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INSIDE iQ

COV ER STORY Albuquerque Isotopes, one of the country’s most successful minor league franchises, embarks on its 10th season

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PUBLISHER

Francine Maher Hopper fran@local-iQ.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/ART DIRECTOR

Kevin Hopper kevin@local-iQ.com EDITOR

Mike English mike@local-iQ.com VP OF SALES & NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

FOOD

Colt Brown colt@local-iQ.com FASHION EDITOR

Lisa VanDyke fabu@local-iQ.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Delightful Northeast Heights eatery evokes cozy meals on the River Seine

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Chela Gurnee 505.264.6350, chela@local-iQ.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Derek Hanley 505.709.0364 derek@local-iQ.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Elisabeth Zahl 505.480.4445, elisabeth@local-iQ.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Jaime Gutierrez 505.967.5702, jaime@local-iQ.com AD PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jessica Hicks jessica@local-iQ.com

M US I C

AD DESIGNER

Rachel Baker rachelb@local-iQ.com EXEC. ASSISTANT/CALENDAR COORDINATOR

Two-piece Cleveland band mr. Gnome carves recognition for itself with sound both playful and searing

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Derek Hanley 505.709.0364 derek@local-iQ.com CALENDAR COORDINATOR

Amanda Stang amanda@local-iQ.com DESIGN ASSISTANT

Hannah Reiter hannah@local-iQ.com PHOTOGRAPHER

Wes Naman wes@local-iQ.com PHOTO ASSISTANT

Joy Godfrey joy@local-iQ.com PROOFREADER

Kayla Sawyer

AR TS

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Justin De La Rosa, Chloe Winegar-Garrett PHOTOGRAPHY INTERNS

Adria Malcom, Stacey Clark

Vortex production of legendary Eugene O’Neill play plumbs the depths of flawed family’s ties

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Shot on location in Alaska, On the Ice explores the entanglements between three young men

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SOCIAL MEDIA INTERN

Sarah Mowrey

ON THE COVER

FI LM

CALENDARS Arts Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Community Happenings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Live Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 COLUMNS Fabü. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Playing with Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Local iQ photographer Wes Naman caught Albuquerque Isotope mascot Orbit for a few snapshots recently, just as he was prepping for the upcoming season, the Isotopes’ 10th.

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORIAL Hakim Bellamy Jeff Berg Max Cannon Charlie Crago Justin de la Rosa Jessica Depies Dave DeWitt Eric Francis Lucas Ian Lindsey Maestes Jim & Linda Maher Cristina Olds Shavone Otero

Steven J. Westman Chloë Winegar-Garrett DISTRIBUTION Miguel Apodaca Kristina De Santiago Sean Duran Jessica Hicks David Leeder Susan Lemme Ronnie Reynolds Distributech Andy Otterstrom

Local iQ FEATURES Places To Be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Marquee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Crossword/Horoscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Red Meat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

SMART LIST 2012 Winners in the annual SMART LIST READER’S POLL categories that didn’t make into the March 8 issue are as follows. We apologize to the winners for the omissions. BEST MIDDLE EASTERN: Sahara Middle Eastern Eatery BEST NEW BAR: Tractor Brewing Tap Room BEST PLACE TO SHOP ORGANIC: La Montanita Co-op

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| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

P.O. Box 7490, ABQ., N.M. 87194 OFFICE 505.247.1343, FAX 888.520.9711 • local-iQ.com SUBSCRIPTIONS are $10 for 6 bi-weekly issues within the Continental U.S. Please send a local check or money order payable to Local iQ, attention “Subscriptions” to the address above. You may also use the number above to place a credit card order. DISTRIBUTION: Find Local iQ at more than 600 locations in Albuquerque, Santa Fe and surrounding areas. If you can’t find a copy, want to suggest a new location, or want to help deliver Local iQ, please call 505.247.1343.

PUBLISHED BY

SAKURA, INC. ALL CONTENTS ©2012 LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDED BY ALLISON AND FISHER AND NATALIE BRUCE ESQ.


CATEGORY

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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CATEGORY

RODEO

SAT

Women & Creativity Grande Finale 7p, Sat., Mar. 31

Free to Breathe Lung Cancer Bike Ride 8:45a, Sun., Mar. 25

Farm & Table 8917 4th NW, 505.503.7124

National Hispanic Cultural Center 1701 4th SW, 312.558.1770

The Pit 1414 University SE, 505.925.1580

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CELEBRATION

FUNDRAISER

Pro Bull Riding Ty Murray Invitational 8p, Fri.; 7p, Sat.; 2p, Sun.; Mar. 23-25

FREE womenandcreativity.org/events

$25, $15 (Chi.); DAY OF EVENT: $30/$20 ONLINE:

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MAR

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rotective head gear remains optional for the mas macho bull riders of professional rodeo. Bring on the dust, the flying hooves and the concussions! The Ty Murray invitational pro bull riding competition hits Albuquerque once again featuring, 1,800-pound bulls and men with names like Kody, Stormy and Dakota. Although most of the daring cowboys attempting to stay on for the long and painful eight seconds wear traditional cowboy hats, Wranglers and flashy leather chaps, protective helmets and vests are becoming more common. Scoring by four judges is based on the time before the rider’s hand comes out of the braided rope or when he hits the ground. The cowboy can also opt out of a ride if the bull fails to put on a good show with spins, kicks and sharp direction changes. In this three-day event, the top 10 riders from the second day will advance and the rider with the highest combined scores from all rounds will be named overall event winner. —CO

COOKING Traditions of New Mexico Cooking with Jane Butel 11a, Sat., Mar. 24 National Hispanic Cultural Center 1701 4th SW, 505.243.0262

$90 womenandcreativity.org/events janebutelcooking.com

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omen have demonstrated their creativity in the kitchen with inspired and delicious dishes for centuries. As part of Albuquerque’s Women and Creativity monthlong celebration, renowned Southwest cooking guru Jane Butel will demonstrate traditional New Mexican fare, explaining the larger cultural context of Spanish influences. No one knows the gourmet secrets of New Mexico cuisine like Butel, who has authored 20 cookbooks, hosted television and radio cooking shows and has celebrated local success with her hands-on cooking schools. The Women and Creativity programs emphasize entrepreneurship as well as creativity, making Butel an obvious choice to lead one of the many varied programs taking place during Women’s History Month. Her demonstration will highlight New Mexican specialties including sopaipillas, carne adobado, posole, flan and empanadas. —CO

hroughout the nation, Free to Breathe raises money for lung cancer research. Lung cancer is considerably less funded than other cancer research, which drastically slows down the process of finding an effective treatment. This hits especially close to home knowing that the leading cause of cancer death in New Mexico is from lung cancer. Albuquerque North Valley resident and event coordinator Annette Leger is living with this cancer, even though she is not a smoker. She decided to bring the national lung cancer research fundraiser to Albuquerque and raise support and awareness for this illness, motivated by her desire to “put one foot in front of the other to create change in the lives of those impacted by lung cancer.” All proceeds go directly to the National Lung Cancer Partnership’s research, education, and awareness programs. —CW

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WED

freetobreathe.org

CONCERT Candyrat Records Guitar Night 7:30p, Wed., Mar. 28 The Cooperage 7220 Lomas NE, 505.255.1657

$16-$19 ampconcerts.org candyrat.com

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n another fine installment of AMP Concert’s “Community Series,” Candyrat Records Guitar Night Tour showcases some of the record label’s most noteworthy talent, which encompasses a massive catalog of guitar virtuosos. Some of the world’s foremost guitaristos will be in tow, as the event has come to serve as a jumping-off point for new and upcoming talent. This is fingerpicking classical guitar at its best. It’s simply good music to chill out to, the kind that pairs beautifully with a warm cup of coffee and a tabloid paper on a cool Sunday morning. The collection of sixstring-slayers slated to represent Candyrat Records during their time in Albuquerque runs the gambit of nationalities, from Canada to Wales, all fresh-faced youths in their early 20s, eager to satisfy your soul with both new interpretations of old classics as well as original compositions. Either way this show should be a must-see for any guitar fan. The lineup: Canadian Ewan Dobson and Welshman Gareth Pearson, with Craig D’Andrea and Matthew Santos rounding out the bill. —CC

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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his grande finale to Albuquerque’s monthlong Women and Creativity celebration features a delicious special menu at Farm & Table and creative shopping at La Parada. In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women and Creativity has been showcasing events promoting women and creativity in partnership with over 30 artists, writers, business owners and art organizations in Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Join in celebration at Farm & Table in Albuquerque’s North Valley and taste fresh, seasonal cuisine. Farm & Table will feature chocolate tasting, herb-infused wines, craft beers and a special menu for this event. At dusk, join for a drum circle on the field plus live music and art on the patio. Amble over to the eclectic, retro, vintage folkloric styles of La Parada, Farm & Table’s sister business, to view work from local female artists including Elena Baca, Janine Mahon, Kathleen Harvold, Sarah Saenz-Mackenzie and more. Kick off the boots, bring out the sandals and quench your spring fever for the grand finale of Women and Creativity. —SO

PHOTO BY SERGIO SALVADOR

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APR

pbr.com

WED

$48-$70

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MAR

SUN

23

MAR

FRI

where to go and what to do: March 22 to April 4

MAR

PLACES TO BE

EXHIBIT Paper Works OPENING:

Wed., Apr. 4 RECEPTION:

6p, Thu., Apr. 5 KiMo Art Gallery 423 Central NW, 505.768.3544

FREE cabq.gov/kimo/art-gallery

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rintmaking is a fantastic art medium for many reasons. It is very complicated to learn since everything has to be planned out in reverse so the image comes out “correct.” The images never look exactly the same, so each printed image is completely unique and original; and printmaking is quite popular in the state of New Mexico. To celebrate this medium and some of the most talented artists in this state, KiMo Art Gallery will be showcasing the work of former and current graduate students, along with a professor as well, throughout the University of New Mexico Art Education Department. Some of the printmakers include Monique Belitz, Jennifer Conn, Helen Cozza, Kelly Eckel, Jane Gordon and Laurel Lampela. The works more or less focus on the New Mexico landscape, but the perspectives range from realistic to abstract. This is a great opportunity to see the high-quality work of local artists. —CW


MARQUEE

Mocha java Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Fest serves three-day dose of what the public craves BY JESSICA DEPIES

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lbuquerque is popular for plenty of things: hot air balloons, green chile, Neil Patrick Harris ... and now we may be gaining popularity as a culinary hotspot for coffee and chocolate. Last year signaled the inception of the Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Fest, and boasting “75-plus chocolatiers, coffee roasters, baristas, bakers, candy makers and more,” as the promotional slogan goes, it can already easily be called the sweetest event in Albuquerque. Since last year’s premier, the festival has already grown dramatically. The event’s website heralds “More Space, More Food, More Fun,” the concept of which producer Dean Strober is taking literally. The festival’s space itself has grown by five times over a year ago, from 12,000-square-feet to 60,000. The essential doubling of vendors since last year guarantees more food. And with a “fun zone” especially for kids, two stages boasting baking contests, cooking demos and live performances and entertainment, more fun is inevitable. PHOTO BY WES NAMAN The pure growth of the event since last This year’s Southwest Chocolate and Coffee year is impressive: while 9,000 individuals Fest features a number of vendors, including Christianna’s Chocolates, a Santa Fe business attended last year, this year Strober is run by Juliette Garcia (left) and Christianna expecting around 15,000. Uehlein (right). Strober’s goal is a little more than to simply get sweets out to the people of Albuquerque. has nothing on this guy. He strives, he told Local iQ, to support One small business that shares Strober’s local business and create a “culinary goals for the Chocolate and Coffee Fest is community” within Albuquerque. Various Christianna’s Chocolates, run in Santa Fe by small businesses in Albuquerque will be in Christianna Uehlein and Juliette Garcia. As attendance this year, including long-time “a very new business attending the Chocolate local favorites Candy Lady and Coffee Fest for the first and Satellite Coffee, as time,” they told Local iQ well as new arrivals to that they “are very excited Southwest Albuquerque’s culinary to participate this year.” scene. They look forward to being Chocolate and This year will also include “amongst many creative Coffee Fest cooking contests for chocolatiers and also to share 5-11p, Fri.; 10a-7p, Sat.; professional bakers, home our specialty as well,” with 10a-6p, Sun., Mar. 23-25 bakers, and kid bakers, the “hope to gain friends and with substantial prizes for Albuquerque Convention clients.” Center the winners — Strober’s The opportunities like these 401 2nd NW, 505.768.4575 way of further fulfilling his given to businesses new and $10, $8 sen., 12/under focus on small businesses. old are part of the appeal, FREE “What we’re really by allowing individuals the chocolateandcoffeefest.com proud of this year is the chance to network, gain a incorporation of the more varied clientele and baking contests,” he said, become a stronger part of the explaining that the best home baker will culinary community Strober visualizes. come away with everything necessary to For much of the Albuquerque public, create his or her own small business. of course, the enticement of coffee and And for those who aren’t bakers, Nestle´ chocolate is enough to attend. Coffee Toll House’s chocolate eating contest, what aficionados will find their niche with various Strober heralded as the biggest hit at the fest samples, while chocolate lovers learn how to last year, will allow a little competition for all. bake their own products or spend time trying out the newest chocolate trends. Finally, a 20-foot chocolate fountain — the largest in New Mexico — will top off And for those who love neither coffee nor Strober’s additions for the year. Willie Wonka chocolate? Oh, who are we kidding?

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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LIFESTYLE

Add massage, facial to pregnancy fringe benefits

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officially believe that glamorous pregnancy is a myth perpetuated by Victoria Beckham, Beyonce and those with armies of 24/7 groomers, stylists and PR sharks. As we all know, many pregnant women report that they feel super-sexy and more beautiful than ever during these magical nine months. I want to slap their glowing faces. When you’re pregnant, your body produces 50 percent more blood, which can brighten the face. There’s also increased hormone production, creating more oils and leaving the face shinier. Combine them, and you have a lovely, luminescent glow ... or brutal acne. I got the latter. It’s awesome. Some preggos also report feeling healthier and more vibrant than ever. I feel like my ribs are going to burst through my skin at any given moment. Again, way awesome. Don’t get me wrong, this pregnancy gig’s cool, but it’s definitely challenging. It has increased my sympathy for the hormonally challenged and chronically pained. Rather than allow this negative stuff to deface this special time, I did what any of us would do: hit the spa. Thanks to pregnancy, I discovered some fab new treatments that I would’ve otherwise overlooked. These treatments aren’t just for preggos, mind you — they’re specialty treatments for those who have other-than-average needs. If that sounds like you, read on. First, I went to Mark Pardo (10420 B Coors Bypass, 505.298.2983, markpardo.com) for an Aveda Hydrotherm Massage ($100) with Art Fuentes. The treatment has the benefits of traditional massage without the normal challenges: no turning over, no face cradles and no cold rooms. Clients lay face up on big pillows filled with warm water, then are slathered with oil and massaged into a state of pure bliss. All your aches, pains and stressors literally float away in this slippery, warm cocoon of security. “It’s like the womb,” said Fuentes, who has massaged Pardo devotees for eight years. “It’s so peaceful that you leave here feeling like a whole different person.” He is so right. The whole spa could’ve crumbled around me, and I wouldn’t have done much more than sigh. Such deep relaxation and peace. Just thinking about it again makes me feel sleepy. This is a great treatment for those who are pregnant, dislike lying on their stomach, can’t lie on their back for too long without pain, or simply desire a new massage and

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relaxation experience. It’s truly a unique spa treatment. Well done, Pardo. Next: the glow. Enter Devon Van Hecke, esthetician and owner of Broadway Skin & Body Retreat (408 Broadway SE, 505.246.2400, broadwayretreat.com). Nestled inside a cozy, adorable Edo Victorian house, Van Hecke and her team offer an impressive menu of top-of-the-line treatments in an inviting, intimate atmosphere. “People feel at home here,” said Van Hecke. For my needs (hormonal breakouts), she selected the Purifying Seaweed Facial ($70), a nutrient-rich treatment that purifies and nourishes. Using the all-natural, organic, vegan skincare line, 100 percent pure, she went to work. Cleansers, toners, creams, steam, hot towels—you know the drill. The seaweed is the real deal, so you need to be able to handle a briny, straight-outta-the-ocean smell. I thought it was cool; not a common smell around here. “Now, it’s time for the facial massage,” she announced. I need you to know something: Devon Von Hecke gives the best “facial massage” that I have ever experienced. It is a treatment in itself, and is far from a facial massage. Indeed, she massages your face, but with a twist: She uses traditional strokes combined with a light-touch method I’ve never experienced before. With one finger, she barely touches a point on your skin and rubs clockwise and counter-clockwise, and the relaxation it invokes is deeply powerful. Done? Not even close. Next, she rubs your neck, ears and scalp within an inch of your life. The scalp massage isn’t wimpy, either, so make sure this is your last appointment of the day, because your ‘do will unquestionably get worked. Beyond bliss! I need more Devon. Ultimately, I was left with a deeply cleansed complexion and the ability to actually sleep through my first night in about a week. Yeah, that’s another pregnancy perk: insomnia. Bonus! Broadway Skin & Body Retreat offers numerous customized facials (including a three-mask ayurvedic facial with Vinies Ayurveda’s Soul products), peels, lifts, glows and scrubs and massage. Not to be outdone, they also do lashes, brows and makeup treatments. PHOTO BY WES NAMAN Must run: I have to go shopping for dresses … and slacks. Got glow? Problem complexions benefit from vegan seaweed facials Just found out there’s a boy and a girl in there! Double trouble by Devon Van Hecke, owner/esthetician at Broadway Skin & Body on the wardrobe front. It’s gonna get really cute around here. Retreat.

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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FOOD

PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

NE Heights French restaurant Chez Axel creates the ambience of a genuine French meal, first with food — as in an exquisite bowl of French onion soup (left) with just the right blend of crusty cheese, beef broth and varied herbs — next with skill in the kitchen, as displayed by Chef/Owner Stefan Springer (center), and finally with elegant table settings (right) and live piano.

French forward Delightful Northeast Heights eatery evokes cozy meals on the River Seine

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visited Paris in the summer of 2010, and while the gorgeous sights and enticing people captivated my heart, the flavors alone were enough to set fire to my nostalgia the moment I departed. I still cling to the memories of the sweet crepes, the creamy chocolate éclairs sold at the colorful bakeries and the luscious French onion soup. But one craving exceeds them all — the deliciously rustic, slow-cooked stew cassoulet. I devoured a bowl on a chilly day in May at a small eatery nestled on a cobblestone street lining the Seine. I’ve been wanting to duplicate the experience ever since. It’s almost possible in Albuquerque. No, there are no cobblestone streets and cozy eateries lining the Rio Grande. But Chez Axel in the Northeast Heights has nearly perfectly replicated this momentous culinary occasion with their big, warm bowl of cassoulet. On a recent visit I could hardly contain my excitement as I delved into the bowl and tasted the meaty pieces of leg of lamb, mouth-watering garlic sausage and chunks of salty bacon that filled the broth with fat and exquisite flavor. It’s one of those hearty meals that warms the body and soul on a chilly day. Tomatoes and white beans add to the medley of textures, and the chef adds herbs and small pieces

of brazen onion that pop with flavor. And you can’t forget the garlic. Oh my, the garlic. If you fear garlic breath, you may want to save Chez Axel for a second date. But be sure to do so — with dim lighting and a piano playing romantically in the background, Chez Axel is the ideal restaurant for a special occasion or romantic evening, as I shared with my husband on this visit. Garlic is a key ingredient in French cuisine and is perfectly executed in this menu. It is tangy, yet never overpowering, and the Snails a l’Aixoise are the perfect selection to gain familiarity with this incredible taste and aroma. Snails are not typically my first choice on a menu, but when in France, do as the French. This appetizer is baked in butter alongside minced garlic and shallots with Pernot liquor and walnut crumbs, creating a hint of nuttiness and crunch to the slightly chewy texture. To add just a bit more garlic to this dish, the snails are served alongside two rosemary and garlic roasted potatoes. Chez Axel These perfectly executed roasted potatoes also accompany the trout amandine, which is one Hours: 11a-2p, Tue.of Chez Axel’s top sellers. A king ruby red trout filet is sautéed in butter with lemon and Fri.; 5-9p, Tue.-Sat. parsley and served with roasted almonds. The brilliant combination of fish and nuts created a 6209 Montgomery NE, wonderful flavor which compensated for the slightly overcooked trout. Alongside the trout, we 505.881.8104 tried the quintessential Soupe a l’Oignon au Fromage. Although it’s a seemingly simple dish, chezaxelrestaurant.com I’ve had many bland experiences with French onion soup. Chez Axel’s is far from tasteless, and I will go so far as to say that it is my absolute favorite in Albuquerque. Beef broth is infused with delicious herbs, the onions are plentiful and tastefully caramelized, and the softened croutons add great texture. As soon as I plunged into the stringy, melted cheese atop the sea of flavor, I immediately remembered exactly why my palette is head over heels in love with French food. As a restaurant with an award-winning chef, enticing atmosphere and extraordinary food, I plan to return to Chez Axel again and again. This hole-in-the-wall eatery will leave your stomach and heart fulfilled and satisfied. And be sure to end your meal with the flambéed bananas sautéed in butter and sugar, topped with whipped cream and almonds — you won’t be sorry.

New North Valley restaurant, Farm & Table, seeks to serve all things fresh and local Planning and building out Farm & Table, located on 4th Street just north of Paseo del Norte has been a long time coming, but now that founder Cherie Montoya Austin has opened the doors to this quaint and laid back eatery, the wait is definitely worth it. As the name suggests, the ingredients are fresh and

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local, with many of the vegetables being grown on site. On a recent visit, my table was savoring every bite of dishes like pan-seared duck breast ($22), braised pork belly ($9) and a ridiculously delicious red chile chocolate cake with vanilla bean flan dessert called Pastel Imposible ($6). —LG

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

PHOTO BY SERGIO SALVADOR

BY LINDSEY MAESTES


FOOD

Deep-fried AZ monkey business, with NM twist

M

ANY PEOPLE THINK THAT HEAVEN IS A CHIMICHANGA, THE STUFFED, DEEP-FRIED

ARIZONA TUCSON. THE

TORTILLA THAT WAS BORN IN SOME RESTAURANT, PROBABLY IN

APPEARANCE OF CHIMICHANGAS SMOTHERED WITH SOUR CREAM HAS OUTRAGED SOME PURISTS.

“AS FOR THE

PERSON WHO SLOPPED SOUR CREAM ON A CHIMICHANGA, OR ANY MEXICAN FOOD,” SAID NOTORIOUS RAILROADER JOE LANCASTER, “I USE A COWBOY PHRASE, ‘GET A ROPE.’” THE CHIMICHANGA HAS ALWAYS COMMANDED A PREMIUM PRICE — BASED NO DOUBT ON ITS SIZE. AN ASTONISHING

1/2 TSP. CINNAMON, GROUND

NUMBER OF LOCAL RESTAURATEURS HAVE TAKEN CREDIT

1 SMALL ORANGE, PEELED, SEEDED, AND CHOPPED

FOR ORIGINATING THIS DISH, WHICH RIVALS FRY BREAD

1/4 TSP. CLOVES, GROUND 6 FLOUR TORTILLAS

ALKA-SELTZER AWARD OF ALL TIME. CLAIMS HAVE ALSO COME IN FROM TUCSON’S EL CHARRO CAFE, LA FRONTERA IN NOGALES AND OTHER RESTAURANTS ALL OVER THE ARIZONA. THE CONSENSUS SEEMS TO BE THAT THE “CHIMI,” AS IT IS FONDLY KNOWN, IS THE CREATION OF THE GARCIA FAMILY, WHO ALSO GAVE BIRTH TO THE NATIONAL CHAIN OF RESTAURANTS OF THE SAME NAME. IT HAS LONG BEEN WRITTEN THAT THE WORD “CHIMICHANGA” HAS NO TRANSLATION INTO ENGLISH EXCEPT AS THE VAGUE “THINGAMAJIG.” BUT RECENTLY,

IN A SKILLET, SAUTE THE ONION IN THE OIL UNTIL SOFT. ADD THE CHILES, CHICKEN, AND SPICES AND SAUTE FOR AN ADDITIONAL FIVE MINUTES. ADD THE CHOPPED ORANGE AND MIX WELL. WRAP THE TORTILLAS IN A MOIST

WORD SLEUTHS HAVE BEEN TRACKING DOWN ITS

TOWEL AND PLACE THEM IN A WARM OVEN TO SOFTEN

MEANING.

FOR

FOR THE

SINCE THE WORD CHANGA MEANS “FEMALE MONKEY” IN SPANISH THAT WAS THE LOGICAL PLACE TO BEGIN. IDIOMATIC SLANG WAS SUSPECTED AND TUCSON FREELANCE WRITER JANET MITCHELL PUT THE QUESTION TO JIM GRIFFITH, THEN DIRECTOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA SOUTHWEST FOLKLORE CENTER. “NO DOUBT ABOUT IT,” HE ANSWERED, “THE WORD ‘CHIMICHANGA’ IS A POLITE VERSION OF AN UNMENTIONABLE MEXICAN EXPLETIVE THAT MENTIONS A MONKEY.” SO, A MONKEY WAS A PART OF THE TRANSLATION, BUT WHAT DID IT MEAN? THE NEXT STEP WAS TO LOOK AT THE FIRST PART OF THE WORD, “CHIMI.” THE CLOSEST SPANISH WORD SEEMED TO BE CHIMENEA, MEANING “CHIMNEY” OR “HEARTH” — AND BOTH WORDS INDICATED HEAT. MITCHELL HAD HEARD TALES ABOUT

1 CUP MONTEREY JACK CHEESE, GRATED VEGETABLE OIL FOR DEEP-FAT FRYING CHOPPED LETTUCE AND TOMATOES FOR GARNISH METHOD:

10 MINUTES. PLACE APPROXIMATELY 1/2 CUP OF

THE CHICKEN MIXTURE IN THE CENTER OF EACH TORTILLA AND TOP WITH CHEESE.

FOLD THE TORTILLA LIKE AN DEEP-FRY THE CHIMICHANGAS, ONE AT A TIME, IN 375 DEGREE OIL UNTIL WELL BROWNED. DRAIN ON PAPER TOWELS AND REMOVE ENVELOPE AND SECURE WITH A TOOTHPICK.

THE FIRST CHIMICHANGA BEING CREATED WHEN A BURRO WAS ACCIDENTALLY KNOCKED INTO A DEEPFAT FRYER AND THE COOK EXCLAIMED,

“CHIMICHANGA!” SHE HAD ALSO HEARD THAT A BAKED BURRO COOKED IN A BAR IN

NOGALES IN THE ‘40S HAD

BEEN CALLED A “TOASTED MONKEY.”

THE LOGICAL CONCLUSION, THEN, WAS THAT THE IDIOMATIC “CHIMICHANGA” MEANS “TOASTED MONKEY,” AND IS AN ALLUSION TO THE

The birth of the chimichanga is placed in several Southwest locales, but one of the most likely is El Charro restaurant in Tucson.

GOLDEN BROWN COLOR OF THE DEEP-FRIED BURRO. THE TOOTHPICK.

CHICKEN, CHILE AND CHEESE CHIMICHANGAS THESE SWEET CHICKEN CHIMICHANGAS WITH FRUIT ARE

SERVE TOPPED WITH SHREDDED LETTUCE,

CHOPPED TOMATOES, AND A SALSA.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS HEAT SCALE: MILD

LIGHTER THAN THE MORE TRADITIONAL BEEF AND BEAN RECIPE POPULAR IN

ARIZONA. WITH GREEN CHILE, THEY NEW MEXICO.

ALSO ADD A TASTE OF

INGREDIENTS: 1 MEDIUM ONION, CHOPPED FINE

DAVE DEWITT, A.K.A. “THE POPE OF PEPPERS,” IS COPRODUCER OF THE NATIONAL FIERY FOODS & BBQ SHOW, THE AUTHOR OF THE DAVE DEWITT’S CHILE TRICVIA AND EDITOR OF THE FIERY FOODS & BBQ SUPERSITE AT FIERYFOODS.COM.

1 TBSP. VEGETABLE OIL 4 GREEN NEW MEXICAN CHILES, ROASTED, PEELED, STEMS AND SEEDS REMOVED, CHOPPED

3 CUPS COOKED CHICKEN, DICED LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

9


PLAY BALL! Albuquerque Isotopes, one of the country’s most successful minor league franchises, embarks on its 10th season PULL ON YOUR BILLED CAP, DUST OFF YOUR the ‘Topes have drawn more than 563,000 fans, topping GLOVE FOR CATCHING FOUL BALLS, GRAB YOUR out at 602,000 patrons in 2009 and consistently putting BAG OF CRACKERJACKS AND LET’S HEAD FOR THE the franchise at the top of minor league attendance lists. BALLPARK, PEOPLE. That most social, family oriented What’s the secret? That aforementioned community of sporting events — a night of watching the Albuquerque baseball tradition is obviously a big factor, stretching back Isotopes compete against the teams of the Pacific Coast to the 29-year tenure of the AAA Albuquerque Dukes League — is about to get rolling once again. from 1972 to 2000, but going back much further as well, The ‘Topes get started with the crack of a bat April 5 in to the original Dukes in 1915, who played in the minor Nebraska against the Omaha Storm league Class D Rio Grande Association. Chasers, and a week later — Friday, April But a consistently successful minor league 13 to be exact — play host to the same Albuquerque baseball franchise doesn’t just happen because Storm Chasers in the Albuquerque home grandpa liked to go to games. Traub, who was Isotopes opener. named the top minor league general manager 2012 SEASON: It marks the annual return of a local in the nation in 2007, said it comes down to APR. 5-SEP. 3 passion, a sport played on a diamond of business rule number one. Isotopes Park lush green grass and red dirt under the “You have to listen to your customers,” he said. 1601 Avenida Cesar spring and summer sun. And not many “This is a family friendly, affordable entertainment Chavez SE, 505.924.2255 cities in the U.S. celebrate it quite like abqisotopes.com business. We focus on the fan experience.” Albuquerque. That might mean the race of taco, and red and “Baseball has a very rich tradition in this green chiles between innings, or the comic community,” said Albuquerque Isotope General Manager meanderings of official mascot Orbit during the game, John Traub in a recent interview with Local iQ. “It’s been or the crowd singing along with Neil Diamond’s “Sweet passed on from generation to generation. The appetite is Caroline” during a game break. Or it could mean any very strong every year.” number of special promotions during the season, which in That might be an understatement. The Isotopes are 2012 include a “Bark in the Park” evening for bringing the embarking on its 10th season in Albuquerque since family dog to the game, 13 different firework nights and arriving from Calgary, Canada, in 2003. In every season, the second annual charity celebrity softball game hosted

by Breaking Bad star Brian Cranston. And the venue certainly doesn’t hurt. Isotopes Park, built for $25 million prior to the 2003 season, features great views of the game and Sandia Mountains, broad walkways for comfortable forays through the crowd and an abundance of fan amenities, from a varied roster of food and drink options to a shop for buying Isotopes and Dodger gear. There’s also the product on the field. The Isotopes renewed Albuquerque’s long-standing ties to the Los Angeles Dodger organization in 2009, and some potential future Major League stars have already moved through the Duke City, including Dee Gordon, who played for the ‘Topes last season and will be the Dodgers starting shortstop this season. The Isotopes return the same coaching staff as a year ago: Manager Lorenzo Bundy, Hitting Coach John Valentin and Pitching Coach Glenn Dishman. “They’re good guys with long careers in player development,” Traub noted. As for who will be on the team this year, Traub noted that players are fighting for Major League jobs in spring training right now, and it will be the first week of April before he or Bundy knows for sure what the roster looks like. But the general manager said, just like the fans and players, he’s excited to play ball. “You’re right on top of the action here at Isotopes Park,” he said. “It’s the minor league experience at its best.”

ALBUQUERQUE ISOTOPES 2012 HOME SCHEDULE ALL GAMES ARE PLAYED AT ISOTOPES PARK 1601 Avenida Cesar Chavez SE, 505.924.2255 TICKETS & UP TO DATE SCHEDULE INFO: ABQISOTOPES.COM

* INDICATES POST GAME FIREWORKS | SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE FRI., APR. 13: vs. Omaha, 7:05p

TUE., APR. 17: vs. Iowa, 6:35p,

MON., APR. 30: vs. Oklahoma City, 6:35p

SAT., APR. 14: vs. Omaha, 7:05p

WED., APR. 18: vs. Iowa, 6:35p

TUE., MAY 1: vs. Oklahoma City, 6:35p

SUN., APR. 15 vs. Omaha, 1:35p

THU., APR. 19: vs. Iowa, 6:35p

WED., MAY 2: vs. Oklahoma City, 6:35p

MON., APR. 16 vs. Omaha, 12:05p

FRI., APR. 20: vs. Iowa, 7:05p

THU., MAY 3: vs. Oklahoma City, 6:35p

10

*FRI., MAY 4: vs. Nashville, 7:05p

SAT., MAY 19: vs. Sacramento, 7:05p

FRI., MAY 25: vs. Oklahoma City, 7:05p

*SAT., MAY 5: vs. Nashville, 7:05p

SUN., MAY 20: vs. Sacramento, 1:35p

*SAT., MAY 26: vs. Oklahoma City, 7:05p

SUN., MAY 6: vs. Nashville, 1:35p

MON., MAY 21: vs. Fresno, 6:35p

*SUN., MAY 27: vs. Oklahoma City, 6:05p

MON., MAY 7: vs. Nashville, 12:05p

TUE., MAY 22: vs. Fresno, 6:35p

MON., MAY 28: vs. Oklahoma City, 1:35p

THU., MAY 17: vs. Sacramento, 6:35p

WED., MAY 23: vs. Fresno, 6:35p

THU., JUN. 7: vs. Memphis, 7:05p

FRI., MAY 18: vs. Sacramento, 7:05p

THU., MAY 24: vs. Fresno, 6:35p

FRI., JUN. 8: vs. Memphis, 7:05p

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

*SAT., JUN. 9: vs. Memphis, 7:05p

THU., JUN. 21: vs. New Orleans, 7:05p

SUN., JUN. 10: vs. Memphis, 6:05p

FRI., JUN. 22: vs. New Orleans, 7:05p

MON., JUN. 11: vs. Round Rock, 7:05p

*SAT., JUN. 23: vs. Nashville, 7:05p

TUE., JUN. 12 vs. Round Rock, 7:05p

SUN., JUN. 24: vs. Nashville, 6:05p

WED. JUN. 13: vs. Round Rock, 7:05p

MON., JUN. 25: vs. Nashville, 7:05p

TUE., JUN. 19: vs. New Orleans, 7:05p

TUE., JUN. 26: vs. Nashville, 12:05p

WED., JUN. 20: vs. New Orleans, 7:05p

*WED., JUL. 4: vs. Round Rock, 6:05p


FIVE QUESTIONS FOR ORBIT Local iQ catches up with everyone’s favorite mascot, Orbit, prior to season number 10 of the Albuquerque Isotopes LOCAL iQ: WHAT IS YOUR PREDICTION FOR THE UPCOMING ISOTOPES SEASON? ORBIT: As mascot for the Albuquerque Isotopes, I always think we’re going to win the championship! Some teams might get worn down as the season goes on, but with my cheery attitude and contagious enthusiasm for baseball, the ‘Topes are coming ready to play each and every day. iQ: THEY SAY YOU ARRIVED FROM ANOTHER PLANET DURING THE INAUGURAL SEASON OF THE ISOTOPES. DO YOU CONSIDER ALBUQUERQUE HOME NOW? IF SO, WE HAVE TO ASK: RED OR GREEN? ORBIT: The Isotopes took me in as their own after they found me wandering the outfield back in 2003. Over the years I’ve made my way around the city PHOTO BY WES NAMAN of Albuquerque visiting people all over the community, and have yet to meet someone I haven’t considered a friend. Albuquerque has become my giant, new home. And as for Red or Green, the only way to go is what the locals call “Christmas.” iQ: YOU SOMETIMES SEEM A LITTLE CLUMSY, BUT YOU HAVE SOME SOLID DANCE MOVES. WHERE DID YOU LEARN HOW TO DANCE? ORBIT: I ask myself that same question every day. My best guess is that I was born with unmatchable dance skills that allow me to do any move, to any song, any time of the day. If only I could apply that to Isotopes Park’s stairs, I feel like I’d avoid half of my tumbles. iQ: WHEN YOU’RE NOT CHEERING FOR THE ‘TOPES, HOW DO YOU SPEND YOUR DAY? ORBIT: Trick question, I’m always cheering for the ‘Topes! But on days away from the stadium I usually visit as many people as possible at schools or hospitals. I also try to beat my Guinness World Record of most high-fives (or high-four in my case) given in a 24-hour period! iQ: KIDS EVERYWHERE CAN’T HELP FROM SMILING WHEN YOU’RE AROUND. WHAT IS YOUR SECRET TO HAPPINESS? ORBIT: My happiness comes from making other people happy. If a hug or dance-off can make someone smile, I’m ready to do it! Plus, I live at a baseball park ... how could I not be happy? THU., JUL. 5: vs. Round Rock, 7:05p

THU., JUL. 19: vs. Memphis, 7:05p

FRI., AUG. 3: vs. Las Vegas 7:05p

SUN., AUG. 19: vs. New Orleans, 1:35p

FRI., JUL. 6: vs. Round Rock, 7:05p

FRI., JUL. 20: vs. Iowa, 7:05p

*SAT., AUG. 4: vs. Las Vegas, 7:05p

MON, AUG. 20: vs. New Orleans, 6:35p

*SAT., JUL. 7: vs. Round Rock, 7:05p

*SAT., JUL. 21: vs. Iowa, 7:05p

SUN., AUG. 5: vs. Tucson, 6:05p

TUE, AUG. 21: vs. New Orleans, 6:35p

SUN., JUL. 8: vs. Round Rock, 6:05p

SUN., JUL. 22: vs. Iowa, 6:05p

MON., AUG. 6: vs. Tucson, 7:05p

FRI., AUG. 31: vs. Omaha, 7:05p

MON., JUL. 16: vs. Memphis, 7:05p

MON., JUL. 23: vs. Iowa, 12:05p

TUE., AUG. 7: vs. Tucson, 7:05p

*SAT., SEP. 1: vs. Omaha, 7:05p

TUE., JUL. 17: vs. Memphis, 7:05p

WED., AUG. 1: vs. Las Vegas, 7:05p

WED., AUG. 8: vs. Tucson, 7:05p

*SUN., SEP. 2: vs. Omaha, 6:05p

WED., JUL. 18: vs. Memphis, 7:05p

THU., AUG. 2: vs. Las Vegas, 7:05p

*SAT., AUG. 18: vs. New Orleans, 7:05p

MON., SEP. 3: vs. Omaha, 1:35p

ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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ALBUQUERQUE ADULT SPORTS LEAGUES ALBUQUERQUE OFFERS AN ABUNDANCE OF SPORTS LEAGUES and athletic activities for adults. From traditional league sports like basketball and softball to more specialized endeavors like archery and bungee jumping, it’s quite likely there’s someone doing it in New Mexico, somewhere. The following resource guide offers websites and contacts for a plethora of adult sports and just scratches the surface of what’s out there. Team or individual registration fees are required for most of these activities, so check with the organizers.

GENERAL INFORMATION cabq.gov/recreation A good general website operated by the City of Albuquerque for finding city sports leagues, teams and groups. Another good resource is the City of Albuquerque Sports Office, 10130 Lomas NE, 505.291.6239.

Archery nmbowhunters.org Provides a directory to multiple archery clubs around New Mexico.

Baseball This male-only league plays a 14-game season May through September. Contact the City of Albuquerque Sports Office, 10130 Lomas NE, 505.291.6239

Basketball cabq.gov/recreation/basketball This league plays from the end of October through mid-March with games scheduled on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

This bowling alley hosts various leagues at all levels of experience. LUCKY 66 BOWL LEAGUES

lucky66bowl.com 6132 4th NW, 505.345.2506 Lucky 66 hosts a variety of leagues year-round. ABQ SUNDAY NIGHT OUT

abq-sno.org An LGBT bowling league, the only one of its kind in Albuquerque, plays its games on Sunday evenings at Holiday Bowl.

Glow Kickball

cabq.gov/recreation/flag-football This city league conducts registration in July for a season that runs from the end of August through mid-December. Games are played at Tingley Park.

glowkickball.com A new charity-focused kickball league. Registration for spring has closed but organizers plan to expand.

Frisbee abqultimate.com The Albuquerque Ultimate Association runs everything from pickup games to leagues and tournaments.

dukecityfix.com/group/ abqkiteflying losalamosartscouncil.org/kitefestival Is it really a sport? Who cares! The Los Alamos kite festival is in May.

Hiking and Rock Climbing

Lacrosse

pages.swcp.com/~nmmc The New Mexico Mountain Club sponsors all types of outdoor adventures throughout the year for members and guests. Memberships are $12 per family per year.

lacrossenewmexico.tripod.com Information for those interested in this challenging team sport can be found on this site. Practices are held at UNM’s Johnson Field.

Hockey nmhockey.com This league promotes the game of ice hockey through the introduction and education of new players.

Bungee Jumping

OUTPOST ICE HOCKEY

bungee-expeditions.com Various locations and prices are offered, with jumps at the Rio Grande Gorge near Taos for $300 per person.

outposticearena.com Located near the Sandia Tram, this ice arena offers various adult classes and leagues.

Cycling nmcycling.org/clubs This website provides a directory to multiple cycling clubs and cycling activities around New Mexico.

Bowling Skidmore’s Holiday Bowl Leagues holidaybowlabq.com 7515 Lomas NE, 505.268.3308

12 LOCAL iQ

Flag Football

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

Kickball kickball.com/albuquerque The Albuquerque WAKA league hosts three seasons a year for hundreds of adult kickballers, with weekly games at Bullhead Park. For more information, email hans@kickball.com

Kite Flying

Roller Derby dukecityderby.com The Duke City roller derby league offers open practices Mondays and Fridays, 6:30-8:30p, for women and men ages 18 and over at the Heights Community Center, 823 Buena Vista SE. The woman-only league competes March through October.

Running abqroadrunners.com This running group charges $10$20 annual dues while offering the support of group runs and meetings for those participating in this often-solitary sport.

Soccer aslsoccer.com The Albuquerque Soccer League and Albuquerque Women’s Soccer League offers a variety of leagues playing both fall and spring.


Softball cabq.gov/recreation/softball The City of Albuquerque offers a number of different softball leagues. Signups for the spring season have closed, but summer and fall leagues are available. NEW MEXICO AMATEUR SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION

nmasa.org This organization offers slowpitch and fastpitch leagues for both men and women.

Tennis tca-tennis.net Varied skill levels are accommodated at competitions hosted by the Tennis Club of Albuquerque.

Volleyball (Grass) sportsmix.org/v5/seasons/ adults-spring This adult league hosts games Mondays and Fridays at 6p at Los Duranos Park on Gabaldon NW.

PHOTO: LUCAS IAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Volleyball (Sand) lucky66bowl.com 6132 4th NW, 505.345.2506 The spring season just started in this league.

WAKA Kickballers mix a lot of fun (and costumes) in the competition in three full seasons throughout the year.

SNEAKERZ SAND VOLLEYBALL

STONEFACE SAND VOLLEYBALL

sneakerzsportsbar.com 4100 San Mateo NE, 505.837.1708 This league features multiple teams and weekly gamhe nights.

stonefacecourts.com 8201 San Pedro NE, 505.259.2898 A league that hosts game nights, tournaments and clinics.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

13


MUSIC SOUNDBOARD

Square One Quintet drops new CD

Cleveland duo mr. Gnome, which includes Nicole Barille on vocals and guitar (left) and Sam Meisner on drums (right), has quickly built a reputation for sometimes-melodic, sometimes-ferocious vocals and creative, driving percussion. While the two-piece formula is not new in the rock world, mr. Gnome’s take on it is turning heads.

Savage sonic snacks Two-piece Cleveland band mr. Gnome carves recognition for itself with sound both playful and searing BY CHARLIE CRAGO

T

hough Ohio lays claim to the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame, it is not really making waves in the music industry these days. However, the Buckeye State has pumped out some of modern rock’s most influential minimalist bands over the years. Enter mr. Gnome. What is becoming common knowledge is that this two-piece out of Cleveland is more than up to the challenge of rocking your brains apart. Fronted by the sometimes melodic, sometimes ferocious vocals and occasionally placid but usually intense guitar work of Nicole Barille — and backed by the always-on-time, never-adull-moment drumming of Sam Meister — mr. Gnome has cultivated a sound that is at once dreamy and playful, while also frightening and dangerous. Although mr. Gnome certainly isn’t the first rock act to rely on the two-piece formula, Barille’s haunting vocal presence makes for a presentation that is disarming to say the least. Local-iQ caught up with mr. Gnome’s Barille for a few minutes during a lull in what is a perpetually chaotic tour schedule, and the singer had the following to say about the shifting terrain of playing live versus recording as a twopiece: “In a live setting it’s so much more punk rock and on the fly. (On a record, we spend) a lot of time just figuring out what we dig and what kind of sounds we really like and what we’re trying to go for,” Barille said. “The fun part’s taking what you’ve made, with so many layers, and trying to make that sound good live, having it come across in the best way. ”

14 LOCAL iQ

Still, for all its filthy rock ‘n’ roll flare, mr. Gnome isn’t just guts and sounds. This is definitely an act with a vision. In addition to the music itself, the duo is also responsible for all the band’s art and video work, while actively promoting the long forgotten artist’s best friend, vinyl. While it may sound trivial, the fact that mr. Gnome sells more vinyl copies of their albums than of CD format is telling in that so much of the band’s appeal comes from their own appreciation of music and all things art. “People dig ‘em,” Barille said, speaking about the appeal of vinyl. “People like that big, physical piece of art. There’s something very different about it in the weird digital age that just kind of shoots music out of the speaker and that’s it, you’re left with nothing.” Barille said vinyl also gives the band a way to put out music that otherwise might get left behind. “With the last record (Keep Your Skeletons) we put out a 7-inch b-side that had two songs that didn’t make the record. One of the songs is just super weird, it just wasn’t fitting, and the other is a really quiet song; they both kind of have a mr. Gnome softer edge. We’re titling it Softly Mad – it’s kind of the softer look of WITH LEECHES OF the record, of the stuff that didn’t make it.” LORE If, after listening to all of mr. Gnome’s albums and b-sides, the 9p, Sat., Mar. 31 craving for more savage sonic snacks has yet to be satiated, fear not: Launchpad Barille and Meister put as much thought into their videos as they do 618 Central SW, their rock. 505.764.8887 As the ease of Internet-based, Do It Yourself videos has nearly $6 consumed all creative thought pertaining to the unique Tickets: holdmyticket.com identification of oneself with the rest of the world, many artists have mrgnome.com launchpadrocks.com succumbed to the always present pitfall of confusing quantity with quality. mr. Gnome has side-stepped this snare by taking the time to meticulously plan out every aspect of the production process, turning their videos into short films. This is why bands started making videos in the first place: as a kind of visual representation of the music they’ve created, meant to be as inspired and meaningful as the music itself (see: Michael Jackson’s Thriller). Barille on the video-making process: “I graduated with an art education degree, and Sam was doing videos before we started mr. Gnome, he was doing corporate jobs and stuff like that, but he was always making his own videos on the side,” she explained. “When we started making music, that was the awesome thing that came along with it; most people would outsource to do the covers and videos, but we could already do it all.” It’s hard to imagine that such a powerful, dynamic sound could emanate from such a small package, but the reality is: mr. Gnome rocked my face off harder than any other band I saw in 2011. Definitely see this band.

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

BY HAKIM BELLAMY On March 15, 1953, Rocky Marciano and Jersey Joe Walcott fought a heavyweight boxing title rematch in Chicago. What relevance does this ESPN factoid have with a music column? Well, that night one of the most famous live recordings in jazz history was also happening in Toronto. Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Max Roach and Charles Mingus formed a five-man super group for The Quintet: Jazz at Massey Hall. The only problem with the prodigious five piece (besides Bud Powell’s notorious drunkenness) was that Diz kept leaving the stage to check on the Marciano-Walcott fight. And though I’m not sure if either of the brass men in local jazz act Square One Quintet are boxing fans, I do know that there is a WBO Flyweight Championship on pay per view the evening of the group’s upcoming CD-release party on Sat., Mar. 31 from 7-10p at La Cumbre Brewing. Square One’s catalog is all original music written by Mike Jaramillo and Matt Lowe (better known as TuMan Production in the local hip hop community). With Jaramillo on drums and Lowe on guitar; the quintet is completed by Daniel Garcia on double bass, Ryan Bridwell on keys/harp and Chadd James on sax/flute. The recent addition of Sammy Isabel on tenor sax gives the band further variety of configuration, and the ability to take bathroom or smoke breaks mid-set. (You musicians out there KNOW how valuable this is). As for the music, Jaramillo says that he and Lowe wanted to get back to their instrumental roots with Square One Quintet. Having started TuMan Productions in 2006 with a focus on hip hop music, Jaramillo says he always dug jazz more, but chose hip hop because it was easier. “I spent the greater part of my career playing instrumental music and it’s nice to get back to that,” said Jaramillo. “Square One is theme music, something from a sitcom like Sanford and Son, Welcome Back Kotter or The Jeffersons.” Jaramillo promises the CD release party will be a “funky, melodic and fun-filled event with the best beer in town.” And for all those boxing fans (even the ones in Square One), La Cumbre fortunately has very nice and very visible flat screen TVs. Hakim Bellamy (hakimbe.com) is an MC, poet, singer-songwriter and proud father. He curates and hosts JazzBars with Hakim Be & Friends the first Tuesday of the month at Jazzbah.


MUSIC

LIV E M USIC

SUBMIT TO LO C A L iQ The next deadline is Mar. 30 for the Apr. 4 issue. Please send calendar entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 888.520.9711 a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 USE THIS FORMAT:

Venue Band GENRE Time, Cost

Kosmos

Composers’ Symposium 2012 CLASSICAL 10:30a, $9-15 Las Placitas Presbyterian Church

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Willy Suere and Friends CLASSICAL 3p, $20

Shotgun Shotgun 8p, FREE

Launchpad

NM Jazz Adult Ed Recital 7p, FREE Imbibe

Last Call 6-9p, FREE

The Albuquerque Battle of the Bands 4p, $8-10

The Cowgirl

Low Spirits

The Gregg Daigle Band AMERICANA 8p, FREE

The Melismatics, Techtonic Movement, Full Speed Veronica 8p, $5

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Mine Shaft Tavern

Jah Branch, Erineo, Ben Jammin and the Skan Artist, Marsions 9p, $4

Lori Michaels JAZZ 6:30-9:30p, $5

The Ruebarbs BLUES 3-7p FREE

Low Spirits

Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

O’Niell’s Pub (Central)

Susan Gibson w/ Becky Alter 9p

The Real Matt Jones 9:30-12:30a, FREE

Holy Water and Whiskey FOLK 4-7p, FREE

Molly’s Bar

Outpost Performance Space

National Hispanic Cultural Center

Scottish Rite Center

Composers’ Symposium 2012 7p, $12-15 St. Clair Winery and Bistro

FRI 23 Annapurna

Jazz Brasilerio w/Tony & Debo 7-9p, FREE Blackbird Buvette

Mega Blast w/Dave 12 & Gabe 9p, FREE

List events any time for free at local-iQ.com *Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out

Casa Esencia

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Dj Dynamixx & DJ Devin TOP 40 9p, $20 for men Cheenah Lounge

Rapid Fire 9p-1a, FREE

Low Life w/ DJ Caterwaul 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge

The Universal ft. CLKCLKBNG & Guests 8p, FREE Cooperage

NM Jazz Adult Educational Recital 7p, FREE Covenant Presbyterian Church

The James King Band, 7p, $10-$15 Imbibe

College Night w/DJ Flo Fader 9p, FREE Jazzbah

Square One Quintet 8:30-11:30p, FREE Launchpad

Nico Vega and The Great Depression 9p, $7 Low Spirits

Chuck Mead 9p, $10 Marcello’s Chophouse

Karl Richardson 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s Bar

Tracey Turpin 1:30-5p Memphis P-Tails 5:30-9:30p Outpost Performance Space

Eliane Elias 7:30p $25-$30 Q Bar

DJ Quico SALSA/BACHATA/REGGETON 9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar

Felix y los Gatos BLUES 8p, FREE

Scalo Il Bar

Rose’s Pawn Shop AMERICANA/ROCKABILLY 8:30p, FREE

Blackbird Buvette

Cosmic Dancing w/ Brendangerous and Nicolatron 9p, FREE Blue Tower Lounge - Buffalo Thunder

Juntos Unidos 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Matt Jones 6-8p, FREE GiG

DJ Rotation 10p, FREE Jazzbah

Soulman Sam 9p, $10 after 10p

Cheenah Lounge Club Warehouse at Buffalo Thunder

DJ KWON 9-1:30a, FREE

Jazzbah

Karl Richardson Duo 6:30-9:30p, FREE Mine Shaft Tavern

Open Mic 7-11p FREE Molly’s Bar

Tom Cat 1:30-5p, Badfish 5:30-9:30p Monte Vista Fire Station

Man No Sober ROCK 9p, FREE Outpost Performance Space

Larry Freedman 5:30-8p, FREE Bert Dalton 9-1a, $10 after 10p Keller Hall

Ryan Montano and Amy Faithe JAZZ 8:30p, $5

Kammo’s Karaoke 9p, FREE Launchpad

Sandia Man, Gusher, Doomed to Exist 9p, $4 Loma Colorado Main Auditorium

Journey of Saint Patrick Concert 6:307:45p, FREE Marcello’s Chophouse

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery

The Cowgirl

Keith Sanchez 3-6p FREE

Karaoke w/ Michele Leidig 9p, FREE

Jazzbah

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Rick Fairbank JAZZ BRUNCH 12-3p, FREE

Bob Tate PIANO 5:30p, FREE

Frank Chewiwie 9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar

Squash Blossom Boys 8:30p, FREE The Cowgirl

John Black FOLK/BLUES 8p, FREE Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Bob Tate PIANO 5:30p, FREE Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

Darin Goldston Duo 8-11p, FREE

WED

28

Blackbird Buvette

Body Language w/ Reverend Mitton 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Vinyl & Versus 8p, FREE Casa Esencia

DJ Josh DANCE 9p, $5 for men Cooperage

Candyrat 7:30p $15-$20 GiG

Trio M 7:30p, $20 Launchpad

Li Chii , Baracutanga, The Jir Project 9p, $4 CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

Mine Shaft Tavern Molly’s Bar

The Memphis P-Tails BLUES 9p, FREE

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

Blackbird Buvette

Q Bar

Marcello’s Chophouse

Polyphony Voices of New Mexico: G.F. Handel’s Messiah 7p, $5-$25

Matthew Martinez y Revolucion’, 101:30a, FREE

Cathryn McGill R&B/JAZZ 9p, $5

26

Suor Angelica/Gianni Schicchi OPERA 7:30p, $7-75

Sin Serenade, St. Petersburg, Mrdrbrd 8p, $5

Rock Bottom 1:30-5p, Group Therapy 5:30-9:30p

Turquoise Trail at Buffalo Thunder

Matthew Martinez y Revolucion’ 10p, FREE

MON

The Tumbleweeds 5:30-9:30p

Low Spirits

The Cathedral of St. John

The Shady Rest Band FOLK 8p, $5

Turquoise Trail - Buffalo Thunder

Launchpad

Keith Sanchez and the Moon Thieves, Reviva, Crazyfool 9p, $7

The Family Coal BLUEGRASS 7-11p, FREE

The Cowgirl

The Cowgirl

College Night w/DJ Twisted Audio 9p, FREE

Launchpad

Jazz Under Glass w/ Cal Haines Trio JAZZ 8:30p, FREE Soul Patrol 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Entourage Jazz JAZZ 6:30-9:30p, $5

Tony & the Bandits 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Cooperage

Composers’ Symposium 2012 7:30p

Tony Rodriquez Duo 6:30-9:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery and Bistro

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE

DJ Rotation 10p, FREE

Scalo Il Bar

7:30p, $25-$30

The Cowgirl

St. Clair Winery and Bistro

SUN 25

Tumbao SALSA 9:30p, $7

Polyphony Voices of New Mexico: G.F. Handel’s Messiah 3p, $5-$25 Rick Mena CAJUN/BLUES 12-3p, FREE

Alex Maryol 9:30p FREE

Cooperage

Concepto Tambor, Maleco Collective, Sense and Change 9p, $7 Marcello’s Chophouse

St. Clair Winery and Bistro

Baracutanga, Nosotros, Mala Mana 7:30p

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Tequila Rain 9p-1a, FREE

Launchpad

Euforquestra 9p,

Spring Swing: Tribute to Anita O’Day ft. Susan Abod, Stu MacAskie, Michael Glynn and Cal Haines 4p, $20

Sol Santa Fe

Bluegrass Jam w/Cathy Faber 1-4p, FREE

The Knux, The Vibrant Sound, The Royal Heist 8p, FREE

Imbibe

Low Spirits

Santa Fe Center for Spiritual Living

The Cathedral of St. John

24

Tequila Rain 9p

Imbibe

Blackbird Buvette

SAT

Club Warehouse - Buffalo Thunder CoolWater Fusion

Mark Weaver UFO Ensemble w/ Harris Eisenstadt 7:30p, $10-$15

Paid My Dues Blues 6-9p, FREE

Silent Crush 8p, FREE

Chusco e Brusco JAZZ 7:30p, $15

THU 22

Canadian progressive metal act Protest the Hero will perform at Sunshine Theater on Friday, Mar. 30. Additional acts on the bill include Periphery, Jeff Loomis Band, The Safety Fire and Today I Caught the Plague. Show at 7p. $16. Tickets available at holdmyticket.com.

Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder

Juntos Unidos, 9p, FREE

** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

TUE 27

Monte Vista Fire Station Nahalat Shalom

Spring Swing: Tribute to Anita O’Day ft. Susan Abod, Stu MacAskie, Michael Glynn, Cal Haines 7p, $20 National Hispanic Cultural Center

Suor Angelica/Gianni Schicchi OPERA 7:30p, $7-75 Q Bar

DJ Dynamixx TOP 40 9p, $10 for men

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

15


MUSIC

LIVE M U SI C St. Clair Winery and Bistro

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 Marcello’s Chophouse

Larry Friedman 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s Bar

Steve Kinabrew 5:30-9:30p Scalo Il Bar

Alex Maryol BLUES 8:30p, FREE St. Clair Winery and Bistro

Joani & Darin 6-9p, FREE

Rhythmethod 6-9p, FREE The Cowgirl

Sean Healen Song Swap WESTERN ROCK 8p, FREE Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Shane Wallin ROCK/SOUL 6:30p, $5 Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

Karl Simmons 9:30-12:30a, FREE

J. Wagner TEXAS FOLK 8p, FREE

FRI 30

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Blackbird Buvette

The Cowgirl

Bob Tate PIANO 5:30p, FREE

THU

29

Blackbird Buvette

KGB Club 10p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge

The Universal ft. CLKCLKBNG and Guests 8p, FREE Jazzbah

Mr. Boogie Woogie 5:30-9:30p North 4th Art Center

Garden: Night by Chris Jonas ft. Del Sol Quartet 9p, $15-$20 Outpost Performance Space

Trio M: Myra Melford, Mark Dresser, Matt Wilson JAZZ 7p, $15-$20 Q Bar

DJ Quico SALSA/TOP 40 9p, FREE Scalo Il Bar

Jazzbah

Open Mic 7-11p, FREE

Last Call 5:30-8p, FREE Bert Dalton 9-1a, $10 after 10p

Molly’s Bar

The Joneses 1:30-5p Rudy Boy Experiment 5:30-9:30p

Launchpad

O’Niell’s Pub (Heights)

The Watermelon Mountain Jug Band BLUEGRASS 4-7p, FREE

Leeches of Lore, Mr. Gnome, Monica & Kerby 9p, $6

The Cowgirl

Monte Vista Fire Station

Felix y los Gatos 9p, FREE

Low Spirits

FOLK 12-3p, FREE

Jessica Fichot, Le Chat Lunatique 8p, $10-$12

Russell Sharf’s Jazz Explosion JAZZ 8p, FREE

Malarky’s

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

National Hispanic Cultural Center

Suor Angelica/Gianni Schicchi OPERA 7:30p, $7-75

Joe West & Friends COUNTRY/

Opa Bar

The Electric Edric Project ROCK 9-1a, FREE

Saudade BRAZILIAN 7p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse

Amy Faithe w/ Jim Ahrend SOUL/R&B/JAZZ 6:30-9:30p, $5

Tony Rodriquez Duo 6:30-9:30p, FREE

MON 2

Outpost Performance Space

Dino J.A. Deane’s Out of Context Orchestra with Myra Melford, CK Barlow JAZZ 7:30p, $10-$15

Mine Shaft Tavern

Blackbird Buvette

Kammo’s Karaoke 9p, FREE

Blue Tower Lounge

Stingrays 1:30-5p Paradox 5:30-9:30p

Equal Cut 9p, FREE

Scalo Il Bar

Monte Vista Fire Station

Boris & the Salt Licks ROOTS/ AMERICANA 8:30p, FREE

All Shall Perish, Carnifex, Fleshgod Apocalypse and more 6:30p, $16

Crazy Fool SKA 9p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse

Outpost Performance Space

Sol Santa Fe

Out of Context WORKSHOP 11a, FREE

Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

The Mighty Regis and Bearmouth 8p, FREE Cheenah Lounge

Juntos Unidos 9p, FREE

CoolWater Fusion

Shane Wallin 6-8p, FREE Cube Restaurant

Taxi Dancer BLUES 6:30-9:30p, FREE El Paseo Bar & Grill

Ballroom Blitz 70’S GLAM 9p, $5 Jazzbah

Joel Fadden Quartet 9-1a, $10 after 10p Launchpad

Roo, Hyperland, Tall Boys, DJ Mello 9p, $5 Malarky’s

The Electric Edric Project ROCK 9-1a, FREE

Gregg Daigle Band BLUES 8p, FREE

Moustachio Bashio: Feathericci, Dirt Girl, Acorn Project, Justin Hood 7p St. Clair Winery and Bistro

Combo Special w/ Joani 6:309:30p, FREE Sunshine Theater

Protest the Hero, Periphery, Jeff Loomis Band, and more 7p, $16 The Cowgirl

Rob-A-Lu ROCKABILLY 8p, $5 Turquoise Trail at Buffalo Thunder

CalQl8tzr 10-1:30a, FREE Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Tumbledown House GRITTY JAZZ 8:30-12a, $5

SAT

31

Sol Santa Fe

Villa-Lobos 7:30p, $10-$15

The Skatalites and The Blue Hornets 7:30p, $17

Scalo Il Bar

Sunshine Theater

Entourage Jazz 8:30p, FREE

The All-American Rejects w/ A Rocket to the Moon 8p, $22

Outpost Performance Space

Sol Santa Fe

Anthony Leon & The Chain, Cristen Grey & the Moving Dunes 7:30p, $5 St. Clair Winery and Bistro

Zembra, 6:30-9:30p, FREE The Cowgirl

The Cowgirl

Karaoke with Michele Leidig KARAOKE 9p, FREE

TUE

3

Melody Guy AMERICANA/COUNTRY/ROCK 2-5p, FREE Barker & Martin CELTIC 5:307:30p, FREE Chango ‘70S-’90S 8p, $5

Blackbird Buvette

Turquoise Trail at Buffalo Thunder

Arlo Guthrie: Boys’ Night Out 7:30p, $39-$59

CalQl8tz 10-1:30a, FREE

Launchpad

Groove the Dig with Old School John Mod, Freakbeat, Garage 9p, FREE Kimo Theater

Blackbird Buvette

Upon a Burning Body, I, The Breather 7p, $10

SOULcial FUNKtion w/ DJs Heavy Roation and TomNice 10p, FREE

Roger Jameson & The Jaded Heart Band FOLK POP 9:3012:30a, $5

The Cowgirl

Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder

Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

Rudy Boy Experiment 9:3012:30a, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Willy J & The Storytellers, The Sweet Repose 8p, FREE Cheenah Lounge

Juntos Unidos 9p-1a, FREE Club Warehouse at Buffalo Thunder

DJ Shurbeat 9-1:30a, FREE Cooperage

Son Como Son SALSAS 9:30p, $7 Corrales Brewery Bistro

Spankey Lee 6-9p, FREE

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

Launchpad

Vernon’s Black Diamond Lounge

Equal Cut 9-1:30a, FREE

16 LOCAL iQ

Suor Angelica/Gianni Schicchi OPERA 2p, $7-75

Molly’s Bar

Perfect Stranger 9p, FREE

Molly’s Bar

Mine Shaft Tavern

National Hispanic Cultural Center

Le Chat Lunatique w/ 505 Stop 8:30p

Marcello’s Chophouse

Dyaus Winters, Def I, Soy the Organic Hispanic, and more 9p, $5

Moustachio Bashio Alter Ego Dance Party 9p, $7/$12

Todd & The Fox 7-11p $5

Sez Who 8:30-11:30p, FREE

Launchpad

El Rey Theater

Karl Richardson Duo 6:309:30p, FREE

Rhythm Dance Co.

Shoulder Voices, Red Light Cameras, Techtonic Movement 10p, FREE

Club Warehouse at Buffalo Thunder

Karl Richardson 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse

SUN

1

Kyle Martin COUNTRY 8p, FREE

WED 4 Kluge Auditorium, UWC-USA (Las Vegas, NM)

Philip Glass & Jon Gibson 7p Low Spirits

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery

Boris McCutcheon AMERICANA/ FOLK 3-6p FREE Launchpad

The Albuquerque Battle of the Bands 4p, $8-10

Dan Coyle, Shane Wallin, Carlos the Tall 9p, $5 St. Clair Winery and Bistro

Dianna Hughes, Michael Anthony, Milo Jaramillo JAZZ 6-9p, FREE The Cowgirl

Jean-Luc Leroux FRENCH COUNTRY/FOLK 8p, FREE


smart MUSIC

I

magine, if you will, that The Doors and The Beach Boys collaborated on an odd, drug-tripped album and you’ll come up with a pretty good idea of what The Growlers have been up to over the past five or six years. The Californian quintet finds $8 a lo-fi groove that pulls on the influences Tickets: holdmyticket. of surf, pop and rock. It really is quite com interesting how listening to a band’s album lowspiritslive.com can mentally take you to a different place thegrowlers.com and time. After listening to the Growlers, you may find yourself in a trance and feel like you’ve been riding in a car to Las Vegas with Hunter S. Thompson. The Growlers’ laid back and psychedelic sound is driven forward by the lyrics and vocals of Brooks Nielsen, who emulates the rugged, meandering style of Jim Morrison. It is oddly catchy but simultaneously dark and cryptic. The Growlers are known for live shows with a theatrical element that seems to accompany their trademark style. It will only be appropriate to catch them in a low-lit room with a glass of whiskey on the rocks in your hand. —Justin De La Rosa The Growlers 8p, Thu., Mar. 29 Low Spirits 2823 2nd NW, 505.344.9555

P

repare for some serious French Jessica Fichot enchantement, direct from Paris WITH LE CHAT LUNATIQUE by way of L.A. Accompanied 8p, Sat., Mar. 31 by her fiery quartet, French/ Low Spirits, AMP Concerts Chinese/American chanteuse and songwriter Jessica Fichot will 2823 2nd NW, 505.232.9868 perform her multilingual blend of $11 original French chanson, gypsy jazz Tickets: holdmyticket.com and international folk. Based out ampconcerts.org of Los Angeles and raised in Paris, jessicasongs.com Fichot has brought the songs of her first album Le Chemin to audiences in France, China, Canada, Mexico and across the U.S. With her new album Le Secret fresh off the press, she’s touring the Southwest, performing on vocals, toy piano and accordion, backed by a band featuring clarinet, sax, guitar and upright bass. Be ready for the romanticism of heartrending torch songs delivered en Français, as well as European standards and downright barn-burners. And don’t be surprised if Finchot throws in some English, Spanish and maybe a bit of Mandarin too — she speaks it all. “The emotion and the words can still touch the audience, even if you don’t understand the content,” she said in a recent interview. Albuquerque’s Le Chat Lunatique will provide the perfect opening accompagnement. —Mike English

W

e all know about college 6th Annual Moustachio basketball’s March Bashio Madness, but the lesserLOST LINGO WITH SOPHISTAknown madness of this glorious FUNK AND ZENOVA month is March Moustache 7p, Sat., Mar. 31 Madness. Yes, it’s a monthlong The Historic El Rey Theater holiday where we lose a little bit of 622 Central SW, 505.242.2353 dignity but gain some facial fuzz $12 ($7 adv.) or 10 canned on our upper lips — so why not food items celebrate it with Glad Castle’s 6th moustachiobashio.com Annual Moustachio Bashio? As lostlingo.com always, the party will feature a bestin-show moustache competition and the music of Bashio veterans versus Albuquerque’s funky jam-rock quintet is the perfect soundtrack to such a night. Singer and guitarist Javier Ortega’s smooth vocals are backed by an impressively articulate band of Burque’s best. Their music is sure to bring out the dance in you as they jam through their set of transcendental and thoughtful tunes. The self-proclaimed alterego dance party will be a night to get weird and get down to some bass-thumping funky grooves. —Justin De La Rosa

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

17


ARTS

AR TS EV ENTS

SUBMIT TO LO CAL i Q The next deadline is Mar. 30 for the Apr. 5 issue. Send entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 505.243.8173, a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 Name of Exhibit/Event Description of exhibit/event VENUE/GALLERY ADDRESS website List events any time @ local-iQ.com

Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

FRI

23

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Director David Jones has taken on the task of directing Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey into Night, a sober look into a day in the lives of one dysfunctional family. The production, starring (from left) Blake Magnusson, Debi Kierst, Paul Ford and Peter Diseth, will run from Mar. 22 through Apr. 15 at the Vortex Theatre.

Dysfunction, forgiveness

THROUGH APR. 28: EXHIBITION

Missions & Moradas of New Mexico: Modernist Views, 1910-1985 This year’s exhibition focuses especially on the mission church at Rancho de Taos, San Francisco de Asis, which has inspired rich and varied works of art for more than a century. 9:30a-5:30p, Mon.Sat., FREE

Vortex production of legendary Eugene O’Neill play plumbs the depths of flawed family’s ties BY CHLOË WINEGAR-GARRETT

“I lay on the bowsprit, facing astern, with the water foaming into spume under me, the masts with every sail white in the moonlight, towering high above me. I became drunk with the beauty and singing rhythm of it, and for a moment I lost myself — actually lost my life. I was set free! I dissolved in the sea, became white sails and flying spray, became beauty and rhythm, became moonlight and the ship and the high dim-starred sky!” —LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT, EUGENE O’NEILL

I

n Long Day’s Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill, the character of Edmund Tyrone recalls a memory of being out at sea and reaching a moment of perfect freedom, away from society and away from the hardships of life. However, he is describing this previous life to his family, James (father), Mary (mother) and Jamie (brother). The men of this household are all alcoholics and the woman is addicted to morphine, creating a somber and depressing setting far distant from Edmund’s memory of peace. David Jones of The Vortex Theatre decided to take on the task of directing Long Day’s Journey into Night. In an interview with Local iQ, Jones described his motivation to pursue this play: “It taught me what real serious drama could be, in the same way that Mahler’s second and Beethoven’s ninth, [Stravinsky’s] Rite of Spring could portray what serious classical music can be,” Jones said. “It is one of the great family dysfunctional plays.”

18 LOCAL iQ

Long Day’s Journey into Night is a sober look into one day in the lives of one dysfunctional family, closely resembling O’Neill’s Long Day’s actual family, and how the twisted need for love and affection Journey into is vastly overshadowed by the addiction issues and bitter anger between characters. While they sincerely wish to help each other, Night they all have too much resentment to ignore. OPENING NIGHT: Jones explains O’Neill’s decision to create this play: “It was 7:30p, Thu., Mar. 22; very emotional — he would break into tears, he would cry in 7:30p, Fri.-Sat., 2p, Sun., his wife’s arms in bed by facing his family’s tragedies,” Jones Mar. 23-Apr. 15 said. “And, when he finished the play, he made a very unusual The Vortex Theatre stipulation: it should not be played or published until 25 years 2004-1/2 Central SE, after his death. When he died in 1953, his widow said, ‘Well, on 505.247.8600 the contrary,’ because she knew how good it was and broke the $7-$15, Pay What you Will: embargo. It instantly became an icon of plays and of literature.” Sun., Mar. 25 As part of the board of directors at The Vortex Theatre, Jones vortexabq.org realized he wanted to take on this play. “I didn’t always want to do it, but at a certain point a few years ago, I knew a few actors who could do it. After a long career of directing, I don’t do just any old things, I do things that are real, challenging, and this is definitely one of those challenges,” he said. “It is emotionally involving, though actually simple in many ways.” Actors Blake Magnusson as Edmund, Debi Kierst as Mary and Peter Diseth as James have never performed this O’Neill production before. Kierst explained her character as “one of the most difficult roles ever written for a woman in American theater, because there are so many levels of how she got to where she is, the descent into the world of morphine, and the reactions become very difficult.” Regarding the personal investment into these roles, Diseth said he feels “it forces such an intense examination of a life full of regret, failed hopes, illusions, filled with denials and having your face rubbed in those denials … it causes a personal and artistic examination.” Magnusson believes everyone has faced a certain level of this family dysfunction, which “makes it harder to act.” The Vortex’s production of Long Day’s Journey into Night is set up black-box-theater style, with the audience playing an almost direct part of the play, creating an intimacy that at times can be uncomfortable and provocative, poignant and emotional. But perhaps a sense of meaning can be found, just as Edmund describes his dream: “For a second you see — and seeing the secret, you are the secret. For a second there is meaning!”

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

WILLIAM R. TALBOT FINE ART 129 W. SAN FRANCISCO, 505.982.1559

williamtalbot.com THROUGH MAR. 24: EXHIBITION

Spiders’ Market Spinners and Weavers Guild presents the Spiders’ Market, featuring hand-woven, hand-knit, hand-spun and hand-made arts. 9a-5p, FREE ALBUQUERQUE GARDEN CENTER 10120 LOMAS NE, 505.296.6020

lasaranas.org PERFORMANCE

Counterpoint A one-night musical and visual collaborative performance presented by Santa Fe Complex. The Chatter Chamber Ensemble will perform Steve Reich’s Different Trains and Arnold Schoenberg’s Transfigured Night. Each composition will be accompanied by the world premiere of a video commissioned by Santa Fe Complex for the performance. 7p, $20 SANTA FE COMPLEX 1807 2ND #107, 505.216.7562

sfcomplex.org THROUGH MAR. 25: PERFORMANCE

The White World Written by Marit Rawley originally as a screenplay, “The White World” tells the story of Clara, a young dancer caught in limbo or “the white world” between the living and the dead. 8p, $14 NHCC 1701 4TH SW, 505.246.2261

nhccnm.org THROUGH APR. 15: PERFORMANCE

The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill A fictional exploration of how America’s greatest playwright, Eugene O’Neill, comes to terms with the treatment of his family in his literary works as he journeys through the afterlife searching for the meaning of his life - and maybe settle a few scores. 7:30p, $15 VORTEX THEATRE 2004 1/2 CENTRAL SE, 505.247.8600

vortexabq.org


ARTS

ART S E VE N T S

WED

28

PERFORMANCE

LECTURE/DISCUSSION THROUGH APR. 15: PERFORMANCE

Is Life Worth Living? The owner of a hotel in an Irish seaside resort decides to host an acting company in the town’s theater. But it turns out the company is presenting a deadly serious play dealing with murder, arson, depression, madness, alcoholism, and even women’s rights. 8p, Fri. &

Gala Celebration & Awards Ceremony The gala event includes a welcome reception, sensational silent auction, and the food of Slate Street Cafe; the awards ceremony and celebration of the 2012 Creative Bravos Honorees. Advanced reservations are required. 6p, $75-$95

ADOBE THEATER 9813 4TH NW, 505.898.9222

ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM OF ART & HISTORY 2000 MOUNTAIN NW, 505.842.0111

adobetheater.com

cabq.gov/museum

THROUGH SEP. 30: RECEPTION

THROUGH APR. 5: WORKSHOP

New Deal CCC Furniture and Tinwork Exhibit A series of lectures, an exhibition, and a symposium about traditional New Mexican furniture and tinwork created at the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp at the Bandelier National Monument between 1933 and 1942. Members only reception is Mar. 23, exhibition opens Mar. 24. 5:30-7p, FREE

Wreath-making for Adults Learn how to make a lovely wreath for giving or decorating with Kathy Hallquist and Rena Jackson. Workshop takes place on Apr. 5. Registration is required and runs from Mar. 24 to Apr. 3. 10a-5p,

SPANISH COLONIAL ARTS SOCIETY 750 CAMINO LEJO, 505.982.2226

EXHIBITION

Sat.; 2p, Sun., $13-$15

FREE LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY 755 LOMA COLORADO, 505.891.5013 EXT. 3033

rfgavin@spanishcolonial.org

The Pop Up ABQ Art, fashion, models and more.

THROUGH APR. 1: PERFORMANCE

7p, FREE

Travelin’ Show In celebration of New Mexico’s Centennial, a presentation of two shows by the late James Galloway.

THE CORRALES BISTRO 4908 CORRALES, 505.379.5072

6p, $8-$12 SOUTHWEST RURAL THEATRE PROJECT, 5800 KATHRYN SE, 505.717.4494

swrtp.org THROUGH APR. 15: PERFORMANCE

Long Day’s Journey into Night Eugene O’Neill’s autobiographical masterpiece takes place over a single day in 1912. It’s a wrenching portrait of love and hate in the American family - the author’s own. 7:30p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$15 THE VORTEX THEATRE 2004 1/2 CENTRAL SE, 505/247.8600

vortexabq.org THROUGH SEP. 30: EXHIBITION

New Recent Acquisitions Exhibit A new exhibition of recent acquisitions to the collections of the museum. A number of generous donors have gifted both colonial and contemporary objects to the museum in the past year. 9a-5p, FREE

THROUGH APR. 1: PERFORMANCE

Bad Seed Colonel and Christine Penmark live in a small town with their daughter, Rhoda. On the surface, 8-year-old Rhoda is sweet, charming, and full of old-fashioned graces. When one of Rhoda’s schoolmates is mysteriously drowned at a picnic, her mother becomes alarmed. 2p, $12-$16 SANDIA PERFORMING ARTS COMPANY - VISTA GRANDE COMMUNITY CENTER 15 LA MADERA, 505/280.6373

SUN 25 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

David Cramer Photography Memorial Retrospective David Cramer was one of New Mexico’s finest nature photographers before his sudden death in March 2010. He was known for remarkable images of the wild. 5p, FREE PLACITAS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 7 PASEO DE SAN ANTONIO, 505.867.8080

spanishcolonial.org

placitasarts.org

24

THROUGH MAR. 25: CLASS/ WORKSHOP

Collagraph Printing - Two Day Workshop Translated literally as “collage prints,” this medium is for artists who thrive on textures and tactile art-making. Students will use this two day class to construct several different plates and learn a variety of ways to print them. 10a-5p, $95-$190

WORKSHOP/CLASS

Walking Stick Workshop at Coronado State Monument Make a yucca walking stick in this workshop for adults. Cost includes yucca sticks and decorative supplies. 10a & 1p, $20 CORONADO STATE MONUMENT 505.867.5351

nmmonuments.org

TUE 27 WORKSHOP/CLASS

10:30a-1p, $10

Introduction to the Art of Landscape Tried to capture the New Mexico landscape in a work of art and wondered where to begin? Learn some basic tips for getting started and capturing the essence of place. Material provided. Bring a photo of a favorite place in nature. Ann Painter, visual artists and arts instructor will facilitate the program. 6-8p, FREE

THE CELL THEATRE 700 1ST NW, 505.766.9142

MUSEUM EDUCATION ANNEX 123 GRANT, 505.946.1039

liveatthecell.com

okmuseum.org

NEW GROUNDS PRINT WORKSHOP & GALLERY 3812 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.8952

newgroundsgallery.com THROUGH MAR. 25 PERFORMANCE

The Rocky Horror Picture Show All are invited to join in and laugh, cry, dance and kiss Saturday night goodbye with 130 closest friends, deviants and creatures of the night!

Free with Museum admission GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 JOHNSON, 505.946.1039

okmuseum.org

THU

29

THROUGH JUN. 22: RECEPTION

Edge of Color A showcase of Tamarind artists associated with the hard-edge/ color-field movement of the 1960s and 1970s. 5-7p, FREE TAMARIND INSTITUTE 2500 CENTRAL SE, 505.277.3901

tamarind.unm.edu RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Annual Santos Show Local santeros creating images of saints with bultos and retablos, as well as traditional arts in clay, fiber arts, paintings, sculpture, wood, metal and tin work. 5-7p, FREE

AFRICAN AMERICAN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 310 SAN PEDRO NE, 505.298.5551

theperformers.org LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Fukushima Japan faced disaster on an epic scale: a death toll in the tens of thousands, destruction of homes and businesses and water and power shortages. Reservations required. 10a-12p, FREE LOS POBLANOS INN & CULTURAL CENTER 4803 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.277.2396

rposton@knme.org Monoprint Workshop with Artists Jaune Quick-to-See Smith and Neal Ambrose-Smith Using nontoxic materials, instructors will execute several fast demonstrations that the class will then create. 1-4p, FREE

SUN

1

SPECIAL EVENT

Annual Open Studios Day 13 local award-winning artists invite guests into their studios to see their latest original works in all media and genres. Refreshments will be served. 1-5p, FREE THE ARTIST STUDIO 8200 MENAUL SUITES A & B, 505.872.1848

MON 2 LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Breakfast With O’Keeffe Barbara Buhler Lynes, curator, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum; and the Emily Fisher Landau director, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center, will speak on the O’Keeffe retrospective exhibition, which as been touring Rome, Munich and Helsinki. 8:30-9:30A, $10

THROUGH APR. 13: WORKSHOP/ CLASS

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 JOHNSON, 505.946.1039

Art for Kids Certified art teacher Susan Gordon will offer four creative sessions for young artists. Children will have the opportunity to draw and paint animal pictures and to create their own masterpieces inspired by famous artists. Registration is free. Space is limited. 10:30-11:30a,

okmuseum.org

FREE ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 EXT. 4

WED

4

WORKSHOP/CLASS

Painting in the Style of O’Keeffe Jan Denton’s instruction includes a study of how O’Keeffe paints and a hands-on demonstration with watercolors for all to try. Space is limited, materials included. 9:30a-12p, $30-$35

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 JOHNSON, 505.946.1039

EDUCATION ANNEX 123 GRANT, 505.946.1039

okmuseum.org

okmuseum.org

TOME ART GALLERY 2930 HWY 47, 505.565.0556

LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Life at Blair House With Mrs. V. Learn the history of this important landmark, and the secrets, shenanigans and quirks of the world’s movers and shakers backstage where “everything is otherwise.” 2-4p, $10 ST. JOHN’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 1200 OLD PECOS TRAIL, 505.982.9274

renesan.org

FRI 30

sandiaperformingarts.org

SPANISH COLONIAL ARTS SOCIETY 750 CAMINO LEJO, 505.982.2226 EXT. 103

SAT

LOO’K Closer: Art Talks at Lunchtime The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum’s curatorial department leads an insightful 15-minute discussion about one work of art by O’Keeffe currently on exhibition. 12:30p,

First Impressions Excerpts from Sleeping Beauty with works of classical and contemporary ballet. 2p & 7p, $15

PERFORMANCE (SOCORRO)

Lights! Coils! Action! The crew of ArcAttack will bring their lights, Tesla coils, and plenty of action to New Mexico in a show sure to spark interest of anyone who enjoys live entertainment. 7:30p, $8-$16 MACEY CENTER - NM TECH 801 LEROY, 505.835.5688

arcattack.com THROUGH APR. 20: EXHIBITION

George Baselitz An exhibition of prints by George Baselitz. Also showing are works by accomplished and versatile Santa Fe artist, James Drake. 5-7p, FREE ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART 435 SOUTH GUADALUPE, 505.982.8111

zanebennettgallery.com THROUGH APR. 1: PERFORMANCE

Disney’s Alice In Wonderland Jr. 32 young actors will perform this fast-paced adaptation featuring updated dialogue and new arrangements of classic Disney songs 7p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10 SOUTH BROADWAY CULTURAL CENTER, 1025 BROADWAY, 505.404.1578

theboxabq.com

SAT

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CLASS/WORKSHOP

Out of Context Youth Conduction Workshop with Dino J.A. Deane A creative soundspace event. For youth with instrumental facility ages 14-18. Pre-registration strongly suggested. 11a, FREE OUTPOST PERFORMANCE SPACE 210 YALE SE, 505.268.0044

outpostspace.org

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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smart ARTS

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hile many people consider only a Garden: Night select few cities in the United States CHRIS JONAS to truly promote and encourage WITH DEL SOL QUARTET contemporary art, like New York or Los 9p, Thu., Mar. 29 Angeles, there is a pleasant surprise that North Fourth Art benefits art lovers in this state. Lucky for Center us, New Mexico is a well-kept secret that is 4904 4th NW, rich with cultural significance and artistic 505.345.2872 creation. One example of this significance $20/$15 (Mem./Stu.) is the upcoming show Garden: Night by vsartsnm.org Chris Jonas. This show is a compilation of outpostspace.org soundscape, imagery, live performance and installation that immerses the audience while creating a surreal and beautiful atmosphere. The San Francisco-based Del Sol Quartet will play live music, integrating a “global pulse” into traditional classical music while accenting Jonas’ composition and artistic vision. The experience is uplifting and inspiring, pushing any boundaries that may be considered to exist in art. Admission is good for Trio M at 7p at Outpost Performance Space and for Garden: Night as well. A shuttle will be available to transport the audience from one space to the other. —Chloë Winegar-Garrett

20 LOCAL iQ

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he legendary Italian composer Giacomo Puccini wrote three one-act operas in his late 19th and early 20th century career, and Opera Southwest stages two of them in this run of high drama, comedy and exquisite singing at the National Hispanic Cultural Center’s $10-$75 Albuquerque Journal Theatre. Tickets: 505.724.4771 Suor Angelica tells the tale of a young operasouthwest.org woman from a noble family who becomes a cloistered nun, only to have her seven years of silence brought to a crashing and abrupt end by a shocking revelation. Soprano Abla Hamza sings the lead role in her Opera Southwest debut. Gianni Schicchi is the story of a crafty con artist who outwits greedy relatives determined to rewrite a deceased man’s will in their favor. The comedy stars Matthew Burns in the title role, and the show includes one of Puccini’s most beautiful and beloved arias, “O Mio Babbino Caro.” Opera Southwest, in its 40th year of operation in Albuquerque, has produced nearly 120 operas for over a quarter million patrons. —Mike English Suor Angelica/Gianni Schicchi 7:30p, Tue.-Sat.; 2p, Sun., Mar. 24-Apr. 1 National Hispanic Cultural Center 1701 4th SW, 505.724.4771

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

Matthew Lutz 10a-4p, Tue.; 9a-6p, Wed.-Sun.; Mar. 16Apr. 28 Matrix Fine Art Gallery 3812 Central SE, 505.268.8952 FREE matrixfineart.com

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n a world consumed by hoards of technology, where do the boundaries between right and wrong begin? When does an object stop being real or start becoming real? Is it possible for humans and technology to co-exist peacefully? Matthew Lutz examines these questions in an intensely surrealist show of traditional oil on canvas paintings that look eerily realistic and almost believably done through a computer program. But Lutz does indeed paint each detail in a super-realistic fashion, creating a universe of precision, beauty and strangeness. He mixes beauty and science fiction seamlessly through his technique. Inspired by contemporary social events, graffiti art and the next generation of youth, Lutz’s work ranges from sublime flower portraits to apocalyptic robotic worlds to juxtapositions of extreme happiness and violence. Some of his paintings contain figures of young adults attempting to be romantic, but who instead appear completely loveless and more interested in their precious cell phones. This show could be a haunting prophecy for a future dystopian society brought on by our addiction to machines — if it has not happened already. —Chloë Winegar-Garrett


FILM

FILM SHORTS BY JEFF BERG

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uccessfully expanded to a feature-length film from a short she made several years ago, director Dee Rees tells the story of a young African American woman Alike (Ah-leekey), a good student and aspiring poet who firmly embraces Pariah her lesbianism. DIRECTED BY DEE REES But she has yet 6:30, 8:30p, Thu., Mar. to come out to 22; 6, 8p, Fri.-Sat., Mar. her family, even 23-24; 3p, Sun., Mar. 25 though they Southwest Film Centerhave suspicions UNM Campus of her sexuality, Located on UNM campus, which is aided SUB basement, 505-277 by their own fear 5608 and ignorance. swfc.unm.edu Alike’s best focusfeatures.com/pariah friend, Laura, who has already chosen to be out and is proud of it, helps Alike (sometimes) to maneuver her way through this emotionally and sexually charged minefield. Outstanding and competent.

I On the Ice uses the cold, sparse setting of Barrow, Alaska, to advance its unique film-noir-style story about three young men and the trouble they get into. Three novice Inupiat Indian actors play the lead roles in the film directed by fellow Inupiat Andrew Okpeaha MacLean.

Below-zero noir Shot on location in Alaska, On the Ice explores the entanglements between three young men BY JEFF BERG

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here have been a number of interesting films made in the beautiful areas of our planet that are subject to a year-round climate of ice and cold. Examples of such movies are Philip Kaufman’s gritty and very real White Dawn, shot on location on Baffin Island in the Arctic region of Canada; and the terrific TV mini-series Shackleton, which was partially shot in Greenland; and the Fast Runner trilogy, all shot in Canada, using mostly Native actors in key parts. On the Ice uses some of the natural On the Ice elements around Barrow, Alaska — mostly cold (it was 18 below in Barrow DIRECTED BY ANDREW the day I wrote this review) and ice OKPEAHA MACLEAN — to advance its unique film-noirSun.-Fri., Mar. 25-30, 4:15, type story about three young men and 8:15p the trouble they get into by trying to Guild Cinema 3405 Central NE, 505.255.1848 be more noble to each other than by guildcinema.com telling the truth. But more than that, ontheicemovie.com it uses a realistic situation to tell a moving and sometimes dark story. Utilizing three novice Inupiat actors, Director Andrew Okpeaha MacLean, who is also Inupiat, constructs a nifty, icy, “hip hoppy” film noir that relies on story and acting and realism. Qalli, who is hoping to break tradition and go to college, is a good friend of Aivaaq, whose impending fatherhood, something he’s not really into, has stalled his life. They are the main characters in the film. The two young men hang out together and talk about all things, while also doing things that they probably shouldn’t, such as partying too much and

smoking crack. However, it seems like a passing phase for both of them. Things change dramatically, however, after a night of partying which ends with some bad feelings toward another friend, James. The next day during a seal hunt, James ends up dead, his body and snow machine pushed into an open hole in the ice to cover the misdeed. But the scenario plays out like a game of Clue. Who did it and how did they do it? Intentionally vague in its presentation, James’ demise is somewhat of a secret from the moment he dies. Aivaaq and Qalli lie about James and what happened, saying that he slipped into the icy water after getting lost in a patch of fog. But from the start, Qalli’s father, Egasak, who is also the head of the local search and rescue team, has his doubts. It doesn’t take long for James’ body to show up and questions to be asked. Fortunately, MacLean doesn’t take the usual liberties with the bleakness that must encompass a place such as Barrow. In a former life, I was a postmaster in the wonderful Crow Indian Nation town of Pryor, Mont., and it was no surprise to see the similarities between Barrow and Pryor. Poverty, blight, addiction and poor housing all helped to trap Pryor’s First Nations’ residents, most of whom were the kindest and most honest people I have ever met. As the casual investigation continues, the film slowly curves into that different arc, where Qalli and Aivaaq spar about taking the blame rather than pointing fingers at each other, trying to absolve themselves of James’ tragic passing. On the Ice is a unique and well-executed film in every respect, from directing and cinematography to writing and acting. Its unique ending is believable and surprising, even if you are somewhat familiar with Native cultures. But more importantly, it is a human drama — played out in a place where you may never set foot.

Declaration of War gnore the misbegotten title DIRECTED BY VALERIE DONZELLI Declaration of War, Opens Fri., Mar. 23 which makes it Call for showtimes sound like a Lifetime CCA Santa Fe Channel Kleenex fest, 1050 Old Pecos Trail, and focus instead on 505.982.1338 the performances in ccasantafe.org this strong French Fri.-Wed., Apr. 6-11 drama. A young 4, 6:15, 8:30p couple, Romeo and Guild Cinema Juliette (groan) meet 3405 Central NE, from across a room, 505.255.1848 date, embrace, guildcinema.com marry, make a baby and become parents. The glitch is that the sweet lad has a brain tumor, which leads them to declare war on the odious and cancerous intruder. The film is a moving portrait of a couple with great chemistry, seeking to save their little guy, but losing their marriage in the process. Strong and believable.

A

lthough a bit too long, Crazy Horse is a fulfilling and Sun.-Thu., Apr. 1-5 extremely detailed 4, 8.30p documentary of the Guild Cinema world-renowned 3405 Central NE, Parisian cabaret of 505.255.1848 that name. Done in guildcinema.com what is referred to zipporah.com as “cinema verité” style (real people in actual moments, without direction or set ups), by minimalist master documentarian Frederick Wiseman, the film is like a fly-on-the-wall opportunity to see what goes on before the remarkably choreographed shows done by the dancers, who are always in various stages of undress. Fascinating and insightful.

Crazy Horse

DIRECTED BY FREDERICK WISEMAN

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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22 LOCAL iQ

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012


PLANET WAVES ARIES (MAR. 20-APR. 19) Your chart gives an image of you remembering something brilliant, like an idea, that you forgot. You may have solved a problem, then misplaced the solution. You may have come up with a creative concept and never wrote it down. Yet there is an underlying story or discovery you made. It might have been an inner revelation that is so striking you have no idea what to do with it, which might lead you to set it aside again. We’re talking about the recognition of who you are, which can arrive in the form of direct contact with your inner being, yet it will feel like remembering something you’ve felt before, no matter how vague or dreamlike the memory is. TAURUS (APR. 19-MAY 20) Are you feeling overwhelmed? You may be in a cycle that you don’t know how to get out of. Or, you may be noticing some qualities of yourself that you wish you could change, but don’t know how. These qualities might exist inside your idea of yourself as a “good person” or “helpful person” and may lead you to wonder whether that’s really true. You’re in the midst of a magnifying effect — certain elements of your psyche are under a lens right now. But that’s not all that’s happening; you’re making discoveries about the love you have to offer, and you may be figuring out that the only thing you really can do with love is to give it away. Whatever else you may be working out, there’s a miracle waiting for you. GEMINI (MAY 20-JUN. 21) You cannot control how people perceive you. You can have a lot of fun being yourself with no particular attempt at spin or image control, and noticing how other people respond. Push the bounds of what’s considered appropriate. You may find yourself in unusual company, among people you don’t usually hang out with. The truth is, you’re more like them than you may think. You are one of the slightly odd, eccentric, creative critters that people look up to because they have that extra edge of freedom. What your charts are suggesting is that now is the time to embody that in a bold way. There is freedom in not caring what people think, but at the same time learning something from how they respond. CANCER (JUN. 21-JUL. 22) Success is an ongoing experiment, not a destination. Remember that as the experiment proceeds in some interesting directions. To facilitate this, stay vocal and visible. Announce your existence to anyone you want to make contact with, particularly people you look up to or admire. Let the transition be a respectful approach to a colleague or potential collaborator rather than “fan mail.” Investigate organizations that you might want to be involved with. If you look, you will see people, or networks of people, with whom you want to share your energy. None of this may get immediate results. The one key is approaching from a place of openness and curiosity rather than attachment to an outcome; you’re in an environment of “expect the unexpected,” which means that the likeliest outcomes are not on your list. LEO (JUL. 22-AUG. 23) I have some experiments to propose for you, around the theme of money and value.

by Eric Francis • planetwaves. net Take some cash out of the bank, if you can. Take out more than you would normally carry. Carry it in your pocket and don’t spend it. Feel it as potential that you can use at any time for any purpose you want — but leave the possibilities open. Then, consider your value in any way besides monetary. Keep this as close as possible to the surface of your thoughts. Consider the influence of your ideas, the value of your help to others and the appreciation that they may feel for you. Then, exert some of that influence. Make an idea known, that you might ordinarily keep to yourself. Help someone when you have the option not to. Note the difference between money and value. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEP. 22) There’s a delightful drama that’s been developing in your sign, involving Mars retrograde. Mars retrograde is taking you on a journey into yourself, and its most recent stop was in the land of how convoluted the psychology of sexual desire can be. This plays itself out in your relationships as a constant crisis of faith, self-criticism and a kind of perfectionism that is getting you nowhere. This puts you in contact with the source of your power and pain, which are closely related. The key to growth is learning from everything and taking any experience as a means to self-knowledge. Keep going past what you think you don’t know or what confuses you or makes you doubt yourself, and follow the story deeper, day by day. LIBRA (SEP. 22-OCT. 23) Maybe you realize that the complicated psychology of other people is too much to deal with, and it’s not your problem. As an antithesis to the games people play, you merely have to notice how people treat you, including whether they mean what they say. It helps if you stop trying to understand the seemingly complex and sometimes self-defeating motives of others, and focus on what drives you. As you grow to understand yourself better, others will become increasingly transparent. Some people are motivated by the desire for communication and community. Others spend their lives avoiding this. While it’s never really possible to sort humanity into two distinct camps, people tend to lean one way or the other. Which is your preference, and how do you express it? SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 22) You must be thinking: there has got to be some kind of conspiracy. You keep meeting the same kind of person, with the same basic problems. The world of demented relationships, denial, pills and attempted glamor stretches from the trailer parks to the suburbs of every city, in an unbroken line of connection. There is a force deeper and more powerful than the prevailing sickness of our culture that is drawing you deeper into your core. You might think of this as a quest for your inner healer, the aspect of your psyche that knows how to turn struggle into strength. There’s a reason so many spiritual texts say all things work together for good; I would propose that they must be worked together for good — and that what serves your healing will serve the healing of the people around you. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 22) You have some opportunities to ground your ideas, and to integrate them into your

UNIVERSAL CROSSWORD

career plan. If you don’t have a career plan, make one — based not on what you wish you could do but on what you actually do, what you love to do. Clean up old plans with no attachment to things that don’t work, are not fulfilling or don’t meet your needs. You’re not going for perfection, but a sense of correctness. Good enough means worth investing your time and energy into. Yours is a fire sign — you’re a brilliant initiator with excellent ideas — but your disadvantage is your tendency to be so in the moment, you don’t consciously build a foundation for the future. Dust off old foundations, repair and build new structures. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 20) You seem to be in the midst of an emotional tizzy that is messing with your confidence. My suggestion? You’re better off being a little off-kilter. I suggest you feel each step you take, putting your feet on the ground carefully. You have an opportunity to take nothing for granted. This may involve a specific emotional matter close to home. The astrology for the next few days might make you inclined to jump to conclusions and be emotionally reactive . That won’t help. Bide your time and listen to what others are saying, and listen to what that deep voice in your belly is saying to you. You do know how you feel, but it may take you a little while to figure it out, and to feel confident that how you feel matters. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 19) Recent events seem to have stirred up a psychological disturbance, take some time and let the waters settle down. Ask yourself: “What is this really about?” You seem to be aware that there are deep and perhaps troubling issues. Take your time and don’t decide that it’s something that you can or must work out at once. There are many developments brewing in some of the most visible areas of your life, and you don’t want to divert energy away from them. Maintain a devotion to healing in the most positive way you can — as a loving commitment to your personal truth — and gently go deeper to figure out what you’re really working through. Meanwhile, you have some opportunities to be more visible than usual — and to feel more appreciated. PISCES (FEB. 19-MAR. 20) The Sun is moving through the last degrees of the zodiac in Pisces, approaching the vernal equinox in the sign Aries. This transition has at least two layers of meaning for you. The last degrees of Pisces have a visionary quality; each day brings a new sensation of transparency, change, and some taste of what is possible. Look carefully enough to notice, both in your inner world and the one that seems to surround you. Remember to hold the vision not just for what you want, but for who you want to be. You contain all potentials, and if you focus your vision and apply some creative energy, it’s only a matter of time before you grow into your vision. As the Sun moves into Aries, you get a reminder of what distinguishes you from others. It’s not merely going on in your imagination — it is your imagination, that is, your ability to think in images. Yet there is something else: a radical quality that ensures you play your own original tune, and that you’re never influenced by someone else unless you want to be.

SOLUTION ON PAGE 24 LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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LOCAL iQ

classified@local-iq.com

CLASSIFIEDS SERVICES

CLASSES

LASTING PAIN RELIEF AND MASSAGE THERAPY LMT 6472 Chronic Pain, Old Injury, MVA. 505-814-1749 Nina

SUBMIT TO LOC A L iQ The next deadline is Mar. 30 for the Apr. 5 issue.

SLOW STRETCH YOGA Tijeras 286-1887 Suzanne Therapeutic Massage #2232

Send entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 888.520.9711, a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194

PENCAK SILAT www.suwandaacademy.com

HANDYMAN Electrical, heating, cooling YOU NAME IT. CALL 505.417.6369

COLONIC, HOT TUB & MASSAGE

$55, Ayla RN.

Albuquerque, 292.9841

Name of Event Description of event VENUE ADDRESS website List events any time @ local-iQ. com

Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

C OM M U N I T Y E V E NT S SAT

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AND SUN. 25

Just Between Friends Consignment Sale Join Big Brothers and Big Sisters and Just Between Friends. Sell and purchase a variety of children’s and maternity gear. 9-5p, FREE NM NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY 600 WYOMING NE, 505.837.0528

bbs-cnm.org Railyard Yardmasters Orientation This is an orientation to the new volunteer program and will have local experts discussing the history, design, and gardens of Santa Fe’s favorite outdoor public space. 9-11:30a, FREE RAILYARD PARK COMMUNITY ROOM 505.316.3596 railyardpark.org

Martha Speaks Learn how This PBS Kids series provides lessons and activities to teach vocabulary skill building. 10a-Noon, FREE. Call 505.277.4087 to register

THU

22

Book Signing Alex Dryden reads and signs his new spy thriller, The Blind Spy. 7p, FREE BOOKWORKS INC., 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8138 bkwrks.com

Learning Landscape Spring Tour: What’s Emerging? Join Christie Green for a tour that explores the “Learning Landscape.” Tour and sack lunch discussion. (Bring a lunch). 11a-1p, $10 suggested donation

MOUNTAINVIEW PRIVATE ELEMENTARY, 4100 NEW VISTAS CT. NW

newmexicopbs.org Creative Bravos Awards A ceremony to recognize the important work being done to enrich our community. Includes silent auction and food. 6p, $75-$95 ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM 2000 MOUNTAIN NW, 505.842.0111

cabq.gov/museum Pueblo Artist Workshop- Pueblo Science Class Make art while learning about the equinox/solcsice and discuss pueblo astronomy. 10a-2p, $10 chi./$25 adults.

ACADEMY FOR THE LOVE OF LEARNING, 133 SETON VILLAGE, SANTA FE, RSVP 505.995.1860

THE INDIAN PUEBLO CULTURAL CENTER, 2401 12TH NW, 505.212.7052

aloveoflearning.org

SUN 25

FRI 23 Meditation for Beginners Each class includes simple prayers, a short teaching and a guided meditation. Every level welcome. Noon, $5

indianpueblo.org

Community Chant/Meditation Sing to help bring solace, find inner harmony, and experience a direct connection with the universal life force. For people of all faiths. 10:30-11a, FREE

KADAMPA MEDITATION CENTER NM 8701 COMANCHE NE, 505.292.5293

ECKANKAR CENTER, 2501 SAN PEDRO NE, SUITE 113, 505.265.7388 hearhu.org

meditationinnewmexico.org

Usui Reiki Training - Level 1 Get your first degree reiki attunement and activate self-healing, intuition and greater balance in your life. 10a-4p, $150 THE SOURCE, 1111 CARLISLE SE, 505.271.4612

Adoptions Learn more about these and many other great pets at AnimalHumaneNM.org Find us: facebook.com/ animalhumanenm

CARMELLA, ID #25824 Carmella is a 3-year-old, female, American Pit Bull Cross who is playful, fantastic with children and pets and enjoys daily exercise. Carmella is housebroken and loveable.

AMETHYST, ID #25922 Amethyst is a 5-year-old, female, Domestic Short Hair Cross. Amethyst is petite, sweet and loves attention. She enjoys being talked to and always offers back a charming meow or two.

24 LOCAL iQ

| ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | MARCH 22-APRIL 4, 2012

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TUE

Sally Denton Sally Denton talks about her new book “The Plots Against the President: FDR, A Nation in Crises and the Rise of the American Right.” 7p, FREE BOOKWORKS INC. 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

WED

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Native People of North America: What they Grew and Gathered William Dunmire will give a slideillustraded lecture on the native people of North America. 6:30-7:30p, FREE LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY 755 LOMA COLORADO NE, RIO RANCHO, 505.891.5013

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us World Tavern Poker Games start at 7, 9p, FREE IMBIBE 3101 CENTRAL NE, 505.255.4200

THU

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OUTStanding Awards 7p, $40 HARD ROCK CASINO AND HOTEL 11000 BROADWAY SE

abqpride.com Volunteer Orientation for The Alzheimer’s Association This orientation will include a menu of volunteer opportunities and a brief presentation on the challenges of Alzheimer’s and the Association’s activities. 10a, rsvp. THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION, NM CHAPTER, 9500 MONTGOMERY NE, SUITE 121, 505.266.4473

alzfdn.org Vicky Kress Book Signing Kress will be available to sign copies of her book, I Didn’t Come Here to Lose. 1p, FREE TRIBES COFFEE HOUSE, 3470 ZAFARANO, SANTA FE, 505.473.3615

tribessantafe.com Author Theresa Thaxton Book Signing Event Thaxton will be available to sign copies of her book, From Waiting to Wedding: Finding Love God’s Way. 2-4p, FREE HASTINGS 6051 WINTER HN NW, 505.898.9227

gohastings.com

1

SUN Author Sandra K. Schackel presents “Working the Land” “Working the Land” provides a deeper understanding of the West’s development over the last fifty years along with shifting attitudes toward women in the workforce. 1p, FREE

Tracking the Tijeras Enjoy a scenic geological hike and see some of NM’s contorted geology in the Sandia Mountains on the Tijeras Fault. $23-$28

UNM BOOKSTORE 2301 CENTRAL NE, 505.277.5451

UNM RECREATIONAL SERVICES 1102 JOHNSON CENTER, UNM, 505.277.0178

bookstore.unm.edu

recsvcs.unm.edu

SAT

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Route 66 Open Space Volunteer Clean Up Volunteer to clean up trash in this unique area and help protect the important natural resources found here. Bring work gloves, water, sack lunch and sturdy shoes. 8:30-Noon, FREE

TUE

2

Book Reading Johhny Boggs discusses his book Jesse James and the Movies. 7p, FREE BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

3

THE ROUTE 66 OPEN SPACE 505.452.5200 cabq.gov/openspace

WED

Fruit Tree Pruning Workshop Designed to acquaint homeowners and volunteers with pruning fruit trees for maximum production. Bring your pruners to work on our apple and apricot trees. 10a-Noon, FREE

Bouldering in the Sandia Foothills Go for an early evening of bouldering on the U Mound at the foot of the Sandia Mountains. Price includes two evenings of bouldering, transportation, guide and equipment. 5:30p, $21-$26

RAILYARD PARK COMMUNITY ROOM, 505.316.3596 railyardpark.org

Usui Reiki Training-Level 2 Receive a Second Degree Reiki Attunement, Practitioner Level for hands on and distance healing, spiritual protection, chakra balancing and more. 10a-4p, $250 THE SOURCE 1111 CARLISLE SE, 505.271.4612

1102 JOHNSON CENTER, UNM, 505.277.0178

recsvsc.unm.edu


Issue 153 - March 22nd - April 4th, 2012  

Take Me Out to the Ball Game! - The Sports in ABQ Issue

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