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May 1, 2014

Hickey Earns Eagle with Library Garden Dancing Queen

By Sean CoLeman

Thanks to Wrentham’s Jackson Hickey, Fiske Public Library has a new wall and garden that will allow people to enjoy the outdoors. The King Philip senior created the garden and wall as part of his Eagle Scout project. The idea came from a problem his mother experiences annually. “My mom is a member of the Wrentham Sohoanno Garden Club and every year they have a plant sale in May at the Fiske Library,” Hickey says. Jackson Hickey stands with his parents at a special Court of Honor where he was formally recognized for “She always com- reaching the rank of Eagle Scout. plains about trying to The response to the project has been dig the dirt at the area along the sidewalk landscaping. “I have worked with Landscape America here in Wrentham for two positive and by completing the project, to plant some of their leftover plants from summers,” Hickey says. “I enjoy landHickey, a member of Troop 131, was able the sale.” scaping, especially hardscaping--the to achieve the rank of Eagle Scout. The Remembering her complaint, Hickey building of walls, walkways and patios-- rank puts the scout in select company decided to build a retaining wall which and also have seen how plants that are since only seven percent of all scouts are would allow for the plants to grow and well nourished improve the look of any able to complete all the necessary realso provide an area for people to sit and area, so I thought that this project would enjoy the garden. To pull off the project, encompass both of these.” JACKSON HICKEY Hickey relied on his experience working

By PatriCk CoLeman King Philip Regional High School Principal, Lisa Oliveira, made Dancing with the Wrentham Stars history by taking home both the Judges' Choice and People's Choice Awards. The night set a record by raising over $84,000 for six local charities. Oliveira, along with Savaria Dance Studio's Petr Dubovsky, a Wrentham resident, brought fiery intensity to the dance floor performing a highly precise pasodoble. The KP principal, dressed in red and black, who prior to the event said she couldn't dance at all, spent countless hours with her partner Dubovsky perfecting the timing and movements to her routine. The hard work impressed the three judges, State Senator Richard Ross, Loral Sims, owner of Loral Sims School of Dance in Plainville, and Wrentham School Committee Chair Ed Goddard, and earning her the coveted Judges' Choice Award. Oliveira, dancing for the KP Turf Project, also raised the most money for the night taking home the People's Choice award. With the pressure of performing behind her, a relieved Oliveira hit the dance floor at the end of the night saying this whole experience was "about the kids."

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May 1, 2014

Torchia Wins Selectman Seat

JACKSON HICKEY continued from page 1

quirements. The road to Eagle isn’t easy. It takes years of dedication and the challenges with completing a project like the wall at Fiske are many. He had to manage a group of people working on the project and he also needed funds for the wall and garden. “The biggest obstacle was the cost of the materials for the project,” Hickey said.

The Board of Selectmen have a new member. Deb Torchia beat George Smith 431 to 227 winning the seat previously held by Michael Carroll. Instead of seeking reelection as selectman, Carroll sought and won one of two seats on the Planning Board along with incumbent Greg McCombs. The other contested race of the night was for Board of Health and incumbent Evert Skinner beat John Zizza 432 to 205.

However, many local businesses stepped up and helped including Unilock, Dowling Corporation, Cataldo’s, and Lowe’s. Now that the project is finished and Hickey is officially an Eagle Scout, he is able to take pride in completing such a major undertaking. “It is really a great feeling every time I go by the library to see it and know that people will enjoy the beauty of the plants and hopefully take a few minutes to sit on the wall and relax,” Hickey said.

Run Your Inserts and Advertisements With Us! Call Tiffany (508) 203-0890

The new wall is designed to hold flowers and let people take a moment to sit.

Hickey's project is a part of Wrentham forever.

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Hickey used his landscaping skills to compete the Library wall project.

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DANCING continued from page 1

While Oliveira took home the hardware, the other dancers delivered athletic, high energy and passionate performances for the enthusiastic crowd. Wrentham Board of Selectmen Chair Joe Botaish executed a memorable tango with his partner Meaghan McHale, owner of Dancer and Beyond Studios, while second grade teacher Kristin Pitman used Joe Botaish and Meaghan McHale her athleticism to flip and strut around the dance floor capped off with business woman with her partner Jan Ondrias from and local mom Julie Sullivan provSavaria. James' Breakfast and ing to be highly versatile on the More owner and chef James Arse- dance floor moving flawlessly nault channeled the Great Gatsby from traditional ballroom moves to along with Dance and Beyond's hip-hop with her partner Lewis Jill Wojnowski in a fun routine that Inman from Savaria. featured a cameo with WoThe stars also showed a sense of jnowski's partner from last year, J.R. McDonald. The show was humor by filming funny spoof videos shown just before their performance.

Kristin Pitman and Jan Ondrias

The other dance for the night was a collective effort. I was supposed to be the sixth dancer, but because I broke my hip two months ago at dance rehearsal, that simply was not going to happen. The organizers and the five other stars put together a beautiful video tribute set to Green Day's "Time of Your Life." It was then followed by my dance partner, Kellcie Teel from Showcase Dance Productions, hitting the stage solo dancing to Shakira's "Hips Don't Lie," but she was soon joined on stage by the stars and their partners, the stars from last year, my neighbors, friends and wife Sheri Coleman. Laundered Shirts $1.85 With Coupon

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The night was hosted by 98.5 Sports Hub talk show host and local, Scott Zolak. The former New England Patriot kept the night moving, while controlling the excited crowd, and keeping the spotlight on all the dancers. In addition to the KP Turf Field project, the other charities that benefited from last night were the Holly Club, Wrentham PTO, Wrentham Lions Club, Friends of Wrentham and Wrentham Food Pantry. Food donations were collected for the Pantry and will be delivered Saturday. The importance of each charity was highlighted in pretaped videos. Once again, Dancing with the Wrentham Stars has provided the town with an opportunity to come together and celebrate the things that make it special to live here. In

Lisa Oliveira takes top honors at this year’s Dancing with the Wrentham Stars.

its second year, the event continues to be a much needed vehicle to boost the fundraising for our local charities but, just as important, it provides us, the people that call this town home, an opportunity to connect a little deeper with our neighbors, make new memories with our friends, and spend the night dancing. I'm already looking forward to seeing what the future stars of Dancing with the Wrentham Stars will do on March 27, 2015. Photos by Christina Allan

(This article originally appeared in The Wrentham Times, www.wrenthamtimes.com.)

James Arsenault and Jill Wojnowski


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 4

Water Crisis By audrey ConneLLy Water. One of the most commonly used substances on Earth. Our planet is filled with gigantic amounts of it. In fact, water covers nearly two thirds of the Earth. So how could we not have enough? We have the same amount of water now as we did at the beginning of time…so how could our

supply be dwindling? The answer is simple: our population.

The amount of people on Earth is increasing at an incredible rate. There just isn’t enough water to supply Earth’s 6.8 billion inhabitants. And the population is just going to continue to grow. You’re probably thinking, “It’s fine. I’m not wasting water. I don’t have any responsibility for what is happening.” Oh, is that so? What about

that burger you had for lunch?According to National Geographic, it takes about 630 gallons of water to produce and cook the average hamburger. And that 25 minute shower you took this morning? 74.5 gallons. And it’s only going to get worse. If we keep wasting at this rate, by 2025 1.8 billion people will be in crisis. 2.3 billion people will be faced with the direct effects of water shortage, even if it isn’t considered a life threatening

crisis. That is about one third of all the people on Earth. Will you be in that third? If we don’t do anything, you definitely could be. Before you know it, you could have to walk for water, just like the people in the country of South Sudan. South Sudan, a large third world country in the middle of Africa, is hit extremely hard by this crisis. According to The Water Project, South Sudan has 2% of its entire water supply available for domestic use. Here in the US, we have 13% available. This water is used to bathe, wash clothing, prepare food, drink, and to do many more everyday things. The rest of Sudan’s water is used industrially to produce food and other products. The water that is available for families to use has to be fetched in jugs miles away. Women and children walk for hours and hours every day, when here, all we have to do is twist a handle. Additionally, that 2% of water used domestically is often plagued by diseases. Some of these include Guinea Worm Disease and diarrhea. In 2006 alone, there were 476 deaths due to diarrhea obtained from the consumption of tainted water. Think about it: here, in Massachusetts, a small ailment like that wouldn’t turn a head. But, in South Sudan, the people can’t keep enough nutrients and water inside of them to survive. Guinea Worm Disease, also known as Dracunculiasis, affects hundreds of people in Sudan each year. In fact, The Water Project also tells us that three out of every five cases worldwide happen in Sudan. The disease is attained when a person or animal drinks water that contains water fleas with guinea worm larvae living on them. It is a very painful infection. Many people in Sudan get this disease because they drink whatever water they find. They don’t have the privilege of pristine, clean water, because there just isn’t enough to be picky. If we don’t work on ways to save what little water the Sudanese have, they will be even worse off than they are now. It is hard to wrap your mind around what is happening to these people. But this could never happen to us. We are above all this, exempt from the consequences of water misuse, right? Wrong. The threat of water scarcity is just as real here as anywhere else. In fact, Boston has been affected by the water crisis already! National Geographic tells us about the diminishing water in the Quabbin

May 1, 2014 Reservoir here in Massachusetts back in 1987. The Reservoir had dropped in volume to less than half of its original size. We were using 50 million gallons more than the 300 million that was considered safe. People were using water as if the supply was endless. Truthfully, it’s not. The government searched for ideas to save us from the impending scarcity looming over us, considering options from every single angle. The option they deemed most appropriate for the situation was to use water from the Connecticut River. Ecological activists pointed out how this could throw the ecosystem in the area off balance. The local government decided to rethink its approach completely. Instead of increasing the amount of water, what about decreasing the demand for it? So they formed the MWRA (Massachusetts Water Resources Authority). This new group scoured houses in Boston and the surrounding areas, fixing leaks and holes in pipes and replacing water consuming products with eco-friendly ones. It was a huge success. We now are back to the original amount of water in the Quabbin Reservoir. The impending threat of a crisis in Boston has been stabilized. So you see, you can make a difference. There are so many ways to help our community save water, even by doing the simplest things. Buy water efficient appliances, take shorter showers, don’t water your lawn when it’s not necessary. Simple as that! That’s what the MWRA did, and in turn, we avoided a colossal problem. South Sudan. Boston, Massachusetts. Two incredibly different places, yet linked together by this growing problem. It’s time that the people of the world join as one to confront this inevitable problem, and put an end to the suffering of the people of planet earth, not only in Sudan but globally. These problems are happening everywhere. But it is not too late to save the world. It doesn’t matter what you do, whether it’s fixing a leaky faucet or building a well in Sudan. Everything counts. But what does matter is when you do it. This problem is worsening, and the more serious our problem gets, the harder it will be to fix. Today is the day to begin the journey to a better future. And that journey starts with you. (Audry Connelly is a Norfolk resident and a student at the Rivers School.)


May 1, 2014

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 5

Norfolk's 5th Annual Clean and Green Campaign The Norfolk Grange invites all citizens, especially the youth, to celebrate Earth Day this year by participating in Norfolk's 5th Annual Clean & Green Campaign on Saturday, May 3. The townwide cleanup will address the litter along roadways and public places in Norfolk. During the morning and early afternoon on Saturday, May 3, individuals and groups are requested to clean up an area of their choice (e.g., their neighborhood or roads/public places as suggested in the Registration packet). Participants should bring their bags of litter and recyclables col-

lected during that morning or early afternoon to the Norfolk Grange Hall, 28 Rockwood Road for drop off between 12 and 4 p.m. There, the Grange will host a celebration of everyone's collection efforts which will include community photos, refreshments, cute "green" giveaways and lots of green/Earth Day information. We have a limited number of thank-you gifts for participants -a large re-usable grocery bag and an Earth Day theme wrist band while supplies last. The Norfolk Grange will also provide Volunteer Recognition Certificates.

Registration is required. The Registration application (including required permission slips for youth) is available in the foyer of the Norfolk Public Library as well as on the Norfolk Grange website, www.NorfolkGrange.org . W e ask that completed forms be dropped off at the Norfolk Public Library Circulation Desk by 5 p.m. April 28. Note, for last minute participants, applications will be available at the Norfolk Grange drop off area – please stop by and complete prior to participating.

Norfolk Lions Announce 2014 Chili Fest Winner On Saturday March 22, 2014, Norfolk Lions held their 7th Annual Chili Fest at St. Jude’s Church. This culinary tradition proved to be extremely successful naming a winner and raising funds for Norfolk Food Pantry. Horse N’ Carriage took home the 2014 honor. The other participants included the Eagle Brook Saloon, Mr. Dooley’s Olde Irish Country Pub, James’ Breakfast and More, Budabings 50s Café and Commonwealth BBQ. According to co-chairs Ray Cisneros and Lynn Worley, the competition was very hot with close voting results. Lion Ray Cisneros presented a plaque to Vinnie Megna, the Executive Chef of the

Horse N’ Carriage Restaurant, who prepared the winning chili. The Lions raised $1,000.00 at the Chili Fest, which will be do-

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

5th Annual Norfolk Community Day Youth Art Show For the 5th year the Norfolk Lions are sponsoring a youth art show open to all Norfolk residents in grades 1 through 6. The art work submitted should represent a ‘Scene around Norfolk/Your Community’. The Youth Art Show, where all the art work will be displayed, will be at Community Day on June 7, 2014 at the Holmes Complex, 22 Myrtle St., Norfolk. In addition, all art work will become a part of a slide show that will be broadcast on Norfolk Cable TV.

based on artistic creativity, neatness and originality. All entries will receive an award and winners in each age group will be awarded 1st, 2nd and 3rd place and honorable mention ribbons. But that’s not all the 1st place winners in each age group and one Grand Prize winner will also each receive gift certificates! These winning entries will be displayed at the Norfolk Library, for all to see, for two weeks after Community Day.

This show is free to all participants, with one entry per person. All artwork must be drawn or painted on paper no larger than 11-inches by 17-inches, using pencils, pens, crayons, paint, markers and fabric. Each entry must include an entry form taped to the backside of the art. Entry forms will be given to all children in the

Norfolk public schools. Forms will also be available in the main lobby of the Norfolk Public Library. Entries will also be judged by a panel appointed by the Norfolk Lions in three age groups: grades 1 and 2, grades 3 and 4, and grades 5 and 6. Winners will be selected

The contest entry deadline is 5 p.m. on Friday, May 23. Entries can be placed in the collection boxes at the Freeman Kennedy or HOD schools, or mailed or dropped off in person to: norfoLk LionS C/o SaLLy Grant

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May 1, 2014

Page 7

Norfolk Cosmetic Surgeon Helping Men and Women to Look Their Best… The Easy Way lies. If you watch the local news and see one of Dr. David’s patients, they look very natural, David tells us….and that’s the way he likes it. Dr. Dave David, one of Norfolk’s residents, loves putting a smile on his patients’ faces. Since beginning his practice of medicine 35 years ago, and spending much of that time in Orange County, California, Dr. David has seen a surge of interest in New Englanders’ desire to look younger, slimmer and more beautiful. Dr. David tells us from his office at Medical Face & Body Aesthetics in Dedham, that both men and women in the Boston area now know it’s ok to do something for yourself, without feeling guilty about it. “My patients back in Newport Beach (California) seemed to have always been interested in looking good, but New Englanders used to be worried about the stigma of looking fake or phony. Some people have the misconception that you’ll have a ‘frozen face’ with Botox or look like a duck with a subtle lip enhancement”. Not so, says Dr. David, who has treated many celebrities and their families, Olympic athletes, and Boston professional athletes and their fami-

Although generally recognized from his national TV appearances with many of the top celebrities, or as a medical news commentator on CNN, Fox News or NECN, Dr. David most enjoys being away from the hustle and bustle of the cameras, and just taking care of his patients in the privacy of his office. Dr. David has a very specialized practice. His philosophy is that nobody can be great at everything and no cosmetic surgeon can master every single procedure. Because of that, the ONLY surgical procedure that he performs these days is the modern day VASER lipo. He performs VASER every day and is viewed as the liposuction expert of New England. “It’s light years ahead of the old traditional lipo”, Dr. David tells us. “It’s performed with the patient awake, listening to music, and it’s much safer and easier than the old lipo, and doesn’t leave the patient with loose skin. “There’s been a huge surge in liposuction on men”, David tells us, as he performs several procedures per week for gynecomastia (enlargement of the chest area by fat or breast tissue), which is a very

disturbing problem for so many men. “With VASER, the solution is simple, takes less than an hour, and it literally changes the lives of my patients”, explains Dr. David, who has become known in the area as the “Go-To Doc” for what the patients call their “man boobs”. As Dr. David explains it, there’s really no other way to successfully treat this condition, short of full blown surgery. The reason for this is that chest fat is the firmest fat in the body and VASER lipo uses ultrasound to melt the fat, prior to its removal, allowing for hard fat or scarred areas to be treated. Many of his patients utilize this same VASER procedure to sculpt the abdomen, love handles, chin and neck, arms, legs and buttocks. He is also sought after for “correctional lipo” by patients who had undesirable results from previous liposuction performed elsewhere. When Dr. David isn’t in the O.R., he’s busy rejuvenating faces, non-surgically, using Botox and facial fillers. “I think less is more”, Dr. Dave insists. “Your friends should think you look great today, but not know why”. At Medical Face & Body Aesthetics, his patients come to him for treatment of their angry lines between the eyebrows, crows’ feet around the eyes, forehead lines, lip enhancement, a “gummy smile” or lines

around the nose and mouth, all of which can be treated in minutes in the office, without surgery. In this tough economy, both men and women have to compete in the workplace with younger colleagues and Dr. David finds that men and women are looking for this edge in the workplace, not just vanity. Dr. David performs every procedure himself and the patients love his warm and caring staff. His patients come to him from all over the country and his patients include many doctors and nurses. He does caution, though, that it’s not all about looking good, it’s

also about “doing good”. Dr. David led an emergency medical and surgical team into Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, and led a team, whose group treated 11,000 patients in south Asia after the 2004 tsunami that devastated Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Thailand. Dr. David believes that God gives each of us gifts, talents and skills that are to be used to help others and he believes that everyone should “give back”. Dave E. David, M.D. can be reached at 1-866-DR YOUTH or at www.medfacebody.com

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Page 8

May 1, 2014

Blough Family of Chicago Spearheads Farm Project Fundraiser for Mount St. Mary’s Abbey Later this month, on May 19th, there will be a convergence on Wrentham of the likes of which you may have never seen before. Bloughs from all around the country will be arriving, one by one, two by two – to join efforts in a work of love and charity for the sisters of Mount St. Mary’s Abbey. And particularly for the love of their sister/aunt, Sr. Robert Blough, and of the peace-filled community of cloistered Cistercian sisters she joined nearly 50 years ago. Sr. Robert tends and shears the flock of sheep that the sisters keep, in the main barn on the property. Built nearly 75 years ago, it can see another century, provided it receives a little restorative work. Upon a visit to the Abbey, Wayne Blough, her brother and a building construction contractor from Chicago, took notice of the restorative needs of the barn and outbuildings, and was inspired to organize a fundraising and a work effort to do the repairs. And he and his family have dubbed it the Abbey Farm Project.

The Blough family is a workforce to be reckoned with. Many of Sr. Robert’s 61 nieces and nephews and 32 grand-nieces and grand-nephews will participate in the project. Wayne will oversee the construction and restorative effort. His sister Karen Kedley, is helping with the fundraising aspect of the project. Wayne’s daughter, Melissa and her husband Chris Amling, created the website www.abbeyfarmproject.com to promote the project and raise donations. And Wayne’s teenage niece, Josephine Blough has raised $700 to date with an entrepreneurial effort of her own. Wanting to do something significant to help with the family effort, Josephine customized bracelets she purchased online – and sold them for a premium at the annual St. Patrick’s Day event on the south side of Boston. And, that’s just he tip of the iceberg. But this not an exclusive event: the Bloughs welcome your help and participation.

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properly maintained. The building is in need of a new structural support beam, roofing and other minor repairs. And the buildings, filled with old equipment and supplies that are no longer used, are in need of sorting through and cleaning. Phase one of this project is scheduled for May 19th-27th, 2014.

If you’d like to financially contribute to the project, you’ll find a link on the sisters’ candy web site www.trappistinecandy.com, or visit the www.abbeyfarmproject.com. To find out how you may contribute your professional skills/ materials for the project, please contact Wayne Blough at 815409-9327 or email him at buildermanwb@gmail.com.


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

List of candidates for the May 6th Norfolk Annual Town Election Moderator - one 1 year term David M. Rosenberg

Constable - one 3 year term Paul H. Terrio - incumbent

Girard L. StAmand

Constable - one 2 year term Mark E. Flaherty - incumbent

Jason Talerman Selectman - one 3 year term Jeffrey T. Palumbo Town Clerk - one 3 year term Carol Greene

Daniel L. Fallon King Philip School Committee - one 3 year term write in Library Trustee one 3 year term Glenn C. Hill - incumbent

Amy D. Lehan Assessor - one 3 year term Patricia J. Salamone incumbent Board of Health one 3 year term Cheryl H. Dunnington incumbent

Patricia M. McCarty Norfolk School Committee two 3 year terms Paul Edward Cochran Jr. Jeffrey R. Curry Michael P. Guidice Jr.

Clothing Drive On May 17th & 18th, the Norfolk Community League will sponsor a Clothing Drive in partnership with LPC Removal Service. Please start saving your clothing, linens, handbags, and shoes for the drive. By making a tax-deductible donation, you will be helping to raise money for our community. The best part is that LPC Removal Service will pick up the items for free at your doorstep!

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Norfolk School Committee one 2 year term Thomas Francis Doyle incumbent

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Planning Board two 3 year terms Steven G. McClain

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John A. Weddleton Recreation Commission two 3 year terms Thomas F. Terpstra - incumbent R. Kevin Doolin Recreation Commission two 2 year terms Todd A. Lindmark - incumbent Liza M. Carreiro

For more details on how to participate and to schedule your FREE pickup, please visit www.junkpickup.com/NCL or contact Amanda and Melissa at fundraising@norfolkcommunityleague.org.

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LPC Removal Services is a local business owned and operated by Norfolk residents Liam and Elizabeth Coen. If you have dumpster rental or weekly waste and recycling needs, please visit www.junkpickup.com or call 1888-junkpickup for more informationfor more information!

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Italian Sub & Mediterranean Wrap Tray Your Choice of Three 2-Liter Sodas Fill out the form below or attach your business card and bring it in to our store. Each Monday, we will pull one lucky business’s info out of a hat and on the Thursday or Friday of that week, between 11:30am and 1:30pm, we will deliver your FREE Lunch Party! Business Name _______________________________ Address _____________________________________ Contact Name ________________________________

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Page 10

May 1, 2014

Spring Home and Garden Can Pools and Lawns Cohabitate Peacefully? The backyard has become a goto destination for warm weather recreation. As the "staycation" has grown in popularity, more effort has been put forth in making the backyard a place where all members of the household can enjoy themselves. That means merging interests into one space. A pool may be competing for acreage along with a decorative patch of lawn. Some homeowners wonder if lawns and pools can be successful alongside each other. Many question if chlorinated pool water poses any ill effects on the grass in the backyard. In addition to splash-out of water during fun times in the pool, water also will be tracked across the lawn from children and adults exiting the pool or will flood the grass when it is necessary to clean and "backwash" the filter. Will you be left with a dried-out patch of chlorine-burnt lawn? Probably not.

Healthy chlorine levels in a pool are kept so that the pool water is generally on par with the chlorine levels contained in regular tap water. You wouldn't hesitate turning on the hose to water your lawn, so you shouldn't be overly concerned about pool water splashing out of the pool, particularly if you are stringent about maintaining the proper pH levels and chlorine levels. Also, soil can withstand chlorine at high acid levels and is pretty resilient about self-correcting. Furthermore, grass blades are selective about which nutrients they absorb, so excess chlorine likely will not penetrate the grass blades. Chlorine also dissipates in the sun. Therefore, while the levels may be elevated upon just hitting the grass, over a short while the chlorine will essentially be used up and pose no additional threat to the surrounding lawn.

it may be safely used on lawns and most flowering plants. It is unadvisable to water vegetable gardens with pool water because of any trace levels of other chemicals that may be found in the pool water. Homeowners still concerned about exposing their lawns to pool water can create a buffer zone around the pool. Inground pools are traditionally bordered by concrete or patio blocks. Place stone or mulch around the perimeter of an above-ground pool to catch any splashes and to create a barrier between the pool and the lawn. Also, direct backwashed water through a long tube and have it flow it to an area away from the lawn.

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May 1, 2014

Page 11

Spring Home and Garden How Technology is Improving Home Design and Remodeling Feeling overwhelmed by technology? You’re not the only one. Most homes have at least half a dozen, if not more, wireless devices streaming a constant flow of news, social media updates, and daily minutia. It’s enough to drive one insane because it’s so hard to break away from the barrage. Gone are the vacations where you can actually escape from your work calls and emails, and many companies have no problem with having their staff on call 24/7, 365 days a year. Amazon and other online shopping web sites are molding a point and click generation of shoppers. Many folks think nothing of taking hours of a small business owner’s time at the local brick and mortar and then ordering products online. Whether it is a pair of shoes or perhaps some wallpaper, this is a trend that is forcing more and more locally owned businesses to close. In the home improvement and design industry, only large chains and big box stores are able to compete with internet sales.

Many of the folks who wax poetically about their small down town area being full of national chains are the same people contributing to the problem! But it’s not all bad. There are many great new products and websites that have made dramatic improvements to the home design and remodeling industry. Whether you are planning a custom home or your dream kitchen, the process can be lots of fun. One exciting development is the explosive popularity of the website HOUZZ.com According to Wikipedia, “Houzz is a web site and online community about architecture, interior design and decorating, landscape design and home improvement. The Houzz platform and mobile apps[2] feature interior and exterior home photos, articles written by architects, interior designers and home design experts, product recommendations, and a user forum.” If you are planning any type of project, it is a terrific idea to set up a free account and start collecting

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pictures and ideas of what you like. When our clients bring this to the table, we are able to fast track the entire design process. A picture is worth a thousand words, and in this case, can be worth dozens of hours. It is not uncommon for our clients to simply share their Houzz idea books and say: “Design and build me that!” Of course, a professional designer will have the ability to put your personal stamp on your job, but this is still an incredible way to engage the process. Another exciting development is the comprehensive integration of 3D rendering software. Hand drawn blue prints and design renderings will soon go the way of the typewriter. There are multiple software platforms available in the industry now, and savvy architects and design firms are employing them to provide stunning, life like design renderings. One important caveat: The super high end cartoon renderings that you see on home improvement and property shows are custom made for use on

TV. We’re not quite there yet, but the products are extremely close to that now. Most rendering software will allow designers to download products such as cabinets, flooring, counters, lighting, and furniture from vendor websites and incorporate them right into your dream design. You can even select your favorite brand and paint color for the walls, then adjust the lighting to see what the room will look like during the day, at night, and with various types of lighting. One of the biggest advantages of rendering software is how easy it is to make changes. With a click of a mouse walls can be moved,

colors changed, windows resize, you name it! This, coupled with employing the HOUZZ database, had streamlined the design and build process dramatically in the last few years. Certainly, the amazing technology in our lives is a mixed blessing. While at times it is overwhelming and stressful, the improvements it brings into our life far outweigh the negatives. If you are considering designing a custom home or any type of home improvement project, be sure to check out HOUZZ.com, and most definitely hire a firm that employs the design software systems.

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Page 12

May 1, 2014

Spring Home and Garden Cost Effective Fencing Options Fencing serves many purposes. Some homeowners erect a fence for privacy, while others do so to contain pets and children. Because fencing can be expensive, some homeowners look for ways to cut costs, which can be relatively easy, especially for those homeowners willing to consider various materials when erecting their fence. Traditional fences are available in materials ranging from wood to vinyl to metal. Homeowners have other options at their disposal if they prefer a more natural fence. Different shrubs, trees or grasses can be planted to create a barrier between properties or within the property.

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When choosing a fencing material, consider that even a less expensive material may prove more expensive in the long run if it needs significant maintenance or has to be replaced in just a few years. Therefore, the most cost-effective fencing material may not necessarily be the least expensive one at the store. Here are some materials homeowners can consider. * Found material: Repurposed wood or metal can be crafted into a rustic, one-of-a-kind fence. Materials can be found that are no cost, requiring only the cost of labor. Should you build it yourself, this can be next to nothing. Sometimes existing

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fences on another property can be disassembled and re-built on your own property for little to no cost as well. * Chainlink/chainwire: Chainlink fencing is one of the most economical types of boundary fencing. The fencing comes in a variety of diamond sizes and is fixed to galvanized pipes spaced across the perimeter of the property. Although it is some of the least expensive fencing, it does not offer much privacy on its own. But if you are looking at fencing simply as a barrier, chainlink could be the way to go. * Picket fencing: A wooden picket fence is another inexpensive fencing material. The pickets can be purchased in various heights, and this fence may be used as garden border fencing or to mark a property line between homes. Spacing the pickets widely apart may cut down on the number that need to be purchased, further keeping the cost down. * Bamboo: Bamboo is a rap-

idly growing grass that produces a hard wood-like material that is used in many building applications. Bamboo wood can be used to build a fence, but the natural plant also can be planted to form a living fence for privacy. * Stockade fencing: A stockade fence is one of the more basic wood fencing options. Wooden slats are placed alongside one another to form an effective and affordable privacy fence. Stockade fencing can be stained or painted to preserve it. Many home improvement retailers sell panels of stockade fencing so that you can make fence installation a do-it-yourself project.

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Page 13

Spring Home and Garden The Right Watering Can Make All The Difference in a Lush Lawn Proper watering is essential when trying to restore or maintain a lush green lawn. If watered incorrectly, a lawn can be susceptible to a host of problems, including insect infestation, weak roots and disease. When watering a lawn, especially when temperatures start to soar in the summer, it's easy to think a lawn needs more water and needs it during those hours of the day when the sun is at its most intense. However, those are two common misconceptions about watering. The following are a handful of tips for homeowners who want to help their lawns endure the summer heat and maintain their lush appeal into the fall. * Water when temperatures are mild. In the summertime, humans typically need water when temperatures are at their most extreme, but that does not mean lawns should be watered when temperatures soar. Water attracts the sun, so watering when temperatures are at their hottest, which is typically around midday and into early afternoon, will likely lead to brown spots indicative of a burned lawn. That's because the sun will be drawn to the water, bearing down on the lawn and burning the grass as a result. When summer arrives, a lawn is best watered when tem-

peratures are at their most mild. That often translates to early morning or early evening. An added benefit of watering when temperatures are on the mild side is less water will be lost to evaporation during this time, meaning you won't be wasting water. * Situate sprinklers to conserve water. Homeowners who won't be hand watering their lawns should make sure their sprinklers are placed properly throughout their property. Situate sprinklers so they aren't watering driveways, walkways or patios. All of the water should be going to the grass, especially when drought restrictions are in place and the amount of watering the law allows is limited. It's also important to make sure water from sprinklers isn't being blocked from reaching the grass by trees. Homeowners with especially large trees on their property should consider hand watering the grass beneath such trees to ensure these areas receive adequate water. * Lean on mulch. Homeowners tend to fear drought for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that drought can cause a green lawn to turn brown, potentially affecting property value and robbing a landscape of its beauty. But there are ways to help the soil retain

moisture when temperatures are especially hot and dry. Mulch around trees, flower beds, gardens and shrubs can help homeowners get the most bang for their watering buck. That's because mulch retains moisture, even when temperatures are especially hot. This helps foster stronger root growth and healthier landscapes that are less susceptible to disease and insect infestation. * Get to know your lawn. Several variables combine to determine how much water a lawn needs. Understanding these variables helps homeowners understand how much to water their own lawns. Local climate is a variable to consider, as is whether or not a lawn was fertilized (experts typically recommend a lawn be fertilized several times, beginning in the spring and ending in October). Soil type and grass type also help to determine how much water a lawn needs, and homeowners who need to determine the type of soil and grass on their property can consult a local lawn care center or landscaping professional. Proper watering can help a lawn survive the dog days of summer, and it's up to homeowners to learn the right techniques.

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Page 14

May 1, 2014

Spring Home and Garden Landscaping Mistakes Get Kids Excited About Gardening to Avoid When designing their landscapes, homeowners may envision grandiose gardens and lush lawns that are the envy of the neighborhood. But such designs can be difficult to maintain, and homeowners often find they are not worth the time or money. Avoiding such costly mistakes allows homeowners to fully enjoy their lawns. The following are a few landscaping mistakes homeowners may want to avoid so they can spend more time enjoying their landscapes and less time working around the yard. * Planting the wrong trees and shrubs: When planting new trees and shrubs around your property, choose varieties that won't overwhelm the property by growing too large. Such trees and shrubs can mask other elements of a landscape, and they can also take a substantial amount of effort to maintain. Avoid spending too much time pruning trees and shrubs by opting for those that only grow to a particular size. * Choosing non-native plants: It's always best to choose plants that are native to a particular region. Native plants have already adapted to the local climate, meaning they can withstand the worst weather that climate has to offer without homeowners having to put in much effort. For example, if you live in an area where drought is common, avoid planting trees, shrubs, flowers, or grass that need ample amounts of water. Instead, opt for those varieties that can survive without significant amounts of water. Exotic plants

might add aesthetic appeal to a property, but that appeal is often short-lived or costly to maintain when a plant is not in its native climate. * Too much lawn: While a large and lush lawn appeals to many homeowners, a yard that is all grass can be difficult and expensive to maintain. Lawns without trees are susceptible to damage from the hot summer sun, and homeowners often respond to that threat by overwatering their lawns. Overwatering not only weakens root systems, but it also leads to higher water bills. Homeowners can downsize their lawns by planting more trees around the property, adding a garden in the backyard or even adding landscape features to their property. * Planting without a plan: When planting new trees around a property, some homeowners plant without first considering the ideal locations for new trees. This can prove an expensive mistake. Planting too close to your house may eventually threaten your home's foundation, as roots grow deeper and deeper into the ground. Planting too close to a home also may prove a security threat down the road, when the tree has grown to full height. Such trees may threaten the home during a storm, so consult a landscaping professional when planting new trees so the trees are located in a place that does not threaten the value of your home or the safety of its residents.

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Many adults understand the joy of gardening, but gardening can be equally fun for children as well. While some adults may feel that certain children do not have the patience or perseverance to see plants grow from seeds to adulthood, selecting plants that are hardy and sprout quickly may be the key to igniting a love of gardening in children.

Choosing seeds that sprout quickly can hold the attention of children who are new to gardening. Many different plants fit this bill. Beans, peas, sunflower seeds, and bell pepper seeds are easy to start and germinate quickly. In addition, many leafy vegetables, such as chard, lettuce, spinach, and mustard, germinate in three to five days. Herbs, such as basil and parsley, also sprout fast. All of these plants are good options for introducing children to gardening, as each provides quick gratification. To further interest children, it is a good idea to plant seeds in a way that allows youngsters to monitor the progress of growth. Use a transparent container, such as rinsed-out glass jars and canisters, to house the plant. Such containers give kids an unobstructed view of the process, during which children can plot the progress of seed germination and easily spot root and stem development. Once the seedlings grow larger, they can be transplanted into different containers. Many seedlings can sprout with water alone. Children can easily grow new plants from clippings of a mature plant left resting in a shallow cup of water, and seeds may not even need soil to germinate. Kids may have luck sprinkling seeds on a dampened, crumpled-up piece of paper towel. Cotton balls

also make a good place to nestle seeds. Either material will hold on to water, keeping the seeds moist until they sprout. Afterward, the seedlings can be carefully moved into a soil-and-compost mix. The paper towel and the cotton balls will decompose and add to the organic matter already in the soil. Edible plants often make good choices for children because kids can reap the rewards of their efforts. Herbs can be sprinkled onto food, or fruits and vegetables can be grown in containers and then served

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at mealtime. Kids can show pride in their accomplishments, especially if they have tangible results on the dinner plate. Children who want to try something different can explore other types of plants. Aquatic plants, or those found at the pet store to grow in aquariums, can be easy to grow. They need little more than a container, fresh water and sunlight. Cacti and other succulents are also fun to explore. These plants are quite hardy in that they can stand up to moderate abuse, such as failure to water frequently enough. The unique appearance of cacti make them interesting focal points for an indoor garden. A love of gardening that's fostered inside can also be explored outdoors. Set aside a plot of dirt where kids can sow their own seeds and tend to their own gardens. This hobby can help children learn patience and hard work while fostering an appreciation of nature.


May 1, 2014

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 15

Spring Home and Garden Improve Your Home and Diet with a Vegetable Garden Planting a garden can add aesthetic appeal and functionality to a property. Vegetable gardens can transform landscapes while putting healthy and homegrown food on the table. By growing their own fruits and vegetables, homeowners have total control over what foods can be harvested, and they can ensure sustainable, safe practices are used to care for the plants. Vegetable gardens can be compact or expansive, depending on how much space is available to cultivate. However, first-time gardeners may want to begin small so they can hone their skills and experiment to see which plants are most likely to thrive in their gardens. Expansion is always a possibility down the road.

good practice, particularly the first year of your garden. After you have mastered the basics, you can branch out into other produce.

Know when to plant Many of the foods grown in vegetable gardens, including tomatoes and peppers, are summer vegetables, which means they reach peak ripeness after the height of the summer season. Pumpkins, brussel sprouts and peas are planted to be harvested later on. These plants may be put in the ground a little later than others. It is less expensive to start seedlings indoors and then transplant them to a garden when the time comes. Seeds can be started three to four weeks before they

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Spend some time examining your landscape. Vegetables generally need ample warmth and sunlight to thrive, so find an area of the yard that gets several hours of direct sunlight per day.

Decide what to plant When deciding what to plant, consider what you eat and how much produce the household consumes, then choose vegetables that fit with your diet. Some vegetables, like peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, and squash, produce throughout the season. Others, such as carrots and corn, produce one crop and then expire. Plan accordingly when you purchase plants or seeds, as you want enough food but not so much that it will go to waste. Choose three to four different vegetables and plant them in the garden. Select varieties that require similar soil conditions, so that you can adjust the pH and mix of the soil accordingly. This will serve as

Vegetable gardens can become central components of outdoor home landscapes. Not only do gardens add aesthetic appeal, but also they produce fresh fruits and vegetables to enjoy throughout the season.

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A sunny spot is good, but you also want a location with adequate drainage so your garden does not succumb to flooding or fungus during and after heavy downpours. Don't place the garden too close to rain gutters or near a pool, where splash-out may occur. Select a location that is isolated from pets so the plants are not trampled and cats and dogs do not relieve themselves nearby.

would be put outdoors. Many vegetables are planted outside in April or May, but definitely after frost conditions have waned. Read seed packets to know exactly when to plant or consult with the nursery where you purchased established seedlings. You also can visit The Garden Helper at www.thegardenhelper.com/vegtips to find out when to plant, seed depth and how long it takes plants to reach maturity.

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May 1, 2014

FSPA All Access Pass For Prospective Students to Feature Open House and Complimentary Spring Concert Tickets Franklin School for the Performing Arts (FSPA) invites prospective students and families to learn more about programs in music, dance and drama via the school’s All Access Pass, which includes complimentary tickets to any of the FSPA Spring Concert performances on Saturday, May 17 at 4 and 7 p.m. and on Sunday, May 18 at 1 and 4 p.m. Featuring FSPA students in all levels and disciplines of dance and musical theater, as well as the FSPA Glee Club, musical theater troupes, dance companies and the international touring ensemble Electric Youth, Spring Concert is presented in an audience-friendly, 90-minute format. The shows pro-

vide a dynamic way to experience FSPA’s performance training and to learn about the curriculum across many dance disciplines, music and mutheater sical programming.

with faculty and staff, and hear more about FSPA programs for all ages and ability levels, whether for recreational enjoyment or serious study. Since 1985, FSPA has been dedicated to the enjoyment of the arts for all ages and to the artistic growth and development of young people. Founded by Director Raye Lynn Mercer, the school is built upon the notion that arts experiences are an integral part of a well-rounded

FSPA will also hold a Spring Open House at 38 Main Street in downtown Franklin on Wednesday, May 21 from 4-8 p.m. The community is encouraged to tour the facilities, observe classes and rehearsals, speak

FSPA Slates Auditions for Summerstage Production of Legally Blonde The Franklin School for the Performing Arts (FSPA) will hold placement auditions for SummerStage 2014 on Monday, May 5 at 6:30 p.m. at 38 Main Street in Franklin. The annual SummerStage musical theater program for students in grades 3-12 features a two-week format and two productions. Students in grades 8-12 will be cast in Legally Blonde: The Musical, the feel-good stage musical adaptation of the smash-hit movie based on the novel by Amanda Brown. Younger SummerStage students (grades 3-8) will be showcased in an original parody titled “Paralegal: The Musical.” SummerStage runs from July 28-August 8, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., with performances on August 7 and 8 at THE BLACK BOX, the new performance and

event venue in downtown Franklin. Auditions are for placement purposes only; all SummerStage students will be cast in the productions. Please prepare 16 bars of a musical theater song. Students also will be asked to dance a simple combination that is taught at the audition. With music and lyrics by Laurence O’Keefe and Nell Benjamin and book by Heather Hach, Legally Blonde is a high energy, campy romantic comedy. With tongue-in-cheek humor and a winning, upbeat style, the musical tells the story of sorority sister Elle Woods, who follows her exboyfriend to Harvard Law School intent on winning him back. But Elle learns to stay true to herself instead.

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FSPA summer session programming runs from June 30 to August 23 and also includes performing arts workshops and one-week camps, an eight-week session of voice, instrumental and dance classes, and two ballet intensives. Performing arts camps include Camp ProVoice, Jazz and Tap Camp, Choreography Camp, Broadway Camp and Acting Camp, as well as Little Gems Ballet Camp, Creative Kids Camp and Little Music School Experience

for younger children. Among FSPA’s 2- and 3-day workshops, critically-acclaimed R&B singer April Hall will conduct a Vocal Styles workshop for ages 13-18, introducing students to jazz phrasing, scatting and improvisation, as well as microphone and performance techniques. Rock Out, for musicians of all levels, provides students with the opportunity to jam with talented area musicians and learn from wellknown Boston professionals. A

education. FSPA brings the performing arts disciplines together under one roof, with an extensive roster of classes and unparalleled calendar of performing opportunities. FSPA’s Spring Concert will be presented at Franklin’s Thomas D. Mercer Auditorium, 224 Oak Street. Tickets are $18 and $20 for general admission. Prospective students and families should call FSPA at 508-528-8668 to reserve their complimentary tickets and schedule a trial class or tour of the facilities. Classes continue at FSPA through June 23 and registration for summer and fall sessions is ongoing. performance skills workshop, Up Your Game, will focus on audition techniques, presentation skills and developing or improving an audition binder, headshot/resume and audition wardrobe. Behind the Scenes will introduce students to the many details involved in bringing a production to the stage, including an overview of the technical and operational aspects of producing a show. Register over the phone at (508) 528-8668 or in person at 38 Main Street in Franklin. For further information, including a summer session brochure with full program descriptions and dates, call or visit online at www.fspaonline.com.

Wrentham Charter Update On March 11, 2014, members of Wrentham’s Town Government Study (TGSC) appeared before the General Court of Massachusetts Joint Committee on Municipalities and Regional Government to testify on Wrentham’s petition to the General Court for a special act creating a Charter for the Town of Wrentham. State Senator Richard Ross and State Representative Shawn Dooley introduced TGSC members Jerry McGovern, Deb Torchia, and Dan Vieira to the Joint Committee in the hearing conducted at the Massachusetts state house. The TGSC provided an overview of the Charter petition and answered the Joint Committee’s

questions. Wrentham’s petition is a result of a 91-21 vote by Town Meeting last November to submit the Charter to the legislative process. Following the hearing, the Joint Committee voted to favorably endorse the petition for a special act. The Charter will next be voted on by the full General Court (Senate and House) later this spring. Assuming a favorable vote by the General Court, the Charter question will be placed on the ballot in Wrentham for the General Election in November 2014. If that vote carries, the Charter will go into effect on January 1, 2015. The TGSC had hoped that the legislative action would have

been timed such as to allow the Charter question to be on the April town election ballot. But it was also understood that that would have been a very tight window of opportunity. Having the question on the November ballot provides a greater opportunity to make the public fully aware or the benefits and impacts of the Charter. Once the General Court votes on the Charter petition, the TGSC will provide more updates and specifics on how the committee will enable the public to become more informed about the November ballot question and the Charter. Submitted by Town Government Study Committee.


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

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May 1, 2014

Living Healthy Understanding Laser Vision Correction By: roGer m. kaLdawy, m.d. miLford frankLin eye Center Also known as refractive surgery, Laser Vision Correction refers to elective operative eye procedures that use a laser to reshape the cornea and change the way light is focused or “refracted” by the eye. The goal is simple: to reduce your dependence on glasses or contacts. If you are nearsighted, farsighted

or have astigmatism and feel that glasses or contact lenses limit your activities, Laser Vision Correction may be the right choice for you. The most common Laser Vision Correction procedures are done with an Excimer Laser. The Excimer Laser is a computer controlled cool laser that corrects vision by reshaping the cornea to improve the way light is focused or

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refracted by the eye. Two major procedure types are available for treating low to moderate levels of nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism: Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) and Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK). In both cases, the laser sculpts the cornea in about 30 to 60 seconds and the entire procedure usually takes less than 15 minutes. The Excimer Laser has been FDA approved for use in both PRK and LASIK. This type of laser is ideal for corneal surgery because it emits a “cool” or nonthermal light beam that eliminates thermal or heat damage to surrounding tissue. Newer lasers are now state of the art and employ custom software able to treat nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism up to a specific level. Lasers also employ eye-tracking devices, providing additional level of precision as the surgery is being performed. This feature allows the laser to continuously detect and compensate for eye movements, while guiding the laser beam to keep it centered over the treatment area. Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) changes the shape of the cornea to improve the way light is focused or “refracted” by the eye. After eye drop anesthesia is used to numb the eye, an instrument or a different laser are used to create a corneal flap. The surgeon carefully lifts the flap, and

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in 30 to 60 seconds, ultraviolet light and high-energy pulses from the Excimer Laser reshape the internal cornea. By adjusting the pattern of the laser beam, the surgeon can treat high levels of near-sightedness and moderate amounts of farsightedness and astigmatism. After the cornea has been reshaped, the flap is gently repositioned in its original position. Because of the cornea’s natural bonding qualities, healing is rapid and does not require stitches. LASIK is performed as an outpatient procedure. Some patients report a slight, post-operative discomfort that is usually alleviated with eye drops. Many patients see a dramatic improvement in their vision within the first day. For others, vision may fluctuate and continue to improve for several weeks. Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) utilizes the same laser, but the procedure is different: After eye drop anesthesia is used to numb your eye, the epithelium (the outermost layer of the eye) is removed followed by applying the same Excimer Laser as in LASIK to reshape the cornea. PRK is performed as an outpatient procedure. Immediately following the procedure, a bandage contact lens is placed over the eye for three to five days to protect the eye while it heals. PRK has a lengthier healing process and more discomfort than

LASIK. Patients may report some discomfort after the procedure until the outer portion of the cornea (epithelium) heals, usually within 48 to 72 hours. Some patients see a dramatic improvement in their vision within the first week. For others, vision may be blurry and fluctuate for several weeks to several months. LASIK and PRK almost always lead to the exact same results. LASIK is faster to heal, but there are risks including the need to perform a cut in the cornea, possible dry eyes because of the cut and the potential for weakening the structure of the cornea if too much correction is needed or if the shape of the cornea is too weak to start with. PRK, on the other hand, has dramatically lower risks of these side effects and of course, there is no cutting to worry about…But the healing time is longer. Refractive surgery cannot correct presbyopia (need for reading glasses when we are over 40). Although the need for glasses/ contacts will be much lower after laser vision correction, the need for reading glasses will persist if you are over 40. In order to alleviate the need for reading glasses (if you are over 40), we sometimes plan monovision. This describes a situation where one eye is corrected to provide good distance vision but the other eye is left slightly nearsighted on purpose. In this case, and for many people, the brain automatically adjusts to use the better eye for the specific targeted vision. The nearsighted eye focuses well on near objects and can be used for reading or similar activities, whereas the other corrected eye can be used for driving, sports, or other activities requiring distance vision. Our center and surgeons are specialty trained in laser vision correction. Patients are offered the best and latest technology available, closer to home. While others ask you to travel somewhere else where you only see your surgeon once or twice, your care with us is by the surgeon himself before, during and after the surgery. Laser Vision Correction can alleviate your dependence on glasses and contacts, and in many cases eliminates this dependence. This is indeed one of the best decisions one can make. For more details, see our ad on the front page.


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May 1, 2014

Page 19

Living Healthy Pond Home names Wrentham's Witham as Marketing Coordinator Pond Home Administrator Becky Annis is pleased to announce Wrentham resident Fran Witham as Pond Home’s Marketing Coordinator. In this capacity Witham will meet with professional health care providers on behalf of Pond Home to help ensure the long-term care needs of local senior citizens.

makes us unique in the industry.” Annis says, “In developing this position I was looking for someone who could help educate professionals in the health care field about the type of care and support we can offer at Pond Home. Fran, who has developed a strong connection to our residents, staff, and families, is the perfect person to fill

this pivotal role within Pond Home.”

Pond Home offers Residential Care and Supportive Nursing Care in a beautifully maintained colonial home on Route 140 in Wrentham, providing all meals and 24 hour nursing care. It is managed by Rogerson Communities, a Boston based non-profit recog-

From its pastoral setting, to its home-cooked, nutritious meals, to its attentive and devoted staff, Pond Home is a retirement home for seniors who want to live in a secure and caring environment while enjoying the companionship of their peers.

Witham has been Pond Home’s Social Worker since July 2012 and will continue in that capacity, in conjunction with her new responsibilities as Marketing Coordinator.

nized as a leader in the management and development of elder housing and services. To learn more about Pond Home contact 508-384-3531, or visit www.pondhome.org. Also, follow Pond Home on Facebook by like its page.

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May 1, 2014

Sports KP Boys Net Squad Aims For 3rd Straight Crown By ken Hamwey Staff SPortS writer This year’s King Philip boys tennis team has a daunting task in the days ahead — it’s to win the school’s third straight KellyRex Division championship in the always challenging Hockomock League. Coach Laurie Puddester’s Warriors have started their season with a 4-2 record, numbers that reveal just how difficult it will be for her squad to win three titles in a row. Last year, KP finished with a 16-2 mark that included a streak of 14 consecutive triumphs. The Warriors’ netmen have talent and they’re athletic but they know what it’s like to have a target on their backs. “Our goal is to win three straight Kelly-Rex championships but it’s going to be a battle,’’ said Puddester who’s in her 14th season as KP’s coach. A lot of things will have to fall into place for a repeat. I see a close-fought race with quality teams competing for the crown. Whoever wins the division will have earned it.’’ Puddester lists Franklin, North Attleboro and Mansfield as strong challengers. “All three have traditionally solid programs,’’ Puddester said. “Franklin has a tennis club so that, in itself, makes them

strong and provides a feeder system. Mansfield and North Attleboro have talent and, like the Hockomock League in all sports, they have athletes. I’m not sure how Attleboro and Taunton will be but I know there’s parity in our division.’’ Puddester has reason to rate her team as a title contender because she’s got 13 returnees from last year and 10 of them are seniors. Two of those seniors are co-captains — Kevin Williamson at second singles and Nathan Gee at second doubles. “Kevin is powerful and fast,’’ Puddester said. “He serves very well and he hits the ball hard. Nathan is a steady, smart player who uses his skills to his advantage. Both captains are quality leaders and they definitely lead by example.’’ Seniors Jason Trudeau and Adam Strubeck are playing at first and third singles, respectively. Trudeau was a Hockomock League all-star last year in first doubles in his first season of varsity tennis and Strubeck did not start last year, nor did he gain any varsity experience in any matches. “Jason is a good athlete who’s fast and has very good hand-eye coordination,’’ Puddester said. “Adam grinds out matches by either fighting through situa-

KP tennis coach Laurie Puddester flanked by her captains -- Nathan Gee, left, and Kevin Williamson.

tions, running constantly or falling to get to the ball. He’s a good baseline player who hits steady ground strokes.’’ The Warriors first doubles tan-

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dem includes two more seniors — Tim Smith and Kyle Caragliano. Both had limited varsity experience last year, playing at second doubles and third singles. “Tim is tall, quick and has good arm length,’’ Puddester noted. “He’s an athlete and he’s very strong at the net. Kyle complements Tim nicely because he’s always trying to set up the play. He’s like a point guard in basketball, eager to pass. Kyle is very steady and focused.’’ At second doubles with Gee will be senior Ross Carey. “Ross has the hardest serve on the team and his forehand shot is strong,’’ Puddester noted. In the mix for playing time at either singles or doubles are sophomore Garrett Schneider and senior Sam Weitzman. “Garrett is fast and coachable and Sam is a steady competitor whose technique is sound,’’ Puddester said. “Both will see

action as the season moves along.’’ Puddester, whose two daughters were outstanding players on the KP girls team, is well-versed in her coaching background. She played No. 1 singles at Chicopee Comprehensive High and later was a teaching pro at a private club. Focusing on academics, she did not play varsity tennis during her undergraduate days at UMass-Amherst. For the last two fall seasons she’s been coaching the North Smithfield varsity girls net team. Whether her Warriors can get to the winner’s circle for the third straight season remains to be seen. But, what is known is that Puddester’s squad will rely on and display three attributes that have led to KP’s success. The Warriors will be competitive, display good sportsmanship and count on a solid work ethic.


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

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Sports Seniors Lead KP Warriors Baseball By CHriStoPHer tremBLay The King Philip Warriors varsity baseball team is returning a solid group of athletes from last year’s 1-19 campaign and Coach Patrick Weir believes his team can only go up. With 11 returning seniors, he knows his team is battle tested and ready to tackle the rest of the Hockomock League, although he knows it’s not going to be easy. “The Hockomock is a very strong league, probably the best in Massachusetts top to bottom,” Weir said. “Game in and game out we’ll have to go up against the iron of the league, there is no weak team.”

Looking to lead the Warriors through the Hock and into the state tournament are senior captains Mike Murray and Eric Cote. Murray, who is coming off an ACL injury, has had a minor setback and will be out the first few weeks of the season but will eventually take control of the centerfield position. Cote, on the other hand, is ready to go and is slated to be the Warrior’s workhorse on the mound. “Eric is a left-handed pitcher who chewed up a lot of innings for us last year,” Weir said. “Unfortunately he was on the short end of a lot of one run games where we committed key errors, but I fully

expect him to turn things around this spring and be that top notch pitcher.” Following Cote in the rotation will be senior righty Anthony Cerrone and John Harvey. Last season Cerrone got hurt and only saw action in a few games early in the season, but Weir is expecting a lot from the senior this year. Sophomore Jake Lannigan, who will see a lot of work on the JV level to open the season, should crack the varsity roster before the midpoint of the season. Offensively KP will look for senior shortstop Owen Galvin to lead the team at the plate.

“Owen led the team in average last year and I expect him to do the same this year,” the coach said. “He’s a gamer through and through with ice water running through his veins.”

take his position behind the plate. As the quarterback of the game, the defensive minded catcher has one of the strongest arms Coach Weir has seen in some time. His ability will keep runners close.

First baseman Tyler Hopkins will supply the Warriors with power, while Stephen Beattie, an outfielder with speed, will be the team’s leadoff hitter while second baseman Patrick Harrington will bat second in the lineup. According to the coach, Harrington puts the bat on the ball and something always seems to happen when he’s on the base paths.

Having only won one game last season, Coach Weir is not setting any type of goals this year.

Alex Shapiro will play the hot corner when Harvey takes to the mound, while Jason Fleming will

“I told the kids we’re going to take it every game, every inning, every at bat,” the coach said. “We’re going to play aggressive baseball in a very tough league, but we will prevail.” Having only been able to secure a single win last spring, there is only one way to go and that’s up and the Warrior nine seem poised to do so.

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KP Squad posed to improve on last year’s season.

Dean College Welcomes New Men’s Basketball Head Coach The Dean College Athletic department is excited to welcome Rico Cabral as its new Men's Basketball Head Coach. Cabral has coaching experience at the junior college level at Massasoit Community College and most recently at the four-year level at Mt. Ida College. He also had stints as an assistant coach at Boston College and St. Bonaventure University. "I have had the pleasure of coaching against Rico when he was at Massasoit," said Dean College athletic director John Jackson. "His teams were always well coached and well disciplined,” added Jackson.

Cabral's accomplishments are well documented, as he has been inducted into the New England Basketball Hall of Fame, the Mount Ida College Athletic Hall of Fame, as well as the Massasoit Community College Athletic Hall of Fame. Cabral will take over the men’s basketball program that went 21-5 this past season, and won both the Region XXI Championship and the Northeast District Championship. The bulldogs also participated in the NJCAA Men's National Division II Championship as the District 2 Representative.

Cabral resides in Walpole with his wife, Patti, and their two sons, Joseph and Michael Founded in 1865, Dean College is a private, residential college located in Franklin Massachusetts, 45 minutes from Boston, Massachusetts, and Providence, Rhode Island. Dean College offers five baccalaureate degrees in Business; Liberal Arts and Studies; Arts and Entertainment Management; Dance; and Theatre. Dean also offers 15 associate degree programs as well as a robust schedule of part-time continuing and professional education credit and certificate programs throughout the calendar year.

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May 1, 2014

Camps Dates for DARE to Things to Consider Before Dream Summer Day Choosing a Summer Camp Program Mark your calendars. The DARE to Dream Summer Day Program is pleased to announce the dates for 2014. A registration form will be sent home from the public schools after April vacation. The same form will be available from the group's web site at www.daretodreamsummer.com at that time as well. *Please note that the program dates are listed by the current (spring 2014) grade of your child. 4th Grade: August 4-8 5th Grade: August 18-22 6th Grade: July 14-18 7th Grade: July 28- August 1 NEW THIS YEAR! 3rd Grade: 2 day program July 21 and 22 (more info to come!) 8th Grade: 1 day trip to Water Wizz on July 23 The DARE to Dream Summer Day Program is entering its 22nd season, and we look forward to seeing you back with us for another exciting and fun-filled summer!

Though February does not often elicit images of youngsters building campfires or playing games in the pool, the month more synonymous with the Super Bowl and Valentine's Day is a great time for parents to start thinking about summer camps for their kids.

Summer camp is often something kids look forward to, and something they will fondly recall long after they reach adulthood. For many kids, summer camp provides a first taste of independence, as youngsters spend significant time away from home without their parents for the first time in their lives. But as great an experience as summer camp can be for youngsters, it can be just as difficult an experience if parents don't find the right fit for their children. That's why it behooves parents to start thinking about summer camps for their kids in winter, before camps start filling out their rosters, which

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A Day in the Life

tends to happen in early spring. The following are a few things parents should take into consideration when seeking a summer camp for their kids.

Staff The right summer camp staff can make all the difference. Many children are understandably shy when arriving at a summer camp, as their friends from back home might not be joining them. That can make kids hesitant to participate in activities or less enthusiastic about those activities. But a good staff will know how to make kids feel welcome, which should help them come out of their shells and make the most of their summer camp experiences. The quality of staffs can vary significantly depending on the camp, so it's important that parents ask camp representatives about their staffs before making any commitments. Ask how long the staff has been together and the types of training new and even veteran staff members undergo before the start of camp season? Does the training include first aid and emergency medical training and certification? It's also good to ask about the vetting process the camp employs before hiring new staff, including the extent of its background checks. Are criminal background checks conducted? How many references must potential staff members supply to be considered for employment? A good camp will be forthcoming with answers to all of your

When vetting camps for kids, parents should ask what a typical day is like once the season hits full swing. Many parents want their youngsters to have a wellrounded experience, while others might want their kids to attend a more specialized camp, whether it's a sports camp focusing on a particular sport or a music camp devoted to helping kids become better musicians. Regardless of the type of camp parents are considering for their kids, they should ask about what daily life at the camp is like. Ask to see schedules and how strictly camps adhere to those schedules. When considering specialized camps, ask the staff representative if kids will have the chance to simply have a little fun and which types of recreational activities are planned to give kids a break from what are often rigorous schedules.

Camp Goals Another thing parents must consider before choosing a summer camp for their kids is the goals of each individual camp. A camp should be dedicated to ensuring kids have fun, even when kids are attending more specialized camps that tend to be more strict. In addition, parents should look for a camp that wants its attendees to foster relationships with their fellow campers. Camp can be lonely for some youngsters, especially those attending summer camp for the first time, but a summer camp that strives to promote friendship among its campers can reduce, if not eliminate, any feelings of homesickness. Late winter is when parents should start looking at summer camps for their kids, and there are a host of factors moms and dads should take into consideration during the vetting process to ensure their youngsters have as much fun as possible.


May 1, 2014

Calendar of Events May 1 Mother Goose on the Loose - A highly interactive program for babies, toddlers, and caregivers. Join us for music, rhymes, puppets, lap bounces, and more! Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA. May 2 Baby/Toddler Playgroups - Two programs – Birth to pre-walkers with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 9:30 a.m. Toddlers (walkers) to ages 2 ½ with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. Meet new friends, play with the toys and gym equipment purchased with funds from the Friends of Fiske!!! Come join the fun! No registration required just drop in. If arriving before 10 a.m. please ring doorbell. Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Rd., Wrentham, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. May 3 Meat Raffle - To benefit the Pan Mass Challenge for the Jimmy Fund. May 3, 2014 at 3pm at the Red Rooster Pub, 510 Washington St./Route 1 in Wrentham. Also a 50/50 Raffle. May 6 Norfolk Annual Town Election, Freeman Kennedy School May 7 Baby Time – Stories, rhymes, songs, and play for babies and their caregivers. Baby Time is now a drop-in program, so there is no need to register. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 10:30 to 11 a.m. Multi-Age Storytime- An interactive drop-in story time with songs, games, and a hands-on activity for children 2 and up with caregiver. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. On My Own Storytime - An independent story time experience with books, songs, and a hands-on activity. Caregivers must stay in the building, but are encouraged to let children attend the program alone. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 1:30 to 2 p.m. May 9 Baby/Toddler Playgroups - Two programs – Birth to pre-walkers with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 9:30 a.m. Toddlers (walkers) to ages 2 ½ with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. Meet new friends, play with the toys and gym equipment purchased with funds from the Friends of Fiske!!! Come join the

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fun! No registration required just drop in. If arriving before 10 a.m. please ring doorbell. Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Rd., Wrentham, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. May 13 Norfolk Annual Town Meeting, King Philip Jr. High School, 7 p.m. May 14 Baby Time – Stories, rhymes, songs, and play for babies and their caregivers. Baby Time is now a drop-in program, so there is no need to register. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 10:30 to 11 a.m. Multi-Age Storytime- An interactive drop-in story time with songs, games, and a hands-on activity for children 2 and up with caregiver. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. On My Own Storytime - An independent story time experience with books, songs, and a hands-on activity. Caregivers must stay in the building, but are encouraged to let children attend the program alone. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 1:30 to 2 p.m. May 8 Science Series: Slimy Science - Ewwww! Learn about all things gooey and slimy in this workshop. We will be doing some silly squishy experiments! Caregivers must remain in the building. Registration required. 10:30 to 11: 30 a.m. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA. Planning for College - the nuts and bolts of paying less for college and getting in, with Paul Hemphill, author and college planning specialist. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA. May 15 Mother Goose on the Loose - A highly interactive program for babies, toddlers, and caregivers. Join us for music, rhymes, puppets, lap bounces, and more! Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA. May 16 Baby/Toddler Playgroups - Two programs – Birth to pre-walkers with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 9:30 a.m. Toddlers (walkers) to ages 2 ½ with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. Meet new friends, play with the toys and gym equipment purchased with funds from the Friends of Fiske!!! Come join the

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*Not valid on trip or diagnostic fees. This offer expires May 31, 2014. Offer code OT-A-50 fun! No registration required just drop in. If arriving before 10 a.m. please ring doorbell. Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Rd., Wrentham, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. May 17 Franklin School for the Performing Arts (FSPA) Spring Concert performances from 4and 7 p.m. Featuring FSPA students in all levels and disciplines of dance and musical theater, as well as the FSPA Glee Club, musical theater troupes, dance companies and the international touring ensemble Electric Youth, Spring Concert is presented in an audience-friendly, 90-minute format. The shows provide a dynamic way to experience FSPA’s performance training and to learn about the curriculum across many dance disciplines, music and musical theater programming. Franklin’s Thomas D. Mercer Auditorium, 224 Oak Street. Tickets are $18 and $20 for general admission. Prospective students and families should call FSPA at 508-528-8668 to reserve their complimentary tickets and schedule a trial class or tour of the facilities. May 18 Franklin School for the Performing Arts (FSPA) Spring Concert performances from 1 and 4 p.m. Featuring FSPA students in all levels and disciplines of dance and musical theater, as well as the FSPA Glee Club, musical theater troupes, dance companies and the international touring ensemble Electric Youth, Spring Concert is presented in an audience-friendly, 90-minute format. The shows provide a dynamic way to experience FSPA’s performance training and to learn about the curriculum across many dance disciplines, music and musical theater programming. Franklin’s Thomas D. Mercer Auditorium, 224 Oak Street. Tickets are $18 and $20 for general admission. Prospective students and families should call

FSPA at 508-528-8668 to reserve their complimentary tickets and schedule a trial class or tour of the facilities. May 21 Baby Time – Stories, rhymes, songs, and play for babies and their caregivers. Baby Time is now a drop-in program, so there is no need to register. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 10:30 to 11 a.m. Multi-Age Storytime- An interactive drop-in story time with songs, games, and a hands-on activity for children 2 and up with caregiver. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. On My Own Storytime - An independent story time experience with books, songs, and a hands-on activity. Caregivers must stay in the building, but are encouraged to let children attend the program alone. Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA, 1:30 to 2 p.m. May 21 Franklin School for the Performing Arts will also hold a Spring Open House at 38 Main St in downtown Franklin on Wednesday, May 21 from 4-8 p.m. The community is encouraged to tour the facilities, observe classes and rehearsals, speak with faculty and staff, and hear more about FSPA programs for all ages and ability levels, whether for recreational enjoyment or serious study. May 22 Mother Goose on the Loose - A highly interactive program for babies, toddlers, and caregivers. Join us for music, rhymes, puppets, lap bounces, and more! Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA. May 23 Baby/Toddler Playgroups - Two programs – Birth to pre-walkers with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 9:30 a.m. Toddlers

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(walkers) to ages 2 ½ with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. Meet new friends, play with the toys and gym equipment purchased with funds from the Friends of Fiske!!! Come join the fun! No registration required just drop in. If arriving before 10 a.m. please ring doorbell. Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Rd., Wrentham, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. May 29 Mother Goose on the Loose - A highly interactive program for babies, toddlers, and caregivers. Join us for music, rhymes, puppets, lap bounces, and more! Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St, Norfolk, MA. Evening Book Group Books will be available at the circulation desk. FACILITATOR : Jan Battikha. Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Rd., Wrentham, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. May 30 Baby/Toddler Playgroups - Two programs – Birth to pre-walkers with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 9:30 a.m. Toddlers (walkers) to ages 2 ½ with Mom, Dad or caregiver meet on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. Meet new friends, play with the toys and gym equipment purchased with funds from the Friends of Fiske!!! Come join the fun! No registration required just drop in. If arriving before 10 a.m. please ring doorbell. Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Rd., Wrentham, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. May 31 Arts on the Common Festival from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wrentham Town Common. Over 30 artists will be there displaying fine arts, crafts, and fiber arts. There will be entertainment including soft jazz, a juggler, Brazilian music, dance demonstration, hand made paper making and more. And for the kids young and old, Chalk the Walk will be back!


Page 24

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

Charter School Gains Regional Status; Will Double in Size BFCCPS to Seek New Facility to Expand Student Population, Programs By J.d. o’Gara It’s one of the oldest charter schools in the state, and now the 20-year-old Benjamin Franklin Classical Charter Public School, serving Kindergarten through 8th grade at 201 Main Street in Franklin, across from St. Mary’s, will double its size, increase to regional status and look for a new building. “We are what’s considered a district charter school,” says head of the school Heather Zolnowski, who has acted not just as principal, but essentially superintendent for the past two years and 5 years as assistant head of school. “We are Franklin Charter School District – if we have more students than we have spaces for, the siblings of those already attending go into first tier (of a lottery system); we pull them first. Then, we pull from anyone residing in Franklin at time of their application. Then, after that, anybody in state of Massachusetts can apply.” Now that the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)

approved the Benjamin Franklin Classical Charter Public School Amendment in late March, students from several other surrounding towns will have a better chance to get chosen in the lottery. “Becoming a regional, the way that that will change is first siblings, then anyone who lives within district will be going into second pool instead of just Franklin, then anyone else,” says Zolnowski. Now included in the second tier along with Franklin residents are those from Holliston, Medway, Millis, Bellingham, Blackstone, Millville, Hopedale, Mendon, Upton, Milford, Norfolk, Plainville, Walpole and Wrentham. “And those are all towns that over the past 19 years have shown interest in applying and attending our school,” says Zolnowski. The charter will also allow the school to double in size, to 900 students a change that will also necessitate a move to a larger facility. Currently, the charter school has 447 enrolled, with a maximum of 450 under their previous charter. This allows space only for open-

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The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) has approved an amendment making the 20-year old Benjamin Franklin Classical Charter School a regional, rather than a district school, and doubling its student population. This means students from towns surrounding Franklin, including Holliston, Medway, Millis, Bellingham, Blackstone, Millville, Hopedale, Mendon, Upton, Milford, Norfolk, Plainville, Walpole and Wrentham, will have a better chance of attending. The school is also searching for a new location to accommodate the increase. Photo used courtesy of BFCCPS.

ings in Kindergarten, says Zolnowski, and only 14 new families this year. The school’s charter was originally approved in 1995. “Our school was started by grassroots group of parents who really wanted a type of education that was different from the type kids were receiving at the time,” says Zolnowski. These parents, she says, wanted to “educate the whole child, not just in math, reading, writing, history and science, but also language and ability to actively think and engage in education. Students start presenting at academic assemblies in Kindergarten, with public speaking up to 8th graders, who have Community capstone projects that students plan, implement and present to audiences of 200 to 300.” Zolnowski explains that the school has a focus on art, music and language and stresses character education in everything it teaches, she says, as well as community service. In addition to classroom education, BFCCPS also partners with parents, whom it sees as the primary educators of their children. “We have an amazing curriculum,” says Joanne Basile, parent of two boys in the school. Basile says she is excited that the school will be able to welcome larger communities.

“I don’t think it’s going to take away anything from the school experience. I think it’s going to expand what we have to offer,” says Basile. “The people who want to travel to the new charter school are going to be people like me, who are invested in the school. In order to go to a charter school, it has to be a family that’s made a choice.” Basile is not daunted that the BFCCPS may have to entertain the possibility of moving to a different

“The church has been very gracious and has worked with us, but they have one of the hugest CCD programs in country,” she adds. Zolnowski says she’d love for her students to have access to a science lab, language classrooms, more space conducive to special education services and expanded outdoor play areas, as well as more access to its building. “The gym is the auditorium is the music room is the cafeteria,” laughs Basile. “Our hope is to stay here in Franklin, This is where our home is … We’re working very hard to stay here,” says Zolnowski. “We’re concentrating efforts into finding a facility that would fit our needs and trying to keep it in Franklin.”

community in order to find space. “That the school might be housed outside of Franklin is worth the reward and the benefits of having a greater space,” says Basile. Zolnowski explains that the old brick building the school leases from St. Mary’s was its old Catholic school. St. Mary’s church in Franklin still uses the building for CCD classes. “At 3:45 every day, we vacate the building, and children come in for CCD programs,” says Zolnowski.

Enrollment is already set for the 2014-2015 school year, says Zolnowski, who adds that the school formed a development task force a couple of years ago to gain parent and staff input, and to learn from other regional charter schools that have undergone similar processes. “The regional aspect of amendment will go in effect for 2015-16 academic year. That will happen in February/March of 2015. We will increase the number of districts served,” says Zolnowski. “We will not increase our enrollment, however, until we can secure a new facility.”


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

Page 25

KP Students Sign Letters of Intent By PatriCk CoLeman Last month, King Philip High School seniors Rachel Palumbo and Owen Gonser gathered with friends, family and school officials. The two high school athletes signed their letters of intent, since both had accepted athletic collegiate scholarships. Gonser, a record setting runner, will head to Storrs, CT in the fall and run for the University of Connecticut, while Palumbo will be a little closer to home playing for Bentley's women's soccer team. Both are looking forward to their college careers and reminisced about their years as Warriors. Gonser is excited to run the rolling hills of Storrs, CT and joining a track program that has new

coaching and is on the upswing with a good solid core of athletes. "I think we can make it to the next level," he says. In addition to being excited to run as a Huskie, he looks back fondly at the track team and being pushed by his teammates. Palumbo is also excited about Bentley and is ready to make the jump to Division II sports. She feels her coach, Gary Pichel, pushed them hard her senior year. "He's pretty demanding," she said with a smile and believes she's prepared to handle the transition to college athlete. She is looking forward to attending a business school with Bentley's reputation, building on the experience she received as part of KP's DECA program. Palumbo is also excited

about going to school close to Boston. "It's the perfect opportunity," she says. When she thinks back over her high school career, she says some of the highlights include intense games against Franklin High School, making the state playoffs for the first time in her last year, and a touching Senior Night. "It was very memorable," she said. "Very rewarding." While both Gosner and Palumbo have plans for the fall, their high school careers are ongoing. Gosner is running spring track and Palumbo is leading the girls' tennis team. (This article originally appeared in The Wrentham Times, www.wrenthamtimes.com)

KP Students Earn National Honor By raCHeL PaLumBo, kinG PHiLiP deCa viCe PreSident Matt Capobianco and Emily Lambalot, both seniors at King Philip Regional High School are the recipients of the 2014 DECA Emerging Leader Honor Award. This award recognizes students studying marketing, finance, hospitality and management for being an academically prepared, community oriented, professionally responsible, and ex-

perience leader through participation in DECA. The award recipients must be a DECA member in his/her senior year of high school with a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or better for each of the high school semesters. The DECA chapter advisor at King Philip High School is James Dow. DECA is a career and technical student organization composed of more than 200,000 students who are inter-

ested in careers in marketing, entrepreneurship, finance, hospitality or management. DECA enhances the preparation for college and careers by providing curricular programs that integrate into classroom instruction, apply learning, connect to business and promote competition. DECA student members leverage their DECA experience to become academically prepared, community oriented, professionally responsible, experienced leaders.

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 26

May 1, 2014

Taylor’s Triumph 2nd Annual Race on June 7th On Saturday, June 7th, 2014, Norfolk will hold its 2nd Taylor’s Triumph, a 5K Run/Walk in honor of Taylor Manning who died unexpectedly of congenital heart failure in May of 2012. Taylor’s passing at the young age of 13 left a lasting mark on the community; she will be forever remembered for her spirit, laughter and sense of adventure that encouraged us all to live life to the fullest. Taylor’s Triumph will take place on Saturday, June 7th at the Holmes Field, 22 Myrtle Street, Norfolk, MA, and kicks off the Norfolk Community Day Celebration. Starting time is 9:00 am and registration will open at 7:30. The officially measured 5K is a fun, scenic route through a beautiful residential section of Norfolk. Runners and walkers can pre-reg-

a special place to live. First-time 5K runners and walkers, young teens and pre-teens, older adults and experienced runners all joined together to celebrate Taylor and support the Manning family. This year, we anticipate an equally enthusiastic outpouring from the community and hope you will join us for this wonderful event.

ister through May 31st at www.racemenu.com/events/35181 -Taylor-s-Triumph or by mailing in a registration form. Registrations will also be accepted on the day of the race. Last year, more than 550 participants attended the first Taylor’s Triumph and the event was a true reflection of what makes Norfolk

The Taylor’s Triumph 5K will include water stations, refreshments and live music! All participants are encouraged to wear Taylor’s favorite color “pink.” Participants will receive a commemorative tshirt and runners will be “chiptimed.” Entry fees are $30 for pre-registrants and $35 for same day registrations. All proceeds will be used for the construction of the Taylor Manning Memorial, an accessible water park at Camp Jew-

ell, a YMCA camp beloved by the entire Manning family. Taylor was a bright, energetic child who excelled in dance and school. She attended both the Norfolk Elementary Schools and Ursuline Academy where she made many enduring friendships. She

had a passion for adventure and loved travelling the country and abroad. She was close to her family and enjoyed spending time with her brother Jack, currently a 7th grader at KP Junior High. Please join the Norfolk community at Taylor’s Triumph to remember Taylor and celebrate her life!

Norfolk Fire Respond to Fallen Tree Norfolk Firefighters responded to a report of tree falling on a home at 14 King Philip Trail shortly before 1pm on March 26th during a time of high winds buffeting the area. The tree caused significant damage to the roof. Firefighters using the aerial ladder cleared sections of the tree and covered the roof with a tarp. Norfolk DPW assisted coordinating a private company's response to remove the tree.

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Norfolk Firefighters assisted the Wrentham Fire Department on April 1st at 808 South Street for a residential building fire. Norfolk Firefighter/Paramedics Jamie Masterson (left) Seth Hamilton (center) and Kevin Brady (right) don protective equipment prior to entering the structure. Plainville and Franklin firefighters were also on scene assisting Wrentham at this 4am fire.

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May 1, 2014

Page 27

May is Disability Insurance Awareness Month Don’t Let These Myths Stop You From Getting the Proper Coverage 1. Myth: “I’d rely on my savings until I could get back to work.”

BY JEFFREY SCHWEITZER Figuring out if you need disability insurance is pretty easy. If you have a job, you need it. Why then do the majority of American workers lack this basic protection? Common misconceptions are largely to blame. Here I will debunk four of the big myths surrounding this essential insurance coverage.

Reality: Most people overestimate the resources they have to cover their expenses if a disabling illness or injury kept them from earning a paycheck. According to a LIFE Foundation survey, half of working Americans say they couldn’t make it a month before financial difficulties would set in, and more than one in four would have problems immediately. Keep in mind that disabling illnesses or injuries often last for months or even year.

2. Myth: “I don’t need it – I don’t work in a dangerous profession.” Reality: You actually have a three in 10 chance of suffering a disabling illness or injury during your career that would keep you out of work for three months or more. While it’s true that people

in professions like farming, law enforcement, and construction face greater risks, the odd of suffering a long-term disability are high for all workers because illness – not accidents – account for 90 percent of disabilities that keep people out of work.

3. Myth: The government provides assistance when people get disabled. Reality: According to the National Safety Council, 73 percent of long-term disabilities are a result of an injury or illness that is not work-related and therefore wouldn’t qualify for state-based Workers’ Compensation programs. If you were hoping for Social Security disability benefits, know that about 45 percent of those who apply are initially denied, and those who are approved receive an average monthly benefit of just $1063, which would leave you with an income barely above the

poverty online. Government programs are a good back-up plan, but shouldn’t be your main line of defense.

4. Myth: “I have disability coverage at work.” Reality: Disability insurance through work is a great benefit, but you need to find out exactly what coverage you have. According to the U. S. Department of Labor, more than 70 percent of employers don’t offer longterm disability coverage. And short-term or partial coverage wouldn’t be enough to allow you to meet your current and future fi-

Plainville Police Officer James Rockett and Wrentham Police Officer Stephen Hearon made contact with the 18-year old and were able to calm him down enough to reach out to him, tie a rope around him and bring him back to safety. He was transported by ambulance to Sturdy

Hospital for evaluation. "Both officers performed exemplary," said Wrentham Police Chief James Anderson. "The professionalism demonstrated reflects highly on them and their profession." Mcgrath completes leadership training Wrentham Police Sgt. Barry McGrath successfully completed “Command Training” at Roger Williams University on April 11, 2014. This two-week comprehensive training program for police supervisors addressed contemporary concepts of management and leadership relevant to the responsibilities of first line

New England

Jeffrey Schweitzer can be found at Northeast Financial Strategies Inc (NFS) at Wampum Corner in Wrentham. NFS works with individuals and small businesses providing financial and estate planning, insurance, investments and also offers full service accounting, bookkeeping, payroll, income tax preparation, and notary public services. For more information, stop by the office, call Jeffrey at 800-560-4NFS or visit online www.nfsnet.com

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Police Save Man; McGrath Completes Special Training Wrentham and Plainville Police were able to save an 18-year old man threatening to jump off the Taunton St. overpass above 495. On March 31st, the man was distraught and had positioned himself outside the railings of the bridge getting ready to jump. Witnesses at the scene called for help and police responded at 3:15 p.m.

nancial obligations if you were unable to work for an extended period of time.

supervisors in a modern police agency. Some of the topics that were discussed included operational leadership and management principles, problem solving, organizational and interpersonal communications, disciplinary issues, and ethical decision making.

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 28

Financial “Spring Cleaning” Can Brighten Your Investment Picture techniques that can be used on your home can also apply to your investments and your overall financial strategy. Here are a few ideas to consider:

By mike kerriGan

The days are getting longer and warmer — a sure indication of the arrival of spring. Another sign of the season may be the urge you get to do some spring cleaning. But you might not have realized that some of the same spring-cleaning

• Get rid of “clutter.” As you do your spring cleaning, you may well find some clutter — a bunch of items you no longer need. As an investor, you might look at your portfolio and also find “clutter” in the form of investments that are no longer appropriate for your objectives. For example, perhaps some of them are virtual duplicates of other investments you own, thereby diminishing your potential for diversification. Or maybe some investments are now too risky for your needs. In any case, you may be better off rebalancing your portfolio.

Simplify your finances.

• Get organized. As you clean your home, you might find ways to organize your belongings and furniture more efficiently. And you may also be able to organize your investments more effectively. One possibility: Consider consolidating your investment accounts with one provider. If you have an IRA here, another one there and some other investments scattered about, you may be paying more in fees and commissions than is necessary. By consolidating these investments, you might save money and paperwork — and more importantly, you may find it easier, with all your investments under one “roof,” to follow a single, unified investment strategy. • Seal “cracks.” Over time, the grout between your kitchen or

bathroom tiles can crack, so you’ll need to re-grout to protect your flooring. And you may find that, in looking at your overall financial strategy, your “protection” component — primarily in the form of insurance — might have developed some “cracks” or “chips.” Specifically, has your life insurance kept up with changes in your family situation? Events such as marriage, remarriage or the arrival of a new child can all trigger the need to review your life insurance. And you’ll also want to make sure you have adequate disability insurance. Consult with a financial professional for information on appropriate protection vehicles. • Do some “dusting.” As part of your spring cleaning, you may need to dust furniture, shelves and other surfaces in your home. And if you’ve been investing for a long time, you may need to metaphorically “dust off” your financial strategy to “freshen it up” to reflect changes in your life. To cite one

Going to Disney World The dance students of Showcase Dance Productions spent their April Vacation in Disney. The dancers were selected by Disney Performing Arts to be part of the entertainment at the Walt Disney World Resort and traveled down to Florida on April 21st.

Mike Kerrigan Financial Advisor .

167 South St Rte 1a Plainville, MA 02762 508-643-0601

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The dancers also participated in Disney’s Broadway Magic Dance Workshop a 2 1/2 hour session blending Disney magic with the glitz of live musical theatre and

May 1, 2014 possibility, as you get close to retirement, you may need to shift some — but certainly not all — of your growth-oriented investments into income-producing ones. But you may also need to review and revise your financial strategy at other points in your life, such as when you begin saving for your children’s college education. Just as spring cleaning can bring more light into your home, sprucing up your investment picture can help you brighten your financial outlook. And these improvements can help you in all the seasons of your life. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. Edward Jones is headquartered in St. Louis. The Edward Jones website is located at www.edwardjones.com, and its recruiting website is www.careers.edwardjones.com. Member SIPC.

will be performing a dazzling Broadway production of Mary Poppins. Miss Sheryl and Miss Erika say the dancers are so excited to be a part of this once in a lifetime opportunity and they are counting down the days.

The Disney Dancers consisted of 21 performers from Wrentham, Norfolk, Franklin, Plainville, Foxboro, Bellingham, Seekonk, Naragansett, RI, Burriville, RI, and Cumberland, RI and ranged in age from 7 to 17 and performed 25 minute shows consisting of Irish Step and Jazz. To prepare for the trip, the dancers rehearsed since February with choreography by Miss Erika Damiani and under the direction of studio owner, Miss Sheryl Simons.

We publish the 1st of every month. Advertisement and editorial deadline is the 15th of each month. editor@norfolkwrenthamnews.com


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

Page 29

home M A R K E T P L A C E Jodi Johnson

Master's Diamond Award Winner REALTOR, Professional Stager C21 Commonwealth 266 Main Street Medfield, MA 02052 Direct: 508-570-4667 Email: info@jodijohnson.com

Need Help Selling Your Home?

My Recent Sales Activity:

"Jodi is a true professional who knows the real estate market. She is also a professional stager who helped us de-clutter our home and make it more appealing to a buyer’ s eye. She was always a step ahead of us. Jodi is a pleasant and personable young lady who goes the extra mile for her clients." Jack & Nancy

10 Valentine Dr. Norfolk $359,900 7 Sanderson St. Medway $315,000 2 Delmar Rd. Medway $299,900 3 Wall St. Walpole $429,900 9 Applewood Rd. Norfolk $579,000

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• www.jodijohnson.com

It’s A Sign of the Times… Spring is finally here!!! The phones are ringing; potential buyers are calling to see homes; and the listing calls are coming in at a steady pace. Homeowners are excited to see the grass again, and they’re now grooming their grounds. Real estate agents should be “marketing like they mean it.” The phones will not ring with market analysis requests unless the offer is made to homeowners.

Online marketing during this busy time of the year is now testing Google’s strength as never before. Offline marketing with postcards will keep the USPS in good standing for several months!! Marketing in your local newspaper is an ideal method of complementing the other online and offline marketing methods. Real estate agents have experienced a winter of consistent

About The Author:

snow storms that created gaps in homeowner responses. The good times are here, and homeowners are responding.

Barbara Todaro is the marketing agent for The Kuney-Todaro Team of RE/MAX Executive Realty in Franklin MA. The Kuney-Todaro Team is an award winning team that ranked #6 in New England and #4 in Massachusetts for 2013. Barbara has 36 years of real estate experience and is a blogger on ActiveRain, Google+ and several other real estate platforms.

Real estate agents who have not yet attempted to shake the fruit from the tree will be dormant this year. Those who are aggressively capturing fresh listings before they hit the ground will flourish. Real estate success is a result of marketing relentlessly. It’s A Sign of The Times….

For further discussion, Barbara Todaro may be reached at 508520-9881.

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 30

May 1, 2014

home M A R K E T P L A C E New Listing in Wrentham!

Circa 1920 surrounded by centuries old trees on the property & abutts Wrentham State Forest . Flowering trees, perennials, shrubs enhance the 2+AC grounds, a vision to enjoy. Charming interior, beautifully maintained. Sunny Great Room overlooks brick patio, relax or entertain. 4 bedrms, 31/2 baths. Home office has separate entrance. 2 Car attached garage. Elegance awaits you ! $584,900

74 Main Street, Medway, MA 02053 Direct: 508-533-6060 • Cell: 508-341-7652 www.classicprops.com

Carolyn Chodat Owner/Broker

Custom built estate home set on 2.02 acres. Offering a resort style atmosphere with an oversized patio, heated in ground pool, spa, cabana, and children's playhouse. Ideal for summer entertaining! Gourmet kitchen with new stainless steel appliances, oversized island with granite counter. Family room and sun room share a see thru fireplace. Master bedroom with vaulted ceiling and Jacuzzi bath. Second floor features a potential au pair or in law suite with private entrance. Walk out lower level has a game room with wet bar, media room, office or bedroom, sitting room, and full bath. Heated oversized garage with 9ft doors for the hobbyist! This is a must see home, meticulous in every detail. Horse lovers please note that horses are allowed, nearby riding trials, and room for a barn! $794,900

Home for Sale in Wrentham

BUILDER/CONTRACTOR

Chris Doucette 508-404-6051

Bob Pett 781-774-0447

DON’T SIGN ANYTHING... UNTIL YOU SEE US. IT COULD SAVE YOU

HUNDREDS...

Julie DiSangro Gross Earns Prestigious Re/Max Chairman’s Club Award Julie DiSangro Gross with Re/Max Real Estate Center, has qualified for the RE/MAX Chairman’s Club Award for 2013. In 2013, Julie Gross completed 48 transactions, distinguishing her amongst her peers and fellow associates as a top 10 Agent within RE/MAX of New England. Julie has been working in the real estate industry for more than 25 years and has extensive experience in residential sales, new construction, and relocation, to name a few of her specialties. Amoung Julie Gross’s achievements are multiple RE/MAX Platinum Club Awards, the esteemed RE/MAX Hall of Fame award, and in March Julie was named to America’s Best Real Estate Agents, a nationally recognized magazine. “Julie Gross has been an integral member of our team and is recognized in our office for her high level of professionalism and dedication to the real estate industry.

She is more than deserving of this renowned award and we are proud to have her on our team,” said Mike Gallagher, Broker/Owner of RE/MAX Real Estate Center. “Winning this award is a tremendous accomplishment. Julie has always been known for her unquestionable integrity, reputation, and exceptional work ethic. Our local communities continue to benefit from Julie’s expertise.” In addition, Julie has supported Norwood Youth Hockey as a past board member and Norwood Town Meeting Member. She makes a consistent commitment to various charitable organizations throughout the Norfolk County area.

About RE/MAX Real Estate Center RE/MAX Real Estate Center is a locally owned and operated fullservice real estate brokerage with offices located in Foxboro, North Attleboro, Norwood, and Walpole Massachusetts. Founded in 1997, the brokerage has 80 Realtors® and specializes in both Residential and Commercial real estate. To learn more, please visit www.realestatecenternow.com.

To Advertise J.L. Sullivan Construction, Inc Your 508-250-3678 Listings! POSSIBLY THOUSANDS.

• Roofing Call • Windows Now!

Lic #060223

Fully Insured

• Siding • Decks

Hic #140985

Call Tiffany Corliss 508-203-0890


May 1, 2014

Mill River Heights In Norfolk Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

9 Lot Community off Myrtle St.

Prices Starting at $839,900 Custom Build Your Home Or Buy A Lot Call Lorraine Kuney

508-380-9938

The Kuney-Todaro Team

“The #1 Team in Franklin’s #1 Office”

Read Barbara’s Blog: www.todarosellsfranklinma.com

Page 31


Page 32

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

May 1, 2014

FITNESS TOGETHER - Spring Training Program

4 Sessions - $99.00

JUMP START YOUR SPRING/SUMMER FITNESS GOALS MONTHLY PROGRAMS NOW AVAILABLE

FT-FRANKLIN | 508.520.6888 13 Main Street • Franklin, MA 02038 fitnesstogether.com/franklin-ma

Orthodontics and Invisalign for Children and Adults Now celebrating our 42nd year of crafting beautiful smiles for generations of Norfolk and Wrentham residents. Premier Elite Invisalign Providers (1200+ cases treated) Friendly and Professional Atmosphere

Convenient Appointments 24/7 On-Call Emergency Coverage

New Patients Always Welcome

Complimentary initial exam and orthodontic diagnostic records Easy Flexible Payment Arrangements • Most Insurances and Flexible Spending Plans Accepted

Trust your family's smiles to one of the most experienced orthodontic practices in the area. 508-359-2576 • 16 Park Street, Medfield www.drstarranddrglick.com

Norfolk/Wrentham May 2014