in that can go in the oven, grease it with butter and cover it all around by laying the slices of ham. Fill it in with the dressed Tortellini and place it in the oven at 200C (gas mark 5) for 45 minutes. Remove from oven and upturn on a dish. Warm up remaining peas with basil pesto.

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 15


Absolute Corkers Ned Halley

Watering hole Kingsdon Inn, Somerset Ned Halley

The pavilion at Chateau Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux, home to the excellent Chateau de l’Estaing 2010

I liked the hullabaloo that greeted the news of the worldwide wine shortage last week. Morgan Stanley, a huge American financial services company which ought to know better, announced that demand for wine “exceeded supply by 300 million cases in 2012”. The shortfall, we are told, has been remedied by wines held in stock from previous vintages. As you might expect. But it can’t go on forever, of course. At some point, all the slack will be taken up, The geniuses at Morgan Stanley say they “expect the current production shortfall to culminate in a significant increase in export demand, and higher prices for exports globally.” It’s all Europe’s fault. “Plummeting production” across the Continent is blamed, thanks largely to “vine pull and poor weather.” Vine pull is digging up uneconomic vineyards, incentivised by grants from the EU to lower the wine lake. And poor weather has indeed played its part. The harvests of 2012 and 2013 have been untypically small. But wine production in the “Old World” (Europe) is still way ahead of local demand. France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Portugal each consume far less wine than they used to, and northern importing nations including us are mature markets. Demand has peaked and is now gently diminishing. In the New World, it’s a different story. In Australasia, the Americas and South Africa they’re upping production in anticipation of burgeoning demand not so much at home, but in the tiger economies of Brazil, India and, of course, China. The people at Morgan Stanley believe interest in wine in these new markets will grow, and inevitably drive prices up. It’s certainly true that the fashion in China for the prestige wines of Bordeaux has put the top chateau names completely beyond the reach of claret lovers on ordinary incomes. But to extrapolate this misfortune into a notion that wine-drinking will become a Chinese custom is ludicrous. I have lived in

the region myself, and know that wine is still regarded as a weird western beverage. Only a tiny minority in China is likely ever to embrace wine-drinking. Admittedly, Chinese minorities can be on a grand scale – there are, for example, now more than a million Chinese millionaires – but in future demand for wine will be mostly met from the new vineyards now springing up in provinces such as Sichuan. I have been told that there are already more acres of vine in China than throughout the United States. To summarise, forget about wine shortages. Let the Australians try to exploit the Chinese market. Europe still has far more wine than it knows how to sell. And if prices do go up here in Britain it will not be down to demand exceeding supply. It will be because alcohol is one of the few commodities successive governments believe they can tax to the brink of extinction at no cost to votes. Before they do so, try some of the finds I have been making at the autumn tastings. Notable among these are wines on generous discounts – which I notice continue as always, the global wine shortage notwithstanding. First up is a simply extraordinary red wine from New Zealand. Craggy Range Te Muna Pinot Noir 2011 says its maker, has “prominent aromatics of black cherry and boysenberry over subtle notes of rose petal, bark, and a hint of fresh mint.” And that’s only the smell. But while sympathising with the perpetual problem of putting the nuances of wine into words, I do get the drift. This is an explosively scrumptious rendering of the ripe strawberry-raspberry pinot noir formula of arresting quality. At Majestic, it’s expensive but not overpriced, coming down from £22.50 to £17.99 if you buy any two Kiwi wines.

16 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

At Waitrose, Araldica Corsini Barbaresco 2010 is down from £11.99 to £8.99. Barbaresco is a grand style of red wine from nebbiolo grapes grown in the Italian province of Piedmont. It is neighbour to Barolo, often cited as Italy’s number one wine. In my experience, Barbaresco, often more intense and supple than its rival, is usually better value. This one, a rarity at under £10, is silky but grippy and a very proper example of the style, cherry-perfumed, sleek and liquorous, elegantly weighted. From the other end of Italy comes an exotic dry white wine, Sainsbury’s Taste the Difference Greco di Tufo 2012 currently reduced from £10.49 to £7.86. The greco is a variety of grape that particularly thrives in the volcanic soil of the parish of Tufo in the Campania region. The wine has a lush, orchard-fruit freshness trimmed with a tangy citrus acidity, and I like to think it has a mysterious spiciness born of the contortions in the earthquake-prone underground of this remote and beautiful region. And finally, an encouraging word about claret. Not all Bordeaux wine has been priced beyond reach thanks to inflated demand in the Far East. There are still good-value wines to be had and oddly enough, one of the best places to look is the Co-op. Stick to the largest branches. My pick of the day is Chateau de l’Estaing 2010 at £8.99. It’s a generously ripe and developed juicy-blackcurranty classic claret with discreet oak richness and long, authentic flavours. My guess is that most casual drinkers would enjoy this just as much as a bottle of Chateau Mouton-Rothschild at a hundred times the price.

There’s a confident air about this fine old village pub. Cottagey on the outside, it catches you unawares once you’re in, with its spacious, open-plan layout, arranged on several different levels into rather stylish sub-zones each with its own appeal. Mrs Halley and I plumped for a window table in the front bar facing the fancy, blondtimber serving area at the centre of the building. Encouraging features included hand pumps for St Austell Tribute and Butcombe ales plus Thatcher’s Dry and Ashton Press for cider drinkers. It’s a foodie pub laid out for eating. Next to us a party of four were getting their lunches just as we sat down. “The food’s simply marvellous here,” one of the ladies confided to me. “We come as often as we can.” All the way from Yeovil, she added. And certainly her home-made fishcakes with thrice-cooked, hand-cut chips, chilli and coriander mayonnaise and garden salad (£10.80) looked entirely worth the journey. I love fishcakes and followed suit. Mrs H went for a starter-size parfait of duck livers at £5.95. We did have a little wait for our order. I tried to mollify my impatient companion by reminding her how many times my chips were being cooked. The trifling delay was warranted. My two fishcakes, the size and shape of tennis balls, crunchily clad and filled with moist salmon and haddock (no noticeable potato) were a treat and the chips likewise. The parfait was so plentiful Mrs H needed to ask for extra toast, which was obligingly delivered. It’s calm, nicely unified and comfortable here. The building’s interesting features include a central inglenook with a table for two inside, and good finishes. Luxurious carpets and quarries cover the floors. If it all looks fresh and newish it’s because a thatch fire in 2010 nearly destroyed the pub. It was closed for nine months of substantial renovations. I knew I had been here before and later looked up what I had written about the place on that occasion, just over ten years ago. It was just as well-run back then, but I indiscreetly reported that the solitary lady behind the bar, in the midst of taking a lot of lunchtime orders, had broken her corkscrew, “leaving her to open serial bottles of wine with a creaky waiter’s friend. I resisted the temptation to ask if I could help.” Weirdly, last week the same thing seems to have happened. I have no idea if it was the same lady serving, but she did have a terrible time trying to open a bottle of wine (an excellent Rioja at £4.30 a glass) with a waiter’s friend corkscrew. Again, I was too diffident to offer assistance.

Wine of the Week Blandy’s Ten-Year-Old Bual Madeira is my idea of a winter warmer. It’s the colour of a newly popped conker, with the same sort of glorious sheen. Next come aromas of toasted nuts, dark preserved fruits, luscious spicy Christmascake suggestions. It is rich rather than sweet, intense not sticky and silky in its texture. If Madeira is a mystery to you, this wine will reveal all. Drink it from a small wine glass with nuts as an exotic appetiser, or with cheese as an after-dinner digestive equal in interest to any kind of port. A 50cl bottle costs £18.22 from Cambridge Wines at 5 Winchester Street, in Salisbury (tel 01722 324486). Voted the Fortified Specialist of the Year in the 2013 International Wine Challenge, this independent merchant boasts the largest range of fortified wines in the country – currently 243 of them. The firm, which retails every kind of wine, was started 20 years ago in Cambridge to supply the university’s eagerly thirsty colleges. The Salisbury branch opened just two years ago, and is very well worth a visit.

The Kingsdon Inn, Kingsdon, Somerset TA11 7LG. Tel 01935 840543

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SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 17


Shopping Lisa Haynes

Photosynthesis taught us that most flowers require plenty of sunshine to grow. But not the blooms that have exploded on to the high street this season... Fashion has defied science with a new spin on florals to match the mood of the season – think dark Gothic blooms, glitzy embellished buds and touchable textured petals. In short, it’s anything but a bright and breezy summer print. You can flower from head to toe, or carry the equivalent of a wardrobe bouquet with a floral clutch. Just make sure you’re engaging in some serious flower power this winter.

Gothic blooms Prints are the most obvious way to work florals but there’s a vital difference between summer and winter prints – the backdrop. Banish ivory, cream, white or bright base shades for a dominant dark colour like black, navy or indigo. Even the brightest of blooms instantly look seasonally appropriate against black, if you still want to look colourful. If patterns are your thing, tactical clashes make a bold statement. If you’re unsure about teaming together floral print separates, the high street has lots of Givenchy-inspired florals set against check backgrounds to tick off two trends in one. For something more abstract, look to dark, painterly blooms that resemble clusters of petals swirling in a wintry storm.

Textured petals Add interest to your winter fashion bouquet with tactile fabrics. Jacquard and velvet florals look especially beautiful in opulent berry tones like claret and burgundy for a ladylike look, while brocade is best suited to metallic tones like gold or bronze. Add some garden glamour to party frocks with intricate embroidery. Blooms sprawled over black lace evoke an instant Gothic feel, but you can go colourful with embroidered florals in a similar tone for an elegant look. Textured florals also come in less glamorous hard-working fabrics. Black leather staples have moved on a step with florals embossed onto dresses and skirts. With leather being so popular right now, this is a floral trend that’s unlikely to wilt any time soon.

Embellished buds Real-life flowers may be beautiful but they can’t sparkle like the fashion variety.

Sequins styled in the form of flowers are freshening up dresses and jackets for the party season. For a stripped-back version, opt for classic black with shimmering metallic blooms. Anti-wallflowers will love bold bright buds emblazoned on statement pieces. Appliqued flowers are instant talking points, but they can be daywear appropriate too if you opt for 3D buds in dark, matte fabrics that cling to tees or sweaters. Just ensure that the rest of your outfit is devoid of texture to ensure your lifelike florals are the centre of attention. For super-subtle, try embellished buds in the same colour as your top.

Bouquet additions Floral finishing touches can give a bland outfit some added flair. If your outfit lacks texture, try a necklace featuring 3D blooms to bring your dress or top to life. The same theory applies to rings and bracelets, but one extravagant floral jewellery piece is enough – think single statement stem, rather than overgrown flower bed. A clutch bag in a floral print can instantly liven up a plain ensemble. You don’t have to stick to safe black – pick out one key colour in the print and go wild. Floral footwear in an all-over print is a big statement, so keep the rest of your outfit pared back. If you just want a subtle flowery flash, look for shoes featuring an embellished bud or a petal-printed heel or sole.

Get the look M&S’s new Christmas poster girl, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, is a model masterclass in chic animal print. Get her Autograph Leather Abstract Print Pencil Skirt for £299, available now (www.marksandspencer.com).

Buy it now Stand by for a French fashion stampede. Isabel Marant is bringing some Parisian chic to H&M with the brand’s latest designer collaboration. “You dress up, but do not pay too much attention and still look sexy. The collection is infused with this kind of easiness and attitude,” says Marant. Isabel Marant pour H&M is available for men, women and children, priced from £12.99.

It’s all about floral patterns in the run-up to Christmas as shown, above, with this Rita floral skirt, £125, and top, £75 – all from Coast (www.coast-stores.com); right, Per Una’s red floral dress, £89, M&S Collection jumper, £75, necklace, £29.50, belt, £19.50 – all Marks & Spencer; far right, multi floral tube dress, £25, from Dorothy Perkins (www.dorothyperkins.com)

18 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

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Shopping Gabrielle Fagan glamorous yet understated, without costing the earth.” Gold, she points out, complements mineral colours, as well as warm blues, reds, pinks and greens. “Metallic gold highlights are emphasised in natural lights, creating a warm and luxe room scheme,” she says. “We’ve used the palest, most delicate gold sheens, through to gloriously rich gold for backgrounds that showcase exquisite details.”

Silver seeker Silver has a cool, calming effect on a scheme and gives a dash of opulence to contemporary settings. “Winter’s the perfect season to introduce metallics throughout interiors and the trend ranges from warm gold and copper through to cooler chrome and stainless steel,” says Gary Chambers at Apollo Blinds, whose made-tomeasure roller blinds start from £62. “We’re also seeing pattern coming to the fore as people feel bolder in their choices, and the blend of metallics and detail is very strong.”

Copper crush

Brighten up your home with some shimmer and shine as metallics put you in the Christmas mood early. Above left, Chasseur brushed metal aluminium mosaics from the Mosaics collection, from £20.45 per square metre, from OriginalStyle.com; above right, Colin’s Rockstar twin, £69, silver dipped Cockatoo, from Bitten (www.bittenlondon.com); top right, Pineapple Glory Cushion Black Silver, £69, from Bitten

If you’re craving a lick of luxury for your home, look no further than metallics. Think glittering gold, shimmering silver and burnished bronze. Precious metal tones sashayed and sparkled their way down the fashion catwalks, and now they’re making their mark on our decor. Decorators, designers and makers have all joined the gold rush, recognising that metallics can bring instant glamour and richness to settings. They’re being seen as accents on accessories, as furniture embellishment and as a brushed finish on textiles. “Gold, particularly, is so much part of our myths and legends, with childhood stories often having pirates hunting for it,” says Frederick Wimsett, who hand-paints Chinoiserie murals which feature 24-carat gold leaf, and whose clients include fashion designer Alice Temperley. “Gold is literally woven into the fabric of our society. Around half of my projects now feature it in some way. It’s warm, light reflective and never goes out of fashion.” Bringing on the bling couldn’t be better timed, as that most glittering of seasons – Christmas – is on the horizon. But investing in some decor treasure for your home won’t be a waste, as this look’s set to last long after the baubles have been packed away. Metallics are featuring significantly in next year’s home collections and the trend will forge its way on to the high street. “The metallics trend is definitely going to stick around and is being employed across the industry, from tiles to fabrics, wallpapers and

Even if you’ve never been a heavy metal fan, the new look of brass, copper, bronze and nickel might change your mind. The finishes are warm and these softer, richer-looking metals, which are joining gold and silver on the decor stage, work well in both a traditional or contemporary setting. “The high-shine metallic hues are back in full force and, after all, what’s not to like? They have a glow and aura of opulence and uberluxury,” says Janet Morais, president and creative director at luxury interiors specialists Koket.

Almondsbury Forge

fur niture,” says Steve Charles, co-founder of rare stone and decorative surface specialists Decorum Est. “It’s been channelled through some of the world’s leading fashion houses and we’re beginning to see it starring in interiors. “Our latest tile collection, Hollywood, has a blend of white, gold and silver hues and is a nod to the decadence and drama of the postGatsby era.” Whether you’re a gold-digger, silver-seeker or just burning for bronze, there’s sure to be something to appeal – and it needn’t tarnish the bank balance. Follow the experts’ advice on creating metallic magic...

Gilt trip Gold’s the undisputed star of metals, and it’s being celebrated in an exciting exhibition at London’s British Museum, Beyond El Dorado (running until March 23, 2014), inspired by the imagined city of gold in South America and featuring an array of ancient Colombian gold art and crafts. If you fancy giving your home a golden touch, stores are glistening with gold-themed items. “Gold accents can be seen in the wallpapers and fabrics from Aegean, the new collection from Sanderson,” says Rebecca Craig, head of design for Sanderson. “We featured gold in response to the demand for luxurious home furnishings that look WCL-E01-S2

Cooking & so Much More Come and see our selection of woodburning, gas and electric Esse range cookers on display, also available in oil, and with back boilers to heat your home. We offer a full installation service We also have over 100 woodburning stoves on display along with wicker log baskets, companion sets, coal hods, spark guards, spares and accessories. Sundays Hill, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4DS

01454 613315

www.almondsburyforge.co.uk

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 19


Books Charles Parkinson

The debate about who King Arthur was, or even if he existed, will probably continue. But I think we can learn a great deal about the history of his era from place names in Britain. Many of these go back to times before the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century, and even to pre-Roman Britain. It is generally agreed that Arthur, if he existed at all, was a British commander in the wars between the indigenous British population and the invading Anglo-Saxons in the late 5th or early 6th centuries. These wars began around the middle of the 5th century, but after the British won a decisive victory at the siege of ‘Mount Badon’ (probably in c.493) there was a peaceful interlude. Hostilities recommenced in the middle of the 6th century, and lowlands England fell under Anglo-Saxon control in the third quarter of that century. It is thought that Arthur may have been a British commander at Mount Badon, and that his reputation preserved the subsequent peace. Logically, since the Anglo-Saxons were spreading westwards from their initial colonies in East Anglia, Kent and Lincolnshire, it is in the east of Britain that we would expect to find the war zones, at least in the 5th century. But an historian called Geoffrey of Monmouth identified ‘Mount Badon’ with ‘Bath Hill’, in a book written in 1136, so many people have assumed that this battle took place in Bath. I do not myself think that is likely, and I explain in my book why I believe that Arbury Hill in Northamptonshire is a more plausible location. After the Anglo-Saxon victories in the late 6th century, the story of Arthur was naturally suppressed in lowlands England, and it survived mainly in Wales, Devon and Cornwall. But Geoffrey of Monmouth also tells us that Arthur fought a campaign on the Continent, which tallies with the known history of a war between the Bretons of north-western France and the Franks, a Germanic people who, like the Anglo-Saxons, were advancing from the east. Certainly, the Arthurian legends are strong in Brittany, and I believe that it is entirely possible that Arthur played a part in that war. There was a significant emigration to Brittany from Wales and the South-West of England, as the Anglo-Saxons resumed their campaign of conquest, and as a result the British Arthurian legends were preserved in Breton folklore. This chain of connections has meant that the Arthurian legends, as they have been

handed down to us, have acquired a distinctly Welsh flavour. But I do not believe that Arthur’s origins were in Wales. It seems that Arthur was a successor to a great British general called Ambrosius Aurelianus, who is historically well-attested, and we can form an impression of the area under the command of Ambrosius by the places which appear to be named after him. Candidates for such places include Ombersley in Worcestershire, Ambrosden in Oxfordshire, Amberley in Gloucestershire, Ambresbury Banks in Epping Forest, Amberley in West Sussex and Amesbury in Wiltshire. All of these places fall within an area bounded to the north and east by Watling Street (now the A5 from London to Wroxeter), taking in London and the south-east apart from Kent, and to the west by the Welsh mountains and the Somerset Levels. It seems likely that this was also the area under the military command of Arthur (as a ‘dux bellorum’, or war leader, not as a king). In the far South West, the area which is now Devon and Cornwall was ruled by King Cado of Dumnonia (c.483 – 537), whose name may be reflected in the name of Cadbury Castle in Somerset, the largest fortification of the period. And I believe that the area immediately to the north of Watling Street was ruled by Mordred, the ‘baddy’ of the legends, whose revolt led ultimately to Arthur’s death (possibly in the 540s). The Domesday Book name of Moddershall, a borough of Stafford, was Modredshale (ie Modred’s Hall or Court). Later, in the early 16th century, an historian named John Leland suggested that Cadbury Castle might be the location of Camelot, largely on the basis that Cadbury is close to the villages of West Camel and Queen Camel. But if Cadbury was named after King Cado, as some think, the castle may not have been under Arthur’s control. Indeed Geoffrey of Monmouth tells us that Arthur’s last battle took place at Camlann, which he says was in Cornwall (according to local legend, at Slaughter Bridge on the River Camel). It is clear that this battle took place in a civil war among the British (it was one of the ‘Three Futile Battles of the Island of Britain’, according to the Welsh), and it seems probable that at least some of the Cornish were opposed to Arthur. So it seems to me that the area under

King Arthur, pictured pulling the sword from the stone, has been the focus for writer Charles Parkinson, below Arthur’s command stopped at the eastern edge of the Somerset Levels, albeit that Camelot may have been a villa near the water. This area would have included Gloucester and Cirencester, Bath and the Mendips. But Arthur was a Romano-British commander from what is now lowlands England, not Welsh, Cornish or Devonian.

Author profile The Duke and the Decoy by Charles Parkinson is published by Armoricana Books, paperback £16.99, ebook £6

Charles Parkinson was born in Singapore, and has lived in the UK and the USA. When he was a young child, his family moved to Guernsey, where he grew up and still resides today. Educated at Rugby School he later read Law at Cambridge. Parkinson subsequently qualified as a chartered accountant and as a barrister, before pursuing a successful career in the financial services industry. In 2004, he was elected to Guernsey’s parliament, eventually becoming the Minister of Treasury and Resources on the island. Since retiring from politics last year, he has been able to focus on his writing. Charles Parkinson’s first book Lisia: Vortigern’s Island was very well received in Guernsey, and was featured widely in the media, including BBC Radio.

Books reviews Saints of the Shadow Bible by Ian Rankin is published in hardback by Orion Books, priced £18.99 (ebook £8.11)

Jeeves And The Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks is published in hardback by Hutchinson, priced £16.99 (ebook £9.20)

Kill or Cure: An Illustrated History of Medicine by by Steve Parker is published in hardback by Dorling Kindersley, priced £19.99 (ebook £6.99)

John Rebus has always existed somewhere between the law and the shadowy backwaters of Edinburgh life. He hankers after the devil-may-care days when the police bent the rules. In this twentieth edition of the trials of Rebus – a series now deeply ingrained in British crime literature – Rankin poses three questions long on the lips of Rebus fans: Is Rebus good? Is he bad? Do we care?

The first point to note about this uproarious novel is that Faulks stresses this is a “homage” to P.G. Wodehouse. Indeed, throughout, Wodehouse’s much-loved Bertie Wooster takes new readers in hand, explaining the background behind mad aunts and old friends. The result is a novel that works both as an introduction to the farcical world of Wooster and his devoted Jeeves, and a welcome revisit for fans.

This book, packed full of fascinating information, illustrations and photographs, begins right back in pre-historic times, examining early techniques for dealing with illness, and looking at beliefs and traditions from across the world. Parker then goes on to examine the rise of scientific medicine as the subject moved away from religion and a more empirical methodology was adopted.

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Books Hannah Stephenson

He’s like a child in a sweet shop as he relishes the arrival of his brand new Porsche. “It’s coming at the end of November,” squeals the Top Gear presenter known as the ‘Hamster’. “I’m so excited. And, yes, I paid full price for it. It cost a lot, I’m embarrassed to say how much.” A little research reveals that the starter price is around £100,500. “I won’t sleep the night before it’s arriving,” he says. “I have a picture of it that I look at regularly. The day I’m not excited about a new car arriving is the day I will give up Top Gear.” The pint-sized presenter and his petrolhead workmates, Jeremy Clarkson and James May, are currently filming the new series of the most successful motoring show ever, to be shown in January. Hammond, 43, will also be presenting a three-part BBC One series next year called Big Weather, examining (and experiencing) extreme weather. “I am happier than I’ve ever been,” he reflects, “but I could attribute that to having two beautiful, healthy daughters who are now best friends. I look forward to seeing them when they come home from school.” He’s managed to cut back on work this year, which has enabled him to spend more time with his family, wife Mindy and daughters Isabella, 13, and Willow, ten, at their 20-acre plot at Bollitree Castle, nicknamed ‘Hamelot’, in Herefordshire. Of course, his lifelong interest in cars and motorbikes – he has around seven or eight cars right now and a staggering 26 motorbikes in his barn – has continued. “I go and sit among them with a cup of tea sometimes, when life becomes too much,” he says wryly. His love of motors is obviously rubbing off on his family. He now lets Isabella ride on the back of his motorbike, he admits. “Mindy isn’t concerned about that, because she rides horses with Willow, and air ambulances are called out far more frequently to equestrian accidents than they are to motorcycling accidents.” When he was a child, his own parents agreed that they’d let him have a motorbike when he turned 16 – and he never let them forget it. “When I was five, I worked out how many days it was before I could take my driving test and I realised it was 365 days fewer before I could ride a motorcycle. They should have said no at that point. “They felt uncomfortable about it, but I’m very grateful to them for letting me have one.” Now he reflects: “It’s all about risk assessment and thinking, ‘I’ve done everything to mitigate against things going wrong’. Is it worth doing? Yes, in the face of the risk that if it does go wrong, this is what might happen. But that’s like everything in life, from walking out of the front door to boiling an egg.” Of course, he will worry if Isabella wants to get her own motorbike at 16, as he did, but his philosophy is that he hopes he will have raised her with sufficient sense to avoid hurting herself. But he somehow can’t see himself becoming his daughters’ driving instructor. “I don’t think they want me to be because I’m just Dad and what do I know about anything?” he laughs. “But I can’t wait to go out in a car with them, to have them drive and to teach them.” But is the Hamster a good driver? “Not really. Every time I say I am, I crash. Every time my wife or daughters say, ‘Just be careful’, I go and do something stupid. I’ve done a

lot of driving so I’m an experienced driver, but that doesn’t necessarily make me a good one.” He has recently taken a more sedate journey to write a coming-of-age memoir through his recollections of eight key road journeys in his life, including family trips from Ripon to Harrogate, Solihull to Weston-Super-Mare and Ripon to Penrith. The collection of journeys form his latest memoir, On The Road. They are all very different trips: the long pilgrimages to Weston-Super-Mare to see his grandparents as a child, arguing in the back seat with his brothers; the crushing disappointment wheeling out the gift of a bike he didn’t want and taking it to school; his first car, a 1976 Toyota Corolla Liftback 1600, which he managed to write off before he was 18. “From about 12 to 14, I was really quite soulful, thoughtful and sensitive, and then the hormones came along and smashed it all up,” he says. “By the time I was 16, I was desperate to ride my first motorbike. The journey may have been humdrum but the bike meant freedom, breaking out and making my way in the world as a growing young adult.” Even today, his hobby is tinkering with cars and bikes. “I run motorcycles going back to the 1920s and rebuild bicycles. I love machinery.” Hammond is no stranger to accidents, his most famous coming in September 2006 when he sustained a serious brain injury while driving a jet-powered dragster for Top Gear on a disused airfield in Yorkshire. He had reached 314mph – an unofficial British land speed record – before a tyre burst and sent the car spinning out of control. The following January, he was back at Top Gear. He has said that work probably helped his recovery. “All of our lives are studded by major events, and they change us,” he says. “It might be getting married, getting or losing a job, having children. There are tragic things that happen in everyone’s lives and they do change us. Brain injury, in my case, has now been filed away to become one of the major formative events in my life. “I don’t wake up of a morning and think, ‘Oh no, I’ve lost the keys because of my head injury’. I’ve accepted that we can be changed by so many things and I’ve just filed it along with them.” But he admits he lives for today more now than he did before the crash. “I believe that what we have is now, the past doesn’t exist any more, but neither does the future. The future only exists in that the anticipation or dread of it can influence your present.” He does sometimes get scared about those high-speed exploits. “If I’m driving a very fast car or attempting a tricky manoeuvre, I do sometimes sit quietly behind the steering wheel for a moment and think. I’d be an idiot if I didn’t.” However, he says the highest safety measures are always in place. “We’re not gung ho, and I’d never work with a bunch of people who asked me to do something that I wouldn’t be prepared to do.” By the time his girls can drive, cars may be very different, he predicts. “There are electric cars, hybrid cars, hydrogen fuel cell cars coming on, which is great. In the next 20 years there will be systems for effectively becoming a train you drive on the motorway, hit the button and your car hooks up and talks to all the other cars.”

Top Gear presenter Richard Hammond has published an unusual memoir, charting some of the significant road journeys of his life – from travelling to Westonsuper-Mare to visit his grandparents, to driving to Harrogate for family holidays

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On The Road by Richard Hammond is published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson, priced £18.99

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 21


Books James Marshall

He’s a leading scientific writer that the West should quite rightly be proud of. Simon Singh is a physics graduate from Imperial College London, a PhD holder in experimental particle physics from Cambridge, while he also spent three years working at the European Centre for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva and, what’s more, he’s from Somerset. Now, the physicist has turned his significant scientific brain to the cartoon world of The Simpsons; a seemingly unlikely subject matter for a scientist, but one that has formed the basis for his new book The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets. What many don’t realise is that intermingled with the catch-phrases, dry humour and slap stick comedy of the long-running show are subtle references to some of mathematics greatest concepts; ranging from Pythagoras to Fermat’s Last Theorem, with – according to Singh – episodes of The Simpsons possessing more mathematics “than any other sitcom out there”. “The thing that everybody is shocked by” says Singh “is that lots of the writers for The Simpsons are mathematicians. Many of them studied at Harvard or did PhDs in mathematics; they may now be comedy writers, but they still love maths. The way they express that love is to put mathematics into the television series”. Some references are very easy to spot, but others are far more subtle and required meticulous, if not unconventional research for an academic, with Singh spending “hours and hours” in front of the television, watching as many series as possible and listening to the DVD commentary of specific episodes. As one of the most successful cartoon franchises, The Simpsons provides a “char ming” vehicle by which Singh is able to introduce and then examine mathematical ideas in an entertaining but informative way. “He says: All I ask is that readers are curious and bright; if they are curious and bright, then this is a great introduction to mathematics… with Homer holding your hand along the way”. As such, the book manages to appeal far beyond the niche audience of the academic and serious amateur scientist. Singh’s interest in science was sparked from an early age and he believes that he was naturally drawn to the complexities of physics. “To me, physics is an obvious thing to be fascinated by. Where did the universe come from, what is the universe made of, is there life on other planets? I just think that any kid is fascinated by those kind of questions; those of us who become scientists are the kids who never lose that curiosity”.

The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets by Simon Singh is published by Bloomsbury, priced £18.99 hardback

This natural curiosity was further developed during his time at Wellington School, in Somerset, where he had “great teachers” who were able to challenge and develop his scientific interests. “My physics teacher Mr Mynett had a real interest in physics, a strong knowledge of physics and he stretched us. It wasn’t easy; he didn’t spoon feed us and would set difficult problems expecting us to solve them. It didn’t suit everybody, but for me, that was just what I needed to prepare me for my university degree and PhD.” Although Singh admits that he would have loved to have pursued a more traditional academic career, he believes that in doing so he would have been an “also ran” in the world of elite physics academia. “I really wanted to be a physicist and if I had had the talent, that’s what I would have done. But I could see others who were quicker and brighter than me and they were the people who would go on and make really important discoveries. I would always have been a runner-up”. So he reassessed his options, deciding to combine his scientific knowledge with other attributes and passions – writing, explaining science to people and a love of television. It has proven to be a remarkable marriage of skills and has been rewarded with the production of television programmes for the BBC, directing a Bafta award-winning documentary and presenting a five-part documentary about code breaking on Channel 4. What’s more, he has written two other bestselling books (The Code Book and Fermat’s Last Theorem) and presented science-based shows on BBC Radio 4. Singh’s West Country roots can be attributed to his grandfather who moved to Wellington from India in the 1930s, with the author’s parents following two decades later. With the family having had a presence in the county for such a long time, Singh has always been proud of his Somerset heritage; a place where he experienced a “perfect” childhood, spending the evenings “wondering the countryside and playing football until the sun set”. As such, the author is happy to be returning to the West later this month, where he will be giving a talk for the Bristol section of the Skeptics in the Pub group; an event where the “rational people of Bristol” can meet and – in this case – listen to Singh discussing the subject matter behind The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets. These small gatherings appeal to Singh and he enjoys the exchange of ideas that take place at the intimate Skeptics’ gatherings; it is in his own words “a popular and engaging setup”. “I will talk for 30-40 minutes, then stop for people to get a drink, chat to their friends and have a think about the subject discussed. The second half is then dedicated to these people coming back and asking questions; my talk is just the start of the event, the real meat of it is what questions people come back with”. Singh’s return to the West – however brief – will be a welcome one and it is likely that a large crowd will gather to meet one of the nation’s most popular physicists, authors and self-confessed Simpson’s fanatic.

Simon Singh is talking to the Bristol branch of Skpetics in the Pub on November 26. To find out more information about his talk, visit: www.bristol.skepticsinthepub.org

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Somerset author and physicist Simon Singh, pictured top, says there is more to the cartoon The Simpsons, above, than meets the eye, and this is something he’ll be discussing in Bristol at the end of the month WCL-E01-S2


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SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 23


Travel Sarah Marshall

The thud of hammers on wood disturbs the usual morning peace by Luang Prabang’s Wat Mai temple. Teenage monks in saffron robes and jasmine scarves are scurrying around the 19th-century complex carrying long stems of bamboo and banana trunks, the building blocks for a traditional boat. They’re preparing for the annual Fire Boat Festival, where 2,000 boats are sent floating along the Mekong river to mark the end of Buddhist Lent. It’s a serious business, with many of the town’s 3,000 mild-mannered monks temporarily revealing uncharacteristic competitive streaks; boats are decorated with elaborate dragon heads and ten-pointed stars, in the hope they’ll win a prize for being the most beautiful. Rivers may provide one of the country’s main transport networks, but my journey here has been by a very different means. I’ve arrived in Laos, a landlocked, mountainous country sandwiched between the more popular tourist destinations of Thailand and Vietnam, by train. One of the poorest countries in South East Asia, and governed by a Communist regime, Laos remains off the mainstream tourist track, and links with the outside world have been slow to develop. The first train linking Thailand and Laos, which crosses the 117km Friendship Bridge from Nong Khai to Vientiane, started running in 2009, and now carries passengers and backpackers daily. But our train crossing was something special; an event which happens only once a year. Greeted by a fanfare of drums, khene pipes and delicate-footed dancers with hair tightly whipped into towering buns, we’d arrived a day earlier on the Eastern & Oriental Express. Furnished in exotic elm, cherry, teak and rosewood, the 22-carriage train embraces the gentlemanly grandeur of the early 20th century, when a vibrant expat community of writers and artists took root in South East Asia. Even the fine, diamond-shaped marquetry was inspired by 1930s Marlene Dietrich film Shanghai Express, a hit with OrientExpress founder James Sherwood.

It’s fitting, then, that our visit should start in Bangkok’s prestigious Mandarin Oriental hotel, a favourite haunt of playwrights Noel Coward and Somerset Maugham, which continues to bask in past glory and was recently named best hotel in the world by the Sunday Times. Sat on a white wicker chair in the Author’s Wing, an atrium lounge where staircases lead to four heritage suites named after the hotel’s most famous literary guests, I imagine an era when the Far East provided creative fodder for artists hungry for something new and exotic. Bangkok, a sprawling, unkempt city heaving with 13 million residents, continues to pulse with excitement and possibility. Boats hurry along the Chao Phraya river, carrying tourists to historic temples, or into quiet flower-lined village canals where locals sell steaming pad thai from long boats in the floating Taling Chan market, and enterprising Buddhist monks sell bags of breadcrumbs to feed long-whiskered cat fish. As we depart for the Bangkok’s Hualamphong train station, the temperature already hitting 34C, I’m reminded of Noel Coward’s disdain for “Mad Dogs and Englishmen” who would brave the scorching equatorial midday sun. But any madness subsides as we board our grand hotel on wheels, where a butler has kindly laid out afternoon tea in our private cabins, and I watch the steel skyscrapers of Bangkok disappear behind me. For the next two days, we will visit an ancient Khmer temple (a forerunner to Angkor Wat) at Phimai Historical Park, taste wines produced in the Khao Yai jungle, and learn about traditional silk weaving techniques. From my window, I watch town and country rush past, as local train stations increasingly begin to resemble toy town replicas. . “When we first started, people would be dressed in silk gowns and heels,” recalls train manager Ulf Buchert, who’s been with the train since its inception. And the menu, devised by French chef Yannis Martineau, is certainly worth getting dressed up for. Meals are prepared with military precision,

Wearing traditional Thai dress, the women prepare for a performance in Thailand’s Phimai Historical Park

Travel news Camping holidays hit a different pitch Camping holidays are changing – and there’s no bigger proof of this than the upcoming sale of Eurocamp. The iconic tour company flourished in the 1980s and 1990s, making holidays under tent or caravan a “respectable” choice for the Volvodriving middle classes, but it has now been put up for sale by its owners, India-based Cox & Kings. “The sale of Eurocamp is a signal of an end of an era,” admits Noel Josephides, chairman of Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA). “There is now an enormous supply of accommodation in hotels across Europe, much of it is very cheap. And campsites, like hotels, know they no longer need to work with operators like Eurocamp when they can get so much business direct from websites.”

While the sale might be sad for Eurocamp – and, indeed, for many people’s nostalgia – it isn’t sad for the camping industry as a whole. “Things have changed massively in the camping and caravanning world – but this sector is very much alive and kicking,” believes Mark Hammerton, whose father launched a camping holiday company in the early 1970s Russell Wheldon, managing director at Alan Rogers Camping, which arranges bookings or lets customers make their own plans at 170 campsites all across Europe, echoes this view. “With tents and camping gear now available through Argos, Tesco and Amazon, there’s a terrific buzz about the sector. “Many campsites are becoming more professional, with infinity pools and water slides. Others settle for a lake in the middle of nowhere.”

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Unified European rail booking system is on the right track

Camping in Europe is still a popular choice

Even rail buffs are sometimes confused by the endless different train booking systems across Europe, but the new online rail booking specialist Loco2.com should make a difference. The website will make it possible to book tickets in one transaction for journeys starting from any UK station and heading to thousands of European destinations. The company has already combined the booking systems of the French and German national rail operators (SNCF and Deutsche Bahn) to offer a huge choice of European rail tickets, and now the addition of tickets for trains in Britain – through the Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) – will let it combine the fares of UK, French and German trains, including high-speed services such as Eurostar, TGV and ICE. WCL-E01-S2


a necessity given the shortage of space onboard. Every plate, cup and teaspoon has been accounted for, with not a centimetre of space left unused. Mentally adding up the volume of washingup involved, I’m even more appreciative of my final breakfast, served while crossing the Friendship Bridge into Laos. As the first part of our journey draws to an emotional end, we head towards a country where politics have shaped a very different future for its people. One of the most heavily bombed countries, per capita, in the world (a figure notched up largely during the Vietnam War), it’s surprising to discover people are generally warm, laid-back and remarkably positive. People may only earn an average of 20p per hour – the price of an egg – but they still find money to throw parties, with speakers tied with ropes to the back of tuk-tuks, and crates of state-brewed Beer Lao shared with friends. Weaving my way through 30 golden temples, interspersed with inviting French bakeries and stalls selling fruit smoothies, it takes me an enjoyably long time to explore the compact town centre. Sticky rice cakes – a staple food for Laotians, who can consume 20kg of the stodgy grain in a month – have been laid out on wire racks to bake in the blistering sun. Young monks take refuge in the shade – one studying a Cambridge University chemistry book. Monks are a constant source of fascination for visitors to Luang Prabang, especially during the early morning almsgiving ceremonies. Sticky rice is fairly tame compared to some of the local delicacies I encounter at the eyeboggling Phousi market: bowls filled with scaly toads, blocks of congealed blood, and plastic bags of bile used for salad dressing. That afternoon, I wander down to the river bank, where park benches overlook the Mekong. I’m joined by a monk, who tells me – in broken English – why he likes to come here and “enjoy the nature”. As children splash around in the water below, and the air fills with the smell of cooked meats, lemongrass and sweet frangipani, I reflect on my five-star journey to Laos. Butler service and comfortable cabin aside, it’s being given access to these places, and moments, that’s the greatest luxury of them all.

Sarah Marshall was a guest of Cox & Kings (020 7873 5000 www.coxandkings.co.uk) which offers an eight-day/six-night trip (eight-day trip including flight/six nights in a hotel) priced from £4,795 per person, including two nights at the Mandarin Oriental Bangkok with breakfast, the two-night Tales of Laos trip on the Eastern & Oriental Express from Bangkok to Vientiane with full board, and two nights with breakfast at La Residence Phou Vao in Luang Prabang. Flights from Heathrow with Eva Air and transfers are also included.

Christmas in sight means cruise prices plunge

Cruise into Christmas with some great deals

Woolacombe Bay Holiday Parks (0843 208 0368) offers three-night weekend breaks for party of up to six staying in a Silver Lodge from £139, saving £140, from Nov 22. Facilities include indoor pools, cinema, tennis and nightly entertainment.

Scotland Unique Cottages (01835 822277) offers seven nights’ self-catering from Nov 16 in The old Fisher man’s Cottage in conservation village of Avoch, ten miles north of Inverness, for total £345, saving £50. Sleeps four in three bedrooms, with shingle beach over the garden wall.

Eastern Europe city breaks lowcostholidays.com (0800 111 6271) offers two nights’ room-only at three-star hotel in Berlin from £99, ex-Stansted Dec 2; two nights’ roomonly at four-star hotel in Budapest from £85, ex-Stansted Dec 2; and two nights’ B&B at three-star hotel in Krakow from £111, exManchester Dec 3.

Walking in Algarve Inntravel (01653 617000) offers seven nights’ B&B from Nov 23 to explore quiet corner of western Algarve independently, either with the hire car or on foot, and based at Quinta das Achadas, near historic fishing port of Lagos, Package at £550 incl home-cooked breakfasts, free upgrade to an apartment, two dinners, three picnics, seven days’ car hire and walking notes. Flights extra.

Netflights.com (0871 703 8000) offers three nights’ room-only at four-star King & Grove from £539, saving £125, and incl Virgin Atlantic return flights ex-Heathrow. Book by Nov 30 for deps Jan 1-27 and Feb 3- Mar 28.

Sri Lanka private tour Hayes & Jarvis (01293 735831) offers Classic Ceylon Tour and beach stay from £1,299, saving £271, with Emirates flights ex-Gatwick Jan 30. Tour includes Sigiriya and famous rock fortress, Kandy’s temples, elephant orphanage and botanical gardens and the tea plantations of Nuwara Eliya. Tour ends with three nights’ half-board at four-star Avani Kalutara Resort.

Bali/Hong Kong

Cruise prices are sliding down to around £40 a day in the Christmas run-up, proving savvy bargains for cruisers who are able to sail away at short notice. “Bookings slow down around November and December, so cruise lines drop prices to tempt customers to book,” says Martin Tanner, product manager at Jetline Cruise. “If you want to book long-haul for next year, book in advance to lock in the lower flight costs before they rise during busy periods.” Current Jetline deals include two nights on P&O’s Arcadia ex-Southampton to Bruges on December 15 from £249; and 12 nights exSouthampton on November 17 on Cunard’s Queen Victoria from £499, calling at Lisbon, Agadir (Morocco), Seville, Gibraltar and La Coruna. WCL-E01-S2

North Devon

New York

Travel facts

The service also means customers travelling from outside London are fully protected under international passenger rights, similar to those afforded to air passengers. On Loco2, a search for any journey into Europe starting from outside London will automatically select a “London International CIV” ticket for the UK portion of their journey, and if a Eurostar train is missed due to a UK rail disruption, customers will be eligible to travel on the next Eurostar service to depart at no extra cost. That hero of the rail buffs, Mark Smith, author of The Man In Seat 61, is a huge fan of the new service. “For the first time, you can enter the name of your local station, however small and insignificant you think it is, then enter Amsterdam or Venice or Lucerne or Berlin or Barcelona or Copenhagen and it’ll work out (and book) all your trains,” he says. “It’ll book to almost any local station abroad, too, however far from an airport.”

Travel take-off

DialAFlight (844 556 6060) offers 10-night fivestar twin-centre from £1,599, saving £50, on bookings by Nov 30 for selected deps in May, incl Cathay Pacific return flights, three nights’ room-only at five-star Harbour Grand Hong Kong and seven nights’ B&B at new Chedi Sakala, south-east Bali in courtyard suite.

New year ski in Austria Supertravel Ski (0207 962 9933) offers sevennight catered chalet stay from Jan 5 in St Anton from £699, saving £550, incl return flights into Innsbruck, transfers, champagne reception on arrival, four-course dinners and selected wines served throughout. Top-floor terrace has superb views.

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Travel Chris Rundle

Chris Rundle enjoyed Christmas at a much more civilised pace in Brittany, after getting fed up with the festive panic in the UK – ‘Would we go back and do it again?’ says Chris. ‘You bet’

It was the year that Christmas preparations all got a bit too much for us. The first cards had been spotted in the shops at the end of August with the first mince pies appearing soon afterwards. And well before Hallowe’en had been and gone, every supermarket appeared to have wound the calendar forward to try to kid us all that it was December, the days were running out and it was time to “shop, shop, shop” for Christmas. We were rapidly tiring of Christmas being fired at us with machine-gun velocity on all sides, whether in the form of the relentless loops of Christmas songs (most of them ghastly) following us around the aisles from the fresh fruit to the loo rolls and back to the checkout, or of the mindlessly repetitive television ads for junk food, all of it, apparently, cheap enough to allow you to feed an entire street for a tenner. By the time the commercial world had worked itself up into a frenzy for the last two or three days we reckoned it would become pretty much unbearable. So we decided to go away. Not far. Just across the Channel to Brittany. Because whatever Brittany offered by way of yuletide celebrations it couldn’t, we figured, be any worse than what was on the menu here – and had every chance of being better. As, without a shadow of doubt, would be the food.

We booked a self-catering cottage and a ferry crossing, which would decant us first thing in the morning on Christmas Eve. We thought long and hard about what we should take, if anything, by way of foodstuffs. Of course a lot would depend on what was open and for how long over there. So picturing us arriving at a Leclerc or an Intermarché to find endless queues of mountainous trollies and closing time brought forward to midday I called the nearest supermarket to where we were staying and asked them what time they were planning to close on the 24th. Oh, they said, about the usual time: 7 O’clock. That was the first surprise. The second was to rock up at mid-morning on Christmas Eve without encountering traffic jams, manifestations of trolley rage, harassed-looking staff and a general air of desperation among customers shopping as though for a nuclear winter. It was, to all intents and purposes, a normal day. There were one or two seasonal goodies on offer: the air-cured hams, the smoked salmon, the special offers on Champagnes and sparkling wines. But the French, bless ’em, were going about their shopping quietly, restrainedly and without the slightest sign of

26 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

PICTURE: STEVE GUSCOTT

panic. We were in, stocked up and out again as quickly as we would have been in March or August. Christmas Day brought another surprise. The bakery was open for business so there were fresh croissants and bread for breakfast. Madame apologised: she would, she said, be closing at lunchtime just for today – but would be open as normal (7am) tomorrow. Next door the grocer also put in half a day on the 25th, catering to a steady stream of customers making their way to and from his shop under the few distinctly un-lavish Christmas decorations the town council had put up. Restaurants, naturally, were open for business though every table had been booked weeks ahead. So when Boxing Day dawned it was as though Christmas had never been. Shops were open and trading; people going to work routinely, rather than taking a twoweek break; life returning to normal after the merest hiccup. A couple of shops were staging what, in a rare moment of optimism, could be described as a sale but there was no hysteria, no queues, no risk – as there had been on Oxford Street the Christmas before – of being trampled face down into the paving slabs. It was all a bit hard to take in, this picture of a normal, quiet, Christmas of the sort we used to enjoy before everything here got so hideously commercialised, the meaning of Christmas became submerged in a tidal wave of conspicuous overconsumption, and even the secular notion of a midwinter festival turned into an orgy of credit card-fuelled unaffordable overindulgence. Would we go back and do it again? You bet.

How to get there Oysters are at the peak of perfection at Christmas while the chefs pull out all the stops for some excellent festive dining in Brittany PICTURES: STEVE GUSCOTT

Brittany Ferries has a limited, but adequate timetable of sailings to and from Brittany this Christmas and a wide choice of self-catering cottages and apartments. A number of special deals are available. For more information, go to www.brittanyferries.co.uk

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Anchorage Hotel

LY I M ED A F N N OW RU &

Babbacombe, Devon

November 2013

Mon 25th - 4 Nights DBB - £120

(

per person per break

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New Years 2013/14

Mon 30th - Thurs 2nd - 3 Nights Full Board - £234 (

All prices are per person per break and include VAT @ 20%

per person per break

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Set in the peaceful Cary Park, a short stroll to the beautiful Babbacombe Downs with views across the bay. Perfect for a relaxing break away from home. 56 En-suite Bedrooms - Ample Parking - Live Entertainment - FREE WIFI - Fully Licensed - Non-smoking Large Gardens - Wide Choice on Menus, Different Everyday - Tea Dance every Tuesday - Lite Lunch Menu

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Aveland Road, Cary Park, Babbacombe, Torquay, Devon, TQ1 3PT

Telephone: 01803 326175 - Email: enquiries@anchoragehotel.co.uk www.anchoragehotel.co.uk WCL-E01-S2

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 27


Walks Martin Hesp

Shapwick Heath on the Somerset Levels is a wonderful place to walk at this time of year, says Martin Hesp, but he advises ‘Unless you’ve got a good torch don’t leave it too long before you begin your return journey’

They’re back, albeit a bit earlier than usual, those murmurations. The great annual starling roosts of the Somerset Levels have begun spinning and weaving through the sky in a great aerial dance. However, apparently, our landscapes play host to just a third of the starlings there were a few decades ago – numbers have dropped by 70 per cent in just 40 years. That might be difficult to imagine when you’re walking out on the Levels staring up at the truly magnificent spectacle which is reckoned to be the biggest daily movement of animals anywhere in Europe – but it is unhappily true, nevertheless. The birds you will be looking at have migrated from as far as Russia, but alas northern European numbers are also down by over half in 30 years. So enjoy the great spectacle while you can, is one bit of advice – but also visit the RSPB website (www.rspb.org.uk) where you can find out what you can do to help the birds. Anyway, the starling murmurations offer a great excuse to go hiking out on the Somerset Levels. Even without starlings, nowhere in the region is so dominated by sky – which might sound like an odd thing to say, but when you’re somewhere so flat, it is the great sky-scapes that shout loudest as they hang huge and billowing above the thin horizontal strip of landscape. It happens that one of my favourite areas of the Levels is “starling central” – by which I mean the dead flat bit (don’t laugh – some parts have tiny humps and hillocks) that lies between the villages of Shapwick and Meare. I was out there a while ago finding out about

the fascinating world of the peat diggers – and it is very much thanks to them that huge nature reserves like the ones at Shapwick Heath and Ham Wall exist and flourish today. The peat-extractors cut down to the clay basin, some 10-12ft beneath present day surface of the Moors, and when they’ve finished with an area it is more or less bound to flood. Enter: the soughing rush and rustling reed. And once they’re established: enter hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of birds. The reed beds are the ornithological equivalent of Heathrow Airport. They abound with birds. They chirrup and quack and boom with birds. They are a venue for not thousands, but millions of birds. They don’t tend to call them “disused peat extraction beds” – instead, organisations like the RSPB have adopted the much more romantic sounding name of “Avalon Marshes” for the general area east of Shapwick Heath which is now a series of four nature reserves – all reed-beds, all wetland reserves – all aimed at helping a whole range of wetland birds and wildlife. The RSPB’s West of England spokesman Tony Whitehead told me: “The really important thing about reed-beds is that there are a few critical species – and top of the list is the bittern – a small brown heron-like bird, extremely rare… “When we first took this land over in 1995 there were just a handful of pairs breeding in the whole UK, and it was this that was the driving force behind us buying this reserve,”

28 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

he said, explaining that the bitterns have now retur ned. “But it’s not just the bitterns,” Tony added. “It’s all the other birds – the marsh harriers, the bearded tits, and even the reed warblers and sedge warblers that weren’t here before we’d taken over the land and started managing it as we are now. “For some of the birds it’s a safety zone but also it offers the things birds need. First protection and shelter, so birds such as the reed warbler can actually make their nests in the stands of reeds. But for birds like the bittern it offers food – it’s full of the fish, the eels, and things like that, that bitterns eat.” I began a walk – that would eventually take me to the RSPB reserve – at the one owned by Natural England next door. This fascinating place, officially known as the Shapwick Heath National Nature Reserve, is situated halfway along the lumpy lane that links Shapwick with the village of Westhaye. The two reserves are linked by the old railway line that used to trundle through here on its way from Highbridge to Glastonbury. I walked a few 100 metres along the old permanent way, then saw a sign pointing to something called the Sweet Track that seemed to disappear through the wild looking woods on my right. It’s all very low key for something so incredibly famous – the Sweet Track is the oldest man-made route-way in Britain and still exists on the reserve, preserved beneath the wet peat. “Around 6,000 years ago Neolithic man settled on the higher dry ground around the heath and built wooden track-ways to cross the wetlands,” explains the Natural England blurb. “This remarkable timber track was built around 3,806 BC to cross 1.2 miles of reed swamp that separated Meare Island from the Polden Hills. “Many amazing Neolithic artefacts

have since been found on the heath, including pots of hazelnuts, a child’s toy tomahawk, and an extraordinary polished jadeite axe from the Alps.” By following a large black plastic pipe (which I believe is there to keep the track moist) I entered the woods and walked south until I reached an open ride between the trees. Turning left down the ride I was able to reach the massive tract of open water bordered by reed-beds that is the centre of this particular reserve. A path that jinks around the old peat diggings would have taken me to the bird-hide, but I turned left instead so that I could regain the old railway line, which I then followed all the way to Ashcott Corner. This is where the RSPB has a car park for the many starling-fans who turn up to visit Ham Wall Reserve. Since the massive migratory starling roosts which occur here each winter were made famous by media coverage, the place has become extremely busy at this time of the year. To gain access to the reserve you simply cross the road and carry on along to old line, which by now is fed up with travelling in a dead straight line so weaves – first to the left, then to the right. It’s along the stretch between the two bends that you will see the RSPB’s reed beds – one on either side of the line – and, at dawn and dusk in winter, this is where the famous starlings like to roost. And a little bird (sorry) told me 3.45pm is a good time to see the birds at present. Unless you’ve got a good torch don’t leave it too long before you begin your return journey. I’d love to tell you about some amazing circular route that will take you around the northern edge of the reserves – but there isn’t one, so you must simply rely on the good old Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway to take you back in the general direction of Highbridge and your car.

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Walks Sue Gearing

Wye Valley – Eagle’s Nest. There are Wye Valley views most of the way on this walk as well as woodland and open farmland, plus the famous Eagles’ Nest viewpoint on this moderate circle on the west side of the Wye, following the Wye Valley Way some of the time. It is ideal for a clear day in the autumn, but also at other times of year and, indeed, in winter the silhouettes of trees and the more open views will be an attraction. There are uphills, including the steady climb to the Eagle’s Nest, but nothing too steep or arduous. However, good boots and a stick will be a help down the steep, stony, but short descent out of the woodland. Most of the going will be on good tracks, so not too muddy or wet. There are several stiles which are not good for less agile dogs. There is no refreshment en route, but plenty of beautiful spots for a picnic.

Start Facing into the parking area, take the broad forest track on the right facing you, through a barrier. This wide track allows in plenty of light and sunshine. Ignore side tracks. It rises very gently after a while. Stay on this for about 0.7 miles.

1 The Tout Reach an open field on the left with houses in the hamlet of Tout, and go ahead through a gate and along a path. Continue to a T-junction with a lane. Cross and go left a yard or two to a marker post. You want to the right hand path, so cross the stile ahead and then another right heading for Penterry Lane. There are beautiful views across the curves of the Wye Valley fields and woods. Drop down to the bottom of the field, heading for the left hand barn of the farm up on the hill ahead. Cross a stile on to a lane. Turn right and after a couple of minutes turn left up the drive to Porthcasseg farm.

2 Farm Pass the farmhouse and low stone conversion and then turn right round the end (the marker arrows are very confusing) and bend right at the back of the farmhouse and go up a good clear track which heads away from the farm. There are great views across the Severn Estuary. Go through a gate and continue in the estuary direction. Pass a disused lime kiln on the left – the remains of the stone arches are just visible. Before the gate are the remains of an old quarry. Cross the stile by the gate

the left which looks like the main path. This soon curves right and when covered with autumn leaves may not always be very clear. You are walking along now in the woodland with a drop on your left.

3 Car park Go left through a parking area at Upper Wyndcliff and take the Wye Valley Way path on the left of the information board – which gives information about the Eagle’s Nest viewpoint. Follow the track uphill, passing a seat and then bend up right continuing the climb. Ignore a right path which would take you steeply down the cliff face to the road below. Carry on a little further to another marker post.

5 Spur Come to the end of the spur, and here watch your footing as you go steeply down the rocky path which can be slippery. It bends right and then reaches a footpath marker. Continue down the Wye Valley Walk which soon joins a wider track. Turn right down a hollow way and then you are directed down left to the end of the woodland and go through a hunting gate. Leaving the WVW, go left in the field which may in parts be muddy. Towards the end of the field bear away from woodland edge and go through a marked hunting gate ahead. Aim for the far bottom corner and cross a stile by a gate. Follow the bottom of the field and before it bends left look carefully for a stile on the right. Cross this, a sunken track, up over another stile and then up across the field to another stile at the top onto a farm lane.

4 Eagle’s Nest Turn right down steps to a viewing platform at the Eagles’ Nest, giving unrivalled views over the meandering Wye, the steep cliffs on the other side, Chepstow Castle and the Severn and Severn bridges. On a clear day you can see well beyond. Return to the Wye Valley Way through the woodland which clothes this side of the Wye Valley road. The path becomes quite narrow and goes alongside a field for a while. Go through an area where you can see the remains of former quarrying, now the habitat of very healthy ferns. Ignore a fork left. Look for fungi in the woods. The path forks. Choose

6 Farm lane Enjoy beautiful autumn colour in the Wye Valley in this walk from Sue Gearing

Turn right passing a well sited bench seat. Carry on to the farm buildings and into the WCL-E01-S2

yard. Then turn right through a metal gate and follow the track which takes you to the far m. At the end of the bungalow go left up into a field and head diagonally across to near the far top corner. This part of the walk is not signed. Go under the electric lines to a marked stile. After crossing, go left and reach an area of small horse paddocks. Cross another stile and then another on the right and continue in the same direction as before. Continue to a gate enjoying more of the glorious views from this high vantage point. At the end follow the arrow down and turn left to stables and then a house. Go downhill on the track opposite the house.

7 Fairoak Crossroads Reach Fairoak Crossroads. Go straight on over and down. Then follow the high hedged lane uphill.

8 Woodland At the top take the first track left through a barrier signed to St Arvans into Fedw Wood. The track leads you all the way back to the parking area.

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 29


Gardening Alan Down

We plant trees for many reasons – shelter, shade, fuel, food, or simply to look at – but trees are integral to our wildlife habitat. Many of the best trees that favour wildlife are among the most decorative of all and especially suited to smaller spaces. While the oak is top of the list as far as number of species supported is concerned, it is not a great choice for anything other than a large garden. So let’s take a look at some of those species that are good for our smaller gardens and especially good for wildlife. In no other order than alphabetical, I start with the alder. Now alders are mostly native trees that tolerate wet soils well. They will also grow in normal well-drained soils but where the soil is perhaps heavy clay and lies wet in winter, this is a tree that will put up with those conditions. Not the showiest ornamental tree but nevertheless it is one of the earliest to flower with long yellow catkins opening soon after the first hazel catkins bloom in late winter. It is very easy to establish and grows quickly to around 10 metres, with a narrow crown and tolerates pruning well. Top choice – Alnus glutinosa or a variety of this. The “Snowy Mespilus” or Amelanchier is a top seller here at Cleeve Nursery and with every reason. Here is a tree that ticks a lot of boxes and, when your garden is a bit on the small side, you need plants that work for you. In spring, just when every cherry is a-blaze of blousy pinks and whites, the Amelanchier is covered in a snowstorm of tiny slightly pink tinted white single flowers. The single blooms are good news for any hungry insect that is looking to get a quick fix of nectar and these are quickly followed by the leaves emerging. By July and August tiny red berries appear but are not there for long, as these are loved by birds. As summer turns to autumn the leaves change to glorious shades of yellow, orange and golden browns. The ultimate dense twiggy branch network can provide excellent shelter and nesting places for birds. Top Choice – Amelanchier canadensis. Birch needs little introduction and most are planted for their glistening, even ghostly-looking white bark. All are quite fast growing, do well in well-drained soils and even tolerate thin shallow poor soils too. They, along with rowans and alders, are a good choice for soils that have been trashed by builders so are a good choice for recently built houses. Virtually all have a narrow upright growing habit that broadens with age. Topping out at around 15 metres high you would perhaps worry that this is too large but the dainty canopy and small leaves provide delightful dappled shade and, equally important to some, very small leaves to pick up in autumn. Although the long spring catkins are wind pollinated, and so of little interest to insects, birds waste no time in “working” the branches for other insects to take back to their fast

growing fledglings. Top choice – Betula utilis jacquemontii or Doorenbos. Cherries are a huge group and among them there are many excellent choices for both wildlife and for attractive garden trees. I must say that I am not a great fan of the blousy Japanese double flowering cherry but I know that it has its devotees. I believe that these much hybridised varieties are also less popular with wildlife too. For me the simplicity of single blooms wins hands down and if you like those doubles, I’m sure that you won’t have to look far to enjoy them in a neighbour’s garden. Cherries flower early and provide that early feast for insects that is so important after a long winter. Blackfly and caterpillars like cherries too and are snapped up by hungry tits of every kind. Expect most to grow to five metres but with wide crowns of similar size and beware that roots on these can come to the surface and make themselves a nuisance on tightly mown lawns. Some cherries produce stunning autumn colour and combining all these attributes my top choice is Prunus sargentiana. Cotoneaster is perhaps more often thought of as a ground or wall coverer but there are some good small trees in this genus too! These are evergreen and provide cover for birds in winter too. Most also are prolific berry producers that larger birds such as the thrush family relish. At only 3 metres high [and often that wide too] this is at the smaller end of the tree range. Trees often need staking for much of their life since they do not make extensive roots. This might be a useful attribute if you want a tree near to buildings. Top choice – Cotoneaster Cornubia. Crab Apples, like cherries offer many good choices. Their resistance to scab and canker disease (both prevalent here in the West Country) narrows the choices somewhat. Some provide plenty of showy fruit, enough for making delicious crab apple jelly and sharing with the birds in winter. Winter visitors from Scandinavia, such as fieldfares and redwings, feast on these in their droves. Trees provide good shelter and nesting sites for birds and, at 510m high, are not particularly large. Some, such as Malus floribunda, make a great show of blossom in spring and it is those that we should be planting. However, rather than going for this one that actually produces very little fruit I am inclined to recommend a better one. This one has the distinct advantage to the gardener with apple trees of being an excellent source of pollen. Top choice – Malus Evereste. Hawthorns are prickly customers but that is often just what songbirds need as that sparrow hawk swoops into the garden. They provide dense prickly shelter that only a foolhardy bird of prey

30 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

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Garden designs would venture into. But hawthorn, botanically known as Crataegus, are good for insects too. Even the double-flowered varieties such as the red Paul’s Scarlet and soft pink Rosea Flore Plena will attract bees and all manner of flies to their flowers. Those with single blooms invariably produce masses of haw berries that persist long into winter and are a reliable source of winter food for wildlife. Most grow to just 3m but my choice is bigger at 5m and has great autumn leaf colour too. Top choice – Prunus prunifolia. Field Maple, an unimproved and ordinary native field maple, is not often planted in gardens but it does make an excellent dense hedge. The flowers are hidden but the seeds are plentiful and eaten by rodents such as mice and squirrels. It copes with just about every type of soil and an excellent choice for windy places, this is an easy tree to grow. In autumn the dense canopy is one of the last to loose its leaves but changes to a superb butter yellow. Top choice – Acer campestre. Holly along with the Cotoneaster is of course also an evergreen but, unlike the latter, holly is slow growing. It grows best in shade and would be a good choice for city gardens where this is an issue through larger trees nearby or shade from buildings exists. The very early flowers are pollinated by flies and, on female varieties, followed by showy berries. Plant both male and female clones to be sure of berries and, besides having something to put behind the picture frame at Christmas, the berries are loved by the thrush family and are quickly cleared by migrating redwings and fieldfares from Scandinavia. In shade, trees can get above their normal 34m but react well to regular pruning. Top choice – Ilex aquifolium “Alaska”. Rowans also known as Mountain Ash, also grow to 3-4m and so are a perfect size for today’s smaller gardens. They will grow in poor soil conditions but, like all newly planted trees grow better if the soil is well prepared and the trees are watered well until fully established. The bunches of spring blossoms have a “goaty” almost rotting flesh smell to them and perhaps this is why they attract flies to pollinate them. Don’t be put off by this as the fruits that follow are showy and often persist well into winter. The regular common rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) is the first to ripen and fruits are gobbled up by birds quickly. The white, yellow and pink-berried varieties give a show for longer but those paler berried varieties need carefully siting in the garden. Try to choose a spot where there is a darker background so that the pale fruits are not lost against a grey winter sky. Most varieties give excellent autumn leaf colour. Top choice – Sorbus Joseph Rock. Trees to avoid because of their large size are oak, beech, Eucalyptus, poplar, lime and plane. However, beech is suitable for a hedge. Also wise to avoid elms, ash, horse chestnut and Robinia pseudocacaia “Frisia” because of disease and pest issues. November through to early March is the traditional planting time and still the best time in many ways. Pot-grown trees can, with good after care, be planted any day of the year. Any tree should be planted well away from buildings and as a general guide no closer than six metres is sensible. Cotoneaster and holly could be planted much closer to buildings than other trees. Avoid planting over the top of underground drains and, equally, planting under power lines is foolhardy. Most trees will need staking until the root system is well established. Trees planted into established grass will struggle since grass provides surprising competition for water and nutrients. It is a good idea to kill off any grass within at least a metre diameter of the tree. Once established, the grass (or garden plants) can be allowed to grow back and this may help to keep more vigorous trees smaller and entice production of more flowers and fruit. Generous watering throughout the spring and summer of the year following planting is a must – a new tree is likely to need at least two to four gallons (that’s two buckets full!) per week. So with National Tree Planting Week right at the end of November this year, what tree are

Delve into A Vintage Garden and you won’t buy socks as gifts again.

you going to be planting for wildlife?

Alan’s gardening tips for the weekend ■ Pot up Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) bulbs. Use quality multipurpose compost and leave the top third of the bulb standing proud of the compost. Water very little until leaves appear. Re-pot older plants into fresh compost now too. ■ Sweep up leaves and compost them by adding Garotta. ■ Check fruit trees for signs of canker. Cut off infected shoots if small but for larger important branches it will be necessary to brush away the dead loose cankered tissue, tidy it up with a sharp knife and then paint the wound with Growing Success Prune and Seal. ■ Remove any fruit that has brown rot. Then burn or bin it. This infected fruit often hangs on the trees as mummified clusters lurking ready to infect next years’ crop. ■ Pinch immature figs off outdoor plants. These will not grow on if left but will rot on the tree so are best taken off now. Anything smaller than the size of a pea can be left to grow on and should survive the winter to ripen next summer. Where the fig is growing in a pot, protect the tender roots from frost by wrapping the pot. ■ Disconnect your hosepipe from the outside tap, store it and lag the tap to protect it from frost. ■ If you can’t put your garden furniture inside then it is probably worth investing in a cover. Wooden furniture should be cleaned down and treated with good oil when dry. ■ Unless the soil is too wet or actually frozen it’s still a good time for planting of hardy plants.

Alan’s Plant of the Week – Christmas Cactus Christmas Cactus (Zygocactus and Schlumbergia) don’t just flower at Christmas. In fact some are already cheering up dull windowsills and rooms. They are remarkably tolerant and longliving indoor plants to grow and it is not unusual to hear of plants being handed down from one generation to another. Since the leaves act as water-holding vessels and, while they are not generally classified as succulents, they will tolerate irregular watering at any time except when plants have flower buds. Forget to water them and the buds all end up on the floor. But this is a plant that is perfectly happy in our warm homes, as many are not. Just starting to bloom now, choose from vibrant reds, soft pinks and occasionally pure white.

What’s On at Cleeve? – Christmas glitter demonstration In this evening demonstration, Felicity Down will give an inspirational demonstration of how to decorate your home this Christmas in an imaginative way. This ticket-only event is on at 7.30pm, on Thursday, November 28, and at Cleeve Nursery, Cleeve, near Bristol, BS49 4PW. To buy tickets at £5 each, with proceeds going to Greenfingers Charity (provide gardens for children’s hospices), call 01934 832134 or info@cleevenursery.co.uk

Run by Phil and Jane Clift from their home in Devon, it all started when Jane wanted to leave her job in IT. Instead, she started selling small plants in pots. Not just any old pots but Victorian terracotta ones and pretty tea cups, sold from a rack at the end of their drive. Then she began handpicking garden accessories to sell too. And A Vintage Garden was born. “I always used to find lovely and unusual things to plant up in the garden,” she muses. “We put a sign up outside our house saying Vintage Garden and I’d go to little markets too. Then it got to the point where pretty much everything in the garden was for sale.” Jane would drop off leaflets in the village, put a notice in the parish newsletter and tapped into her ever-growing database of email addresses. Customers would come and enjoy tea and cake while they browsed. Then Phil decided to quit his hugely successful job in marketing for the record label industry. Back in the day Phil was involved in the promotion of bands including the mighty Dire Straits and Bath’s Tears for Fears. Their whimsical hoard now includes all sorts of original one-offs from the past, as well as newly-made artisan products. Jane reaches for a tall curly piece of ironwork. “This is from the 1930s. It’s a plant pot holder – or possibly a champagne holder,” she smiles. “We try to think of the different ways you can use something.” Recently a beautiful 1930s rocking deck chair sold within a few hours. An elderly lady wanted to find a good home for a family heirloom, an enamelled 100-year-old pot with a lid in a vibrant hue of blue, belonging to her mother. “These are the things that are lovely to sell because you can pass their stories on,” Jane says.

Garden ornaments from A Vintage Garden PICTURE: MATT AUSTIN

Jane and Phil host stalls at Bridport markets, with plans to expand into Devon soon. “Everyone comes and says to us that our stall is the loveliest they’ve seen,” Jane says, looking very pleased. My eyes are drawn to a higgledy-piggledy array of old-fashioned wooden fishing boxes which are both practical and full of character. I then spot a vintage French coffee grinder, also made of wood. “I don’t know why,” Jane says, “I just saw it in a little French recycling place that was run by homeless people, and thought, I love this.” Fran McElhone

For more visit www.avintagegarden.co.uk

Contact Alan Cleeve Nursery’s Alan Down can be contacted at the nursery on 01934 832134. If you would like to ask Alan Down a gardening question, visit www.cleevenursery.co.uk and click on the Ask Us A Question tab. Alan can only answer emailed questions. Visit Alan’s blog at cleevenursery.co.uk/blog You can also follow Alan on Twitter: @AlanEDown

Pictures Prunus sargentiana is shown in the main image – one of Alan’s top tree choices; from left, Malus Everest fruit; the Christmas cactus; removing immature figs is a job for the weekend; the wonderful bark on a Betula utilis Jacquemontii

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For Good Advice & Excellent Home Grown Plants visit your local nursery!

Cleeve Nursery

138 Main Road, Cleeve, BS49 4PW 01934 832134 www.cleevenursery.co.uk

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 31


Antiques War heroes remembered Dominic Winter

A North European swept-hilt rapier, circa 1630, pictured top, sold for £1,950 (estimate £400 to £600), with Dominic Winter. A Second World War pair of medals comprising India General Service Medal 1908-35 and IGS 1936-39 to Private William Friel of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders sold well. Private Friel was captured by the Germans during the Battle of Crete and spent the rest of the war in various prisoner of war camps in Germany. Sold with his Army red book, pictured, and cap badge, it fetched £270 (having been estimated at £100 to £150). Together the collection raised £16,000

The Specialist Arms, Medals and Militaria sale at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on November 8 proved to be a solid performance with some strong prices achieved. A collection of seven 17th century and later swords consigned to the auctioneers by a Scottish Cat Sanctuary all sold way above estimate. Discovered in a derelict house in the Scottish Highlands, all the proceeds from the estate were to be donated to this charity and the auctioneers were very pleased to assist. Leading the way was a Scottish ribbon hilted broadsword which exceeded all expectations, selling for £3,900 (estimate £400 to £600), a North European swept-hilt rapier circa 1630 sold for £1,950 (estimate £400 to £600). Also from the estate was a Waterloo 1815 Campaign Medal to Private William Simonds 30th (Cambridgeshire) Foot, which was a good example and sold within estimate for £1,650 (estimate £1,500 to £2,000). Also, a Second World War pair comprising India General Service Medal 1908-35 and IGS 1936-39 to Private William Friel of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, sold well. Private Friel was captured by the Germans during the Battle of Crete and spent the rest of the war in various prisoner of war camps in Germany. Sold with his Army red book and cap badge, it fetched £270 (having been estimated at £100 to £150). Together the collection raised £16,000. Also included in the sale from other vendors were the usual array of Victorian, First and Second World War medals, with a few lots standing out from the norm. These included a four clasp Military General Service Medal 1793-1814 to Sergeant Major Robert Willis, 3rd Dragoons. He served in the Peninsular War and was eventually discharged, worn out for service. Incidentally, four clasps was the maximum for the regiment and attracted a lot of interest, selling for £1,200 (estimate £1,000 to £1,500). Two British Empire Medal groups attracted global interest because each was scarce and possibly unique. First was a group of three comprising BEM, Africa General Service 1902-56 and General Service 1918-62, with two clasps awarded to Lance-Corporal Wlodzimierz Bujakowski, East Kent Regiment, who won his BEM for taking command at a water filtration unit in the Suez when fighting broke out early in January 1952. He handled his section weapons with such skill and dash that casualties in his section from opposing snipers were reduced to a minimum. The group was sold with the original typed citation and case of issue and went for a respectable £1,550 (estimate £,1000 to £1,500) with all proceeds being donated to the regiment. A pair of medals awarded to extraordinary stewardess Elizabeth Plumb, comprising BEM and Lloyds Medal for Bravery at Sea, created worldwide interest on the day – rather unsurprisingly considering her story. Stewardess Plumb had been serving in RMS Rangitane when the ship was torpedoed by German raiders disguised as Japanese merchant traders on the November 27, 1940, and although severely wounded from the shelling, she carried on helping the injured for a total of nine hours until they were all taken from the lifeboats on to a German prison ship. Once on board she refused medical attention from the German doctors, with one doctor remarking: “Don’t English women ever cry?” But the nightmare did not stop there, for the crew of the Rangitane were then marooned on Emarau Island in the Bismarck Archipelago until January 1941. Stewardess Plumb was so traumatised by the experience that she never returned to the UK and instead resided in Auckland, New Zealand. There was global interest in this lot – a most interesting collection – and it sold to the successful bidder for £3,000 (estimate £1,000 to £1,500). The hammer total for the sale was £161,000. The next sale will be in May 2014. For more information please contact Henry Meadows on 01285 860006 or henry@dominicwinter.co.uk

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A pair of medals, main image, top right, awarded to extraordinary stewardess Elizabeth Plumb, comprising BEM and Lloyds Medal for Bravery at Sea, created worldwide interest when they came for auction with Dominic Winter. Pictured right: a Second World War pair of medals comprising India General Service Medal 1908-35 and IGS 1936-39 to Private William Friel of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders also sold well

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Playtime is a history lesson Chorley’s Late 19th and early 20th-century dolls, toys, games and puzzles will take pride of place in the surround of eight dolls’ houses, all to be offered for sale by Chorley’s on November 28 at Prinknash Abbey Park in Gloucestershire. Toys that could have been portrayed in paintings by Millais or Sophie Anderson are now gathered in the saleroom portraying the feeling of a Victorian Christmas. The majority have been in the ownership of a collector who built up the collection over the past 60 years. Dolls by the German makers Simon & Halbig, Armand Marseille and Koppelsdorf accompany earlier bisque and wax head dolls, all beautifully clothed and in remarkable condition; the auction values of these will range from £50 to £400. The doll’s houses, one of which (Lot 1) is the most magnificent to be offered for sale in the area, will attract many potential buyers, who will also be keen to acquire some of the many furnishings also on offer. Miniature Victorian furniture will be marvelled at and the tiniest portrait of an 18thcentury lady in a gilt frame will have collectors reaching for their magnifying glasses. It measures just a half an inch high and should realise between £300 and £400. A remarkable collection of tinplate toys in almost mint condition may provide stocking fillers for some lucky children this Christmas. It is most unusual to find Lehmann, Bing and Gunthermann clockwork insects and animals in the quantities that will be offered at the auction and a clockwork motorbike The Echo (Lot 153) should race away from its estimate of £400 to £600. With a similar estimate, a fascinating tinplate clockwork aeroplane (Lot 162), Bleriot’s monoplane may get off to a flying start. Among other toys in this outstanding collection are a German circus by Schönhut (Lot 208), with five painted clowns, an elephant and a donkey, estimated at £400 £600, a French Punch and Judy theatre (Lot 209) which should achieve £300 and a German Noah’s Ark (Lot 210), with both Mr and Mrs Noah and a large quantity of animals, hopes to sail away at £500. Farm animals and soldiers by the English firm Britain appear in multiple lots in the sale and are accompanied by boxed sets of Roman soldiers by Heinrichsen and the Aldershot Camp by Heyd (Lot 240), each likely to achieve several hundred pounds. To complete the Victorian Christmas picture, a beautiful rocking horse by Matthews of Gloucester (Lot 244), will bring a smile to many attendees’ faces; despite its age, its condition is good and it may well achieve £600. Viewing days: Tuesday, November 26, 9am–7pm; Wednesday, November 27, 9am–7pm; Thursday November 28, 8.30am –10.30am.

Some of the best of the Beatles Moore Allen and Innocent Fifty years ago – at the height of Beatlemania – Swindon music lover Joan Britton made her way to Heathrow airport to watch John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr board a flight to New York at the start of The Beatles’ first American tour. With three school friends the 15-year-old crafted a banner out of a bed sheet and shoe polish, and with a prime spot at the front of the airport’s viewing platform she’s sure the Fab Four saw her plea for the band to Come Back Soon. News footage of screaming Beatles fans at airports on both sides of The Pond are among the most iconic images of the decade. And now Joan’s banner, along with her precious collection of vinyl LPs and other items of memorabilia, including magazines and books, posters, autographs and albums of newspaper cuttings, is to be sold at an antiques auction in the Cotswolds. “We went to the airport on the bus on a wet day in February 1964,” recalls Joan. “In those days you could stand on a viewing platform and watch the planes take off and land. That’s what we did. We got to the front, hung our

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An Armand Marseille bisque head doll, estimate £180 to £220, and a beautiful rocking horse by Matthews of Gloucester (Lot 244), will bring a smile to many attendees’ faces at Chorley’s next sale, along with a Crawford’s Biscuits bus, estimate £180 to £220. Bottom: Swindon Beatles fan Joan Britton is to put some of her pop memorabilia under the hammer with Moore Allen and Innocent

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Antiques FROM PAGE 33 banner over the railing, screamed, and cried.” Screaming was a big part of being a Beatles’ fan. Joan – who grew up in Brixton – was lucky enough to see the band live in concert at the height of their fame, at the Hammersmith Odeon in December 1964. “We were all screaming,” she says. “It was ear-shattering. We didn’t hear any of the songs, but that didn’t matter, we knew them so well anyway. A lady behind us told us to sit down and be quiet. We said something like ‘what do you expect?’ The screaming was infectious – you couldn’t help yourself.” Another piece of Joan’s Beatles collection comes from 1964 – parts of a billposter for the movie A Hard Day’s Night, which was showing at the girls’ local cinema in Brixton. The poster featured 20 black and white photobooth-style images of the band, which the young fans cut up and divided between them. Meanwhile, a Saturday job at Woolworth’s – and a staff discount – meant Joan was always one of the first to own a new Beatles album on its release. Vinyl copies of 1963’s Please Please Me and With The Beatles; Hard Day’s Night and Beatles for Sale (1964); Help and Rubber Soul (1965); Revolver (1966); and Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967) form part of the auction lot. Joan’s dose of Beatlemania lasted until 1967, although she continued to attend concerts throughout the Sixties. In 1969 she watched Jimi Hendrix at the Royal Albert Hall – “it was

This Chinese figural ewer featured with Greenslade Taylor Hunt. It realised an impressive £1,000

the first time I’d seen someone play guitar with his teeth” – and the album she bought on the strength of his performance – a mono version of his psychedelic classic Axis: Bold as Love – is the rarest and most valuable record in the collection. Throughout the Sixties, Joan collected autographs, and some of the biggest names of the decade – including Ronnie Spector, Donovan, Manfred Mann, Keith Moon and Alan ‘Fluff ’ Freeman – all appear in her album, alongside the signature of Val Doonican. “I wasn’t a fan, and I can’t remember where I met him,” Joan admits. “I expect I just asked him for his autograph because he was on the telly.” Joan says she was fortunate to have lived in London during the Swinging Sixties. “We would go up West and see bands on a regular basis,” she said. “Nothing became of most of them, but some of them became the biggest bands in the world.” Her collection of music and mementos of the period has followed her from loft to loft, and was, until recently, collecting dust in a cupboard under the stairs. Joan hopes her pieces of memorabilia will bring pleasure to a collector, while the money she makes from the sale will be spent on Christmas presents for her three grandchildren. The collection will be sold by Moore Allen & Innocent in Cirencester – whom she decided to contact after seeing auctioneer Philip Allwood on the BBC TV show Flog It! – on Friday, November 22 , with a guide price of £300 to £500. For a full auction catalogue, visit to www.mooreallen.co.uk

Fab Four: a sign of the times Killens Back in May 1965, the Beatles were at the height of their success and filmed their movie, Help! at Knighton Down on Salisbury Plain. Staying at Amesbury, they were mobbed by fans striving to obtain the group’s autographs. Not too many fans were successful but a set of autographs obtained at this time together with other pop autographs has been entered into the next sale of Antiques, Fine Art and Collectables to be staged by Killens at the Mendip Auction Rooms today. In addition to a diverse entry of furniture and collectables, there is a good collection of jewellery and silver entered including a fine large single stone diamond ring (estimate £2,500 – £3,500) as well as some excellent pictures including 18th-century portraits. Viewing for the Antiques and Sporting Sales take place on November 14 (10am-6pm) and 15 (10am-7pm). A further General Sale of Victorian and Later Effects will take place on November 26. The auction rooms are open from 10am – 5pm Monday – Friday and free valuations can be given. Alternatively, the team are also able to undertake free home visits. For more information, contact Gareth Wasp or Jake Smith– 01749 840770 or you can email enquiries@mendipauctionrooms.co.uk

Russian sleeper awakes Greenslade Taylor Hunt International bidders tussled to secure this 19th-century Russian oil painting, pictured top centre, and sent prices rocketing at Greenslade Taylor Hunt’s November monthly sale. Right: a portrait of Captain Robert Poole, (1761-1833) holding a telescope under his right arm, realised £550. Above: this very rare Lund’s Bristol cream boat, though cracked and repaired, did not deter determined collectors. Eventually a phone bidder secured it for £2,200. Left: at what was the auctioneers’ best sale of the year, this bronze figure made £1,300

International bidders tussled to secure a 19thcentury Russian oil painting and sent prices rocketing at Greenslade Taylor Hunt’s November monthly sale. Enormous pre-sale interest was stoked up when the picture by Alexander Gine (18301880) was featured on the auctioneers’ online catalogue. Phone bidders from around the world, including Ukraine and New York, attempted to secure the painting. It was eventually knocked down to a determined buyer in the room for £22,500. The picture, which achieved the top price of the day, was consigned from a local vendor who had no idea of the painting’s potential value. It was among a strong painting section – a large-scale battle scene realised £4,500, while a portrait of Captain Robert Poole, a Somerset mariner who is buried in the churchyard at Staplegrove, near Taunton, made £550. Another star performer was a very rare Lund’s Bristol cream boat. Perfect examples have been known to fetch up to £10,000. This piece was cracked and repaired, but its

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condition did not deter determined collectors. Eventually a phone bidder secured it for £2,200. Strong interest continues in Oriental ceramics and works of art, which were both well represented at the Octagon Salerooms, in East Reach, Taunton. A Chinese famille verte charger made £600, while a white jade desk weight achieved £700. A good quality Japanese ivory Shibayama box went for £620. Top price in this section was a Chinese figural ewer that made £1,000. It was the auctioneers’ best sale of the year, with robust prices achieved across all sections – a bronze figure made £1,300 and a Welsh longcase clock went for £1,600. A dazzling selection of jewellery also caught the eye and there was concerted bidding for the most prized pieces. A good diamond three stone ring – the central old cut diamond weighing around one carat – went for £1,250. High prices were achieved for a large selection of jewellery including a Middle Eastern gold filigree bangle that went for £820. A dainty and appealing Victorian diamond and sapphire brooch modelled as a bunch of flowers made £620. Australian Arts and Crafts silver proved another draw. A number of lots by the well-regarded maker James Linton sold well. Highlights included a pair of silver serving spoons that went for £290. The next monthly sale is on Thursday, December 5. It will be followed by a collectors sale on Friday, December 6. Further details are available from the salerooms on 01823 332525.

The Titanic is relaunched Gardiner Houlgate Gardiner Houlgate will be holding an auction on November 28 and among the items for sale is a fantastic model of the Titanic, made entirely from matchsticks. The model is being sold on behalf of Victim Support and was made by prisoners in Shepton Mallet. Launched in January 2012, Time Well Spent was a project in which prisoners at Shepton Mallet prison signed up to donate art works, made during their educational classes, to Victim Support. These items were then sold to raise money for the organisation. Sadly, the project concluded in 2013 due to the closure of the jail but if you want to own a piece of history and help a very worthwhile cause at the same time then why not come to the auction? Full details can be found on the website www.gardinerhoulgate.co.uk

A 1961 Mini pick-up, top, sold for a massive £14,000 in the Charterhouse classic vehicle auction on Sunday, November 3, while this model of the Titanic, made entirely from matchsticks, features with Gardiner Houlgate, and a set of Beatles autographs obtained at Amesbury in Wiltshire in 1965, together with other pop autographs has been entered into the next sale of Antiques, Fine Art and Collectables to be staged by Killens at the Mendip Auction Rooms today

Pick-up is a Mini marvel Charterhouse A 1961 Mini pick-up sold for a massive £14,000 in the Charterhouse classic vehicle auction on Sunday, November 3. Expert Matthew Whitney said: “We have had some huge success selling Minis over the past few years, having sold a garage-stored non-running Mini Cooper for a client in Leicester at £29,000, and a modified Mini van for £13,000. So now we have sold the pick-up for £14,000 it completes the trio of Mini body styles produced!” The Mini pick-up sold by Charterhouse has spent all of its life in the ownership of one Dorset family. Having covered just 27,000 miles from new, it was laid up in a barn for many years until pulled out, when it was treated to a new re-spray along with re-commissioning work. At the Charterhouse auction there was a bidding war between a buyer in the room against a live internet bidder. This auction of classic cars, motorcycles and automobilia pushed the year’s total for this Charterhouse specialist department to just under £1,500,000 – confirming their place, they say, as the leading firm of auctioneers who sell classic cars, motorcycles and automobilia. Charterhouse is now accepting entries into their first classic car auction of 2014 – in February. If you have a vehicle or motorcycle you would like to enter into the sale, please contact Matthew Whitney, associate partner at Charterhouse, The Long Street Salerooms, Sherborne, Dorset 01935 812277 or via email on info@charterhouse-auctions.co.uk

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Antiques FROM PAGE 35

From theatre to field Tamlyns At Tamlyns’ recent autumn antiques auction a small oil on ivory panel of a gentleman in a theatre box and in original decorative brass frame sold for £2,000. The artist’s signature was difficult to decipher but the work was of high quality. Sadly, the panel had been broken in two places and repaired. However, this did not seem to deter buyers – as seen by the realised price! Elsewhere in the sale, a Swiss-made 18ct gold cased gentleman’s wristwatch, the dial enamelled with an image of Saudi Arabia, sold for £1,600; a beautifully illustrated book – Iqbal Poet of the East, made £650; a collection of old Indentures £420; a Gordon Highlanders diamond set regimental sweetheart brooch £480; an early Victorian 18ct gold cased pocket watch £410 and a Royal Worcester porcelain model of a Hereford Bull by Doris Lindner £370. Tamlyns has recently reintroduced these specialist catalogued antiques auctions and plans to hold three in 2014, with the first taking place in the spring. Anyone interested in entering items into this or any of Tamlyns future sales can contact the auction rooms on 01278 445251 for further information. Meanwhile, Tamlyns collectors’ auction on Tuesday, November 19, includes a rare Matchbox Fordson tractor. These were usually produced with orange wheel centres but this little model has the very desirable and scarce yellow centres. Added to that, it has its original box and is in lovely condition, it should sell for between £170 and £190. The sale will also include some interesting cigarette cards by E Robinson & Sons of regimental mascots. Although only four out of a set of 25, these are again scarce and should make between £60 and £80. There is a large section devoted to the first part of a collection of toys from a local deceased estate – part two to follow in February 2014. There are also sections of medals, militaria, coins, postage stamps, breweriana, toy trains, sporting memorabilia and other myriad collectables. If you go to www.tamlyns.co.uk you can find the catalogue with images of all lots. For further information, contact the auctioneers on 01278 445251.

TV experts head West Westpoint Fair On November 23 and 24, the International Westpoint Antiques and Collectors Fair rolls into the West Country – at Exeter. With up 250 dealers from all over the country, the fair will be full of top quality antiques and collectables, say the organisers. Bayliss Antiques of Shropshire will have for sale a very rare Wooton Partners desk in burr walnut, which will be on display in the foyer as you arrive. Tim Wonacott from BBC TV’s Bargain Hunt programme will be doing a brief piece for the show about The Wooton Desk Company, which originates in the USA. The Bargain Hunt team of experts will be filming at the Devon County Showground’s Westpoint Arena. Four shows will be filmed on both days, with teams of the blues and reds competing with help from the experts.

Town celebrates its heritage Honiton Antiques Fair

At Tamlyns’ recent autumn antiques auction a small oil on ivory panel of a gentleman in a theatre box – top left – and in original decorative brass frame, sold for £2,000. Late 19th and early 20th century dolls, toys, games and puzzles will take pride of place in the surround of eight dolls’ houses, all to be offered for sale by Chorley’s on November 28 at Prinknash Abbey Park in Gloucestershire – among them this Italian senor figure

Two years ago the antiques fraternity of Honiton in East Devon got together to plan a week of antiques-based events – a festival which comes to a conclusion today after celebrating its third year. The purpose is to promote the town’s antiques shops and related businesses, as well as the town itself, aiming to attract new customers and remind regulars of the varied stock, skills and knowledge available in Honiton. Over 85 dealers operate out of Honiton’s antiques shops and centres. The town also supports two auction rooms and several restorers and conservators, and it justly de-

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serves the title of the Antiques Capital of the South West. Events have been held throughout the town this week and there is one last chance to savour the occasion, as the festival ends today. For more details, visit honitonantiquesfestival.com, where you can also download an events diary to see what has been going on each day, and find details about parking and eating, etc. The popular Restoration and Conservation Fair – an exhibition and demonstration of restorers’ and conservators’ skills and techniques will take place today in the Baptist Chapel, from 10am-3pm. Exhibitions throughout the week have included Metalwork for Furniture – a loan exhibition at Roderick Butler, Marwood House. This is a country dealer’s workshop collection of brass and iron handles, castors, hinges, etc, including rare examples with makers’ marks, and brassfounders’ catalogues. Other displays and activities have included Honiton Lace Making at Bel-Ami Antiques and Interiors; handworked embroidery, lace and related pieces on Caroline Bushell’s stall in Fountain Antiques Centre and Honiton Pottery at Antique and Chic, Dolphin Court. There will be English Country Grandfather Clocks in association with David Gibson Fine Antique Clocks at Pilgrim Antiques, and The Carriage Clocks of Henri Jacot at Leigh Extence’s showroom at the Grove Antiques Centre. There is an exhibition called British Travellers in Spain from 1587 at Graham York Rare Books. This features books, manuscripts and prints spanning five centuries. Highlights include a royal binding on an 1813 Portuguese Almanack used as a diary in the Peninsula Wars; a manuscript journal by John Croft, 1766; a postcard from the Spanish Civil War dated 1937; and an original travel poster for the Canaries, published by the Spanish Tourist Board circa 1930s. Chilcotts Auctioneers staged events all week and today at 11am is their Antiques and Interiors Auction.

Paintings will spark interest Phillip Pyle A fine selection of paintings and watercolours will be sold by Phillip Pyle at Hatherleigh in Devon today – along with a wide variety of other items. A signed watercolour by George Henry Jenkins (1893-1914) depicts Anstey’s Cove from the Bishop’s Walk near Torquay and has a guide of £150-£250, while a fine oil painting on canvas of two foxhounds, indistinctly signed, has a guide of £200-£300. Charles Frederick Lowcock’s signed Visiting Granny features two children visiting their grandmother in a Victorian cottage interior. Lowcock, born in 1848, lived to the age of 104 – and was a prolific exhibitor at the Royal Academy. In an auction with 700 lots there will be three kitchen pine dressers with a guide of £300-£400 each. A silver London 1902 hallmarked boat-shaped bowl with blue glass liner, at 12in long, has a guide of £600-£700. And a similarly hallmarked fancy shaped bowl profusely embossed made by Edward Barnard has a guide of £700-£800. With Christmas coming there is a 1950s 5in tall tinplate Noddy (£10-£15) and from the same era a battery operated Noddy and car, offering a good gift solution for a youngster.

Unusual and intriguing Michael Bowman The rare and the exotic shone out from the crowd in Michael Bowman’s October 19 auction at Chudleigh in devon. A 20th century Oriental rug, brought by a Torbay couple into one of the auctioneer's regular Monday afternoon valuation days at Chudleigh, proved to be the most popular lot of the day. Estimated at just £150-£200, the rug has numerous worn areas, but was distinctive on account of the numerous portraits of middle-eastern nobility arranged in rows across the entire surface. This attracted the attentions of many internet enquirers. A mailing list client from London was the eventual buyer at £2,000.

A fine oil painting on canvas of two foxhounds, top picture, indistinctly signed, has a guide of £200£300 and goes under the hammer today in Devon. A battery operated Noddy and car are in the same sale. Main picture, centre, features at an exhibition called British Travellers in Spain from 1587 at Graham York Rare Books in Honiton today. Also featuring in the Honiton Antiques festival were this 1813 Portuguese Almanack used as a diary in the Peninsula Wars; and a manuscript journal by John Croft, 1766

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Television and radio FILM CHOICE

TOP TV CHOICE

Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back Former intergalactic farm boy Luke Skywalker is forced to take time off from rebelling against the Empire so he can seek out wizened Jedi master Yoda, who picks up his training where Obi-Wan left off. But when Luke’s comrades Han Solo, Princess Leia, Chewbacca and C-3PO are kidnapped by Darth Vader and his cronies, he abandons his lessons to save them. It’s quite simply the best of the six Star Wars movies thanks to a fine script by Lawrence Kasdan and Leigh Brackett, and assured direction by Irvin Kershner. In fact, it’s got pretty much everything – romance, adventure, quirky robots for the kids, and enough dramatic substance to leave grown-ups absorbed as well. The special effects and set pieces are simply dazzling. (Today, ITV, 3.45pm) Black Swan Ballerina Nina is initially overjoyed when she lands the coveted lead in a new production of Swan Lake. The problem is it’s a dual role, and while the director thinks she’s perfect for the pure, vulnerable White Swan, he’s not sure she has the necessary passion for the evil, seductive Black Swan. Determined to prove herself, Nina sets out to embrace her dark side, but in the process starts to lose her sanity. Despite being set in the outwardly genteel world of ballet, Black Sawn is a gripping, occasionally harrowing tale of one woman’s psychological breakdown. Natalie Portman deservedly won an Oscar for her role as tortured Nina (and she certainly looks the part as a ballerina), but credit should also go to director Darren Aronofsky for making a potentially difficult subject so very watchable. The British Board of Film Classification has revealed that Black Swan generated the most complaints of any movie in 2011 – many of them from people who had been expecting more dancing, and less sex and psychological horror. But it’s a gripping tale.

From UFOs to ghosts, unexplained events never fail to capture the imagination, as Ben Shephard discovered while making new series Mystery Map, which hits our screens this week. As part of his new show, Shephard stayed in the ancient and “unnerving” Guy Fawkes Inn in York, which is reputedly haunted by the historic figure, famous for his involvement in the great Gunpowder Plot. “I’ve never personally experienced any sort of ghost,” explains Shephard, who for ten years presented ITV’s GMTV. “But spending a night in a haunted room, even though I’m relatively rational, is still an uneasy thing to do.” He took no chances with his room being overrun with ghouls. “I ended up blocking the light under the door, just in case,” confesses the 38-year-old, laughing. “I was sure that the crew were going to come up and knock on the window in the middle of the night, because if I’d been them, I would have done exactly that.” Mystery Map is on ITV on Wednesday

DVD The Wolverine (Cert 12, 126 mins, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment) Logan (Hugh Jackman) is haunted by the death of his beloved Jean Grey (Famke Janssen). A swordswoman called Yukio (Rila Fukushima) tracks him down and asks Logan to accompany her to Japan to meet Shingen Yashida (Horiyuki Sanada), who Logan saved from the radiation blast in 1945 Nagasaki. Reluctantly, Logan agrees and he is shocked to find an old and frail Shingen under the constant surveillance of a statuesque medic (Svetlana Khodchenkova). Soon after, Shingen dies and the Yazuka attempt to kidnap granddaughter Mariko (Tao Okamoto), who is poised to assume control of the family dynasty. Logan rescues Mariko in the nick of time and she develops deep feelings for her protector. Based on a 1982 comic book storyline set in Japan, The Wolverine is a welcome change of style and pace for the franchise. James Mangold’s film strips back the action in favour of romance.

IN PROFILE Name Jack Whitehall Best known for His stand-up routines Early Life Born Jack Peter Benedict Whitehall in Westminster, London, on July 7, 1988, to former actress Hilary Gish and former actors’ agent Michael, who counted Judi Dench, Colin Firth and Richard Griffiths among his clients. Michael also wrote the memoir SharkInfested Waters and formed two production companies, one of them with Nigel Havers, who is Jack’s godfather. Jack attended the Harrodian School in London alongside Twilight saga star Robert Pattinson. He went on to attend The Dragon School in Oxford and then Marlborough College, an independent school in Wiltshire. Career During his gap year, Whitehall decided to pursue a career in stand-up comedy. He juggled studying history of art at Manchester University with gigs. In June 2008 he presented the first week of Big Brother’s Big Mouth on E4. He followed this up with appearances on Channel 4’s 8 Out of 10 Cats. Whitehall dabbled with acting as a child (he appeared, age nine, in the series Noah’s Ark and claims to have auditioned for Harry Potter), and returned to it as an adult with the sitcoms Fresh Meat and Bad Education. He’s a regular competitor on sports quiz A League of Their Own, appears on various panel game shows, and continues to do stand-up. He also has a new chat show, featuring his dad, on BBC Three. Trivia He’s been dating actress Gemma Chan for three years. Quote “I think I may have done too many panel shows. After a while people get bored of you. I might be a bit more selective in future.” See Never Mind the Buzzcocks, BBC Two, 10pm, Tuesday

RADIO Shadowlands (BBC Radio Four, Sunday, 1.30pm) – This version of William Nicholson’s acclaimed drama about the author CS Lewis’ marriage to an American divorcee, Joy Davidman Gresham is quite a tear-jerker. Martin Jarvis stars as the author and Joanne Whalley is his co-star. This is a whole box-of-hankies affair, such is the sorrow at the end. Archie Scottney’s 2009 adaptation of William Nicholson’s award-winning play set in the 1950s, tells the moving story of the relationship between Oxford don Lewis and American writer Gresham. Martin Jarvis shines alongside Joanne Whalley and Kenneth Danziger. Originally broadcast in 2009, it is well worth tuning in for once again.

TV QUIZ

TV QUIZ ANSWERS 1. GMTV 2. Laura Whitmore, Rob Beckett and Joe Swash 3. Don Draper 4. She’s a headmistress 5. 1989

38 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

Natalie Portman won an Oscar for her role as tortured Nina the ballerina in the gripping Black Swan. Jack Whitehall, left, is back on our screens this week

1 Which flagship breakfast programme did Ben Shephard, who presents ITV’s Mystery Map, starting on Wednesday, November 20, host for ten years? 2 I’m A Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here is about to return to ITV on Sunday. What are the names of three people who host ITV2’s spin-off show? 3 Jon Hamm reunites with Daniel Radcliffe for the second series of A Young Doctor’s Notebook beginning on Thursday on Sky Atlantic. What’s the name of Hamm’s Mad Men character? 4 Sarah Lancashire reprises her role in the new series of Last Tango In Halifax, which begins on Tuesday on BBC One. What job does her character Caroline have? 5 Cast Your Mind Back... David Suchet finally says goodbye to playing Hercule Poirot. What year did he debut on screen as the Belgian detective?

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Television Susan Griffin

Sarah Lancashire, as Caroline, alongside Celia (Anne Reid), Alan (Derek Jacobi), and Gillian (Nicola Walker)

Sarah Lancashire is sitting at the table in a set resembling the interior of a cottage. Camera operators and lighting technicians bark orders at one another, while a woman from wardrobe constantly fiddles with the collar of Lancashire’s shirt. Amid all this hustle and bustle, the actress remains absolutely still, her head lowered. Finally a hush descends. “Action” is yelled, and a moving scene between Lancashire and her co-star Nicola Walker plays out for the umpteenth time. As soon as “That’s a wrap!” is called, the previously morose-looking actress lifts her head and grins. “Sorry if I was being a bit actory then, it just helps me to be quiet,” she says. The scene marks the end of the shoot for Lancashire, who for the last few months has been filming the much-anticipated second series of Last Tango In Halifax. “The schedule’s demanding but it’s not a hardship, because it’s so stimulating, and as

an actor you wait an entire career to be involved in a project like this,” says the Lancashire-born star. The romantic drama follows former childhood sweethearts Alan and Celia, played by Sir Derek Jacobi and Anne Reid, as they embark on a relationship after reuniting in their seventies – as well as the troubled goings on of Celia’s daughter Caroline (Lancashire) and Alan’s daughter Gillian (Walker). It would be easy to underestimate the series, given its gentle-sounding premise, but it’s as dark as it is comic and proved a huge hit with critics and viewers when it was shown late last year. “People have absolutely taken it to heart and love the fact that it’s a romance essentially about older people, which is something we’ve shamefully had to wait a very long time for,” says Lancashire, 49.

“It doesn’t surprise me because we can all relate to a multi-generational family.” She stresses that its success starts and ends with the Bafta-nominated television writer and playwright Sally Wainwright, saying: “We’re very blessed to be involved with one of her projects.” But, just as musicians can feel trepidation ahead of a second album release, the actress wonders what the reaction will be to this follow-up. “I suppose people have expectations of what they think the series is now, and invariably you hope you’re not going to disappoint, but I don’t think people will be disappointed. It’s absolutely terrific stuff. “We’re a real company of actors and we more than get on, we care for each other,” she says, adding that she relished every moment playing the depressed, Oxbridge-educated Caroline, a role that earned her a Bafta nomination earlier this year. In the first series, viewers witnessed the headmistress attempt to cope with her adulterous husband, as well as the repercussions of her own affair with Kate, a female colleague. “The nature of the role I play has clearly hit a nerve with a lot of people,” she says. “They haven’t seen that nature of a relationship portrayed or written in such a sensitive manner. It’s not there to shock, it was really beautifully done.” As the series isn’t filmed chronologically, Lancashire wasn’t aware her character was gay until half-way through the production. “The director phoned me and said, ‘I think you ought to know this’,” she says. Was it a shock? “Yes, it was a huge shock,” she laughs,

though it didn’t change how she approached the role. “I approach it as a human being, that’s all. I don’t look at her gender or sexuality,” says Lancashire, who has a ten-year-old son with second husband, TV producer Peter Salmon, and two grown-up children from her first marriage.” She notes that some of the scenes between Caroline and Kate are “absolutely heartbreaking”. “I can entirely relate to that, because it’s about human emotion. Love is love,” she says. “It doesn’t matter about sexuality, but about how you feel towards somebody else, and being kind and good and honest with them.” That said, Caroline “isn’t out and proud”. Lancashire explains: “All the way through the second series, it’s very much a clandestine relationship in that she hasn’t quite found the courage to just step out of the closet and go, ‘Here I am, and this is me’.” It’s left to Kate to try and help her find the confidence. “It’s interesting. You think Caroline has the upper hand in most things, because she has that arrogance but, interestingly, a lot of guidance comes from Kate.” Last Tango marks a departure for the actress, whose most recent projects have been period dramas (Lark Rise To Candleford, The Paradise and Upstairs Downstairs). “The lovely thing about Last Tango is that you don’t have to hold back. You can bare your entire soul because it’s a contemporary piece, and Sally gives you a lot to work with,” she says.

The second series of Last Tango In Halifax begins on BBC One on Tuesday

PICKS OF THE WEEK

ENTERTAINMENT (Saturday, ITV, 8pm) There are just four weeks left until we find out who will win The X Factor 2013

DOCUMENTARY (Saturday, More4, 9pm) Kennedy’s Nuclear Nightmare marks the 50th anniversary of his assassination

DOCUMENTARY (Sunday, Channel 4, 8pm) Queen Victoria and the Crippled Kaiser reveals the monarchs’ relationship

DRAMA (Sunday, Channel 4, 9pm) In case you didn’t know it, Homeland is one of the most acclaimed American series ever

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DOCUMENTARY (Monday, Channel 4, 9pm) The Sound of Musicals tells the story of producer Cameron Mackintosh

MUSIC (Friday, BBC Four, 9pm) John Denver was a truly great songwriter – as we discover in John Denver: Country Boy

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 39


Saturday television&radio Saturday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

STRICTLY COME DANCING 6.30pm, BBC1

Bruce Forsyth, Tess Daly and the Strictly entourage head to Blackpool’s worldfamous Tower Ballroom, for this week’s edition.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 10.00 Saturday Kitchen Live (S). 11.30 Food & Drink (R,S,HD). 12.00 Football Focus (S,HD). 12.45 Saturday Sportsday (S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (S,HD). 1.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S). 2.00 Live International Rugby Union (S,HD). 4.30 A Question of Sport (R,S,HD). 5.00 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (S,HD). 5.20 Children in Need: The Best Bits (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

THE X FACTOR 8pm, ITV

THE JONATHAN ROSS SHOW Dermot O’Leary hosts the Great British Songbook 9.30pm, ITV

Week, as the remaining acts face increasing pressure to pull out all the stops and impress with note-perfect performances. Recent results have shown that none of them can afford to be complacent, and with the final still four weeks away, there will inevitably be some surprise exits.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 7.35 Film: Emergency Call (S) (1952). ●● 9.05 Film: The Journey of Natty Gann (S) (1985). ●●● 10.40 Reel History of Britain (R,S). 11.10 The Life of Birds (R,S). 12.00 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (R,S,HD). 12.45 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (R,S,HD). 1.30 The A to Z of TV Cooking (S). 2.15 EastEnders (S,HD). 3.40 Escape to the Country (R,S,HD). 4.25 Flog It! 4.55 Live International Rugby Union (S,HD).

CASUALTY 9pm, BBC1

As rugby coach Ricky encourages his son Simon to use dirty tactics against fellow player Clive, they come to blows during a scrum, leaving one injured on the ground and the other with a badly bruised hand. Once at the hospital, Simon’s aggressive behaviour lead Lily to suspect he might be using steroids.

The host is joined by guests including Sarah Millican, who talks about her standup tour Home Bird, and One Direction, who discuss their rapid rise to fame around the world.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Babar and the Adventures of Badou (R,S). 6.10 Matt Hatter Chronicles (R,S). 6.35 Dino Dan (R,S). 7.00 Canimals (R,S). 7.25 Sooty (S). 7.35 Horrid Henry (R,S). 7.50 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (S). 8.15 Bottom Knocker Street (S). 8.30 Munch Box (S). 9.25 ITV News (S). 9.30 The Home of Fabulous Cakes (R,S,HD). 10.30 Murder, She Wrote (R,S,HD). 11.25 ITV News and Weather (S). 11.35 Surprise Surprise (R,S,HD). 12.40 You’ve Been Framed! (R,S). 1.10 Doc Martin (R,S). 2.10 The X Factor Results (R,S,HD). 3.45 Film: Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (S,HD) (1980). ●●●●●

Channel Channel 4

6.00 The Treacle People (R,S). 6.10 The Hoobs (R,S). 7.00 Volleyball (R,S). 8.00 The Morning Line (S). 9.00 The American Football Show (S). 10.05 Frasier (R,S). 10.30 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 11.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,S,HD). 11.55 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer puts on weight. 12.25 Heston’s 70s Feast (R,S). 1.30 Channel 4 Racing (S). Live coverage from Cheltenham and Wetherby. 4.00 Come Dine with Me (R,S,HD).

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 10.00 Power Rangers: Megaforce (S,HD). 10.35 Slugterra (S,HD). 11.00 Inside Hollywood. 11.05 Ben Fogle’s Animal Clinic (R,S,HD). 12.05 Stobart: Trucks, Trains & Planes (R,S,HD). 1.05 Film: The Christmas Card (S) (2006). Drama, with John Newton. ●●● 2.50 Film: The Town Christmas Forgot (S,HD) (2010). Drama, with Lauren Holly. ●●● 4.30 Film: A Grandpa for Christmas (S,HD) (2007). Comedy, starring Ernest Borgnine. ●●

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

11 after

12

▼ ▼ ▼ ▼ ▼

9.00 Casualty (S,HD). 14/48. See Choices Above. 9.50 BBC News; Weather (S,HD).

10

6.30 Strictly Come Dancing (S,HD). Bruce Forsyth, Tess Daly and the Strictly entourage head to Blackpool’s world-famous Tower Ballroom, the spiritual home of dancing, for this week’s edition. Over the years its elegant surroundings have played host to thousands of amateur and professional dancers – not to mention Hayley and Roy from Coronation Street. See Choices Above. 8.00 Atlantis (S,HD). 8/13. The trio face danger as they escort a valuable cargo across the desert. 8.50 The National Lottery Live (S,HD). Chris Evans reveals the results of the Lotto and the Thunderball.

6 7 8 9

Atlantis, 8pm

QI, 10pm

7.30 Live Rugby League World Cup (S). The third quarter-final (Kick-off 8.00pm). Mark Chapman introduces coverage of this evening’s fixture at the DW Stadium in Wigan, featuring the Group A runnersup against the third-placed team in Group B. This encounter is expected to feature England following their defeat in the opening match of the tournament against Australia, while the race to qualify from Group B with holders New Zealand was wide open between France, Papua New Guinea and Samoa. With commentary by Dave Woods and Brian Noble, and analysis by Jamie Peacock, Jon Wilkin and Eorl Crabtree. Subsequent programmes subject to change.

10.10 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (S,HD) (2007). The swashbuckling rogues join forces with old foe Barbossa against villainous Lord Beckett. But first they have to journey to the ends of the Earth to free Captain Jack Sparrow from his hellish imprisonment in Davy Jones’ Locker. Fantasy adventure sequel, starring Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley and Chow Yun-Fat, and featuring a cameo appearance by Keith Richards. ●●● Followed by National Lottery Update. See Choices Above.

10.00 QI (R,S,HD). 11/18. With Ronni Ancona, Dave Gorman and Lee Mack. 10.30 Formula 1: United States Grand Prix – Qualifying Highlights (S,HD). The battle for pole position at the United States Grand Prix.

12.45 Film: Highlander: Endgame (S) (2000). An immortal warrior enlists the aid of a fellow clansman in opposing an enemy who has been seeking revenge for centuries. Fantasy sequel, with Christopher Lambert, Adrian Paul, Bruce Payne, Lisa Barbuscia, Donnie Yen, Jim Byrnes, Beatie Edney and Sheila Gish. ●● 2.20 Weatherview (S). 2.25 BBC News (S,HD).

1.20 Film: Radio On (S,HD) (1979). A DJ drives from London to Bristol to investigate his brother’s death, encountering a succession of strange people along the way – but his interest in solving the mystery begins to wane as the journey unfolds. Road movie, starring David Beames, Lisa Kreuzer and Sting. ●●● 3.00 This Is BBC Two (S).

11.45 Stark Raving Mad (S) (2002). A man saddled with his late brother’s debts comes up with a scheme to rob a bank – but nothing goes according to plan. Crime comedy, starring Seann William Scott. ●●

40 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

The Chase: Celebrity Special, 7pm

Grand Designs, 8pm

International Boxing, 10pm

6.05 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.15 ITV News and Weather (S). 6.30 New You’ve Been Framed! (S). Dogs reveal where they stand on Europe.

6.30 News (S).

7.00 The Chase: Celebrity Special (S,HD). 7/14. With Andrea McLean, Robbie Savage, Jessica Taylor and Rory McGrath. Bradley Walsh hosts.

7.00 The Political Slot (S). MP James Wharton explains his European Union Referendum Bill. 7.05 Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD (R,S,HD). 7/22.

6.10 5 News Weekend (S,HD). 6.15 D-Day: The Ultimate Conflict (R,S). Drama-documentary telling the story of the critical Second World War offensive, profiling the inventors who worked behind the scenes to create an assortment of unusual machines for the Allied landings.

8.00 The X Factor (S,HD). 18/22. See Choices Above.

8.00 Grand Designs (R,S,HD). 11/11. Kevin McCloud revisits Lucie Fairweather, who decided to carry on with a project to build an eco-friendly family home in Suffolk after the death of her partner.

8.00 JFK’s Secret Killer: The Evidence (R,S,HD). Documentary investigating the events during and directly after the shooting of US president John F Kennedy, revealing a new theory as to the identity of the assassin.

9.30 The Jonathan Ross Show (S,HD). 6/10. See Choices Above.

9.00 Black Swan (S,HD) (2010). Premiere. A repressed ballet dancer leads a sheltered life, devoted entirely to her art. She pursues the lead role in a production of Swan Lake, but the director convinces her she will only be capable of dancing the part if she embraces her darker impulses. This leads her into a destructive relationship with a rival that threatens her sanity. Drama, starring an Oscar-winning Natalie Portman. With Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassel, Winona Ryder, Barbara Hershey, Benjamin Millepied, Ksenia Solo and Kristina Anapau. See Choices Above. ●●●●

9.00 Battle Scarred: Nightmare on Civvy Street (S,HD). 3/4. See Choices Above.

10.30 ITV News and Weather (S); Weather. 10.45 Take Me Out (R,S,HD). 5/8. A guitar teacher from Huddersfield, a 999 call operator from Bristol, a London choir leader and a Belfast butcher enter the love lift in the hope of impressing 30 single women. All four hopefuls will be turning on the charm in a bid to land a date on the Isle of Fernandos. However, to have any chance of succeeding, they must ensure the female participants keep their lights on as a sign of approval. Paddy McGuinness presents. 12.00 Jackpot247. Viewers get the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show USA (R,S). The host takes his successful talk show stateside. 3.45 ITV Nightscreen (HD). Text-based information service.

11.10 The Deep Blue Sea (S,HD) (2011). Premiere. A woman leaves her husband for a younger man, but finds their relationship brings only despair. Drama, with Rachel Weisz and Tom Hiddleston. ●●●●

10.00 International Boxing (S,HD). James DeGale v Dyah Davis. Mark Pougatch presents live coverage of the bout for the WBC Super Middleweight Silver title at Glow in Bluewater, Kent. DeGale makes another defence of his fledgling belt, which he hopes will further boost his prospects of earning a shot at WBC world title holder Sakio Bika in the future, who is one of only three men to have defeated his opponent tonight. Plus, action from Hughie Fury’s latest heavyweight contest, as he continues his burgeoning career.

1.05 Stand Up for the Week (R,S,HD). Paul Chowdhry hosts the satirical comedy show, with Seann Walsh, Josh Widdicombe, Simon Evans, Romesh Ranganathan and Angela Barnes discussing the news. 1.50 Paddy’s TV Guide (R,S,HD). Paddy McGuinness takes a comic look at families. 2.35 Hollyoaks (R,S,HD). 4.40 90210 (S,HD). 5.20 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD).

12.00 SuperCasino. 3.10 Charley Boorman’s Extreme Frontiers (R,S,HD). 4.00 Wildlife SOS (R,S). 4.25 Make It Big (R,S). 4.50 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.00 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.10 Hana’s Helpline (R,S). 5.20 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.30 The Funky Valley Show (R,S). 5.40 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.50 Hana’s Helpline (R,S).

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BATTLE SCARRED: NIGHTMARE ON CIVVY STREET 9pm, Channel 5

SPY KIDS 8pm, Sky1

Chris Terrill examines why some former soldiers live in a state of hypervigilance, seeing everything and everyone around them as a potential threat.

ITV2 ITV2

6.00 Holiday Showdown (R). 6.50 Coronation Street (HD). 8.10 Emmerdale (HD). 11.00 The X Factor USA (HD). 1.00 The X Factor USA (HD). 2.00 Peter Andre: My Life (R,HD). 3.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 3.30 Film: Kindergarten Cop (HD) (1990). ●● 5.45 Film: Mr Bean’s Holiday (HD) (2007). Comedy, starring Rowan Atkinson. ●●

A megalomaniac threatens to take over the world, so two married spies come out of retirement to thwart his plans. However, when they go missing, it is up to their plucky children to step in and save the day. Family adventure directed by Robert Rodriguez, starring Antonio Banderas and Carla Gugino.

E4 E4

6.00 Switched (R). 6.25 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 7.10 Charmed (R). 8.05 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 10.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 11.00 2 Broke Girls (R,HD). 12.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 1.05 Made in Chelsea (R). 2.10 Film: Aliens in the Attic (HD) (2009). ●●● 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1

6.00 Glee (R,S,HD). 8.00 The Fantasy Football Club. 9.00 Game Changers. 10.00 Soccer AM. 12.00 WWE Superstars (HD). 1.00 Micro Monsters with David Attenborough (R,S,HD). 1.30 Micro Monsters with David Attenborough (R,S,HD). 2.00 Film: Stargate – Ark of Truth (S,HD) (2008). ●●● 4.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Saturday television&radio PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: AT WORLD’S END 10.10pm, BBC1

BLACK SWAN 9pm, Channel 4

Premiere. A repressed, sheltered ballet dancer is encouraged by a director to explore her darker impulses at the risk of her sanity. Drama, with Natalie Portman.

Fantasy adventure sequel, starring Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush, Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley.

Gold GOLD

6.15 Last of the Summer Wine 7.20 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 7.50 Last of the Summer Wine 9.10 As Time Goes By 9.50 Last of the Summer Wine 11.05 Jeeves and Wooster 1.30 Porridge 2.10 Being Ronnie Corbett 3.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 4.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 4.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 5.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 5.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1

6.00 FIFA Futbol Mundial 6.30 Champions League Weekly (HD). 7.00 International Football (HD). 8.00 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). 9.00 Game Changers (HD). 10.00 Soccer AM (HD). 12.00 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). 1.00 Champions League Weekly (HD). 1.30 Live International Rugby Union (HD). 4.55 Live International Rugby Union (HD).

Die Hard 4.0, 9pm

A League of … 9.45pm

Only Fools and Horses, 6pm

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Sheldon receives a prestigious prize. 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 All Aboard: East Coast Trains (R,S,HD). Documentary exploring the work of East Coast rail employees.

6.00 Only Fools and Horses. Rodney and Albert worry the flat will get overcrowded once Raquel and Del’s baby arrives.

7.25 Evan Almighty (HD) (2007). Politician Evan Baxter is recruited by God for a special mission. A great flood is coming, and like Noah before him, Evan has to build an ark to protect the wildlife of the world from the impending cataclysm. However, convincing others that the end is nigh proves difficult. Comedy, with Steve Carell. ●●●

7.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Lily visits a specialist who bears an uncanny resemblance to Barney. 7.30 Suburgatory (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer, Marge and the kids have biblical dreams. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD).

7.10 Only Fools and Horses. Part one of two. Del and Rodney get the chance to leave Peckham behind for a holiday in the Florida sun.

8.00 New Girl (R,HD). The gang attends a dating convention. 8.30 New Girl (R,HD). The room-mates fight over a parking spot. Comedy, with Zooey Deschanel and Jake Johnson.

8.00 Spy Kids (S,HD) (2001). See Choices Above. ●●●●

8.20 Porridge. Godber starts work on another O-level course, but wily old cellmate Fletcher can’t understand why he doesn’t just cheat in the exam. Prison comedy, starring Ronnie Barker.

9.30 The Xtra Factor (HD). Caroline Flack and Matt Richardson present the companion show, getting the first reactions from the contestants and judges following the latest Saturday night live show.

9.45 A League of Their 9.00 Die Hard 4.0 (HD) 9.00 Little Britain. Dafydd Own: Best Bits (R,S,HD). (2007). Tough New York works as a rent boy and James Corden presents cop John McClane is sent Vicky shows off her out-takes from series to escort a computer dancing skills, while seven of the comedy hacker to Washington Florence and Emily tackle quiz, featuring team for questioning. During their facial hair. captains Jamie Redknapp 9.40 Little Britain. With this routine operation he and Andrew “Freddie” stumbles on a criminal Richard Madeley and Flintoff, plus regular mastermind’s plan to Judy Finnigan. panellist Jack Whitehall. launch a technological terrorist attack on the 10.30 Sporting Greats (S). A US, and is forced to enlist 10.45 Road Wars (R,S). Police 10.20 The Catherine Tate Show. Peter Kay guest officers use unmarked profile of Michael the hacker’s aid in foiling stars in the sketch show, cars fitted with on-board Johnson, the American the evil scheme. Action featuring the video cameras, offering sprinter who won four thriller sequel, with comedienne as an an insight into vehicle Olympic gold medals, in Bruce Willis, Timothy assortment of oddball crime and how it can be addition to eight golds Olyphant, Justin Long, characters. prevented. The at the World Maggie Q, Cliff Curtis, programme also Championships. 10.55 Bottom. The bachelors Jonathan Sadowski, features footage of have a run-in with the Andrew Friedman and dangerous drivers. police. Kevin Smith. ●●●●

Evan Almighty, 7.25pm

10.30 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). Comedy quiz hosted by Keith Lemon, with McFly’s Harry Judd and Dougie Poynter joining team captains Holly Willoughby and Fearne Cotton to answer questions on showbiz news and gossip.

Live Darts, 7pm

7.00 Live Darts (HD). The Grand Slam of Darts. Coverage from Wolverhampton Civic Hall, as the knockout stage of the competition continues with the concluding two quarterfinals. Three of the four matches at this stage last year finished 16-12, with Raymond van Barneveld the only player to enjoy a slightly more comfortable progression to the semi-finals, in his 16-10 victory over fellow Dutchman Christian Kist.

11.35 The Inbetweeners (R). 11.15 Road Wars (R,S). Police 11.35 The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer. The Will tries to reinvent the officers combat vehicle Stott brothers appear on boys’ image by taking crime. This Is Your Life, while them clubbing around 11.45 Night Cops (R,S,HD). dodgy councillors Cox London, but Simon is Officers deal with a and Evans brighten up unsure whether to go feisty mother and armed the seafront with until Carli shows an youths. celebrity litter bins. interest in the outing.

11.00 Spanish Football Gold. Real Madrid v Barcelona. 11.15 Spanish Football Gold. 11.30 Football Gold (S,HD). Chelsea v Tottenham Hotspur from 1993/94. 11.45 Football Gold (S,HD).

12.05 The X Factor (R,HD). The hopefuls perform British hits. 1.35 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! Top Trials (R). A look back at the funniest and most freaky Bush Tucker Trials. 2.25 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 2.50 Teleshopping. 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.10 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 12.40 Rude Tube (R,HD). Internet clips on the theme of travel. Last in the series. 1.40 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.10 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 2.35 Happy Endings (R,HD). 2.55 Rude Tube (R,HD). 3.50 Glee (R,HD). 4.30 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

12.00 Saturday Reloaded (HD). A round-up of the latest football goals. 1.00 Darts (HD). The Grand Slam of Darts quarter-finals. 4.30 Sporting Greats (S). A profile of Carl Lewis. 5.00 Football Gold (S,HD). 5.15 Football Gold (S). 5.30 Football Gold (S,HD). 5.45 Football Gold (S,HD).

RADIO

11.20 Fake Reaction (R,HD). With guest panellists Chelsee Healey, Lethal Bizzle, Tom Deacon and Matthew Crosby.

Radio 1 5.00am Rob da Bank 7.00 Gemma Cairney 10.00 Matt Edmondson 1.00pm Huw Stephens 4.00 Radio 1’s Dance Anthems with Danny Howard 7.00 MistaJam 9.00 Charlie Sloth 11.00 DJ Target 1.00am Diplo and Friends 3.00 Friction Radio 2 6.00am Anneka Rice 8.00 Sounds of the 60s 10.00 Graham Norton 1.00pm Pick of the Pops 3.00 Dermot O’Leary 6.00 Liza Tarbuck. Featuring a personal playlist and the host’s take on the world. 8.00 TBA 10.00 Sounds of the 80s. With Jim Kerr of Simple Minds and Wang Chung’s Jack Hues. Midnight Gideon Coe 3.00 Richard Allinson

12.45 Nothing to Declare (R,S). 1.45 Caribbean Cops (R,S,HD). 2.40 The Counsellor: Sky Movies Special (R). 3.10 Road Wars (R,S). 3.35 Road Wars (R,S). 4.00 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 4.30 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 5.30 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD).

Radio 3 7.00am Breakfast 9.00 News 9.03 CD Review 12.15pm Music Matters 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Saturday Classics 4.00 Sound of Cinema 5.00 Jazz Record Requests 6.00 Jazz LineUp. The European Jazz Orchestra at the Stockholm Jazz Festival. 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert. Yutaka Sado conducts the BBC Philharmonic in Chausson’s Poème and Berlioz’s Rêverie et Caprice with violinist Sayaka Shoji, plus music by Barry Gray, Dukas and Walton. 10.00 Hear and Now. Live music by Ensemble Linea and violinist Irvine Arditti. Midnight Geoffrey Smith’s Jazz 1.00 Through the Night

Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 iPM 6.00 News and Papers 6.07 Open Country 6.30 Farming Today This Week 6.57 Weather 7.00 Today 9.00 Saturday Live 10.30 How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love My Albatross 11.00 The Forum 11.30 From Our Own Correspondent Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 Money Box 12.30 The News Quiz 12.57 Weather 1.00 News 1.10 Any Questions? 2.00 Any Answers? 2.30 Saturday Drama: Air Force One 3.30 Tim Key’s Easy USSR 4.00 Weekend Woman’s Hour 5.00 Saturday PM 5.30 The Bottom Line 5.54 Shipping

12.15 Big Train. Comic skits and sketches from the award-winning show, including a boxing toddler being forced to throw her next fight, and rioting beefeaters on the streets of Britain. 12.55 Little Britain 1.25 Little Britain 1.55 Bottom 2.25 The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.15 Loose Ends 7.00 Profile 7.15 Saturday Review. Presented by Tom Sutcliffe. 8.00 Archive on 4: The Kennedy Book Depository. Literary and cinematic responses to the assassination of John F Kennedy in 1963. 9.00 Classic Serial: Sword of Honour – Unconditional Surrender. By Evelyn Waugh. 10.00 News and Weather 10.15 The Moral Maze 11.00 Round Britain Quiz 11.30 The Echo Chamber Midnight News and Weather 12.30 The Boundless Garden 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast

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BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.20 Family Guy (R,S). 12.40 Family Guy (R,S). 1.00 Family Guy (R,S). 1.25 Family Guy (R,S). 1.45 Family Guy (R,S). 2.30 The Revolution Will Be Televised (R,S). 3.00 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 3.30 Fuzzbox (R,S).

12.30 Top of the Pops: 1978 (R). 1.15 Sounds of the 70s 2 Troubadours – Peaceful Easy Feeling (R). 1.45 Frozen Planet (R). 2.45 Benjamin Britten on Camera (R).

7.00 Rugby Union (S). England v New Zealand. Jason Highlights from Twickenham, where the hosts concluded their autumn international schedule against the world champions. 8.00 Doctor Who: Greatest Monsters and Villains Weekend (S). Joel Dommett reveals which enemies are ranked six to four in the countdown. 11.30 Family Guy (R,S). Peter decides to become a member of the paparazzi. 11.55 Family Guy (R,S).

7.00 Frozen Planet (R). How animals in the polar regions adapt to the summer weather. 8.00 Benjamin Britten on Camera. The composer’s broadcasting legacy. 9.00 Borgen. New series. Birgitte Nyborg is persuaded to re-enter the political arena. 10.00 Borgen. Birgitte suffers a setback. Drama, starring Sidse Babett Knudsen. 11.00 Queen Live in Budapest: Hungarian Rhapsody (R). A performance by the rock band during the 1986 Magic Tour.

Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 6.00 Saturday Breakfast 9.00 The Danny Baker Show 11.00 Fighting Talk Noon 5 Live Sport 2.30 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby 5.00 Sports Report 5.45 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby. Ireland v Australia (Kick-off 5.45pm). 8.00 Saturday Edition 10.00 Stephen Nolan. A phone-in on the day’s events. 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 Alan Titchmarsh Noon Nicholas Owen 3.00 Jamie Crick 5.00 Saturday Night at the Movies 7.00 Alex James’s Magical Musical Tour 9.00 The New Releases Show 10.00 Smooth Classics Midnight Bob Jones

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 41


Sunday television&radio Sunday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

BRITAIN AND THE SEA 9pm, BBC1

David Dimbleby explores aspects of the country’s maritime history, beginning with a look at the history of exploration in Devon and Cornwall.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.00 The Andrew Marr Show (S,HD). 10.00 Sunday Morning Live 2013 (S,HD). 11.00 Sunday Politics (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S). 1.00 BBC News (S,HD). 1.15 Escape to the Country (R,S). 2.15 Points of View (S,HD). 2.30 Live International Rugby Union (S,HD). Scotland v South Africa (Kick-off 3.00pm). 5.05 Lifeline (S,HD). 5.15 Songs of Praise (S,HD). 5.50 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

QUEEN VICTORIA AND THE CRIPPLED KAISER – SECRET HISTORY 8pm, Channel 4

Documentary revealing the secret childhood of Queen Victoria’s eldest grandson, the future Kaiser Wilhelm II, through a long-hidden cache of intimate family letters. Wilhelm was born with a paralysed arm – and was subjected to bizarre and cruel attempts to cure the condition.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 6.55 Film: The Velvet Touch (S) (1948). ●●● 8.30 Alan Titchmarsh’s Garden Secrets (R,S,HD). 9.30 Gardeners’ World (R,S,HD). 10.00 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites (S). 11.30 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (R,S,HD). 12.15 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (R,S,HD). 1.00 Food & Drink (R,S,HD). 1.30 Rugby Union (S,HD). 2.30 Live Rugby League World Cup (S,HD). 5.00 Flog It! (R,S).

I’M A CELEBRITY GET ME OUT OF HERE! 9pm, ITV

TOAST OF LONDON 10.30pm, Channel 4

Ant and Dec present as a fresh batch of famous faces wave goodbye to their lives of luxury and set up camp among the creepy-crawlies of the Australian jungle.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Babar and the Adventures of Badou (R,S). 6.10 Matt Hatter Chronicles (R,S). 6.35 Dino Dan (R,S). 7.00 Canimals (R,S). 7.25 Sooty (S). 7.35 Horrid Henry (R,S). 7.50 Victorious. 8.15 Bottom Knocker Street (S). 8.30 Fort Boyard Ultimate Challenge (S). 9.25 ITV News (S). 9.30 Storage Hoarders (R,S,HD). 10.30 Sunday Side Up (S,HD). 11.30 Sunday Scoop (S). 12.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 12.35 Inside the National Trust (S,HD). 1.35 Love Your Garden (R,S,HD). 2.35 The X Factor (R,S,HD). 4.05 Downton Abbey (R,S,HD). 5.35 Prize Island (S,HD).

Tired of doing voiceover work and appearing on stage every night, Steven hires a new agent and tries his hand at a different career – an author of erotic literature. He also finds himself a glamorous woman, who would be perfect for him if only they could find a moment in private.

Channel Channel 4

6.10 The American Football Show (R,S). 7.05 FIA GT Blancpain Endurance Season Review (S). 8.00 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 9.00 Frasier (R,S). 9.30 Sunday Brunch (S). 12.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,S,HD). 12.55 The Simpsons (R,S). 1.25 Channel 4 Racing (S). 3.30 Film: Congo (S,HD) (1995). Jungle adventure, starring Dylan Walsh. ●● 5.35 Film: Night at the Museum (S,HD) (2006). See Choices Above. ●●●

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 10.00 Power Rangers: Super Samurai (R,S,HD). 10.35 Slugterra (S,HD). 11.00 The Hotel Inspector (R,S). 12.00 Cowboy Builders (R,S,HD). 1.00 Police Interceptors (R,S,HD). 2.00 Film: Little Nicky (S) (2000). Comedy fantasy, starring Adam Sandler. ●●● 3.35 Film: Click (S,HD) (2006). See Choices Above. ●● 5.35 Film: Lucky Christmas (S,HD) (2011). Premiere. Romantic drama, with Elizabeth Berkley. ●●●

11 after

12

6.15 Countryfile (S,HD). Julia Bradbury reveals how Benjamin Britten was inspired by the Suffolk countryside.

6.35 Regional News (S); Weather 6.45 ITV News and Weather (S).

7.15 Strictly Come Dancing: The Results (S,HD). Another couple leave, and JLS and Andre Rieu perform.

6.00 JFK: The Final Visit to Britain (S). The story of US president John F Kennedy’s last trip to the UK. 6.30 Days That Shook the World (R,S). 7.00 Coast (R,S,HD). 1/6. Nick Crane travels from London to Belgium. 7.05 Kennedy Home Movies (R,S). Life in one of the 20th century’s most powerful families.

8.00 The Paradise (S,HD). 5/8. Tom is furious that Moray’s new pocket-watch counter is attracting attention away from his food hall, so he asks Denise to come up with ideas for improving other departments. Drama, starring Emun Elliott. 9.00 Britain and the Sea (S,HD). 1/4. See Choices Above.

The X Factor Results, 8pm

10

Respect: A Felix Dexter … 10pm

6 7 8 9

The Paradise, 8pm

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

Was It Something I Said?, 10pm

The Hotel Inspector, 11am

7.00 Coronation Street (S,HD). Hour-long episode. Peter steps in when David hassles Tina in the Rovers.

7.40 News (S).

8.00 Great Continental Railway Journeys (S,HD). 4/6. Michael Portillo travels through Scandinavia, crossing the bridge linking Denmark to Sweden to retrace the journey of a train that carried a revolutionary Russian passenger.

8.00 The X Factor Results (S,HD). 18/22. The two acts with the lowest number of public votes face each other in the sing-off, and for one of them the dream of stardom will be over. Gary Barlow and Miley Cyrus perform live.

8.00 Queen Victoria and the Crippled Kaiser – Secret History (S). See Choices Above.

7.15 5 News Weekend (S,HD). 7.20 Rush Hour 2 (S) (2001). The two mismatched detectives travel to Hong Kong when terrorists bomb the US embassy, and are soon involved in keeping tabs on the prime suspects – high-ranking Triad members involved in an international counterfeiting ring. Action comedy sequel, starring Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker, John Lone, Zhang Ziyi, Roselyn Sanchez and Harris Yulin. ●●●

9.00 Africa 2013: Countdown to the Rains (S,HD). 3/3. The rains finally arrive and the grazing animals can leave the river and spread out across the valley, forcing predators to work much harder for their food. Last in the series.

9.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (S,HD). 1/20. See Choices Above.

9.00 Homeland (S,HD). 7/12. See Choices Above.

10.00 BBC News; Regional News and Weather (S,HD). 10.25 Formula 1: United States Grand Prix – Highlights (S,HD). Suzi Perry introduces action from the United States Grand Prix at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas, where the 18th and penultimate round of the campaign took place. Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel were the dominant drivers here last year, with Hamilton winning the race from second on the grid, and the Mercedes man was looking to become only the fourth driver to win the race on more than two occasions.

10.00 Respect: A Felix Dexter Special (S,HD). A tribute to the comedian, who died last month. 10.30 Hebburn (R,S). 1/6. The return of the comedy about a Tyneside family. The Pearsons deal with the aftermath of Joe’s stroke, which means Pauline going back to work as an estate agent.

10.30 ITV News and Weather (S); Weather 10.45 Off Their Rockers (R,S,HD). 1/6. Hidden-camera show in which senior citizens play pranks on the public. A nun wreaks havoc on a mobility scooter and a beautician deals with a surprising enquiry.

10.00 Was It Something I Said? (S,HD). 7/8. With Rhod Gilbert and Josie Long. 10.30 Toast of London (S,HD). 5/6. See Choices Above. 10.55 Alan Carr: Chatty Man (R,S,HD). 12/18. With Russell Brand and Adam Hills, plus music by the Wanted.

11.00 Never Mind the Buzzcocks (R,S,HD). 8/13. Michael Bolton hosts, with Carol Vorderman, Shane Filan, Seann Walsh and Diana Vickers. 11.30 Rugby League World Cup (S,HD).

11.15 Anglo-Welsh Cup Rugby Union (S). Highlights of the second round of pool matches, which included Newport Gwent Dragons v London Wasps, Saracens v Scarlets and Gloucester v Newcastle Falcons.

11.55 Fresh Meat (R,S,HD). 2/8. Vod comes up with a plan to get rid of her holiday romance, JP tries to steal the girl Howard likes, and Kingsley dates both Heather and Josie, who is keen to return to Manchester.

11.15 Once Upon a Time in Mexico (S) (2003). A legendary gunman seeking revenge for his wife’s murder is recruited into a CIA agent’s plan to stop an assassination. Thriller, starring Antonio Banderas. ●●●

12.25 Weatherview (S). 12.30 BBC News (S,HD).

12.15 Film: More Than Just a Game (S) (2007). South African fact-based sporting drama, starring Presley Chweneyagae and Wright Ngubane. ●●● 1.45 Sign Zone: Countryfile (R,S). The team visits Cannock Chase in Staffordshire. 2.40 Sign Zone: Holby City (R,S). Chantelle faces a crossroads in her life. 3.40 This Is BBC Two (S). Preview of upcoming programmes.

12.15 The Store. 2.15 Motorsport UK (HD). Highlights from Silverstone, featuring the Ginetta Junior Championship and Porsche Carrera Cup. 3.05 ITV Nightscreen (HD). 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S). The host invites guests to air their differences over family and relationship issues, and provides them with his own brand of no-nonsense advice.

12.45 American Football Live (S). Denver Broncos v Kansas City Chiefs (Kick-off 1.30am). Coverage of the AFC West encounter from the Sports Authority Field at Mile High. 4.45 KOTV Boxing Weekly (R,S). Arash Usmanee v Argenis Mendez. Plus, action from an archive bout. 5.15 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). High-stakes game show, with Noel Edmonds.

1.15 SuperCasino. Live interactive gaming. 3.10 The Gadget Show (R,S,HD). 4.00 Wildlife SOS (R,S). 4.25 Make It Big (R,S). 4.50 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.00 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.10 Hana’s Helpline (R,S). 5.20 Angels of Jarm (R,S). 5.30 The Funky Valley Show (R,S). 5.40 Roary the Racing Car (R,S). 5.50 Hana’s Helpline (R,S).

42 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

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9.00 The Book of Eli (S,HD) (2010). A man travels across a postapocalyptic America carrying a book believed to hold the key to mankind’s future. He encounters trouble in a desolate town and finds himself pursued by a despotic leader who will stop at nothing to get his hands on the text. Action adventure, starring Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman, Mila Kunis, Ray Stevenson, Jennifer Beals, Evan Jones, Frances de la Tour and Michael Gambon ●●●


HOMELAND 9pm, Channel 4

REVOLUTION 10pm, Sky1

Saul takes a career gamble while his old adversary is in custody, Carrie and Quinn struggle to contain a local police investigation, and Mira has a big decision to make about her marriage.

ITV2 ITV2

6.00 Beauty and the Geek (R). 6.45 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 7.10 Emmerdale (R,HD). 10.00 Coronation Street (R,HD). 11.25 The X Factor (R,HD). 12.55 The Xtra Factor (R,HD). 1.55 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 2.25 Film: Ice Age: The Meltdown (HD) (2006). ●● 4.15 Film: Peter Pan (HD) (2003). Fantasy adventure, with Jeremy Sumpter. ●●●

A new power comes to light as Aaron speculates about the extreme effects of Nano technology, while Miles reconnects with a figure from his past, a Texas Ranger who might just be the key to bringing down the Patriots. Meanwhile, emotions run high when Charlie is reunited with Miles and Rachel.

E4 E4

6.00 Switched (R). 6.25 Make It or Break It (R,HD). 7.10 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 7.55 Charmed (R). 9.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 10.00 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 12.35 Made in Chelsea (R,HD). 1.35 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 2.35 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 3.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 4.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1

11.00 WWE: Experience (HD). 12.00 Film: Spy Kids (S,HD) (2001). ●●●● 1.45 Futurama: Welcome to the World of Tomorrow (R,S). 2.00 Ashley Banjo’s Secret Street Crew (R,S,HD). 3.00 Futurama (R,S). 3.30 Futurama (R,S). 4.00 Futurama (R,S). 4.30 Futurama (R,S). 5.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 5.30 The Simpsons (R,S).

FILM PICKS

Sunday television&radio NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM 5.35pm, Channel 4

Gold GOLD

6.00 Last of the Summer Wine 8.30 As Time Goes By 9.05 Being Ronnie Corbett 10.30 Last of the Summer Wine 11.50 Keeping Up Appearances 12.30 Keeping Up Appearances 1.10 Only Fools and Horses 2.20 Only Fools and Horses 3.30 Harry Hill’s Christmas TV Burp 4.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 4.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 5.00 Jeeves and Wooster

Rude Tube, 10pm

Karl Pilkington … 9pm

The Office, 9pm

6.25 The Lost World: Jurassic Park (HD) (1997). Scientist Dr Ian Malcolm reluctantly joins a research team on the island where his employer first designed genetically engineered dinosaurs. Meanwhile, a big-game hunter takes the chance to bag the biggest prize of all – a Tyrannosaurus rex. Steven Spielberg’s dinosaur adventure sequel, starring Jeff Goldblum, Julianne Moore, Pete Postlethwaite and Richard Attenborough. Including FYI Daily. ●●●

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 The Simpsons (S,HD). Marge tries to protect Maggie from children’s television. 6.30 Yonderland (S,HD).

6.10 Jeeves and Wooster. Bertie does a romantic good deed.

7.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). The friends compete in a scavenger hunt. 7.30 Rules of Engagement (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (S,HD). Grampa revisits his days as a feared TV wrestler. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). With the guest voice of 50 Cent.

7.20 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. The quirky comic gives his take on Wild at Heart. 7.50 Harry Hill’s TV Burp

8.00 Crocodile Dundee (HD) (1986). A New York reporter searches the Australian Outback for a maverick hunter with a legendary reputation, and invites the adventurer back to America. But the diehard Aussie needs to draw on all his survival skills to adjust to life in the urban jungle. Comedy adventure, written by and starring Paul Hogan, with Linda Kozlowski, John Meillon and Mark Blum. ●●●●

8.00 Arrow (R,S,HD). Oliver and the Canary are attacked by a trained killer from the League of Assassins, and Donner presents Moira with an ultimatum.

8.20 Porridge. Fletch tries to ensure that Godber has not blown his chances of early release after he gets into a fight a week before his parole board hearing. Final episode of the sitcom.

9.00 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life (S,HD). Karl ends his journey with a look at differing attitudes to death. In Ghana, he attends his first-ever funeral and the accompanying parade. Last in the series.

9.00 The Office. The staff celebrate Red Nose Day. 9.40 The Office. There are more changes in the pipeline at Wernham Hogg and David Brent shares his management philosophy with a trade magazine.

10.00 Revolution (S,HD). See Choices Above.

A man gets his hands on a remote control that allows him to fastforward through the dull parts of his life. Comedy, starring Adam Sandler.

The exhibits at a New York museum come to life and run riot after dark, causing mayhem for the nightwatchman. Comedy, with Ben Stiller.

The Lost World … 6.25pm

9.00 The Xtra Factor (HD). Caroline Flack and Matt Richardson go behind the scenes of the main results show to chat to the departing act and get opinions of the night’s performances.

CLICK 3.35pm, Channel 5

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1

6.00 International Rugby Union (HD). 7.00 International Rugby Union (HD). 8.00 Game Changers (HD). 9.00 Football Gold (S). 9.15 Football Gold (S). 9.30 The Sunday Supplement (HD). 11.00 Goals on Sunday (HD). 12.30 Live Anglo-Welsh Cup Rugby Union (HD). 3.00 FL72 Live (HD). Bradford City v Coventry City (Kick-off 3.30pm).

7.00 Great TV Mistakes (R,S). Mishaps from Fawlty Towers, Friends and EastEnders. 7.30 Doctor Who: Greatest Monsters and Villains Weekend Joel Dommett reveals the top three villains, as voted for by the viewing public. Last in the series. (S). 10.00 Family Guy (S). 10.25 The Revolution Will Be Live Darts, 7pm Televised (S). 10.55 American Dad! 6.00 Anglo-Welsh Cup (R,S). Rugby Union (HD). Bath 11.20 American Dad! v Exeter Chiefs. (R,S). 11.40 Snow, Sex and Suspicious Parents (R,S). 7.00 Live Darts (HD). The 12.40 The Revolution Grand Slam of Darts. Will Be Televised (R,S). Coverage from 1.10 Staying In with Greg Wolverhampton Civic and Russell (R,S). 1.40 Hall, as the prestigious Sweat the Small Stuff tournament concludes With James Acaster and with the final. Raymond Chris Ramsey. (R,S). 2.10 van Barneveld and Some Girls (R,S). 3.40 Michael van Gerwen C-Bomb (R,S). were involved in the final last year, with Barney edging a tight contest 16-14.

11.00 Nighty Night. Cath’s 11.00 The Inbetweeners (R). 11.00 A Young Doctor’s 11.00 Darts (HD). The Grand therapist throws a beach The friends go clubbing Notebook (R,S,HD). Slam of Darts. Action party. in London. Comedy drama, starring from Wolverhampton Daniel Radcliffe and Jon 11.40 Nighty Night. Jill’s Civic Hall, as the 11.35 Drifters (R,HD). Meg Hamm. world falls apart. prestigious tournament shocks the girls. Comedy, Comedy, with Julia Davis concluded with the final. with Jessica Knappett 11.30 Road Wars (R,S). and Angus Deayton. and Lydia Rose Bewley.

12.40 Utterly Outrageous Celebrity Frock Ups (R). Denise Van Outen’s favourite fashion slipups. 1.40 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). 2.25 Life’s Funniest Moments (R). Candid moments captured on camera. 2.50 Teleshopping. Home shopping. 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.10 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Sheldon tries to extend his lifespan. 12.35 Misfits (R,HD). 1.40 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.05 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.30 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.50 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 3.10 Bob’s Burgers (R,HD). 3.35 Hollyoaks (R,HD).

RADIO

11.35 Tricked (R,HD). TOWIE stars James ‘Arg’ Argent and James ‘Diags’ Bennewith take a terrifying taxi ride. Last in the series.

Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester Radio 3 7.00am Breakfast 9.00 News 9.03 Sunday Morning with James Jolly Noon Private Passions 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 The Early Music Show 3.00 Choral Evensong 4.00 The Choir 5.30 Words and Music 6.45 Britten 100 Sunday Feature: Cultural Conchies 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert 10.00 Drama on 3: Bix: Singing the Blues 11.30 BBC National Orchestra of Wales 12.30am Through the Night Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Bells on Sunday 5.45 Profile 6.00 News Headlines 6.05 Something

Understood 6.35 Living World 6.57 Weather 7.00 News 7.07 Sunday Papers 7.10 Sunday 7.55 Radio 4 Appeal 7.57 Weather 8.00 News 8.07 Sunday Papers 8.10 Sunday Worship 8.48 A Point of View 8.58 Tweet of the Day 9.00 Broadcasting House 10.00 The Archers 11.15 Desert Island Discs Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue 12.30 The Food Programme 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World This Weekend 1.30 Reflections 2.00 Gardeners’ Question Time 2.45 The Listening Project 3.00 Classic Serial: The Russian Gambler 4.00 Open Book 4.30 The Echo Chamber 5.00 File on 4 5.40

7.00 Billy Budd from Glyndebourne. A performance of Benjamin Britten’s all-male opera, with a libretto co-written by EM Forster. 9.45 The Golden Age of the Tram – A Streetcar Named Desire (R). A history of trams in Britain, exploring why they became popular in cities and towns at the start of the 20th century, and discovering why some areas have reintroduced them. 10.45 The Golden Age of Canals (R). The changing face of Britain’s canals after the Second World War. 11.45 When Albums Ruled the World (R).

1.15 Paul McCartney in Concert (R). 2.15 Wings Over the World (R).

10.20 The Thick of It. The 10.00 Champions League unravelling of the keyWeekly (HD). A look worker housing policy ahead to matchday five. forces Nicola Murray and 10.30 Football Gold (S). Peter Mannion onto the Action from Arsenal v defensive. But the more Leeds United in the they spin the story, the 2002/03 season. bigger the scandal 10.45 Football Gold (S). becomes. Chelsea v Tottenham Hotspur from 1993/94.

10.00 Rude Tube (R,HD). Alex Zane presents the inaugural “Rude’lympics” – 50 memorable examples of sporting success and failure, featuring a pool towel dash and a shopping centre Base jump.

Radio 1 5.00am Seani B 7.00 Gemma Cairney 10.00 Matt Edmondson 1.00pm Huw Stephens 4.00 The Official Chart Show with Jameela Jamil 7.00 Dan & Phil 9.00 The Surgery with Aled & Dr Radha 10.00 Annie Mac Midnight BBC Introducing with Jen and Ally 2.00 Monki 4.00 Dev Radio 2 6.00am The Sunday Hour 7.00 Clare Balding with Good Morning Sunday 9.00 Steve Wright’s Sunday Love Songs 11.00 Weekend Wogan 1.00pm Elaine Paige on Sunday 3.00 Johnnie Walker 5.00 Paul O’Grady 7.00 Sunday Night with Michael Ball 9.00 Clare Teal 11.00 Don Black

BBC4 BBC4

9.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). Bradford City v Coventry City. Action from the League One encounter at Valley Parade, as the sides met for the first time since 2003.

10.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 10.30 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! (HD). New series. The latest gossip from the jungle, with guests Ferne McCann and David Haye.

12.00 Road Wars (R,S). 12.30 Road Wars (R,S). 1.00 Night Cops (R,S,HD). 2.00 Nothing to Declare (R,S). 2.30 Nothing to Declare (R,S). 3.00 Caribbean Cops (R,S,HD). 4.00 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 4.30 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD). 5.00 Crash Test Dummies (R,S,HD).

BBC3 BBC3

12.20 The Office. David Brent is in his element as the staff prove how wacky they can be for Red Nose Day – but he does not bank on being upstaged by manager Neil. 1.00 The Office. David Brent shares his management philosophy. 1.30 The Thick of It 2.00 Nighty Night 2.30 Nighty Night Profile 5.54 Shipping Forecast 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.15 Pick of the Week 7.00 The Archers 7.15 I’m Dave Podmore, Get Me Out There 7.45 A Flash of Fireflies. A Chip of Glass Ruby. By Nadine Gordimer. Abridged and produced by Gemma Jenkins. Last in the series. 8.00 Feedback 8.30 Last Word 9.00 Money Box 9.26 Radio 4 Appeal 9.30 Analysis 9.59 Weather 10.00 The Westminster Hour 11.00 The Film Programme 11.30 Something Understood Midnight News and Weather 12.15 Thinking Allowed 12.45 Bells on Sunday 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast

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1.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). Bradford City v Coventry City. 2.00 Champions League Weekly (HD). A look ahead to matchday five. 2.30 Football Gold (S). Everton v Liverpool from the 2000/01 season. 2.45 Football Gold (S). 3.00 Darts (HD). The Grand Slam of Darts final. 5.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). Radio 5 Live 5.30am The Non League Football Show 6.00 Sunday Breakfast 9.00 SportsWeek 10.00 Pienaar’s Politics 11.00 5 Live Investigates Noon The Ashes: Not Just Cricket 1.00 5 Live Sport 3.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby 5.00 6-0-6 6.30 5 Live Formula 1: 2013: United States Grand Prix 9.00 On the Money 10.00 Stephen Nolan 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 Aled Jones Noon Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen 3.00 Charlotte Green’s Culture Club 5.00 The Classic FM Chart 7.00 David Mellor 9.00 Benjamin Britten’s Women 10.00 Smooth Classics Midnight Bob Jones

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 43


Monday television&radio Monday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

RIPPER STREET 9pm, BBC1

FEAR OF FLYING: CAUGHT ON CAMERA 9pm, Channel 4

Flight is sent undercover into the Irish community in an attempt to catch an escaped bomber who has killed a prominent MP. Damien Molony stars.

For most people, boarding a plane is like catching a bus. However, for about 20 per cent of the UK population, air travel is a terrifying experience. In this one-off documentary, people who are scared of flying agree to record themselves as they confront their fears, with the support of their friends and families.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast 9.15 Neighbourhood Blues 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S,HD). 11.00 Saints and Scroungers (S,HD). 11.45 Escape to the Country (R,S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Moving On (R,S,HD). 3.00 Pressure Pad (S,HD). 3.45 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (S,HD). 4.30 Antiques Road Trip (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two 6.35 Homes Under the Hammer 7.35 Saints and Scroungers (R,S,HD). 8.20 Sign Zone: Real Rescues (R,S). 9.05 The House That £100K Built (R,S). 10.05 Swansea Market (R,S). 10.35 Click (R,S,HD). 11.00 News (S,HD). 11.30 World News (S,HD). 12.00 Daily Politics (S). 1.00 Rugby League World Cup (R,S,HD). 1.45 Coast (S,HD). 2.30 Floyd on France 3.00 Cagney & Lacey (R,S). 3.45 Are You Being Served? (R,S). 4.15 ’Allo ’Allo! (R,S). 4.45 Fred Dibnah’s World of Steam, Steel and Stone 5.15 Flog It! (R,S).

FRESH MEAT 10pm, Channel 4

THE CHOIR: SING WHILE YOU WORK 9pm, BBC2

Vod tries to break up with Javier, Howard devises a plan to humiliate JP, and a romantic weekend in the country raises troubling questions for Kingsley and Josie. Zawe Ashton stars.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S,HD). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Peter Andre’s 60 Minute Makeover (S,HD). Transforming a loft conversion in Blackpool. 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point: Lucky Stars (R,S,HD). 5.00 The Paul O’Grady Show (S,HD).

Gareth Malone looks for hidden vocal talent among the staff of supermarket giant Sainsbury’s as he continues his quest to get British workplaces singing. The revelation that the choir’s deepest bass is a big Dolly Parton fan may provide an unlikely source of unity in the group’s collection of workers.

Channel Channel 4

6.10 The Hoobs 7.00 According to Jim 7.30 Will & Grace (R,S). 7.55 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 8.55 Frasier (R,S). 10.00 Undercover Boss Australia 11.00 Beat My Build 12.00 News Summary 12.05 SuperScrimpers (R,S,HD). 12.20 Film: Winchester ’73 (S,HD) (1950). ●●●● 2.10 Phil: Secret Agent Down Under (S,HD). 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal (S,HD). 5.00 Four in a Bed (S). 5.30 Come Dine with Me (S,HD).

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 The Hotel Inspector (R,S). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Police Interceptors (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 The Mentalist (R,S,HD). 3.15 Film: Amish Grace (S) (2010). Fact-based drama, starring Kimberly Williams-Paisley. ●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD). Danni issues Chris with a second warning at work.

MasterChef: The … 8.30pm

Coronation Street, 7.30pm

Health Freaks, 8.30pm

The Gadget Show, 8pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (S,HD). 2/23. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). Sienna’s plans are jeopardised as Tom’s injury gets worse.

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Dr Bradley tells April she has the chance to become a world-class doctor. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Hosted by Alex Jones and Matt Baker. 7.30 Regional Programme (S). Followed by BBC News; Regional News

6.00 Eggheads (R,S). Quiz show, hosted by Jeremy Vine. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). Zoe Ball chats to the latest couple to be eliminated. 7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip (S,HD). 11/20. Vicky Entwistle and Shaun Williamson team up with experts Paul Laidlaw and Mark Stacey to hunt for antiques across Yorkshire.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). Marlon suspects Rhona is back on the pills. 7.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Leanne worries about Nick after he forgets to meet a supplier.

7.00 News (S). 7.55 4thought.tv (S).

7.00 Wild Things with Dominic Monaghan (S,HD). See Choices Above.

6 7 8 9

The One Show, 7pm

8.00 EastEnders (S,HD). Phil finally discovers what happened to Shirley, Denise is stunned when she finds out Ian lied to her and Lauren seeks comfort in Jake’s arms. 8.30 Fake Britain (S,HD). 15/15. The sale of dangerous fake lighters.

8.00 University Challenge (S,HD). 19/37. The second round continues. 8.30 MasterChef: The Professionals (S,HD). 9/24. Eight more contenders face an invention test.

8.00 Tales from Northumberland with Robson Green (S,HD). 4/8. How Northumberland’s border with Scotland has shaped British history. 8.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Julie’s dreams of fostering hang in the balance.

8.00 What’s Your Pension Really Worth?: Channel 4 Dispatches (S). Michael Buerk asks how prepared the nation is for retirement. 8.30 Health Freaks (S). 5/6. Possible treatments for acne, boils and hair loss.

8.00 The Gadget Show (S,HD). Judge Jules checks out four leading DJ apps in Ibiza, and Pollyanna Woodward is in Slovenia to test a hydrofoil. Plus, a look at the Nvidia Shield handheld game console. Followed by 5 News at 9.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

9.00 Ripper Street (S,HD). 4/8. See Choices Above.

9.00 The Choir: Sing While You Work (S,HD). 3/8. See Choices Above.

9.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (S,HD). 2/20. Ant and Dec watch the drama unfold as the contestants acclimatise to their jungle surroundings, and at least one of them has to take part in the dreaded Bushtucker Trial. The next edition is on Wednesday.

9.00 Fear of Flying: Caught on Camera (S). See Choices Above.

9.00 7 Days That Made the Führer (S,HD). Documentary examining pivotal moments in Adolf Hitler’s pre-Second World War adult life, from his rejection by an art academy in Vienna to his annexation of Austria.

10.00 The Wild Geese (S,HD) (1978). A corporation hoping to bring about the downfall of an African dictator hires a group of British mercenaries to free a political prisoner dangerous to the regime. However, when the company changes its plans and makes a deal with the tyrant, the soldiers and the man they have saved are left surrounded by hostile military forces with no escape route. Action adventure, starring Richard Burton, Roger Moore, Richard Harris and Hardy Kruger. See Choices Above. ●●●

11

10.00 Never Mind the Buzzcocks (S,HD). 9/13. Comedian Jack Whitehall hosts the comedy music quiz, with Johnny Borrell, Aston Merrygold, Katy B and Alex Brooker joining team captains Phill Jupitus and Noel Fielding. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD). Followed by Weather.

10.00 ITV News at Ten (S). 10.30 Regional News (S); Weather 10.35 The Agenda (S,HD). 7/10. ITV’s political editor Tom Bradby presents a discussion on the week’s main talking points, with guests from the worlds of politics and popular culture.

10.00 Fresh Meat (S,HD). 3/8. See Choices Above. 10.50 Cardinal Burns (S,HD). 3/6. Featuring a comic take on American indie films.

10

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S); Weather 10.35 Have I Got a Bit More News for You (S,HD). 4/11. Jo Brand hosts the quiz, with panellists Gyles Brandreth and John Prescott joining Paul Merton and Ian Hislop as they take the mickey out of recent news stories. 11.20 It’s a Wonderful Afterlife (S,HD) (2010). An Indian mother turns to murder in her desperation to marry off her daughter, but ends up haunted by her victims. Supernatural comedy, with Shabana Azmi and Goldy Notay. ●●

11.20 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). 1/8. Drama, starring Greg Kinnear and Katie Holmes as President John F Kennedy and his wife Jackie, charting the political crises that occurred during his term in office.

11.10 Animal Heroes (R,S,HD). 2/3. Women who serve on the front line with their dogs offer an insight into their roles, and a young Labrador accidentally swallows a live explosive.

11.25 Man Down (R,S,HD). 2/6. Dan tries to win back Naomi. 11.55 Rory Peck Awards 2013 (S). 3/4. Ahmed Farah on his shortlisted feature about a man convicted of murder.

12.55 Weatherview (S). 1.00 BBC News (S,HD).

12.05 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). John F Kennedy marries Jackie. 12.50 Africa 2013: Countdown to the Rains (R,S,HD). The rains finally arrive and the grazing animals spread out across the valley. Last in the series. 1.50 Sign Zone: Film 2013 (R,S). 2.20 Sign Zone: Dan Snow’s History of Congo (R,S). 3.20 This Is BBC Two (S). 4.00 BBC Learning Zone (S,HD).

12.05 Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 Champions League Weekly (S,HD). A look ahead to the matchday five fixtures. 3.25 ITV Nightscreen (HD). 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

12.00 The Shooting Gallery: Blame the Parents (S). Short works by Scotland-based film-makers. 12.30 Film: The Woman in the Fifth (S,HD) (2011). See Choices Above. ●●● 2.00 Nashville (S,HD). 2.45 90210 (S,HD). 3.25 SuperScrimpers’ Challenge (R,S,HD). 4.20 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 5.15 Countdown (R,S,HD).

after

12

www.stroudauctions.co.uk

12.40 Lost Heroes of World War One (R,S). The Battle of the Somme. 1.05 SuperCasino Live interactive gaming. 3.10 Slaughter at the Farm: Countdown to Murder (R,S,HD). 3.55 House Doctor (R,S). Hall and living-room makeovers. 4.20 House Doctor (R,S). 4.45 Great Artists (R,S). 5.10 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

STROUD AUCTION ROOMS Entries are now invited for our December auction

to include specialist sections of silver, jewellery, coins, watches, clocks, fine wines & spirits

And our January auction

To include ceramics, glass, ephemera & books

Free valuations every Friday & Saturday at our saleroom or at your home by appointment 44 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

WCL-E01-S2

01453 873800


WILD THINGS WITH DOMINIC MONAGHAN 7pm, Channel 5

ARROW 8pm, Sky1

Amanda Waller, a member of the Advanced Research Group United Support (Argus) arrives in Starling City and quickly makes her presence known by kidnapping Diggle. However, she has some information for him – Lyla has gone missing while chasing a lead on Deadshot in Moscow.

The actor resumes his search for unusual and interesting creatures after a mid-series break, travelling to Laos in Southeast Asia to look for the giant huntsman spider.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale (R,HD). 6.25 Coronation Street (R,HD). 7.25 Up All Night (R,HD). 7.50 Ben and Kate (R,HD). 8.10 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 8.40 Dinner Date (R,HD). 9.40 The Real Housewives of New York City (R,HD). 10.35 Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 11.30 Big Rich Texas (R,HD). 12.25 Emmerdale (R,HD). 12.55 Coronation Street (R,HD). 1.55 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R). 3 4.05 The Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 5.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (R,HD).

6.00 Switched 6.25 90210 (R,HD). 7.10 Ugly Betty 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee (R,HD). 10.00 New Girl 10.30 Mindy Project 11.00 Rules of Engagement 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 1.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 2.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1 6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 910.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 5.00 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Monday television&radio THE WOMAN IN THE FIFTH 12.30am, Channel 4

THE WILD GEESE 10pm, Channel 5

British mercenaries hired to free a political prisoner from an African state are betrayed by their employers. Adventure, with Roger Moore.

A writer working in a French hotel undergoes strange experiences after begins an affair with a guest. Thriller, with Ethan Hawke.

Gold GOLD 6.05 Last of the Summer Wine 7.05 Sykes 7.50 Bread 8.30 Last of the Summer Wine 9.50 Keeping Up Appearances 11.10 Porridge 11.50 The Return of the Borrowers 12.30 ’Allo ’Allo! 1.10 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 1.40 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 2.10 As Time Goes By 2.50 Jeeves and Wooster 4.00 Last of the Summer Wine 5.25 One Foot in the Grave

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 8.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). 10.00 Darts (HD). 12.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). 1.00 Football Gold (S). 1.15 Football Gold (S). 1.30 Darts (HD). 3.30 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). 4.00 Game Changers (HD). 5.00 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD).

Celebrity Juice, 11pm

Made in Chelsea, 10pm

Arrow, 8pm

Not Going Out, 9pm

FL72 Live, 7.30pm

6.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Humorous footage, including a Reliant Robin that flips 360 degrees.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 Yonderland (R,S,HD). A group of monks gets on the wrong side of Negatus. 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD).

6.05 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 6.35 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. Comic review of TV favourites.

6.00 FL72 Review. A roundup of recent matches, featuring all the goals from League One and League Two.

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Comical clips, featuring a quad bike with a mind of its own. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R).

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Zoey sets Ted up on a date with her naive cousin.

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer becomes a missionary. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer becomes a hippie.

7.05 The Vicar of Dibley. Geraldine tries to make the supreme sacrifice by giving up chocolate for Lent.

8.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Comedian Harry Hill narrates a selection of camcorder clips, including two musical horses and one very happy monkey.

8.00 New Girl (R,HD). Nick and Schmidt disagree over an anniversary celebration. Comedy, starring Jake Johnson. 8.30 New Girl (R,HD). Winston tries to distract a heartbroken Schmidt.

8.00 Arrow (HD). See Choices Above.

8.00 The Two Ronnies Sketchbook. Messrs Corbett and Barker reminisce about sketches including Home Rule for Ruislip, Crossed Lines and the Phantom Raspberry Blower.

9.00 Utterly Outrageous 9.00 Rude Tube (R,HD). Alex Celebrity Frock Ups Zane introduces viral (R). Denise Van Outen clips of merry mishaps counts down her 20 including a parallel favourite fashion slipparking fail marathon, ups, featuring interviews the infamous with Helen Flanagan, Wealdstone Raider, a Joey Essex, Kerry Katona, scary ice-cream van and Amy Childs and Perez a memorable television Hilton. news debut.

9.00 Strike Back: Shadow Warfare (S,HD). Letherby attacks Kamali’s home and kidnaps his daughter Esther. Meanwhile, Stonebridge, Scott and the team try to track him down and find a weakness they can exploit.

7.00 Froch v Groves – The Tactics 7.30 FL72 Live (HD). Walsall v Peterborough United (Kick-off 7.45pm). All the action from the League One clash at the Bescot Stadium, between two sides with promotion aspirations. Walsall have a realistic chance of a play-off place this season, but Posh will be more ambitious, as they look to challenge Leyton Orient and Wolverhampton Wanderers for automatic promotion.

10.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! (HD). TOWIE’s Ferne McCann and boxer David Haye join Laura Whitmore, Joe Swash and Rob Beckett to dissect all the latest news and events from the jungle.

9.00 Not Going Out. Comedy, starring Lee Mack and Sally Bretton. 9.40 Not Going Out. Encouraged by Lucy and Barbara, Lee tries speeddating. Comedy, starring Lee Mack, Tim Vine and Sally Bretton.

11.00 A Young Doctor’s Notebook (R,S,HD). Vladimir is required to conduct a double amputation. 11.30 Spartacus: Vengeance (R,S,HD).

11.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. A comic review of Life on Mars. 11.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. Comic review of TV favourites.

11.00 Froch v Groves – The Tactics. A look ahead to the super middleweight title fight between Carl Froch and George Groves. 11.30 FL72 Review

12.50 Fake Reaction (R,HD). Comedy panel show, hosted by Matt Edmondson. 1.30 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). Klaus turns to Stefan for help when Rebekah turns down his plea to stop Kol. 2.15 Keith Lemon: The Hot Desk 2.25 Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.45 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). A naval commander’s daughter is videotaped being buried alive. 1.40 Cop Squad (R,S,HD). 2.35 Road Wars (R,S). 3.05 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

12.00 Men Behaving Badly. Gary staggers home from a weekend’s creative writing course to find Dorothy in bed with Tony. 12.40 Not Going Out. Lee’s attempt to impress Lucy backfires. 1.20 Not Going Out. Comedy, starring Lee Mack. 1.50 Men Behaving Badly 2.20 Just Good Friends

12.30 SPFL Round-Up (HD). A review of the latest round of fixtures from the Scottish top flight. 1.00 Froch v Groves – The Tactics 1.30 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD). 2.30 FL72 Highlights (HD). 3.30 FL72 Review 4.30 Froch v Groves – The Tactics 5.00 Soccer AM: The Best Bits (HD).

RADIO

11.00 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). 11.00 Drifters (R,HD). Meg shocks the girls. With guests Kelly Brook, Ronan Keating and 11.35 2 Broke Girls (R,HD). Chris Ramsey. Caroline decides to use an online fundraising 11.50 Take Me Out (R). website. Comedy, Dating show, hosted by starring Kat Dennings. Paddy McGuinness. 12.05 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 1.05 Suburgatory (R,HD). 1.35 Happy Endings (R,HD). 2.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 2.25 Rude Tube (R,HD). 3.20 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 3.40 Glee (R,HD). 4.20 Life Unexpected (R,HD). 5.00 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 Radio 1’s Stories 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight Rock Show with Daniel P Carter 2.00 B.Traits 4.00 Dev Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Jeremy Vine 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Paul Jones 8.00 Jo Whiley. Including reviews of new albums by Lady Gaga and Cliff Richard. 10.00 Annie Lennox at the BBC 11.00 Jools Holland Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composer of the Week: Britten 100 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 4.30 In Tune 6.15 Opera on 3: Verdi 200 10.45 The Essay: Paris 1913 11.00 Jazz on 3 12.30am Through the Night Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 9.00 Start the Week 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 A Very Powerful Politician? (The First Year of the Bristol Mayor) 11.30 Ed Reardon’s Week Noon News

12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 You and Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 A History of Britain in Numbers 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: Two Pipe Problems 3.00 Round Britain Quiz 3.30 The Food Programme 4.00 Scallop 4.30 The Infinite Monkey Cage 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue. From the Playhouse Theatre in Weston-superMare. 7.00 The Archers. Kirsty faces an ordeal, while Shula also has a lot on her plate. 7.15 Front Row. With Michael Ignatieff. 7.45 Love and Mettle. By Andrea Earl. 8.00 Machiavelli: Devil or

Democrat? 8.30 Analysis. Roberto Unger outlines his alternative progressive agenda. Last in the series. 9.00 Shared Planet. Monty Don investigates how the Sequoia National Park in California and other wildlife areas are rethinking their boundaries, as species migrate as a result of global warming. 9.30 Start the Week. The formative years of Mahatma Gandhi. 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Lowland 11.00 Mastertapes 11.30 Today in Parliament Midnight News and Weather 12.30 Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service

WCL-E01-S2

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 The Revolution Will Be Televised (R,S). 12.40 The Ultimate Guide to Doctor Who (R,S). 2.35 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). 3.05 Staying In with Greg and Russell (R,S). 3.35 Going Native

12.15 Bouffants, Beehives and Bobs: The Hairstyles That Shaped Britain (R). 1.15 Only Connect (R). 1.45 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? (R). 2.15 Great British Railway Journeys (R). 2.45 Light and Dark (R).

7.00 Top Gear (R,S). The Lotus T125 and a demolition challenge. 8.00 The Ultimate Guide to Doctor Who (S). An in-depth look at the sci-fi show. 10.00 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). The comedian’s perspective on the news. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). Phil finally discovers what happened to Shirley. 11.05 Family Guy (R,S). Brian has a political change of heart. 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). Peter discovers Lois’s father is having an affair. 11.45 American Dad! (S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather 7.30 Great British Railway Journeys (R). 8.00 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? (R). Bob visits the hospital after injuring his foot. 8.30 Only Connect. Two teams compete for a place in the semifinals. 9.00 Light and Dark. Part one of two. How light has helped scientists uncover the universe’s secrets. 10.00 Storyville: The Spy Who Went into the Cold 11.15 Mark Lawson Talks to John le Carre (R).

STROUD AUCTION ROOMS

Entries now invited for our upcoming auctions

December 11th & 12th

10.20 Outnumbered. Auntie 10.00 The Footballers’ Angela visits the family Football Show (HD). with her new husband in Dave Jones is joined by tow and an evening out guests including provides Ben with the footballers, managers opportunity to tell and club chairmen to everyone about his sex discuss all the major education class. With stories in the week’s Samantha Bond and football news. Douglas Hodge.

10.00 Karl Pilkington: The 10.00 Made in Chelsea. Moaning of Life Spencer reveals more to (R,S,HD). Karl ends his Andy about Louise and journey with a look at her mysterious lover, differing attitudes to while Alex tries his best death. In Ghana, he to make a good attends his first-ever impression when Binky funeral and the takes him to the country accompanying parade. to meet her mother. Last in the series.

BBC3 BBC3

Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport: The Monday Night Club. Football debate and the latest sports news. 9.00 The Ashes: The Tuffers and Vaughan Cricket Show. The latest cricket news from England’s winter Ashes tour. 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Nick Bailey

to include specialist sections of silver, jewellery, watches, clocks, fine wines & spirits

January 15th & 16th

Ceramics and glass; books; ephemera including advertising and memorabilia; binoculars, telescopes and photography; scientific instruments; weights and scales.

February 12th & 13th

Asian and tribal Art; textiles; toys; musical instruments and rare vinyl; fine furniture

March 12th & 13th

Jewellery; silver; watches and clocks; coins and stamps; paintings and pictures Free valuations every Friday & Saturday at our saleroom or at your home by appointment

www.stroudauctions.co.uk

01453 873800

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 45


Tuesday television&radio Tuesday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

LAST TANGO IN HALIFAX 9pm, BBC1

LIVE INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL 7.30pm, ITV

England v Germany (Kick-off 8.00pm). Adrian Chiles is joined by Michael Ballack and Lee Dixon to present coverage of the friendly international at Wembley Stadium, as the sides meet for the first time since the 2010 World Cup. Commentary by Clive Tyldesley and Andy Townsend.

Alan regains consciousness after his heart scare, and he and Celia make a momentous decision. Comedy drama, starring Anne Reid.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast 9.15 Neighbourhood Blues (S,HD). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (S,HD). 11.00 Saints and Scroungers (S,HD). 11.45 Escape to the Country (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S,HD). 1.00 News (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Moving On (R,S,HD). 3.00 Pressure Pad (S,HD). 3.45 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (S,HD). 4.30 Antiques Road Trip (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 6.35 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S,HD). 7.35 Saints and Scroungers (R,S,HD). 8.20 Sign Zone 10.35 HARDtalk (R,S,HD). 11.00 News (S,HD). 11.30 News (S,HD). 12.00 Daily Politics (S). 1.00 Cash in the Attic (R,S). 1.45 Coast (S,HD). 2.30 Floyd on France (R,S). 3.00 Cagney & Lacey (R,S). 3.45 Are You Being Served? (R,S). 4.15 ’Allo ’Allo! (R,S). 4.45 Fred Dibnah’s World of Steam, Steel and Stone (R,S). 5.15 Flog It! (R,S).

HEBBURN 10pm, BBC2

MASTERS OF SEX 10pm, Channel 4

Pauline is bullied at work by a fellow estate agent, Dot moves back in with the family and Jack finally gets the opportunity to clinch a book deal. Comedy, starring Gina McKee.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Peter Andre’s 60 Minute Makeover (S,HD). A foster parent’s lounge and bedroom are given a facelift. 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point: Lucky Stars (R,S,HD). 5.00 The Paul O’Grady Show (S,HD).

The researchers become participants in their own study, but Johnson fears their work may be interfering with Masters’ home life. Ethan struggles to let go of past feelings and comes under pressure from Libby to resume her fertility treatment in secret. American drama, starring Michael Sheen.

Channel Channel 4

7.05 According to Jim 7.30 Will & Grace 7.55 Everybody Loves Raymond 9.00 Frasier 10.00 Undercover Boss Australia 11.00 Beat My Build (S,HD). 12.00 News (S). 12.05 River Cottage Bites (R,S,HD). 12.20 Film: Guadalcanal Diary (S) (1943). See Choices Above. ●●●● 2.10 Phil: Secret Agent Down Under (S,HD). 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal (S,HD). 5.00 Four in a Bed (S). 5.30 Come Dine with Me

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 The Hotel Inspector (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Ben Fogle’s Animal Clinic (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 NCIS (R,S). Gibbs and his team investigate the bizarre death of a Marine. 3.15 Film: Christmas in Canaan (S) (2009). Drama, with Jaishon Fisher and Zak Ludwig. ●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD).

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

6.00 The Simpsons (S,HD). 3/23. Marge campaigns against a combat sport. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). Browning’s body is finally uncovered.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). Paddy ignores Marlon’s wishes and decides to take Leo home. 7.30 Live International Football (S,HD). England v Germany (kick-off 8.00pm). Adrian Chiles is joined by Michael Ballack and Lee Dixon to present coverage of the friendly international at Wembley Stadium, as the sides meet for the first time since the 2010 World Cup. While England were largely outplayed on that occasion and lost 4-1, the match will be remembered most for Frank Lampard’s shot onto the crossbar that bounced down into the German goal, with the officials’ failure to see it leading to renewed calls for the introduction of goal-line technology. Commentary by Clive Tyldesley and Andy Townsend. See Choices Above.

7.00 News (S). 7.55 4thought.tv (S).

7.00 Jungle Babies: Tarsier Tails (S,HD). 7/8. 7.30 The Dog Rescuers (S,HD). Kate Fletcher and Becky London make a shocking discovery. Followed by 5 News Update.

8.00 Obsessive Compulsive Cleaners (S). 4/8. A hoarder receives help from a civil servant who gets through nearly 70 bottles of bleach a month. Plus, a woman who shares her home with up to 10 dogs at any one time.

8.00 Cowboy Builders (S,HD). Dominic Littlewood and Melinda Messenger help Kevan and Alison Bowles from Bottisham, near Cambridge, who paid over the odds for a new home near relatives that was left unfinished. Followed by 5 News at 9.

9.00 The Sound of Musicals (S). 2/4. See Choices Above.

9.00 The Mentalist (S,HD). 4/22. Lisbon and Jane are called in by FBI Agent Reede Smith to investigate the death of financier Benjamin Marx, who was on a list of Red John suspects full of red herrings that was stolen from Jane’s home.

The Mentalist, 9pm 6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Evelyn is desperate to get back to the lodge. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut, 11pm

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

The Paul O’Grady Show, 5pm

6.00 Eggheads (R,S). Quiz show. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). Zoe Ball is joined by the couple who narrowly avoided elimination on Sunday. 7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip (S,HD). 12/20. Judith Chalmers competes against her son Mark Durden-Smith.

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Live chat and topical reports, presented by Matt Baker and Alex Jones. 7.30 EastEnders (S,HD). Followed by BBC News; Regional News. 8.00 Holby City (S,HD). 6/52. Chrissie is overwhelmed with the emotion of the past few months and does not know what she wants any more. Meanwhile, Arthur stands up to Malick when he spirals out of control.

8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals (S,HD). 10/24. Four of the eight chefs from yesterday’s heat return to face a skills test in which they must create a savoury sabayon sauce and use it to make a glaze for seafood.

9.00 Last Tango in Halifax (S,HD). 1/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 Strange Days: Cold War Britain (S,HD). 2/3. Dominic Sandbrook examines the frontline of the conflict in the late 1950s and early 1960s when a prosperous British state based on consumerism was pitched against the Soviet ideal of communism.

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S). Followed by National Lottery Update. 10.35 Imagine – Turning the Art World Inside Out (S,HD). 4/7. With huge success at recent exhibitions in Venice, London and Paris, interest in outsider art has never been higher. But what is it exactly?

10.00 Hebburn (S). 2/6. See Choices Above. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD). Followed by Weather.

10.10 ITV News and Weather (S). 10.40 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.45 International Football Highlights (S,HD). England v Germany. Action from the friendly international at Wembley Stadium, as the sides met for the first time since the 2010 World Cup. Presented by Adrian Chiles.

10.00 Masters of Sex (S,HD). 7/12. See Choices Above.

10.00 Castle (S,HD). 8/24. Beckett and Castle investigate when a New York subway worker is killed in Central Park and discover a camera at the crime scene that contains evidence of a kidnapping. Crime drama, starring Nathan Fillion.

10 11

Strange Days: Cold War … 9pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6 7 8 9

Imagine … 10.35pm

11.45 The Girl in the Park (S) (2007). See Choices Above. ●●●

11.20 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). 3/8. Bobby tells his father he is unsure about taking on the role of Attorney General, and John’s advisers urge him to launch the Bay of Pigs invasion. Drama, starring Barry Pepper.

11.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show USA (S). The host takes his successful talk show stateside, where he invites American guests to air their differences, and dispenses his own judgment on the situation.

11.10 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (S,HD). 7/9. With Andrew Flintoff, Lorraine Kelly, Josh Widdicombe and Rob Beckett. 11.55 Random Acts (S). Short film featuring a fire-breathing circus act.

11.00 Body of Proof (R,S,HD). 8/9. Megan seeks the help of her estranged mother Joan to track down the hit-and-run driver responsible for killing a Philadelphia homicide detective.

1.30 Weatherview (S). 1.35 BBC News (S,HD).

12.05 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). JFK prepares for the possibility that Premier Khrushchev may try to seize control of Berlin after Russian troops move into the city, and Bobby forms the Organised Crime Division. 12.50 The Choir: Sing While You Work (R,S,HD). 1.50 Sign Zone: Stephen Fry: Out There (R,S). 2.50 This Is BBC Two (S). 3.55 BBC Learning Zone

12.30 Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 Loose Women (R,HD). With Gareth Malone and the Backstreet Boys. 3.45 ITV Nightscreen (HD). 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S,HD). Guests air their differences.

12.00 Poker (S). Action from the Pokerstars.com & Monte Carlo Casino Grand Final. 1.00 KOTV Boxing Weekly (S). 1.30 Volleyball (S). 2.25 FIA GT Blancpain Endurance Season Review (R,S). 3.20 SuperScrimpers’ Challenge (R,S,HD). 4.10 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 4.50 Countdown (R,S,HD). 5.35 Baking Mad with Eric Lanlard (R,S,HD).

12.00 Slaughter at the Farm: Countdown to Murder (R,S,HD). 12.50 SuperCasino Live interactive gaming. 3.05 Battle Scarred: Nightmare on Civvy Street (R,S,HD). 3.55 House Doctor (R,S). Bedroom and bathroom makeovers. 4.20 House Doctor (R,S). 4.45 Great Artists (R,S). 5.10 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

after

12

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STROUD AUCTION ROOMS Entries are now invited for our March auction

to include jewellery; silver; watches and clocks; coins and stamps; paintings and pictures Free valuations every Friday & Saturday at our saleroom or at your home by appointment 46 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

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THE SOUND OF MUSICALS 9pm, Channel 4

RULES OF ENGAGEMENT 9pm, E4

Cameras go behind the scenes with Cameron Mackintosh as he stages a revival of circus spectacular musical Barnum. Plus, productions of Happy Days – A New Musical and Mamma Mia!

Brenda enlists Jeff and Audrey’s help when she does the catering for an event at Columbia University, but it seems the guests are more impressed with Jeff’s bartending skills than his wife’s waitressing. Comedy, with Megyn Price, Patrick Warburton, Oliver Hudson, David Spade and Bianca Kajlich.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale (R,HD). 6.25 Coronation Street (R,HD). 7.25 Union J: The Hot Desk (R,HD). 7.35 Up All Night (R,HD). 8.00 Ben and Kate (R,HD). 8.25 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 8.55 Dinner Date (R,HD). 9.55 The Real Housewives of New York City (R,HD). 10.55 The Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 11.55 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 12.25 Emmerdale (R,HD). 12.55 Coronation Street (R,HD). 1.55 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R). 4.05 The Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 5.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (R,HD).

6.00 Switched (R). 6.25 90210 (R,HD). 7.10 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee (R,HD). 10.00 New Girl (R,HD). 10.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 11.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 1.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 2.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1 6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,HD). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Tuesday television&radio THE GIRL IN THE PARK 11.45pm, BBC1

GUADALCANAL DIARY 12.20pm, Channel 4

Drama, with Sigourney Weaver, Kate Bosworth, Alessandro Nivola, Keri Russell, David Rasche, Elias Koteas and Maury Ginsberg.

Gold GOLD 6.10 Sykes 6.45 Bread 7.35 Sykes 8.15 Bread 8.50 ’Allo ’Allo! 9.30 As Time Goes By 10.10 Last of the Summer Wine 11.30 One Foot in the Grave 12.10 Ever Decreasing Circles 12.50 ’Allo ’Allo! 1.25 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 2.25 As Time Goes By 3.00 Only Fools and Horses 3.50 Last of the Summer Wine 5.05 The Vicar of Dibley

Second World War drama, based on the book by Richard Tregaskis, starring Preston Foster, Anthony Quinn and Lloyd Nolan.

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 Froch v Groves – The Tactics 9.30 FL72 Review 10.30 The Footballers’ Football Show (HD). 11.30 SPFL (HD). 12.00 FL72 Review 1.00 Froch v Groves – The Tactics 1.30 Soccer AM (HD). 2.30 FL72 Review 3.30 FL72 Highlights (HD). 4.30 Froch v Groves – The Tactics 5.00 The Footballers’ Football Show (HD).

The Vampire Diaries, 9pm

The IT Crowd, 10pm

Revolution, 9pm

Miranda, 9.40pm

Live Football, 7.30pm

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). Potential suitors woo a single man from Brighton. Narrated by Charlotte Hudson.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Amy is disappointed by Sheldon.

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). Frankie and Axl fall out over the latter’s graduation party plans. 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S).

6.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp A quirky look at Lemur Island, Wags’ Boutique and Lewis. 6.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp

6.00 Football Gold (S). 6.15 Football Gold (S). Classic action. 6.30 Sportswomen (HD).

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Featuring the ultimate drooling dog. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R).

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). A shocking accusation places Joe and Lindsey’s wedding in jeopardy. 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Bart sees into the future. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Lisa enters a singing competition.

7.00 You, Me & Them 7.40 Outnumbered Auntie Angela introduces her new husband to the family. With Samantha Bond.

8.00 100% You’ve Been Framed! (R). Harry Hill narrates a selection of viewer-submitted comical clips featuring the farmyard, stage performances and holidays.

8.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Barney tries to help Ted find a date. 8.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). The friends compete in a scavenger hunt.

8.00 All Aboard: East Coast Trains (HD). The documentary exploring the work of East Coast rail employees continues with a look at how well the staff members get along with one another.

8.20 Only Fools and Horses The Trotters meet a pregnant German woman who is in need of help, so Del-Boy becomes her saviour and plans to make himself money at the same time.

7.00 Behind the Ropes – Froch 7.30 Live International Football (HD). Sweden v Portugal (kick-off 7.45pm). Coverage of the second leg of the World Cup play-off at the Friends Arena in Solna, where one of the remaining places at next year’s finals in Brazil is decided.

9.00 Revolution (R,S,HD). 9.00 The Vampire Diaries 9.00 Rules of Engagement Aaron speculates about (HD). Damon and Elena (HD). See Choices Above. the extreme effects of try to help Stefan 9.30 Rude Tube (R). Including Nano technology, Miles through a confusing a British “fluteboxer” reconnects with a figure time – a task that ends and a drive-through from his past, and up taking Elena on an rapper. emotions run high when emotional journey of her Charlie is reunited with own. Supernatural Miles and Rachel. drama, starring Nina Dobrev.

9.00 Only Fools and Horses Del cashes in on a miracle. 9.40 Miranda Penny decides to throw a party, hoping one of the male guests will turn out to be a suitable partner for Miranda.

10.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! (HD). The latest from the Australian wilderness, featuring uncut footage and interviews with the celebrities.

11.00 A Young Doctor’s Notebook (R,S,HD). Young Vladimir feels increasingly isolated. 11.30 Road Wars (R,S,HD). Exeter police spray a youth with CS gas.

11.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp The comic presents a quirky review of TV favourites including Lemur Island, Wags’ Boutique and Lewis. 11.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp

11.00 Football Gold (S,HD). 11.15 Football Gold (HD). 11.30 Behind the Ropes – Froch Following Carl Froch as he prepares for his fight against George Groves.

12.55 Tricked (R,HD). TOWIE stars James ‘Arg’ Argent and James ‘Diags’ Bennewith take a terrifying taxi ride, and Olympic boxer Luke Campbell gets his gold medal messed with. Last in the series. 1.45 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). Damon and Elena try to help Stefan. 2.30 Teleshopping

12.30 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.25 UK Border Force (R,S,HD). 2.20 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.10 UK Border Force (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,HD). 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). Dog gets a surprise from a fugitive. 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

12.00 Men Behaving Badly Tony returns from his holiday sporting an ill-advised beard, while Gary faces an altogether larger problem – Dorothy has moved in. 12.40 Men Behaving Badly 1.15 Rev 1.45 Men Behaving Badly 2.15 Men Behaving Badly 2.45 Cr*pston Villas

12.00 International Football (HD). 1.00 Football Gold (S). 1.15 Football Gold (S). 1.30 Behind the Ropes – Froch 2.00 Football Asia (S). 2.30 International Football 3.30 Football Gold 3.45 Football Gold 4.00 Behind the Ropes – Froch. 4.30 Football Asia (S). 5.00 International Football

RADIO

11.00 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). 11.05 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). James ‘Arg’ Argent joins the comedy quiz show. 11.35 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Amy is 11.50 Take Me Out (R,HD). disappointed by Contestants include Sheldon. Comedy, twins hoping to win a starring Mayim Bialik. double date.

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 The Review Show with Edith Bowman 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight Punk Show with Mike Davies 2.00 Nihal 4.00 Dev Radio 2 9.30am Ken Bruce Noon Jeremy Vine 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo. With Terry Pratchett and Maddy Prior. 7.00 Jamie Cullum 8.00 Jo Whiley 10.00 JFK – The First Pop President 11.00 Mark Radcliffe’s Music Club Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composer of the Week: Britten 100 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composer of the Week: Britten 100 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert 10.00 Night Waves 10.45 The Essay: Paris 1913 11.00 Late Junction 12.30am Through the Night Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 The Politics of Architecture 9.30 15 by 15 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape

Letters 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 Shared Planet 11.30 Curlew River Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 Call You and Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 A History of Britain in Numbers 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: Two Pipe Problems 3.00 The Kitchen Cabinet 3.30 Mastertapes 4.00 Spin the Globe 4.30 A Good Read 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 It’s Your Round. With Rufus Hound, Roisin Conaty, Alex Horne and Paul Sinha. Last in the series. 7.00 The Archers. Dan is prepared to talk. 7.15 Front Row 7.45 (LW) Love

and Mettle 7.45 (FM) Love and Mettle 8.00 Gettysburg. James Naughtie examines the relevance of Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 political speech – the Gettysburg Address, which he delivered while standing in a field in Pennsylvania. 8.40 In Touch 9.00 All in the Mind. The second of three programmes celebrating the show’s 25th anniversary. 9.30 The Politics of Architecture. Jonathan Glancey explores what influences the design of buildings. 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Lowland 11.00 The Infinite Monkey Cage 11.30 Today in Parliament Midnight News 12.30 Book of the

WCL-E01-S2

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 Snow, Sex and Suspicious Parents (R,S). 1.10 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 1.40 The Revolution Will Be Televised (R,S). 2.10 Staying In with Greg and Russell (R,S). 2.40 The Cariad Show (R,S). 3.00 Snow, Sex and Suspicious Parents (R,S).

12.55 Great British Railway Journeys (R). 1.25 Colouring Light: Brian Clarke – An Artist Apart (R). 2.25 Cathedrals

7.00 Don’t Tell the Bride (R,S). An eccentric groom plans his wedding. 8.00 Gavin & Stacey (R,S). Nessa goes into labour a month early. 8.30 World’s Craziest Fools (R,S). Internet clips and home video footage, presented by Mr T. 9.00 Snow, Sex and Suspicious Parents (S). 10.00 Sweat the Small Stuff (S). With Ana Matronic. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). 11.45 American Dad! (S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Great British Railway Journeys (R). Michael Portillo sets off on a journey from Oxford toward South Wales. 8.00 Natural World: The Himalayas (R). How animals cope with mountain life in the Himalayas. 9.00 Cathedrals. Richard Alwyn visits Wells Cathedral in Somerset. 10.00 Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (R). Classic Seventies espionage drama. 10.50 Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (R). Smiley covers some old ground. 11.40 Storyville: The Spy Who Went into the Cold (R).

STROUD AUCTION ROOMS

NO SALE NO FEE ONLINE BIDDING WHY ACCEPT LESS?

10.20 Mrs Brown’s Boys 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles 10.00 Behind the Ropes – 10.00 The IT Crowd (R). Jen Dermot’s pre-marriage (R,S,HD). Kensi and Froch Following Carl tries to escape Bill nerves get the better of Deeks investigate when Froch as he prepares for Crouse’s amorous him and he locks himself a radical terrorist his super middleweight advances, while Roy also away in a cupboard, so it organisation notorious title fight against George struggles to fend off an is up to Agnes, Father for orchestrating a series Groves, which is set to admirer. Comedy, with Quinn and best man of bombings in the take place in Manchester. Katherine Parkinson. Buster to try to calm him 1970s seems to have 10.30 Football Gold (S). 10.30 The IT Crowd (R). Moss down. Comedy, starring re-emerged. Starring and Roy display curious 10.45 Football Gold (S). Brendan O’Carroll. Daniela Ruah. symptoms.

12.00 Misfits (R,HD). Rudy’s alter ego becomes more of his own person. 1.05 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 1.35 2 Broke Girls (R,HD). 2.05 The IT Crowd (R). 2.30 The IT Crowd (R). 2.55 Rude Tube (R). 3.20 Bob’s Burgers (R,HD). 3.45 Glee (R,HD). 4.25 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

BBC3 BBC3

Week: The Screwtape Letters 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport 8.00 5 Live Sport: International Football 2013-14 10.00 5 Live Sport: Final Whistle 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 9.00am John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive. With John Brunning. 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Nick Bailey

Can you afford not to sell with us?

A large twin handled Royal Worcester vase decorated with 'wading storks', signed A Lewis, sold for £2,000

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SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 47


Wednesday television&radio Wednesday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

FILM 2013 11.05pm, BBC1

NIGEL AND ADAM’S FARM KITCHEN 8pm, BBC1

Claudia Winkleman and Danny Leigh review the latest releases, including Jennifer Lawrence in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, the sequel to the hit of 2012.

Nigel Slater and Adam Henson join forces to grow and cook Britain’s favourite food from a working farm in the Cotswolds, taking their lead from the top 50 buys on UK shoppers’ supermarket lists. The duo begin by looking at how the growth of convenience food has led to a decline in traditional cooking.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast 9.15 Neighbourhood Blues (S,HD). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S,HD). 11.00 Saints and Scroungers (S,HD). 11.45 Escape to the Country (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S,HD). 1.00 BBC News; Weather (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Moving On (R,S,HD). 3.00 Pressure Pad 3.45 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (S,HD). 4.30 Antiques Road Trip (S,HD). 5.15 Pointless (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 6.30 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S,HD). 7.30 Saints and Scroungers (R,S,HD). 8.15 Sign Zone 11.00 BBC News (S,HD). 11.30 Daily Politics (S). 1.00 Lifeline (R,S,HD). 1.10 The A to Z of TV Gardening (S). 1.30 Coast (R,S,HD). 2.30 Floyd on France (R,S). 3.00 Cagney & Lacey (R,S). 3.45 Are You Being Served? (R,S). 4.15 ’Allo ’Allo! (R,S). 4.45 Fred Dibnah’s World of Steam, Steel and Stone (R,S). 5.15 Flog It! (R,S).

TUDOR MONASTERY FARM 9pm, BBC2

NAZI QUEST FOR THE HOLY GRAIL 9pm, Channel 5

Documentary examining the story of the Nazis’ quest to rediscover the lost Aryan race and retrieve their forgotten secrets – including the Holy Grail. Heinrich Himmler took charge of the project and sent archaeological expeditions to remote sites across the globe.

The team turns its attention to wool, which was the source of much of the country’s wealth in Tudor times, and Ruth Goodman uses sheep’s milk to make cheese.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S,HD). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Peter Andre’s 60 Minute Makeover (S,HD). 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). David Dickinson and his team travel to Colwyn Bay, north Wales. 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (S,HD). 5.00 The Paul O’Grady Show (S,HD).

Channel Channel 4

6.00 The Treacle People 6.10 The Hoobs 7.05 According to Jim 7.30 Will & Grace (R,S). 7.55 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 9.00 Frasier (R,S). 10.00 Undercover Boss Australia (R,S). 11.00 Beat My Build 12.00 News 12.05 Kirstie’s Vintage Home 12.25 Film: Carry On Spying (S) (1964). ●●● 2.10 Phil: Secret Agent Down Under (S,HD). 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal 5.00 Four in a Bed (S). 5.30 Come Dine with Me

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 The Hotel Inspector (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Cowboy Builders (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 NCIS (R,S). 3.15 Chinese Food in Minutes (R,S). 3.20 Film: Jane Doe: How to Fire Your Boss (S) (2007). Murder mystery, starring Lea Thompson and Joe Penny. ●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD).

Celebrity Antiques Road Trip, 7pm

Emmerdale, 7pm

24 Hours in A&E, 9pm

Ben Fogle’s Animal Clinic, 8pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (S,HD). 4/23. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). A shocking accusation places Joe and Lindsey’s wedding in jeopardy.

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Kyle takes Evelyn to see Ricky. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD). Topical debate and analysis of the day’s major stories.

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Matt Baker and Alex Jones present the live magazine show. Followed by BBC News; Regional News.

6.00 Eggheads (R,S). Quiz in which the winners of famous game shows work as a team to tackle a new set of challengers. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). 7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip (S,HD). 13/20. With Nina Wadia and Miles Jupp.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). Rishi has a heart attack. 7.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Simon is nowhere to be seen when Tina goes to pick him up from school.

7.00 News (S). 7.55 4thought.tv (S).

7.00 Emergency Bikers (R,S). Birmingham paramedics race to two serious incidents. Followed by 5 News Update.

8.00 Nigel and Adam’s Farm Kitchen (S,HD). 1/4. See Choices Above.

8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals (S,HD). 11/24. Four chefs from Monday’s heat prepare rolls, baguettes and four-plait loaves.

8.00 Mystery Map (S,HD). 1/2. See Choices Above.

8.00 Location, Location, Location (R,S,HD). 1/4. Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer revisit two families who were selling up to fund their dream business.

8.00 Ben Fogle’s Animal Clinic (S,HD). Niamh Lewis tries to determine why a prize-winning mare has become infertile, and a giant tortoise puts up a fight when Lindsey Harland attempts to fit it with a microchip. Followed by 5 News at 9.

9.00 New Tricks (R,S). 6/10. When a retrospective exhibition of murdered fashion designer Ritchie Levene’s work opens, the team is prompted to re-examine the three-year-old crime. Crime drama, guest starring Rupert Graves and Hannah Waterman.

9.00 Tudor Monastery Farm (S,HD). 2/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (S,HD). 3/20. Ant and Dec present the latest from the jungle, revealing the tears, tantrums and terror as the campers take part in Bushtucker Trials and dream of the lives they have left behind.

9.00 24 Hours in A&E (S). 2/6. Young parents Nicole and Stefian arrive in resus with their 19-month-old daughter Xah’Nae, who is unresponsive and has a high fever, and doctors fear she may have a life-threatening infection.

9.00 Nazi Quest for the Holy Grail (S,HD). See Choices Above.

6 7 8 9

New Tricks, 9pm

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S). Followed by National Lottery Update. 10.35 A Question of Sport (S,HD). 5/36. With England fast bowler James Anderson, 2003 superbike world champion Neil Hodgson, former swimmer Karen Pickering and Welsh boxer Nathan Cleverly.

10.00 The Culture Show: Paul Smith – These Are a Few of My Favourite Things (S,HD). 22/32. The fashion designer chooses the objects that sum up his life. 10.30 Newsnight (S,HD). Followed by Weather.

10.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

10.00 Gogglebox (S). 9/13. Weekly TV review programme in which some of Britain’s most opinionated and avid viewers comment on the best and worst shows of the past seven days. 10.45 Bouncers (R,S,HD). 2/3. A Colchester bouncer deals with violent behaviour on New Year’s Eve.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

11.05 Film 2013 (S,HD). 3/7. See Choices Above. 11.35 American Beauty (S,HD) (1999). Oscar-winning black comedy drama, starring Kevin Spacey. ●●●●●

11.20 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). 5/8. JFK grows concerned about civil rights protests in the South when a black student tries to gain admission to a university, and Joe Sr suffers a stroke. Drama, starring Greg Kinnear.

11.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 11.05 Stiff Upper Lips (S) (1998). An upper-class twit plots to marry off his sister to his best friend, but she is more interested in a gamekeeper. Comedy, starring Peter Ustinov. ●●●

11.50 Drifters (S,HD). 3/6. Meg gets the break she has been longing for when she is offered an internship at a local radio station, but she must seize the opportunity and make a big impact at Pennine Hits.

1.30 Weatherview (S). 1.35 BBC News (S,HD).

12.05 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). The Cuban Missile Crisis brings America and the Soviet Union to the brink of war, and Jackie discovers her husband’s affair with Washington socialite Mary Meyer. 12.50 Strange Days: Cold War Britain (R,S,HD). The effect of the Cuban missile crisis. 1.50 Sign Zone: See Hear (R,S). 2.20 This Is BBC Two (S). 3.50 BBC Learning Zone

12.50 Jackpot247 Interactive gaming. 3.00 Film: American Dreamz (S,HD) (2006). The dim-witted US president makes an appearance on a popular TV talent show, unaware one of the acts is a suicide bomber. Satirical comedy, starring Hugh Grant and Dennis Quaid. ●● 4.45 ITV Nightscreen (HD). 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

12.20 Drifters (S,HD). 12.50 Random Acts (S,HD). 12.55 Fear of Flying: Caught on Camera (R,S). 1.50 Film: Harsh Times (S,HD) (2005). See Choices Above. ●●● 3.45 SuperScrimpers’ Challenge (R,S,HD). 4.40 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 5.35 Hugh’s 3 Good Things: Best Bites (S,HD). 5.40 Countdown (R,S,HD).

10 11

after

12

www.stroudauctions.co.uk

10.00 Magnum Force (S,HD) (1973). Maverick cop Dirty Harry Callahan antagonises his superiors once more in his pursuit of a vigilante group responsible for murdering the city’s most wanted criminals. However, he is unaware that the killers are some of his fellow officers – and are prepared to see him dead to keep their secret safe. Action thriller sequel, starring Clint Eastwood, Hal Holbrook, Mitchell Ryan, David Soul and Robert Urich. See Choices Above. ●●●

12.20 The Big Game (S,HD). Poker game in which amateurs compete against worldclass professionals. 1.15 SuperCasino Live interactive gaming. 3.05 Benidorm ER (R,S,HD). 3.55 House Doctor (R,S). A bungalow in Portishead, Somerset. 4.20 House Doctor (R,S). 4.45 Great Artists (R,S). 5.10 Michaela’s Wild Challenge (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

STROUD AUCTION ROOMS

01453 873800

Stroud Auction Rooms have been achieving extraordinarily high prices in all areas including gold, silver, jewellery, watches, clocks, coins, medals, stamps, ceramics & Oriental art We use the world's number one online live auction platform to ensure that your items are seen by the right people, wherever they are in the world.

Free valuations every Friday & Saturday at our saleroom or at your home by appointment 48 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

WCL-E01-S2


MYSTERY MAP 8pm, ITV

Part one of two. Ben Shephard and Julia Bradbury investigate mysterious incidents, beginning with the Rendlesham Forest UFO sighting and a spinning statue at the Manchester Museum.

MISFITS 10pm, E4

Rudy takes Finn to the superpower support group to help him get over Jess – but a girl with a strange power becomes infatuated with Finn and goes to extreme lengths to be with him. Meanwhile, Rudy tries unsuccessfully to quash his own growing attraction to Jess.

FILM PICKS

Wednesday television&radio HARSH TIMES 1.50am, Channel 4

MAGNUM FORCE 10pm, Channel 5

An unstable Gulf War veteran’s efforts to start a new life come to nothing, driving him and an old friend to crime. Drama, with Christian Bale.

Dirty Harry goes after the vigilantes executing San Francisco’s criminals, unaware the killers are his fellow cops. Thriller sequel, starring Clint Eastwood.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.35 Holiday Airport 7.35 Up All Night (R,HD). 8.00 Ben and Kate (R,HD). 8.25 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 8.55 Dinner Date (HD). 9.55 Real Housewives of New York City (HD). 10.55 Real Housewives of New Jersey 11.55 You’ve Been Framed! 12.25 Emmerdale (HD). 12.55 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! Top Trials 1.55 Jeremy Kyle Show 4.05 Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 5.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! Top Trials (R).

6.00 Switched (R). 6.25 90210 (R,HD). 7.10 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee (R,HD). 10.00 New Girl (R,HD). 10.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 11.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 1.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 2.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 7.30 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 9.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

6.00 Sykes 6.30 Bread 7.10 Sykes 7.50 Bread 8.30 Ever Decreasing Circles 9.10 ’Allo ’Allo! 9.50 As Time Goes By 10.30 Last of the Summer Wine 11.50 Ever Decreasing Circles 12.35 ’Allo ’Allo! 1.10 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 2.10 As Time Goes By 2.50 Jeeves and Wooster 4.00 Last of the Summer Wine 5.20 Only Fools and Horses

Ocean’s Thirteen, 8pm

Crocodile Dundee II, 7.30pm

A League of Their Own, 8pm

The Vicar of Dibley, 7.40pm

What’s the Story?, 10pm

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). A woman from Glasgow takes part in the dating show. Narrated by Charlotte Hudson.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Howard takes advantage of Sheldon.

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). Part two of two. Axl struggles to pass his English exam. 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S).

6.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp A quirky review of Marbella Belles. 6.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp Quirky TV review.

6.00 FIFA Futbol Mundial 6.30 Football Gold (S). Tottenham Hotspur v Chelsea from 2007/08. 6.45 Football Gold (S)

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Harry Hill narrates camcorder calamities. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R).

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). 7.30 Crocodile Dundee II (HD) (1988). The rugged Australian adventurer sets out to save his reporter girlfriend from New York drug dealers. Comedy adventure sequel, starring Paul Hogan, Linda Kozlowski, John Meillon and Charles S Dutton. ●●●

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Bart is kidnapped by a chimpanzee. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Homer joins the power plant’s softball team.

7.00 Porridge A midday cuppa causes a stir. 7.40 The Vicar of Dibley Election fever hits the village. Sitcom, starring Dawn French.

7.00 Behind the Ropes – Groves Following George Groves as he prepares for his fight against Carl Froch. 7.30 Ringside Special (HD).

8.00 A League of Their Own (R,S,HD). With Paula Radcliffe, Chris Ashton and Richard Ayoade.

8.20 Miranda Penny decides to throw a party, hoping one of the male guests will turn out to be a suitable partner for Miranda, who tries to get out of attending the event.

8.30 Ringside Special (HD). James DeGale v George Groves. Action from the 2011 British Super Middleweight title bout at the O2 in London.

9.45 Rude Tube (R). Series showcasing the most popular internet videos of all time and interviewing the people who create them, presented by Alex Zane.

9.00 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life (R,S,HD). Karl ends his journey with a look at differing attitudes to death. In Ghana, he attends his first-ever funeral and the accompanying parade. Last in the series.

9.00 You, Me & Them A ghost from Lauren’s past returns and ruins Ed and Clive’s snooker night. 9.40 Mrs Brown’s Boys Dermot gets cold feet in the run-up to his wedding. Comedy, with Brendan O’Carroll.

9.30 Behind the Ropes – Groves Following George Groves as he prepares for his super middleweight title fight against Carl Froch, which is set to take place in Manchester.

8.00 Ocean’s Thirteen (HD) (2007). Danny Ocean rounds up his band of crooks for one last heist. Gang member Reuben has been left traumatised and in a coma after being double-crossed by crooked casino owner Willy Bank, and Danny decides that payback is in order. He plans a scheme that will leave Bank penniless, but needs the help of an old enemy. Comedy, with George Clooney. ●●●

Sky1 Sky1

Gold GOLD

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 Behind the Ropes – Froch 9.30 International Football (HD). 10.30 Football Gold (S). 10.45 Football League Gold (HD). 11.00 Behind the Ropes – Froch 11.30 Football Asia (S). 12.00 International Football (HD). 1.00 Behind the Ropes – Froch. 1.30 Game Changers (HD). 2.30 International Football (HD). 3.30 Behind the Ropes – Froch 4.00 Football Gold (S) 4.15 Football Gold (S) 4.30 International Football (HD) 5.30 Behind the Ropes – Froch

10.00 Strike Back: Shadow Warfare (R,S,HD). Letherby attacks Kamali’s home and kidnaps his daughter Esther. Military action drama, starring Rhona Mitra, Zubin Varla and Robson Green.

10.20 Blackadder Goes Forth 10.00 What’s the Story? (HD). Capt Blackadder takes a Sarah-Jane Mee presents break from the trenches a discussion show while hunting for a spy focusing on recent sports in a hospital, and will developments. not let an obvious suspect cut his holiday short. Comedy, guest starring Miranda Richardson.

11.30 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). 11.05 Made in Chelsea (R). Alex meets Binky’s Keith Lemon and mother. regular team captains Holly Willoughby and Fearne Cotton are joined on the comedy quiz show by American Pie star Jason Biggs.

11.00 A Young Doctor’s Notebook (R,S,HD). Young Vladimir vows to make a clean start. Last in the series. 11.30 Cop Squad (R,S).

11.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 11.00 Sporting Heroes: Gary The quirky comic takes a Newbon Interviews characteristically surreal Martin Johnson (S,HD). look at Bear Grylls’ An interview with the extreme antics in Born former rugby union star. Survivor. 11.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp

12.20 Take Me Out (R,HD). A plasterer, a student, a van driver and a furniture designer take part. 1.25 Lemon La Vida Loca (R,HD). Keith begins to date a former Pussycat Dolls member. 2.05 Life’s Funniest Moments (R). Candid moments captured on camera. 2.30 Teleshopping

12.30 Road Wars (R,S,HD). 1.25 UK Border Force (R,S,HD). Officers in Calais search lorries for illegal immigrants. 2.20 Road Wars (R,S,HD). 3.10 UK Border Force (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 4.30 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R,S). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

12.00 Yes, Prime Minister Jim must make some unusual arrangements to secure the loan from Kumranistan. Comedy, starring David Haig. 12.40 Rev 1.15 The Comic Strip Presents: Beat Generation 1.45 Men Behaving Badly 2.15 Just Good Friends 2.45 Cr*pston Villas

RADIO

10.30 I’m a Celebrity Get 10.00 Misfits (HD). See Me Out of Here Now! Choices Above. (HD). Uncut footage from the jungle and interviews with the celebrities, with TOWIE star Ferne McCann and singer Brian McFadden. Laura Whitmore and Joe Swash present.

12.10 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 12.40 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 1.10 Suburgatory (R,HD). 1.40 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.05 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 2.25 Bob’s Burgers (R,HD). 2.50 Glee (R,HD). 3.30 Life Unexpected (R,HD). 4.15 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 3.30 The Official Chart Update 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 My Playlist 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight Huw Stephens 2.00 Benji B Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Jeremy Vine 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo. Music and entertainment. 7.00 The Folk Show with Mark Radcliffe 8.00 Jo Whiley 10.00 The People’s Songs 11.00 Trevor Nelson’s Soul Show Midnight Janice Long

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composer of the Week: Britten 100 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 3.30 Choral Evensong 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composer of the Week: Britten 100 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert 10.00 Free Thinking 10.45 The Essay: Paris 1913 11.00 Late Junction 12.30am Through the Night Radio 4 5.30am News Briefing 5.43 Prayer for the Day 5.45 Farming Today 5.58 Tweet of the Day 6.00 Today 8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 Midweek 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 10.00 Woman’s

Hour 11.00 Batting for the Middle Kingdom 11.30 Hard to Tell Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 You and Yours 12.57 News and Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 A History of Britain in Numbers 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: Ten Lessons in Love 3.00 Money Box Live 3.30 All in the Mind 4.00 Thinking Allowed 4.30 The Media Show 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 Tom Wrigglesworth’s Hang-Ups. Tom’s father becomes engrossed in putting together their family tree. Last in the series. 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front Row 7.45

Love and Mettle. By Andrea Earl. 8.00 The Moral Maze. Michael Buerk is joined by Michael Portillo, Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips and Kenan Malik for a debate on the ethical issues behind the week’s news. 8.45 Four Thought 9.00 Frontiers 9.30 Midweek 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Lowland 11.00 Before They Were Famous 11.15 Irish Micks and Legends 11.30 (LW) Test Match Special 11.30 (FM) Today in Parliament Midnight (FM) News 12.30 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 (LW) Test Match Special 1.00 (FM) As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast

WCL-E01-S2

BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 American Dad! (R,S). 12.30 Backchat with Jack Whitehall and His Dad (R,S). 1.00 Jack Whitehall Live (R,S). 2.00 Free Speech: Live from Parliament (R,S). 3.00 Hotel of Mum and Dad (R,S).

12.00 Benjamin Britten on Camera (R). 1.00 Britain’s Natural World: The Unnatural History of London (R). 2.00 Great British Railway Journeys (R). 2.30 Timeshift: A Day at the Zoo (R).

7.00 Great TV Mistakes (R,S). 7.10 Atlantis (R,S). 8.00 Free Speech: Live from Parliament (S). 9.00 Jack Whitehall Live (S). 10.00 Backchat with Jack Whitehall and His Dad (S). New series. Comedy chat show, with guests Jeremy Paxman and Danny Dyer. 10.30 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). The comedian’s perspective on the news. 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). Brian and Stewie set out to get revenge against Santa. 11.45 American Dad! (S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Great British Railway Journeys (R). 8.00 Britain’s Natural World: The Unnatural History of London (R). The capital’s secret wildlife. Last in the series. 9.00 Timeshift: A Day at the Zoo. How zoos first captured the imagination of the British public. 10.00 Harlots, Housewives & Heroines: A 17th Century History for Girls (R). The domestic lives of women in Restoration England. 11.00 Frozen Planet (R).

STROUD AUCTION ROOMS

Entries now invited for our upcoming auction

February 12th & 13th to include specialist sections of Asian & tribal art; textiles;toys; musical instruments and rare vinyl; fine furniture

12.00 Behind the Ropes – Groves 12.30 Football League Gold 1.00 FIFA Futbol Mundial 1.30 What’s the Story? 2.30 Sporting Heroes: Gary Newbon Interviews Martin Johnson (S,HD). 3.30 Behind the Ropes – Groves 4.00 Football Gold (S). 4.30 FIFA Futbol Mundial 5.00 What’s the Story? Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 The Ashes: Flintoff’s Ashes Roadshow 8.30 The Ashes: Not Just Cricket 9.30 The Ashes 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert. Trinity Laban’s Young Musicians Gala, from St John’s, Smith Square in London. 10.00 Smooth Classics. With Margherita Taylor. 2.00am Nick Bailey

A pair of 19thC Chinese blue and white vases decorated with court scenes and Yongzheng mark to base sold for £2,200

Free valuations every Friday & Saturday at our saleroom or at your home by appointment

www.stroudauctions.co.uk

01453 873800

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 49


Thursday television&radio Thursday’s Television Guide TV PICKS

ANIMAL ODD COUPLES 8pm, BBC1

CHARLEY BOORMAN’S USA ADVENTURE 8pm, Channel 5

Part one of two. Liz Bonnin finds out if animals of different species can get along, asking whether an orang-utan could keep a dog as a pet.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.15 Neighbourhood Blues (S,HD). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (S,HD). 11.00 Saints and Scroungers (S,HD). 11.45 Escape to the Country (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R,S,HD). 1.00 BBC News (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Moving On (R,S,HD). 3.00 Pressure Pad (S,HD). 3.45 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (S,HD). 4.30 Antiques Road Trip 5.15 Pointless (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

The actor embarks on another epic journey, this time exploring America. He begins by exploring the lava fields of Hawaii Island and then taking to the waters off Waikiki Beach in an outrigger canoe. Charley then heads north to Alaska, where he tries to fulfil a boyhood dream of building an igloo.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 6.35 Homes Under the Hammer 7.35 Saints and Scroungers (R,S,HD). 8.20 Sign Zone: Real Rescues (R,S). 9.05 Dive WWII (R,S). 10.05 Tom Kerridge’s Proper Pub Food (R,S). 10.35 HARDtalk (R,S,HD). 11.00 News (S,HD). 11.30 World News (S,HD). 12.00 Daily Politics (S). 1.00 Cash in the Attic (R,S). 1.45 Coast 2.30 Floyd on France (R,S). 3.00 Cagney & Lacey (R,S). 3.45 Are You Being Served? (R,S). 4.15 ’Allo ’Allo! (R,S). 4.45 Fred Dibnah’s World of Steam, Steel and Stone 5.15 Flog It! (R,S).

AN ADVENTURE IN SPACE AND TIME 9pm, BBC2

BRITAIN’S SECRET TREASURES 8.30pm, ITV

Drama written by Mark Gatiss telling the story of how sci-fi series Doctor Who was first brought to the screen in November 1963. Starring David Bradley and Brian Cox.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Peter Andre’s 60 Minute Makeover (S,HD). Transforming a bedroom and bathroom. 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). Valuing antiques in Gloucester. 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (R,S,HD). 5.00 The Paul O’Grady Show (S,HD).

Mariella Frostrup visits Germany to investigate a badge that reveals the story of a massacre and a forgotten English saint, while Ekow Eshun researches the origins of an unusual 17th-century grooming aid. Presented by Michael Buerk and Bettany Hughes.

Channel Channel 4

6.35 The Hoobs (R,S). 7.05 According to Jim (R,S,HD). 7.30 Will & Grace (R,S). 7.55 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 9.00 Frasier (R,S). 10.00 Undercover Boss Australia (R,S). 11.00 Beat My Build (S,HD). 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary (S). 12.05 Kirstie’s Vintage Gems (S,HD). 12.10 Film: King Solomon’s Mines (S,HD) (1985). See Choices Above. ●● 2.10 Phil: Secret Agent Down Under (S). 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal (S,HD). 5.00 Four in a Bed (S,HD). 5.30 Come Dine with Me (S,HD).

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 The Hotel Inspector (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Stobart: Trucks, Trains & Planes (R,S,HD). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 The Mentalist (R,S). 3.15 Film: Lucky Christmas (S,HD) (2011). See Choices Above. ●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD). Imogen sees Mason kissing Rhiannon.

Celebrity Antiques Road Trip, 7pm

Britain’s Secret Treasures, 8.30pm

Bouncers, 10pm

Person of Interest, 10pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6.00 Eggheads (R,S). Quiz show, hosted by Jeremy Vine. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). A look ahead to the weekend’s action.

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

6.00 The Simpsons (S,HD). 5/23. Marge becomes a sex symbol after posing for a calendar. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD).

6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). Spencer’s behaviour becomes increasingly erratic and aggressive. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). Topical stories from around the UK. 7.30 EastEnders (S,HD). Jake has bad news for Lauren. Followed by BBC News; Regional News.

7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip (S,HD). 14/20. With chef James Martin and model Jodie Kidd.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). 7.30 Britain’s Secret Drinkers: Tonight (S,HD). Fiona Foster examines the issue of regular drinking at home.

7.00 News (S). 7.55 4thought.tv (S).

7.00 Police Interceptors (R,S,HD). Officers face one of Cumbria’s most alcohol-fuelled nights of the year. Followed by 5 News Update.

6 7 8 9

Question Time, 10.35pm

8.00 Animal Odd Couples (S,HD). 1/2. See Choices Above.

8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals (S,HD). 12/24. Six chefs battle it out in the quarter-final, preparing a dish of their own invention before four of them go on to cook two courses for a panel of food critics.

8.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). A furious Charity demands the truth from Rachel and then flies off the handle with Jai. 8.30 Britain’s Secret Treasures (S,HD). 6/8. See Choices Above.

8.00 George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces (S,HD). 5/9. The architect makes progress with his tree house, inspired by a visit to a futuristic home designed to save space, and meets a couple building a wilderness beach hut.

8.00 Charley Boorman’s USA Adventure (S,HD). See Choices Above.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

9.00 Britain’s Secret Terror Force (S,HD). John Ware reports on an anti-terrorist squad run by the British Army in the early 1970s, investigating allegations that rogue members of the unit killed innocent civilians.

9.00 An Adventure in Space and Time (S,HD). See Choices Above.

9.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (S,HD). 4/20. Ant and Dec present all the highs and lows from the past 24 hours in the Australian jungle as the campmates spend another day taking on physically and mentally demanding challenges.

9.00 Bedlam (S,HD). 4/4. See Choices Above.

9.00 Children of the Master Race (S,HD). Documentary following the stories of three people who were products of a Nazi birthing programme to create a “racially pure” generation of Aryan children.

11

10.30 Newsnight (S,HD).

10.00 ITV News at Ten (S). 10.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 The Jonathan Ross Show (R,S,HD). 6/10. With One Direction, Eminem, Forest Whitaker and Sarah Millican.

10.00 Bouncers (S,HD). 3/3. The police face crowd-control issues in Colchester, while door staff in Clacton-on-Sea deal with everything from people stripping naked to mass brawls. Last in the series.

10.00 Person of Interest (S,HD). 5/22. The Machine dispenses the social security number of an uncompromising journalist, and Reese and Finch discover there is a long list of people who would like to see her dead.

10

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 Question Time (S,HD). 11/38. Topical debate from Salford, Greater Manchester, chaired by David Dimbleby.

11.35 This Week (S). Andrew Neil, Michael Portillo and guests discuss political and parliamentary developments from the past seven days.

11.15 Weather (S). 11.20 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). 7/8. JFK and Jackie mourn the death of their newborn child.

11.40 The West Country at Westminster. Debating the issues that matter to people in the region.

11.05 24 Hours in A&E (R,S). 2/6. A couple arrive in resus with their baby daughter, who is unresponsive and has a high fever, while doctors suspect a 61-year-old woman has suffered a stroke.

11.00 Harold Shipman: Born to Kill? (R,S). 2/5. A psychological profile of the serial killer.

12.20 Holiday Weatherview (S). 12.25 BBC News (S,HD).

12.05 The Kennedys (R,S,HD). Bobby blames himself for John’s death, and President Lyndon Johnson’s popularity reaches an all-time low as war rages in Vietnam. Last in the series. 12.45 Tudor Monastery Farm (R,S,HD). 1.45 Sign Zone: Welcome to the World of Weight Loss (R,S). 2.50 This Is BBC Two (S). 4.00 BBC Learning Zone

12.05 Jackpot247 Viewers are offered the chance to participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of their sofas, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.00 Britain’s Secret Drinkers: Tonight (R,HD). 3.25 ITV Nightscreen (HD). Text-based information service. 5.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (R,S).

12.10 One Born: What Happened Next? (S,HD). 1.05 Random Acts (S). 1.10 Tutankhamun (R,S). 2.05 Unreported World (R,S). 2.30 What’s Your Pension Really Worth?: Channel 4 Dispatches (R,S). 3.00 Health Freaks (R,S). 3.30 SuperScrimpers’ Challenge (R,S,HD). 4.25 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 5.25 Countdown (R,S,HD).

12.00 SuperCasino Viewers get the chance to take part in live interactive gaming, with an entertaining mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.10 Bomb Patrol (S,HD). 3.55 House Doctor (R,S). 4.20 House Doctor (R,S). 4.45 Great Artists (R,S). 5.10 Nick’s Quest (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

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STROUD AUCTION ROOMS Entries are now invited for our January auction

to include ceramics & glass; ephemera including advertising & memorabilia; binoculars, telescopes & photography; scientific instruments; weights & scales

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50 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

WCL-E01-S2

01453 873800


BEDLAM 9pm, Channel 4

INSIDE RAF BRIZE NORTON 8pm, Sky1

The last edition of the series pays a visit to a psychiatric ward for over-65s at the South London and Maudsley institution, where patients include a woman who has forgotten her identity.

Behind the scenes at the biggest and busiest military airbase in the UK, shedding light on the work and lives of its servicemen and women. The series begins with a look at the critical cargo the compound transports on a daily basis, including a helicopter travelling to Camp Bastion in Afghanistan.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale 6.25 Coronation Street 6.55 Tinie Tempah 7.05 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 7.35 Up All Night 8.00 Ben and Kate (R,HD). 8.25 Dinner Date (R,HD). 9.25 The Real Housewives of New York City 10.55 The Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 11.55 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 12.25 Emmerdale 12.55 Coronation Street 1.25 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 1.55 The Jeremy Kyle Show 4.05 The Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 5.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (R,HD).

6.00 Switched (R). 6.25 90210 7.10 Ugly Betty 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee (R,HD). 10.00 New Girl (R,HD). 10.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 11.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 11.30 Charmed 12.30 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 1.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 2.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1 6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 9.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 4.00 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Thursday television&radio KING SOLOMON’S MINES 12.10pm, Channel 4

LUCKY CHRISTMAS 3.15pm, Channel 5

A single mother struggling to make ends meet thinks her problems are solved when she wins the lottery, only to lose the ticket before she can claim the money. A greedy construction worker offers to help her get it back in exchange for a share of the winnings. Romantic drama, with Elizabeth Berkley.

Action adventure based on H Rider Haggard’s novel, with Richard Chamberlain, Sharon Stone, Herbert Lom and John Rhys-Davies.

Gold GOLD 6.00 Sykes 6.30 Bread 7.00 Sykes 7.40 Bread 8.15 Ever Decreasing Circles 8.55 ’Allo ’Allo! 9.35 As Time Goes By 10.15 Last of the Summer Wine 11.35 Porridge 12.15 Ever Decreasing Circles 12.55 ’Allo ’Allo! 1.35 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 2.35 As Time Goes By 3.15 The Vicar of Dibley 3.55 Last of the Summer Wine 5.15 One Foot in the Grave

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 Behind the Ropes – Groves 9.30 FIFA Futbol Mundial 10.00 Sporting Heroes: Gary Newbon Interviews Martin Johnson 11.00 Total Rugby 11.30 Behind the Ropes – Groves 12.00 What’s the Story? (HD). 1.30 Behind the Ropes – Groves. 2.00 Sporting Heroes: Gary Newbon Interviews Martin Johnson (S,HD). 3.00 FIFA Futbol Mundial 3.30 Behind the Ropes – Groves 4.00 What’s the Story? (HD). 5.00 Behind the Ropes – Groves 5.30 FL72 Preview

Tricked: Favourite … 9pm

Suburgatory, 8pm

Trollied, 9.30pm

Blackadder Goes … 7.40pm

Live Victory … 7.30pm

6.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Featuring a boy snowboarding on a treadmill.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Mr Burns receives a blood transfusion from Bart.

6.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. Comic view of The Apprentice and Any Dream Will Do. 6.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp.

6.30 Ringside (HD). Boxing magazine, including highlights of recent bouts and interviews with the stars. 7.30 Live Victory Shield Football (HD). Wales v Northern Ireland (kickoff 7.35pm). Coverage of the fixture at Nantporth, Bangor, as both sides play their final match of the competition. England started as favourites to retain their title, and began with a narrow victory over Wales.

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Featuring daft dads and mischievous children. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R).

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). The day of Lindsey’s wedding arrives. 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). Three spooky tales from Springfield. 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S). Bart is knocked down by Mr Burns’ car.

7.00 Porridge. Fletcher finds three is a crowd. 7.40 Blackadder Goes Forth. Capt Blackadder hunts for a spy in hospital.

8.00 The Guide to You’ve Been Framed! (R). Harry Hill presents a compilation of clips including a dog on a slide, and a cat trying to take part in a game of table tennis.

8.00 Suburgatory (HD). 8.30 The Big Bang Theory (HD). Amy spoils one of Sheldon’s favourite films by pointing out a plot hole.

8.00 Inside RAF Brize Norton (S,HD). See Choices Above.

8.20 Yes, Prime Minister. The government faces another crisis when a coalition partner threatens to leave, while the issue of Scottish independence raises its head.

9.00 Tricked: Favourite Tricks (HD). Magician Ben Hanlin looks back at highlights from the series, including his pranks on the public and his most popular celebrity tricks.

9.00 2 Broke Girls (HD). The girls try to find a home for a stray cat, but Max decides to take it in despite Caroline’s protests. 9.30 Drifters (HD). Meg invites a new friend back to the flat.

9.00 Moone Boy (R,S,HD). Martin befriends a new boy. Steve Coogan guest stars. 9.30 Trollied (R,S,HD). Store boss Gavin gives Julie a management handbook to help her earn the respect of co-workers.

10.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! (HD). Laura Whitmore and Joe Swash present the latest gossip from the jungle, along with comedian Rob Beckett and guests Brian McFadden and Kimberley Walsh.

9.00 Only Fools and Horses. The Trotters are caught up in an attempted robbery. 9.40 Gavin & Stacey. Bank Holiday Monday sees the Essex contingent arrive for a sunny day at the beach in Barry.

9.30 FL72 Preview. A look ahead to the latest round of fixtures in the Championship, League One and League Two.

10.00 Road Wars (R,S). Police 10.20 You, Me & Them. A 10.30 Ringside (HD). Boxing 10.00 Educating Essex (R). ghost from Lauren’s past officers use unmarked magazine, including Two bubbly girls fall out returns and ruins Ed and cars fitted with on-board highlights of recent and the consequences Clive’s snooker night. video cameras, offering bouts and interviews of their argument spill Comedy, starring an insight into vehicle with the stars currently into the classroom, and Anthony Head and Eve crime and how it can be causing a stir in the ring. the teachers struggle to Myles. prevented. keep students focused on academic work and 10.30 Road Wars (R,S). Police their futures. officers combat vehicle crime. 11.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. 11.00 Road Wars (R,S,HD). 11.30 Premier League World Dog handler Darryl gets 11.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. (HD). A round-up of the a nasty surprise when he The quirky comic takes a latest news surrounding tries to break up a pub surreal look at soap the Premier League, fight in Exeter city sagas and celebrities. featuring interviews with centre. managers and players.

12.55 Plebs (R,HD). Comedy, following three young men as they pursue romance, try to hold down jobs and climb the social ladder in Ancient Rome. Starring Tom Rosenthal and Joel Fry. 1.20 Plebs (R,HD). 1.50 Life’s Funniest Moments (R). 2.15 Teleshopping. 5.45 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.00 Road Wars (R,S,HD). The Road Crime Unit tracks a car loaded with drugs. 1.00 UK Border Force (R,S,HD). 2.00 Road Wars (R,S,HD). 3.00 UK Border Force (R,S). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R). 5.00 Airline (R,S). 5.30 Airline (R,S).

RADIO

11.00 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). 11.05 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Barney With guests Mo Farah, is reluctant to sell his Example, Lisa Snowdon home. and Chris Ramsey. 11.35 The Big Bang Theory 11.50 Take Me Out (R,HD). (R,HD). 12.05 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Howard tries to avoid being sent into space. 12.40 Misfits (R,HD). 1.45 Educating Essex (R). 2.35 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 3.00 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 3.20 Bob’s Burgers (R,HD). 3.45 Glee (R,HD). 4.30 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James 7.00 Zane Lowe 9.00 In New DJs We Trust 10.00 Phil Taggart and Alice Levine Midnight The Residency: Kutski 2.00 Toddla T Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Jeremy Vine 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country 8.00 Jo Whiley. With Mary J Blige. 10.00 The Blagger’s Guide to Doctor Who 10.30 Who Is the Doctor? Midnight Janice Long 2.00 Alex Lester

Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composer of the Week: Britten 100 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 4.30 In Tune 6.30 Composer of the Week: Britten 100 7.30 Radio 3 Live in Concert: Britten 100. Martyn Brabbins conducts the BBCSSO in works by Britten, including the Quatre Chansons Françaises with soprano Elizabeth Watts, plus Mahler’s Fourth Symphony. 10.00 Night Waves. Frances Spalding and Alexandra Harris discuss Myfanwy Piper’s librettos for Britten. 10.45 The Essay: Paris 1913 11.00 Late Junction 12.30am Through the Night

Radio 4 5.30am (LW) Test Match Special 5.30 (FM) News Briefing 5.43 (FM) Prayer for the Day 5.45 (FM) Farming Today 5.58 (FM) Tweet of the Day 6.00 (FM) Today 8.00 (LW) Today 8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 In Our Time 9.45 (LW) Daily Service 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 Crossing Continents 11.30 The Songs of Molly Drake Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping 12.04 You and Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 A History of Britain in Numbers 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: Pilgrim 3.00 Open Country 3.27 Radio 4 Appeal

12.00 Men Behaving Badly A road-rage incident makes Gary look a coward. 12.40 Men Behaving Badly 1.15 The Comic Strip Presents: Bad News Tour. Spoof documentary following a heavymetal band. 1.45 Men Behaving Badly 2.15 Just Good Friends 2.45 Cr*pston Villas 3.30 Open Book 4.00 The Film Programme 4.30 Inside Science 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 Clare in the Community 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front Row 7.45 Love and Mettle 8.00 The Report 8.30 The Bottom Line 9.00 Inside Science 9.30 In Our Time 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Lowland 11.00 Andrew Maxwell’s Public Enemies 11.30 (LW) Test Match Special 11.30 (FM) Today in Parliament Midnight (FM) News 12.30 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 12.48 Shipping 1.00 (LW) Test Match Special 1.00 (FM) As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping

WCL-E01-S2

12.00 NFL – A Football Life (HD). Profiles of Reggie White and Jerome Brown, the former American football stars, who died in 2004 and 1992 respectively. 1.00 Live NFL (HD). Atlanta Falcons v New Orleans Saints (kick-off 1.25am). 4.30 Ringside (HD). Boxing magazine. 5.30 Premier League World (HD). Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 The Ashes: Breakfast 10.00 Tony Livesey Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Richard Bacon 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport 7.30 5 Live Sport. A look back at the 2003 rugby union World Cup. 9.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Boxing. A preview of Carl Froch v George Groves. 9.30 The Ashes. A look ahead to day two of the First Test. 10.00 Question Time Extra Time 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Nick Bailey

BBC3 BBC3

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 American Dad! (S). 12.30 Him & Her: The Wedding (R,S). 1.00 Backchat with Jack Whitehall and His Dad (R,S). 1.30 The Revolution Will Be Televised (R,S). 2.00 Snow, Sex and Suspicious Parents (R,S). 3.00 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 3.30 Him & Her: The Wedding (R,S).

12.10 Light and Dark (R). 1.10 Cathedrals (R). 2.10 Top of the Pops: 1978 (R). 2.50 Atlantis: The Evidence (R).

7.00 Doctor Who at the Proms (R,S). 8.15 Top Gear (R,S). 9.00 Comedy Fest Live 2013 (R,S). Part two of two. Adam Hills showcases performances from the Festival Fringe. 10.00 Him & Her: The Wedding (S). New series. Paul goes missing on the morning of his wedding. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). Jake has bad news for Lauren. 11.05 Family Guy (R,S). 11.25 Family Guy (R,S). 11.50 American Dad! (S). Roger rediscovers one of his personas.

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Top of the Pops: 1978 (R). 8.00 Atlantis: The Evidence (R). Investigating the supposedly lost island of Atlantis. 9.00 Blackfish: The Whale that Killed: Storyville. The story of a captive orca that has been involved in the deaths of three people. 10.20 West Coast Otters (R). Portrait of two otters on Scotland’s west coast. 10.30 Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child. 10.55 Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child. 11.20 Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child. 11.45 Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child.

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SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 51


Fr iday Television television&radio Friday’s Guide TV PICKS

THE GRAHAM NORTON SHOW 10.35pm, BBC1

LIVE AT THE APOLLO 9.30pm, BBC1

Matt Smith and David Tennant chat about the Doctor Who special, and Emma Thompson, Jimmy Carr and Robbie Williams perform I Wanna Be Like You.

BBC1 BBC1

6.00 Breakfast (S,HD). 9.15 Neighbourhood Blues (S,HD). 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S,HD). 11.00 Saints and Scroungers (S,HD). 11.45 Escape to the Country (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (S,HD). 1.00 BBC News (S,HD). 1.30 Regional News (S). 1.45 Doctors (S,HD). 2.15 Moving On (R,S,HD). 3.00 Pressure Pad (S,HD). 3.45 Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds (S,HD). 4.30 Antiques Road Trip 5.15 Pointless (S,HD).

FILM RATINGS ●●●●● Excellent ●●●● Very good ●●● Good ●● Average ● Poor

New series, which sees Eddie Izzard hosting an evening of stand-up at the Apollo in Hammersmith, London, treating the audience to his own brand of stream-of-consciousness humour before introducing routines by The Last Leg star Josh Widdicombe and South African comic Trevor Noah.

BBC2 BBC2

6.00 This Is BBC Two (S). 6.30 Homes Under the Hammer (R,S,HD). 7.30 Saints and Scroungers (R,S,HD). 8.15 Sign Zone: Real Rescues (R,S). 9.00 Flog It! Trade Secrets (R,S). 10.00 Question Time (R,S,HD). 11.00 BBC News (S,HD). 11.30 BBC World News (S,HD). 12.00 Daily Politics (S). 1.00 Formula 1: Brazilian Grand Prix – First Practice (S,HD). 2.45 Film: Ride Lonesome (S) (1959). ●●●● 3.55 Live Formula 1: Brazilian Grand Prix – Second Practice (S,HD). 5.35 Flog It! (S,HD).

ME, YOU AND DOCTOR WHO: A CULTURE SHOW SPECIAL 9.30pm, BBC2

RUGBY WORLD CUP WINNERS: TEN YEARS ON 10.35pm, ITV

Matthew Sweet examines the cultural impact of the sci-fi series, with contributions by Matt Smith, Mark Ravenhill and Ken Livingstone.

ITV1 ITV

6.00 Daybreak (S,HD). 8.30 Lorraine (S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (S,HD). 10.30 This Morning (S). 12.30 Loose Women (S,HD). 1.30 ITV News and Weather (S). 1.55 Regional News (S). 2.00 Peter Andre’s 60 Minute Makeover (S,HD). The singer heads to Faversham, Kent. 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal (S,HD). 3.59 Regional Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping Point (R,S,HD). 5.00 The Paul O’Grady Show (S,HD).

Martin Bayfield is joined by Lawrence Dallaglio, Will Greenwood, Matt Dawson, Ben Kay and Richard Hill to look back at England’s triumph in the 2003 rugby union World Cup, featuring extended highlights of the final and players’ tweets.

Channel Channel 4

6.10 The Hoobs (R,S). 7.05 According to Jim (R,S,HD). 7.30 Will & Grace (R,S). 7.55 Everybody Loves Raymond (R,S). 9.00 Frasier (R,S). 10.00 Undercover Boss Australia (R,S). 11.00 Beat My Build (S,HD). 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary (S). 12.05 Jamie’s 15 Minute Meals (R,S,HD). 12.30 Film: 20 Million Miles to Earth (S,HD) (1957). ●●● 2.10 Phil: Secret Agent Down Under (S). 3.10 Countdown (S,HD). 4.00 Deal or No Deal (S,HD). 5.00 Four in a Bed (S). 5.30 Come Dine with Me (S,HD).

Channel Channel 5

6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff (HD). 11.10 The Hotel Inspector (R,S,HD). 12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S,HD). 12.15 Emergency Bikers (R,S). 1.15 Home and Away (S,HD). 1.45 Neighbours (S,HD). 2.15 The Mentalist (R,S). 3.15 Film: The Nightmare Nanny (S,HD) (2013). Premiere. Thriller, starring Ashley Scott and Mekenna Melvin. ●●● 5.00 5 News at 5 (S,HD). 5.30 Neighbours (R,S,HD). The residents search for Jackson.

(R) repeat (S) subtitles (HD) highdefinition

6.00 The Simpsons (S,HD). 6/23. Bart befriends a former schoolboy prankster. 6.30 Hollyoaks (S,HD). The day of Lindsey’s wedding arrives.

7.00 Live International Rugby Union (S). Wales v Tonga (kickoff 7.30pm). Coverage of this evening’s autumn international at the Millennium Stadium, as the nations meet for the seventh time. Wales have won all six of the previous fixtures, and will expect to do so once again here, but Warren Gatland may be tempted to rest some of his star players following matches against South Africa and Argentina, with Australia still to come next weekend.

7.00 Emmerdale (S,HD). 7.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Grace and Faye run wild after Tracy gives them the keys to No 1.

7.00 News (S). 7.30 Unreported World (S). 8/8. Volunteers helping vulnerable children in Nepal’s orphanages. Last in the series. 7.55 4thought.tv (S).

7.00 Chris Tarrant Goes Fishing (S). Chris and John Horsey flyfish for pike in Chew Valley Lake, Somerset. Last in the series. Followed by 5 News Update.

8.00 Off the Beaten Track (S,HD). 3/6. Christine Bleakley returns home to Strangford Lough in Co Down. 8.30 Coronation Street (S,HD). Liz tells Tracy she is taking Amy to live with her.

8.00 Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD (S,HD). 8/22. Phil Coulson and his agents pick up the pieces in the aftermath of the events chronicled in Thor: The Dark World, but circumstances threaten to destroy a member of the team.

8.00 Stobart: Trucks, Trains & Planes (S,HD). A driver realises his trailer is too tall to go under a bridge. Followed by 5 News at 9.

9.30 Me, You and Doctor Who: A Culture Show Special (S). 23/32. See Choices Above.

9.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (S,HD). 5/20. Hunger is kicking in for the celebrities and the pressure mounts for the next contestant who must face the Bushtucker Trial to earn food for the camp. Ant and Dec present.

9.00 8 Out of 10 Cats (S,HD). With Jo Brand, Nick Helm, Jordan Stephens and Louis Walsh. 8/9. 9.30 Man Down (S,HD). 6/6. See Choices Above.

9.00 The Nazi Killers (S). Docudrama about an undercover mission by the US to strike back at Nazi Germany, in which two Jewish refugees and a former Wehrmacht officer parachuted into the Austrian Alps.

10.00 ITV News at Ten (S). 10.30 Regional News (S); Weather. 10.35 Rugby World Cup Winners: Ten Years On (S,HD). Martin Bayfield is joined by Lawrence Dallaglio, Will Greenwood, Matt Dawson, Ben Kay and Richard Hill to look back at England’s triumph in the 2003 rugby union World Cup, featuring extended highlights of the final and players’ tweets, which help shed light on the occasion. See Choices Above.

10.00 Alan Carr: Chatty Man (S,HD). 13/18. The host is joined by cockney comedian Micky Flanagan, who talks about his latest DVD Back in the Game, and actress Sheridan Smith, who discusses her new film Powder Room. Plus, music by Bastille, who perform Of the Night.

10.00 Lethal Weapon 4 (S) (1998). Mismatched LAPD detectives Riggs and Murtaugh stumble across a ship transporting Chinese immigrants into the US. As they try to get to the bottom of the organisation behind the smuggling, they find themselves up against a master criminal who is an expert in martial arts and heads a Chinese triad responsible for people-trafficking and forgery. Action adventure sequel, starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Rene Russo, Joe Pesci, Jet Li and Chris Rock. Edited for language. ●●●

Stobart: Trucks, Trains … 8pm 6.00 Home and Away (R,S,HD). A woman turns up at the diner claiming to be Chris’s girlfriend. 6.30 NewsTalk Live (S,HD).

Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD, 8pm

6.00 Regional News (S); Weather. 6.30 ITV News and Weather (S).

Coronation Street, 7.30pm

6.00 Eggheads (R,S). Quiz show, hosted by Jeremy Vine. 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing – It Takes Two (S,HD). A look ahead to tomorrow’s live show.

7.00 The One Show (S,HD). 7.30 A Question of Sport (R,S,HD). With James Anderson, Neil Hodgson, Karen Pickering and Nathan Cleverly. Followed by BBC News; Regional News. 8.00 EastEnders (S,HD). Mixed emotions come to the fore at Alfie and Roxy’s stag and hen parties. 8.30 Miranda (R,S,HD). 6/6. The joke-shop owner dreams of the perfect Christmas. Last in the series. 9.00 Have I Got News for You (S,HD). 7/11. Jack Whitehall hosts, with panellists including Janet Street-Porter. 9.30 Live at the Apollo (S,HD). 1/6. See Choices Above.

10.00 BBC News (S,HD). 10.25 Regional News (S). Followed by National Lottery Update. 10.35 The Graham Norton Show (S,HD). 6/20. See Choices Above.

10.30 Newsnight (S,HD).

10 11

Live International Rugby … 7pm

6.00 BBC News (S,HD); Weather. 6.30 Regional News (S); Weather.

6 7 8 9

Miranda, 8.30pm

11.20 Bluestone 42 (S,HD). 6/8. Nick and Simon help each other learn to dance. 11.50 The Brothers Grimm (S,HD) (2005). See Choices Above. ●●

11.00 Weather (S). 11.05 The Science of Doctor Who (R,S,HD). Professor Brian Cox examines the science behind the long-running sci-fi series.

1.40 Weatherview (S). 1.45 BBC News (S,HD).

12.05 Sign Zone: Question Time (R,S). David Dimbleby chairs a debate from Salford, Greater Manchester, as a panel of guests faces topical questions from the audience. 1.05 Sign Zone: The Paradise (R,S). Tom asks Denise to come up with innovations for other departments. 2.05 This Is BBC Two (S). Preview of upcoming programmes from BBC Two.

after

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www.stroudauctions.co.uk

12.10 Jackpot247 3.00 Film: Zeppelin (S) (1971). See Choices Above. ●● 4.40 ITV Nightscreen (HD).

11.05 Stand Up for the Week (S,HD). 4/8. Paul Chowdhry hosts the satirical comedy show. 11.55 Was It Something I Said? (S,HD). 7/8. Extended edition, with Rhod Gilbert and Josie Long. 12.40 Gogglebox (R,S). Weekly TV review programme. 1.25 Random Acts (S). Examining the meaning of legacy. 1.30 The Ricky Gervais Show (R,S,HD). 1.55 The Big C (S,HD). 2.25 2 Broke Girls (S,HD). 2.50 Don’t Trust the B**** in Apartment 23 (S,HD). 3.15 90210 (S,HD). 4.00 90210 (S,HD). 4.40 Deal or No Deal (R,S,HD). 5.30 Countdown (R,S,HD).

12.30 SuperCasino Viewers get the chance to take part in live interactive gaming, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively chat from the presenting team. 3.05 Charley Boorman’s Extreme Frontiers (R,S,HD). 3.50 Motorsport Mundial (HD). 4.20 House Doctor (R,S). 4.45 Great Artists (R,S). 5.10 Nick’s Quest (R,S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R,S).

STROUD AUCTION ROOMS

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52 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

WCL-E01-S2

01453 873800


MAN DOWN 9.30pm, Channel 4

HOLLYOAKS 7pm, E4

Brian is nominated for a business award and Dan must quickly find a tuxedo and a date to impress his ex. Comedy, with Greg Davies, Mike Wozniak, Rik Mayall and Roison Conaty.

Sienna overhears Jack advising Darren to do the right thing and break things off with her, but when the conflicted Osborne lad finds her at the folly later, she makes sure he is unable to end their relationship. Meanwhile, Robbie comes up with a malicious way to take vengeance on a neighbour.

ITV2 ITV2

E4 E4

6.00 Emmerdale 6.25 Emmerdale (R,HD). 6.55 Keith Lemon: The Hot Desk (R,HD). 7.05 You’ve Been Framed! (R). 7.35 Up All Night (R,HD). 8.00 Ben and Kate (R,HD). 8.25 Dinner Date (R,HD). 9.25 The Real Housewives of New York City 10.55 The Real Housewives of New Jersey (R). 11.55 You’ve Been Framed! 12.25 Emmerdale 1.25 You’ve Been Framed! 1.55 The Jeremy Kyle Show 4.05 The Real Housewives of New Jersey 5.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! (R,HD).

7.10 Ugly Betty (R,HD). 8.00 Charmed (R). 9.00 Glee (R,HD). 10.00 New Girl (R,HD). 10.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 11.00 Rules of Engagement (R,HD). 11.30 Charmed (R). 12.30 Hollyoaks (R,HD). 1.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). 2.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 3.00 New Girl (R,HD). 3.30 The Mindy Project (R,HD). 4.00 Rules of Engagement 5.00 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD).

Sky1 Sky1 6.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R). 7.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). 8.00 Stargate SG-1 (R,S,HD). 9.00 Hawaii Five-0. 10.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 1.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R,S,HD). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R,S,HD). 3.00 Stargate Atlantis (R,S,HD). 4.00 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). 5.00 Futurama (R,S). 5.30 The Middle (R,S,HD).

FILM PICKS

Friday television&radio THE BROTHERS GRIMM 11.50pm, BBC1

ZEPPELIN 3am, ITV

A British agent fakes his defection to Germany in a ruse to steal secrets from an airship factory. First World War adventure, starring Michael York.

Terry Gilliam’s period fantasy adventure, with Matt Damon, Heath Ledger, Jonathan Pryce, Monica Bellucci and Lena Headey.

Gold GOLD 6.00 Sykes 6.30 Bread 7.00 Sykes 7.40 Bread 8.15 Ever Decreasing Circles 8.55 ‘Allo ‘Allo! 9.35 As Time Goes By 10.15 Last of the Summer Wine 11.35 One Foot in the Grave 12.20 Porridge 1.00 ‘Allo ‘Allo! 1.40 Harry Hill’s TV Burp 2.40 As Time Goes By 3.20 Yes Minister 4.00 Last of the Summer Wine 5.20 Only Fools and Horses

SkySports1 Sky Sports 1 6.00 Good Morning Sports Fans (HD). 9.00 Ringside (HD). 10.00 The Rugby Club (HD). 11.00 Sporting Heroes: Gary Newbon Interviews Martin Johnson (S,HD). 12.00 FL72 Preview. 1.00 Ringside (HD). 2.00 Sporting Heroes: Gary Newbon Interviews Martin Johnson (S,HD). 3.00 FL72 Preview. 4.00 Premier League World (HD). 4.30 Ringside (HD). 5.30 Champions League Weekly (HD).

You’ve Been Framed!, 7pm

2 Broke Girls, 8.30pm

Moone Boy, 11pm

Gavin & Stacey, 7pm

FL72 Live, 7.30pm

6.00 Dinner Date (R,HD). A woman from West Yorkshire takes part in the dating show.

6.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Howard awaits the shuttle launch. 6.30 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD).

6.00 The Middle (R,S,HD). The Hecks panic when hapless Sue receives her learner driver’s licence. 6.30 The Simpsons (R,S).

6.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. A comic look at soaps and celebrities. 6.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp.

6.00 The Fantasy Football Club (HD). A discussion on key fantasy football issues.

7.00 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Featuring a woman using stairs as a slide. 7.30 You’ve Been Framed! (R). Featuring a man’s seal impression.

7.00 Hollyoaks (HD). See Choices Above. 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (R,HD). Barney’s dad Jerry comes to visit.

7.00 The Simpsons (R,S). 7.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). Marge tries to protect Maggie from the dangers of children’s television.

7.00 Gavin & Stacey. The gang descends on the beach. 7.40 You, Me & Them. A ghost from Lauren’s past returns.

8.00 Evan Almighty (HD) (2007). Politician Evan Baxter is recruited by God for a special mission. A great flood is coming, and like Noah before him, Evan has to build an ark to protect the wildlife of the world from the impending cataclysm. However, convincing others that the end is nigh proves difficult. Comedy, starring Steve Carell, John Goodman, Lauren Graham and Morgan Freeman. ●●●

8.00 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Amy spoils one of Sheldon’s favourite films by pointing out a plot hole. 8.30 2 Broke Girls (R,HD). Max decides to take in a stray cat.

8.00 Yonderland (R,S,HD). A group of monks gets on the wrong side of Negatus. 8.30 The Simpsons (R,S,HD). Grampa revisits his days as a feared TV wrestler.

8.20 Porridge. The inmates are shocked to discover there is a thief in their midst, so Fletcher decides to stage a mock trial to bring the culprit to justice.

10.00 I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here Now! (HD). Laura Whitmore and Joe Swash present the companion show, alongside comedian Rob Beckett. The celebrity guests are singers Brian McFadden and Kimberley Walsh.

9.00 Die Hard 4.0 (HD) 9.00 Glee (S,HD). The Gleeks (2007). Tough New York pay a musical tribute to cop John McClane is sent Katy Perry and Lady to escort a computer Gaga, and in New York, hacker to Washington Kurt, Santana, Rachel for questioning. During and Dani are impressed this routine operation he by Elliot “Starchild” stumbles on a criminal Gilbert (guest star Adam mastermind’s plan to Lambert). launch a technological terrorist attack on the US, and is forced to enlist 10.00 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life the hacker’s aid in foiling (R,S,HD). Karl ends his the evil scheme. Action journey with a look at thriller sequel, with differing attitudes to Bruce Willis, Timothy death. In Ghana, he Olyphant, Justin Long attends his first-ever and Maggie Q. ●●●● funeral and the accompanying parade. Last in the series.

9.00 The Royle Family. Festive special from 2008. Denise decides to cook the Christmas dinner after being inspired by Nigella Lawson, and invites Dave’s parents – much to Jim’s dismay.

7.00 Froch v Groves – The Final Countdown (HD). A look ahead to the fight between Carl Froch and George Groves. 7.30 FL72 Live (HD). Doncaster Rovers v Yeovil Town (kick-off 7.45pm). Coverage of the Championship fixture at the Keepmoat Stadium, featuring two clubs near the bottom of the table. Both teams have relatively decent defensive records, but goals have been hard to come by, meaning three points here for either would be a massive boost to their credentials.

12.55 Fake Reaction (R,HD). With former Pussycat Doll Kimberly Wyatt, Olympic long jump champion Greg Rutherford, comedian Jeff Leach and 2007 Big Brother winner Brian Belo. 1.40 The Vampire Diaries (R,HD). 2.25 Teleshopping. 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen (HD).

12.00 UK Border Force (R,S,HD). Documentary series taking viewers inside the UK Border Agency. 1.00 UK Border Force (R,S). 2.00 Road Wars (R,S,HD). 3.00 UK Border Force (R,S,HD). 4.00 Dog the Bounty Hunter (R). 5.00 Airline (R,S). An Elvis impersonator flies to Malaga. 5.30 Airline (R,S).

RADIO

11.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp. 11.00 Moone Boy (R,S,HD). 11.30 Premier League The quirky comic takes a Martin befriends a new Preview (HD). A look surreal look at soap boy. ahead to the weekend’s sagas and celebrities, fixtures. 11.30 Trollied (R,S,HD). Julie is subjecting them to his given the store’s unique brand of scrutiny. management handbook. 11.30 Harry Hill’s TV Burp.

Radio 1 6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Fearne Cotton 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Dev 4.00 Greg James 6.00 Radio 1’s Dance Anthems with Greg James 7.00 B.Traits 9.00 Pete Tong 11.00 Skream and Benga 1.00am Radio 1’s Essential Mix 3.00 Annie Nightingale Radio 2 5.00am Vanessa Feltz 6.30 Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce Noon Paddy O’Connell 2.00 Steve Wright in the Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo 6.00 JFK: Minute by Minute 9.00 Desmond Carrington: The Music Goes Round 10.00 The Radio 2 Arts Show with Claudia Winkleman Midnight Huey

Morgan 3.00 Richard Allinson Radio 3 6.30am Breakfast 9.00 Essential Classics Noon Composer of the Week: Britten 100 1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert 2.00 Afternoon on 3 4.30 Britten 100: In Tune 6.45 Bridcut’s Britten 7.30 Britten 100: BBC Symphony Orchestra Centenary Concert 10.00 Britten String Quartets: Quartet No 2 11.30 Classic Britten Midnight Britten by Night 1.00 Through the Night Radio 4 5.30am (LW) Test Match Special 5.30 (FM) News Briefing 5.43 (FM) Prayer for the Day 5.45 (FM) Farming Today 5.58 (FM) Tweet of the Day 6.00 (FM) Today 8.00 (LW) Today

8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament 9.00 Desert Island Discs 9.45 (LW) Act of Worship 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00 Forever Young 11.30 The Gobetweenies Noon News 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast 12.04 You and Yours 12.52 The Listening Project 12.57 Weather 1.00 The World at One 1.45 A History of Britain in Numbers 2.00 The Archers 2.15 Afternoon Drama: Lewis and Tolkien – The Lost Road 3.00 Gardeners’ Question Time 3.45 Where Were You When Kennedy Was Shot? 4.00 Last Word 4.30 Feedback 4.56 The Listening Project 5.00 PM 5.54 (LW)

BBC4 BBC4

12.10 American Dad! (R,S). 12.30 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 1.00 Snow, Sex and Suspicious Parents (R,S). 2.00 Him & Her: The Wedding (R,S). 2.30 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). 3.00 Sweat the Small Stuff (R,S). 3.30 Nick Helm’s Heavy Entertainment (R,S).

12.10 Glen Campbell: The Rhinestone Cowboy (R). 1.10 John Denver: Country Boy (R). 2.10 Country at the BBC (R). 3.10 John Denver at Wembley Arena (R).

7.00 The Ultimate Guide to Doctor Who (R,S). 9.00 Sex, Stags & Prague: Stacey Dooley Investigates (R,S). The seedier side of Prague. 10.00 Russell Howard’s Good News (R,S). The comedian’s perspective on the news. 10.30 EastEnders (R,S). Mixed emotions come to the fore at Alfie and Roxy’s stag and hen parties. 11.00 Family Guy (R,S). 11.25 American Dad! (R,S). 11.50 American Dad! (R,S).

7.00 World News Today; Weather. 7.30 Bach: A Passionate Life (R). John Eliot Gardiner examines the man behind the music. 9.00 John Denver: Country Boy. The life and legacy of singersongwriter John Denver. 10.00 Country at the BBC (R). 11.00 John Denver at Wembley Arena. A performance by the US musician. 11.40 Sounds of the 70s 2 Guilty Pleasures – Love Will Keep Us Together (R). Featuring performances by the Carpenters and Bread.

STROUD AUCTION ROOMS

Entries now invited for our upcoming auction

December 11th & 12th to include specialist sections of jewellery, silver, watches, clocks, coins, fine wines & spirits

10.20 Come Fly with Me. 10.00 Froch v Groves – The Immigration officer Ian Final Countdown (HD). Foot pulls Taaj in for 10.30 The Fantasy Football questioning and Club (HD). John Fendley Fearghal takes desperate and Paul Merson present measures to be a discussion on key nominated for Steward fantasy football issues, as of the Year. Anna Friel well as the weekend’s and Germaine Greer Premier League matches. guest star.

11.00 Celebrity Juice (R,HD). 11.35 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). Howard awaits 11.50 Take Me Out (R,HD). A the shuttle launch. dancer, a debonair Londoner, a businessman and a student take part. 12.05 The Big Bang Theory (R,HD). 12.35 Drifters (R,HD). 1.10 PhoneShop (R). 1.40 Noel Fielding’s Luxury Comedy (R,HD). 2.15 Chris Moyles’ Quiz Night (R,HD). 2.55 Meet the Parents 3.45 The Cleveland Show (R,HD). 4.05 Glee (R,HD). 4.55 Ugly Betty (R,HD).

BBC3 BBC3

12.00 Men Behaving Badly Deborah’s new student friends make Gary feel long in the tooth and turn Tony green with envy. There is only one solution – a night out at a rave. 12.40 The Royle Family 1.45 Come Fly with Me 2.15 Men Behaving Badly 2.45 Cr*pston Villas Shipping 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News 6.30 The News Quiz 7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front Row 7.45 Love and Mettle 8.00 Any Questions? 8.50 A Point of View 9.00 A History of Britain in Numbers 9.59 Weather 10.00 The World Tonight 10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Lowland 11.00 A Good Read 11.30 (LW) Test Match Special 11.30 (FM) Today in Parliament 11.55 (FM) The Listening Project Midnight (FM) News and Weather 12.30 (FM) Book of the Week: The Screwtape Letters 12.48 Shipping Forecast 1.00 (LW) Test Match Special 1.00 (FM) As BBC World Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast

WCL-E01-S2

12.00 Froch v Groves – The Final Countdown 12.30 FL72 Highlights 1.30 Premier League (HD). 2.00 Froch v Groves – The Final Countdown 2.30 Fantasy Football Club 3.30 Champions League (HD). 4.00 FL72 Highlights (HD). 5.00 Froch v Groves – The Final Countdown Radio 5 Live 5.00am Morning Reports 5.30 Wake Up to Money 6.00 The Ashes: Breakfast 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire Noon Shelagh Fogarty 2.00 Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport. Dan Walker is joined by John Hartson and Robbie Fowler to look ahead to the weekend’s football, as the Premier League resumes following an international break. 10.00 Stephen Nolan. 1.00am Up All Night Classic FM 6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John Suchet 1.00pm Jamie Crick 5.00 Classic FM Drive 8.00 The Full Works Concert 10.00 Smooth Classics 2.00am Bob Jones

Free valuations every Friday & Saturday at our saleroom or at your home by appointment

www.stroudauctions.co.uk

01453 873800

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 53


Puzzles and poetry

west crossword

PICTURES OF INNOCENCE At the Saturday morning ‘minors’ club, we country boys would meet And shed our inhibitions to the sound of stamping feet, The plot-lines might be corny and the dialogue absurd But we hailed from homespun pastures and we hung on every word. In a town beset by outlaw hordes, one man could save the day Just as he’d done the week before in Dodge or Santa Fe And, despite his busy schedule, he would somehow find the time To sing a soppy love song to Adele or Clementine. Due compensation followed as he galloped through the dust To do what all good men should do and cowboy heroes must Yet we remained undaunted by the many risks he’d run For we knew he had to be there in the episodes to come. As he rode off in the sunset, it was time for light relief, So along came Stan and Ollie whose intentions came to grief, Deceptively simplistic but a gentle, joyful treat Drawing pealing gales of laughter from confusion and defeat. With the respite of the interval, the birthday boys were called To shuffle on the stage, red-faced and clearly unenthralled, Each friend was loudly barracked though the wise would come to learn That time brings retribution and we all would take a turn.

When at last the lights were lowered, it was business as before With Merry Men or musketeers or a desert island shore Or a jungle romp with Tarzan swinging Cheetah on his knee When the audience, with one accord, conversed in chimpanzee. Abbott and Costello and the Bowery Boys, to boot, Such fare was our escape-path with the real world in pursuit, Out there, the future waited with a stern, reproving tongue But just for now, so briefly, we rejoiced in being young. We stumbled back to daylight as though waking from a dream And pedalled home on bicycles to Buryan or Pendeen, To scattered farms and hamlets, leaving fantasy behind But providing it with grazing in the pastures of our mind. Such times have changed, dear children, you have screens to call your own And they steal away life’s mysteries long years before you’re grown, Pour scorn upon our innocence but let the record show We had more fun for ninepence than you’ll ever, ever know.

For book enquiries, including Call of the Wild, ring 01752600366

chess Bob Jones The Beacon Seniors Congress has finished. Jim Burnett of Doncaster was a new face on the local scene and looked impregnable early on and a likely winner. Here are his first 2 games. White: R Scowen (159). Black: J Burnett (196). French Defence [C02] 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bd7 6.Be2 Nge7 7.0–0 Ng6 8.b3 Be7 9.Ba3? There is no possibility of winning a pawn as White’s own important e-pawn would also fall. So it puts the bishop out of the game. 9...0–0 10.Bd3 b6 11.Re1 Rc8 12.Nbd2 f5 13.exf6 Rxf6 14.Bxg6? Swapping off his most active piece. 14...Rxg6 15.Ne5 Nxe5 16.dxe5 Bc6 17.f3 Qc7 18.Nf1 All

White’s pieces are now at the edge of the board and none of them posing any threat. 18...Rf8 19.Kf2 Rg5 20.Qd3 Rxe5 Opening the way for Black’s queen, bishops & central pawn to flex their muscles. 21.Rxe5 Qxe5 22.Re1 Qf6 23.Bb2 e5 24.Qe2 Bd6 25.c4 d4 Creating a passed pawn and finally giving the “French bishop” room to breathe. 26.Nd2 Qh4+ 27.Kg1 e4 28.Nxe4 Bxh2+ 28...Qxh2+ 29.Kf1 Bxe4 30.Qxe4 Bg3 31.Rc1 Qh1+ 32.Ke2 Qxg2+ 33.Kd1 Qxf3+ 34.Qxf3 Rxf3 leaving White without a move on the board. 29.Kf1 Bf4 30.Nf2 Re8 31.Qd1 Be3 32.Nh3 Bxf3 0–1. White: J Burnett (196). Black: B Gosling (151). [A42] 1.d4 g6 2.Nf3 Bg7 3.c4 d6 4.g3 e5 5.Bg2 Nd7 6.e4 Ne7 7.0–0 exd4 8.Nxd4 0–0 9.Nc3 a6 10.Re1 Ne5 11.Bf1 c6 12.h3 Qb6 13.Nb3 Be6 14.Be3 Qc7 15.Nd2 b5 16.cxb5 axb5 17.Qc2 Rfc8 18.b3 b4 19.Na4 c5 20.Rac1 A speculative sacrifice follows. 20...Rxa4 21.bxa4 Qd7 22.Bb5 N5c6 23.h4 Bc3 24.f3 Qc7 25.Kg2 Nd4 26.Bxd4 cxd4 27.Red1 d5 28.Nb3 Qe5 29.Bd3 dxe4 30.fxe4 Be1 A great idea that doesn’t quite work. White must give up his queen, but having won the earlier exchange, he gets plenty of compensation for it. 31.Qxc8+ Nxc8 32.Rxe1 Bxb3 33.Rxc8+ Kg7 34.axb3 2 rooks would be equal to a queen in most positions, but with the bishop thrown in as well, the Black queen cuts a lonely figure. 34...Qe6 35.Rc4 g5 36.hxg5 Qg4 37.Rxd4 Qxg5 38.Re2 Qc5 39.Rd5 Qb6 40.Bc4 h6 41.Rf5 1–0 In last week’s position, Black won by 1…Rd1+ and White must take it or lose his queen, but then faces 2…Nf2+ forking king and queen. Here is another Dave Collier win, this time in the British Championship. White to move and win immediately.

54 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

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22 A 5 In the centre of Truro the leading building society has ACROSS stopped arranging loans (4) 7 The food produced by Ian, a top living centre 5 In the chef centre of Truroin the the leading buildingof Devizes, extraordinary society has stoppedisarranging loans (4)– I'm a huge fan (10) 7 The produced by Ian, a top chef living 8 food When we first met Tim, Des and in the centre of Devizes, isStoke extraordinary – Charlie from Climsland C I’m a huge fanseemed (10) they horrible – the type of people who think they have 8 When we first met Tim, Des and Charlie all Climsland the answers from Stoke they (4-4) seemed horrible 10type Heofwas a naughty boy,allbut – the people who think little they have as (4-4) Noel from East Knoyle the answers matured, he changed (4) 10 He a naughty little boy, butin as front Noel of 11was There is parking right from East Knoyle changed (4)just this pubmatured, with he lodgings, outside of Sidmouth R in front(4) 11 There is parking right of thishotel pub 13 We are staying at a small with lodgings, just outside of Sidmouth (4) about a mile and a half from Wick (8) at a small hotel about a 13 We are staying 15 heart was(8)broken whilst mile andMy a half from Wick living in a place near Clawton 15 My heart (8) was broken while living in a place 16near TheClawton last holiday my two parents (8) went on together was a place on the edge of Bodmin Moor, 16 The last holiday my two went on O parents last they brought togetherand was the a place onthing the edge of Bodmin me back was some Moor, and the last thing they broughtCornish me cheese (4) cheese (4) back was some Cornish 17 So, when my second cousin 17 So, when cousin waswas in Cornwasmy in second Cornwall last, he all wall last, he all by (4) himself ? (4) bywas himself? 18 I have lived in Boise, 18 I haveLuxembourg lived in Boise, and Luxembourg and – I Mamhead Mamhead – I travel around and organise travel around and organise people and resources (8) S people and resources (8) 21 three My mates threeand mates I went 21 My I wentand to Nye in the to NyeofinJune the– we second of June second half visitedhalf the Nag’s Head before heading off tothe get an ice cream – we visited Nag's Head (6-4) before heading off to get an ice cream (6-4) 22 The are talking is in about Dart22 thing The we thing we areabout talking mouth, isn’t it? (4) is in Dartmouth, isn't it? (4)

DOWN 1 So Ben is leaving Branksome and moving to a place near DOWN Highbridge with another man? (4) 21 SoIfBen you're looking for and a moving flat- to is leaving Branksome a place near Highbridge withthis another man? bottomed boat, try small (4) company based in the south west (4) looking a flatbottomed 32 IfIyou’re hear youforcan have boat, top try this small company based in the south holidays in and around this west (4) place near Devizes (8) 43 IThis woman, anholidays eccentric hearyoung you can have top in and leading living in around this placeartist near Devizes (8) Sidmouth, left school with just 4 This woman, two young O levels (4) an eccentric leading in Sidmouth, left school with just 5artist Myliving youth was unhappily spent twoinO levels (4) a large suburban housing estate in north-west Plymouth 5 My youth was unhappily spent in a large (8) suburban housing estate in north-west Ply6mouth Unfortunately Ben and Kelvin, (8) who live on the outskirts of Rhyl, have been given thewho sack 6 Unfortunately Ben and Kelvin, live on the–outskirts of Rhyl, have given the sack they worked in been a financial – they worked in a (4,6) financial establishment establishment 9(4,6)It's a terribly slow train that takes you to this place in the 9 It’s a terribly slow train that takes you to this middle nowhere – it's– it’s in one place in the of middle of nowhere in one of the in Five Valleys (10)in theof Five Valleys Gloucestershire Gloucestershire (10) 12 Weareare visiting our son near 12 We visiting our son near Bournemouth in order to see the babies his wifeto hassee just had Bournemouth in order (8) the babies his wife has just had (8) 14 My My mother mother had first baby in ainplace 14 hadher her first baby near Bampton (8) a place near Bampton (8) 18 Theydiscovered discovered an explosive 18 They an explosive that had been that inhad been inplanted planted a classroom Exeter (4)in a classroom in Exeter (4) 19 Lying – th re’s a parish in Somer19 Lying IIam amnot not –ethere's a parish setin that has the same as asame village in Somerset that name has the Norfolk name(4)as a village in Norfolk (4) 20 Was there a need to set up this 20 Was there a need to set up this environmentenvironmental project in al project in Cornwall? (4) Cornwall? (4)

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Solutions on Page 56 WCL-E01-S2


Stars Claire Petulengro

cryptic crossword ACROSS Cryptic

Crossword

ACROSS removed – compDOWN 9 With the contents letely (6,3) 10 Ordered, (8)accompanied 9 Withastheagreed contentsto beforehand 1 Leave, 12 Tip ‘Noremoved Gentleman’ (4) - completely by X (8) 13 Vilify as ‘a nincompoop with good (6,3) 2 aSay it’s a cinch, for all figure’ 10 Ordered, as agreed to hear (6) (6) to beforehand (8)isn’t a flop 3 (7) Deem deliberate (8) 14 The player is good: 12 talking, Tip “No Gentleman” Do your 15 Kept to fluster the 4fellow (7,2)utmost and (4) line of descent 17 Can’t understand why you turnfind a ablind eye 13 Vilify as “a nincom(6) to? (4,2,3) poop with a good fig5 Becomes infatuated 18 Persuaded now to go back again ure” (6) with(3,4) and gets 20 Seek on behalf of, taking a longdeceived time (6) 14 The player is good: by (5,3) 21 What the diner ordered in a low voice? (4) isn’t a flop (7) 6 Finishing preparing 24 Support the flag (8) 15 Kept to fluster for cold weather (8,2) 26 A watch fortalking, the arm (8) the fellow (7,2) (4) 7 In grassland antelope 28 The right direction understand why go(6) slowly (7) 29 For17an Can’t ownerless pet, it’s wrong 31 Arguesyou that new turnaanew blind bed eye requires 8 Hea left here with a girl ‘28’ (7) to? (4,2,3) - irresponsible (6) 34 Should get themnow trained reckonedhates it, 18 Persuaded to go first, 11 INon-believer (9) back again (3,4) perhaps (7) 36 Is it used extensively by ambulance men? 16 Affectionate, yearn to (9) 20 Seek on behalf of, long time (6) embrace the little girl 38 Ours istaking soura (7) diner (6) in 39 It’s21 dry,What butthe wet weather is coming (6) ordered in a low 19 Money, when back40 Being the one (4)to put on (5) voice? (4) stuck in the pipeing, 41 Bet24Anne putthe outflag feelers Support (8) 20 Ere leaving, feared it (8) 26 A watch for the arm would be a passing 42 Precedes as one takes the lead (4,5)

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Other people are making changes in their lives. Does that mean you have to? No it does not, but for some reason you’re over analysing. Emotional blackmail has seen you far too keen to please others. Time for a change then my friend. Call now so I can help you.

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You’re worrying about things which haven’t happened yet and it would pay for you to delve deeper and get a better understanding of what the things you’ve committed to this month really entail. Ring now to hear why it’s worth checking your birthday calendar.

22

23 24

25

26

27 28

29

30

31

32

33 35

34

36

You are aware of what other people want, but you’re not too sure where you’re going. That’s because you lost sight of what you wanted when you took on another’s problems. Ring now to hear why this can be your most romantic week yet. Changing situations in others’ lives force you to give someone you care for an ultimatum but it’s clear you feel you have no choice. Try to think before you speak and plan your words from your own heart. Give me a call to hear why it will pay to dress well this month.

37

39

38

It’s impossible to know what a change is really leading to until we get up close. Fear is stopping you from doing what would eventually make you happy. Take a deep breath and go forward to your future. . Ring now so I can tell you more.

40

(8)

fancy (3) 22 Spy on a man (5) 29 For an ownerless pet, 23 Talk about a duffer it’s wrong (6) when it comes to 1 Leave, accompanied by X (8) 2 Say 31 it’s a cinch, all to hear (6) Argues thatfor a new games! (6) 3 Deem deliberate bed requires(8) a new 25 Handing over the job 4 Do your“28” utmost (7) and find a line of to?descent (10) (6) 34 Should get them 26 The sunfish? (3) 5 Becomes infatuated with and gets trained first, I reck27 Daub on Esme in the deceived by (5,3) oned (9) pub (7) (8,2) 6 Finishing preparing for cold weather 36 Is it used extensively 30 Having 7 In grassland antelope go slowly (7) gone off by ambulance again, came 8 He left here with a men? girl – irresponsible (6) back (8) 11 Non-believer hates it, perhaps (7) to lose track, (9) 31 Made 16 Affectionate, yearn the 38 Ours is sour (7) to embracethe girl,little embarrassed, girl 39 It’s dry, but wet was upset (8) (6) weather is coming in 32 Bars intended for the 19 Money, when backing, to put on (5) (6) window? (8) 20 Ere leaving, feared it would be bedroom a passing 40 Being the one stuck 33 Shut up and got on fancy (3) pipe(5) (4) (7) 22 Spy oninathe man 23 Talk a duffer 41 about Bet Anne put out when feel- it35comes Aims to to carry one games! (6)ers (8) across (6) 25 Handing over the job to? (10) 42 Precedes as one 36 Chucks the fish 26 The sunfish? (3) takes the lead (4,5) aboard (6) 27 Daub on Esme in the pub (7) 37 About to consume, he 30 Having gone off again, came back (8) had put in the 31 Made to lose track, the girl, embarrassed, microwave (6) was upset (8) 28 The right direction (4) DOWN

32 Bars intended for the bedroom window? (8) 33 Shut up and got on (7) 35 Aims to carry one across (6) 36 Chucks the fish aboard (6) 37 About to consume, he had put in the microwave (6)

41

42

Neptune helps you to make sense of past issues and come to terms with what did or did not happen. From this week, I am witnessing a stronger and more positive Virgo evolving. Give me a call and I’ll tell you what I know about love.

Quick Crossword

quick ACROSS crossword 9 Business costs (9) ACROSS 10 Complete turn (8) 12 Wildcat (4)

913 Business costs Waterways (6) (9) 1014Complete turn Hotchpotch (7) (8) Heavenly 1215Wildcat (4)(9) Obligatory (9) 1317Waterways (6) Template (7) (7) 1418Hotchpotch 20 Last (6) 1521Heavenly (9) letter (4) Second Greek 1724Obligatory Blameworthy(9) (8) Oratory (8)(7) 1826Template Garden 2028Last (6) tool (4) Clergyman (6) letter (4) 2129Second Greek 31 Far-off (7) 2434Blameworthy (8) (9) Heartbeat regulator 2636Oratory Hard (9)(8) African tool river (7) 2838Garden (4) Speaker (6) (6) 2939Clergyman French(7) cheese (4) 3140Far-off 41 Cutlery item (8) 3442Heartbeat Begin (9) regulator (9) 36 Hard (9) 38 African river (7) 39 Speaker (6) 40 French cheese (4) 41 Cutlery item (8) 42 Begin (9)

DOWN 1DOWN Paper size (8) 2 Doghouse (6) 3 Holiday (8) (8)country (6) 41 Paper Middle size Eastern 52 Doghouse Supposed (8)(6) 63 Holiday Hospital employee (5,5) (8) 74 Middle Everlasting (7) Eastern country (6) 85 Supposed Edible tuber(8) (6) 11 Imitative person (7) (5,5) 166 Hospital Somnolentemployee (6) (7) 197 Everlasting Lorry (5) 20 Female tuber sheep (3) 8 Edible (6) 22 Famous musical (5) (7) 11 Imitative person 23 Dwarfed tree (6) 16 Somnolent (6) 25 Venomous spider (5,5) 19 Lorry 26 Manage (5) (3) 20 Female sheep 27 Circus swing (7) (3) 30 Overcome (8) 22 Famous musical (5) 3123 Dwarfed Spring flowertree (8) (6) 32 Tied up (8) spider (5,5) 25 Venomous 33 Huge (7) 26 Manage 35 Force (6) (3) 27 Circus swing (6) (7) 36 Mythical creature 37 Pandemonium(8) (6) 30 Overcome

You will be met with greater understanding from family and loved ones, so this would be an ideal week to tackle those difficult or sensitive issues. This is a great week for new relationships or first dates. Ring now for insight. Arguments which have already taken place can be smoothed over by peace talks you instigate this week. Try to keep your head down in work and get the job done. Ring now to hear which sign knows you better than you know yourself. You’re not going to want to stick to arrangements, so try not to tie yourself down and make promises you are not going to want to keep. Family want to push you into something you don’t want to do. Ring now to hear which sign is telling lies.

31 Spring flower (8) 32 Tied up (8) 33 Huge (7) 35 Force (6) 36 Mythical creature (6) 37 Pandemonium (6)

Don’t take anger you’re feeling about others out on those who are not involved. Try talking to someone you know you can trust and work out what the best way forward is.Give me a call to hear why your career can, and will, be so much more.

Solutions on Page 56

scribble pad

This is a time of great learning for your sign where new careers appeal to you and you’re not afraid to learn things. Some of your sign will have their sights set on mixing travel with new jobs. Give me a call now for inspiration and clear vision for your future. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself feeling tearful about the events which have occurred this month. You’ve been through a lot and you wouldn’t be human if you didn’t express how you felt. Ring now to hear who the thorn in your side may be.

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SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013 WEST COUNTRY LIFE 55


Puzzles

1

Where in the West?

3

Can you name and locate these five well-known West Country abbeys? Solutions below on the right.

4

5

6

2

1 Hailes Abbey, near Winscombe. 2 Glastonbury Abbey ruin. 3 Bath Abbey. 4 Flaxley Abbey, Forest of Dean. 5 Sherborne Abbey. 6 Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire.

Crossword solutions West

Across: 5 Subs, 7 Aficionado, 8 Know-alls, 10 Tyke, 11 Pinn, 13 Hamswell, 15 Ashwater, 16 Yarg, 17 Solo, 18 Mobilise, 21 Ninety-nine, 22 This Down 1 Mark, 2 Scow, 3 Poulshot, 4 Lass, 5 Southway, 6 Bank Clerks, 9 Nailsworth, 12 Newborns, 14 Morebath, 18 Mine, 19 Lyng, 20 Eden.

Cryptic

Across: 9, Inside out 10, Arranged 12, Heel 13, Ass-AI-L 14, Pi-anist 15, Rattle-d-on 17, Fail to see 18, Won over 20, For-age 21, Bass 24, Standard 26, Repeater 28, East 29, A-stray 31, Deb-ates 34, Meth-ought 36, Stretcher 38, Anagram 39, Ra-is-in 40, Ma-I-n 41, Ante-nnae 42, Goes ahead Down: 1, With-draw 2, Assert (a cert) 3, Consider 4, Strain 5, Falls for 6, Wrapping up 7, Andante 8, (he)Re-miss 11, Atheist 16, Lo-Vi-ng 19, No-tes 20, F(e)a(re)d 22, A-gent 23, Rabbit 25, Assignment 26, Ray 27, B-Esme-ar 30, Re-turned 31, Der-aileD 32, Serenade 33, Boarded 35, Tra-I-ns 36, S-ling-s 37, Heat-e’d

Quick

Across: 9, Overheads 10, Rotation 12, Lynx 13, Canals 14, Farrago 15, Celestial 17, Mandatory 18, Pattern 20, Endure 21, Beta 24, Culpable 26, Rhetoric 28, Rake 29, Parson 31, Distant 34, Pacemaker 36, Difficult 38, Zambezi 39, Orator 40, Brie 41, Teaspoon 42, Originate Down: 1, Foolscap 2, Kennel 3, Vacation 4, Israel 5, Presumed 6, Staff nurse 7, Eternal 8, Potato 11, Copycat 16, Sleepy 19, Truck 20, Ewe 22, Evita 23, Bonsai 25, Black widow 26, Run 27, Trapeze 30, Surmount 31, Daffodil 32, Tethered 33, Immense 35, Compel 36, Dragon 37, Uproar

56 WEST COUNTRY LIFE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16 2013

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West Country Life Magazine 16 November 2013