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LOCAL HEAT OKLAHOMA MONTHLY

FREE

OCTOBER 2008 / ISSUE 7

URBAN MUSIC AND POLITICS

HOW DOES IT MIX?


LOCAL HEAT MARCUS HAYES Publisher KEIANA THOMAS Copy Editor CARLA THOMAS Advertiser Relations DEE DYMOND Projects Manager CARL HOLMES Circulation Manager CARLA LEE Marketing Director LES JOHNSON III Illustrator SEDRICK FRAZIER Inspiration WRITING TEAM KAY NELSON CALVIN GENTRY SALLIE SACKER TERRELL XCELL Mailing Address: P.O. Box 60469 Oklahoma City, OK. 73146 Phone: 405-313-7128 Email: info@thelocalheat.com Website: thelocalheat.com Myspace: www.myspace.com/ localheatundergroundpublication Local Heat is circulated free of charge on a monthly basis. Please only take one copy per person. We want as many readers as possible to view our publication and the ads placed by our valued advertisers. Thank you for your cooperation and your support. Copyright 2008 Local Heat Magazine LLC. LOCAL HEAT is a registered trademark of Local Heat Magazine LLC.

HEAT CONTENTS 3 COCO JONES LOCAL HEAT HOLLYWOOD NAKEETA SMITH 4 DISTRIBUTION POINTS BROKEN ANGELS MYSPACE SINGLES 5 DJ HILL CELEBRITY TOURNAMENT JEWELS URBAN BOOKS BESTSELLER 7 MUSIC vs. POLITICS

8 LIKE WILL AND JADA MISS AMBER

9 HEAT BEATS RECORD LABEL SPOTLIGHT LIVE MUSIC REPORT

JJ FASHION 4500 S. BRYANT

LIVE MUSIC SUPPORT

10 MHP YOUNG CHRIS 7-UP HEAT OF THE MOMENT

11 CD REVIEWS NEW ECONOMY 12 EVENTS CALENDAR

URBAN CLOTHING

Dickies, rugs and more


LOCAL HEAT HOLLYWOOD Will Smith plans to star in Columbia Pictures’ “The Last Pharaoh,” the story of Taharqa, the pharaoh who battled Assyrian invaders starting around 677 B.C. in ancient Egypt. “Braveheart” author Randall Wallace is penning the script. Smith next stars in Columbia’s “Seven Pounds,” a reteam with “Pursuit of Happyness” director Gabriele Muccino. A sequel to Spike Lee’s “Inside Man” is moving forward at Universal. Lee says he is excited to be working on a sequel to “Inside Man” (2006) which earned more than $175 million at the worldwide box office and centered on a standoff between a bank robber (Clive Owen) and a hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington) at a New York bank. Universal Pictures’ tentatively titled “Inside Man 2” would revisit the lives of those characters but would not follow the storyline of the original. Tyler Perry has formed 34th Street Films, an L.A.-based production arm of his Atlanta-based Tyler Perry Studios that will focus on projects written and directed by outside talent. Cedric the Entertainer has signed on for the romantic comedy “All’s Faire in Love,” about a drama school grad whose crush on a fellow actress in his Renaissance Faire theater troupe is sabotaged. Owen Benjamin and Christina Ricci will play the budding couple in the film, which was originally titled “Ye Olde Times.” Cedric replaces the once-attached Jack Black as Professor Shockworthy, whose appearances bookend the film he narrates in fairy-tale style. David Alan Grier’s character-driven sketch magazine series, “Chocolate News,” debuts Oct 15 on Comedy Central. The “In Living Color” alum and Tony Award-nominated Grier is the creator, executive producer and host of the series which takes on a variety of contemporary topics where everyone and everything is fair game. In addition to hosting the series, Grier will also portray multiple characters within the series’ investigative reports, which will be presented by a cast of three correspondents. Grammy winner Kanye West has teamed up with Comedy Central to develop “Alligator Boots,” a new show described by the Hollywood Reporter as “hip-hop meets the Muppets.” Mario Van Peebles’ will next direct the action thriller “Kerosene Cowboys” for Svarog-Afterburner Films.

WHERE ARE

LOCAL HEAT IS ALWAYS LOOKING FOR TALENTED WRITERS WHO CAN ALSO INTERVIEW AND REPORT ON EVENTS. IF YOU’RE SERIOUS, PROFESSIONAL AND HAVE SOME TIME,

THE HEROES? By Marcus Hayes I was watching the 10 o’clock news when I first learned of the September disappearance of Nakeeta Smith, a Del City, Oklahoma resident. Having heard of situations like this before, I feared the worst. Days later, my fears were unfortunately confirmed. She was found deceased. And at the hands of a man who should have been protecting her. More and more these types of violent acts against women are happening in our state. In fact, there are disturbing and alarming statistics that point to a problem in Oklahoma. But where does it come from? What makes a man who outweighs a woman by 100 pounds get so angry that he wants to take her life? I don’t know, and I don’t want to know. What I do want to know is when will it stop? I guess as long as there is evil on earth, there will be murder and killing. I want to know about the men of honor, though. The Heroes. The ones that are

PLEASE EMAIL US AT NAKEETA SMITH providing loving homes for their families and children. That’s Heat. That’s what makes a man— a man. I’m glad I will never be in the same room with Nakeeta’s husband. I believe I would be tempted to knock him the @#*^ out. But, that’s just more violence. I feel for her family though. I know they are feeling a loss that those of us outside of her family can only imagine. I guess the rest is up to us. Domestic violence won’t end, but we can end our toleration of it. If you see that stuff going on, say something. Step up to the plate, and make it your business. Declare that no one will hit and murder our women! Not anymore!

info@thelocalheat.com FOR MORE DETAILS. (Now, when we say email, we mean email, and that means no calls.) THANKS.

Tulsa’s CoCo Jones is fighting her way to the top of the music business in Atlanta and proud to call Oklahoma home

HOT COCO

T

ulsa, Oklahoma produced

the Wilson brothers of the Gap Band. Not many people outside of Oklahoma are aware of that. Now, if you don’t know who the Gap Band is, you are missing some fun music in your life. Believe it or not, Tulsa has produced more national talent in urban entertainment than any city in the state, including Oklahoma City. There are no observable reasons for why this is. It just is. That being said, CoCo Jones, one of the newest and hottest Tulsa products, is our bet for one of the next R&B breakouts to make it on the national stage. “Actually, I grew up everywhere, I was a military kid. The environments changed so much from small towns to islands. My family and extended family live in Fernandina Beach Florida. But oddly enough, the longest I’ve ever lived anywhere consecutively was in Tulsa. So Oklahoma has become home to me over the past decade,” says Jones. Jones upbringing and influences have helped her in business dealings. “I came from a long line of hard women. What I mean by that is they are very independently minded, strong and have endured and overcome much. I learned everything from my grandmother and mother. Both handled themselves with class and were very no-nonsensed,” says Jones.

It was during high school that Jones really developed a love for music and singing while being in church. She linked up with Reaction, a group she founded, and began writing and performing original material. Recently, like many entertainers looking to exhibit their craft in a bigger market, Jones moved to Atlanta. “The difference between Atlanta and Oklahoma is that Atlanta has an established music base, and is now one of the major hubs for music. [Atleast for the urban market] Oklahoma is still emerging. The political game [in music] is definitely stronger out here, because there are powers that be and have been for years. A positive for Atlanta is that

the market is open and people are willing to support the arts. Venues aren’t hard to find; events are common, and people come out to support. There is a comraderie in Atlanta when it comes to music and artists that is unlike any other place I’ve been to. However, unlike Atlanta, I think the beauty of Oklahoma is that most of the artists aren’t trying to duplicate a formula; which is the norm [in Atlanta],” she said. The music industry can be a shady place at times. Jones feels she has the right team. “I am blessed to be surrounded with people that I consider to be family. There was one instance in particular when I had a guy who claimed to be a promoter in Texas. He came with seemingly verifiable references and pitched an idea to me and my team about expanding into that area. To make a long story short, he ended up using the promotional items to make money for himself right there in Tulsa. Sometimes you can do research and still get got,” says Jones. Jones is currently working on an album simply titled CoCo Jones. Someday she would like to win a Grammy for Best Album. “I’d like to write a number one hit. What I want most is to be an artist that is looked back upon as having made music that spoke from and to the soul of man.” LH


SINGLES OF THE MONTH

The singles of the month column is designed for you to discover new songs by local artists that might have what takes to be a hit. Most of these tracks should be able to be located on Myspace.com. If you’re interested, please take a moment to listen to these songs.

LOCAL HEAT DISTRIBUTION POINTS

BROKEN ANGELS

The Broken Angels is an Oklahoma City promotional company founded by young women from somewhat different backgrounds, but they all came together and our bound by friendship, respect, and hard work.

*NORTHWEST BEAUTY WORLD (5029 N.W. 10th off Ann Arbor) CD WAREHOUSE (N.W. 39TH & PENN) BROWN SUGA CAFÉ (2805 N.W. 122nd & May) GUITAR CENTER (2940 N.W 59TH) BORDERS (3209 N.W. EXPRESSWAY) BARNES AND NOBLE (6100 N. MAY)

Lydia, Cory, Lindsay, and Jennifer promote bands and events. We were impressed with their embrace of all types of art forms. They’ve been around since 2007. Over a table full of IHOP pancakes and a steak omellete, we got the scoop on the Broken Angels.

DIGITAL MEDIA (1821 N. CLASSEN BLVD) F.Y.E (5939 NW Expressway St) ARTIST OF HAIR SALON (925 W. BRITTON RD.) EXPERIENCE MUSIC (QUAIL SPRINGS MALL) EXPRESS DISCOUNT GROCERY (700 W. BRITTON RD. & SHARTEL) *EAST CLUB SPYCE (BRICKTOWN) CLASSIC NAILS (1800 N.E. 23rd) NEXT 2 JUSTICE (1800 N.E. 23RD) INTOUCH COMMUNICATIONS (1933 N.E. 23rd) OOH-WEE SHOES (1726 N.E. 23rd) FOXY NAILS (1000 N.E. 23rd) ADAMS BARBERSHOP (1517 N.E. 23RD) ASHANTI HAIR SALON (23rd & Bryant KEMET PLAZA) THIS IZ IT RESTAURANT (KEMET PLAZA) F.Y.E (7301 S Pennsylvania Ave) OFF THA RACK (OLD PARIS FLEA MARKET) BRAIDS, FADES AND MORE (5735 S. Pennsylvania Ave) EARGASM (CROSSROADS MALL) 405 MUSIC (OLD PARIS FLEA MARKET) JJ’s FASHIONS (S.E 44th & Bryant OAK CLIFF ) HARLEM KNIGHTS (SE 44TH & Bryant) DA BOMB Barbershop (1518 S.E 44th) RANDY’S M&M (3200 S. Boulevard) *SPENCER SPENCER FOOD MART (N.W. 23RD & Spencer Rd.) KP MUSIK (1911 S. SUNNYLANE) CD EXCHANGE (AIR DEPOT) TRALAWNEY’S HAIR STUDIO (8421 N.E. 10TH) THIS AND THAT HAIR STUDIO (N.E. 10TH & MIDWEST BLVD) TBC AND SALON (7027 RENO & AIR DEPOT) SAVE AND SHOP (10TH & MARYDALE) ROSE STATE COLLEGE (STUDENT CENTER)

BEGINNING THIS MONTH, WE BEGAN POSTING THE MYSPACE SINGLES OF THE WEEK ON OUR PAGE. PLEASE CHECK THE PAGE EACH WEEK FOR OUR PICKS. WE WILL THEN CHOOSE THE SONGS WITH THE MOST HITS TO PLACE IN OUR SINGLES OF THE MONTH FOR THE LOCAL HEAT MAGAZINE.

How did you all meet each other? Lindsay: Different places at different times. We use to have more girls involved, but they’ve kinda come and gone. We are looking for more girls to make it a more solid team. Do you all make a lot of money? Lydia: Well, the money that we do make goes into T-shirts and other things that can help make us known and get our name out. So you’re into fashion too? Broken Angels: Yes. (They have a clothing company in mind as well.) Lindsay: Actually, we want to build an empire. What do you offer your clients? Lindsay: We understand a lot of bands don’t have a lot of money so we try to work with them. We print up flyers for events, and we do full internet campaigns. Also, we can go to events and set up merchandising booths for the band. Cory: The bands help us out in different ways too, by helping us get

our name out. How old are you? Cory: I’m 23. Lindsay: 21. Lydia: 21. Do you all have disagreements about the direction of the organization? If so, how do you resolve the issues? Lydia: We have had minor disputes in the past, but we’re still kicking. Communication has been our biggest thing. Sometimes we have to agree to just drop some things and get back to work. Lindsay: Ultimately, we’re all working towards the same goal. We may take on different tasks, but we make everything work. Do you all have titles? Lindsay: Well, Cory is like the president. Cory: I think we all work together, but I just basically say we have certain tasks to fulfill, and I don’t feel like we need titles.

Cory: When I started Broken Angels, I wanted a place where women could work in the entertainment business and be proud of themselves and what they can accomplish. We’re serious about what we do. Lindsay: It’s promoting unity with women. We were all a little different from each other, but we accept each others differences. Broken Angels is a place for women to express themselves and belong. How do you view Hip-hop? Lydia: We promote Hip-hop as well, and the artists are telling their story. Everyone has a story. Cory: I like seeing the passion that the artists have. I feel like I can learn something from the experiences of others. How do boyfriends and significant others feel? Broken Angels: It’s not a problem. Will you turn any women away that want to be Broken Angels? Lindsay: If they have the drive and determination, they will be accepted. LH.

GUESTROOM RECORDS (125 E. MAIN ST.) Norman *TULSA STARSHIP RECORDS

THE BROKEN ANGELS can be contacted on www.myspace.com/brokenangels405


HEAT> EVENTS

CELEBRITY BASKETB AL L TOURNAMENT

DJ HILL

DJ Hill, a local promoter and DJ, runs the monthly [H]ood Celebrity Basketball Tournament. From all accounts, it has been a successful Sunday afternoon event for the whole family. October’s event was held at Star Spencer High School and the turn out was as expected. The Urban League came out to do voter registration and other entities and local business people set booths at the event. “Basically, I wanted to do something and give back to the community,” says DJ Hill. Hill goes around the city to find teams

THIS FALL—

that want to sign up to play. Other attendees and participants included local models, and the event was hosted by Scissorhands.

JEWELS

Jewels are the hit of the seasons. As the weather turns colder, the clothes get bolder in color. Rich vibrant reds and deep dark turquoise are the colors to wear this autumn. And as we all know, red and blue make what? They make the IT color of this year’s runway and off the runway designs. Purple, the color of royalty, is seen as the ruler over the autumn fashion palette. When planning your wardrobe this fall, break into the world of purple. A must have is the always in style cashmere sweater in a plush purple hue. You could pair it with a silk print skirt by Oscar de la Renta for a very for a very feminine look or

By Sallie Sacker

you could throw on a pair of charcoal dress pants to bring out the opulence of the jewel tone in your sweater. Whatever you do, make it purple! Accessorize you new affluent tinted outfits by investing in an all encompassing handbag. Whatever style you like to carry, it better have color with a tinge of jewel. A bag like that would be an investment on your part that could pay off all season long. Also, don’t leave out the jewelry you need to go with your new garments. Gold is back and for the fall, it is here to stay. Just remember this season, it is all about the jewels. Take the rich colors from your jewelry: the red rubies, purple amethysts, even deep green emeralds and add them to your attire. As long as the cold wind blows, jewels reign over the fashion world.

URBAN BOOKS October 2008 Bestsellers List HARDCOVER FICTION 1. Sin No More by Kimberla Lawson Roby 2. Deliver Me From Evil by Mary Monroe 3. Something On The Side by Carl Weber 4. Waking With Enemies by Eric Jerome Dickey 5. Blonde Faith by Walter Mosley 6. Pleasure by Eric Jerome Dickey 7. Them by Nathan McCall 8. The Pastor’s Wife by ReShonda Tate Billingsley 9. Honey Flava by Zane 10. Blood Colony by Tananarive Due PAPERBACK FICTION 1. Dutch 3 by Dutch 2. The Pastor’s Wife by ReShonda Tate Billingsley 3. Black Widow by Nikki Turner 4. Sweet Dreams by Nikkea Smithers 5. True to the Game II by Teri Woods 7. Payback With Ya Life by Wahida Clark 8. Bad Girlz 4 Life by Shannon Holmes 10. Single Mama Drama by Kayla Perrin

EVERYBODY IS READING LOCAL HEAT

ADVERTISING SPACE AVAILABLE FOR RATES PLEASE CALL 405-313-7128 1/16 page to Full page space for your promotional needs.


URB AN M USIC

PO LI TI VS. CS Modern music has always carried a message. Folk music of the 1960s began what we call “protest” music today. The sounds of the rock n roll music of the late sixties and the soul music of the early to mid-seventies advanced the idea that music could be used as a vehicle to change the world. Songs like “Unfortunate Son,” “War,” “Ball of Confusion,” and other staples of radio in those days dealt with the idea of a change in the society that the artists lived in. In fact, it was not unusual to see songs in the Top 10 that dealt with political and social issues. Sure, there were hundreds of songs, that were very


good, that simply were about romantic love or having a good time. But music with a message was common on the airwaves and in peoples’ homes. The Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War era helped generate some of the most thought provoking and engaging music. It’s widely held by some that the best music, period, of the twentieth century, came courtesy of the late 60s and early to mid-1970s. Everyone wasn’t excited about the “message music” though. It’s no secret that in his company’s earlier years, Berry Gordy of Motown didn’t want his artists’ music catalogs to contain too many songs dwelling on themes of social and political discontent. His opinion was that it would be bad for business. He figured no one wanted to hear the Jackson 5 singing about people going hungry or politicians not telling the truth. As the artists, writers and musicians became more insistent on recording music that dealt more with subject matter that involved current events, Motown began to release some of its most memorable songs such as most of the tracks that made up Marvin Gaye’s What’s Goin On album. Before that, Stevie Wonder released several songs hitting on crime in the streets, poverty, currupt political systems and world unrest. Towards the end of 1975, Disco music began to catch on in clubs and at skating rinks all across America. Because of the dominating narrative of “shake your groove thing,” and “dance, dance, dance,” it began to seem like protest, justice, and peace no longer had a place on

the radio airwaves or in popular culture. With record companies getting larger and larger, most were looking to make a quick profit and the disco phenomenon helped fuel those profits. But as quickly as it came, Disco was gone and it left a child behind. That child was called Hip-hop. Hip-hop began in the poorer neighborhoods of New York City. Its first performers were usually men who were hosting an event and would talk over a disco song chanting and sometimes rhyming. Somehow it developed into a whole new genre of music having original melodies, music, and a steady rhyme pat-

tern with the lyrics. In the early 1980s, it became customary for artists to have atleast two or three songs that had some type of constructive lyrical theme. Most of those songs touched on the dangers of abusing drugs, and responsible sexual behavior. Groups like Public Enemy came along and changed the landscape. It was then cool to sing about politics and the justice system again. The spirit of the 1960s had come back around and expressed itself through Hip-hop. Public Enemy’s second album, It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back, helped bring an enlightened consciousness that was missing in the music. They talked about the power of the people, political awareness, irresponsible news channels, voting, CIA and FBI agendas, education, and freedom of speech. No other genre of music was speaking to young people in this way. White

youth were also being influenced by this new wave of socio-politically charged music. Part of Public Enemy’s allure was that the band actually had beats and rhythms that people could dance to as well. Public Enemy helped inspire a new generation of Hip-hop artists who had something substantial to say. Afro-centric groups began to spring up, issuing messages of self respect, community responsibility and knowledge of history. On the other side of the U.S. map, in California, artists were fashioning their own brand of political ideology. It was, however, mixed with a more darker tone. Gangsta rap, as the media began to call it, dealt with some of the same themes politically and socially, but also gave the listening public a window in which to look through and observe the twenty year affects of Los Angeles’ gang culture. Largely exposing the rampant currupt practices of the L.A.P.D, but discussing other issues also, the westcoast music (with artists like Ice T, Cam and Ice Cube) continued the trend of socio-political enlightenment in music. Soon, however, a more aggressive strain of this music would overshadow the earlier musical demands for community responsibility and knowledge of history and self, and encouraged a more individualistic view that seemed to be more and more fixated on partying, money and material things. Record companies, ever the eye on the dollar, jumped on the so-called gangsta rap bandwagon, and the early 1990s ushered in a decade of albums jam packed with narratives of dope sells, shiny suits, chrome rims, 9mms, set trippin’, and baby mamas. The message, it would seem, had been lost. However, through it all, groups like Public Enemy, though not selling as many albums as they did in their heyday, were still around and reaching their fans. Today, the internet is making it easier for artists to get their message out. As urban radio gets further and further away from playing anything that remotely sounds like a socio-political anthem, the internet will increasingly become the place to get a steady diet of “message music.” There is a resurgence though. THE OBAMA FACTOR Urban artists and hundreds of other artists from different genres all

over the world have, for reasons of their own, embraced Barack Obama’s movement. Never before has there been so many songs created that honor a political figure. Never. Musicians are even remaking current radio songs and changing the lyrics to reflect their support for Obama. Being just 47 years old, Obama would have been a freshman in

college when Hip-hop music began its march through popular culture. He has been influenced by the sound. He, like many others, can appreciate the capacity urban music has to teach and edutain (educate+entertain). Time will tell if Obama’s current influence on urban music will have any lasting affects. Will current artists develop permanent interest in exploring social and political issues in their music? It is highly unlikely. Why? Simply put: that type of music doesn’t sell like the other music you hear on the radio. However, every now and then, there are exceptions, but by and large, the mass appeal is not there. However, it has been refreshing to many to hear the new music of current artists showing a different side, and explore deeper topics. Obama, without a doubt, has had an impact. National artists like Nas have chosen to use their popularity and positions as major label artists to make music that their hearts and consciousness leads them to make. It is not “all about the benjamins” with them. There are still thousands of bands and artists around the country, and a few in Oklahoma that continue to mix social issues and political themes into popular music. You might have to scour the internet and search a little harder, but the music is important, and it is out there. LH


LIKE WILL AND JADA On a Friday night date in O-City and you’re trying to figure out the game plan? Here are our recommendations: The Olive Garden (Italian dining) If you like three cheese lasagna and all types of pasta dishes, this is the spot. Word of advice: Do not wear a white shirt, unless you plan on wearing tomato sauce stains for the rest of the night. Warren Theater (Moore, OK) This is hands down the nicest theatre in the surrounding Oklahoma City area. If you’re over 21, there is even a balcony where drinks are served.

area. Of course, depending on the season, the look may change, but it’s always beautiful out there. Night Spots This is a tricky one. If you’re looking to dance the night away with that special someone, there are a few spots with good DJs, dependable security and bartenders who won’t tell you “we don’t make that one here.” We don’t have a pick, but we did tell you what to look for.

[Movie Rental at the house] Brown Sugar Need we say more. It’s a classic.

[Soundtrack and mood music] Dru Hill A mixtape of Dru Hill slow jams.

Our man, the Wyldchild Scott Wright, celebrated a birthday on October 9th at the 3-6 Lounge. He was in his element and being himself. We won’t print the man’s age without getting his permission, but we appreciate his contribution to Oklahoma’s entertainment landscape. Twenty plus years of radio and still doing his thing and doing it his way. That’s what Heat is.

GET ON THE LOCAL HEAT STATEWIDE MESSAGE BOARD www.thelocalheat.com/forum sign up and join the discussion on any topic.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY MAN,

Myriad Botanical Gardens For a nice romantic walk, it’s hard to find a more attractive and relaxing

THE HEAT DISCOVERS.......................... Edmond, Oklahoma native Miss Amber (Modeling)

20 years old Edmond, Oklahoma native Miss Amber has been modeling off and on since she was a child.

“I plan to reach the sky’s limit in the modeling world,” says Miss Amber. She explains that she only wants to do work that’s in good taste and that represents the classy aspects of a woman. The University of Central Oklahoma junior is working on a PR/ Marketing degree. “The best part of modeling is getting to dress up and look your best,” Amber says. She explains the bad part is the reality of scams. With a supportive family, Miss Amber would like to do magazine, billboard, commercial and everything that consists of print work modeling. She also hopes to publish her own fashion and health awareness publication.

BARBERS STYLISTS AND COSMETOLOGISTS “Our readers support our advertisers” WE HAVE SPACE FOR YOU 405-313-7128

EDMOND, OKLAHOMA


BEA TS BEATS

THE PRODUCER’S COLUMN

KURT DOGG

Equipment used: PRO-TOOLS REASONS PROGRAM YAMAHA EX 7 CD TURNTABLE

Clients: POLO MISTA CAIN CHRIS MCCAIN J-STAR CO2 SB MEECHIE

Kurt Dogg is a very well respected local producer that has built up a good body of work over the years. He feels his quality of work has gotten better, and he’s able to do what he wants to do and what feels right. “I don’t make music to fit in,” says Kurt. On the differences of Hip-hop productions versus R&B tracks,

more on melody so the song can flow. Hip-hop songs focus more on the drop of the song.” Who are his dream artists to work with? “I would like to produce for Lloyd, Musiq soulchild, Busta Rhymes and T.I,” Kurt says. Upcoming projects: SB TRAMEE www.myspace.com/4kurtdogg LH

Kurt offers his view: “R&B tracks focus

RECORD LABEL SPOTLIGHT BOMB CITY RECORDS Owners: Daniel Rockwell Headquarters: Oklahoma City, OK. Founded: 2005 Number of Artists: 2 www.myspace.com/bombcityrecords Would you say Bomb City is more of a family than a business? BCR: We are definitely a family hands down. Music is art, and it’s supposed to be fun. If you let money and other outside things take that away from you, there is no point in even doing it. Businesses can be temporary, but family is forever. Is it easy to run a record company in Oklahoma? BCR: I think it’s a little bit easier to do in Oklahoma, because we are still trying to create an identity for ourselves so almost anything goes. There is no pressure to sell like this guy or be like that guy. It’s more like, “let’s be the first to do this or that. Let’s raise the bar.” How important are original marketing and promotional ideas for a label? BCR: Your ideas can make or break you in Oklahoma, because once again, everything we are doing right is new. A lot of different strategies are working for different people. And as far as marketing goes, it depends on what type of crowd you are trying to reach or what type of message you are trying to send to the fans.

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HEA T AT

Why do you think record labels are still a good idea, and why do artists need them? BCR: Record labels are good for artists, because they help them in the areas that they need to improve on. Not every label is the same, and if an artist finds the right fit, they could blow up overnight instead of trying to weather the storm and do it all themselves, which could slow their progress. Is there any type of mark you want Bomb City to make statewide? BCR: The only thing we would like to do is improve the professionalism of everyone who claims to be involved in music in the state of Oklahoma. I believe one of the major reasons why no one from Oklahoma has gotten a major recording deal is that, as a whole, we don’t present ourselves properly at times. It hurts us all. What’s the difference between a guy who has a real record label and a guy that’s just “putting out CDs.” BCR: Anyone can put out a CD. It takes real business people and musicians to have a successful record label. 2009 Projects: Okiemade Vol. 2 Respect -Lil Re Various Mixtapes

LIVE MUSIC REPORT THE OTHERSIDE OKLAHOMA 100 By: Dee Dymond

Gorilla Entertainment of Cleveland, Ohio shined love down on Oklahoma by bringing Bizzy Bone to Tulsa to perform his latest and greatest hits while providing a platform for local celebrities to reach out and touch some new fans with their music. The concept: 100 acts performed and opened for Bizzy Bone (of Bone Thugs n Harmony fame) during a two day concert event at The Otherside, a Tulsa venue. The two day event took place Friday and Saturday, September 26th and 27th.

The Urban Community Loses One of its Bright Lights

RAY LIVE

There were two sides to the venue, both equipped with stages and a good sound system. The animated host,,affectionately called Shugga Booga, provided a lesson to the audience on the importance of supporting Oklahoma artists. For the most part, all of the artists represented themselves well. Some of the local artists performing were Big Stik, Rugged Individuals, Doc and Hood, Mellokie, MHP, Addlib, Mista Cain and others. As for Bizzy, he was his usual self— eyes closed while flipping through tracks from his latest solo project. Bizzy joined the crowd for a moment before his performance, as fans enjoyed rocking side by side with one of the legends in the game.

Oklahoma native Ray “Ray Live” Cunningham, a contributing writer to Down magazine and The Source, passed away in early October of natural causes. Our sympathies and prayers are with his family and children. To pay your respects, you can leave words of peace and respect on his personal page at: www.myspace.com/ray_live

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FIRST LADIES OF HIP-HOP

TRAMEE

MEECHIE

LEGA C

MZ. BOMBAY

MELLOKIE

Since its start, women have always played a key role in the development of urban music. Salt N Pepa, Sweet T, Ice Cream Tee, MC Lyte, and Queen Latifah set the national stage for future ladies who loved the music and the culture. Fast Forward to 2008 in Oklahoma City and Tulsa, and you’ll find the next generation of ladies looking to make their mark on the local music scene. Lega C (Tulsa), Meechie (OKC), Tramee (OKC), Mellokie (Tulsa), and Mz. Bombay (OKC) will storm the stage of the Bora Bora Club on Thursday, November 13th in what we believe is the first all ladies Hiphop show ever in Oklahoma. It will definitely be a concert that you don’t want to miss. The door entry is only $6.00 as to keep it low for minimal impact of your pocket flow. We hope that local fans of the music come out and support the ladies as they put it down for Hip-hop and the “O”.

LIVE MUSIC >>SUPPORT


ARTISTS’ PROFILES MHP

YOUNG CHRIS

Talk a little bit about how hard you all had to work to sell 4,000 copies of your album? MHP: Man, it’s a full time job. We sell CDs from OKC to Witchita Falls, Texas. That’s how we pay our bills and take care of our families. We’re everywhere from corner stores and flea markets to clubs out in Witchita Falls, Texas and every small town and in between. We are Native Americans, and we just signed a Mexican rapper named Texas Bandit to our label. So our grind is paying off. Big thanx to all the people and supporters that we have. Did you all grow up together? MHP: Yea. We’re all cousins. We’re all on the same page as far as our music and concepts. We don’t rap about kicks and diamonds. We talk about real facts. We make songs for the people struggling. MHP just don’t stand for Money, Hustle, Power; it also stands for “family, loyalty, and love.” We have a code we live by. Can you talk about other business ventures you all are trying to get off the ground? MHP: When we talk about power moves, we’re talking about buying our mamas houses. As far as business, we are coming out with a clothing line soon. We have a production company and studios for selling beats and studio time. We can’t leak out all the plans for our ventures. There are too many biters! How long has MHP been together? MHP: Two years. There are seven members in the group. Who started the group? MHP: Jay Liotta and Nasty Poppa Dollaz Is there a lot of support for local artists in Lawton? MHP: Not really. It’s kinda like OKC. How do you overcome peoples’ doubts of your skills and talent, if you encounter that? MHP: We don’t worry about that. As a movement, what do you hope to accomplish?

Do you remember how you felt when you made your first recording? Young Chris: Man it was crazy. The first recordings we did were on a karaoke machine in our homeboy’s shed. We really thought we were doing it then. Tell us about Grind Time. Young Chris: Grind Time Entertainment was started by me and one of my long time friends. We knew we had something going so we made it official. The name kinda just came to us by accident when we were talking on the phone one day and we ran with it. In a state with atleast 300 hip-hop acts, what can you do to stand out? Young Chris: You won’t catch me lying on a track. I am real talk. I really talk to the streets. You were at the “Great Day” event. Why did you feel it was important for you to be there? Young Chris: It was an event highlighting artists in Oklahoma. Like you said— there are over 300 hip-hop acts out here. If somebody wants to highlight me as an artist, I’m going to be there. If emceeing wasn’t your thing, what would you be doing? Young Chris: No comment. Name one artist that has influenced you and why? Young Chris: Jeezy. He’s really influenced me to pursue this music and make it a career. I remember reading an XXL interview with him, and he was talking about the critics saying he glorifies the streets. His response was that he doesn’t glorify the streets; he just knows that there are people out there doing the things he used to do, but he made it. He said he is their hope. I really felt that, and it stuck with me.

ON THE GRIND

POWER MOVES

MHP: We want to show kids that they can do anything they put their minds to. Current Release: Vol. 1 Get Money Label: Money Hustle Power Entertainment www.myspace.com/mhpinc

7-UP

supportive of each other at all. They hate on each other. Or they say that someone’s music is not “street” enough. That’s wack to me. We need to come together. How did you get the name 7-UP? 7-UP: When I was a kid, that was my drink. What do you think people think of your music? 7-UP: That I do me. I try to make hits, not just songs. If you could get on a track with one artist from OKC, who would it be? 7-UP: Chop Chop How supportive is local radio of your music? 7-UP: The support is cool, but it could be better. What elements make a hit song in your opinion? 7-UP: The beat and the hook.

THE HOOK AND THE BEAT You’re making noise in Tulsa. What’s the music scene like? 7-UP: I don’t think the artists are very

Upcoming Release: TBA Label: 918 Entertainment www.myspace.com/iztha7up

Upcoming release: Okie Made Vol 2 Label: Grind Time Entertainment www.myspace.com/the1youngchris

IN THE HEAT OF THE MOMENT...................... Word has it that local artist management company, Street Fame, has signed OKC’s Big 8............. The Heat has learned, but has not confirmed that local artist Flame was told by a major label in California that if they signed him, he couldn’t represent Oklahoma but had to rep California. The result: He walked. Hey, that’s what we heard................. We also got the scoop on a story about Kanye West when he was starting out. It turns out that on one of his trips to Oklahoma, he wanted to do some work at one of the Oklahoma City studios, and the guys running the studio turned him away and told him he wasn’t “hard” enough. Yep, we’re thinking the same thing. Later ya’ll. LH

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LOCAL HEAT MUSIC REVIEW

J. TUCK THE ESSENCE Foolish Wayz Entertainment

All artists statewide are welcomed to send a copy of their album or mixtape to Local Heat for review. All CD’s must have artwork and contact information. Send all music to: Local Heat P.O. Box 60469 Oklahoma City, OK. 73146

MOUSE MEEZY / ROCC BOTTOM WE GOT NEXT

Presidential Trap House Oklahoma City 2008 presidentialtraphouse.com Mouse Meezy is one of the most energetic and animated local artists you will ever come across. He teams up with Rocc Bottom to deliver We Got Next. This album makes you feel like there’s a party happening, and you want to be there. Both Mouse and Rocc feed off each other well while never sounding messy. The subject matter doesn’t rotate to often, but the Trap House stars make a good case for why they should be “next”. Try “Extra Chewy.”

8 BIT CYNICS THESE BOOTS WERE MADE FOR WALKING $trapped For Cash Records

Lawton www.myspace.com/8bitcynics

There’s a reason why local artist Jabee calls this group his favorite local Hip-hop band. And you have to see their live show. Dewey Binns is one of the best lyricists in the state, and he displays it on this release. One of only a hand full of Hip-hop acts in the state with a live drummer and a bass guitar player, this disc gives you that classic “beats and rhymes” feel with little regard for the swag phenomenon. With strong tracks throughout the album — 8 Bit has very few reasons to be cynical.

MHP VOL. 1 GET MONEY Money, Hustle, Power Entertainment

Lawton 2008 www.myspace.com/mhpinc

Real talk is the only way to describe the narratives of this MHP release. Jay Liotta and the crew never sugar coat some of the realities of urban life. As hard as they come on record, MHP still makes time to compose a couple of tracks for the ladies. For their next release, MHP might want to have more diverse beat selections, though. Different types of sounds and production would compliment the voices of the vocalists. If you’re in the market for urban-lite, keep stepping, but for aggression over beats, you’ve got it here.

2008 www.myspace.com/jtuck151

Decent production throughout, Tuck’s heavy tracklist shows he has a lot to say. Starting out with “Wake Up,”and “Feel Me,” J Tuck’s voice and flow immediately points to heavy southern influence. What’s interesting is that it is obvious Tuck has studied the elements of style; the songs are put together well. Lyrically, however, Tuck could have given us a little bit more, as it seems he may have been holding back and not giving us The Essence in full strength. Overall, The Essence is a creative effort.

A NEW URBAN MUSIC ECONOMY “I buy local CDs all the time now. The music has to be good though.” - Edmond resident Consider this: If every urban music fan in the state of Oklahoma bought one local CD a month, we could actually have a scene where many people in the local entertainment industry can begin having very viable ventures. Duplication and manufacturing companies, models, musicians, studio owners, video producers, and promotional companies can all

benefit from a movement like that. With major label CDs now being sold for $9.99 in their debut weeks, it might help for local artists to keep their prices between $7 and $8.00 or lower. This price structure is easier for music buyers to support for local CDs. With this, instead of giving away hundreds of CDs, you may end up selling that amount.


EVENTS OCTOBER CALENDAR OCTOBER C Plus The DugOut / October 16

Lil Wayne BOA Center (Tulsa) / October 11 Full Flava Kings Sax Martini Lounge (Tulsa) October 12 Ecclectic Soul Sessions Lit Lounge / October 14

Big Slack Bora Bora / October 16

DL Hughley Civic Center / October 19

Presidential Trap House Bora Bora / October 30

Ecclectic Soul Sessions Lit Lounge / October 21

Cara Black Makers Straight Up Lounge / October 31

Jabee & Friends Cara Black The Conservatory / October Remington Park Racino / 17 October 25 Tova Hair Cafe / October 23

THANKS FOR SUPPORTING LOCAL HEAT


Local Heat Magazine  

October 2008 Issue

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