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February 1, 2013

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Artist a Wild Flower, Rare Bird in Local Scene Pamela Ruby Russell’s Photos Celebrated in Norfolk, Franklin By J.D. O’Gara

the River Flows, So Flows the Man.”

There’s no doubt. Pamela Ruby Russell is anything but conventional. When you meet her, you know you’ve encountered a force of nature, a flash of light and color that flits in and out of the picture like a hummingbird. Conversation with her is a fast-moving carnival ride, with bursts of passion, warmth and enthusiasm. Trying to describe her isn’t easy, but luckily, she documents the emotional experience of being Pamela through photographs and music. And it’s a beautiful view One can easily mistake Russell’s ephemeral nature – the ve- Award-winning photographer and singer/songwriter Pamela Ruby Russell is a splash of color on the suburban horizon of historic Norfolk, locity and intensity with which Mass. she puts forth her thoughts – as being frivolous. That is, until they experience her work. “When you’re an artist, you’re for.” Russell adds, with a laugh, an interpreter,” says Russell. “getting paid also helps!” Vivid color and crisp images in“You take in information, happy vite the viewer to linger in her After being encouraged to exor sad. You translate it into your photos, from a breathtaking press herself by a college acting panorama of ocean, a tropical language and share it. You’re re- coach, Russell first took to the jaunt into a lush Technicolor sponsive to the world around you, road with her camera photogreen jungle, or a doorway into how it makes you feel and then graphing the Hudson River coastthe tiny world of a leaf bug. Rus- you put it out there in whatever line through four seasons. The sell’s photographs are truly a medium works for you. If you result was her first New York oneglimpse of the world through her touch one person with your art, woman exhibition entitled “As that’s the greatest gift you can ask eyes.

Although her photography has won many awards over the years, Russell doesn’t define herself by it, saying her music is equally important to her as an artist. After honing her photo skills while living in Provincetown and the French West Indies, Pamela put down roots in Boston, studying voice and piano with Dante Pavone, Mark Baxter and others. Performing her first music gig at 32, Russell spent time in the Boston music scene with her various rock bands and recording. Although never released commercially, tracks from those early studio sessions grabbed the attention of famed DJ Joe Viglione and WBCN’s Carter Alan, making her a Featured Local Artist. She later recorded, Highway of Dreams (www.CDBaby.com/ rubytunes and iTunes) with her co-producer Peter Calo, Carly Simon’s guitarist, along with musicians from nine different countries.

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Six brave souls of the Wrentham area will dance into the spotlight next month at Lake Pearl Luciano’s for the first local fun and friendly fundraising competition of its kind in town. Dancing with the Wrentham Stars, organized by Wrentham Community Events, Inc., aims to bring the community together and raise funds for six different charitable organizations. The dance-off will take place on March 8 at Lake Pearl Luciano’s. According to one of the event’s organizers, Cal Harkins, dancers will have had 10 weeks to raise funds for organizations they’re teamed up with. On the night of the event, votes can be cast, for the cost of a dollar donation each, for each competitor. The

ARTIST

DANCE continued on page 2

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DANCE continued from page 1

dancer who amasses the highest number of votes, or raises the most for his or her organization, wins the “People’s Choice Award,” while the Judge’s Choice Award will be presented to the dancer scoring highest with a panel of judges. “The idea for the event came before the creation of the organization,” says Cal Harkins, who says the idea was borrowed

from a successful event like it in neighboring Norwood. Harkins, who grew up in Norwood, was talking one day with fellow Wrentham resident Tricia Dever Kelley about how successful Wrentham Day was in the town. “We were talking about Wrentham Day and how everyone comes together, and that’s kind of where we got the idea,” says Harkins, who knew that Norwood had an annual event that benefited the Circle of Hope Foundation. She and Kelly, she says, envisioned helping Wrentham organizations in a similar fashion. The two spent many weeks, she says, setting up meetings with other who would help

Manny Barros, a Divisional Retail Sales Manager for Home Market Foods who hosts many local events such as WeST Comedy Night, Family Fun Day, and the end of season Soccer Bash, is aligned with Random Smile Project, a non profit organization which provides multifaceted support to those experiencing difficult times.

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JR McDonald is an Executive Vice President at Cushman & Wakefield of MA. He will raise money for The Wrentham Lions Club, an organization most known for fighting blindness, but also one that empowers volunteers to serve their communities.

who have to put themselves out on the dance floor and see how much they can raise,” she says. Each star is receiving 10 dance lessons, donated by local studios, which include Dance and Beyond and Showcase Dance Productions, both in Wrentham and Savaria Dance Studio of Norwood. Each star has been matched up with a professional dance instructor who will choreograph a routine for them which they will perform the night of the event.

Dr. Jeff Marsden, Superintendent of Wrentham Public Schools, will dance for WEST (Wrentham Elementary School Trust), which seeks to fund innovative and educational projects for the Wrentham Elementary Schools. WEST has assembled an entire team of volunteers who are ready to support Jeff in his fundraising efforts.

“I think, in some instances, it’s who’s crazy enough to do this?” jokes J.R. McDonald, one of the six local faces who will be appearing on stage at Luciano’s. “(Dance lessons are) not something that fits neatly into any of these people’s schedules,” says McDonald, who at the time of interview had completed just one of his ten instruction sessions. “Really, it’s an effort on everyone’s part to pull this together,” he says. This is the first time, says McDonald, that he’s ever done anything like this.

ation Complex, Marci Odams, who works for Jesuits of New England and tends bar at Eaglebrook, who will dance for The Friends of Wrentham; Leanne Smith, owner of The Hairsmith Salon, who will dance for the Holly Club; Manny Barrows, of Home Market Foods, who will dance for the Random Smile Project; Dr. Jeff Marsden, Superintendent of Wrentham Public Schools, who will dance for WEST (Wrentham Elementary School Trust), and J.R. McDonald, Executive VP at Cushman & Wakefield, who will dance for the Wrentham Lions Club.

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them set the event up. “We didn’t know how the money was going to flow, things like that,” says Harkins. She explains that although they had a big idea, they needed “to create something to handle this event.” Thus, Wrentham Community Events was born. Currently, the group is made up of five volunteers, including Harkins, Kelley, Janet Steponaitis, Cheryl Ringler and Susan Cullen. Harkins applauds the six Wrentham “stars” making this effort, who include Judi Miller, of King Philip Schools dancing for The William A. Rice Recre-

“It’s something of a unique

“It was important to us to keep everything in Wrentham,” says Harkins. “Anything raised will be put back into Wrentham.” Wrentham Community Events wanted to “keep everything in Wrentham” and will also closely with Cable 8, Wrentham’s local cable provider. Although dancers were given tickets to sell, there will be a public ticket sale on February 2nd, for one day only, from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the Terrace Café in downtown Wrentham.

Leanne Smith, who has owned The Hairsmith Salon for the past 22 years and will dance for The Holly Club. Two of Leanne's sons Greg and Garrett are members of the military (US Airforce and The Coast Guard), and with the Holly Club has been involved in helping veterans.

So far, Harkins has been heartened by the response to the event, and she hopes pulling off a successful community event will then lead to other events to

idea. The stars really have to do a lot,” she says, “They are front and center. They’re the ones

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Judi Miller, with the King Philip School District for 33 years, spending the last 22 years as the Secretary to the Principal at the King Philip Middle School, will raise funds for The William A. Rice Recreation Complex, which provides recreational space for residents throughout the Norfolk County area.

“bring the community together.” “In the past 18 months, all the conversations we’ve had with people were very positive,” says

Harkins explains that proceeds from the event will benefit the local community.

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Marci Odams, who works in the Treasurer's office for the Jesuits of New England and also tends bar at The Eaglebrook Saloon. She is raising fund for The Friends of Wrentham, an organization which raises funds to nurture the lives of the residents of the Wrentham Development Center.

Harkins. “We’re very excited it’s all coming to fruition. We had a ball every step of the way. I hope everyone else will think so, too.” For more information on Wrentham Community Events, visit www.wce02093.org or email wrenthamcommunityevents@gmail.com.

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ARTIST

I never gave up on goodness.”

continued from page 1

Russell explains, “I create because I must. When I’m focusing on something creative, life makes sense and remembering what’s truly important is easy. Having gone through so much, I’ve got compassion for what we as humans endure and move beyond in each of our own lives.”

Currently the Vice Chair of Norfolk’s Democratic Town Committee, Pamela’s proud of being a community activist, but she’s also been an actress, silversmith, restaurateur and chef, housecleaner, Tarot card reader in Mexico, an emergency overnight vet’s nurse and even an elephant rider in a Mexican circus. Life’s taken her to some unique heights, including Woodstock in 1969, but things haven’t always been smooth sailing. Ms. Ruby’s had her challenges. Born in New York City, she and her brother survived tragic family dysfunction and violence. After her parents’ divorce in her teens, Russell struggled to support her mother, whose dive into long-term, untreated depression and alcohol abuse finally resulted in suicide

Russell spent a lot o time with this little fellow, she says, calling the finished product “Afternoon Soiree.”

when Russell was 22. Years later Russell learned more about inner strength, surviving a violent random street attack that left her unable to walk for a year. “I got through it,” says Russell. “I had my songs and dreams. And

Russell will often use Photoshop to bring out the color in her photos. Her objective in doing so, she says, is to present the emotion she felt when she took the picture.

fine art photography continues to please her many collectors. Pamela’s husband, respected astrologer Eric Linter, describes Pamela as “a rare creature on this planet.” “I’ve had profoundly inspiring influences in my life,” says Russell. “I’ve been lucky to have found amazing teachers. It’s a

Russell strongly encourages others to pay attention to their inner muses and share their creativity. “Mark Baxter, my long time vocal coach, ‘kindly scolded’ me once,” she says. “He said to me, ‘Stop being selfish and share your gifts.’” This past fall, Russell asked 26 local artists to share their work in her “Ruby & Friends’ Second Annual Art Exhibition,” which she curated and hosted at Norfolk’s Public Library with fellow photographer Janet Casey from Medfield. Russell’s own work has been shown at the Franklin Art Center, Zullo Gallery in Medfield, the Attleboro Museum, Cobwebs Antiques in Boston, and Providence’s Tsetse Gallery to name a few venues. She’s won numerous awards, among them first prizes in Stony Brook Camera Club competitions.

February 1, 2013 great honor and blessing to be a vessel of creativity and to know that what I share can be constructive and healing. Perhaps that’s the result of living a long time and allowing myself to be grateful and respect what comes through me.” Pamela Ruby Russell can be contacted at: pamelarussellphotos@gmail.com and on Facebook. This past fall, Pamela Ruby Russell put together a show featuring the work of several local artists. Although we are unable to show all of the photographs, here is a smattering of some work by the following local artists:

Photos by Victoria Schepps

With her website under construction, Pamela’s photos are on Facebook. Russell is currently preparing new exhibitions, she says, from work she shot on a recent trip to the French West Indies. Her artist portraits are used on CD covers and book jackets, while her

Two photos by Craig Higgins

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Valentine’s Day Norfolk Lions to Hold 2nd Health & Wellness Fair Fun! For Kids: Cupcake Decorating will be taking place at Norfolk Public Library just in time for kids in grades 3-6 to make some tasty treats for their Valentines. Registration is required for this class, which will take place in the Storyhour/Craft Room of the library from 3:30-4:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 7th. Contact Amy Reimann at (508) 5283380x5 or areimann@virtualnorfolk.org How about making a beautiful floral arrangement for your special someone? Rick Tedoldi, of the Norfolk Garden Club, will be showing kids in grades K-6 how to do just that at the Norfolk Public Library on Tuesday, February 12th, at 3:30 p.m. Registration is also required for this class, which has a $5 fee that must be paid at the time of registration, which can be done at the library registration desk. The Franklin Public Library is also putting its heart into Valentine’s Day, starting with a Krafty Monday celebration at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, February 4th for ages 6-8. Children will make “Valentine’s Day Wreaths” Later, on Valentine’s Day itself, the Fun Club, for ages 8-12, will play a special game of Valentine Bingo at 3:30 p.m.

For Adults: At the Proctor Mansion Inn, 36 Common St., Wrentham Special Valentines Thurs. Feb 14

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Sinatra & Ballroom Dancing featuring Mike Dutra $99 per couple (plus tax & gratuity), Doors open at 6:45 p.m., performance 7:30-10:30 p.m. An assortment of hot & cold appetizers, followed by light desserts & coffee, and cash bar Space limited. Advance reservations strongly recommended. Enjoy the show and stay the night! Performance & Room $199 per couple (plus tax & gratuity)

Yoga for Two Why not let Valentine’s Day take a new twist? Consider Partner Yoga, with Victoria Haffer at Yoga at the Ashram, at the Baba Siri Chand Yoga and Retreat Center, 368 Village Street in Millis. The event will take place on Friday, February 15th, from 7-8:30 p.m. and costs $35 per couple. Register online at www.YogaAtTheAshram.org.

The Norfolk Lions, in conjunction with representatives of the Medical and Wellness Community in the surrounding area, will hold the second “Health & Wellness Fair” for the Town of Norfolk and surrounding area on Saturday, March 2, 2013 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will be held at the newly-constructed Freeman Kennedy School, Boardman Street, Norfolk MA.

The day is being held in recognition of the need to make information available to the public that can help people make good decisions about life style and wellness. At the same time screening will be provided to assist in early diagnosis of conditions that frequently affect wellness, such as blood pressure, glaucoma, hearing loss, skin care, stress relief, exercise programs, nutrition and diabetes. New to the event this year will be the New England Organ Bank and the American Red Cross Bloodmobile which will hold a blood drive. Always recognizing the need for blood, the Norfolk Lions is thrilled to have this new, major participant. The Avon Breast Cancer Awareness Foundation will be in attendance as well.

Representatives will be on hand to provide instruction and consultation on a variety of health and wellness issues. Games and token giveaways will be made available to reinforce the recognition of the wide variety of resources readily available in our town and region. This is a FREE service event sponsored by the Norfolk Lions and open to the public.

“We are thrilled to be able to offer this event to the town of Norfolk and the surrounding communities”, say Paul Terrio and Al Bozza, the co-coordinators of the event. Al Bozza further goes on to say that nutrition will play a major role in this coming year’s event. Al, who is involved with the Nutrition Task Force for the area, is striving to provide good eating and cooking demonstrations at the event.

Along with American the Red Cross, other participants include the Lions EyeMobile, dental care, chiropractic, mobility, exercise and general wellness participants. Games, competitions, instruction and prizes will all be a part of the event. If you would like to participate, please contact Paul Terrio at (508) 528-1922 or phterrio@gmail.com, or Al Bozza at (774) 571-5170 or abozza@aol.com for more information. Norfolk Lions is part of Lions Club International, which has members in over 207 countries and areas, and includes a roster of over 46,000 clubs with 1.35 million members.

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February 1, 2013

Stuff to Do During February School Vacation By J.D. O’Gara

Stony Brook is located at 108 North Street in Norfolk.

Learn About Nature!

Visit the Library!

Stony Brook, in Norfolk, offers February Vacation Week programs: Tuesday, February 19th – Friday, February 22nd, from 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Themes: Tuesday – The Arctic; Wednesday – Japan; Thursday-Frozen Desert; FridayAloha Ring of Fire. Fee: $40m/$47nm per child. Pre-registration is required for all programs (except as noted). For more details, visit the Mass Audubon webpage at www.massaudubon.org or contact us at (508) 528-3140. Register by phone, email (stonybrook@massaudubon.org), fax (508-553-3864) or in person.

The Friends of the Medway Library will host a Free Movie and Popcorn event at the Medway Library, 26 High St., Medway, on February 21, 2013 at 3 p.m. Come watch Woody, Buzz, Jessie & Stinky Pete in the 2nd movie in the Toy Story series while munching on a variety of special treats. Sign up at the library or email the Friends at libfriendsprez@yahoogroups.com. Walk-ins will be accepted, but we prefer you to sign up so we can provide enough treats. Movie is rated G and runs 92 minutes.

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The Franklin Public Library, 118 Main St., Franklin will host a Family Storytime on Tuesday, February 19th, at 10:30 a.m., followed by a Winter Carnival later in the day for all ages at 3:30 p.m. featuring games, music, crafts, henna tattoos, face painting, refreshments, and more. On Wednesday, February 20th, the Franklin Library will offer Haunts, Haints, and Hollers: Scary Stories to Rattle Your Bones for ages 8 to 12 at 6:30 p.m. featuring International storyteller, Rona Leventhal, who will share the drama of haints, dead folk, shape shifters, and mysterious players.

Go Ice Skating! Don’t risk the ice at local ponds! Play it safe at the Norfolk Arena, One Dean St., in Norfolk. Public skating is open from 9-10:50 a.m. and 1-2:50 p.m. Monday through Friday, 7-8:50 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, from 1-2:50 p.m. In Franklin, The Pirelli Veterans Arena, 910 Panther Way, is open for public skate during vacation week from 12:30- 2:30 on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 1-3 p.m. Wednesday, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Saturday and 2:404:40 p.m. on Sunday.

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more. Call (508) 620-0937 or visit www.danforthmuseum.org. NEA Free Family Super Saturday on February 2, 9 and 23, from 10 a.m. – noon, includes free admission, gallery tours and activities. The museum also has vacation week classes. Visit the website for more details.

Play Soccer! Forekicks, at 10 Pine St., in Norfolk, is offering February vacation soccer skills clinics with two-day sessions for 7-9 yearolds and 10-12 year-olds on Thursday, February 21st and Friday, February 22nd, from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. for $125. Just visit www.forekicks.com.

Get Fit! Kidzturf, at 36 Milliston Road, Millis (in the Roche Bros. Plaza), offers a 6,000 square-foot facility for kids to blow off steam. In addition to school vacation week camps, Kidzturf has an open gym with equipment, and an inflatable obstacle course. Membership is not required for drop-off Turf Time, which costs $15 per hour with $5 per each additional sibling (must be potty trained). Parents can opt to Stay and Play for $15 a session and $5 per additional sibling, and there is no charge for children under age one when accompanying an older sibling. Membership brings Turf Time down to $10 per visit and lends discounts for other offerings. Visit www.kidzturf.com or call (508) 376-6222.

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Go Bowling! Ryan Family Amusements, at 1170 Main St., Millis is almost never closed. Take the kids for some candlepin bowling, and then blow off some extra energy with the arcade games. Hours are 9 a.m. – 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 9 a.m. – Midnight Friday Saturday. Ficco’s and Bowladrome, on Rte. 140 in Franklin, also offers candlepin bowling and is open 9 a.m. –10 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, 9 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. –11 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. –10 p.m. on Sunday.

Shoot Some Arrows! Ace Archers, Inc., at 131 Morse St. in Foxboro offers archery classes and practice (although beginners are advised to take one of the beginning archery classes on the second and fourth Saturdays before taking additional classes or using practice time. Hours are a bit unusual, so for more information, visit www.acearchers.com or call (508) 697-5647 for vacation week details.

Paint Some Pottery! Let the kids get creative at The Clayroom, located at 930 Main Street on the corner of 1A and Rte. 27 in Walpole. The hours are 12-6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, or Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Appointments are not necessary and all ages are welcome to paint a piece of bisque pottery from the shelves. You pay for the cost of the piece, plus an $8 fee per painter, which covers paint, brushes, stencils, sponges, squeezebottles, glazing, firing and studio space and time. Call (508) 660-1110 or visit http://clayroom.biz/index.html for more details.

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February 1, 2013

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Paying For College May Now Be Less Taxing Education Tax Rules Parents facing college expenses have several provisions in the tax law to consider. The benefits don’t apply to all, but there is something of interest for many families.

Tax credits The American Opportunity Tax Credit (formerly The Hope Credit) is available for certain tuition and fees, and it allows you to reduce taxes annually up to $2,500 per student for four years of college. The credit is equal to 100% of the first $2,000 of qualified expenses and 25% of the next $2,000. The Lifetime Learning Credit covers any year of post-secondary education, with a maximum credit of $2,000, no matter how many students in the family are eligible. Both the American Opportunity Tax Credit and lifetime learning credits phase out for taxpayers with higher incomes.

Other Education Tax Incentives Education savings accounts. You may establish an education savings account (previously called an education IRA) with a nondeductible contribution for any child under 18. The annual contribution limit is $2,000. Funds can accumulate and be paid out tax-free for qualified college expenses, including tuition, fees, books, supplies, equipment, and certain room and board costs. The funds can also be used to pay for elementary and secondary (K-12) school expenses at public, private, or religious schools. Eligibility for an education savings account starts phasing out at $95,000 of AGI for single taxpayers and $190,000 for married folks. individual retirement accounts (iRas). Existing IRAs can also be a source of college funds. You may make withdrawals before age 59 without penalty for amounts paid for college or graduate school tuition, fees, books, room and board, supplies, and equipment.

Education savings bonds. Interest on Series EE and Series I bonds issued after 1989 is nontaxable when used to pay tuition and fees for you or your dependents. This tax break begins to phase out once income reaches certain levels. Section 529 plans allow individuals to set up an account on behalf of someone else (say a child or grandchild) that can be used to pay college expenses. There are two types of plans: Prepaid tuition plans are designed to hedge against inflation. You can purchase tuition credits, at today’s rates, that your child can redeem when he or she attends one of the plan’s eligible colleges or universities. Both state and private institutions can offer prepaid tuition programs. Using tuition credits from these programs is tax-free. College savings plans are statesponsored plans that allow you to build a fund to pay for your child’s college education. Your contributions are not tax-deductible, but once in the plan, your money grows tax-free. Provided the funds are used to pay for qualified college expenses, withdrawals are tax-free. Qualified expenses include tuition, fees, books, supplies, and certain room and board costs. Private institutions are not allowed to set up college savings accounts. Student loan interest deduction. Interest on certain student loans can be deducted whether or not you itemize your deductions. The maximum deduction is $2,500 per year over the loan

Page 7

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repayment period and income phase out rules apply here as well. Other tax benefits. Most scholarships remain tax-free, nontaxable employer-paid tuition may be available, and education expenses related to your job still may be deductible. When you start examining your situation, remember that many of these provisions are designed so that you can’t benefit from more than one in any given year. We can help guide you through the maze and help ensure that you receive the maximum possible benefit. Jeffrey Schweitzer can be found at Northeast Financial Strategies Inc (NFS) at Wampum Corner in Wrentham. NFS works with individuals and small businesses providing financial and estate planning, insurance, investments and also offers full service accounting, bookkeeping, payroll, income tax preparation, and notary public services. For more information, stop by the office, call Jeffrey at 800-560-4NFS or visit online - www.nfsnet.com. 

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 8

Registration Still Open for Spring Travel Soccer through S.C. Norfolk

5th

3TUDENTS

Jazz Sunday Brunch in Downtown Wrentham

Registration is still open for SC Norfolk uniform. start of the season. The games are Spring Travel Soccer through played on Saturdays and there will If you volunteer to be a head The Terrace CafĂŠ Expands Offerings S.C. Norfolk, although $30 late be 2 weekly practices. The season coach and you have an ‘F’ coachThe Terrace CafĂŠ is pleased to announce the addition of a Jazz fees (after Jan. 16) are now being runs from April 6, 2013 through ing license, your child's program Sunday Brunch to its current fare and live music offerings in the applied. Eligibility is open to all June 22, 2013. fee will be refunded at the end of New Year. The brunch takes place Sundays from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. children living in Norfolk (or with the season. New this season, SC Norfolk will and includes a buffet-style menu of breakfast entrĂŠes and meats, a parent living in Norfolk) in be offering team jackets, shirts and fresh pastry, lunch entrĂŠes, gluten-free choices, and a range of bevRegistrations completed after grades three through sixth. Regissweatshirts, which may be purerages from cappuccino to mimosas. ter online at http://www.norfolk- the deadline will be placed on a chased through the registration soccer.com/"www.norfolksoccer. wait list. Registrations will only be Local saxophonist and vocalist, Gianlorenzo, provides website. Pictures and pricing for Certificates GiftMike com. The cost is $100, plus a late accepted provided all outstanding Gift Certificates smooth Jazz entertainment throughout the brunch for a relaxing Available the merchandise canAvailable also be found fee, and payments must be made fees to the Club have been paid. $FOUSBM4USFFU /PSXPPEttXXXOPSXPPETUBHFDPN Sunday experience. on the website www.norfolksoc#PY0GmDF)PVST.POEBZ'SJEBZ BNQNQN online using a credit or$FOUSBM4USFFU /PSXPPEttXXXOPSXPPETUBHFDPN debit card. #PY0GmDF)PVST.POEBZ'SJEBZ BNQNQN Team rosters will be available ap- cer.com. The cost is $14 per person for all-you-can-eat. Children under Uniforms are required at a cost of proximately 2 weeks prior to the 12 are $8. $60 if the player does not own a

Next to Normal

Next to Normal

The acclaimed, groundbreaking musical “that pushes Broadway in new The The acclaimed, groundbreaking musical “that pushes Broadway in directionsâ€? new (Rolling Stone). With a thrilling contemporary score, Next to Terrace CafĂŠ is a family owned and operated casual restaudirectionsâ€? (Rolling Stone). With a thrilling contemporary score, Next to Normal is an emotional powerhouse of a musical about a family trying ranttofeaturing fine dining and live music in the heart of Wrentham. Normal is an emotional powerhouse of a musical about a family trying to care of themselves and each other. take In 2012, owner Nancy Lockwood and her son Josh Walker opened take care of themselves and each other. Book and Lyrics by Brian Yorkey - Music by Tom Kitt the establishment, which has helped draw patrons and musicians Book and Lyrics by Brian Yorkey - Music by Tom Kitt Directed by Kelly Warriner - Music Direction by Rob Goldman Directed by Kelly Warriner - Music Direction by Rob Goldman to the Cast features: Sheila Newton, Nicholas Connell, Steve Shannon, Kelly downtown Wrentham community. Cast features: Sheila Newton, Nicholas Connell, Steve Shannon, Kelly Newton, Nicholas Paradiso, Nathan Lamont Newton, Nicholas Paradiso, Nathan Lamont The Jazz Sunday Brunch is the newest addition to the Terrace

JAN 25-27th

JAN 25-27th

Friday & Saturday @ 8PM, Sunday @ 2PM Friday & Saturday @ 8PM, Sunday @ 2PM Tickets: $25 & 27 Adults $23 & 25 Students/Seniors Tickets: $25 & 27 Adults $23 $FOUSBM4USFFU /PSXPPEttXXXOPSXPPETUBHFDPN    $ FOUS&BM25 4UUSStudents/Seniors SFFU /PSXPPEttX XX XX X XOPSXPPETUBHFDPN #PY0GmDF)PVST.POEBZ'SJEBZ BNQNQN # PY0GmDF)PVST.POEBZ'SJEBZ BNQNQN

CafÊ’s menu, as they continue to expand and refine their offerings in response to customer tastes. They also accommodate private parties.

To find out more, follow The Terrace CafĂŠ on facebook, visit Comedy Night with Don Gavin, http://wrenthamterrace.com, or call Nancy at (508) 384-3269. The Comedy Night with Don Gavin, Terrace CafĂŠ is located at 36 South Street in Wrentham Center. The Godfather of Boston Comedy The Godfather of Boston Comedy Gift Certificates Available

$FOUSBM4USFFU /PSXPPEttXXXOPSXPPETUBHFDPN

With Jim Colliton and Dan Boulger #PY0GmDF)PVST.POEBZ'SJEBZ BNQNQN

With Jim Colliton and Dan Boulger

Don is considered the Godfather of Boston Comedy. He was one of the original founders of Don is considered the Godfather of Boston Comedy. He was one of the theoriginal famousfounders Ding-HoofComedy Club in Cambridge, MA (a launching pad for some of the funniTickets: $20 inThe advance the famous Ding-Ho Comedy Club in Cambridge, MA (a launching pad est, for some of funnibrightestthe and most original comic talent in America.) Later, Don founded Nick’s Comedy acclaimed, groundbreaking musical “that pushes Broadway in new est, and With most original comic talent intoAmerica.) Later, Don founded Nick’s Comedy (Rolling Stone). a thrilling contemporary score, Next $25 at thedirections� doorbrightest Stop & was a pioneer at the Comedy Connection. Don has toured every state of the union Normal is an emotional powerhouse of a musical about a family trying to Stop & was a pioneer at the Comedy Connection. Don has toured every state of the union performing in clubs, theatres, festivals, colleges & corporate events. Don has performed take care of themselves and each other. A FU N F I D S 2-8 performing clubs, theatres, festivals, Book andin Lyrics by Brian Yorkey - Music by Tom Kittcolleges & corporate events.inDon overhas 100performed countries with his work with the USO & cruise ships. Don is lightning quick & Directed100 by Kelly Warriner - Music by Robwith Goldman in over countries withDirection his work the USO & cruise ships. Don is lightning quick & he performs. a sure fire hit wherever Cast features: Newton, Nicholas Steve Shannon, Kelly a sure fireSheila hit wherever he Connell, performs.

Next to Normal

Newton, Nicholas Paradiso, Nathan Lamont

FEB 9th

FEB 9th

JAN 25-27th

PMs4ICKETS!DULTS3ENIORS

PMs4ICKETS!DULTS3ENIORS

Friday & Saturday @ 8PM, Sunday @ 2PM Tickets: $25 & 27 Adults $23 & 25 Students/Seniors

Casablanca

Beatlemania Again Comedy Night with Don Gavin, The Godfather of Boston Comedy

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February 1, 2013

FEB 16th

PMs4ICKETS!DULTS3ENIORS

FEB 16th

Kids become PMs4ICKETS!DULTS3ENIORS the Big Bad Wolf and blow the house down, Ă„_9VZPLÂťZ^YVUNYO`TLZHUK[LZ[[OLPYZRPSSZ^P[O[OL:PTVU Says Song. Like everyone’s favorite teac Debbie connects with her audience and respects kids for the people they Come see this classic love story onThethe bigPremier screen, World’s Beatles Stage Show! This outstanding performance features three versions of The are, Beatles all in and her warmth is sincere and her radiance downright starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. one show. The show starts with “Meet The Beatlesâ€?, then contagious.

PMs4ICKETS!DULTS3ENIORS

Beatlemania Again

into the “Sergeant This is the perfect way to celebratetransforms Valentine’s Day! Pepper� era and finishes with

the “Get Back� era and a great encore. Beatlemania Again Parents’ Choice What kids features Broadway cast members as well as former mem-

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y of musicians ingshow arraMister she brings each sho music artist, G performs songsto from his new bilingual FEB 13th, 14th and bers of 15th the Hall & Oates Band! This incredible has

somesorts of hand keyboard, all named cussion, energetic some Chocolalala, one ofperthe best CDs of theand year by The [PTLZ aHU` IHJRPUN ]VJHSPZ[Z ZH_VWOVULZ IHUQV Ă„KKSL Mister G has been traveling and writing original Ă…\[L ^OPZ[SLZ `V\ UHTL P[ ;OL` L]LU KV H WLYMVYTHUJL PMs4ICKETS!DULTS3ENIORS songs for children in Latin and around the USA, and segment with their aAmerica ward winning cartoons! Kids lo ve his music blends Latin traditional instruments, and a dizzying being acti ve rhythms, participants in every song, and the audience is much a styles. part of Mister the show Debbie and her band. range ofasmusical Gaswill also perform songs from his 2011 CD BUGS, called People magazine and chosen Free Debbie and“irresistibleâ€? Friends song by download here: www.northshoreacappella.com FEB 17th as one ofwww the .debbieandfriends.net best children’s albums of the year by Parents’ Magazine. PMs4ICKETS+IDS!DULTS Come sing and dance away the mid-winter chill! Parents’ Choice Gold Award-winning international children’s Parents’ Choice Gold Award-winning international children’s music artist, Mister G performs songs from his new bilingual music artist, Mister G performs songs from his new bilingual Chocolalala, named one of the best CDs of the year by The UPCOMINGalbum 2013 SHOWS album Chocolalala, named one of the best CDs of the year by The Washington Post. Mister G has been traveling and writing original January 25 - 27 Next to Normal April 20 North Shore Acappella Washington Post. Mister G has been traveling and writing original songs for children in Latin America and around the USA, and his February 9 Comedy Night with Don Gavin, April 27 Comedian Hypnotist: Jim Spinnato music blends Latin rhythms, traditional instruments, and a dizzying songs for children in Latin America and around the USA, and his The Godfather of Boston Comedy Benefiting Kids 2 Camp at Hale Reservation range of musical styles. Mister G will also perform songs from his music blends Latin rhythms, traditional instruments, and a dizzying With Jim Colliton and Dan Boulger MayBUGS, 4 An Evening with Tynan 2011 CD called “irresistibleâ€? byRonan People magazine and chosen range of musical styles. Mister G will also perform songs from his February 16 Beatlemania Again FEB 17th 11 best children’s Comedy Night Sweeney as oneMay of the albums ofFeaturing the year Steve by Parents’ Magazine. 2011 CD BUGS, called “irresistibleâ€? by People magazine and chosen March 2 PMs4ICKETS+IDS!DULTS Pauline Wells - A Celtic Crossing With the Dave Russo and Will Noonan Come sing and dance away mid-winter chill! as one of the best children’s albums of the year by Parents’ Magazine. Benefiting Cops for Kids with Cancer Come sing and dance away the mid-winter chill! MOVIES performed to rave reviews nationwide! album

PMs4ICKETS!DULTS3ENIORS3TUDENTS

FEB 16th Washington Post.

March 9

The World Famous Hal McIntyre Orchestra Featuring a Tribute to Sinatra, Starring America’s Number 1 Sinatra Vocalist, Steve Marvin Next to Normal Directed by Don Pentleton

January 25 SHOWS - 27 OMING 2013

Feb 13, 14 & 15 Casablanca UPCOMING 2013 SHOWS April 17, 18 & 19 April 20

Alfred Hitchcock Festival North Shore Acappella

We publish the 1st of every month. Advertisement and editorial deadline is the 15th of each month. editor@norfolkwrenthamnews.com


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

February 1, 2013

Page 9

Don’t Miss the Norfolk Lions Chili Fest What better way to beat the winter doldrums and warm the spirits than with a little chili? The Norfolk Lions 6th annual Chili Fest will be held on Saturday, February 16, 2013 at 6 p.m. at St. Jude Church hall, 86 Main Street, Norfolk. This year, we have 6 great area restaurants competing for bragging rights to Best Chili of 2013: Eagle Brook Saloon, Horse N’ Carriage, Mr. Dooley’s Olde Irish Country Pub, James’ Roadside Café, Budabings 50s Café and new this year Bourque’s Restaurant. You get to sample each chili and then vote for your favorite. The winner will be announced at the end of the evening.

In addition to the chili, you will also be served mac & cheese, salad, cornbread, beverages and dessert. It’s a great meal and lots of fun for the whole family! For the first time this year, you will be entertained with live music by the Mike Tarara Band! Tickets are $15 for anyone over 10 years old and $5.00 for all others. Seating is limited, so advanced tickets are recommended. Tickets can be purchased by calling (508) 5079801 or emailing norfolklionschili@gmail.com. All proceeds from this event will benefit the Norfolk Food Pantry. So come on out to Chili Fest and feel the heat!

Run Your Inserts With Us! Call Christina Robertson (508) 468-6916 See Our Menu Inside This Paper Town Pizza (508) 384-8002 • 60 South Street, Downtown Wrentham

Norfolk Girls Softball Opens 2013 Spring Registration Norfolk Girls Softball is excited to open Spring Registration for 2013! Registration can only be completed online through the NGS website, www.norfolkgirlssoftball.net. Registration will remain open through January 21. After this date, a late fee of $25 will automatically be added to your registration fee upon checkout.We hope to see you on the fields in the Spring!

Serving Breakfast & Lunch

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 10

February 1, 2013

PAWS OF PLAINVILLE Gain a Pet in Plainville! Since last issue, two of the cats at Paws Of Plainville have been adopted, but the shelter still has a number of homeless kitties under its wing. Come and meet the following cats:

The Kardashians We ’ ve b e e n bustling at the shelter keeping up with the Kardashians!! Kris is here and so were two of her daughters, Khloe and Kourtney. These debutantes are as busy as they are beautiful, so busy in fact that Khloe and Kourtney didn’t stay with us too long… Kris is still here with us though and she is a black & white double pawed beauty. This socialite is in great

demand so let us now quickly when you would to make this Kardashian the newest member of your kin!! Kris is estimated to be between 1 and 2 years old, is spayed, combo tested negative and up to date on her regular shots.

Channing D e a r John Q. Public; We have a dilemma here, we are trying to work some of our adoption magic and find a new family to step up and adopt this gorgeous guy. Meet Channing, he is not your average Joe. In fact, our tuxedoed heartthrob in residence has been voted Paws of Plainville’s sweetest kitty alive!!! He’s the man that you definitely

want to bring home but please, no fighting ladies, it is first come, first served when it comes to making Channing the newest member of your family… Channing is 10 months old, has combo tested negative, and is up to date with his regular shots

Ted “ H e d o n ’ t want to be a tiger, c a u s e tigers play too rough, and he don’t want to be a lion, cause lions ain’t the kind you love enough”… Ted really is like a big, cuddly teddy bear. He is the perfect potato to snuggle up next to you on the couch and he won’t even hog the remote... So take some advice from the King and let this guy be your loving teddy bear!! Ted has been neutered, and is up to date with his regular shots.

Dean College School of the Arts Presents

R

Sterling Sterling is tired of being runner up in the fore v e r h o m e Olympics so now he is going for the gold!! We’ve been busy buffing and fluffing and now this silver tabby is well polished and would make a purrfectly priceless addition to any home… Make Sterling’s dream of being your number one come true and you will treasure him forever… Sterling has been neutered, combo tested negative, and is up to date with his regular shots.

Volunteers Needed! Winter is a busy time here at the Paws of Plainville, Inc. shelter. We try to take in as many cats as

J

we can during the inclement weather and extra volunteers are always needed to help care for our feline guests. Spring can be even busier because it is kitten season and foster families are needed to care for pregnant and nursing mothers as well as abandoned kittens. Please contact us if you would like to help out by volunteering or fostering. It is very rewarding knowing that you made a difference in the lives of these homeless kitties! If you are interested in meeting these or any other cats/kittens in our care waiting for a home, or in volunteering, please call (508) 695-4707 (leave a message if need be!). Paws of Plainville, Inc. is dedicated to helping the homeless cats in the local area. We are an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization. All donations are tax deductible and can be sent to P.O. Box 2236, Plainville, MA 02762. For more information, please visit us at www.pawsofplainville.org

omeo & uliet

February 27 - March 3, 2013 Box Office Tickets $5 - $20 Online purchase available 508-541-1605 The Main Stage 109 W. Central St. Franklin, MA

www.dean.edu/romeoandjuliet

By William Shakespeare


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

February 1, 2013

THE PURR-FECT CAT SHELTER Pet of the Month

Get a New “Honey” This Valentine’s Day

Sweetness is what this young lady is all about. This is "Honey," and she was a neighborhood stray that belonged to everyone but no one took responsibility for her. The shelter received a call from someone in the neighborhood saying that the cat was pregnant and needed to be properly taken care of. PCS took her in and she delivered her kittens in one of our foster homes and happily they have all been adopted. Now Honey is looking for her forever home, where she can be loved and kept safe and warm. She's a gentle, friendly cat that loves to sit in a window while being groomed and pampered. She is a beautiful orange tiger with white that just wants a loving family to belong to. If you are interested in Honey or any of the other cats available for adoption from The Purr-fect Cat Shelter

please visit our website www.purrfectcatshelter.org or call the message center at (508) 533-5855. The Purr-fect Cat Shelter is a non-profit, no-kill,

Page 11

FPAC to Present Winter Family Concert Series The Franklin Performing Arts Company (FPAC) is pleased to present the second of this season’s winter Family Concert Series. On February 3rd, Jamie Barrett Presents Family Favorites. This will be followed by Little Red Riding Hood – An Opera for Children, on March 17. The interactive performances introduce audiences of all ages to music of many genres – classical, jazz, folk, blues, pop and rock – and feature talented musicians in an engaging, entertaining and educational format. All Winter Concerts will take place at 1 p.m. at 38 Main St., Franklin. For more information, visit www.FPAConline.com or call (508) 528-8668.

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Check Out Our New Products And Services in our Newly Expanded Grooming Center & Re-Tail Store • Doggie Bakery • Grooming Supplies • Leashes/Toys • Spa Packages & More!

all volunteer organization providing care and shelter to homeless cats and kittens with the ultimate goal of finding permanent loving homes for each cat.

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Page 12

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

February 1, 2013

FPAC Presents The Sound ofM usic The hallways of the Franklin School for the Performing Arts (FSPA) were buzzing with excitement on Saturday, January 12 as some 150 area children, ages 7 and older, arrived with music in tow to audition for the roles of the seven von Trapp children in Franklin Performing Arts Company’s upcoming production of The Sound

of Music. The open auditions also cast a large number of ensemble roles. FPAC will present the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical theater classic, with professional orchestra, on Saturday, March 2 at 7:30 p.m. and on Sunday, March 3 at 2 p.m. at Franklin’s Thomas D. Mercer Auditorium.

Delighting audiences for generations, The Sound of Music is based on the true-life story of the Austrian von Trapp family. Captain von Trapp’s mischievous children are at the heart of this beloved musical. Singing the timeless classics “Do-Re-Mi,” “So Long, Farewell” and “Edelweiss,” the young performers enchant audi-

ences just as the Governess Maria’s love of music and song wins the hearts of the children and their father. In casting the seven roles, height was considered along with acting and singing ability. From 5-year old Gretl to 16-year old Liesl, the children must form an iconic ascending line. “The extraordinary turnout for The Sound of Music auditions is a testament to the popularity of this musical theater classic,” said Raye Lynn Mercer, FPAC Executive Director. “Our creative team and large cast of students and adults are excited to begin the rehearsal process as we prepare to stage this Rodgers and Hammerstein favorite with professional orchestra.”

The talented cast of 111 performers comes from 21 area towns. Franklin’s Erica Glenn and Bob Matson of Millis will perform the lead roles of Maria and Captain von Trapp. The von Trapp children will be portrayed by Sam Evans (Kurt) of Medfield, Michael Fajardo (Friedrich) of Hopkinton, Ali Funkhouser (Liesl) of Franklin, Teagan McStay (Louisa) of Franklin, Mairead Nee (Brigitta) of Walpole, Catherine Oliviere (Marta) of North Easton and Grace Pictured, in rehearsal, are the seven young performers cast as the von Trapp children in Franklin Performing Arts Tucceri (Gretl) of Franklin. Actors Company's production of The Sound ofM usic. From left to right are Ali Funkhouser (Liesl) of Franklin, Grace Tucceri cast in featured roles include Gra(Gretl) of Franklin, Sam Evans (Kurt) of Medfield, Mairead Nee (Brigitta) of Walpole, Teagan McStay (Louisa) of Franklin, Catherine Oliviere (Marta) of North Easton and Michael Fajardo (Friedrich) of Hopkinton. ham Hancock (Rolf Gruber) of

Franklin, Amanda Flynn (Governess Elsa Schrader) of Plainville, Nick Paone (Max Detweiler) of Franklin, Shauna Martin (Mother Abbess) of Franklin, Giovanna Ferri (Frau Schmidt, the housekeeper) of Franklin, Chuck Peters (Franz, the butler) of Franklin, Melissa Mandia (Sister Sophia) of Franklin, Alicia Rivera (Sister Margaretta) of Franklin, Kelly Sabini (Sister Berthe) of Franklin, Wendy Jones (Baroness Elberfeld) of Franklin and Ed Jones (Baron Elberfeld) of Franklin. Raye Lynn Mercer and Nick Paone co-direct the production, with musical direction by Hallie Wetzell, choreography by Mercer and Kellie Stamp, and costuming and production coordination by Tracy Lane. A distinctive suburban non-profit arts organization founded in 1991, FPAC presents quality performances while offering opportunities for professional artists, community performers, families and students of the arts to work together in a collaborative and creative environment. Tickets for The Sound of Music cost $30, $28 and $26. To purchase tickets, call (508) 5288668, visit the box office at The Spotlight Shop (34 Main Street, Franklin) or order online at www.FPAConline.com.

Electric Youth in Concert at Showcase Live Electric Youth (EY), the international touring ensemble of talented singer-dancers trained at the Franklin School for the Performing Arts (FSPA), will take the stage at Showcase Live at Patriot Place in Foxboro on Sunday, February 10 at 6 p.m. Fresh off of a 2012 European concert tour of Italy and Austria, Electric Youth will embark on a three-week Asia Tour in August 2013, with performances in Hong Kong. The Showcase Live concert will debut two full sets of high-energy music, including contemporary pop, classic rock, country and Broadway hits. Backed by an eight-piece band of professional musicians, EY’s Showcase Live performance will feature fullychoreographed performances of Queen, The Beatles, Aretha Franklin, Duffy, One Direction, Green Day and more, as well as

Broadway production numbers from musicals including Movin’ Out, Footloose and Tommy. Electric Youth 2013 includes Madison Asgeirsson, 14, Kendra Dombroski, 14, Ali Funkhouser, 16, Graham Hancock, 16, Jocelyn Jones, 14, and Shaina McGillis, 14, from Franklin; Michael Fajardo, 14, from Hopkinton; Maddy Williams, 14, from Medway and Jenna McDermott, 14, from Wrentham. Tickets prices are $18 - $37.50. To purchase tickets, call FSPA at (508) 528-8668 or visit the Showcase Live Box Office at www.showcaselive.com. For premium seating and reservations for large parties of 8, 12 and 20, contact FSPA. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. for dinner and best seat selection. For more information, visit www.electricyouth.com.

The nine members of Electric Youth 2013 will appear in concert at Showcase Live on February 10. Backed by an eight-piece band of Boston musicians, the ensemble is preparing for its first Asia Tour this summer.


February 1, 2013

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 13

Culinary Cabaret Food & Wine Event Showcases Culinary & Performing Arts Milford, MA – The Franklin Performing Arts Company (FPAC) presents Culinary Cabaret on Friday, March 8, from 7-10 p.m. at Clarke, The Ultimate Kitchen Resource and Culinary Center, 393 Fortune Boulevard in Milford. The evening features inspired cuisine and creative cooking demonstrations by area culinarians, wine tastings, and entertainment by Electric Youth and FPAC guest artists. Culinary Cabaret supports Electric Youth, an elite ensemble of talented singer-dancers, and their 2013 Asia Tour.

VH1 and The Food Network. Chef Nirschel competed on Season 7 of Food Network Star and has been featured in Food and Entertainment spotlights on “Dr. Oz” and Martha Stewart Radio, among others. His Culinary Bad Boy Productions offers catering services, cooking courses and demonstrations. Chef Nirschel has worked with acclaimed chefs Bobby Flay, Alton Brown, Giada De Laurentiis, Guy Fieri, Robert Irvine and Paula Dean. He has served as personal chef for Mr. Sean “Puffy” Combs.

Culinary Cabaret 2013 marks the return of this signature event following a successful debut last year at Clarke. This year, FPAC is pleased to shine a light on the Franklin Food Pantry (FFP) at the Culinary Cabaret event and help launch the new Sponsor-a-Shelf program. The initiative promotes community involvement in meeting the needs of Pantry clients by enlisting the commitment of business and civic organizations to sponsor a shelf at the pantry and help stock particular items for a designated period of time.

Culinary Cabaret event partners include Artistry Boston Catering and Events, The Cake Bar, Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse, Panzano Provviste e Vino, Sabine’s Cuisine Personalized Chef Services, Tavolino, 3 Restaurant and Whole Foods Market. Clarke’s award-winning venue features a kitchen-theater classroom and gallery of designer kitchens, providing an inventive setting to eat, drink, learn, and celebrate.

This year’s food and wine event will also showcase Celebrity Chef Christopher Nirschel, featured nationally on CNN, NBC, FOX,

Chef David LoMonaco of Whole Foods Market and actor Nick Paone are pictured in an interactive and entertaining cooking demonstration presented at last year's Culinary Cabaret event.

The ticket price of $75 per person includes delicious food, fine wines, distinctive craft beer, mouthwatering desserts, and exciting entertainment. To purchase tickets, call (508) 528-8668 or visit www.electricyouth.com.

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Page 14

Living Healthy Correcting Astigmatism During Cataract Surgery BY ROGER M. KALDAWY, M.D. MILFORD FRANKLIN EYE CENTER Many of us may one day need cataract surgery. A cataract happens when the clear lens inside our eyes becomes cloudy, causing problems with reading and seeing well in the dark, in particular when driving. Modern cataract surgery is

now more than replacing the cloudy lens with a clear lens implant. While achieving this goal, we can also correct vision problems, including the need to wear glasses for reading and astigmatism. Astigmatism describes visual blur caused by a cornea that is ob-

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long instead of spherical. The cornea is the clear structure in front of our eyes, and is the window through which light goes inside the eye. When there is astigmatism, the cornea is football shaped (different lines of curvature) instead of basketball shaped (same lines of curvature no matter how you look at the basketball). Astigmatism is present in many people as a natural part of their eyeglass prescription. Patients that are nearsighted and farsighted can also have astigmatism. Astigmatism causes blurred vision at near and far, but is easily corrected by glasses or contact lenses. When a patient without astigmatism has cataract surgery, the standard implant lenses result in excellent distance vision. Patients with astigmatism will still need glasses for far and near after cataract surgery if a standard lens is used because standard lenses do

not correct astigmatism. There are currently three good choices to reduce or eliminate astigmatism in cataract surgery, leaving a patient with clearer vision without glasses or contact lenses. When we correct astigmatism in the setting of cataract surgery, patients are generally very happy and they need their glasses less often than before‌and in many cases they don’t need the glasses at all. Here are the 3 ways we can correct the cataract and astigmatism:

Limbal Relaxing Incisions At the time of cataract surgery, we can perform limbal relaxing incisions on the cornea to correct a moderate amount of astigmatism. We use computer programs to attempt precision corrections of smaller amounts of astigmatism. At the time of surgery, we will simply make small relaxing incisions

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February 1, 2013 using a state-of-the art femtosecond laser available in few and select centers only. We are glad to have access to this laser and offer this procedure to our patients. Not only do we use the laser to correct astigmatism, but the same laser can perform a blade-free procedure, in essence performing the entire procedure without the need for manual blades, and relying on the accuracy and precision of the femtosecond laser to perform many steps of the surgery. Limbal relaxing incisions work well, but if patients have larger degrees of astigmatism, limbal relaxing incisions are not powerful enough.

Toric Intraocular Implants For patients with higher amounts of astigmatism, a Toric Intraocular Lens implant can reduce astigmatism. A Toric implant is a high tech implant that corrects astigmatism. Instead of correcting astigmatism in the cornea like limbal relaxing incisions, these specialty lens implants correct astigmatism at the lens plane. After removing the cloudy lens, we replace this lens with this special Toric implant so as to correct both the cataract and the astigmatism in one single procedure.

Laser Vision Correction We can perform Laser Vision Correction to reduce or eliminate astigmatism. In this case, we give a chance to the eye to heal and then correct the astigmatism with laser vision correction. At times, a limbal relaxing incision or a Toric implant can leave a small amount of residual astigmatism. We can eliminate this residual astigmatism with laser vision correction. Patients feel comfortable that if they are left with a small amount of astigmatism, there is a safe, precise and effective method to try to achieve as perfect of a result as possible. If a patient elects to have a standard intraocular lens and later decides that astigmatism reduction is something that they desire, Laser Vision Correction can also be used to eliminate it. If you have cataracts and astigmatism, there is an answer for you. We have three unique techniques to eliminate or reduce astigmatism. All have been tested and the results are impressive. At Milford Franklin Eye Center, Dr. Kaldawy is the first to offer bladeless laser cataract surgery in the area and among the first in New England. We are proud to bring this technology to the area allowing us to correct the cataract and astigmatism all in one procedure. For more details, see our ad on the front page.


February 1, 2013

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Living Healthy

Starving Yourself is No Way to Lose Weight

By MiChaeL WOOD, CSCS, Chief fiTneSS OffiCer aT KOKO fiTCLuB

It’s estimated that more than 40 million Americans go on some kind of diet each year. Most give up within a few weeks. And many try again next year, ever hopeful that “this time” it will be different. The fact is, crash dieting and yoyo dieting as it’s called is not only ineffective, it can actually make it harder to achieve your goal of losing weight. It’s true. The reason diets seem to get harder or less effective the older we get and the more we do them is because the thing we lose most on a diet too often is muscle. Less muscle means your metabolism slows. So when you go off your diet, and go back to eating “normally,” there’s now an even wider gap between how much you

take in and how much you burn. That’s why 95% of all dieters gain all the weight they lose on a diet within a year, plus a few extra pounds. There has to be a better way. Fortunately there is. In my many years working with clients and participating in research studies at the world renown USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts at Tuft University, I have seen first-hand how important maintaining your body’s lean muscle mass is to long-term, permanent weight loss. It’s a healthy, “inside-out” approach that unfortunately too few people know about. It’s focused on burning calories first, rather than cutting calories. Here’s how it works—and why it works so well:

STEP 1: TURN UP YOUR METABOLIC FURNACE Any successful weight management program needs to start on the inside: your body’s lean muscle level. While your metabolism is partly set by genetics, which you can’t do anything about, you can however make significant changes to your lean muscle level with a consistent program of strength training 2-3x/week. Increasing lean muscle in your body increases your basal metabolic rate, which in turn means you’ll burn calories at a higher level 24/7. Whether you are on a diet or not!

STEP 2: INCREASE THE BURN While strength training is the first and most important thing to do, layering in a complementary program of interval-based cardio exercise is next in line. Cardio exercise 3-4x week, amps up your daily calorie burn, plus

Page 15

does wonders for your heart & overall health. And it’s great at relieving stress that can cause you to overeat or make unhealthy food choices that sabotage your success. STEP 3: FUEL YOURSELF, DON’T STARVE YOURSELF Once you have the “burn” part of the fat loss equation down, now it’s time to look at your diet. With all those extra calories your body is now burning up from increasing your metabolic furnace, you’ll find your “diet” can be much less restrictive, and sustainable. Which means that you are far more likely to reach your goal. Simple changes like cutting down (or out) sugar, reducing highly refined carbs like white bread, and reducing fatty fast food meals and sodas are often all it takes for many people. No fancy “diet”. Just sensible eating and portion control. The key is to properly fuel your body with the right quality and quantity of food, not starve it. And be realistic. A healthy rule of thumb is to lose 1-2 pounds per week until you reach your goal. It’s a process, not

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a sprint. And it works. This insideout approach will show you that it doesn’t take a highly restrictive crash diet to make a real difference, permanently; in how good you look and feel every day. TURNING THEORY INTO ACTION There is no secret that exercise and nutrition are the keys to longterm weight loss. And there is no shortage of ways to do it—either on your own or by hiring a coach to devise a plan for you. Koko FitClub is the first to combine custom exercise and custom nutrition planning together and make it simple to reach your goal. It’s all based on this inside-out approach with a private coach virtually guiding you on what exercises to do, and how to eat properly to fuel your body for the fastest results. I developed our Koko “Fuel” Plans with some of the best and brightest in the nutrition field, and I am really proud of the results we get for our members. Try it for yourself at a Koko FitClub near you. Learn more at: www.kokofitclub.com

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February 1, 2013

Free Divorce Seminar

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The Divorce Collaborative LLC, a family and education law firm with offices in Bedford, Franklin and Shrewsbury, is hosting a free seminar on February 20, 2013. The two-hour seminar, Massachusetts Divorce – What to Know Before You Go, starts at 6:30 p.m. and will be conducted at the Milford Town Library, 80 Spruce Street, in Milford.

Attendees will learn about divorce process options, including mediation, collaborative divorce, and litigation; and topics such as child support, property division, along with a review of the new alimony statute. Space is limited, so please register in advance by sending an email to Christine at cbussell@divorcecollaborative. com or call (877) 842-1199. You can also sign up online by visiting www.divorcecollabortive.com

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February 1, 2013

Great Winter Excursions By reBeCCa KenSiL

Are you looking for something active to do this winter? There are many fun activities to do in the colder months, such as hiking, skiing, and snowshoeing. Luckily, there is no need to drive out to western Massachusetts to go on an outdoor adventure in the snow. Here are three great local places in

southeastern Massachusetts to visit. noon Hill is a 204-acre open space preserve located in Medfield and managed by non-profit organization, The Trustees of Reservations. The preserve is defined by wetlands, pools, boulders, Oakhickory forest, rocky ledges, and steep ravines, so it can be a tougher

trek for adventurers. It has 4.5 miles of trails available for hiking, snowshoeing, and skiing. Another highlight is that Noon Hill connects to the 200-mile Bay Circuit Trail, which passes through Boston suburbs all the way from Plum Island on the North Shore to Duxbury on the South Shore. The Bay Circuit Trail also passes over the summit of 370-foot Noon Hill. Here, open ledges offer views of

Winter Brings Additional Hazards

By reBeCCa KenSiL

Frostbite

Winter in New England is a time when people can enjoy skating, skiing, sledding, and hiking. The snow and ice provide many opportunities for adventures, but these trips also have hazards, as two local hikers recently learned.

The signs Another danger is frostbite. Frostbitten tissue may be white, numb, and soft in mild cases, and can be warmed by direct contact with another’s skin. Severe frostbite is hard, and professional medical attention is needed.

At the beginning of January, two hikers, Seamus Cuddy, 18, and Michael Agnello, 17, were stuck 30 feet above the ground on Joe’s Rock in Wrentham. One hiker grasped a branch with two hands and had two feet on the cliff. The other hiker sat in a small crevice. Joe’s Rock is a notable hiking spot in Wrentham. It has a 220-degree view of Boston and Rhode Island, and the rock’s 490-foot elevation is the highest in Wrentham. Despite being an attractive hiking spot, it is dangerous. Fortunately, they were able to dial 911 and receive help. The duo had climbed the rock before, but never in winter. In addition to being trapped in a difficult spot, they were at risk of hypothermia, which is just one danger of winter activities.

How to help Be sure to insulate the tissue to avoid further damage. The area may also be put in a 105 degree hot bath, but only if there is no chance of refreezing, which would cause more damage.

Below are some precautionary tips from Appalachian Mountain Club’s Guide to Winter Hiking & Camping, so local adventurers can be prepared when bracing the winter elements.

Hypothermia The signs A scare during winter activities is hypothermia, which can turn fatal when the body temperature continually drops. First tell-tale symptoms are loss of motor skills and shivering. Often, those with hypothermia will want to lie down. Next, one may mumble/grumble about their discomfort. If the condition becomes severe, he or she will shiver vigorously, and then suddenly stop trembling. The skin will become bluish-colored and the pulse weak. How to help To help someone with a mild case, bring the person to a warm and dry environment (ex. tent and sleeping bag). Give him or her dry clothes. Body heat helps, so stay close. Warm water bottles can be placed in armpits and at feet. Also, give him/her bits of food and sips of warm drink. Able victims can do some sit-ups to generate body heat. Severe cases For severe cases, make sure they receive professional emergency help immediately. Treat the person carefully. Do not make him/her exercise or eat. Focus on insulating the person with sleeping bags, blankets, hats, and fleece jackets. Wrap a tarp, tent, or reflective blanket around the victim so only the face is exposed. Then, figure out an evacuation plan.

How to prevent To avoid frostbite, cover skin when it is cold and windy. Frostbite often occurs in parts like the ears, nose, toes, and fingers, so wear gloves/mittens, a face mask, and goggles. If the temperature is below zero, avoid contact with liquid. Especially avoid fuel or metal fuel canisters, which can cause frostbite instantly. There are also many snow and ice hazards in the winter. Try to avoid these winter traps:

Page 17

Norfolk, Walpole, and Great Blue Hill. Be sure to check out Holt Pond, a constructed mill pond that was built in 1764 to service colonial-era mills, or the waters-edge views of Charles River for a splash of fun. Open sunrise to sunset. Noon Hill Ave., Norfolk, MA, (508) 785-0339, thetrustees.org. F. gilbert Hills State Forest. Characterized by oak and pine, this forest has 1,027 acres in Foxboro and Wrentham. This area is a good location for long-distance hiking, as it provides 23 miles of trails. The Warner Trail, for example, leads from Norfolk County through Rhode Island. Additionally, this forest connects to Franklin and Wrentham State Forests. These are minimally developed properties and are great for more hiking, skiing, snowshoeing. Open 8 – 5 p.m. 45 Mill St.

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The Blue Hills Reservation Located only minutes from busy downtown Boston, this reservation is expansive. The location has more than 7,000 acres and covers areas of Milton, Randolph, Quincy, and Dedham. In addition, the area has 125 miles of trails. This reservation also has many scenic views. The Great Blue Hill, for instance, is 635 feet tall, and visitors can see over the entire city area. Plus, there are 22 smaller Blue Hills to explore. This reservation provides many outdoor activities, such as ice skating, skiing, snowshoeing, and hiking. For a break from the outdoor activities, check out the science center and museum at Blue Hill. Open dawn until dusk. 695 Hillside St., Milton, (617) 698-1802, mass.gov.

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Falling ice Be aware when traveling below cliffs and trees, where ice might fall down, and do not linger. This is especially true after an ice storm or when the sun is shining on the ice overhead. Wear a helmet if you have to cross through these dangerous areas. Undercut Snow Sometimes snow seems to cover the ground, but the layer is actually thin because snow below melts quicker than the top layer. Streams may undercut the snow, which could mean an icy plunge into water. Avoid the lowest valleys. Probe the snow with a pole or ski to check what is ahead. Winter Storms One should seek shelter from the wind if trapped in a winter storm. Find shelter beside large rocks or in the middle of mature trees. However, make sure to check that trees are not dead and likely to fall. If possible, set up a tent or snow trench and stay dry and hydrated. Whiteouts When wind whips snow around so that everything is white, this can ruin one’s sense of direction. Figure out where the landmarks are before the wind picks up, and use your compass for navigation. avalanches Avalanches are large amounts of snow sliding down a slope. Most slopes that avalanche are between 30-45 degrees and are treeless. Avoid avalanche-prone areas a full-day after high winds with rain, heavy snowfall, or quick thaws. The best way to learn about avalanches is to take a seminar. These are just a few tips to keep in mind when hiking in the winter. There are many potential problems, so take every precaution. Courses and certifications in hiking and first-aid are recommended for hikers.

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Come Sled at Cedariver

Come & Hike This Winter!

Join this invigorating winter 6 week class for the physically fit hiker! Embrace this part of the yearHiking trails are serene during the winter months. Every week, we will meet at a new location (a list will be given out).

First Location: F. Gilbert Hills in Foxboro Thursdays: Feb 28, March 7, 14, 21, 29, April 4 Saturdays: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, April 6 To register please go to www.virtualnorfolk.org/rec or call (508) 520-1315 for more information.

Motorcycle Helmet Recall Vega Helmet Corp recalling XTS Motorcycle Helmets Later this Month The Massachusetts Motorcycle Association (MMA) would like all riders to be aware that Vega Helmet Corp. has announced that it is recalling more than 30,000 model XTS Helmets after testing found that some did not meet crash protection safety standards. Vega specifically identified XTS halfhelmets in sizes Large, Extra Large, and XX Large produced

between May 2011 and October 2012. Safety Testing by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration performed earlier this year identified that four (4) Extra Large Helmets failed to pass. According to reports by the Associated Press, there’s no evidence that anyone has been injured because of the

defective helmets. The MMA suggests that all riders who wear Vega XTS Half-Helmets in sizes L, XL, and XXL check the manufacturer date on the labeling inside the helmet. Further information should be available from Vega Helmet Corp. when the recall begins in Late January. For More Information, see http://www.MassMotorcycle.org or contact SafetyDirector@MassMotorcycle.org.

Special Lunch, Show at Norfolk Senior Center A pre-Valentine’s Day celebration has been scheduled for Wednesday, February 13th at the Norfolk Senior Center beginning at 12 Noon. There will be a delightful Veggie Lasagna luncheon (including salad, dessert, coffee or tea) to be followed at l p. m. by a lively and humorous presentation by professional comedian, actor, and entertainer Steve Henderson (aka “Jerry Atric”). This highly acclaimed performance features comical and touching stories about the experiences of an elderly man confronting healthcare, ice cream, and even romance.

A unique and truly uplifting program, supported in part by the Norfolk Cultural Council, a local agency supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, not only communicates a very positive message about the challenges and realities of aging, it does so with generous doses of healthy humor. To reserve your place sign-up at the Senior Center front desk or call (508) 528-4430. If you have a friend, neighbor, or relative residing in Norfolk, but has yet to visit the Senior Center, this enter-

taining event could provide an ideal introduction to the Center, its staff, its volunteers, and its many services and resources. And, remember, Norfolk’s Senior Center is open to all Norfolk residents, not just its seniors. To receive a full schedule of Senior Center activities, call (508) 528-4430 or visit the Council on Aging site at http://bit.ly/XR2e2c The Center is located at 28 Medway Branch Rd. and is open Mon. Fri. from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Trustees of Reservations Site on Forest Road to Host Sledding Event Celebrate mid-winter with a day of sledding at Cedariver. The Cedariver Sledding Event, hosted by the Trustees of Reservations, will take place at the Cedariver Reservation, 161 Forest Road, Millis, on Saturday, February 9th, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Bring a toboggan or tube and head for the hill overlooking the Charles River. Enjoy hot cocoa, s’mores, or a cup of hot oatmeal by the campfire. Cedariver is also a wonderful place to enjoy with snowshoes or cross-country skis. Free event (donations welcome) depends on snow cover; call (508) 785-0339 to confirm or to receive phone call in event of reschedule.

Parkinson’s Support Group to Meet Feb. 13 On February 13th, the Parkinson’s disease Support Group will meet from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Held on the second Wednesday of each month, the group is designed for caregivers and their loved ones. Meetings include speakers, refreshments, conversation and support. The group is free and open to the public. Community VNA at 10 Emory St. Attleboro MA hosts the meetings. To learn more, please call 800-220-0110 or visit www.communityvna.com and click on the Calendar.

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Every Month

April 1, 2010

Voters Reject BOH al Propos

Vol. 1 No. 3 BY J.D. O’GARA Free to Every Home Tashjian began his entrepreneurEvery Month Charles Tashjian a former ial career April Calendar 1, 2010 grad- Photosite in 1999 as owner of uate of May Norwood High School in Millis, later shifting aims to offer Norwood to page 9 residents a offset printing in 2004. He then lot more than the premiere expanded his localtownpages in their issue of the productionbusiness to include mailboxes of local telephone this month; he hopes Rain cou ld directories in O’GARA for to N school BY J.D. new connection to their foster a Holliston, the Dover, Sherborn, COLEMA not spoil a fun time went to wife, Jen, N commuUxbridge and surred says BY PATRICK COLEMA nity. over-14 thousand d registe donor,” Al Garcia ction. His rounding areas. 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Aand attempt certain persconsist that serve predicted major feature of be- higher, ed to make thegood shape. vice articles and page 6 wider cross bers should of Selectmen. ted by recipients. region. g, I put us here that opportunity even knots in It in what wasweather, skirting manag make sure ons. his life. the new website is aro Team “Withhave to papers,” possi- power other for suppor aneven thinkin a Office recipes of the month. “You an ony-Tod says Tashjian, by the Board ased as in the that were the Gulf Stream le conditi to listen read and without facing line telephone directory. “you’re favorab y. He lin’s #1 at The Kune if there are one or break two low fronts Hatteras. Tashjian is encouraging it “Really, you’re ever ive – try to live as faith-b ticle was Steve Langle with lucky rous.” supin Frank blogs if a.com an Town residents will be two articles t tween up from Cape about the actual al had the student groups from klinm #1Team Barbara’s Selectm told him I’m O Negat able Towns Clean Up page 17 can be treache town. coming ons weren’ Nor- We nfran to search their own d the proposof Selectmen by read plan the to Service Directory on conditi ructio being wood ysis nounce transplant, towns community south high school const Board to find focused Sinceand sailed 12 years! el Carroll et Anal for individuals and page 17 .new community Localtownpages has port of the -1 with Micha Leclair MarkBY for the last businesses, based.” www also invited monthly.a voice through the new Question to be on Free J.D. O’GARA 3 perfect, #1 in Norfolk automatically getting . Bob a vote of Students, under superMayofwithout Readers are invited making us 14 town meeting. a list local nonprofit groups to 11th Ballot vote against to submit businesses Flowers aren’t the only Thanks for not in their immedi- monthly news articles submit vision of their instructors, the only attendance. cepting this grant, however, le. colorful and event submit will articles, announcements and story ''2 /( in is June With aatedebt items popping up in area. proIf two-thirds of voters listings. The publisher Y RAFFLE was not their Millis yards exclusion override, -0,/6 /12 that the at the town 15.Without the grant, the 13000+ peop ade also en- publication. own articles for ideas to norwoodnews@v LIDA in the warming climate. cost voters approve meeting vote for the home M A R K E T P L A C E 32 $.&erizon. '+)*% explainedto look at imcourages local merchants reaches HOa beautiful, handm ings! net, or by override, the would be $7.7 million for More and a one-time expen'2+&'. 41 Langley to offer (508) 533-1333. *'calling le furnish cy for effort more signs are adorning This ad the diture that increases town will pay for a adorab was an The deadline /-' "+2* bond of ap- structure planned for the corner the front page 18 the town’s tax onal efficien Tashjian does think se with website to enter: lawns of Millis homes proximately $5 million of only until the debt dollhou information the 15th/.& for submissions is &*# $( ! '% $*- posal g the operati a test to see new om this spring, for the new Exchange Street and Route 109. is paid. ,,, ()+ of each month. provin Go to our udentialpage.c !) and also both for, and against, &facility. to make ()+ &*# $( www.pr “Contact Us” a vote re- al duced, This price is greatly “The opportunity really reRemov of the Board an appetite town’s ,,, '% If Millis taxpayers ! garding the construction • Tree Click on thanks was is now,” the AY vote to a for grant C of the Pruning O there of over override, NS says Library Trustee 3 if in how T R TemTreea new $2.7 • MEDW U C T IService library for the town. the annual bottom Beverly al million the ! library O N Directory changes THAM $23 3 & DESIGN On May 11,Remov uted. Furtheran lin. line ple. “The state has rea ceived broader • WREN Hardscapes “yes” vote will put a • Stump is constit grant •goes from the !Massachusetts for taxpayers (who own the avers p in Frank away • Stonewalls Proposition 2Service & page • Lawn Installation that it was MEDFIELD after June government ! /-' /1) age $365,000 and Maintenance16• & 17 Walkways NKL IN 15. If we do not 1/2 debt exclusion override qualBoard explained Estate Grou home) is about $154 • Bobcat Tree Services • Snow do it on theGrinding of Library Commissioners at the beginning 555 /.& now, I *24 more, he to identify highly apD - FRA Plowing #1 Real think table for consideration • Stump we’re lookingGuaranteed (MBLC) — The deadline !" Hour* Lowest Prices nity of 20 years, and h the ! Call the at a at the June MIL FOR # for ac- $89 in the Emergency opportu ers throug Truck that it last year of the bond. *24 Hour* Tree Service home M A R K E T P L A C E Emergency Since 1948 • Bucket ified membprocesses and Board LIBRARY the ent Residential Basement N Complete by Sump Water & Commercial Systems pointm continued on page page 18 Visit Pump Service & 19 4 Website For Complete democpower grab Sales & Service List of Services and wasn’t a en. “There is no Current Coupons: Any Job "# www.knightsl N Quality/Quantity $50 Off CO of Selectm

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February 1, 2013

Page 19

Silver Set Gazette TV Program Celebrates 10 Years The Norfolk Council on Aging is pleased to announce the 10th anniversary of its Silver Set Gazette television program brought to you by Norfolk Community Television (NCTV). Established 10 years ago, with the cooperation and assistance of Paul Guertin, NCTV manager (now retired), hosts Norma Shruhan, the Director of the Norfolk Senior Center, and Richard Connors, a Council on Aging Board Member, have made the program a great source for Senior Center news and updates.

Wrentham Seeks to Form Elderly and Disabled Taxation Fund Committee The town of Wrentham is looking for three (3) Town residents to be members of the Elderly & Disabled Taxation Fund Committee (MGL Chapter 60, Section 3D). Taxpayers may donate to the Taxation Fund, and this Committee would be charged to carry out the provisions of this Chapter and identify the recipients of such aid. If you are interested, visit the Events page at the Wrentham town website (http://wrentham.ma.us) and click the link provided for an Application Form. Submit the completed form to the Board of Selectmen's Office.

The popular cable broadcast is both informative and lighthearted (and serious when appropriate) with lots of conversational humor for an audience of seniors and non-seniors alike interested in Senior Center programs and activities. The show also showcases guests, including Jason Talerman, the Chairman of the Coun-

cil on Aging Board, and Bill Crane, the President of the Friends of the Council on Aging. In addition, guest-participants are often interviewed to introduce and describe new or ongoing activities for both seniors and non-seniors at the Center. On this anniversary the Norfolk Council on Aging would also like to salute and thank Katie Woodhams (our photo guru) and the folks at NCTV for their support and assistance over the years.

For those interested, the dates and broadcast times of the Silver Set Gazette Program can be found by going to the NCTV site at http://bit.ly/Y9kSGB Or an online copy of the current Silver Set Gazette is available by going to http://bit.ly/Vl0O0e A print copy is available by calling the Senior Center at (508) 528-4403. The Norfolk Senior Center is located at 28 Medway Branch Road and is open Monday thru Friday from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 20

February 1, 2013

Stony Brook Announces Its February Programming Turtle Trekkers: Saturdays, February 2nd and 16th, from 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Start your weekend off right with a fun and knowledgeable Stony Brook teacher on the trails. Each day will have a special topic created to excite your child about the natural world. There will be crafts, activities and lots of laughter. This month’s themes: Exploring Shadows/Let It Snow. Ages 2.9 to 6

with a parent. Fee: $8m/$10nm per adult/child pair Home Tweet Home: Saturday, February 2nd, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Time to do something sweet for the tweets! February is a perfect time to help our local birds by building a place to live. We will talk about what birds are looking for in a home and then assemble a bird house. After you build your birdhouse, you can take it home and paint it. Minimum age 6. Fee includes materials to build one birdhouse. Fee: $25m/$29nm per adult/child Sweets for the Tweets: Saturday, February 9th, from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. And now some tweets (I mean treats) for the tweets! We will make a variety of edibles for birds with seeds, dried fruits, popcorn and other items. You can either bring your treat home or hang it

at Stony Brook. We will end with a short walk to look for birds. Minimum age 6. Parents free. Fee: $6m/$8nm per child. Tales and Trails: Tuesday, February 12th, from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Each day we will explore a different nature theme through stories, activities, and an investigation of Stony Brook trails. This program will encourage curiosity about the natural world and will introduce the observation skills that can turn every walk into a fulfilling and educational experience. Please make sure to bring appropriate clothing for the winter’s walk. Drop-off program, but parents welcome. Ages 4-6. Fee: $7m/$9nm Holiday Hikes: monday, February 18th, from 9 – 10:30 a.m. Start your day with an exhilarating walk along Stony Brook’s trails. We will explore the forest and fields in search of wildlife and their signs. After our walk, we’ll head into the Nature Center to warm up with a cup of coffee, tea or hot chocolate. All ages welcome. 5 and under free. Fee: $3m/$5nm.

Presidents’ Day Birding in northern Ri: monday, February 18th, from 7 a.m. – 1 p.m. Rhode Island is home to a wonderful system of parks and refuges, and we will explore two of these during this short ramble south and west of Stony Brook. We will start out in RI at the George Washington Memorial State Forest before heading to Lincoln Woods State Park in Lincoln RI. This area has reliably produced both Red-tailed and Red-shouldered Hawks in past years. After birding Lincoln Woods, we will head out to Adams Farm for one more search for winter finches before heading back to Stony Brook. Fee: $38m/$48nm per person February Vacation Week: Tuesday, February 19th – Friday, February 22nd, from 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Your children don’t have to go far away to experience a new world or discover something new about themselves. Have them come to Stony Brook during the vacation weeks. We know how to make learning fun! Themes: Tuesday – The Arctic; Wednesday – Japan; Thursday-

Frozen Desert; Friday-Aloha Ring of Fire. Fee: $40m/$47nm per child Brunch with the Eagles: Sunday, February 24th, from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Bald Eagles can be found flying over open water in search of food during the wintertime. One of the best places to find them is along the Connecticut River. See spectacular views of eagles as they perch on trees at such locations as Gillette Castle State Park and near the Goodspeed Opera House. Then relax and warm up as we enjoy brunch at the famous Griswold Inn in Essex, CT. Bring binoculars and a spotting scope if you have one. Price includes brunch. Fee: $79m/$90nm per person Pre-registration is required for all programs (except as noted). For more details, visit the Mass Audubon webpage at www.massaudubon.org or contact us at (508) 528-3140. Register by phone, email (stonybrook@massaudubon.org), fax (508-5533864) or in person. Stony Brook is located at 108 North Street in Norfolk.

Local Rotary Seeks Citizen, Employee Nominations For the 28th consecutive year, local citizens and employees will be publicly recognized for their contributions to the community by the North Attleboro and Plainville Rotary Club. The honorees will be recognized during the Rotary Club’s 2013 Distinguished Service Awards Banquet, which will take place on Monday, March 18 at 6 p.m. at Highland Country Club in Attleboro. In keeping with its club motto, “Service Above Self,” the Rotary Club seeks five worthy individuals each year by asking members of the community to nominate citizens for recognition. Individuals are nominated for having demonstrated the “Service Above Self” ideal through service to the community. The nomination categories for each individual are as follows:

OUTSTANDING CITIZEN This person must have served the community in a manner above and

beyond that expected of all citizens. The individual does not have to reside in North Attleboro or Plainville.

OUTSTANDING YOUTH This individual must be under 21 years of age and live in North Attleboro or Plainville.

OUTSTANDING PUBLIC EMPLOYEE The recipient of this award must currently serve North Attleboro or Plainville as a paid employee but does not have to reside in either town.

OUTSTANDING EDUCATOR This person must be a current professional educator in the North Attleboro or Plainville school systems. He or she does not have to live in either town.

OUTSTANDING SENIOR CITIZEN This individual must be 65 years of age or older and reside in North Attleboro or Plainville.

Nomination forms must be completed and returned by Feb. 15 to the following address: Dr. John Barone, 107 North Washington St., North Attleboro, MA 02760, Attn: DSA. Winners will be notified in advance of the awards banquet, which the general public is invited to attend by reservation. As part of this program, a booklet is prepared for distribution at the banquet. To help raise funds for charities such as Lenore’s Pantry, Christmas Is For Kids and the Hockomock Area YMCA, as well as sponsoring the North Attleboro High School Football Banquet, the Town Pool Swim Meet and the Fishing Derby, advertising space is sold in this booklet. The ad choices are as follows: The “exclusive” outside back cover ($250), the inside front or back cover ($150), full page ($100), half page ($50), quarter page ($35) and a double line ($10). Color ads are available for an additional $25 per ad. Cover ads are sold on a first-come, first-served basis.

If you would like to place your ad in this year’s booklet, call Dr. John Barone at (508) 699-2481, email him at johnwbaronedmd@ verizon.net or fax your ad to (508) 699-0717. Ads must be received by Feb. 15. Please make checks

payable to “North Attleboro/ Plainville Rotary Club” and submit them to the following address: Dr. John Barone, 107 North Washington St., North Attleboro, MA 02760, Attention: DSA.

We publish the 1st of every month. Advertisement and editorial deadline is the 15th of each month. editor@norfolkwrenthamnews.com


February 1, 2013

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Norfolk DA Offers Updated Posters Online Option Offers Latest News and Contact Info. Norfolk DA Michael Morrissey’s Office has posted updated regional domestic violence, sexual assault and substance abuse hotline posters. Any business, school or organization that wishes to post credible, up-to-date resources on those topics, or the Prescription Drug Disposal Partnership between DA Morrissey and local police departments can print copies of these posters in the Media section of www.norfolkda.com. Posters are updated semi-annually.

Wrentham Lions Club Membership Night in March The Wrentham Lions Club will hold a membership night on Thursday, March 14th at 7 p.m. at the American Legion Hall on route 1A in Wrentham. This informal gathering is for service-minded men and women who might be interested in joining or learning more about the Lions Organization and how the local Wrentham Lions Club supports the Wrentham community, the state and international charities.

Lions Club International is the world’s largest nonprofit service organization in the world, with 1.3 million members and in over 200 countries. The Lions Foundation helps to eradicate preventable blindness, provide disaster relief, support youth, and meet humanitarian needs worldwide. For more information, please contact Pat Elliott, Membership Chair at (508) 384-8760 or visit our website at www.wrenthamlions.org .

Federated Church Pancake Breakfast February 2 The Federated Church of Norfolk will hold a Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, February 2 from 8 - 10 a.m. In addition to our famous homemade pancakes, omelets or fresh eggs will be cooked to order. Ham, sausage, hash brown potatoes, homemade biscuits with sausage gravy, and cinnamon rolls complete the menu. It’s all you can eat for $7, with a Sr. citizen cost of $5. Breakfast is free for children under age 10. The Federated Church is located at the corner of Main Street and Route 115 across

from the Town Common. The breakfast is served in the church vestry, which is handicapped accessible. For more information, contact the church office, (508) 528-0262.

Page 21

2013 Could Spell Disaster for Your Estate Plan! The Biggest Mistakes Seniors and Boomers Make in Estate & Asset Protection Planning...and How to Avoid Them:

Part Two. Last time, we covered some very important information regarding your Estate & Asset Protection planning. However, we were just getting started! There’s so much more truly VITAL information to know. Even with this final installment, we will have barely scratched the surface! Please do yourself AND your family a big favor and complete your estate & asset protection education and review. Once you’ve absorbed these critical points you’ll know how important it is for you to follow up with us at Dennis Sullivan & Associates “for Guaranteed Education, Value, and Lifetime Protection”.

Mistake No. 7 Not Planning for Disability If you become disabled, what will happen to your family? Who will make your financial and health care decisions? No One! Your family will be forced to spend thousands to go to court to appoint a guardian or conservator just to be allowed to participate in your health care and financial decisions. Leaving it up to the court will cost ten times as much as it should! Because of HIPAA concerns, many hospitals do not accept your out of date disability documents! The most effective way to avoid this disaster is to have updated, current disability documents ready when you need them.

Mistake No. 8: Waiting Too Long to Capture Your Opportunity to Protect Your Assets Baby boomers are retiring in record numbers! Longer life ex-

pectancies and the average age getting older and older are creating an increasing demand on benefits from Medicare and Medicaid. The Congressional Budget Office is now reviewing a proposal that would allow the government a bigger share of your home and life savings. If you don’t act BEFORE the law is changed you may be stuck with a 10-year look back period. If you act now, your home, spouse and life savings can be protected with the current 5 year look back period. Learn more. Call us before it’s too late at (781)-2372815.

Mistake No. 9: Not Planning to Protect Children and Grandchildren's Inheritances

gency contact information and advanced directives are always available. We even provide a wallet card so your wishes are known in any emergency.

Mistake No. 11: Leaving Veteran’s Benefits Unclaimed Married veterans are entitled to receive $2,053 per month. That’s over 24,000 per year! Single veterans can collect up to $1,731 per month, over $21,000 per year, and widows of veterans can collect $1,112 per month or $13,344 per year. Are you leaving thousands per year on the table? To learn more visit www. SullivanVeteransReport.com or call (781)-237-2815.

Mistake No. 12: Leaving Creditors, law suits, divorce? Your Home Unprotected

Who will inherit your assets? Will your beneficiaries be disinherited by a divorce? Will they be pressured to gifts they otherwise would not want to make? Will your beneficiaries make high-risk investments or loans? Will they get sued and lose everything? Take action to protect your beneficiaries’ inheritance from the reach of creditors, law suits and even divorce. Our team of professionals has helped hundreds of Massachusetts families do exactly that. Let us help you plan for what is sure to come!

YOU COULD LOSE YOUR HOME! If you get sick and need nursing home care and aren’t ready, you’ll be forced to pay back nursing home and medical costs by any means necessary! You can keep your home off the auction block but you must act quickly. The Congressional Budget Office is now considering a significant reduction in the home equity exemption that exists today. Don’t allow your home to be sold at auction by creditors. Call our offices and beat the CBO to the punch! (781)-237-2815.

Mistake No. 10: Not Having Emergency Contact Information Available

Protect your life savings and avoid disastrous estate planning mistakes, attend one of our free Trust, Estate & Asset Protection workshops. Call 800-964-4295 (24/7) or to register online visit www.DSullivan.com. For the full article on the Top Mistakes Seniors and Boomers Make in Estate and Asset Protection Planning, Please visit www.DSullivan.com/Top-Mitakes.

67% of the time, advanced directives are not available when needed according to the American Medical Association. Too often EMTs and hospitals do not have the proper federal authorization to speak with your spouse or representative on your behalf! You may have NO VOICE at your most critical time of need! Be certain both your emer-


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 22

February 1, 2013

Calendar of Events February 1 Picnic Playgroup, 11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St., Norfolk, storyhour/craft for children up to age 5 with caregiver, call Amy Reimann at (508) 528-3380, x5 or email areimann@virtualnorfolk.org February 2 Pancake Breakfast, Federated Church of Norfolk, corner of Main St. and Route 115 across from Town Common, All you can eat for $7, seniors $5 or children under ten free. Accessible to people with disabilities. For more information, call (508) 528-0262. Lego Club, 2:30-3:45 p.m., SWEATT Meeting Room, Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Road, Wrentham. The Lego Club has resumed on Saturdays. February 3 Franklin Performing Arts Company (FPAC) winter Family Concert Series: Jamie Barrett Presents Family Favorites, free interactive performance offered to the community at 1 p.m., 38 Main St., Franklin February 4 Kindergarten registration begins for Norfolk Public Schools February 5 Ed Morgan Sing-Along, 10:3011:30 a.m., Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St., Norfolk, Join Ed for singing, dancing— great for babies, toddlers and preschoolers, contact Amy Reimann at (508) 528-3380, x5 or email areimann@virtualnorfolk.org Building Blocks, 4:30-5 p.m., Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St., Norfolk, LEGO creation group for kids in K-5, who must be accompanied by an adult, contact Amy Reimann at (508) 528-3380, x5 or email areimann@virtualnorfolk.org February 6 Multi-Age Storytime, 11:1511:45 a.m., Norfolk Public Li-

brary, 139 Main St., Norfolk, drop in storytime with songs, games and hands-on activity for kids 2+ with caregiver Wrentham Public Schools Project Blossom Preschool program parent informational night/Open House, 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. in the Vogel Auditorium. Prospective parents and guardians of children entering preschool in September 2013 are invited to tour and speaker with teachers and administration. February 8 & 9 Neil Simon’s Laughter on the 23rd Floor, 8 p.m., Walpole Footlighters, 2 Scout Road, Walpole, www.footlighters.com February 9 Cedar River Sledding Event, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., sponsored by the Trustees of Reservations, Bring your toboggan or tube (or snowshoes and cross-country skis) and head to Cedariver Reservation, 161 Forest Road, Millis, overlooking the Charles River. Enjoy hot cocoa, s’mores, or a cup of hot oatmeal by the campfire. Event depends on snow cover; call (508) 785-0339 to confirm or to receive phone call for rescheduled event. FREE (donations welcome) Lego Club, 2:30-3:45 p.m., SWEATT Meeting Room, Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Road, Wrentham. The Lego Club has resumed on Saturdays. February 10 Sunday Spinners, Norfolk Public Library Community Room, 139 Main St., Norfolk, 1-5 p.m., Contact Kris Bent at krisbent@msn.com Franklin School of the Performing Arts’ Electric Youth at Showcase Live!, Patriot Place, Foxboro, 6 p.m. Accompanied by an eightpiece band of world-class musicians, EY will deliver a fully choreographed show with an extensive repertoire of classic rock, contemporary pop, country and Broadway hits. Tickets $18 $37.50. To purchase, tickets call

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box office at (508) 528-8668. Table reservations are available for larger parties of 8, 12, or 20. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. for dinner and best seat selection. February 12 Toddler Play N Learn with Gina McGarrigle, 10:30 a.m., Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Rd., Wrentham, for ages 12-30 months with caregiver, program being offered by Self Help Inc., Coordinated Family and Community Engagement, free, but donations of canned goods gratefully accepted for Wrentham Food Pantry. Sign up at circulation desk. February 13 Parkinson’s Disease Support Group, Community VNA, 10 Emory St., Attleboro, for caregivers and their loved ones, includes speakers, refreshments, and support. Call (800) 220-0110 or visit www.communityvna.com. February 13-15 Casablanca, The Norwood Theatre, The Norwood Theatre, 109 Central St., Norwood, http://norwoodstage.com February 15 &16 Neil Simon’s Laughter on the 23rd Floor, 8 p.m., Walpole Footlighters, 2 Scout Road, Walpole, www.footlighters.com February 16 Lego Club, 2:30-3:45 p.m., SWEATT Meeting Room, Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Road, Wrentham. The Lego Club has resumed on Saturdays. The sessions are held in the Sweatt Meeting Room. Norfolk Lions Chili Fest, 6 p.m., St. Jude Church hall, 86 Main Street, Norfolk. Six area restaurants competing for bragging rights. Includes chili, mac & cheese, salad, cornbread, beverages and dessert. $15 for anyone over 10; $5 all others. Seating is limited, call (508) 507-9801 or email norfolklionschili@gmail.com for advance tickets. Entertainment by the

Mike Tarara Band. All proceeds to benefit Norfolk Food Pantry. February 17 Neil Simon’s Laughter on the 23rd Floor, 2 p.m., Walpole Footlighters, 2 Scout Road, Walpole, www.footlighters.com February 20 Massachusetts Divorce – What to Know Before You Go, free seminar 6:30 p.m. at Milford Town Library, 80 Spruce St., Milford. Hosted by Divorce Collaborative, LLC. Space limited. Register at cbussell@divorcecollaborative.com, (877) 842-1199 or www.divorcecollaborative.com. February 23 Lego Club, 2:30-3:45 p.m., SWEATT Meeting Room, Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Road, Wrentham. The Lego Club has resumed on Saturdays. Ivy Music Open House and Concert, 6 p.m., 175 Main St., Norfolk. Visit www.iveymusicacademy.com February 26 Fun with Folktales, 3:30 p.m., Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St., Norfolk, Classic American Tall Tales with hands-on activities and games, includes snack, for children in grades K-2, registration required, contact Amy Reimann at (508) 528-3380, x5 or email areimann@virtualnorfolk.org Building Blocks, 4:30-5 p.m., Norfolk Public Library, 139 Main St., Norfolk, LEGO creation group for kids in K-5, who must be accompanied by an adult, contact Amy Reimann at (508) 528-3380, x5 or email areimann@virtualnorfolk.org February 27 Foreign Film, 7 p.m., Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Road, Wrentham. Romeo & Juliet, Dean College, 7:30 p.m., General admission pricing is $20.00, children 10 and

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under, $5.00. For ticket and information email boxoffice@dean.edu or call (508) 541-1605. Or visit www.dean.edu/performance. Wrentham Public Schools Kindergarten “Alternatives” Parent Meeting, 6:30 p.m. in the Vogel auditorium, prospective parents and guardians of children entering kindergarten in September 2013 are invited for overview of half-day, transition or full-day kindergarten programs. February 28 Evening Book Group, 6 p.m., Fiske Public Library, 110 Randall Road, Wrentham. Romeo & Juliet, 7:30 p.m., Dean College, General admission pricing is $20.00, children 10 and under, $5.00. For ticket and information email boxoffice@dean.edu or call (508) 541-1605. Or visit www.dean.edu/performance. March 2 Norfolk Lions 2nd Annual Health & Wellness Fair, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Freeman Kennedy School, Boardman St., Norfolk, will provide information on healthy choices, stress relief, nutrition, skin care, screenings for blood pressure, glaucoma and hearing loss. This year will feature New England Organ Bank and American Red Cross Bloodmobile, which will hold blood drive, as well as the Avon Breast Cancer Foundation. If you would like to participate, please contact Paul Terrio at 508-528-1922 or phterrio@gmail.com, or Al Bozza at 774-571-5170 or abozza@aol.com for more information. FPAC’s The Sound of Music, 7:30 p.m., Franklin’s Thomas D. Mercer Auditorium, Tickets for The Sound of Music cost $30, $28 and $26. To purchase tickets, call (508) 5288668, visit the box office at The Spotlight Shop (34 Main Street, Franklin) or order online at www.FPAConline.com. March 3 FPAC’s The Sound of Music, 2 p.m., Franklin’s Thomas D. Mercer Auditorium, Tickets for The Sound of Music cost $30, $28 and $26. To purchase tickets, call (508) 5288668, visit the box office at The Spotlight Shop (34 Main Street, Franklin) or order online at www.FPAConline.com

March 14 Save the Date for Wrentham Lions Membership Night


February 1, 2013

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 23

Sports Layman Adjusting To Basketball Life At Maryland By Ken haMWey Jake Layman is acutely aware that his transition from all-star basketball player in the Hockomock League to Atlantic Coast Conference freshman would be a work in progress. The former King Philip Regional center, who was ranked the third best small forward in Massachusetts by ESPN last year, has started two games and is averaging 15 minutes an outing for the University of Maryland. The 6-foot-8, 210-pound swingman is scoring an average of 4.3 points a game and grabbing 2.8 rebounds a contest.

His second start, however, was dynamic. He scored 20 points against Virginia Tech, 18 of them coming in the first half.

lege. There’s more screening, more cutting. It’s important to defend off the ball. Right now, my total focus is on defense.’’

Layman, who had 10 full scholarship offers that included Louisville, Florida and Syracuse, isn’t worrying about statistics or playing time. Where he’s focused, however, is improving his defense and ball-handling.

Layman, who averaged 25 points, 17 rebounds and 5 blocks as a senior at KP, is also adjusting to a faster-paced game and working on his passing in the backcourt.

“At King Philip, I played against centers and forward but at Maryland I’m defending against guards who are quick,’’ Layman said after a morning practice on campus at College Park. “There’s more intensity on the defensive end in col-

“College basketball is so much faster,’’ he said. “The game is uptempo all the time. Handing the ball and distributing it are areas I spend extra time on in practice. It’s important to pass crisply. My first game was against the University of Kentucky (national champions), and every player I faced was a high-school all-star.’’

“Mark Turgeon is a fine head coach,’’ Layman said. “He’s lowkey, knows how to fix problems and is a good motivator. “He’s always been positive and extremely encouraging.’’ Layman’s also spending lots of time in the weight room. “I’m lifting weights once a day,’’ Layman said. “I’ve gotten bigger, gaining about 17 additional pounds of muscle.’’ Turgeon likes Layman’s work ethic and views him as one of the building blocks for Maryland’s future.

“Jake is working hard in practice,’’ Turgeon said. “We’re excited for him and feel like he’s going to be a big part of our success. He got an opportunity against Virginia Tech, hit his first shot and had a couple put-backs. More importantly, he’s gotten better defensively. That’s the key … he uses his length and speed to be a good defender and a better rebounder. He’s gotten tougher.’’ The Terrapins know they’ve got a gem in a player who can rebound, play defense and even shoot threes.

When the Terrapins opened their season against Kentucky, Layman fared well in his debut, playing 11 minutes. He had 3 points, 2 rebounds and a block in the threepoint defeat. Layman, whose first start came against Maryland Eastern Shore, provided a glimpse of just how important a role he may play in Maryland’s future. Alternating between guard and forward, he scored 10 points, grabbed 4 rebounds, had an assist and converted two of four three-point shots in 22 minutes. “That effort felt good but there’s still room for improvement,’’ Layman said. “If I stay focused on daily progress, everything else will take care of itself.’’ And it did when Maryland opened its Atlantic Coast Conference schedule against Virginia Tech. Layman’s 20 points keyed the Terrapins 94-71 victory. “We all have to step up in conference play,’’ Layman said. “I felt confident that I was ready. Virginia Tech was a great game for us – a good start.’’

Jake Layman, a star at King Philip and the state, has gone on to the University of Maryland, where every player he faces is an all-star.

Layman is enjoying his new teammates, new coach and the atmosphere of big-time college basketball.

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 24

February 1, 2013

Sports Tom Hall, Tri-County's Unsung Hero By ChriSTOPher TreMBLay Franklin’s Tom Hall became interested in Football at the age of eight when he began watching the Patriots and soon after his father suggested he try out for the Pop Warner team. Now 10 years later, he’s concluded his senior season with Tri-County, which included two trips to the Vocational Super Bowl. “I just fell in love with football, mainly because I could hit people and not get in trouble for it,” said the Cougar tackle. “Playing the (offensive) line you get to hit someone on every play.” Hitting people aside, Hall was a three-year varsity starter for TriCounty who really impressed his coach. “If you had to draw a picture of a student athlete – you’d get Tom,” Tri-County Coach Tony Mazzola said. “He’s a quiet kid with no rah, rah, but he goes out and does his job. As a lineman, if your name isn’t called, then you know you’re doing something right. You never heard his name called.”

It wasn’t until his sophomore year until Hall made the varsity squad, and although his first game wasn’t one to write home about, he did use it as a stepping stone to make a name for himself over the next three seasons.

they felt they were the better team. “Last year, we thought that we were the better team and we could just walk over anyone in our way,” Hall said. “It was a real wake-up call for us after the first quarter.” While Hall and Cougars teammates were on the losing end of both Super Bowls, no one knew what was in store for them this year.

“Making the varsity team was a different experience. I really didn’t know any of the players, but they were nice and taught me a lot about the game,” Despite a tough year, Tom Hall held his own this year, Hall said. “My moving from center to tackle to fill a need. The player first start, we is considering putting his athletic prowess and team played terrible as a mentality to work in the Army next year. team, but I felt that During his first two years on the all the pressure was on my shoulders and it was my fault that we varsity team, the Cougars went to played badly. After talking to the the Vocational Super Bowl, only to coaches and the upper classman, I lose both contests. The first, Hall’s was reassured that it wasn’t my inaugural season with Tri-County, the team was just happy to be fault and I felt a lot better.” there, but the second time around,

“It’s your senior year, so you want to do good, but we didn’t have a good year at all (TC finished 1-9). Still, I wouldn’t trade it for anything,” the Franklin resident said. “Coach called this year the middle child syndrome. The older kids, or those in front of us, were the ones that we looked up to, while the ones behind us were the ones people were talking about.” Coach Mazzola knew this fall was going to be taxing on the kids, and he let them know it prior to the season getting under way. “This year was extremely tough. Most of these kids had three years of post season play under their belts, but I let them know that it was going to be a hard year,” the coach said. “Despite the 1-9 record, they continued to work

hard and never gave up, and Tom had a lot to do with that.” Although Hall was not named to the All-Star team, he was rewarded with the Cougars’ Unsung Hero award, during a year that he was asked to change positions. Hall played center for Tri-County his first two varsity seasons, but was moved to tackle this past fall because of need. “We graduated four linemen from last year’s squad and needed to move Tom to fill the gap,” Mazzola said. “The move came easy for him. In the past, he was used to double teams and handling bigger guys at the center position, but as a tackle, he only had to worry about guys coming at him from one side.” Following high school, Hall would love to continue playing football, but at this point in time, he’s leaning toward joining the army. When next year’s team takes the field without Hall Mazzola will feel his loss. “I’m really going to miss him,” the coach said. “He’s been here all three years with me, and I have to say I was lucky to have kids like Tom during those years.”

New KP Coach Clifford Hoping for Slam Dunk Season by Christopher Tremblay Five years ago, prior to Sean McInnis taking over the King Philip boys basketball program, the Warriors were literally the doormat of the Hockomock League. King Philip was amidst a sting of 40 straight loses, but with the signing of McInnis and an emerging freshman named Jake Layman, the Warriors began to

change the outlook of the program. It took two years, but during the 2011 season King Philip finished 14-8, earned a number seven seed and eventually lost to Hopkinton in overtime in the Division 2 South Championship game. Last year the Warriors went 17-3, grabbing a 3 seed in the tournament and once again fell to Hopkinton, this time in the quarterfinals.

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Layman has since moved onto the University of Maryland, and McInnis is now trying to resurrect the girls; basketball team. Tim Clifford is now in charge of the boys program. Clifford, who played basketball at Walpole High School and Holy Cross, was part of McInnis’ staff coaching the KP freshman team before spending the last two seasons as an assistant at his alma mater, Walpole. “Sean McInnis and his coaching staff put together a successful program and built a tradition here at King Philip and I’m looking to continue that,” Clifford said. “It’s not going to be easy when you lose a team that included Jake Layman, Christian Fair and Connor Smith, but we’re going to work hard at upholding the tradition installed by McInnis’ and his staff.” Granted, losing a 6’9” division 1

college prospect does leave the Warriors with a gigantic hole in their starting lineup, but KP’s new coach is looking to be as competitive as his team possible can within the league. “You can’t lose kids like Jake and not feel it,” the coach said. “There’s no denying that the Hockomock is a strong league, and we’ll be fighting for a middle spot in the league, hoping to compete in

all games. As the year goes by, we should be getting better and steal a couple of wins here and there.” Clifford will be looking toward Pat Lydon, who is returning from injury, guard Sam McDonald; Jimmy Layman, the team’s leading scorer; point guard Jared O’Connor, Erik Ryan and Mike

COACH continued on page 25


February 1, 2013

Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 25

Sports McInnis Aims For KP Girls Five To Gradually Improve By Ken haMWey The King Philip girls’ basketball team may not look very imposing right now, but wait awhile, because the view will be changing soon. Coach Sean McInnis, who took the program’s reins this year, has a history of transforming down-andout teams into tourney-bound squads. The 42-year-old coach resurrected the Weston High girl’s team into a Dual County League powerhouse, and after two losing seasons, the KP boys mentor helped the Warriors advance to the Division 2 South Sectional final in 2011. Give McInnis a challenge and the first thing he does is roll up his sleeves and get to work. The KP girls, who won only nine games during the last four years and currently have a 2-7 record, are acutely aware that McInnis’ last two projects produced glowing results. At Weston, McInnis’ squads qualified for tourney play in seven of his eight years there and the Wildcats won their first league title during his reign. Weston also advanced to the Division 3 North Sectional final. At KP, with the boys, McInnis’ last two years ended with the Warriors compiling records of 18-6 and 20-3. “Our goal is to strengthen the girls program and make KP an aspiration school,’’ McInnis said. “We want other programs to aspire to be like us, and we want studentathletes to come to KP. Building this team is a process, and the girls

COACH continued from page 24

know it. In three years, we should be in the tournament. We want opponents to look at their schedule and know that they’re in trouble with a KP matchup. We want to make girls basketball relevant.’’ McInnis understands the job ahead will involve some patience. He also is fully cognizant that the three previous coaches were all quality leaders. “The girls team had solid coaches,’’ McInnis said. “Dan Damish, Jim Leonard and Megan Barry are good educators and good coaches. Megan left to devote more time to her work in education. People must realize that KP competes in a very tough (Hockomock) league.’’ Two girls who’ll help build the foundation for the future are junior captains Ellen Wagner and Amanda Johnson. McInnis respects the forwards’ leadership abilities. “Ellen unfortunately broke her hand in our first game,’’ McInnis said. “Hopefully, she’ll return next month. She’s a tremendous leader who rallies the troops. Amanda works hard to get our rebuilding going. She starts at forward and is averaging six rebounds a game.’’ Three guards who play key roles are junior Alicia Cuoco, sophomore Grace Davis and freshman Maddie Purdue. “Alicia plays great defense and is a capable ball-handler,’’ McInnis noted. “Davis is another strong defender who can score and Maddie will be an excellent all-around

Pergola to hopefully lead the Warriors into the state tournament. In addition to his starters, which have yet to play a full game together, KP also has a deep bench with a lot of new players. Coming off the bench will be James O’Brien, a sophomore who can play just about every position; Pat Casey, the team’s spark off the bench; Mike Corrcos and Tyler Hopkins. Clifford is hoping that the success brought on by the past Warriors teams will breed into the future teams allowing the tradition to be carried on for many years to come.

As he has done in the past, Coach Sean McInnis hopes to turn lagging KP Girls Basketball into a model of strength.

player. In our double-overtime victory over Weston, she had 20 points, six steals and seven rebounds.’’

ers and scorers,’’ McInnis said. “They’re learning and adjusting, and they’ll gain confidence as they get more experience.’’

Freshman Rylianne Dalzell and senior Mary Allen are reliable defensive stalwarts in McInnis’ scheme that stresses defense first. “Rylianne and Mary draw our opposition’s best scorers. They’re tenacious on defense and I’m thrilled with both. Mary showed veteran leadership in the Weston win by scoring 11 points.’’

Soph Brianna Miccile displayed grace under pressure in the triumph against Weston. The power forward hit the tying basket in regulation, got the tying basket to force a second overtime, and converted a pair of free throws to ice the outcome. “Brianna had three big scoring opportunities and she was cool under pressure,’’ McInnis said.

Junior McKenzie Richardson and sophomore Emily Sullivan are guards who can turn up the dial on offense. “They’re both good shoot-

“We need to get the kids involved in basketball at a younger age, so that we can build upon that,” Clifford said. “Basketball has little to do with the coach, but a lot with the community.” New KP Boys' Basketball Coach Tim Clifford, shown at inset, demonstrates techniques to his team. He's hoping for his team to hold its ground this year after the loss of some key players.

Four guards who will gain experience at the varsity level and likely become solid role players are

freshmen Caroline Molla, Jen Lacroix and Samantha Madden and soph Madison Mitteness. “They’ll become key cogs and big contributors down the road,’’ McInnis noted. A former Wakefield High player, McInnis is adjusting to his new coaching role and he fully understands what the transition to the girls team involves. “It presents a new challenge,’’ he said. “I miss the boys and the family atmosphere we had with the great parents associated with that program. But, the girls are a new family, and they also present a new opportunity.’’

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 26

February 1, 2013

The Fiscal Cliff Deal and Your Taxes What will and won’t change. BY BILL NEWELL Several tax hikes, some tax breaks. Now that the fiscal cliff deal assembled in Congress is becoming law, it is time to look at some of the tax law changes that will result. Here are the major details in the bill, which will bring significant tax hikes to some households in an effort to increase federal revenues by $600 billion over the next ten years. The Bush-era tax cuts will be preserved for at least 98% of taxpayers. Individuals with incomes of $400,000 or less and households with incomes of $450,000 or less will not see their federal income tax rates rise. The EGTRRA/JGTRRA cuts have been made permanent for such earners. The wealthiest americans are looking at a major income tax hike. The top marginal tax rate will rise 4.6% in 2013 to 39.6%. Individuals with more than $400,000 in taxable income and couples with more than $450,000 in taxable income will be affected. This is the first major income tax increase on the highest-earning taxpayers in 20 years. Now when you take that 39.6% top rate and pair it with the oncoming 3.8% Medicare surtax, what is the impact for the wealthiest taxpayers in dollar terms? It is major. The non-partisan Tax Policy Center calculates that in 2013, households with incomes between $500,000 and $1 million should see their federal income taxes rise by an average of $14,812. What about households with incomes

above $1 million? The Tax Policy Center projects taxes rising an average of $170,341 for these couples and families this year. Practically speaking, all working americans will see taxes rise in 2013. The payroll tax holiday of the past two years officially ends with the new bill’s passage. In 2011 and 2012, employee payroll taxes were reduced by 2% as an economic stimulus – an idea that came from the White House. In 2013, the payroll tax rate returns to its old level and employees will pay 6.2% in Social Security taxes rather than 4.2%. This tax break saved a worker making $50,000 annually about $1,000 last year. Employee earnings up to $113,700 will be taxed. Estate taxes now top out at 40%. Additionally, the individual estate tax exemption falls slightly to $5 million. Both of these changes are permanent. The alternative minimum Tax has been patched - permanently. Congress no longer has to arrange an annual fix for the Alternative Minimum Tax that was never indexed to inflation. This patch is retroactive to 2012, of course. The Pease provision & personal exemption phase-outs are back. As a result of the deal, 80% of itemized deductions will be eliminated in 2013 for individuals with adjusted gross incomes of more than $250,000 and couples with adjusted gross incomes of more than $300,000. That threshold is also where personal exemption phase-outs will start in 2013. Dividends will not be taxed as ordinary income. Single filers

Norfolk Democratic Town Committee Caucus Date set for February 9: The Norfolk Democratic Town Committee has set their caucus date for Saturday, February 9th in the School House Room at the Norfolk Public Library at 10 a.m. Jack McFeeley, a 25-year member, will be running the caucus proceedings.

with taxable incomes of more than $35,350 and joint filers with table incomes above $70,700 will see a top dividend tax rate of 15% this year. Dividends coming to individuals making more than $400,000 and households making more than $450,000 will return to the 20% level, 5% higher than they were in 2012. Investors in the 10% and 15% tax brackets will pay no taxes on dividends. The top capital gains tax rate is now 20%. Wealthy investors paid a 15% tax on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends in 2012. That will rise 5% this year. Single filers making more than $400,000 and joint filers making more than $450,000 will face this tax hike. Those in the 25%, 28%, 33% and 35% federal tax brackets will pay 15%, and those in the 10% and 15% brackets will face no capital gains taxes. long-term unemployment benefits live on. They will be sustained through the end of 2013 for roughly 2 million people. another “doc fix” has been made. Drastic cuts in Medicare payments to physicians will be avoided for 2013 as a result of the new legislation. The Earned income Tax credit, american Opportunity Tax credit & child Tax credit will be extended through 2017. President Obama has long sought to preserve the $2,500 American Opportunity Tax Credit for college expenses, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Child Tax Credit – and that will occur thanks to the fiscal cliff deal. The $250 deductions for teachers' classroom expenses will also be extended into 2013.

50% bonus depreciation is preserved for 2013. The tax break that permits companies to accelerate depreciation schedules for major capital investments lives on for another year.

The “sequester” will be delayed 2 months. The automatic federal spending cuts that were set to occur January 2 will be postponed until March while Congress tries to craft a plan to replace them.

The R&E tax credit & wind production tax credit are both sustained. Both federal tax breaks are available again for 2013.

While the new tax rates may slow the economy this year, they will also decrease some of the uncertainty, which could bode well for investors.

The charitable iRa rollover provision returns. You can practically hear the cheers ringing out at non-profits across the country: thanks to the fiscal cliff deal, people over age 70½ will again be permitted to make taxfree transfers from an IRA to a charity, university, or other qualified non-profit organization in 2013.

William C. Newell, Certified Financial Planner (CFP), is president of Atlantic Capital Management, Inc. a registered investment advisor located in Holliston, Mass. With Wall Street access and main street values, Atlantic Capital Management has been providing strategic financial planning and investment management for over 25 years. On the Web at www.atlanticcapitalmanagement.com.

Fallen and Forgotten: The Ernie Schaaf Story It was 80 years ago this February when Wrentham's Ernie Schaaf became a tragic footnote in the history of boxing. The young, handsome, and talented fighter was on the verge of greatness until he went into the ring against a giant of a man, Primeo Canera. Four days later, he would be dead, leaving behind a devastated family, a heartbroken community, and questions on how such a tragedy could happen. It is an American story about a Wrentham man few know and even fewer remember.

Please join Patrick Coleman, the editor of The Wrentham Times, at the Fiske Public Library on February 13, at 7 p.m. for an informative presentation on the fascinating life of Ernie Schaaf. We will discuss Schaaf's meteoric boxing career and life in Wrentham. The presentation will cover his days growing up in New Jersey, Schaaf's Navy years and the myths surrounding his last and fatal fight.


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

February 1, 2013

Page 27

Local Attorney Joins National Academy

Jubinville Sworn In Robert L. Jubinville, a Milton attorney, was sworn in Thursday, Jan. 3 as the District 2 Governor’s Councillor at the State House at noon. His District includes Millis, Medway, Franklin, Norfolk and Wrentham, among other towns.

Robert Deschene of Deschene Law Office, has joined the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, Inc. (NAELA). Deschene, a resident of North Attleborough, focuses his practice on estate planning, elder law and asset protection. He is also a member of WealthCounsel, the Advisors Forum, and of both the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Bar Associations.

Jubinville, an attorney of 33 years and former Massachusetts State Police Trooper/Detective, ran for the same seat and lost in the previous two elections of 2010 and 2008. In January, the District 2 incumbent of 18 years passed away and the seat remained vacant until the election. In September, Jubinville won the primary over Bart Timilty, Brian Clinton and Patrick McCabe. He was then elected to the two-year term over Republican Earl Sholley in November.

Established in 1987, the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) is a nonprofit association that assists lawyers, bar organizations and others. Members of NAELA are attorneys who are experienced and trained in working with the legal problems of aging Americans and individuals of all ages with disabilities. The mission of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys is to establish

NAELA members as the premier providers of legal advocacy, guidance and services to enhance the lives of people with special needs and people as they age. NAELA currently has more than 4,000 members across the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia. For more information, please contact NAELA at (703) 942-5711 or visit www.naela.org.

The Wrentham Cultural Council is Seeking New Members If you have an interest in becoming active in promoting the arts and humanities in the town of Wrentham, the Wrentham Cultural Council has an opportunity for you. The council has two open seats to fill. The Cultural Council is a local branch of the Massachusetts State Cultural Council and is responsible for reviewing and awarding grants for cultural programs in the town. The Council also holds special events and exhibits at the Old Fiske Museum where it shares space with the Historical Commission. Visit our website to see the many activities we have held http://wrenthamculturalcouncil.shutterfly.com/. If you

would like to become involved and have some time and energy to contribute, please submit an application to the Selectmen’s Office at 79 South Street, Wrentham MA 02093. The “Committee/Commission” application form can be found on our website in the Volunteer section. If you have questions, please contact Andrea Tooker at wrenthamculturalcouncil@gmail.com or call (508) 384-8689. The Wrentham Cultural Council is a local agency which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

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Aand attempt certain persconsist that serve predicted major feature of be- higher, ed to make thegood shape. vice articles and page 6 wider cross bers should of Selectmen. ted by recipients. region. g, I put us here that opportunity even knots It in what wasweather, skirting manag Stream in make sure ons. his life. the new website is aro Team “Withhave to papers,” possi- power other for suppor anwere even thinkin a Office recipes of the month. “You an ony-Tod says Tashjian, the by the Board ased as Gulf le conditi to listen read and without facing break in low fronts that line telephone directory. y. He lin’s #1 at s. the favorab lucky if there are one The Kune Tashjian is encouraging “you’re “Really, you’re ever ive – try to live as faith-b ticle was Steve Langle it with suport tween two in Frank blogs rous.” if Cape Hattera a.com an Town residents will be two articles about al had the by student groups from klinm theons up from #1Team Barbara’s Selectm told him I’m O Negat actual able weren’ Towns Clean Up page 17 can be treache town. coming en Nor- We nfran the propos to search their own read plan the to Service Directory on conditi ructio being community wood high school to ysis nounced Board of SelectmCarroll transplant, towns const Sinceand find focused sailed south 12 years! el et Anal for individuals and page 17 .new community Localtownpages has a voice through the port of the -1 with Micha Leclair MarkBY for the last businesses, based.” www also invited Question to be on Free new J.D. O’GARA 3 perfect, #1 in Norfolk Bob automatically getting a vote of Mayofwithout Readers are invited making us against. 14 town meeting. a list local nonprofit groups to submit monthly. Students, under super11th for vote Ballot to businesses Flowers submit Thanks vision of their instructors, aren’t the only colorful not in their immedi- monthly news articles the only attendance. cepting this grant, however, le. and event submit will articles, announcements and story ''2 /( in is June With aatedebt items popping up in area. If two-thirds of voters listings. The publisher the proY RAFFLE was not their Millis yards exclusion override, -0,/6 /12 at the town 15.Without the grant, the 13000+ peop ed that ade also en- publication. own articles for ideas to norwoodnews@v LIDA in the warming climate. cost voters approve meeting vote for the home M A R K E T P L A C E 32 $.&erizon. '+)*% courages local merchants y explain to look at imreaches HOa beautiful, handm ings! net, or by override, the would be $7.7 million for More and a one-time expen'2+&'. ad 41 calling Langle furnish to (508) *' offer le cy 533-1333. for effort more This the diture that increases town will signs are adorning the adorab was an The deadline /-' "+2* page 18 front proximatelypay for a bond of ap- structure planned for the corner the town’s tax onal efficien Tashjian does think se with website to enter: lawns of Millis homes of only until the debt dollhou information the 15th/.& for submissions is &*# $( ! '% $*- posal g the operati a test to see new om $5 million for the new Exchange Street and this spring, is paid. ,,, ()+ of each month. provin Go to our udentialpage.c Route 109. $( ! ) and also both for, and against, make &facility. www.pr “Contact Us” '% ()+ &*# a vote the Board an appetite to re- al duced, This price is greatly “The reRemov of opportunity ,,, If on ! Millis garding the construction Tree taxpayers vote for the really is now,” town’s • of Click was AY CO new $2.7 thanks to a grant of over override, NS says Library 3 if there in how the T R TemTreeaPruning • MEDW U C T IService Trustee library for the town. the annual bottom Beverly al million the ! library O N Directory changes THAM $23 3 & DESIGN On May 11,Remov uted. Furtheran lin. line ple. “The state has rea ceived broader • WREN Hardscapes “yes” vote will put a • Stump is constit grant •goes from the !Massachusetts for taxpayers (who own the avers p in Frank away • Stonewalls Proposition 2Service & page • Lawn Installation that it was MEDFIELD after June government ! /-' /1) age $365,000 and Maintenance16• & 17 Walkways NKL IN 15. If we do not 1/2 debt exclusion override qualBoard explained Estate Grou home) is about $154 • Bobcat Tree Services • Snow do it on theGrinding of Library Commissioners at the beginning 555 /.& now, I *24 more, he to identify highly apD - FRA Plowing #1 Real think table for consideration • Stump we’re lookingGuaranteed (MBLC) — The deadline !" Hour* Lowest Prices nity of 20 years, and h the ! at a Call the at the June MIL FOR # for ac- $89 in the Emergency opportu ers throug Truck that it last year of the bond. *24 Hour* Tree Service home M A R K E T P L A C E Emergency Since 1948 • Bucket ified membprocesses and Board LIBRARY Residential & Commercial Basement Sump N Complete Water Systems by the pointment continued on page page 18 & 19 Visit Pump Service 4 Website For Complete democpower grab Sales & Service List of Services and wasn’t a en. “There is no Current Coupons: Any Job "# www.knightsl N Quality/Quantity $50 Off CO of Selectm

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Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

Page 28

February 1, 2013

Like to Sing? Come to the Charles River Chorale! All Are Still Welcome to Come Sing Along We've started rehearsals, but that doesn't mean you aren't invited! Come on by and get your song on! The Charles River Chorale was formed in 1985 as the Millis Community Chorale. It performs two concerts in Millis each year, a Holiday Concert, and a Spring Concert. The Holiday Concert focuses on the December holidays, with both secular and sacred Christmas music coming to

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the fore. The Spring concert typically includes selections from Broadway shows, movie classics, patriotic songs, and music written by prominent American composers like Irving Berlin and Stephen Foster. The Chorale also sings at other events by invitation. We have sung with the Greater Marlborough Symphony Orchestra and the Claflin Hill symphony Orchestra. Although it remains centered in Millis, the Chorale has attracted members and audience from throughout the Charles River watershed area. Medway and Franklin are both well represented, and members travel from as far as Boston and Attleboro to sing with the organization. Founding Director Roy S. Kelley remains at the helm as the Chorale celebrates its silver anniversary. The Charles River Chorale, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) corporation. Your donation is fully tax-deductible. Come to the Church of Christ on Route 115, just north of the intersection of Route 109 in Millis, on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. to join and sing. The Chorale is a nonaudition all-volunteer group

We publish the 1st of every month. Advertisement and editorial deadline is the 15th of each month. editor@norfolkwrenthamnews.com

The Charles River Chorale, shown here, puts on a Spring and Winter Concert each year and also takes part in a number of other events. The Chorale is a non-audition, all-volunteer groupMillis High School on December 8th, at 7:30 p.m. Photo used courtesy of Charles River Chorale, taken by Tim Rice of Tim Rice Photography

based in Millis and is comprised of over 50 singers from surrounding towns. Just this past August, Greg Quilop became the chair of its executive board. Led by Musical Director and founder Roy S. Kelley, the Charles River Chorale presents Chorale's 28th season entertaining local audiences. Visit w w w. c h a r l e s r iv e r chorale.net for additional information.

Chamber Government Affairs Luncheon to Feature Kennedy U.S. Congressman Joseph P. Kennedy lll Featured Speaker for Milford Area Chamber of Commerce Joe Kennedy is our newly elected U.S. Representative for the MA 4th Congressional District. A former prosecutor and member of the Peace Corps, Joe has dedicated his career to pursuing justice and standing up for people who are getting overlooked by our system. Joe previously served as an Assistant District Attorney for Middlesex County, prosecuting a wide variety of misdemeanors and felonies. Joe attended Harvard Law School, where he spent most of his time working for the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, a student managed pro-bono law firm. Joe grew up in the Commonwealth and studied Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He speaks fluent Spanish and resides in Brookline. Joe served in the Peace Corps from 2004-2006, where he worked on economic development/community reinvestment in the Dominican Republic. Monday, February 11th, 2013 11:30am - Luncheon with Presentation and Q&A Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Boston/Milford 11 Beaver Street, Milford, MA 01757 $35.00 MACC/495 MetroWest Partnership Members $50.00 Non Members Reserve a table of 8 people for $250


Local Town Pages www.norfolkwrenthamnews.com

February 1, 2013

Charles River Masons Strive to Do Good By J.D. O’Gara A lot of giving goes on behind the scenes. That’s the case with the members of the Charles River Masonic Lodge of Medway, who serve Medway, Millis, Franklin and surrounding areas. The volunteers offer a “Masonic Angel Fund,” in the hopes of providing modest assistance to needy children who don’t usually fit the criteria for social service programs. According to the Masons, these funds might be used for such items as eyeglasses, clothing, footwear, school supplies, and minor health and dental services.

Local school principals and school personnel can apply for assistance on behalf of a child. The Charles River Mason’s prefer not to have direct contact with a family, but to work with school officials to fulfill the need in as timely a manner as possible. Masonic organizations contribute over $1 million a day to various causes. Although, like any fraternal organizations, some of the Mason’s customs are known only to members, the organization is not a secret society. It holds monthly meetings, breakfasts and raises funds for the community, striving to do good.

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A man who wishes to become a Mason can send in an application, and the organization will review it and sit down with the applicant. The only criteria is that the individual believe in a supreme being. According to the Massachusetts Freemasons, applicants must be 18 or older, and must seek membership of his own accord by petitioning a lodge and asking a member to sponsor his application. The Charles River Masons meet the second Wednesday of each month at their lodge at 37 Cottage Street, Medway, aside from July and August. For more information, email charlesriver@massfreemasonry.net or visit http://mamasonic15.org/CharlesRiver/. The Charles River Masonic Lodge is located at 37 Cottage Street in Medway and serves surrounding towns such as Franklin.

Valentine's Day Facts Save money this Valentine's Day and Superstitions Every February 14th people around the world exchange gifts, chocolates and romantic greetings for a day set aside for lovers. Many traditions are followed, all in the name of St. Valentine. Still, people may not understand why such customs are upheld. Much of the history of Valentine's Day and St. Valentine himself is shrouded in mystery, and much of what's widely accepted is inaccurate. To set the record straight, here are some facts about the holiday. • Valentine's Day is believed to have originated from a celebration in Rome during the fifth century. This celebration paid tribute to St. Valentine, a Catholic priest. Other historians surmise it was a way to "Christianize" the pagan holiday of Lupercalia, which was a fertility festival. Included in the traditions were boys and girls drawing names from a box and exchanging gifts. • The Catholic Church acknowledges at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus. • All of the stories surrounding St. Valentine -- whether they are disputed or not -- paint him as a sympathetic and heroic individual. • Valentine's Day greetings have been popular from the Middle Ages onward, though they have been usually verbal in

nature. • The oldest known written valentine still in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt. • Valentine's Day is celebrated in the United States, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, France, and Australia. • Valentine's Day and Mother's Day are the most popular holidays to give flowers. • According to Hallmark, women purchase 85 percent of all valentines. • According to the Greeting Card Association, an estimated one billion Valentine's Day cards are sent each year, making Valentine's Day the second largest card-sending holiday of the year behind Christmas. • Candy was among the earliest Valentine's Day gifts and remains a popular gift today. • Some tales suggest that the type of bird a girl watches on Valentine's Day predicts her future husband. A bluebird indicates a happy man, while a sparrow indicates a poor man. • In Medieval times, girls consumed unusual foods on Valentine's Day in the belief it would make them dream of their future husbands.

Valentine's Day can be a joyous time for couples, but it can also be expensive. A bouquet of roses and some new jewelry capped off with a night out on the town adds up, and many men and women find themselves looking for ways to celebrate Valentine's Day without breaking the bank. While a night in is always a great way to save some money, couples can still spend a night away from home without straining the wallet. The following are a few ways costconscious couples can save some money this Valentine's Day. • Avoid prix fixe. Many restaurants offer prix fixe menus on Valentine's Day. These menus reduce the amount of options at a couples' disposal, and couples might be forced to pay for several courses when they would prefer just an entree. If cost is a concern, pick a restaurant that offers a full menu instead of prix fixe. This allows you to avoid potentially costly appetizers and desserts while still affording you the opportunity to share a night out together. • Avoid going out on Valentine's Day. Another way to save money is to go out a day or so before or after Valentine's Day instead of on the holiday itself. Many restaurants are fully booked for dinner on Valentine's Day, so you might be forced to choose a restaurant that stretches

your budget. It should be easy to book a reservation a night before or after the holiday, and doing so allows you to choose a restaurant that's more aligned with your budget.

• Shop ahead of time. It's customary to exchange gifts with your significant other on Valentine's Day, but it might be difficult to find a good deal on a gift if you wait until the last minute. Rather than procrastinating, shop for a gift well in advance of the holiday. Because of the proximity of Valentine's Day to the holiday season, you might be able to find a gift when shopping for the holidays. The holiday shopping season is known for its

great deals, so look for something you can save until mid-February. If you go this route, just make sure the gift you buy will still be eligible to be returned or exchanged if need be. Even if you wait until after the holiday season to find a gift for your valentine, the earlier you start shopping the more time you have to comparison shop and hunt for a deal. • Consider a picnic. A day or night away from home doesn't have to be spent at an expensive restaurant or on a romantic getaway. If the weather allows, consider a picnic in the park. Cook up your valentine's favorite meal and bring along a bottle of wine and then enjoy some time together under the warm sun at a fraction of the cost of a more traditional Valentine's Day date. • Forgo roses for a rose bush. Roses are a staple of Valentine's Day, but they can also bust a budget. Instead of an expensive bouquet, tell your loved one you will plant him or her a rose bush instead once the weather warms up. This frees up some money in the short term, and once the rose bush blooms this will prove one Valentine's gift that keeps on giving. Valentine's Day is a beloved tradition for many couples, but it doesn't have to stretch your budget.


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Avoid Becoming a "Groundhog Day" Investor Groundhog Day is almost here. For most of its history — which, according to some reports, dates back to the first celebration in 1886 or 1887 in Punxsutawney, Pa. — Groundhog Day held little significance for most Americans. But that changed in 1993, with the release of the movie Groundhog Day, in which a semi-embittered meteorologist, played by Bill Murray, is forced to re-live the same day over and over again. He repeatedly makes poor choices, until he finally learns from his mistakes and is granted the ability to move on with his life. Since the movie came out, the term “Groundhog Day” is often used to refer to a situation in which someone repeats the same mistakes. It’s a phenomenon that happens in many walks of life — including investing.

suggestions: Don’t chase after “hot investments.” Many investors make this same mistake over and over — they hear about a “hot” investment from a friend, relative or television commentator, and they buy it. Too often, though, by the time they purchase this investment, it’s already cooling down. Even more importantly, it just might not be suitable for them. So instead of pursuing “hot” choices, pick those investments that are appropriate for your needs, goals and risk tolerance.

you’re making toward your goals by checking your portfolio once a month. Don’t let fear and greed drive your choices. “Buy low and sell high” is the classic piece of investment advice. But too many investors only buy investments when they’re on the rise and sell them when they’re falling. In other words, they’re doing the opposite of “buy low and sell high” — and they’re being driven by fear and greed. Keep these emotions out of your investment strategy, and you’ll help yourself greatly.

Don’t maintain unrealistic expectations. Some people consistently put off investing until “later,” figuring they can always catch up by putting away more money during their peak earning years. Don’t make that mistake. To achieve your longterm goals, such as a comfortable retirement, you need to invest early and keep investing, rather than wait for a time in your life when you may suddenly have more money “freed up” for investment purposes. Also, don’t anticipate that you’ll steadily earn a good rate of return on your investments. Although the financial markets have trended up in the long term, we’ve seen many down markets that have lasted for a year or longer. Factor in these

February 1, 2013

fluctuations when estimating the rate of return you’ll need to achieve your goals. For these types of calculations, you may want to work with an experienced financial professional. These and other “Groundhog Day”-type investment mistakes can be costly. But you can avoid them if you maintain a solid investment strategy, if you’ve got patience and perseverance — and if you stay focused on the long-term horizon. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. Submitted by Mike Kerrigan Financial Advisor of the Plainville Edward Jones Office.  He can be reached at (508) 643-0601.

Don’t over-analyze short-term price fluctuations. Some investors check their portfolios' performance every day, or even several times a day. But if you’re constantly evaluating how your investments are doing over short intervals, you may be tempted to make unwise deci- Financial Services Firm Makes Fortune List for 14th Year So, how can you avoid be- sions in response to sudden Financial-services firm Edward administrator. Each Edward Jones pany's responses to the institute's coming a “Groundhog Day” in- drops or jumps. You can get a Jones ranked No. 8 on Fortune branch office includes one finan- Culture Audit, which includes devestor? Here are some good sense of the progress magazine's "100 Best Companies cial advisor and one branch office tailed questions about pay and bento Work For 2013" list in its 14th administrator who work one-on- efit programs and a series of appearance on the prestigious list, one with clients in the communi- open-ended questions about hiring according to Mike Kerrigan, a fi- ties where those clients live. practices, internal communicanancial advisor in Plainville, MA. tions, training, recognition proTo pick the 100 Best Companies grams and diversity efforts. Edward Jones' 14 Fortune rank- to Work For, Fortune partners with ings also include top 10 finishes for the Great Place to Work Institute to Edward Jones provides financial 10 years and consecutive No. 1 conduct the most extensive emservices for individual investors in Mike Kerrigan Financial Advisor rankings in 2002 and 2003 and ployee survey in corporate Amer- the United States and, through its consecutive No. 2 rankings in 2009 ica. Two-thirds of a company's affiliate, in Canada. Every aspect 167 South Rte 1a MikeStreet Kerrigan Plainville, MA 02762 Financial Advisor and 2010. Fortune and Time Inc. score is based on the results of the of the firm's business, from the 508-643-0601 are not affiliated with and do not institute's Trust Index survey, types of investment options offered 167 South Street Rte 1a Plainville, MA 02762 endorse products or services of Ed- which is sent to a random sample to the location of branch offices, is 508-643-0601 ward Jones. of employees from each company. designed to cater to individual inThe survey asks questions related vestors in the communities in Currently, Edward Jones has www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC to their attitudes about manage- which they live and work. The 4,630 positions available throughwww.edwardjones.com ment's credibility, job satisfaction, firm's 12,000-plus financial adviwww.edwardjones.com out the country, mostly for finanand camaraderie. The other third of sors work directly with nearly 7 cial advisor and branch office the scoring is based on the com- million clients to understand their personal goals -- from college savings to retirement -- and create long-term investment solutions that emphasize a well-balanced portfolio and a buy-and-hold strategy. Edward Jones embraces the imporREBATES UP TO $1,925 FOR GAS or $950 OIL tance of building long-term, facewith 7 years to pay at 0% interest to-face relationships with clients, helping them to understand and Maximize your savings by replacing your OLD heating unit now: make sense of the investment opIt’s Coan to be warm and cozy this winter, with the Best for Le$$ tions available. $200 Free Oil Delivery Discount Coupons (Oil accounts only, on automatic delivery) Edward Jones is headquartered

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Life Changes Change Tax Filing Status: Know Yours to Prevent Overpaying By rayMOnD anDOLfO, OffiCe ManaGer, h&r BLOCK franKLin, Ma

Married filing separately

One of the most common mistakes taxpayers make is selecting the wrong filing status. A short lesson on filing statuses could help ensure you pay only what you owe in taxes and get back the tax refund you’re due.

Filing separately can sometimes lower a tax bill. For example, if one of the spouses has low income and high medical bills, it could work in their favor to file separately to claim these expenses as itemized deductions. This is because their spouse’s income could make it difficult to reach the threshold for claiming medical expenses. Starting in 2013, for taxpayers under 65 to claim medical expenses, they must exceed 10 percent of their adjusted gross income, an increase from the previous 7.5-percent threshold.

If it has been a while since you filled out a tax form using a pen, you might have forgotten about the tax rate schedule. This schedule outlines how taxes are applied based on filing status. The points at which you move from one tax bracket to the next one vary based on your filing status. If you select the wrong filing status, you very likely will not be taxed accurately because the moves to higher tax brackets are prompted by different amounts for each filing status. Also, because the amount of the standard deduction is different for each filing status, selecting the wrong one could result in paying taxes on more income than you’re required. So, selecting the correct status is very, very important. To help you determine which is right for you, following are the IRS filing statuses with some information about each one.

Single Those who are not married may file as single. Your marital status on Dec. 31 of the year for which you are filing your tax return determines your filing status. This means taxpayers who are not divorced on Dec. 31 must continue to use one of the filing statuses for married couples, which are generally married filing jointly and married filing separately. In some cases, married and single individuals may be able to file as head of household.

Married filing jointly Generally, married taxpayers file a joint return because of the added tax benefits, including eligibility for certain credits. Also, if your spouse died in the tax year for which you are filing, you can likely file as married filing jointly.

Head of household with a qualifying person Married and single taxpayers can sometimes qualify to file as head of household when these conditions are met: • You are either single or considered unmarried for tax purposes – Married taxpayers are considered single for tax purposes if they have not lived in the same home as their spouse for at least the last six months of the year • Paid more than half the cost of keeping up your home • Had a qualifying dependent living in your home more than half of the year – If the qualifying dependent is your parent, the requirement to have lived with you is waived – which could really help out those in the sandwich generation.

Qualifying widow(er) with a dependent child For up to two years after a spouse’s death, the widow(er) may continue to use the married filing jointly tax rate by filing as a qualified widow(er) with a dependent child, as long as the taxpayer hasn’t remarried.

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‘It’s complicated’ No, “it’s complicated” isn’t a filing status, but certain big life changes can make it difficult to determine your correct filing status. In fact, some people find themselves eligible for more than one status. A common example is when taxpayers with children are in the process of getting a divorce or have separated. Depending on the specifics of their situation, parents who are divorcing or separated may be eligible to file under three filing statuses: married filing jointly, married filing separately or head of household with qualifying person. Another time this would generally apply would be when single taxpayers with a child, or other qualifying relative, may be able to file as either single or head of household. Guessing what your filing status is or assuming it is the same as last year could cost you now or catch up to you and cost you later, especially if your marital status has changed. If you have questions about your filing status, or any other tax issue, contact a tax professional. Call us in Franklin, (508) 528-6012.

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February 1, 2013

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Norfolk/Wrentham February 2013  

Norfolk/Wrentham Feb 2013 edition.