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AUGUST 2010 | Issue 1

EISTEDDFOD FEVER

THE HILL IS ALIVE WITH THE SOUND OF MUSIC AS THE TOWN GETS READY TO HOLD THE 41st BROKEN HILL EISTEDDFOD


from the editors It was not that long ago we could not wait to leave Broken Hill. Oh, how things change!

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hilst our time away has shown us a glimpse of the outside world, it has also taught us that there is nothing like the comfort and friendship you find in a small town like Broken Hill. There are many exciting and colourful stories to be unravelled hereboth from the past and present...inspirational people and events that have shaped Broken Hill’s history and will shape its future. A future that we are excited to embrace. And so we introduce to you LOCAL TALK BROKEN HILL- a free community magazine written by locals about local people and community events. It has been an exciting venture from encountering the idea of this magazine to the first printed copy. We have already met so many wonderful people doing fantastic things for our community. We encourage you to get involved with LOCAL TALKmake it your hub for information and conversation.

WWW.TEMPLEOFFITNESS.COM.AU Phone (08) 8088 4825

Over 5 Leading Les Mills Programs Fully Equipped Gym Open 6am Daily Indoor Cycling & Boxing Studio Exclusive Cardiotech Supplier (Treadmills & Vibrational Technology)

Visit the website to re-read articles or view videos of interviews and events. Comment on the articles and have your say about local issues. Encourage businesses to support the magazine through advertising and through the use of our graphic design and video production services. And please contact us if you are aware of events in the community that could be featured in the magazine. After all, we have created this for you- the people who make Broken Hill. We love living in Broken Hill. The community spirit here is undeniable. We look forward to being a part of a medium that can assist in growing that spirit and connecting the community in ways that it has not seen before. We sincerely hope you enjoy our first issue...and we look forward to your support and involvement. Happy reading! JOSH & KRISTIL COWDREY To help improve this publication we would appreciate your feedback. Send comments or suggestions to editors@localtalk.com.au


CONTENTS AUGUST 2010 | Issue 1

6

Things To Do In August

8

Kidz Talk

9

Competition Time

10

Community Talk

16

Local Spotlight

17

Business Talk

19

Food Talk

20

Career Talk

22

Story Time

23

Stay Local

24

Eat Local

26

Explore Local

28

Sport Talk

29

Fitness Talk

30 31

Have Your Say

Local Talk Calendar Philharmonic Choir Sacred Concert Taeja Edwards, Angus Defranceschi & Hamish Curtis ‘I Love Broken Hill’ Colour-in Competition

LOCAL TALK ONLINE!

If you have access to internet then hop online and visit the Local Talk community website at www.LocalTalk.com.au. On the website you will find all the content contained in this magazine plus additional content. Read articles and watch videos on the Local Talk TV Vimeo and YouTube channels. Engage in the Local Talk social networking channels on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest from around the region.

Broken Hill Eisteddfod Supporting Youth in our Community Kindergym Artist Deirdre Edwards Pryority Skin and Body Care Josh’s Business Building Tip Insure Against the Unexpected

PHOTO OF

THE M ONTH

Broccoli Pastsa Otto Peeterson - RFDS Pilot My Friend Rachael - by Mark Curtis Tarrawingee Holiday Units Broken Hill Bells Milk Bar and Museum The Royal Flying Doctor Service Geva Mentor - Adelaide Thunderbirds Fitness Tips for People on the Go!

Broken Hill Map

FRONT COVER: Isabella DeFranceschi Local Talk Magazine is owned and operated by Brastin Pty Ltd (ACN 095 879 904) 164 Argent St Broken Hill NSW 2880. Copyright 2010 by Brastin Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is strictly forbidden without the written permission of the publisher. Brastin Pty Ltd accept no responsibility in respect of any products, services or goods which may be presented in this magazine, or any errors, omissions or mistakes in editorial references. This magazine can also be viewed online at:

www.LocalTalk.com.au

PHOTO: Outback Sunset - by Josh Cowdrey Do you have a special photo be it landscape, objects, or a cute someone with a special smile? Send your photos to editors@localtalk.com.au

LF! E S R U O Y EXPOSE A QUALITY, COST EFFECTIVE MEDIUM FOR COMMUNICATING YOUR BUSINESS BRAND ACROSS BROKEN HILL Local Talk Magazine is distributed FREE each month to over 10,000 homes and businesses across Broken Hill.

Local Talk Magazine 164 Argent Street, Broken Hill NSW 2880. Ph (08) 8087 5410 email: editors@localtalk.com.au


Galena Street Broken Hill, TEL (08) 8088 3833


S

hae Wants to be a youth worker

BUILDING COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

TO MAKE THESE DREAMS COME TRUE Congratulations to Josh and Kristil Cowdrey on the launch of the first edition of Local Talk.

S

HANNON Wants to be an architect

Once again, the Broken Hill community has benefited from the vision and passion of its young leaders by supporting the Local Talk team as they embark on this very exciting project. Broken Hill City Council is committed to supporting the region’s young people, through training, mentoring, advising and sponsorship as well as pursuing opportunities for future industry and educational development. It is certainly a wonderful moment when a new project is born in the City, particularly one that will enhance the social cohesion of the community by highlighting and celebrating the wonderful stories of the people who live and work in the region. It will make great reading for residents and visitors alike. I encourage the community to support Local Talk. Who knows – you might know a person whose story belongs on one of these pages one day!

KATELYN Wants to be an arborist

Wincen Cuy Broken Hill Mayor

Broken Hill … a safe, vibrant, prosperous and culturally rich City achieved through community leadership and sustainable management.

M

att Wants to be part of the winning team

Contact us at the Customer Service Centre, 240 Blende Street, or phone us on 08 8080 3300. Alternatively, you can visit our website at: www.brokenhill.nsw.gov.au

Broken HillAUGUST City2010 Council | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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things to do in August

R A D N E L A C Y T MUNI M O C K L A T L LOCA Silverlea Gala

Community Markets

Mountain Bike Club Time Trial

Field & Games

Sacred Concert Trophy Shoot

Broken Hill Eisteddfod

To contribute to the Local Talk Community Calendar call (08) 8087 5410 or email kristil@localtalk.com.au 8th MOUNTAIN BIKE CLUB TIME TRIAL Broken Hill to Silverton. Starting at the gate opposite the Quondong Farm on the Silverton Road at 9 am (Registration from 8 am). 13 years and above. Members $5, non-members $15. Phone Shelley on 0419 283 745 for more information. 14th COMMUNITY MARKETS 200 Beryl Street from 9 am. Fresh fruit & veggies, gourmet meats, jams, pickles, cakes, biscuits, Asian food, chocolates, sweets, olive trees and products, souvenirs, toys, clothes, paintings, folk art, engraved glass...and of course a good old Aussie BBQ. Phone David on (08) 80878903 for more information. 14th & 15th FIELD AND GAMES ASSOCIATION TROPHY SHOOT To be held at the Target Range on the Silver City Highway. 10 am start both days. 50 targets Saturday, 100 targets Sunday. Phone Rod on (08) 80874236 or 0407 187 498 for more information.

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15th PHILHARMONIC CHOIR SACRED CONCERT St. Peters Church, 3:30 pm. $5.00 donation at the door. See full article on page 7 for more information. 21st-25th BROKEN HILL EISTEDDFOD Various sessions over 5 days. All sessions held at the Entertainment Centre. See full article on page 8 for more information. Mondays BROKEN HILL PHILHARMONIC CHOIR REHEARSALS Every Monday evening, 7:30 pm, Choir Rooms (corner of Sulphide and Crystal Streets). Phone June on (08) 80874004 for more information. Tuesdays BROKEN HILL CIVIC ORCHESTRA REHEARSALS Every Tuesday evening, 7:30 pm, B.I.U Band Hall (Beryl Street). Phone Peter on (08) 80884840 for more information.

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

Thursdays BARRIER INDUSTRIAL UNIONS BAND REHEARSALS Every Tuesday evening, 7:30 pm, B.I.U Band Hall (Beryl Street). Phone Ross on (08) 80879887 for more information. Tuesdays & Thursdays DRAMA CLUB Held Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4-5:30 pm, at Theatre 44 (Wills Street). Phone Katrina on (08) 80878948. Throughout AugustREGIONAL ART GALLERY EXHIBITION Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery, 404-408 Argent Street. Phone 08 8080 3440 for more information.

Use the Local Talk Calendar to help plan your month. Feel free to cut it out and stick it on your fridge. Fill in the blank spaces with important events.


things to do in August

SACRED CONCERT IN ST PETER’S CHURCH There is nothing more stirring than listening to beautiful voices in the resounding acoustics of a sacred building. And thats exactly what audiences will be treated to at the upcoming Philharmonic Choir’s Sacred Concert.

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embers of the Broken Hill Philharmonic Society Choir will present a Sacred Concert in St Peter’s Church on Sunday August 15th. The concert will commence at 3:30 pm. The performance will include pieces by Rutter, Faure and Bruckner, as well as old favourites such as ‘Panis Angelicus’ and ‘Ava Maria’. There will also be a performance of ‘Exsultate Justi’an arousing work by John Williams from the movie “Empire of the Sun”. The Philharmonic Choir has a long and proud history in the Broken Hill community. There will be around 23 members performing in the

choir at the Sacred Concert, ranging in age from young adults in their 20’s to enthusiastic senior members. The choir will be conducted by Diane Cotterill, who has been music director for 4 years, and assistant conductor Randall Wheatley (pictured). The choir will be accompanied by Jocelyn Keast. Audiences will also be treated to solo performances by Diane Cotterill and Lorraine McIntyre. Both singers are very well known in the Broken Hill community for their devine voices and outstanding performances. There will be a special treat in store for music lovers- Jocelyn

Keast will also feature as a soloist performing on the church’s “Pro Hart” Pipe Organ. Admission to the concert will be a $5.00 donation on the day. So whether you are a patron of the fine arts, or are just looking forward to a nice Sunday afternoon full of lovely music, make your way along to the Sacred Concert and support one of Broken Hill’s finest choral ensembles

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WATCH MORE OF THE INTERVIEW & CATCH A GLIMPS OF THE REHEARSAL ONLINE AT OUR WEBSITE. www.localtalk.com.au

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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TAEJA EDWARDS

ANGUS DEFRANCESCHI 8

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

HAMISH CURTIS


competition time

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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community talk

THE HILL IS ALIVE... WITH THE SOUND OF MUSIC! The month of August will bring the sound of music to the air as the 41st Broken Hill Eisteddfod takes place.

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he Eisteddfod will bring together people of all ages and levels of ability, united by one thing- a love of the performing arts. There will be many interesting and enjoyable sections for the public to see including dance, instrumental, vocal, speech and drama events. Audiences will again be delighted and entertained by a number of talented locals, as well as some competitors from Mildura and Menindee. The Broken Hill Eisteddfod has a rich and important history as part of the Broken Hill community. It has been run annually by the volunteers that form the Broken Hill Eisteddfod Society since 1969 and has provided an important performance opportunity for the towns inspiring performing artists. One only has to look at the list of past competitors to feel the wealth of talent that has passed through this town- a history of quality performances that this years entrants are happy to continue. The Eisteddfod begins on Saturday 21st of August with the dance sections. This year will provide an opportunity for many competitors to debut as a soloist. Combine these with the regulars who are seasoned performers in the local Eisteddfod and audiences will be witness to an interesting and exciting display of dance. There will be solo events, as well as duets, trios and troupe sections in a variety of dance styles. From the beauty of classical ballet to the heart-pumping jazz routines, from the elegance that is traditional Irish dancing to the cool moves of hip hop, there will be something to entertain

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everyone. The dance session begins at 9:00 am and will run for most of the day. The Saturday evening session will begin at 7pm and will see the first events in the Instrumental section takes place. These sections will include performances by the B.I.U Band and the Broken Hill Civic Orchestra- two local groups with their own established history in the community. It will prove an enjoyable night of fine music.

“There will be many interesting and enjoyable sections for the public to see including dance, instrumental, vocal, speech and drama events.� Sunday 22nd of August will see the popularly contested vocal events take place. Competitors in the vocal section range in age from 10 and under to young adults. Contestants will compete in a variety of events including own choice, character in costume, duets, and the ever exciting Pop Stars event. Pop Stars contestants face off in a series of heats to determine the finalists who will compete for the title during the Monday evening session of the Eisteddfod. The Pop Stars event is always a crowd pleaser and this year will be no exception.

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

As is tradition with the Broken Hill Eisteddfod, the Monday morning session will see many of the local schools being represented in the Choral sections. Most schools have had a long and proud history of involvement with the Eisteddfod, and it is a delight to see so many youngsters enjoying participating in these events. The afternoon session will see an array of diverse performances from classical to blues and jazz, performed by the youngest of beginners to the most proficient amateur pianists this region has to offer. Continuing through the week to Tuesday will see a range of Speech and Drama and Instrumental events hit the stage. A highlight event of the Eisteddfod will take place on Tuesday with the 5 and 6 years nursery rhymes recitation. The littlies entered in this section recite their chosen nursery rhyme for adjudication only- and rightly so. For these youngsters summoning the courage to present their item on stage already makes each and every one of them a winner. Wednesday the 25th of August will see the 41st annual Broken Hill Eisteddfod come to a close- and what better way to end it than another performance by the children of this city as they take part in the schools verse speaking choirs sections. All events for the Eisteddfod will be held at the Broken Hill Entertainment Centre and are open to the general public. Programs can be purchased at Broken Hill Music or at the Eisteddfod

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For more information phone Merrilyn Podnar (0880877633) or Pauline Rauert (0880876779) or visit the Eisteddfod website www.bheisteddfod.webs.com.


PHOTO: MAHAILA DENTON (5 YRS OLD) WILL BE PERFORMING IN THIS YEARS EISTEDDFOD

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AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill


community talk

SUPPORTING YOUTH IN OUR COMMUNITY Understanding the importance of encouraging and nurturing the youth of Broken Hill so that they have the opportunity to become valued members of the community. We need to support our youth to enable them to achieve excellence!

Anthony Hayward (pictured) is a young and vibrant artist making his way in the dynamic world of art and culture.

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he 18 year-old trainee has immersed himself in his work at the Regional Art Gallery, enjoying the local, regional and international flavour the employment opportunity has afforded him. Employed by West State Training and hosted by Broken Hill City Council, Anthony works closely with the gallery team, guided by Gallery Manager Bruce Tindale. However, this unassuming young man, has not only made an impression on his gallery colleagues but also the broader community. His passion and respect for his heritage and the arts and cultural industry has been rewarded with introductions to significant figures in the industry at conferences, meetings and exhibitions. It is an exciting introduction to the industry before he pursues his University studies in 2011. It is this kind of extraordinary experience that Council aims to provide young people to consolidate the future of Broken Hill.

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Customer Service Trainee Kate Pittaway, 19, made such an impression on the Council Customer Service Team during her one-year cadetship in 2009, that Council and West State Training approved is hosting a second year of training so that she can complete her Certificate in Business Administration this year.

“It is important that, as a community, we identify local opportunities for young people and support our youth to achieve excellence,” General Manager Frank Zaknich understands the importance of supporting young people in their home town. If they are encouraged and nurtured, they will become valued members of the community, not just at work but also in a broader capacity. Frank commenced his Local Government career as a traineehealth & building surveyor with Council in 1981 and after

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

20 years developing his Local Government skills and experience across two states, he returned to his home town as General Manager in 2006. “It is important that, as a community, we identify local opportunities for young people and support our youth to achieve excellence,” Frank said. “Council offers a broad range of opportunities in partnership with a number of organisations from traineeships, cadetships, personal coaching and mentoring for young people interested in developing a career in Local Government,” Frank said. Council currently has four cadets working in environmental services, two in finance and one in Information Technology. There are apprentices in mechanics and carpentry and Indigenous traineeships offered at with the Art Gallery/Albert Kersten Geo Centre, Community Services, Youth Services and Customer Service teams each year. In partnership with NOVA and West State training, Council also hosts a Disability Trades Assistant trainee and will shortly place a horticultural trainee under the same scheme. “To ensure that our young people are supported well, Council also provides a number of training


opportunities for every person on the Council team each year and encourages the continued education and skill development of its employees. In more recent years, an essential part of the Council training package has included the process of Business Excellence, with other opportunities for senior members of the team to develop skills in coaching and mentoring. Council currently has four Life Coaches on its team who pride support for trainees working at Council and in other organisations. For a number of years, Council has also provided student scholarships in areas of need for the Broken Hill community such as Engineering and Health. “Council has identified gaps in professional services and is providing support for local youth to train and bring home their newfound skills and qualifications,” Mr Zaknich said. Council works in partnership with the Greater Western Area Health Service to provide the David Bowler Memorial Scholarship to help train and retain local young people in the health sector. Council also offers an undergraduate Civil Engineering scholarship each year which provides university fee support and holiday work experience for engineering students.

Currently there are two students supported by this scheme. Arend Boog, has recently completed his Graduate Engineering studies and is a valued member of Council’s Infrastructure team. Two more students are currently in their second year of studies. Council’s philosophy is shared with many Councils across Australia that rural, regional and remote communities are at their healthiest when they produce local solutions to local challenges. “One of the main themes that the community identified during the Community Strategic Planning process this year was that the community expected Council to provide strong leadership in creating opportunities to attract and retain young people to the City,” Mayor Wincen Cuy said. “While the community has laid down a significant challenge for council, Council prefers to regard these challenges as opportunities,” Mayor Wince Cuy said. “If Council can identify training and educational support opportunities for young people, then that will be Council’s legacy to the Broken Hill Community. This legacy is essential to ensuring that Broken Hill has a vibrant and sustainable future,” Mayor Cuy said

PHOTO: KATE PITTAWAY - CUSTOMER SERVICE TRAINEE

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TO ADVERTISE IN LOCAL TALK CALL (08) 8087 5410

PHOTO: AREND BOOG GRADUATE ENGINEER AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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FUN AND LEARNING AT THE SAME TIME!

community talk

Kindergym is an opportunity for young children to develop physical skills in a fun / play environment at their own rate. It channels energy appropriately into a creative thought process and encourages them to decide how to use the equipment available.

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un, fun and more fun is what leader, Jodi Eberle, is serving up at the Broken Hill Kindergym. And for the local youngsters in attendance there could not be a more appetising menu. There are slides, balls, swings, trampolines, puzzles, beams and swings, as well as songs, dances and other structured activities. The truth is it’s not only the children who are coming out on top. Attending a Kindergym session is like feeding kids chocolate coated broccoli. The kids love it- and the parents walk away with the sound knowledge that it’s been extremely beneficial. Kindergym is a nationally accredited movement based program aimed at 0 to 5 year olds that is designed to give them a good understanding of physical development and movement. In addition, it is a good chance

PHOTO: Jordanah Hibberd & kindergym leader jodi eberle playing on the slide

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for the children to interact oneon-one with their parent or carer and to spend quality time in a structured environment whilst exploring activities at their own pace. Kindergym offers facilities for children starting from 6 to 9 months of age, once they start exploring their own environment at home. Attending Kindergym classes encourages children to explore the space around them and discover new environments. The sessions run during morning hours, catering for children up to 4-5 years of age (generally until they start school).

“I enjoy seeing the children grow and develop week after week!” Kindergym is about more than just learning. It is a development and exploration experience for the children. They learn about their bodies and their environment, improving motor skills and physical development along the way. Important developmental skills such as co-ordination, spacial awareness and balance are also a focus. But the sessions are structured in such a way that the children do not necessarily see the learning. They are too immersed in the fun and games. And it is obvious from their eager participation that the Broken Hill Kindergym is serving up a winning recipe. The sessions have both structured

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

learning activities and free play times. The group activities provide children with an introduction to skills such as listening to an instructor and taking turns. It gives them a chance to work as part of a team and follow instructions from someone other than their parent or carer. It is an excellent way to introduce them to a pre-school or school type environment. These skills are further developed when the children reach about 4-5 years of age (generally the year prior to starting school) when they can move into a pre-gym class. The pre-gym class contains about 45 minutes of structured learning- as well as free exploration time. This class builds on specific skills week by week that will lead into the basics of the gymnastics program. Any way you look at it, Kindergym is definitely an activity worth attending. Whether you are looking for somewhere to relax and connect with other parents, a place for the children to meet and play or a structured learning environment where your child can improve on essential developmental skills, Kindergym is definitely the place to be

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KINDERGYM CONTACTS For all Kindergym enquiries contact Jodi Eberle on (08) 8087 6163 Kindergym class sessions are held on Tuesdays & Thursdays at 9.30 am and 10.30 am both days. Pre-Gym Classes (4 - 5 years) are held on Tuesdays from 12 pm to 1 pm. The Gymnastics Club is located at 24 Central Street, Broken Hill.


PHOTO: Tyler with his MUM Playing in the PHOTO: JACKSON CLIMBING THE LADDER

kindergYm ball pit

l l i H ken

Bro

PHOTO: THOMAS PLAYING IN THE TUNNEL AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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local spotlight

DEIRDRE EDWARDS

With over 30 years experience as an artist, Deirdre Edwards gives us an insight into her career as a ‘mixed medium’ artist.

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eirdre has always had a love of art. As a little child she loved spending time sitting on her own drawing or sketching. This often led others to refer to her as a ‘loner’. But the time spent drawing has certainly paid off. She is now a renowned artist with successful exhibitions and a lifestyle which allows her to do what she loves. As a mixed medium artist Deirdre enjoys working on paper, canvas, board and various other mediums. In addition to this, she also enjoys print making. This varied skill set means that there is a variety of subject matter available, which helps create never-ending inspiration. Deirdre has been developing her artwork for over 30 years. Starting out as an ink and water colour artist, she branched into acrylics and touched on oils before settling into a mixed medium. Although her talent is obvious, completing painting certificates and attending workshops and courses have also helped enhance her natural talent for art. Everywhere Deirdre goes there is something from which she draws inspiration. Details of

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particular subjects are features of her work. Deirdre explained that rather than looking at a landscape in a broad aspect she prefers to select a tree or bush that has a particular way of inspiring her. Although it doesn’t happen very often, when Deirdre is confronted with an inspirational block she will go back to basics, do some spontaneous drawings on a completely different subject or pull out some old sketches before returning to the original work. When asked what she likes to do in her spare time Deirdre replied “I like to fish!”. Deirdre and her husband have been fishing all over Australiacatching marvels such as Marlin, Barramundi, Queen fish- in fact its an impressive list of catches that fishing addicts would probably drool over. Deirdre described this year as being a “wonderful year”. She has enjoyed two solo exhibitions, one of them being at the Regional Art Gallery for which she also published a very successful book. Deirdre is continuing to build on her success by publishing a second print of her book.

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

August will be an exciting month for Deirdre as she will be featured in a solo exhibition in South Australia. The works for this exhibition will be displayed in South Australia and the exhibition will focus on celebrating 150 years of copper mining in Moonta. Deirdre is currently working hard on finishing her remaining artwork for this exhibition. For the future, Deirdre hopes to continue to enjoy her work, to paint what she feels - what she loves - and see what comes out

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FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT DEIRDRE VISIT HER WEBSITE AT:

www.djdee.com.au WATCH AN EXTENDED INTERVIEW WITH DEIRDRE ONLINE AT: www.localtalk.com.au

PHOTO: DEIRDRE’s LATEST WORK


business talk

MAKE YOURSELF A

PRYORITY!

Visit an oasis in the outback and relax, rejuvinate and recoup. manicures, you will find it all available at Pryority. A speciality you can experience at Pryority is Bamboo massage. Warm bamboo massage is an ancient muscle relief technique used to release tight, tense muscle PHOTO: KATE PRYOR (PRYORITY SKIN AND fascia and helps to aid circulation. BODY CARE) Warmed bamboo sticks are rolled firmly over the muscles to t is always nice to see instantly soften and soothe. someone who has found a It is a brisk, yet rejuvenating passion and followed their treat for both your body and dreams. It is even better when your soul. that person is a local and applies this passion to their Kate chooses to focus on work, allowing the community natural and organic products to benefit from a service that such as essential oils and is of the highest quality. Kate aromatherapy as a basis Pryor is one such person, and for her treatments. Whilst her business is PRYORITY- skin Kate firmly believes that and body care. technology in skin care has its place, she believes Kate began her interest in that people benefit from beauty therapy when she the use of wholesome completed work experience natural products, without at a beauty salon during high chemicals, that are gentle school. From there her passion on the skin. It may be an has grown into her own home old remedy, but it works. based business. And the aromatherapeutic benefits for clients mean If you imagine an oasis in the that the treatments are not desert- a sanctuary where just physical, but can also you can feel at peace enhance the way you feel. while being pampered and revitalised- then you will be Above all, the absolute getting close to imagining advantage of visiting the Pryority experience. Pryority is the personalised From facials to various service. Being a home kinds of massage, make-up based business means application, waxing and there is only one customer

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at a time- and this means you have Kate’s full attention for the duration of your visit. The beauty room is fitted out with simple, yet stylish, decor and is fully equipped for the services Pryority provides. It is a sanctuary where you can get away from it all- enter the peaceful room and feel relaxed and comfortable. Everybody needs a little bit of relaxation- a bit of time for themselves. So what better way to have some time for yourself than to experience a hands on treatment in peaceful surrounds? Experience the magic of touch therapy that massage can offer. Or revitalise your skin with a customized facial. They are not only an indulgence, they are a part of looking after yourself and having healthy skin. So consider Pryority next time you need a time out. You deserve it...and your body will thank you

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AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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business talk JOSH’S BUSINESS BUILDING TIP

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f you don’t use business cards to build your business then you are really missing out. Living in the booming technology age means that printing costs are affordable and business cards can be easily ordered. For around $100 you can invest in full colour, double-sided business cards that will ‘wow’ your customers.

a piece of art. I never leave the house or the office without a couple of business cards in my pocket. When you hand out your business card, always give more than one, so your card can be passed on to someone else. Help build your business the smart way, invest in some quality business cards.

Business cards are a conversation starter, a coupon, referral, appointment reminder,

INSURE AGAINST THE UNEXPECTED! Planning is the essence of any financial strategy. If you’ve planned properly, then you’ve left nothing to chance. Effective planning also means having a strategy in place to deal with life’s unexpected events.

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life insurance policy provides financial assistance in the form of a lump sum to your family or other dependants in the event of your death. At a time when your family won’t want to be worrying about money, this lump sum can be used to meet their ongoing financial commitments, such as the mortgage, and to maintain their standard of living. You may be thinking ‘who needs life insurance?’ Simply, if you have a family who is financially dependent on you and/or have debts that are serviced from your income alone, you should look at taking out life insurance. Obviously, the greater your financial obligations and the more dependants you have, the more life insurance you’ll need to protect your assets and your family’s financial security. There are different types of life insurance available to you. For example, term life insurance

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only provides death cover and has no real investment value, but life insurance is a cumulative investment that has a monetary value at the end of the policy. You’ll need to explore your options to make sure you have the type of life insurance cover, which best suits your needs and personal situation. Most superannuation funds also offer some form of life insurance protection if you invest your retirement savings with them. However, don’t assume this cover alone will be adequate. It will be entirely dependent upon your current needs, debts, and other obligations such as your own business, as well as the number of family members financially dependent on you. Ensuring you have adequate life insurance given your individual circumstances can be a difficult task. We can sit down with you and discuss your current financial situation to ensure that in the

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

unfortunate event of your death, the last thing your family will have to worry about is their financial security. Disclaimer This editorial provides general information only. Before making any investment decisions, we recommend you consult a financial planner to take into account your particular investment objectives, financial situation and individual needs. AXA Financial Planning and its Authorised Representatives do not accept any liability for any errors or omissions of information supplied in this editorial


food talk

Yo Momma in the kitchen ok!

ery Co t s y M k l Local Ta Are you longing for real, good food?

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ne of the greatest pleasures of travelling has to be good food, and Broken Hillites are known to travel, so we all must have sampled some good food along the way. Whether it be due to our low cost of living or our adventurous natures, I bet you all know someone who has been “away” or is going “away” soon. Through this monthly column, I aim to bring to you Real, Good, Food, the type you get when your “away”... Thai Curries, Vietnamese Spring Rolls, Turkish Bread and Dips, Real Italian Pasta, Greek Meze ... you know what I mean? But while we're saving to go “away” we'll need a bit of home cooking and some budget recipes to help us get there, so I'll throw in a few of those as well. This month, to kick us off, I thought I'd share with you a favourite recipe. But let me stress first, that I am not a trained chef, I am just a cook. A cook who loves to travel and experience all the world has to offer including real, good, food. This recipe comes from time spent in Italy with my daughter who was working as an Au pair in Milan. The family she was living with had gone to Tuscany for the weekend. The cupboards were bare apart from a little broccoli, parmigiano and dried pasta. I'll cook lunch, she told me... I wasn't very confident, but when she was finished, I was converted. It's a dish, where unlike Australia, Pasta is the star. It doesn't need loaded sauces or complicated, expensive ingredients. It's simple, economical, and very tasty.

Broccoli Pasta Ingredients: ½ kg Broccoli 500gm (100% durum wheat) dried pasta (any shape is fine, I use bows ) 3 cloves fresh garlic ½ cup olive or grape seed oil 1-2 tsp vegeta or similar dried vegetable based stock cracked black pepper to taste 200 gm grated fresh Parmigiano (Parmesan) cheese

Method: Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil. (Water should taste as salty as the sea, as this is what gives the pasta it's taste) Chop the Broccoli including the stalk into small, bite size pieces. Add to the boiling water and continue to boil for about 5-7minutes.

Add the pasta and cook till al dente or firm to the tooth (about 8-10 minutes). By this stage, the broccoli should be falling apart. While the pasta and broccoli are cooking, finely chop the garlic and gently fry or poach in the oil. The object is to infuse the oil with the garlic, not brown it. Drain the pasta, reserving about a cup of the water. Add the drained pasta to the oil and garlic, then the grated Parmesan and then add the cracked black pepper and vegeta to taste. Slowly add the reserved cup of hot water, stirring all the while to create a luscious sauce. This dish serves 4 with a green salad and panini on the side. For the carnivores, add a little pan fried veal in sage butter

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Next Month, I will give you the recipe for the best tasting gnocchi and I may even throw in an a classic Italian dessert. Cheers till then. Send comments and suggestions to: YoMomma@localtalk.com.au

FUDGE Bells Traditional Handmade Fudge Gluten Free. Cooked Onsite. No Added Preservatives. Free Fudge Tasting. Bells Milk Bar & Museum Now Open 7 Days 10am - 5:30pm 160 Patton St. Ph (08) 8087 5380

FREE FUDGE SLICE* With any Bells Milkshake, Spider, or Mug of Coffee Simply present this voucher. *one per voucher. not vaild with other offers. expires 31/08/10

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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career talk

HIGH FLYING CAREERS! Do you enjoy flying? Do you love the outback? Do you want to make a difference in people’s lives? Then a career with the Royal Flying Doctors might be the job for you! We caught up with Otto Peeterson (pilot) to find out a more.

Job Title:

Unique Features:

Pilot for the Royal Flying Doctors

Once again, the thing that makes this job unique is its unpredictable nature. When flying for a commercial airline your shifts are generally set. You sign in and out at particular times and you know where you will be flying each shift. As explained above this is not the case when working for the RFDS. You never know what the day will bring.

Job Description: The job of being a pilot for RFDS entails many different things. Obviously you need to fly the RFDS plane, both on clinic trips and to emergencies. However, in different situations you may be required to help in a medical capacity as an extra pair of hands for the doctors/nurses, and you may also find yourself comforting family members and answering their questions about what is happening at the time. It can be difficult and confronting, but also extremely satisfying and rewarding.

Challenging Aspects: The biggest challenge of this job is its unpredictability. Of course people can’t plan when tragedy will strike, and the flying doctor plane may get called just as your shift is nearing its end, or in the early hours of the morning. You could be flying to an unfamiliar place, and need to land the plane safely on a dirt airstrip which may not have been used for years. And in outback Australia the possibility of bad weather or dust storms crossing your path is very real. But these challenges are all part of making the job interesting and exciting.

Training Requirements: Once you have your pilots license, you need to build up a number of hours before considering a career with the RFDS. It would also be beneficial to have done remote area flying as most of the job is flying in the outback, not the cities.

Recommended Personal Attributes: To consider this career you will need to have a love of flying. You will need to see the challenges of the job in a positive light and not as burdens. And most of all, you will need to develop an understanding of outback Australia and the people who live there- as these are the people you will be dealing with on a daily basis

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WATCH THE INTERVIEW ONLINE AT: localtalk.com.au

Rewarding Aspects: The most rewarding part of the job is also its biggest challenge. The unpredictability. You never know what a particular shift will bring. You could be doing clinic flights, called out to an emergency, or be doing a patient transfer to an Adelaide hospital. You may be confronted with a standard injury scenario or something more gruesome like a car roll where people have been thrown from the car. And it is extremely rewarding and satisfying to be able to help people in those kinds of situations where normally medical help would not be available.

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AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

PHOTO: rfds beechcraft airplane


Being a Doctor or a Nurse is something most kids dream about at one stage or another. Helping cure the sick and save peoples lives sounds like a rewarding carer. But its a long road from dreaming it to becoming it. Add to this the fact that you may need to perform medical procedures some 30,000 feet in the air and you have Brendan Kiley’s job.

Job Title:

Unique Features:

Senior Flight Nurse for the Royal Flying Doctors

The unique thing about this job is that you provide emergency medical care on a plane. There are not many other jobs where this is required.

Job Description: Work as a flight nurse on the emergency aircraft. This involves 12 hour shift work. The job includes travelling to remote properties and accident scenes in outback Australia. You may be involved with medical procedures performed both on the ground and in the air, and you will need to accompany patients on patient transfers between Broken Hill and Adelaide. On around 85% of flights you will fly flight nurse and pilot only, the remaining 15% you will be accompanied by a doctor.

Challenging Aspects: As well as the challenges of emergency medical care, this job has the added challenges of weather and flying. In outback Australia the temperatures can get very hot, having a plane parked in the sun for around 45 minutes (whilst you attend to patients on the ground) can mean that the temperature inside the plane is around 60 degrees when you load the patients. You also need to consider that the plane will be moving, encountering turbulence and other weather conditions, and you are approx 30,000 feet in the air with no access to a hospital or emergency medical team for assistance. Factor in all of these things and the job becomes very hot, stressful, noisy and challenging.

Training Requirements: The minimum requirements include becoming a registered nurse and a registered midwife. You need to have at least 5 years post-graduate experience with a majority of that being in critical care. It is also recommended to have experience in emergency and aviation nursing.

Recommended Personal Attributes: To consider this career you will need to be interested in a medical career. You will need to be flexible and adaptable. You will need to be able to make lifechanging decisions under pressure and of course, you will need to enjoy flying! WATCH THE INTERVIEW ONLINE AT: localtalk.com.au

Rewarding Aspects: Being a reactive service, you know that being mobilised for a call out means that you are going to make a difference to someone, somewhere. You will be serving and helping people in ways that no-one else can. In most cases you are called to the RFDS is the only line of healthcare for the people involved. Your presence can mean the difference between life or death- and to know that you have saved a life is extremely rewarding.

PHOTO: rfds AIRCRAFT MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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story time

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hen I was a young boy, about that age at which one is more closely tied to teddy bears than toys, I used to visit a great white house, with dark blue trim, a deep verandah running right around and a manicured rolling back lawn. I thought this significant house was situated most advantageously, on a main road, adjacent to the main east-west transcontinental railway line. I must admit, that at age four, all I knew was that there were frequent trains that caused the level crossing lights to flash, the bell to ding and the engine’s whistle to sound – all very stimulating to a boy so young. One might well assume that a man of great import would live in such a house – and I am sure there was, for the house belonged to an important mining company. However, the personage who drew us there was a lady, dubbed, by my Grandma, “My friend Rachael”. Thus, Mrs Strempel became “My friend Rachael”. Such a title as this was a rare privilege, in a bygone era where men were men, women were women, children were children, and every elder was addressed by Mister or Mrs. I was not sure how I was able to get away with that cheeky mischief, until recently, when my mother remarked that I was cute when I was three. On that topic, all I shall say is it hasn’t lasted. Nevertheless, the privilege of calling a superior by their Christian name ensured a certain regard was nurtured, which has stayed with me. Fondness may be a better word, for that affection was also directed toward my yellow teddy bear, given me by “My friend Rachael’s” son. My teddy still sits in my wardrobe, losing more yellow fur, but still with arms outstretched, ready for another hug. And my Grandma and I were always welcome at that big white house, with deep blue trim. There was always a cup of tea in the kitchen with “My friend Rachael”, for me, a weak concoction with at least half a cup of milk and two sugars for taste. Morning tea was always at eleven, and never before. I dare say that this was a ploy to keep a restless boy occupied with clock-watching while

My Friend Rachael

Written by Mark Curtis

two friends conversed. An occasional safari up the enormously long passageway took us to the lounge room. There, sitting resplendent in its own wooden cabinet, was a Sharp Trinitron Colour Television – just the same as Grandma’s. This only added to the rarefied air of the lounge room, television was still black and white at our house. It was with great sadness that my Grandma told me the news of “My friend Rachael” moving to Bateau Bay. “How can someone live in a bay?”, I remember thinking. Bateau Bay sounded peculiar to my young ears, but impressive, maybe more so than the big white house, with deep blue trim. However, it did mean the end of visiting “My friend Rachael”. Grandma’s future visits would be after a long journey, the type of journey on which one would not take a young grandson – Grandfather was het up enough on a trip without adding to it. Not long after beginning my apprenticeship on the mine, the tradesman to whom I was assigned for the day had the job of disconnecting the power from that big old house. The paint was flaking; the gardens unkept and a lone river gum seedling had begun sprouting in the once well-tended front garden. I was able to transplant that tree to the back garden of my parent’s house, where it grows to this day, spreading its branches wide, reminding me again of the welcome extended to my Grandma and me. The great white house, with its dark blue trim, deep verandah and rolling lawn are gone now. Just a few overgrown foundations remain beside a busy road, advantageously adjacent to the main east-west transcontinental railway line. Engines still sound their horns, as they approach the level crossing, with its flashing lights and dinging bell. But, the young boy misses his Grandma now gone to her best friend, Jesus. The young boy also misses cups of tea with “My friend Rachael”, who passed away peacefully on July 16, 2010 at Mercy Health, Albury aged 83 years

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T WRITE A S

ORY

Do you enjoy writing? If you have a story you would like to share then we would like to know. Drop your story into the Local Talk office at 164 Argent St or email to kristil@localtalk.com.au.

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AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill


stay local

Tarrawingee Holiday Units Broken Hill Where the city and the outback meet!

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hen choosing a place to stay in Broken Hill a number of factors come to mind. You need something accessibleclose to town, close to shopping centres and close to tourist attractions. Something affordable with a friendly atmosphere and proprietors you can trust. And it would be nice to indulge a bit as well. Maybe a swim in the pool or a BBQ, internet access, austar, air conditioning and heating. But wouldn’t it be great to find a place that has all of the above plus the real outback experience of having the bush and kangaroos out the back? Well, that’s exactly what Tarrawingee Holiday Units provide. This holiday accommodation stop has it all. There are 12 spacious units (accommodating up to 6 people per unit) providing the perfect home-away-from-home setting. Each unit has its own car space, kitchenette and dining space. The contemporary decor compliments the look of the villas and adds to the relaxing atmosphere. There are pristine gardens on site, as well as a

laundry room and blue phone. Combine these with the features mentioned above and you have the perfect retreat for you, and your family. As previously mentioned, the real buzz of the place is the combination of city-type accommodation within the setting of the outback. At the back doorstep of Tarrawingee there lies a mass of rocks and scrub, home to kangaroos and other wildlife. Guests can witness the true outback while staying in the heart of the city, creating the ultimate Broken Hill experience. If you wish to stay at Tarrawingeeor are looking for a place for visitors to stay- then be sure to call and book in early. The units are extremely popular, being frequently booked out by returning guests who have obviously enjoyed their stay. So don’t miss out on a chance to stay in spacious luxury. Become a part of the Tarrawingee family and enjoy your stay in Broken Hill

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Tarrawingee Holiday Units 253 Wills Street, Broken Hill Ph: (08) 8087 9350 www.tarrawingeeunits.com.au WATCH THE INTERVIEW ONLINE AT THE LOCAL TALK WEBSITE www.LocalTalk.com.au

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PHOTO: ENJOY A SWIM IN THE POOL AT TARRAWINGEE HOLIDAY UNITS AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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Photo: bells milk bar CIRCA 1953

eat local

OVER 100 YEARS OLD AND STILL GOING STRONG! Step back in time and immerse yourself in the glory of the 1950s. We interviewed Bell’s Milk Bar owner Jason King and discovered a history which has spanned over 100 years.

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t is easy to see why locals, interstate visitors and even travellers from around the world love visiting Bells Milk Bar. It is not just the amazing range of delicious menu items, or the sheer old fashioned hospitality and service. Nor indeed is it the characteristic decor or the enthusiasm and passion that oozes out of Jason, the owner. It is the sense of atmosphere that encompasses you as soon as you step inside the doors. A nostalgic memory of that special outing with your family, a special treat from your Nanna, a place for young love.....memories that can last a lifetime. Stepping into Bells is like stepping back in time. And that is a feeling too often lost in today’s fast-paced society. The history behind Bells spans over one hundred years. It started out as Fentons - a confectionary and cordial making business in 1892. In 1903 Minnie Pearl Davis joined the business.

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AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

Minnie Pearl eventually took over the business with her husband, John Joseph Longman (who sadly was killed in the First World War). Minnie Pearl was the true pioneer of Bells. After she remarried a Bell in the 1930’s the shop was re-modelled in the style of the time, and was named Bells Milk Bar. Minnie Pearl’s son, Les Bell, and his wife Mavis naturally carried on in the Bell’s footsteps and took over ownership of the milk bar. In 1956 the shop was renovated with a styled decor typical of the 50’s. A few years ago the current owner, Jason King, moved down from Darwin and took on ownership of Bells with his fiancé, Dominique. In short, the business has been trading in one way or another for well over 100 years. While the history of Bells is fascinating, the real reason to visit the place is, of course, to indulge yourself in their diverse array of deliciously appealing menu items.


The milkshakes and spiders at Bells are somewhat of a phenomenon- largely due to the fact that the cordials and syrups used are still made on site, as they had been originally. You can also order ice-creams, thickshakes and sundaes, as well as the recently added (and very delicious) home made fudge. And don’t be deterred by the cold weather- their range of hot waffles and hot beverages (including espresso coffee from Jasper Coffee in Melbourne) are the perfect winter treat for the whole family. Bells really is an indulgence destination. And the Bells experience does not have to end at the conclusion of your visit. Bells also offer bottles of Milkshake syrups and Spider cordials to take home- butterscotch, Lime, Banana, Coconut, Chocolate, Raspberry, Hazlenut were just some of the flavours that caught my attention. Their range is endless. Imagine being able to create your own Bells drink even when the shop isn’t open. Genius! Although all of that should be enough to get you motivated to visit Bells, there is still more. The 3 bedroom house at the back of the shop has been renovated into a museum full of interesting historical facts about the hay-day of milk bars, in particular Bells.

It is fascinating to read the history and view the historical items on display- letting your mind wander to days gone by and reliving (or imagining) the lifestyle of the 50’s. You can purchase memorabilia of 50’s culture from the museum- a must have for all you fifties fans. And if you still aren’t convinced then consider this- Bells also offer free wireless internet for customers. Not exactly an offer you would have seen in the 50’s, but certainly a brilliant idea for people who can’t leave their laptops at home!

“Good oldfashioned indulgence you have to taste to believe”

PHOTO: The famous Bells Milk bar SODA Spider. If you have not yet experienced the amazing atmosphere that is Bells Milk Bar then head on out South and give it a try. Bring your family or catch up with friends. Take a step back in time to a simpler lifestyle. Slow down for a while and just take it easy. You won’t be disappointed

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For owner, Jason king, there has never been any other option other than to try and keep Bells as authentic as possible. The milk bar culture of the 50’s is all but nonexistent in Australia today and Broken Hill is very fortunate to have a place that encourages people to keep the 50’s spirit alive. Bells Milk Bar is located at: 160 Patton Street, South Broken Hill, Outback NSW 2880 Phone: (08) 8087 5350 Opening Times: Bells Milk Bar is open 7 Days a week from 10:00 am to 5:30 pm and longer in Summer.

PHOTO: Bells milk bar as it is today - step back in

www.bellsmilkbar.com.au

time and enjoy bells 50s & 60s decor AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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explore local

ANGELS REALLY DO HAVE WINGS!

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he Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia is one of the largest and most comprehensive aero-medical organisations in the world. The RFDS delivers extensive primary health care and a 24 hour emergency service to those who live, work and travel throughout Australia. The RFDS is a not for profit organisation. They receive some support from the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments, although the main source of funding is through fundraising and donations from the community. These donations help purchase and medically equip the aircraft. Across the nation the RFDS provides medical assistance to over 270,000 people every year, or one person every two minutes. The RFDS provides an emergency response for those who become seriously ill or injured, who live, work or are travelling within a remote area, with no nearby medical facilities. Patients are evacuated by air to the nearest medical facility or hospital. The RFDS provides this emergency response 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The RFDS is reachable by a HF radio that is fitted with RFDS frequencies. The range of frequencies and emergency contact numbers for the RFDS can be found on their website www.flyingdoctor.org.au The Flying Doctor also provides the transportation of patients between hospital facilities, known as interhospital transfers, usually when a patient requires medical treatment in a large regional areas or cities.

Local Talk catches up with Rach the Royal ael Flying Doc to r Service to Johansson from this outba ck icon is understan all about! d what

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SO MUCH TO DISCOV

The RFDS also provides health advice to patients in remote areas, who have no other form of medical assistance. Patients will contact their nearest RFDS base via HF radio or phone and speak with the RFDS duty doctor, who will assess the situation and provide the necessary medical advice. The patient will be monitored to determine if an aerial evacuation is needed or if they require a follow up at one of the next remote clinics. GP clinics are held every weekday by the RFDS, where doctors, allied health professionals and specialists travel to remote outposts to see patients. Over 14,000 clinics are provided by the RFDS throughout remote Australia every year to take GP services, nursing services, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, women’s health, mental health, dental services and health promotion and education services to the people who need them most. Another service is the Medical Chests, which contain a range of pharmaceutical and non pharmaceutical items. The Medical Chests provides a range of treatments, to be used with advice from a doctor. The items are listed with a set of instructions for each item and only certain items can only be given to a patient via a doctor. There are over 3000 medical chests located in remote areas across Australia. They exist in remote areas, at a specified location. That location has a designated person in charge of the medical chest. These medical chests are a life line for remote communities.

PHOTO: ENTRANCE TO THE ROYAL FLYING DOCTOR SERVICE BRUCE LANGFORD VISITORS CENTRE BROKEN HILL

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AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill


museum offers interactive displays, showcasing a history of the service and paying tribute to many of those who have worked and comtinue to work with the RFDS and those who continuously support the Royal Flying Doctor Service, South Eastern Section.

PHOTO: RFDS GIFT SHOP AND MUSEUM Nationally the service is divided into four operating sections; Central Section, Queensland Section, the South Eastern Section and Western Operations, and together we service 80% of Australia. The Broken Hill Base is part of the South Eastern Section and is one of the 21 RFDS bases located around Australia. The South Eastern Section covers an area that includes far western NSW, south western QLD and north eastern SA. The South Eastern Section cover over 640,000km, and in one year alone flew over 54,000 patients, conducted over 350 clinics and made an astonishing 22,000 landings! “The main highlight I see everyday is the dedication and passion that all of my colleagues have for the Royal Flying Doctor Service. They all contribute to the effective working operations of the South Eastern Section. The commitment from all of the team is very inspiring. The greatest highlight for me is hearing the many stories from those who have a close connection with the RFDS, maybe from a previous patient or from a family who live at a remote station, who attend regular clinics.” “Working with a variety of people at the Broken Hill Base is really amazing. I learn so much from the doctors and nurses, especially Senior Flight Nurse Brendon Kiley, who really amazes me with his stories and the passion he has for his role and the RFDS. I am amazed everyday by the generosity, the commitment and the warm hearts of our donors, who really give so very much of themselves to the RFDS South Eastern Section, through their donations and fundraising events. They all are very special, very giving people.”

The theatre seats 44 people, where you can enjoy a cinematic experience viewing a short film about the Broken Hill Base and the Broken Hill team. The merchandise shop sells official RFDS merchandise, plus many other gifts and souvenirs. You can enjoy a tour of the Broken Hill Base, which includes the Communications Room and then the Hangar, the home of our aircraft, where you can watch the real life operations of the Aviation, Medical and Engineering team. The Broken Hill Base and the Visitors Centre is unique as it is the only working RFDS base that is located at an airport and open to the public daily for tours. The tour is conduced by an experienced Tour Guide, who will ensure that you get the true experience of the RFDS

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Open Monday to Friday 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. Saturday, Sunday and Public Holidays 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM. Closed Good Friday, Christmas Day and Boxing Day Admission Prices (which includes the museum, film and guided tour): $7.00 per adult $3.70 per child (under 12) $18.50 per family (2 adults, 2 children under 12) $5.90 per concession card holder (seniors, students) Large group bookings are welcome; groups over 10 receive the concession price per person. Broken Hill residents can gain entry for a gold coin donation. The Royal Flying Doctor Service South Eastern Section also has its very own web shop, with a selected range of official RFDS merchandise. Shop online at www.flyingdoctor.org.au and click on the NSW link featured on the map.

“Hearing these stories and meeting these people, you really learn how much of a lifeline the RFDS is to those living, working or travelling in remote Australia. I feel extremely proud to be part of the RFDS South Eastern Section and I witness everyday the fantastic work and dedication of the very humble South Eastern Section team.” says Rachael. Located at the Broken Hill base is the Bruce Langford Visitors Centre, named after local benefactor, the late Bruce Langford. The Visitors Centre has a museum, theatre and merchandise shop. The

PHOTO: RFDS COMMUNICATIONS CENTRE AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

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MORE THAN JUST A MAGAZINE

At Local Talk we are more than just a magazine. We bring the quality and variety of big city services to small town Broken Hill at an affordable price. The Local Talk Magazine is our primary product that serves the local community and tourists in the form of interesting content about the Broken Hill community. In addition, the magazine provides a quality, cost effective method of building brand awareness amongst the community.

The entire Local Talk magazine is written, designed and published locally by Local Talk employees. One day, we hope to be able to print the magazine locally as well. Local Talk can provide businesses and the community with the following products and services:

- Graphic and creative design. From logos and business cards to flyers, brochures, posters, wedding invitations, announcements and all kinds of marketing material. Not only do we design, we can organise printing and manufacture of all materials; - Website design, domain name registration and website hosting services. From small one page websites to large e-commerce solutions; and - Photography and high definition video editing and production services. We can cover weddings, events and productions for use online such as commercials, testimonials and product demonstrations. Come and visit us in our new office located inside the Broken Hill Chamber of Commerce at 164 Argent Street or call (08) 8087 5410 or email josh@localtalk. com.au. Visit our website at www.localtalk.com.au

sport talk

SPORTING STAR VISITS BROKEN HILL It is not every day that you are in the presence of an international sports star!

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e were lucky enough to find ourselves in such a situation recently when Adelaide Thunderbirds netballer Geva Mentor visited Broken Hill. So for all you non-netball fans lets hit you up with a quick biography. Geva Mentor is an English international netball player. She was selected for the England national team in 2000, debuting the following year against New Zealand. Her achievements in netball include a silver medal at the 2005 World Youth Netball Championships and a bronze medal at the 2006 Commonwealth Games. In 2008, Mentor signed up to play with the Adelaide Thunderbirds in the Australasian ANZ Championship. Whilst touring the Royal Flying Doctor Base here in Broken Hill with her mother and brother, Geva was only too happy to stop for a quick chat and photograph. She explained that the netball

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competitions in Australia are far beyond what she would have experienced in England. Whilst netball as a sport is heavily populated there, the sponsorship and media coverage is lagging behind.

her family visited many tourist attractions such as the Royal Flying Doctors Base, the Big Picture and the GeoCentre and was impressed with the culture of outback Australia. And there was even a mention of her returning to Broken Hill in a professional capacity to run some coaching sessions for aspiring netballers. But with Geva returning to the UK soon to start training for the Delhi Commonwealth Games, it could be a while before we see her back in Broken Hill!

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Geva was also eager to pass on some advice to the future netball stars of Broken Hill. Back in England, Gevas role as Sports Development Officer allows her to do just that - see children at school level and give them opportunities to take their sport further. And what was her advice? To enjoy what you are doing. Train hard and listen to advice- but stay grounded and enjoy your sport. This time around Geva was only breezing through Broken Hill as a tourist. She complimented the people of the town, saying they have been very welcoming, and she loved seeing so many friendly, smiling faces. Geva and

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

PHOTO: GEVA MENTOR


fitness talk

FITNESS TIPS FOR PEOPLE ON THE GO!

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e're all busy – and that's the understatement of the year. Between work, school, kids, parents, pets, whatever, there's just simply not enough time in the day to get everything done. These long to-do lists force us to prioritise our activities, and ultimately leads to something just not getting done. More often than not, that one thing that doesn’t get done is exercise. It's just too easy to come up with a reason for doing something -anything, reallyinstead of going to the gym. The cycle of work, family commitments, TV time, household chores, etc continues and before you know it, you haven't had a good work out in weeks. But what if it was so easy to work some quality physical activity into your day that you'd be silly not to? Good news: it is. Here's how:

Park farther away. How often will you circle a car park trying to find a spot as close to the shops as possible? Try parking farther away to burn a few extra calories during your daily errands. If you drive to work, parking at the far end of the car park every day can really help. Think about it this way - you can burn an extra 10 calories every time you walk from your car to the shops or office by parking farther away. If you do that five times a day, it adds up to more than 18,000 calories over a year.

Take the stairs. Walking up stairs is a surprisingly high intensity activity that can raise your heart rate quickly. If you're in need of some extra exercise, taking the stairs over the elevator is an excellent way to get it.

Play with the kids. Playing with the kids is a fast and fun way to burn some extra calories. Take them to the park, play tag, kick the soccer ball around- whatever you fancy. Kids have a ton of energy, and keeping up with them can sometimes be even better than going to the gym. The time will fly by too!

Use your lunch break. Rather than going out to lunch or just sitting in front of your computer checking the latest gossip, take a short walk during your lunch break. Just like parking farther away, it doesn't take much to make a difference. Try just going 10 minutes out the door, then turning around. That's an extra 20 minutes of exercise that you wouldn't normally get.

Learn to love commercials. If you are one of those people who do not have time to exercise but have plenty of time to watch TV, then use the commercials as opportunities to get in some quick and effective exercise. Try alternating pushups, sit-ups, jumping jacks and arm circles during the commercial breaks of your favourite shows. If you're not sweating by the end of the episode then you're just not trying! The best part: this all counts as quality exercise. You can get an effective workout without leaving your living room or missing a single minute of your show

.

Do you know any good fitness tips? Do you have a fun way of keeping fit? Send your comments to:

editors@localtalk.com.au

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill

29


have your say

WATCH THIS SPACE!

Starting in our September issue of LOCAL TALK this page will be reserved for you- the people of the Broken Hill Community- to have your say about issues you feel need to be addressed.

Email us at haveyoursay@localtalk.com.au or jot down your thoughts in writing and drop them into our office at 164 Argent Street. We look forward to hearing from you!

Please write in with anything you feel the need to say- concerns about local issues, praise for a person or group of people who are doing positive things in the community or ideas for enhancing the Broken Hill community spirit are examples of topics for consideration.

Write to us at:

haveyoursay@localtalk.com.au

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW BROKEN HILL? • The City covers an area of 179km². • The most recent estimates (2006) placed the population at 20,223. • Total rateable land value for Broken Hill is $92,135,350. • The number of rateable properties is 10,539. • During its early years, Broken Hill was known not only for its mineral wealth but also for its dust storms and poor living conditions. • A typhoid epidemic in Broken Hill in 1888 killed 128 people. • In 1891 Broken Hill was the third largest town in NSW, with a population of over 21,000.

• Today the city of Broken Hill is the largest regional centre in the western half of New South Wales. • Street names in Broken Hill are generally named after the first alderman (Ryan, Cornish, Chapple), mining officials (Jamieson, Wilson, Patton) or minerals (Argent, Blende, Sulphide, Chloride) • The Silver Tree, one of Broken Hill’s most famous icons, weights 8.5 Kgs. • On New Years Day 1915, Broken Hill was the scene of the only enemy attack on Australian soil during World War I.

PHOTO: VIEW OF BROKEN HILL FROM THE TOP OF THE Line of Lode remnant mullock (skimp) dump

30

AUGUST 2010 | LocalTalk Broken Hill


Afghan Mosque...........B-W6 Albert Morris Av ......... B-E4 Aleppo Pl ........................ B-F19 Allendale St ..................... B-E3 Anglican .................B-G17/O8 Argent La ...............B-J10/R10 Argent St.........................B-K10 Arizona Pl ...................... B-E20 Athel Pl.............................B-E19 Bagot St........................... B-R10 Baptist Church ............ B-Q6 Barrier Hwy ......... B-A6/Y11 Bathurst St .......................B-R9 Beryl La ..................... B-L9/O9 Beryl St.................................B-J9 Bismuth St ........................ B-F7 Blende St .........................B-K10 Block 10 Lookout .....B-G11 Bonanza St ..................... B-F15 Boron St .............................B-S9 Boughtman St ..............B-E18 Bowen St........................... B-L6 Brady St ............................. B-Y9 Brazil St ..............................B-R8 Bromide St ......................B-M4 Bronhill St ......................... B-E4 Brookfield Av................. B-F3 Brooks St ......................... B-U3 Brown St ..........................B-D2 Buck St...............................B-U8 Burke St ...........................B-B10 Calcite St ...........................B-C1 Callitris Pl ......................B-G20 Campbell St..................... B-S4 Carbon St ....................... B-E11 Casuarina Av ...............B-H19 Catholic Church ...................... ...................................... B-N7/U8 Central St ......................B-H16 Chapple La......................B-N6 Chapple St ......................B-M7 Chettle St ....................... B-S10 Chloride St .....................B-N8 Christian Fellowship Church of Christ .........B-N7 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints .........B-P9 Clarke St............................B-J18 Cobalt St ..........B-H9/L9/O9 Comstock St ................B-G16 Cornerstone..................B-N7 Cornish La........................ B-E8 Cornish St ....................... B-C8 Creedon St ....................B-B11 Crusade Centre ......... B-Q5 Crystal St ........................ B-L11 Cummins La ......................B-J3 Cummins Pl ..................... B-T3 Cummins St .......................B-J3 Delamore St ................. B-O9 Doe St ...............................B-D4 Duff St .............................B-G19 Dundas Av ..................... B-F19 Eyre St .............................B-G15 Federation Way........ B-M12 Finn St ..................................B-F4 Fisher St .............................B-R5 Gaffney La ......................B-B11 Gaffney St .......................B-B12 Galena St..........................B-G6 Garnet St ...................B-K4/K9

Gawler Pl ......................B-O10 Gossan St....................B-J5/J10 Graphite St .....................B-G9 Gray St ............................ B-W7 Griffiths St ..................... B-A11 Gypsum St......................B-E10 Hall St............................... B-W7 Harris St ...................B-C6/C9 Harvey St .........................B-G7 Haskard St...................B-W10 Hebbard St ...................B-G16 Hill St .....................................B-J5 Holdsworth St........... B-N14 Holten Dr ..................... B-O13 Horsington Dr................B-E1 Horsington St ............. B-W9 Hynes St ....................B-C4/E4 Iodide La ...........................B-P7 Iodide St ............................B-P9 Jabez St............................B-U10 Jacaranda Pl ...................B-E18 Jamieson St ...................B-D18 Jehovah’s Witness ......B-H9 Jones St .............................B-H5 JP Keenan Lookout ..... B-L7 Junction Cir ....................B-S11 Kanandah Pl..................B-A10 Kanandah Rd ...............B-A10 Kaolin St....................B-L6/L10 King St ...............................B-L15 Knox La ..........................B-G20 Knox St ...........................B-H20 Lambert Pl .....................B-F20 Lane La..... B-M7/O7/P7/T7 Lane St...............................B-N7 Lawton St ..................... B-M19 Little McGowen St .....B-V5 Long St ..............................B-G6 Lunam St .......................... B-C8 Lutheran Manse .........B-P10 McCulloch St ........B-T8/T10 MacGillivray Dr ......... B-O11 McGowen St...................B-R5 Mann St ...........................B-X10 Maraylya Ln ......................B-P1 Marks St............................. B-L7 May Harding Dr............ B-E5 Menindee Rd ................ B-S18 Mercury St ........................B-F8 Mica St ................................B-K8 Morgan La .......................B-N4 Morgan St ......................... B-E4 Morish St.............B-D17/H17 Murton St ........................B-U8 Newton La ..................... B-C6 Newton St ......................B-C7 Nicholls St .....................B-D11 Nine Mile Rd ...................B-L1 Noonan St........................B-V8 Norfolk Av....................B-G19 O’Farrell St .....................B-G5 Old South Rd ..............B-H12 O’Neill La ......................... B-S4 O’Neill St .......................... B-S4 Outback Community Church..............................A-O6 Oxide St ...........................B-O3 Patton St ........................B-D16 Pell La .................................B-D7 Pell St............................B-B7/E7 Phillips St ......................B-W10

Picton St ..........................B-E17 Pinnacles Pl ...................B-A10 Pinnacles Rd .................B-A10 Piper St ............................B-G15 Proprietary Sq ............. B-P11 Quarry St.........................B-H7 Queen St .......................B-C17 Racecourse .......................B-Y4 Racecourse Rd ...............B-Y4 Radium St .........................B-R4 Rainbow Av..................B-D16 Rakow St .......................... B-C6 Rasp St................................ B-S4 Rhodonite St ...................B-S9 Rockwell St ......................B-J15 Rowe St ............................. B-F9 Ryan La.............................B-B10 Ryan St ............................ B-C11 Salvation Army..............A-E2 Sampson St .................... B-F10 Schlapp St .................B-M1/P1 Sculpture Site ..................B-L1 Seventh Day Adventist ....... ................................................ A-K2 Silica St ..............................B-U9 Silver City Hwy ........................ .......................... B-A17/G12/X5 Silver St ............................ B-S10 Slag St................................B-B12 Smith St ............................B-H9 South Rd ......................... B-F13 South St ..........................B-G17 Sturt St .............................B-R11 Sulphide St .............B-N3/N8 Talbot St ..........................B-L18 Talc St.................................B-H8 Thomas La .............B-G4/O4 Thomas St ..........................B-J5 Tin St .................................. B-X9 Torquata Pl ....................B-F20 Tramway Tce ...................B-F6 Visitor Information Centre ..............................B-L10 Tuart St .......................... B-M19 Union St............................. B-P4 Uniting Church of Australia ............................A-E4 Uranium St.......................B-R4 Victoria St......................B-D17 Wandoo St ......................B-J19 Warnock St ....................B-H7 Warren St ......................B-V10 Wentworth Road.....B-A17 Westside Dr ................B-D12 White Rocks ..................B-N1 Whittaker St .................B-K16 Wicks St ............................B-K7 Williams La ...................... B-J5 Williams St ......................B-H6 Wills La .............................B-C9 Wills St ...............................B-B9 Willyama St ......................B-L1 Wilson St ........................B-E17 Wolfram St ......B-K8/S8/U8 Wolfram Ln ..................... B-S8 Wright St .........................B-H7 Wyman La ......................B-O2 Wyman St ............... B-E2/H2 Zebina St......................... B-Q6 Zinc St................................. B-E5

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Basketball Stadium

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Warnock St

Smith St

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Local Talk Magazine - Issue 1 August 2010